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APHRODITE STATHOPOULOU ARCHITECT ENGINEER NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS PORTFOLIO + TEXTS

2007-2011

Aphrodite Stathopoulou Architect-Engineer a_stathopoulou@hotmail.com http://issuu.com/saphrod

TABLE OF CONTENTS Urban intervention network in PLATO’S ACADEMY PROPOSAL for the MUSEUM of the CITY OF Athens diploma project

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IDEOLOGY, MEMORY, PLANNING. Three characters in search of the past cities within the contemporary urban fabric. thesis project

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ATHENSX4_urban VOIDS towards a COMMON GROUND

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1st A.A.W. beyond contemporary transformations NEOCLASSICAL TRIANGLE study of its public spaces

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HOUSING COMPLEX in Anavyssos, Greece

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EUROPAN 2011 NEUILLY SUR MARNE_A LAKESIDE ESTATE sub_URBAN ARKS

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FILOPAPPOU HILL τopography TRACES ACADEMIC ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING metaxourgeion

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Intervention in Ilia, Peloponnese RESTORATION OF A BURNT VILLAGE

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ATHENS BENCH MARK Future Bench_ “BENCH-PLANT” Urban equipment desing competition

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HAND DRAWING PAINTINGS AND SKETCHES

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POSTER FOR TOMORROW “THE RIGHT TO EDUCATION”

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Urban intervention network in PLATO’S ACADEMY

a PROPOSAL for the

MUSEUM of the CITY OF Athens

D I P L O M A P RO J E C T 2 0 1 0 ACADEMIC | N.T.U.A.SUPERVISORS: ASST. PROF. TSIRAKI S., PROF. MAVRIDOU M. DATE OF PRESENTATION: 03 NOVEMBER 2010 COLLABORATORS FOR THE FIRST PART OF THE PROJECT_ (MASTERPLAN): CHONTOS CH., GIAKOUMAKI E. RESEARCH PROJECT

Network of intervention_the master-plan This project is developed in an area close to the historical centre of Athens, right above the trail of the ancient road “Demosio Sema.” It proposes a network of urban interventions, ranging in scale, in the area surrounding the archeological park of Plato’s Academy and the homonymous surrounding neighbourhood. The subjects examined consist of collective housing, education, research and culture. The project focuses on the boundaries between today’s lively neighborhood and archaeological park aiming to alleviate the short-term impact of the intense development process, the area was subjected to, this past decade. Adjacent to the park, “Monastiriou” street becomes a pedestrian road constituting the main axis of intervention. Acting as the main link between the local residential area and the centre of Athens in addition to the broader archaeological network of the city [Unification of the Archaeological Sites of Athens S.A.] In an effort to reconstitute the relation with the neighboring residential area, “Sepolia”, “Tripoleos” street also becomes a pedestrian road connecting “Ippeios Kolwnos” hill with the Park of Plato’s Academy. cross-section of Plato’s Academy park and adjecent pedestrian axis:

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case study of collective housing research and educational centre museum of the city of Athens map of masterlpan, urban intervention network in Plato’s Academy

Redesigning the park_

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The park itself becomes a reference point for the project; today it takes up two roles: its large scale impact as an archaeological monument and the local scale of a neighborhood’s park. In an effort to reinterpret its dual character the austere existing contour of the park is removed and the archaeological excavations intertwine with the open green spaces through folding landscape. Following this folding line, the existing excavations are redesigned as green geometrical slopes.

the existing excavations are residesigned as green geometrical slopes

Exploiting the hidden urban reserve, the earth is cut revealing the rich strtigraphy of the Attic landscape

In addition to the analysis and proposed urban design interventions within a broader working group, this study examines the development of the urban front of the archaeological park, continuing the existing network of educational uses. A research centre concerning the city of Athens is proposed to be located right at the intersection of the pedestrian roads of “Monastiriou” and “Tripoleos”, where a part of the park penetrates the urban fabric.

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The Plato’s Academy park, as it changed throughout the years

1930 / 1950 / 1970

park area today

planned park area

planned museum site

proposed park area

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Museum of the city of Athens The network operations at the Plato’s Academy, wich were constributed during the teamwork part of the current study is completed with the establishment of Athens’ city Museum regionally towards the park in front of the pedestrian axis of “Monastiriou” street, and as the conclusion of a walk between two major future poles (Kerameikos, Plato’s Academy). Both the existent plan concerning the museum’s placement within the park, and the planned building program are re-examined and recasted toward an optimal integration into today’s lively local neighborhood.

Cut_Paste The building is developed as a cast-cave-in depth of two floors below ground.

The museum becomes a point of observation, both from and toward the city, as it is traversed by points or peaks that serve as landmarks above ground, reminiscent of contemporary urban geometry.

Scenario_Concept The aim is to create a building that will be seen as landmark for the city while incorporating both the scale of the local neighbourhood and the openness of the park; a museum that remains closely associated to both the contemporary and the symbolically charged historical lanscape. The proposal consists of a type of building that serves as a threshold between park and city, growing as a boundary defined line; a structure that finally appears “non-built� but serves mostly as a path, parallel to the axis of the proposed promenade. There are two main access that lead to the single foyer, located on the first level. This foldable system of ramps, distributes moves bilaterally across the bottom level of the main exhibition and then gradually ascends, in a circular path that leads to the same initial space of the single first level foyer. Natural lighting is also achieved through this system, featured by a folding land frontier between park and building; similar to these folding geometrical landscape slopes that are used to form the boundary of the park throughout the whole master-plan.

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photo of physical model

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public area zone (1) exhihibition zone (2) complementary functions (3) storage areas (4)

(1) (4) (2)

circulation diagram

exploded axonometric of the building.

(3)

(2)

Realization The building carries a mixed structure of both reinforced concrete plates and extensive regional walls, and slender metal pillars -arranged in grid constructionordered by (9x9) meters apart. The aboveground parts of the building are metal frames covered by u-glass for simultaneous insulation and transparency. Additionally green roofs, which consist of the natural flora of the park, are added toward the improvement of both the buildings’ isolation and environmental conditions, while the linear, symbolic, structure of the building remains discreetly visible.

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IDEOLOGY, MEMORY, PLANNING Three characters in search of the past cities within the contemporary urban fabric

The present thesis examines the correlation between the contemporary urban fabric and the embedded past cities within. The field of study is extended across a strip of Athenian land that includes the areas surrounding the Acropolis and Keramikos sites up to the park of Plato’s Academy. As designers we are confronted with the issue of contemporary development in the present urban fabric and the management of the past that is revealed in fragments. Topographies of the past are occasionally revealed in the present and are subsequently defined as present fragments of a former whole. The fragment is defined as the part which post exposure, constitutes a non-organic urban subset within the urban hypertext. An aesthetic approach to reality or a potential for planning? The fragments potentially constitute the raw material of a continuously updated design process. They confer significance and quality of space, act as capacitors of meaning and memory despite the fact that they lie inert towards contemporary necessities. The mnemonic field of the fragment is rich and its spatial presence highly exploitable. Therefore this thesis examines the fragment in an effort to grasp the whole; whereas it deals with the former in order to comprehend the contemporary In order to explore, define and reflect on this issue three characters with different frames of reference and practice are introduced: the wanderer who according to his ideology sensorially explores the urban form, the scholar who analyses and evaluates the elements that compose the collective memory and, finally, the designer who, considering the above, composes strategies and structures that define space.

Richard Hogg, wired magazine U.K, Okt. 2009 u

THESIS PROJECT 2009 ACADEMIC NTUA 2009 SUPERVISOR: PROF. P. TOURNIKIOTHS S. TSIRAKI

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“We find ourselves devoted to the idea that behind the seeming lies what’s true; but this is a matter of perception as in fact, what’s real is only what we see. It looks like face in Vertigo: we have one person (the visible part) and fantasize the wealth of human reality (the dark part), but in reality, what we perceive is only the image of the face.” S.Zizek p

“...memory is the thread that runs through the whole complicated structure of the city ...”Rossi, Aldo, The Architecture of the city

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mapping of the field of memory

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mapping of the image of the city

“Every collective memory requires the support of a group delimited in space and time. [...] How can currents of collective thought, whose impetus lies in the past be recreated when we grasp only the present?” Maurice Halbwachs: “Forgotten spaces left buried under the city [act] either as historical reserve or as surviving reminders of lost projects and fantasies” Gordon Matta Clark

the wonderer Guy Debord:

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“the naked city” 1957

Monty Pythons:

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“silly walks”

Robert Smithson: “a heap of language” q

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the scholar

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the designer

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CONTENTS

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0 FOREWORD

3 URBAN FRAGMENT + URBAN DESIGN

A LINEAR PATH A CIRCULAR PROCESS

DESIGN [DEFINITION]

METHODOLOGY

DESIGNER [DEFINITION]

URBAN FABRIC & URBAN FRAGMENT

DESIGNING THE PRESENT DESIGNING IN RELATION TO THE ABSENT

1 URBAN FRAGMENT + IDEOLOGY WANDERING [DEFINITION]

THE PLAN FOR NEW THE CAPITAL [ATHENS] THE FRAGMENTED INCEPTION

WANDERER [DEFINITION]

PEELING THE URBAN HYPERTEXT

WANDERING THROUGH URBAN FRAGMENTS

A FRAGMENTED NARRATION

LOCOMOTION_DEFINING THE INTERRELATION BETWEEN FABRIC & FRAGMENT

A NARRATIVE THROUGH FRAGMENTS

CESSATION _DEFINING THE BOUNDARIES GAZE_DEFINING CONTRADITCTION

E.A.X.A [PROGRAM FOR THE UNIFICATION OF THE ARCHEOLOGICAL SITES OF ATHENS]

CONNOTATION _DEFINING SYMBOLS 2 URBAN FRAGMENT + MEMORY MEMORY [DEFINITION] SCHOLAR [DEFINITION]

4 AFTERWARD URBAN FRAGMENT & URBAN FABRIC FUTURE CONCERNS

SPACE THAT ENCAPSULATES TIME RECYCLING OF MATTER RECYCLING OF MEANING

bibliography

ENTROPIC SWIRL

[ Imagine a container full of sand divided into two, with black sand on one part and white sand on the another. Ask a child to run a hundred times in clockwise direction, whithin the container until the sand turns gray. If you then ask it to run in the opposite direction, the result would not be a restoration of the initial separation, but a greater degree of gray-ness and thus, the increase of entropy. ] Robert Smithson

THE PAST THAT’S COMPOSED BY EACH PRESENT THE CONSTANT PRESENT THE PRESENT AND THE ABSENT

[exerpt from thesis project] Movement in the city indicates the possibility of traversal, intersection, coherence and continuity. The evident incoherence that characterizes the fragments of former topographies is defined, as the trajectory of the wandererin an effort to remain coherent- is limited on the level of the present city. Therefore those subsets are (sub)consciously defined as fragments. The fractures that are created on the edges, where different loci overlap stop the wanderer on the constantly redefined (urban)boundaries/thresholds. The concept of the boundary suggests the idea of segmentation, the distribution of each stratification, the definition of their overlapping and their correlation with the whole. In today’s exposed fragments those boundaries are rigidly formulated. On the present route that connects Keramikos with Plato’s Academy park (and passes over the former tracks of Dimosion Sima road) ancient topographies appear as fragmentary findings amongst high density urban blocks. The contemporary metropolis is ruptured on its own terms. In this case the whole defines and limits the fragment. The shape of the past topography resembles an “ancient urban block”. While movement locates and identifies subsets within the whole in a successive manner, the glance -on the other handsuppresses the links between images that consitute the whole. The glance appears to selectively capture- to “aim”- as the subject reflects while glancing. The mental images that arise by association on the wanderer’s mind are part of his familiarization with space. Therefore the sporadically exposed fragments can become autonomous symbols. [....]

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Rossi defines the city as the locus of collective memory. The urban context becomes the field of reference and feedback for the actions and aspirations of a society. The fragment as an element resistant to time, encapsulates the outcome of an urban transformation in its structure and consequently becomes a memory capacitor. It simultaneously introduces the visible (present/positive space) and implies the invisible (absent/negative space). The invisible is defined as the accumulation of structures and images that are lost, unseen or unknown to the collective conscious. Negative space -seemingly void- can challenge memory. Off-memory space accumulates material that has passed into oblivion. It is what’s invisible rather than what’s visible that mobilizes the mind and captures fantasy in an effort to approach a hidden reality. The fact that something former –ancient –is buried in the subsoil, is an ingrained attribute of the Athenian landscape and is intrinsically embedded in the collective conscious as an entity. The paradox occurs as follows: Athens contains and appreciates the invisible in its entirety but is hostile and detached towards it in individual practices. [...] The introduced characters are merely three different aspects of the same person –the architect tracing the relationship of the modern city and the former cities embedded within. Future design practice lies on the determination of a fine balance that illustrates the identity of space in light of contemporary demands. Design objectives should concentrate on the creation of open structures that correlate the heterochronous fragments to the evolution of the city and its inhabitants.

ATHENSX4_urban voids urban VOIDS towards a COMMON GROUND

ARCHITECTURAL IDEA COMPETITION 2010, HONORABLE MENTION COLLABORATORS: CHONTOS CHRISTOS, GIAKOUMAKI ELENI, KAPSIMALIS ALEXANDROS, STOFOROS KOSTIS, FANOU EVITA, FYTOU ADAMANTIA-MARIA

“The competition called for the selection of four blocks in the city of Athens. It’s objective was to releave the problems the city faces due to high density and the lack of both green and common space, by the reformation of the urban blocks with the optimum utilisation of the crossroad that devides them ”

(1)

(2) sketch by Dimitris pikionis and greek apartment block

(1) nexus between built and void in the urban landscape

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Site/Locus

Chronology

The randomly exacerbated and intense urbanization the city of Athens went through over the years redefined the habitation conditions on its very center, making daily life problematic and even adverse in many aspects. Scattered hills, insufficient free-space, sporadic or organized archeological findings, neoclassic and modern buildings, dense building blocks, cars, narrow roads, even narrower pavements and diverse residents together establish “the vibrant urban patchwork” of today’s Athens. Thus, the Attic landscape becomes the field of two competitive elements: the man-made, and the natural. The former features a built, structural “carpet”, consisting mostly of apartments and residential blocks though the latter emerges seemingly unstructured, severing the former in the form of peaks (hills, mountains) or simply empty – deactivated spaces (open-spaces, urban voids, archeological excavations)

As a city, Athens is characterized by historical depth. The various, historical layering deposits, can be seen as a rich stratigraphy, a set of successive layers of urban development containing material inventory from previous time periods that altogether form the chronology of the site. Present day city-life dwells on the top layer of the this “sediment”. An “urban grid” that both the regulation of horizontal property in1929 and the mass urbanization of the 1950s established. Over the past several decades the city of Athens finds itself in a state of constant building stock renewal: small private properties and buildings turn into high-rise structures, characteristic of intense building activity. Consequently, shaping an adverse, non-environmentallyfriendly urban environment, consisting of degraded, energy-intensive building stock, lack of greenery, inadequate open space, poor ventilation and insolation conditions.

(2)

Structure & Geometry 22

We see the residential apartment block as the prevailing structural unit of the urban block and hence the built environment. This “machine of habitation”, fueled by the “exchange system” (a uniquely Greek arrangement,

early 1900

whereby the owner of a building plot is compensated with apartments in lieu of payment for the land that he relinquishes to the contractor who builds an apartment block on it), with its simple construction

method and technology is ever-transformed, repeated and gradually occupied almost all of the Attic plain. The construction of the apartment block, realized by reinforced concrete, repeated throughout the urban fabric creates a “multi - story domino”, hosting a variety of urban uses. Thus, a conceivable space-grid is introduced, which organizes living space into compartments behind walls of plastered brick while facing continuous or intermittent balconies that together constitute the street-facades.

post war growth

The early (1929) variant of this urban apartment block is a solid building that covers almost all of the area of the existing plot, leaving very little free space. Later, (19??) another variant of the apartment block was later established, where the ground floor of the building either acquires a variety of uses behind gallery fronts, or takes the form of a “pilotis” and serves as a parking space. At this point 30% of the total area of the plot is established as the least mandatory open space.

today

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4=1 For our case-study, we select four blocks in the centre of Athens, in a high density area at the saddle of “Strefi” and “Lycabettus” hills. By joining these four blocks (AthensX4) the empty space that is originally defined - on ground level by the intermediate cross roads - gradually develops into the whole space between them, becoming of great importance. The void, becomes the key methodological tool for designing the new urban block., potentially converting all remaining space (including the remaining open spaces, “ pilotis”, semi open galleries and roofs) into common ground for citizens. case study appartment blocks

neoclassical buildings early modernist buildings modern buildings

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variant types of blocks in the center of Athens and the relationship between build and void

urban appartment building typology

housing

entertainment

urban appartment block structure

commercial

void

built

Proposal

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The fragmented geometry of the built environment in Athens, which has arisen from the contemporaneous land fragmentation and plot ownership produces a chaotic ridge that in its turn gives great mobility and potential to all surrounding space. Considering the complementarity between built and void, the construction grid of built space can be converted to a deconstruction grid of empty space, introducing a design tool. Thus, empty space can penetrate built space following its own construction-grid, creating a form of controlled deconstruction that will be first realized on ground level and will gradually develop into upper stories forming a changing process that over time will reinstitute a new porous mass urban block. Thus reinistituting the urban relationship between earth and air. As a projection of the proposed deconstruction grid, first at ground level, we recommend a 2*2m grid which provides a flexible structure where 6 essential ground types are put together selectively in order to accommodate various activities or user interaction ways. The selective mixing of soil and recycled aggregates allows us to restore several different qualities of the Attic natural landscape. This mechanism is a pilot proposal for the urban environment of Athens. It can be user defined, ever changing, flexible and can gradually develop to create a new urban megablock (assembly of 4 smaller blocks) with crossroads that merge to create better habitation conditions within the city centre. we define five basic types of soil: (a) clay, (b) black clay soil for high density vegetation, (c) red clay soil for agriculture and gardening, (d) recycled aggregates, (e) beaten earth floor

(a) (c) (b)

(d)

(e)

the selective mixing of soil and recycled aggregates, that come from the demolished build enviroment, helps to create a variety of different ground types in order to restore selected features of the Attic landscape.

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light void

air

water

ground

built

controlled deconstraction: structure grid of build enviroment embeded in void

scaling down the void in its natural elements

We see the built, artificial landscape we inhabit as voluminous, a non-permeable, private space, denser at its base, fragmented toward the top, which altogether forms a restless city scape. The empty space, the void surrounding it, is the residual space we don’t inhabit or use. Nevertheless, it is a space full of potential.

1st A.A.W.

beyond contemporary transformations

NEOCLASSICAL TRIANGLE study of its public spaces

Athens Architecture Workshop URBAN DESIGN

ATHENS 2010

atelier Bruno Messina | Luigi Pelligrino

a

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a. Kerameikos square proposal, conisting of the two museum buildings b. The neoclassical triangle as it remains today, within the contamporar y urban fabric

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In 1834 when Athens becomes the capital of the new Hellenic state, the city is but a small village, around the sacred rock of the Acropolis where the Parthenon lies. This period many projects are processed; neo-classical, courtly and grand proposals that attempt to revive the ideal of the classical city in the modern era. The first urban plan developed by S. Kleanthis and E. Shaubert provided a vast archaeological park around the Acropolis and the creation of a new city at the north of the ancient polis. The proposal consists of three new wide avenues, that are arranged according to the orientation of a triangular system; they stand between three large squares, but only two of these (Syntagma and Omonoia) are realised. The third, that stands right upon the ancient archaeological site of Kerameikos, remains uncompleted. A year later Leo von Klenze, develops a intermediate solution: the old city remains almost intact within its limits: the old quarters of Plaka, Monastiraki and Psyrri; while the new city focuses on the triangular system and develops in an effort of finding a balance with the existing surroundings. Thus, the modern city of Athens has in its very inception a form of a dual identity. Particularly where the third square was to be situated, in the archeological site of Kerameikos, we define these ever-tangled components of space and time within the city. Our proposal consists of cutting down the existent building-volume right at the archeological site boundaries. Thus releasing a large parkland area, between the organized excavations, the adjacent pedestrian axis and railroad, linear to Ermou street, one of the three axes of the neoclassical triangle, connecting Kerameikos to Syntagma square.

We propose two linear buildings - two tubes about 150 meters long at the outline of the park where the new archeological Museum of Kerameikos is to be situated: The first building is located along the axis of Ermou street to enhance the visual contact among Kerameikos and Syntagma square; thus, recasting the relationship between to vertices of the neoclassical Triangle. The second building is placed right at the end of Ermou street in order to define the lower boundary of today’s archeological area and is developed in such way that it bypasses the adjacent arterial highway to connect with the cultural area of Technopolis. Our archeological future: Diachronic Athens: 2,500 years ago, today, tomorrow. The archeological area of Kerameikos, is planned to be expanded, so that the site of the excavations in 100 years -or much less perhaps- will be much wider. We envision a vast archeological laying 6-10 meters lower than today’s city level. The two buildings suspended above the new Kerameikos will now form a relic of the modern era, a fragment that traces the alignment of the neoclassical Triangle; a possible contemporary archeology.

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building 2 connecting to Technopolis

building 1 adjacent to archeological site of kerameikos

public space archeological site pedestrian axis railroad longitudinal section

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Existing retail buildings to be cut down in oreder to reveal parkland area

The archeological area of Kerameikos and existing boundaries to be redefined

View to Syntagma square and Lykabetus hill from within the linear museam building

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HOUSING COMPLEX in Anavyssos, Reinterpreting the Athenian suburbia

PROFESSIONAL WORK 2011 HOUSING PROJECT COLLABORATOR: C.CHONTOS

athens

anavyssos

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Reinterpreting the Athenian suburbia landscape

As the city of Athens grew, the suburbs expanded; defining an area of semipermanent residence along the coastal line, that connects the inner city of Athens to the cape Sounion. As the construction process continued, these past decades, seaside rural areas where gradually transformed into urban sprawl. In this housing complex project, we attempt to redefine the terms of Mediterranean suburban residence, while striving for a sustainable, resilient and ecologically benign solution. We seek a way in which the landscape could regain its rural characteristics, while simultaneously satisfying modern living conditions. Seemingly going a step backward, we introduce the concept of ploughed fields in order to trace certain zones upon the site of our proposal. These vegetation stripes become zones of probabilities, hosting different uses; interior space followed by open space that is either left intact to resemble its physical characteristics or is cultivated, so to form an edible landscape. We propose two main typology variants in an attempt to introduce different ways of indoor-outdoor interrelation:

context

site

I. The strip house, that consists of a linear sequence of closed and open spaces that are connected through a long gallery; which serves more as an open structure that physically integrates outdoor and indoor living space. II. The cube-house , that consists of a central space around which a circular sequence of closed and open spaces is developed in split - level; which in its turn, serves more as a closed structure that ascends above the natural landscape to form an observatory toward the seaside view.

intervation

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housing complex masterplan building typologies

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housing complex masterplan vegetation stripes

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views of cube house physical model

views of strip house physical model

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main floor plan

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EUROPAN 2011 NEUILLY SUR MARNE_A LAKESIDE ESTATE

sub_URBAN ARKS

PARIS

ARCHITECTURAL IDEA COMPETITION 2011 TEAM LEADER: STATHOPOULOU AFRODITI ASSOCIATES: CHONTOS CHRISTOS, FANOU EVITA CONTRIBUTOR: FYTOU ADAMANTIA-MARIA

We are called to introduce an experimental urban model in the midst of an environmentally crucial area and era. It is this premise that strives to set this project’s objective: a built environment configuredbased on the very ecosystem it inhabits. As a site prone to flooding, water becomes a fundamental feature of Neuilly - sur - Marne’s identity challenging it’s transformation to a ‘lakeside estate’ .

NEUILLY SUR MARNE

The site calls for an ecological grounded vision and as such, requires equivalent ecological practices, nonetheless regarding the handling of resources and waste ( I ). A sustainable built environment consisting of 21st -century eco-business storehouses can now be envisioned ( II ). Defined as a suburban area, Neuilly - sur Marne is prone to sprawling. As many of our cities continue to struggle with dead inner-cores and retail sprawl at the periphery, there’s never been a more urgent need to look at what makes neighborhoods tick, businesses thrive and communities vibrant. We introduce a ‘suburban ark’, a sequence of vast areas (fields) and infrastructure which includes a potentially dense housing complex (100 dwellings per hectare across the two sites) together with other uses (commerce, educational, businesses, e.t.c) , as a carrier of a new sustainable suburban alternative. Thus Neuilly - Sur - Marne can become a profound component of the Descartes Cluster, featuring innovation. ( III )

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The ark consist of a metaphor that symbolically succeeds to raise floodingrisk awareness. Furthermore, a completed ark distributed through the waterways surrounding the site serves as a ‘mobile landmark’ that communicates this exact new urbanization idea. In order to form an urban (or suburban) model that succeeds to meet the aforementioned goals, a “tool case” is introduced. It consists of four key elements, instruments in the hands of the designer, responding to the specificity of the site. Networks, manmade and natural, are introduced or reshaped to form new ways of mobility while respecting the site’s natural green routes and waterways. They are site-specific and ecologically benign solutions (1). Agriculture is imbedded into the community. We see agriculture as a key attraction for getting city dwellers out to the countryside to not only fill their lungs with fresh air but also buy preserves, rare potatoes and delicate bakery-goods from local producers. (2) Water, due to its powerful presence in the site, is conceived as a precious resource that can be harvested through various patterns and be re-introduced. Drain dykes, embedded to the proposed infrastructure, distributed across the site, succeed in holding as much as 961150 m3 of water, either sustaining it to feed the community’s needs or to be redistributed to the adjacent fields. (3) Finally, a sustainable urban construction is introduced, interacting with water and operating in a nontoxic manner. Incorporated water management systems and onsite usage of other renewable sources compose a structure responding to its bio-region’s characteristics. (4) last but not least, as the cycle of water eternally repeats itself, it reminds us of the significance of the ‘time’ factor ; it is what will progressively alternate any given structure and advocate for its efficiency.

exploded axonometric of the proposed infrastucture

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site_context

flooding levels

draining canals and infrastructure strips

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Part of the proposed urban infrustructure structure floats away, as a mobilemark: a means to communicate the regional consciousness

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cross section of proposed infrastructure

strip plan and longitudinal section of proposed infrastructure

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FILOPAPPOU HILL τopography TRACES

ACADEMIC ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO 8A NTUA 2008 COLLABORATOR: CHONTOS CHRISTOS

filopappou hill as opposed to the acropolis

i n t e r v e n t i o n s i t e p l a n . Tra c i n g t h e a n c i e n t city Walls in the valley to east par t of Filopappou hill.

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Philopappou Hill, to the southwest of the Acropolis is known for its long history embedded to the history of Athens. We see it as an organic -non-static- site, on which different scriptures, prints and tracings of past times are read. We seek to highlight these scattered topographies with minimally invasive techniques, in order to conceptually group them together so that they acquire both coherence and continuity.

In search of a mechanism that constitutes a design scenario, we imagined a type of CT, which scans the hill; identifies individual historical points of interest and notes them, while leaving the geometry of the ground intact . In a place where many components are mixed to an assemblage, consisting of the intense built and natural terrain, from the ancient routes of the Long City Walls, the Observatory and “Pnyx� to the subsequent intervention of the architect Dimitris Pikionis; our goal is not to add a foreign design element but define the system in which those pre-existing elements interact and succeed one another.

east valey, filopappou hill, Great walls and ancient route

A grid system is implemented, parallel to the direction of an ancient route that once led to one of the main entrances, through the great walls and into the ancient city. This ancient path, that went through the east valley and up the hill, was also traced by greek architect D.Pikionis in his interventions at Filoppapou hill (1954-57). The grid is indicated by lightning pillars, placed on every 25 meters that thicken and dilute according to the points of interest. In addition, parallel to the direction of this implemented grid system and adjacent to historical scriptures found throughout the hill, we place folding strips that trace the traveler’s movement and frame the views between ancient to contemporary.

view from Fiopappou hill toward the Acropolis

The intervention grid, placed on every 25 meters form a grid that thickens and dilutes according to the points of interest.

The strips fold down to highlight the past engravings and wrap above, to form a platform-observatory of the present.

These folding concrete meander motives serve as a background enhancement of preceding elements that are traced throughout the hill, integrating past and modern. A higher density grid forms right above the historical site of the valley on the east side of Filopappou hill, to both form a threshold between hill and adjacent urban fabric and to enhance the east entrance of the hill as opposed to the west one featured by D.Pikionis.

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING

metaxourgeion

SELECTED PROJECT TO BE PRESENTED MINISTRY OF EDUCATION REPRESENTATIVES ACADEMIC ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN DESIGN STUDIO 5, NTUA 2008

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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This project called upon the development of an elementary-school building design in a busy and vibrant neighbourhood close to the historical centre of Athens. My design objective was to create an “open school” , so that it could have a controlled interaction with its surrounding community. I therefore, aimed to design a building whose structure would be clear to understand both when experienced from the inside and as perceived from the outside. I divided the site into three distinguished zones, that define consecutive closed and open spaces of different use within the school environment, while forming different facade qualities in correlation to the building’s surroundings. The middle zone consist of the main school-yard, that also has an open and a closed space part. I visualised this zone to function as a whole, while creating an open environment, where dynamic interaction between students and teachers or the community is to be sustained, so that both interconnectedness and a sense of place could be demonstrated. This central space, that holds open facades, also serves as the main entrance to the school building; while it functions as a multi-purpose room, hosting both the auditorium surrounded by the library and the students’ dining room. The movement is distributed along the two adjacent galleries, to the class rooms; that are distinguished as separate entities, situated in pairs, to form yet another two zones of consecutive closed and open space throughout the building. These zones function more as boundaries, hosting smaller, more private open spaces to serve each class-room’s outdoor activities separately.

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FACADES AND SECTIONS OF THE BUILDING DRAWN BY HAND

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auditorium cross section

longitudinal section

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main entrance elevation

schoolyard elevation

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Intervention in Ilia, Peloponnese RESTORATION OF A BURNT VILLAGE

Rapti, Ilia, Peloponnese Greece

ACADEMIC / WORKSHOP N.T.U.A. URBAN DESIGN STUDIO 2009 COLLABORATOR: C.CHONTOS

This project was developed after a surveying field workshop at N.T.U.A, in order to restore a farming village that was burnt during the Greek forest fires of the summer of 2008. In our proposal, we attempt to introduce a contemporary farmhouse and it’s typology variants, while reshaping the infrastructure of the village. We seek to intergrate the traditional farm house with modern necessities. Both aiming for project resilience and durability, while seeking economical and ecological solutions. We approach restructuring after a forest fire, as a sort of recycling-of-material proccess. While the walls of traditional stonebuilt buildings are demolished by the fire, each piece of stone -still- remains intact. We therefore reuse this material, alongside with reinforced concrete in order to rearrange and reinstitute the ruins, to form our proposal.

destroyed structural matter is recycled to form new structures

Destroyed existing typologies

Typologies_ground floor plan

Typologies_first floor plan

Quantitative information

area: 220 m2 bedrooms: 3 residents: 6 +

area: 200 m2 bedrooms: 3 residents: 6 +

area: 160 m2 bedrooms: 2 residents: 4 +

area: 240 m2 bedrooms: 3 residents: 8 +

longitudinal section and main elevation

Deployment of typologies throughout the village

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ATHENS BENCH MARK Future Bench_ “BENCH-PLANT” Urban equipment desing competition

FINALIST

Urban equipment desing competition 2010 COLLABORATORS: E.GIAKOUMAKI, C.CHONTOS

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In search of urban furniture equipment situated on an Athenian utopia, we design a city-bench that does not merely occupy urban space. Thus, referring to the art of “Topiary�, a practice that trains live plants to develop and maintain defined shapes a bench shaped plant is introduced. We design a metal wireframe in the shape of a rectangular prism, with embedded sitting cavities that rests in soil and thus allows various plants to grow upon it. Selected shrubs with dense foliage that grow on Attica’s natural ecosystem, such as lavender, laurel and myrtle are used for this purpose.

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HAND DRAWING

a visual interpretation of space

PAINTINGS AND SKETCHES

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POSTER FOR TOMORROW “THE RIGHT TO EDUCATION”

FINALIST

INTERNATIONAL POSTER COMPETITION (cover-poster to be featured on a limited edition of Clairefontaine’s notebooks).

Poster variants Raise_Your_Hand: The Right to Education is a universal right. It is both what lets us communicate, discover and express ourselves, and the ultimate right that permits us exercise our remaining human rights. The immediate expression of this universal right by raising one’s hand, I find most powerful. This way, a hand that’s facing up is simultaneously made the indication of something symbolically transcendent, a powerful protest against a violation of a right, whereas -to the contrary- an index facing down foretells the direction a world without education is to take.

[...] “becomes the indication of something symbolically transcedent”

t featuring the ceiling of Sistine Chapel

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Aphrodite Stathopoulou, was born in Athens, Greece in 1985. She graduated from the National Technical University of Athens with a grade of 8.85/10, earning a masters degree in Architecture – Engineering in 2010. Her thesis project entitled: “Ideology, Memory, Planning. Three characters in search of the past cities within the contemporary urban fabric.”, presented in the “Plato’s Academy in the worldwide civilization” conference, completed o pattern of stimuli, analysis, praxis in order to reinterpret the Athenian urbanity. Her diploma project entitled: “Urban intervention network in Plato’s Academy. A proposal for the museum of the city of Athens”, approached design as a link between distinct systems as she continued to research the interrelation between historic and contemporary contexts within the urban fabric. Upon graduation, she was honored to present her work to the local community. She participated in various competitions in graphic design, architecture and urbanism. She ranked among the finalists in the international Design competition “Athens BenchMark _Future Bench” and the Poster4tomorrow “Right to Education” international Graphic Design competition. Her team was awarded a honorable mention in the urban design competition for young architects “AthensX4”. She currently works as a freelance architect, involving herself in housing projects and urban design competitions, while looking for the opportunity to pursue graduate studies abroad.


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