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“A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE’S PERCEPTION TOWARDS TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT AT HINDUSTAN COCA-COLA BEVERAGES PRIVATE LIMITED” Undertaken at

HINDUSTAN COCA-COLA BEVERAGES PRIVATE LIMITED.

DECLARATION

I Mr. XYZ a bonafied student of Department of Management Studies, Engineering College, would like to declare that the project entitled “A Study On employees Perception Towards training and development programmes in Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages private Limited� In partial fulfillment of Master of Business Administration Course of XYZ University is my original work.

Place: Date:

SIGNATURE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT My

very

Prof. XYZ

special .My

thanks very

and

gratitude

to

our chairman

special

thanks

and

gratitude

to

our beloved principal Prof. XYZ. My very special thanks and gratitude to the Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Private Limited, which has given me its consent to undertake a project. I am also indebted to convey my sincere thanks to Mr.XYZ who guided me well and all other staff members of the company. I would like to thank Mr.XYZ, for his valuable guidance, advice and continuous encouragement during this project work. And I would like to thank all the staff of my department for their valuable guidance, advice and continuous encouragement during the project work. Finally I thank who was with me and spared their time with me to do the project work, and they are none other than my Parents, Respondents Friends and Relatives who supported me to complete my project work.

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER

TITLE

NO. ABSTRACT LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES 1.

INDUSTRY PROFILE

2.

INTRODUCTION OF THE PROBLEM 2.1 TITLE OF THE PROJECT 2.2 NEED FOR THE STUDY 2.3 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY 2.4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY 2.5 STATEMENT OF THE STUDY

3.

ORGANISATION PROFILE

4.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

PAGE NO

CHAPTER NO. 5.

TITLE

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 5.1 RESEARCH DESIGN 5.2 DATA COLLECTION METHODS 5.3 RESEARCH INSTRUMENT 5.4 SAMPLING 5.5 ANALYSIS TOOLS 5.6 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

6.

DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION 6.1 PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS 6.2 GRAPHICAL ANALYSIS 6.3 STASTICAL ANALYSIS 6.3.1 CHI-SQUARE 6.3.2 WEIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 6.3.3 CORRELATION

7.

FINDINGS

8.

SUGGESTIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

9.

CONCLUSION APPENDIX BIBLIOGRAPHY

PAGE NO.

LIST OF TABLES

TITLE

TABLE NO 1

2

TABLE SHOWING THE AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS. TABLE SHOWING THE DEPARTMENT OF THE RESPONDENTS

3

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

4

TABLE SHOWING TOTAL EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

5

TABLE SHOWING COCA-COLA EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

6

TABLE SHOWING UNDER GONE THE TRAINING PROGRAMME

7

TABLE SHOWING TRAINING PROGRAMME IMPORTENT

PAGE NO.

TABLE NO

TITLE

7(i)

TABLE SHOWING TO DEVELOP SKILLS

7(ii)

TABLE SHOWING TO DEVELOP KNOWLEDGE

7(iii)

TABLE SHOWING TO DEVELOP INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP

7(iv)

TABLE SHOWING TO DEVELOP ATTITUDE

8

TABLE SHOWING HOW FREQUENTLY TRAINING PROGRAMMES ARE CONDUCTED

9

TABLE SHOWING WHAT ARE THE TRAINING METHODS ADOPTED IN THE ORGANIZATION

10

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS PRESENT TRAINING MODULE SATISFACTION

11(i)

TABLE SHOWING IF 'YES' IMPROVED YOUR SKILLS

11(ii)

TABLE SHOWING IMPROVED YOUR KNOWLEDGE

TABLE

TITLE

PAGE NO.

PAGE

NO.

NO 11(iii)

TABLE SHOWING IMPROVED YOUR INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP

11(iv)

TABLE SHOWING DEVELOP YOUR ATTITUDE

12

TABLE SHOWING HANDLING DAY TO DAY ACTIVITIES EFFECTIVELY AFTER ATTENDING THE TRAINING PROGRAMME

13

TABLE SHOWING IF 'NO' REASON FOR THE DISSATISFACTION

14

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS PLACE PREFERE FOR THE TRAINING

15

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS NO OF DAYS PREFERE FOR THE TRAINING

16(i)

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS RATE THE FACILITIES FOR DURING THE TRAINING PROGRAMME - TRAINING MATERIAL

16(ii)

TABLE SHOWING MODE OF TRAINING

16(iii)

TABLE SHOWING ABOUT TRAINER

16(iv)

TABLE SHOWING ABOUT TRAINING ROOM

TABLE

TITLE

PAGE

NO.

NO 16(v)

TABLE SHOWING ABOUT AMBIENCE

16(vi)

TABLE SHOWING ABOUT FOOD

17

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EVALUATION PROCEDURE

18

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS PREFERE FOR LIKE TO GET TRAINED

19

TABLE SHOWING RESPONDENTS PARTICIPATION LEVEL

20

TABLE SHOWING GIVEN OPPORTUNITY TO PRESENT THE PROBLEM

CHART

TITLE

PAGE

NO.

NO 1 2 3 4

5

THE AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS. THE DEPARTMENT OF THE RESPONDENTS EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION TOTAL EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS COCA-COLA EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

6 7

UNDER GONE THE TRAINING PROGRAMME TRAINING PROGRAMME IMPORTENT

7(i)

TO DEVELOP SKILLS

7(ii)

TO DEVELOP KNOWLEDGE

7(iii)

TO DEVELOP INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP

7(iv)

TO DEVELOP ATTITUDE

8 CHART NO 9

HOW FREQUENTLY TRAINING PROGRAMMES ARE CONDUCTED TITLE

PAGE NO.

WHAT ARE THE TRAINING METHODS ADOPTED IN THE ORGANIZATION

10

RESPONDENTS PRESENT TRAINING MODULE SATISFACTION

11(i)

IF 'YES' IMPROVED YOUR SKILLS

11(ii)

IMPROVED YOUR KNOWLEDGE

11(iii)

SHOWING IMPROVED YOUR INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP

11(iv)

DEVELOP YOUR ATTITUDE

12

HANDLING DAY TO DAY ACTIVITIES EFFECTIVELY AFTER ATTENDING THE TRAINING PROGRAMME

13

IF 'NO' REASON FOR THE DISSATISFACTION

14

RESPONDENTS PLACE PREFERE FOR THE TRAINING

15

RESPONDENTS DAYS PREFERE FOR THE TRAINING

CHART NO 16(i)

TITLE

PAGE NO.

RESPONDENTS RATE THE FACILITIES FOR DURING THE TRAINING PROGRAMME TRAINING MATERIAL 16(ii)

MODE OF TRAINING

16(iii)

TRAINER

16(iv)

TRAINING ROOM

16(v)

AMBIENCE

16(vi)

FOOD

17

RESPONDENTS SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EVALUATION PROCEDURE

18

RESPONDENTS PREFERE FOR LIKE TO GET TRAINED

19

RESPONDENTS PARTICIPATION LEVEL

20

GIVEN OPPORTUNITY TO PRESENT THE PROBLEM

CHAPTER - 1 INDUSTRY PROFILE

INDUSTRY PROFILE

Soft drinks are one of the common drinks which are basically used for thirst quenching purpose. It was introduced in the 17th century. Due to the changing life scenario it is now positioned as a fun drink and virtually luxury. Soft drink is consumed by almost every section of the society for its cool and tasty attributes.

HISTORY The first marketed soft drinks (non-carbonated) appeared in the 17th century. They were made from water and lemon juice sweetened with honey. In 1676, the campaign de Limonadiers of Paris were granted a monopoly for the sale of lemonade soft drinks. Vendors would carry tanks of lemonade on their backs and dispensed cups of the soft drink to thirsty Parisians. Joseph Priestley In 1776, Englishmen created the first drinkable man-made glass of carbonated water three years later, Swedish chemist Torbern Bergman invented a generating apparatus that made carbonated water from chalk by the use of sulphuric acid. Bergman’s apparatus allowed imitation mineral water to be produced in large amounts. John Mathews In 1810, the first united states patent was issued for the ;means of mass manufacturer of imitation mineral waters’ to Simons and rundell of Charleston south Carolina however, carbonated beverages did not adhesive great popularity in America until l1832, when john Mathew invented his apparatus for the making carbonated water. John Mathews then mass manufactured his apparatus for a sale to soda fountain owners. THE SOFT DRINK BOTTLING INDUSTRY Over 1,500 U.S. patents were filed for a cork, cap or lid for the carbonated drink bottle tops during the early days of the bottling industry. Carbonated drink

bottles are under a lot of pressure form the gas. Inventors were trying to find the best way to prevent the carbon dioxide or bubbles form escaping. In 1892, William painter a Baltimore machine shop operator patented the “crown cork bottle seal”. It was the first very successful method of keeping the bubbles in the bottle.

Automatic Production of Glass Bottles: In 1899, the first patent was issued for a glass bowling machine for the automatic production of glass bottles. Earlier glass bottles had all been hand blown. Four years later the new bottle bowing machine was in operation. The inventor Michael Owens, an employee of Libby Glass Company first operated it within a few years glass bottle production increased from 1,500 bottles a day to 57,000 bottles a day.

Horn Paks and Vending Machines During the 1920’s the first”Horn-Paks” were invented hornpaks are the familiar pack beverage carrying cartons made from cardboard. Automatic vending machines also began to appear in the 1920 the soft drink had become an American mainstay. SOFT DRINK MARKET IN INDIA The history of the soft drink market in India started by back in early 1940’s by Glucose Company and next by Parle group in 1949 followed by another manufacturers of soft drinks like pure drinks. Mc Dowell, dukes etc. after the exit of the coca-cola in 1977 Parle became the undisputed market leader till recent past. Since the introduction these soft drinks were served in 2oo ml packs that too in bottles only. In September – October 1998 Parle had decided to go for

250 ml bottles and introduced thumps up in Delhi. The main factor that influenced them in going to 250ml instead of 200ml was to counter attack the entry of Pepsi.

PRESENT SCENARIO Latter on when globalizing our economy opening it up for MNC’s like Pepsi, Coca-Cola, and Cadbury etc to enter the real cola war had begun. Although the import and manufacture of international brands like coke and Pepsi is enhanced in India, the local brands are being stabilized by advertisement good quality and low cost. Ever since the entry of Pepsi, the competition between Pepsi and Parle was a battle of small arms, as the alliance of Parle with coke and constant reveal of sophisticated management techniques by Coke and full fledge highly innovative promotional activates by Pepsi has really made the industry as a battle field of cannons. One can make above statement by seeing advertisement expenditure and investment of Coke and Pepsi. Coke is expected to pump 2400 crores and Pepsi 300 crores into the Indian markets apart their initial investment of 250 crores and 500 crores respectively.

MARKET SHARE Cola products account for nearly 61-62% of the total soft drink market. The brands that fall in the this category are Pepsi, Thumps Up, Diet Coke, Diet

Pepsi, Bovonto etc. Non-Cola segments which constitute 36% can be divided into four categories based on the types of flavors available namely orange, cloudy Lime, Clear Lime and mango. Coca Cola, king of soft drinks industry boasts a global market share of around 50% followed by Pepsi Company at about 21% and Cadbury Schweppes at 7%. INDIAN ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

CEO CEO John John Ustas Ustas

VP VP Sales Sales

VP VP Supply Supply Chain Chain

CFO CFO

Director Director HR HR

VP VP BSG BSG

Region Region VP VP (North) (North) Region Region VP VP (Central) (Central) Region Region VP VP (South) (South)

WORLD ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

Chairman Chairman and and CEO CEO E. E. Neville Neville Isdell Isdell

President President CCNA CCNA

EVP EVP & & President, President, Coca-Cola Coca-Cola International International

CFO

EVP EVP & & President, President, Marketing, Marketing, Strategy Strategy & & Innovation Innovation

Director Director ,, HR HR

President, President, Bottling Bottling Investments Investments & & Supply Supply Chain Chain Irial Irial Finan Finan

Region Region Director Director Steve Steve Buffington Buffington

CFO CFO

Region Region Director Director

Singapore Singapore CBO CBO

Brazil Brazil CBO CBO India India CBO CBO (HCCBPL) (HCCBPL) China China CBO CBO

CHAPTER-2 INTRODUCTION TO THE PROBLEM

2.1 TITLE OF THE PROJECT

“A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE PERCEPTION TOWARDS TRAINING

AND DEVELOPMENT AT HINDUSTAN COCA-COLA BEVERAGES PRIVATE LIMITED”

2.2NEED FOR THE STUDY In spite of rapid growth technology, HR has become a critical factor in making the technology efficient enough to compete in the market. To make the HR more competitive training and development has gained lots of importance in making HR a success factor. The organizational personnel at different levels require different skills these skills can be developed though various training and development programmes. This project is to be helpful for HCCBPL to find out the perception on training and development.

2.3 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:  To Study the Employee Perception towards Training and development in Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages private limited SECONDARY OBJECTIVE:  To find out the expectations of employees on the training and development  To assess the satisfaction level of employees on current training module  To identify the employees preference on  Place of training  Training method  Duration of training

SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Training is a long-term investment in human resource management. So, when proper training methods are designed, it reflects on both employees’ productivity and morale of the employees’ This project will help the management in understanding the employees’ perception on training and development module. This will reveal the satisfaction level, the performance on training method / trainer / period and etc. The above information will contribute a lot in redesigning the training module that will balance the organization need and personnel needs. 2.4 STATEMENT OF THE STUDY ♦ This topic is chosen because training is a key success factor of any organization in today’s context. ♦ The organizational personnel at different levels require different skills. So, these can be developed through various training and development programmes. ♦ This study helps to identify the opinion regarding the existing training programmes and perception on training and development programmes.

CHAPTER – 3 COMPANY PROFILE

COMPANY PROFILE

Dr.John S.Pemberton in Atlanta, Georgia invented coca-cola with coke leaves and kola nut as a basis in may1886. Dr.John S.Pemberton’s first coke leaf drink, French winecok, was actually imitation of Vin mariani, a coke wine drink invented by Angelo Mariani and the same was considered superior than the original drink. As Dr.John S.Pemberton was not in good health he sold part of the company to Willis Veneable and George Lowndes in 1887. Neither had the time to make marker or sell coke and they sold their share of the company to Wool folk Walter and his younger sister Margaret Dozier. Dozier owned two-ninths and walker four-ninths of the formula rights. Later venable somehow disposed of his portion of coca-cola in 1887 to Joseph Jacobs owner of Jacob’s pharmacy in early October 1887 Dr. John S. Pemberton got three investors with and ad

and he took $2000 from

J.C.Mayfield, A.O.Murphey and E. H. Bloodworth. The three new partners were ready to produce all of Pemberton’s wonderful medicines. At this point the formula of Coca-Cola was officially owned by Pemberton, Walker and Dozier and several others had interest in it. Candler, an ambitious Atlanta druggist some how acquired control of the company in 1888. With Charley Pemberton (John’s Son) claiming his rights to the drink. This kicked off two coke clones by the name of Yum Yum and Koke. Despite illness Pemberton continued with his work and developed a new drink, a modified cola with celery extract but died on August 16, 1888 before finishing the drink. Exactly two weeks after Pemberton died Candler bought the remaining interest of Walker and Dozier for $1000 with the expectation of the Walker, Candler & company had legal right to coca-cola. In 1891, nine years prior to the invention of paper clip, Asa Candler became the owner of the five year ole coca-cola business and the incorporated

the coca-cola company and registered the “Coca-Cola” trademark with the U.S. patent. The secret formula dubbed “7X” and was only shared with a handful of his most trusted associates. In 1899, two Chattanooga, Tennessee entrepreneurs who bought the rights to bottle and sell coca-cola across the united states ushered large scale bottling in that operation was the forerunner of the targets, most widespread production and distribution network in the world. The Coca-Cola Spenserian script as a reminder was splashed on the side of buildings and banner walls to the extent of 2.5 million. Sq.feet in the America by 1908. By 1960’s the company moved onto more modern methods of promotion as other means of advertising had emerged. Candler sold the coca-cola company in 1919 for $25 million to an Atlanta banker named Woodruff and investor group he had organized in 1923 E.Woodruff’s 33 year old son Robert Woodruff was elected as the president of Coca-Cola

Company.

“The

Business was re-incorporated as Delaware Corporation and 500,000 shares of common stock were sold publicly for $40 per share”. Robert Woodruff bought Coca-Cola Company to even greater highs for more than six decades. “Fundamental to his success was a commitment to the highest standards for product quality a commitment that remains a hall mark of the Coca-Cola system today”. In 1960 the Coca-Cola Company purchased minute maid corporation adding frozen citrus juice concentrates and adds along with the trademarks minute maid and Hi-c the company’s beverage line. The company later acquired Duncan foods a coffee producer and formed the Coca-Cola company foods divisions in 1967, now known as the “Minute Maid Company” during 1977-

1983 the company produced and marketed wine in the United States and bought Belmont Spring Water Company incorporated in 1982. Although Coca-Cola had debled on several industries over the years in 1981 Roberto Goizueta a chemical engineer rejuvenated the business and engineered the largest diversification the $700 million acquisition of Columbia picture in 1982. In 1985 Coke changed its original recipe for a “New Coke”. Market shares had fallen and Guizueta changed the name to “New Coke” the same was rejected by the customers. This forced the company to get back to the original recipe. In 1986, it consolidated the U.S. bottling operation it owned into Coca-Cola enterprises and sold 51% of the new company to the public. Coca-Cola company thought that the entertainment business would be good for ;them and in 1982 acquired Columbia pictures industries which joined Tri Star pictures in 1987, to form the independent corporation Columbia pictures entertainment inc. Coca-Cola the sold Belmont springs water companying. In 1989 closing out a decade of accelerated growth and change while Robert was in the company the value rose form $4 billion to $145 billion. In 1977, Douglas Ivester, the architect of Coca-Cola’s restructured bottling operations took over the company. COCA-COLA IN INDIA After a 16 years absence, Coca-Cola returned to India in 1993 Coca-Cola India has made significant investments to build and continually improve its business in India including new production facilities, waste water treatment plants and distribution systems and marketing equipment. During the past decade the Coca-Cola system has invested more than US $ 1 billion in India. In

2003 Coca-Cola India pledged to invest further US$100 million in its operations. Coca-Cola business system directly employees approximately 6000 local people in India and indirectly created employment for more than 125,000 people in related industries through their various Vast supply and distribution system. The Coca-Cola system in India companies comprises 27 wholly owned company-owned bottling operations another 17 franchise owned bottling units. A network of 29 contract packers also manufactures a range of product for the company. Coca-Cola India has 50% market share nationally in the soft drink segment. Despite accumulating losses of Rs.2,086 crores in its bottling subsidiary, Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages in the last two years, the coal giant has signaled its intention to stay the long haul in India. Coca-Cola India’s biggest has come from Kinley, it packaged water brand Kinley has a market share of 35.1% nationally in this segment.

FRAME WORK OF THE COMPANY

VISION STATEMENT

Our Vision:

Profit:

Plant: Being a responsible global citizen that makes a difference.

Maximizing return to shareowners while being mindful of our overall responsibilities.

Partners: Nurturing a winning network of partners and building mutual loyalty.

Sustainable Growth

People: Being a great place to work where people are inspired to be the best they can be.

Portfolio: Bring to the world a portfolio of beverage brands that anticipate and satisfy peoples desire & needs.

MISSION STATEMENT

OUR MISSION: “To refresh the world… in mind body and spirit. To inspire moments of optimism… through our brands and our actions. To create value and make a difference… everywhere we engage.”

QUALITY POLICY “We at Chennai unit will ensure customer and consumer satisfaction by providing the best quality products and services through continuous improvement of our system and processes.”

ENVIRONMENT POLICY “We at Coca-Cola India are in the business of beverages that refresh people. We will carry out our operations in ways that Protect, Preserve and Enhance the Environment we work in. Our activities are guided by Coca-Cola eKOsystem, which provides a framework to transform this principle in actions.”

UNIT ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

AGM AGM // AOD AOD

Plant Plant Manager Manager

Route Route to to Market Market

HR HR Manager Manager

Finance Finance Manager Manager

Channel Channel Manager Manager

ASMs ASMs

Area Area Capability Capability Dev Manager Dev Manager

Sales Sales Executives Executives

Market Market Developers Developers

Sales Sales Manager Manager // GSM GSM

Sales Sales Trainers Trainers

Distributors/ Distributors/ Salesmen Salesmen

Marketing Marketing

Key Key Accounts Accounts

PRODUCT PROFILE Coca cola from an average six drinks a day at the time of invention is consumed currently at the rate of more than 834 million drinks per day generating sales over $15 billion a year. The objective of the Coca-Cola is to benefit and refresh everyone. Founded in1886, Coca Cola Company is the world’s leading

manufacturer, marketer and distributor of non-alcoholic beverage concentrates and syrup, owns nearly 400 beverage brands. The corporate headquarters is located at Atlanta, with local operations in over 200 countries around the world. Another aspect involving Coca-Cola distribution system is the company’s ambitious product line. These beverages are classified into four separate groups, which consist of the following: carbonated Soft Drinks (CSD) – Coke, Sprite, Limca, Fanta, Mazza, Dr.pepper etc., No-carb-Nestea juices, Fruitopia etc., Isotonic – PowerAde and Water-Desani (filtered water) and Evian (pure spring water is imported from Sweden). Products of Coca-Cola Beverages: Coca-cola HBC products are alcohol-free beverages. The majority of sales (approximately 77%) are carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) from The Coca-Cola Company that are among the most famous brands in the world. We have the right, in the countries where we operate, to produce, package, distribute and sell specific beverages of The Coca-Cola Company, principally Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola light, Fanta, Sprite, Minute Maid, BonAqua and Lift. Four of these brands-- CocaCola, Coca-Cola light, Fanta, Sprite—are four of the world’s top five CSD brands. Coca-Cola HBC’s product line also includes juices, water, sports and energy drinks (Burn and Power), and ready-to-drink beverages such as teas and coffees. We are constantly expanding our product range in response to changing consumer preferences. A prime example of this is the Fanta brand. Coca-Cola HBC now offers Fanta in 34 flavors that are tailored to satisfy local tastes. In Greece, we introduced limited edition flavors of Fanta, including Fanta

Madness and Fanta Mandarin. Hungary has launched Fanta Blue-Grape and Fanta Wild Berry, and the Fanta line was extended in Italy by adding Fanta Bitter Orange, Fanta Blood Orange and Fanta Chinotto. Nigeria, celebrated the country’s 40th anniversary by presenting consumers with Fanta Black Currant. The Fanta range is now the second largest brand in Nigeria, after Coca-Cola.

DIFFERENT FLAVORS COCA-COLA PRODUCT ♦ Coca-Cola ♦ Thums Up ♦ Sprite ♦ Fanta ♦ Diet Coke ♦ Limca ♦ Maaza

WATER & SODA: ♦ Kinley ♦ Schweppes (Soda water)

CHAPTER – 4 REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE Training is a process of learning a sequence of programmed behaviour. It is application of knowledge. It attempts to improve their performance of their current job or prepare them for an intended job.

Development is related process and it covers not only those activities, which improve job performance, but also those, which brings about the growth of the personality and helps the individuals in the progress towards maturity and actualization of their potential capacity so that they become not only effective employee but also better citizen. Training and development is a process that attempts to improve an employee with information, skills, and an understanding of the organization and its goals. In addition, training and development are designed to help a person continue to make positive contribution in the forms of good performance. ♦ “Training and development of the employees is not an optional, it is an intrinsic part of practice of human resource management in people”. - Mr. Keep ♦ “Training was treated as a necessary overhead in the past. But in today’s knowledge based economy, training employees to the changing world is considered mandatory’. - Dr. Amitabh Kodwari, HRM Review Quality of work life ♦ "Training is a continuous, systematic development among all levels of employee of that knowledge and those skills and attitude which contributes to their welfare and that of the company” - Planty, M.C. Cord

♦ “The strategic move to outsourcing the human resource function, especially training and development, has gained momentum. The key strategic issue in sourcing versus out sourcing training and development depends on whether a company can achieve competitive advantage by performing the training and development function internally on a continual basis, or would it gain more efficiency by out sourcing it - B.Sumalatha – HRM Review Organizational strategy and HR ♦ “Training is the act of increasing the knowledge and skill of an employee for doing a particular job”. “Development is a broad one. It includes both training and education. Its aim is to improve the overall personality of an individual”. - Tripathi ♦ “Training is a learning experience in that it seeks a relatively permanent change in an individual that will improve his or her ability to perform on the job”. - David A.Decenzo - Stephen P.Robbins ♦ Success of any training programme largely depends upon proper identification of training needs. Training needs are felt by the managers when they discover/perceive deviation between standard performance and actual performance of its employees. It is not that only workers need training of course workers need training to operate machines reduce scrap and avoid accidents simultaneously

supervisors, managers and executives do need to be trained and development to grow and acquire maternity of thought and action. International journal of training and development “Training tools and methodologies” Volume xxii No.1 – Jan-mar 2002 ♦ Training typically involves providing employees the knowledge and skills needed to do a particular task or job, though attitude change may also be attempted Randy c. defimone John m. Harris Thomson publication ♦ Most training is directed at upgrading and improving an employee’s technical skills. This includes basic skills-the ability to read, write, and perform math computations-as well as job specific competencies. Stephen P.Robbins & Mary coulter

TRAINING Training is the process of enhancing knowledge developing skills and changing attitudes of people so that they are effective in their work responsibilities. Hassling defines “training as a sequence of experience of opportunities designed to modify behaviour in order to attain a stated objective”.

Oaten define training as any activity, which deliberately attempts to improve persons, a skill at a task.

DEVELOPMENT According to Richardson development is a step process and day-to-day growth where the people define the problem and they plan for the future.

Why training? Selection for employment us from a perfect process of necessity, it is almost always a compromise candidates rarely offers a perfect match for the job specification strength in some areas must compensate for deficiencies in other. Training and development is the simple term used for the process of inducing behaviour modification for matching the employee’s characteristics with the organization needs. The training process differ from managerial level to workers from the superior to subordinates according to dale and yahoo, training is taken to imply to educated somewhat narrowly, mainly by instruction drill and discipline.

EVALUATION OF TRAINING

WHAT IS EVALUATION? Though people use the term evaluation in different ways, according to the dictionary it means getting to know the value of something�. The key to good training lies in good design on a realistic assessment of training needs but the success is measured by evaluation.

The evaluation is a process of using the outcome of assessment testing and measuring is widest sense to make one or more informed value judgments that help to know the degree of success achieved. Now, it is obvious that it is evolution the makes any effort (like training) complete and more meaningful. WHY

EVALUATE

(NEED

FOR

EVALUATING

TRAINING

PROGRAMS) Organizations spent vast sums of money time and efforts in equipping their human resources with skills so necessary for achieving organizing rules, and training has come to stay as the most preferred intervention style in equipping the staff. Since we like to think of training as an investment rather than a cost so we feel we should demonstrate a return. But how do training institutions come to know whether:  They are getting values for their money or the sponsoring agent.  The extent to which training has helped to solve the organization’s problems.  The existence of the training functions is fully justified or not.  Anything better can be done in the future and its effectiveness improved upon or not.  All the above queries are answerable by EVALUATING the training programmes. TRAINING AND THE WORK PLACE

Most training takes place in an organizational setting, typically in support of skill and knowledge requirements originating in the work place. This relationship between training and the workplace is illustrated in the figure below. 1

2

3

TRAINING

REACTIONS

LEARNING

4

5

WORK PLACE

RESULTS

BEHAVIOUR

The Structure of the Training Evaluation Problem Using the diagram in figure 1 as a structural framework, we can identify five basic points at which we might take measurements, conduct assessments, or reach judgments. These five points are indicated in the diagram by the numbers 1 through 5. 1) Before training. 2) During training. 3) After training or before entry (Reentry).

4) In the workplace. 5) Upon existing the workplace. EVALUATING STRATEGIES In the current climate of cost cutting and downsizing, training professionals are under increasing pressure to provide positive, measurable evidence of the bottom line contribution of training. Yet evaluating the effects and results of training is notoriously difficult. Here are a few thoughts on evaluation, collected from our own experience, which you may find useful in planning what to evaluate, and how to go about doing it. PLANNING EVALUATION A common mistake which many organizations make is that they leave evaluation considerations until after they have planned and delivered their training. For evaluation to be truly effective the evaluation strategy needs to be planned and designed in conjunction with, rather than after the training planning and design stages.

Level 1: Reaction – a measure of satisfaction Level 2: Learning – a measure of learning Level 3: Behavior – a measure of behavior change Level 4: Results – a measure of results

LEVELS OF EVALUATION

ASSESSING TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS often entails using the fourlevel model developed by Donald Kirkpatrick (1994). According to this model. Evolutions should always begin with level one, and then, as time and budget allows. Should move sequentially through levels two, three and four. Information from each prior level serves as a base for the next level’s evaluation. Thus, each successive level represents a more precise measure of the effectiveness of the training program. But at the same time requires a more rigorous and time consuming analysis. LEVEL 1 EVALUATION – REACTIONS Just as the word implies, evaluation at this level measures how participants on a training program react to it. It attempts to answer questions regarding the participant’s perceptions – Did they like it? Was the material relevant to their work? According to Kirkpatrick, every program should at least be evaluated at this level to provide for the improvement of the training program. In addition, the participant’s reactions have important consequences for learning (level two). Although a positive reaction does not guarantee learning, a negative reaction almost certainly reduces its possibility

LEVEL 2 EVALUATION – LEARNING Assessing at this level moves the evolution beyond learner satisfaction and attempts to assess the extent students have advanced in skills, knowledge, or attitude. Measurement at this level is more difficult and arborous than level one. Methods range from formal to informal testing to team assessment and selfassessment. If possible, participants take the test or assessment before the training (pretest) and after training (post test) to determine the amount of learning that has occurred.

LEVEL 3 EVALUATIONS – TRANSFER This level measures the transfer that has occurred in learner’s behavior due to the training program. Evaluating at this level attempts to answer the question – Are the newly acquired skills, knowledge, or attitude being used in the everyday environment of the learner? For many trainers this level represents the truest assessment of a program’s effectiveness. However, measuring at this level is difficult as it often impossible to predict when the change in behavioral will occur, and thus requires important decisions in terms of when to evaluate, how often to evaluate, and how to evaluate. LEVEL 4 EVALUATIONS – RESULTS Frequently thought of as the bottom line, this level measures the success of the program in terms that managers and executives can understand increased production, improved quality, decreased costs, reduced frequency of accidents, increased sales, and even higher profits or return on investment. From a business and organizational perspective, this is the overall reason for a training program yet level four results are not typically addressed. Determining results in financial terms is difficult to measure, and is hard to link directly with training.

TRAINING NEED ANALYSIS(TNA) An analysis of training need is an essential requirement to the design of effective training. The purpose of training need analysis is to determine whether there is a gap between what is required for effective performance and present level of performance.

Why training need analysis?

Training need analysis is conducted to determine whether resources required are available or not. It helps to plan the budget of the company, areas where training is required, and also highlights the occasions where training might not be appropriate but requires alternate action. TYPES OF NEEDS ANALYSES Many needs assessments are available for use in different employment contexts. Sources that can help you determine which needs analysis is appropriate for your situation are described below. •

Context Analysis. An analysis of the business needs or other reasons the training is desired. The important questions being answered by this analysis are who decided that training should be conducted, why a training program is seen as the recommended solution to a business problem, what the history of the organization has been with regard to employee training and other management interventions.

User Analysis. Analysis dealing with potential participants and instructors involved in the process. The important questions being answered by this analysis are who will receive the training and their level of existing knowledge on the subject, what their learning style is, and who will conduct the training.

Work analysis. Analysis of the tasks being performed. This is an analysis of the job and the requirements for performing the work. Also known as a task analysis or job analysis, this analysis seeks to specify the main duties and skill level required. This helps ensure that the training which is developed will include relevant links to the content of the job.

Content Analysis. Analysis of documents, laws, procedures used on the job. This analysis answers questions about what knowledge or information is used on this job. This information comes from manuals,

documents, or regulations. It is important that the content of the training does not conflict or contradict job requirements. An experienced worker can assist (as a subject matter expert) in determining the appropriate content. •

Training Suitability Analysis. Analysis of whether training is the desired solution. Training is one of several solutions to employment problems. However, it may not always be the best solution. It is important to determine if training will be effective in its usage.

•

Cost-Benefit Analysis. Analysis of the return on investment (ROI) of training. Effective training results in a return of value to the organization that is greater than the initial investment to produce or administer the training.

TRAINING NEED ANALYSIS ARISES THREE LEVELS

Corporate need and training need are interdependent because the organization performance ultimately depends on the performance of its individual employee and its subgroup.

Organizational Level – Training need analysis at organizational level focuses on strategic planning, business need, and goals. It starts with the assessment of internal environment of the organization such as, procedures, structures, policies, strengths, and weaknesses and external environment such as opportunities and threats. After doing the SWOT analysis, weaknesses can be dealt with the training interventions, while strengths can further be strengthened with continued training. Threats can be reduced by identifying the areas where training is required. And, opportunities can be exploited by balancing it against costs. For this approach to be successful, the HR department of the company requires to be involved in strategic planning. In this planning, HR develops strategies to be sure that the employees in the organization have the required Knowledge, Skills, and Attributes (KSAs) based on the future KSAs requirements at each level.

Individual Level – Training need analysis at individual level focuses on each and every individual in the organization. At this level, the organization checks whether an employee is performing at desired level or the performance is below expectation. If the difference between the expected performance and actual performance comes out to be positive, then certainly there is a need of training. However, individual competence can also be linked to individual need. The methods that are used to analyze the individual need are: • Appraisal and performance review

• Peer appraisal • Competency assessments • Subordinate appraisal • Client feedback • Customer feedback • Self-assessment or self-appraisal

Operational Level – Training Need analysis at operational level focuses on the work that is being assigned to the employees. The job analyst gathers the information on whether the job is clearly understood by an employee or not. He gathers this information through technical interview, observation, psychological test; questionnaires asking the closed ended as well as open ended questions, etc. Today, jobs are dynamic and keep changing over the time. Employees need to prepare for these changes.

CHAPTER - 5

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

INTRODUCTION Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem is to how research is done scientifically.

It consists of the

different steps that are generally adopted by the researcher to the study his research problem along with logic behind them. It is necessary to the researcher to develop certain tests.

5.1 RESEARCH DESIGN Research design is a plan to answer whom, when, where, and how the subject under investigation conceived so as to obtain answers to research questions.

Here in order to meet the research objectives Descriptive

research design is used.

DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH It is undertaken when the researcher wants to know the characteristics of certain friars such as age, educational level, income, occupation etc. The study, which is carried out, is descriptive in nature, because the researcher is done after an analysis of the problem and the survey, which is followed in order to collect primary data. 5.2 DATA COLLECTION METHOD • Primary data • Secondary data PRIMARY DATA 

The primary data are those which are collected afresh and for the first time, and thus happen to be original in character.

 Primary data was collected by the method of survey by using questionnaire. SECONDARY DATA

 Secondary data, on the other hand, is those which have already been collected by someone else and which already been passed through the statistical process.  Secondary data pertaining to this study was obtained from company documents, brouchers, departmental information’s etc.

5.3 RESEARCH INSTRUMENT Questionnaire: In this method, a questionnaire is sent to the concerned persons with the request to answer the questions and return the questionnaire. A questionnaire consists of number of questions printed or typed in a definite order on a form. In the research closed ended questions were used.

5.4 SAMPLING DESIGN SAMPLING Sampling is the process of selecting a sufficient number of elements from the population, so that a study of sample and an understanding of its properties or characteristics would make it possible for us to generalize such properties or characteristics to the population elements.

SAMPLING SIZE The total numbers of respondents are termed as sample size. The sample size for this analysis is 202 respondents.

SAMPLING UNIT Sampling unit is that of “who is to be surveyed”. The survey is on Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Private Ltd. SAMPLING PROCEDURE: Sampling procedure is about “how respondents should be chosen” Census Method (Cover all workers) was chosen. PERIOD OF STUDY: The research is carried out for 100 days between 02.01.08 to 08.04.08

SAMPLING AREA: “Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Private Limited”, Madura-Nemam Village, Poonamallee Taluk, Thiruvellore Dist.,

5.5 ANALYSIS TOOLS The information gathered is analyzed by using the following appropriate tools such as:

PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS: Percentage refers to a special kind of ratio. Percentage is used in making comparison between two or more serious of data. Percentage Method is used to describe relationship. Formula: No. of respondents Percentage (%) = _________________________

X 100

Total respondents Bar charts, Pie charts, Cone charts are used to explain the tabulation clearly. CHI-SQUARE TEST: The objective of chi-square is to determine whether the real or significant difference exists among the various groups. Chi-square test involves comparison of observed frequency (Oi) and the expected frequency (Ei) The Null Hypothesis is rejected if the computed value is greater than the tabulated value. The Null Hypothesis is accepted if the computed value is less than the tabulated value.

Formula:

X2 = ∑ (Oi - Ei)2/ Ei Where, Oi = Observed frequency Ei = Expected frequency Expected frequency is calculated using this formula. Ei = RT x CT RT = Row total for the containing cell CT = Column total for the containing cell N = Total number of observations

WEIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD:

XW =

Σ Wi Xi Σ Xi

ΣWi = Add the reverse order rank.

COEFFICIENT CORRELATION: Correlation is a statistical tool which the studies the relationships between two variables, and correlation involves methods and techniques used for studying and measuring the extent of the relationship between two variables. It is a statistical procedure by which we can determine the degree of association or relationship between two or more variables. Correlation may be defined as a tendency towards interrelation variation and the coefficient of correlation is a measure of such tendency. i.e the degree to which the two variables are interrelated is measured by a coefficient which is called coefficient correlation, it gives degree of correlation. Check whether there is a correlation between Department and present training module satisfaction level & Age and present training module satisfaction level.

n ΣXY - ΣX ΣY r = ________________________ √n ΣX2-(ΣX)2 √n ΣY2-(ΣY)2

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

CHAPTER – 6 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

AGE TABLE- 6.1.1

No of S.no Particulars respondents 1 25&below 11 2 26-30 41 3 31-35 69 4 36&above 81 TOTAL 202 CHART-6.2.1

% Of respondents 6% 20% 34% 40% 100%

AGE 6% 20% 40%

25&below 26-30 31-35 36&above

34%

INFERENCE In this survey 40% and 34% of the respondents are 31-35 and 36& above age group.

DEPARTMENT TABLE-6.1.2 S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Particulars Production Quality Maintenance Supply chain Stores Shipping Logistic TOTAL

No of respondents 64 46 38 14 10 21 9 202

% of respondents 32% 23% 19% 7% 5% 10% 4% 100%

CHART-6.2.2

PERCENTAGE

DEPARTMENT 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

32% 23% 19%

7%

10% 5%

4%

ic st gi Lo g n pi ip Sh es o r hain St c ly pp ce Su na n e nt ai M lity ua on Q ti uc od Pr

DEPARTMENTS

INFERENCE: In this 32% of the respondents are production department and 23% of the respondents are quality department.

EDUCATION QUALIFICATION TABLE-6.1.3 S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6

Particulars Below SSLC SSLC/HSC ITI Diploma Graduation Post

No of respondents 29 34 38 25 49 27

% Of respondents 14% 17% 19% 12% 24% 14%

graduation TOTAL

202

100%

CHART-6.2.3

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

14%

Below SSLC

14%

SSLC/HSC

17%

ITI Diploma

24%

Graduation 19%

12%

Post graduation

INFERENCE: The 24% and 19% of the respondents are graduation and ITI.

TOTAL EXPERIENCE TABLE-6.1.4 S.no 1 2 3 4

Particulars 0-3 Years 4-6 Years 7-9 Years Above 9 Years TOTAL

No of respondents 15 26 24 137 202 CHART-6.2.4

% Of respondents 7% 13% 12% 68% 100%

TOTAL EXPERIENCE 80% 68%

70% PERCENTAGE

60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10%

13%

12%

4-6 Years

7-9 Years

7%

0% 0-3 Years

Above 9 Years

YEARS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 68% of the respondents are above 9 years total experience they have.

COCO-COLA EXPERIENCE TABLE-6.1.5 S.no 1 2 3 4

Particulars 0-3 Years 4-6 Years 7-9 Years Above 9 Years TOTAL

No of respondents 32 33 40 97 202 CHART-6.2.5

% Of respondents 15% 16% 20% 49% 100%

COCA-COLA EXPERIENCE 60% 49%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40% 30% 20%

20% 15%

16%

0-3 Years

4-6 Years

10% 0% 7-9 Years

Above 9 Years

YEARS

INFERENCE: The survey shows that 49% of the respondents are above 9 years experience in coca-cola.

UNDER GONE TRAINING PROGRAMME TABLE-6.1.6

S.no Particulars 1 Yes 2 No TOTAL

No of respondents 202 0 202 CHART-6.2.6

% Of respondents 100% 0% 100%

UNDER GONE THE TRAINING PROGRAMME 0%

Yes No

100%

INFERENCE: The survey show that 100% of the respondents are under gone the training programme.

TRAINING PROGRAMME IMPORTANT A) TO DEVELOP SKILLS TABLE-6.1.7 (i) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Factors Strongly agree Agree Strongly disagree Disagree Neither agree or disagree TOTAL

No of respondents 136 58 5 1

% Of respondents 67% 29% 2.5% 0.5%

2 202

1% 100%

CHART-6.2.7 (i)

DEVELOP SKILL 70%

67%

PERCENTAGE

60% 50% 40%

29%

30% 20%

2.50%

10% 0%

Strongly agree

Agree

0.50%

1%

Strongly Disagree Neither disagree agree or disagree FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 67% percentage of the respondents is strongly agree to develop the skills.

B) IMPROVE KNOWLEDGE TABLE-6.1.7 (ii) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Factors Strongly agree Agree Strongly disagree Disagree Neither agree or disagree TOTAL

No of respondents 74 115 4 2

% Of respondents 37% 57% 2% 1%

7 202

3% 100%

CHART-6.2.7 (ii)

IMPROVE KNOWLEDGE 57%

PERCENTAGE

60% 50%

37%

40% 30% 20% 2%

10% 0%

Strongly agree

Agree

1%

3%

Strongly Disagree Neither disagree agree or disagree FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 57% percentage of the respondents is agree to develop the knowledge.

C) DEVELOPE INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP TABLE-6.1.7 (iii) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Factors Strongly agree Agree Strongly disagree Disagree Neither agree or disagree TOTAL

No of respondents 69 95 15 6

% Of respondents 34% 47% 7% 3%

17 202

9% 100%

CHART-6.2.7 (iii)

PERCENTAGE

DEVELOP INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

47% 34%

7%

3%

9%

Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Neither agree disagree agree or disagree FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 47% percentage of the respondents is agree to develop the interpersonal relationship.

D) IMPROVE ATTITUDE TABLE-6.1.7 (iv) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Strongly agree Agree Strongly disagree Disagree Neither agree or disagree TOTAL

No of respondents 74 94 14 4 16 202

CHART-6.2.7 (iv)

% Of respondents 37% 46% 7% 2% 8% 100%

PERCENTAGE

IMPROVE ATTITUDE 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

46% 37%

7%

Strongly agree

Agree

2%

8%

Strongly Disagree Neither disagree agree or disagree FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 46% percentage of the respondents is agree to develop the attitude.

HOW FREQUENTLY TRAINING PROGRAMMES ARE CONDUCTED TABLE-6.1.8 S.no 1 2 3 4

Particulars Monthly Quarterly Half yearly Yearly TOTAL

No of respondents 16 75 75 36 202 CHART-6.2.8

% Of respondents 8% 37% 37% 18% 100%

FREQUENTLY TRAINING PROGRAMMES ARE CONDUCTED

18%

8%

Monthly Quarterly 37%

Half yearly Yearly

37%

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 37% percentage of the respondents said quarterly and half yearly training programmes are conducted.

WHAT ARE THE TRAINING PROGRAMMES ADOPTED TABLE-6.1.9

S.no Particulars On-the-job 1 training Classroom 2 training 3 Both TOTAL

No of respondents

% Of respondents

58

29%

32 112 202

16% 55% 100%

CHART-6.2.9

TRAINING PROGRAMMES ADOPTED 60%

55%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40% 30%

29%

20%

16%

10% 0% On-the-job training

classroom training

Both

TRAINING METHODS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 55% percentage of the respondents said both the On-the-job training and class room training adopted in the HCCBPL.

TRAINING MODULE SATISFACTION TABLE-6.1.10

S.no Particulars 1 Yes 2 No TOTAL

No of respondents 185 17 202 CHART-6.2.10

% Of respondents 92% 8% 100%

TRAINING MODULE SATISFACTION

8% Yes No

92%

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 92% percentage of the respondents are satisfied in the present training module.

A) IF‘YES’ IMPROVED YOUR i) SKILLS TABLE-6.1.11 (i) S.no 1 2 3

Particulars Great extent Some extent Never TOTAL

No of respondents 111 72 2 185

% Of respondents 60% 39% 1% 100%

CHART-6.2.11 (i)

SKILLS 70% 60%

PERCENTAGE

60% 50%

39%

40% 30% 20% 10%

1%

0% Great extent

Some extent

Never

FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 60% percentage of the respondents is great extent to develop the skills.

ii) KNOWLEDGE TABLE-6.1.11 (ii)

S.no 1 2 3

Particulars Great extent Some extent Never TOTAL

No of respondents 111 74 0 185 CHART-6.2.11 (ii)

% Of respondents 60% 40% 0% 100%

KNOWLEDGE 70% 60%

PERCENTAGE

60% 50%

40%

40% 30% 20% 10%

0%

0% Great extent

Some extent

Never

FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 60% percentage of the respondents is great extent to develop the knowledge.

iii)

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP TABLE-6.1.11 (iii)

S.no 1 2 3

Particulars Great extent Some extent Never TOTAL

No of respondents 83 96 6 185 CHART-6.2.11 (iii)

% Of respondents 45% 52% 6% 100%

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP 60%

52%

PERCENTAGE

50%

45%

40% 30% 20% 6%

10% 0% Great extent

Some extent

Never

FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 52% percentage of the respondents is some extent to develop the interpersonal relationship.

iv) ATTITUDE TABLE-6.1.11 (iv) S.no 1 2 3

Particulars Great extent Some extent Never TOTAL

No of respondents 93 90 2 185

FIGURE-6.2.11 (iv)

% Of respondents 50% 49% 1% 100%

ATTITUDE 60% PERCENTAGE

50%

50%

49%

40% 30% 20% 10%

1%

0% Great extent

Some extent

Never

FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 50%&49% of the respondents is great extent and some extent to develop the attitude.

a) HANDLING DAY TO DAY ACTIVITIES TABLE- 6.1.12 S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Strongly agree Agree Strongly disagree Disagree Neither agree nor disagree TOTAL

No of respondents 63 94 3 2 23 185

% Of respondents 34% 51% 2% 1% 12% 100%

CHART-6.2.12

HANDLING DAY TO DAY ACTIVITIES 60%

51%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40%

34%

30% 20%

12% 2%

10%

1%

0% Strongly agree

Agree

Strongly Disagree Neither disagree agree nor disagree

FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 51% percentage of the respondents

are agree to handling day to day work effectively after attending the training programme..

REASON FOR DISSATISFACTION TABLE-6.1.13

S.no Particulars Trainers are not 1 satisfied No on-the-job 2 training 3 Language barrier TOTAL

No of respondents

% Of respondents

6

35%

11 0 17

65% 0% 100%

CHART-6.2.13 REASON FOR DISSATISFACTION 70%

65%

PERCENTAGE

60% 50% 40% 30%

35%

20% 10% 0% Trainers are not satisfied

No on-the-job training

0% Language barrier

FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this reason for dissatisfaction total 17 respondents are not satisfied. In that 65% of the respondents are no on-the-job training.

PLACE PREFERE FOR TRAINING TABLE-6.1.14

S.no Particulars 1 Training institute 2 Training workshop With in the 3 company 4 Other company TOTAL

No of respondents 60 55 56 31 202

% Of respondents 30% 27% 28% 15% 100%

CHART-6.2.14

PLACE PREFERE FOR TRAINING

15% 30% Training institute Training workshop With in the company

28%

Other company

27%

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 30% percentage of the respondents are like to prefer training institute .

NUMBER OF DAYS PREFERE FOR TRAINING TABLE-6.1.15 S.no 1 2 3 4

Particulars One day Two days Three days Four days TOTAL

No of respondents 64 71 45 22 202 CHART-6.2.15

% Of respondents 32% 35% 22% 11% 100%

NUMBER OF DAYS PREFERE FOR TRAINING

11% 32% One day

22%

Two days Three days Four days

35%

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 35% percentage of the respondents are preferring two days for training.

RATE THE FACILITIES PROVIDED DURING THE TRAINING PROGRAMME a) TRAINING MATERIAL Table-6.1.16 (i) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor

No of respondents 110 67 17 6 2

% Of respondents 55% 33% 8% 3% 1%

TOTAL

202

100%

CHART-6.2.16 (i)

TRAINING MATERIAL 60%

55%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40%

33%

30% 20% 8%

10%

3%

1%

0% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Very poor

FACTORS

INFERENCE: : In this survey shows that 55% percentage of the respondents are excellent for providing the training material during the training programme.

b) MODE OF TRAINING TABLE-6.1.16 (ii) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 44 131 22 4 1 202

% Of respondents 21.5% 65% 11% 2% 0.5% 100%

CHART-6.2.16 (ii)

MODE OF TRAINING 70.00%

65%

PERCENTAGE

60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00%

21.50%

20.00%

11%

10.00%

2%

0.50%

Poor

Very poor

0.00% Excellent

Good

Fair FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 65% percentage of the respondents is good for providing the mode of training during the training programme.

b) TRAINER TABLE-6.1.16 (iii)

S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 51 99 47 4 1 202 CHART-6.2.16 (iii)

% Of respondents 25% 49% 23.5% 2% 0.5% 100%

TRAINER 60% 49%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40% 30%

25%

23.50%

20% 10% 2%

0.50%

Poor

Very poor

0% Excellent

Good

Fair FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 49% percentage of the respondents is good for providing the trainer during the training programme.

d) TRAINING ROOM TABLE-6.1.16 (iv)

S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 57 102 39 4 0 202 CHART-6.2.16 (iv)

% Of respondents 28% 51% 19% 2% 0% 100%

TRAINING ROOM 60% 51%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40% 30%

28% 19%

20% 10%

2%

0%

0% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Very poor

FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 51% percentage of the respondents is good for providing the training room during the training programme.

e) AMBIENCE TABLE-6.1.16(v) S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 54 96 42 7 3 202 CHART-6.2.16 (v)

% Of respondents 27% 48% 21% 3% 1% 100%

AMBIENCE 60% 48%

PERCENTAGE

50% 40% 30%

27% 21%

20% 10%

3%

1%

0% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Very poor

FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 48% percentage of the respondents is good for providing the ambience during the training programme.

f) FOOD TABLE-6.1.16 (vi) S.no Particulars 1 Excellent 2 Good 3 Fair 4 Poor 5 Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 32 72 65 20 13 202

CHART-6.2.16(vi)

% Of respondents 16% 36% 32% 10% 6% 100%

FOOD 40%

36%

35%

32%

PERCENTAGE

30% 25% 20%

16%

15%

10%

10%

6%

5% 0% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Very poor

FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 36% percentage of the respondents is good for providing the food during the training programme.

EVALUATION PROCEDURE TABLE-6.1.17 S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Particulars Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 47 112 37 6 0 202

% Of respondents 23% 56% 18% 3% 0% 100%

CHART-6.2.17

EVALUATION PROCEDURE 3%

0% 23%

18%

Excellent Good Fair Poor Very poor

56%

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 56% percentage of the respondents is good for maintaining the evaluation procedure in the company.

LIKE TO GET TRAINED TABLE-6.1.18 S.no Particulars 1 Training faculty Industry 2 supervisors/managers 3 Consultants 4 Co-employees TOTAL

No of respondents 89 64 35 14 202

CHART-6.2.18

% Of respondents 44% 32% 17% 7% 100%

PERCENTAGE

LIKE TO GET TRAINED 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

44% 32% 17% 7% pl em oC

ry r pe su rs so vi

lty cu fa

s ee oy

s nt lta su on C

st du In

ng ni ai Tr

er ag an /m s

FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 44% percentage of the respondents like to get training training faculty.

RATE THE PARTICIPATION WITH COLLEAGUES/FACULTY TABLE-6.1.19 S.no Particulars 1 Excellent 2 Good 3 Fair 4 Poor 5 Very poor TOTAL

No of respondents 70 98 34 0 0 202

CHART-6.2.19

% Of respondents 34% 49% 17% 0% 0% 100%

PARTICIPATION

PERCENTAGE

49%

50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

34%

17%

0%

Excellent

Fair

0%

Very poor

FACTORS

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 49% percentage of the respondents is good for participation.

GIVEN OPPORTUNITY TO PRESENT THE PROBLEM TABLE-6.1.20 S.no Particulars 1 Yes 2 No TOTAL

No of respondents 162 40 202 CHART-6.2.20

% Of respondents 80% 20% 100%

GIVEN OPPORTUNITY TO PRESENT THE PROBLEM

20%

Yes No 80%

INFERENCE: In this survey shows that 80% percentage of the respondents are said yes to given the opportunity to present problem.

6.3-STATISTICAL TOOLS 6.3.1-CHI SQUARE ANALYSIS I. DEPARTMENT & EMPLOYEES PLACE PERFERE FOR TRAINING Place

Training

Training

With in the

Other

TOTAL

Prefer

Institute

Workshop

company

company

16 12 11

22 16 11

13 11 13

13 7 3

64 46 38

6

2

5

1

14

3 9 3 60

3 0 2 56

2 8 3 55

2 4 1 31

10 21 9 202

Department

Production Quality Maintenance Supply chain Stores Shipping Logistic TOTAL

H0: There is no significant difference between Department and Place prefer for training.

H1: There is significant difference between Department and Place prefer for training.

X2 = ∑ (Oi - Ei)2/ Ei Where, Oi = Observed frequency Ei = Expected frequency

S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6

Oi 16 22 13 13 12 16

Ei 19.01 17.74 17.43 9.82 13.66 12.75

(Oi-Ei)2 9.06 18.15 19.62 10.11 2.76 10.56

(Oi-Ei)2/Ei 0.48 1.02 1.13 1.03 0.2 0.83

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 TOTAL

11 7 11 11 13 3 6 2 5 1 3 3 2 2 9 0 8 4 3 2 3 1

12.52 7.06 11.29 10.53 10.35 5.83 4.16 3.88 3.81 2.15 2.97 2.77 2.72 1.53 6.24 5.82 5.72 3.22 2.67 2.5 2.45 1.38

2.31 0.004 0.08 0.22 7.02 8.01 3.39 3.53 1.42 1.32 0.001 0.053 0.52 0.22 7.62 33.87 5.2 0.61 0.11 0.25 0.3 0.14

0.18 0.001 0.007 0.02 0.68 1.37 0.81 0.91 0.37 0.61 0.0003 0.019 0.19 0.14 1.22 5.81 0.91 0.19 0.04 0.1 0.12 0.1 2 X =18.487

Degree of freedom = (4-1) (7-1) = (3)(6) = 18 Tabulated value @ 5% for degree of freedom 18 = 28.869 Calculated value < Tabulated value = 18.487 < 28.869 There fore, we accept H0

INFERENCE: There is no significant difference between Department and Place prefer for training.

II. DEPARTMENT AND EMPLOYEES LIKE TO GET TRAINED

Like to get Trained Department

Production Quality Maintenance Supply chain Stores

Training faculty

Industry Consultants supervisors/managers

Coemployees

TOTAL

30 18 21

19 18 10

10 6 4

5 4 3

64 46 38

3

6

5

0

14

4

4

2

0

10

Shipping Logistic TOTAL

7 6 89

7 0 64

6 2 35

1 1 14

21 9 202

H0: There is no significant difference between Departments and like to get trained.

H1: There is significant difference between Departments and like to get trained.

S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Oi 30 19 10 5 18 18 6 4

Ei 28.2 20.28 11.1 4.44 20.27 14.57 7.97 3.19

(Oi-Ei)2 3.24 1.64 1.21 0.31 5.15 11.76 3.88 0.66

(Oi-Ei)2/Ei 0.11 0.08 0.11 0.07 0.25 0.81 0.49 0.21

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 TOTAL

21 10 4 3 3 6 5 0 4 4 2 0 7 7 6 1 6 0 2 1

16.74 12.04 6.58 2.63 6.17 4.44 2.43 0.97 4.41 3.17 1.73 0.69 9.25 6.65 3.64 1.46 3.96 2.85 1.56 0.62

18.15 4.16 6.66 0.14 10.04 2.43 6.6 0.94 0.17 0.69 0.07 0.48 5.06 0.12 5.57 0.21 4.06 8.12 0.19 0.14

1.08 0.35 1.01 0.05 1.63 0.55 2.72 0.97 0.04 0.22 0.04 0.7 0.55 0.02 1.53 0.14 1.03 2.85 0.12 0.23 2 X =17.96

Degree of freedom = (4-1) (7-1) = (3)(6) = 18 Tabulated value @ 5% for degree of freedom 18 = 28.869 Calculated value < Tabulated value = 17.96 < 28.869 There fore, we accept H0

INFERENCE: There is no significant difference between Department and employees like to get trained.

6.3.2-WEIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD I-TRAINING PROGRAMME IMPORTANT Factors Particulars Skills Knowledge Interperson al relationship

Strongly agree

Agree

136 74

58 115

Neither agree nor disagree 2 7

69

95

17

Strongly disagree

Disagree

5 4

1 2

15

6

Attitude

74

94

5

16

4

Strongly agree

Agree

14

3

4

2

Neither agree nor disagree

1

Strongly Disagree disagree

Skill

136

58

2

5

1

Knowledge

74

115

7

4

2

Interpersonal Relationship

69

95

17

15

6

Attitude

74

94

14

4

XW

=

16

Σ Wi Xi Σ Xi Σ Wi = 5+4+3+2+1 = 15

Skill

Knowledge

Interpersonal Relationship

- (136*5) +(58*4)+(2*3)+(5*2)+(1*1)/15 = 680+232+6+10+1/15 = 929/15 = 61.93 - (74*5)+(115*4)+(7*3)+(4*2)+(2*1)/15 = 370+460+21+8+2/15 = 861/15 = 57.4 - (69*5)+(95*4)+(17*3)+(15*2)+(6*1)/15 = 345+380+51+30+6/15 = 812/15

I

II

Attitude

= 54.13

IV

- (74*5)+(94*4)+(16*3)+(14*2)+(4*1)/15 = 370+376+48+28+4/15 = 826/15 = 55.07

III

CONCLUSION:

In this important for training while using the weighted average method they are giving the important to Skill – I and Knowledge –II weight they had given.

II- EMPLOYEES ARE IMPROVED Factors Particulars Skills

Great extent

Some extent

Never

111

72

2

Knowledge

111

74

0

Interperson al relationship

83

96

6

Attitude

93

90

2

3 Great extent

2 Some extent

1 Never

Skill

111

72

2

Knowledge

111

74

0

Interpersonal Relationship

83

96

6

Attitude

93

90

2

XW

=

Σ Wi Xi Σ Xi Σ Wi = 3+2+1 =6

Skill

Knowledge

Interpersonal Relationship

- (111*3) +(72*2)+(2*1)/6 = 333+144+2/6 = 479/6 = 79.83 - (111*3)+(74*2)+(0*1)/6 = 333+148+0/6 = 481/6 = 80.17 - (83*3)+(96*2)+(6*1)/6

II

I

Attitude

= 249+192+6/6 = 447/6 = 74.5

IV

- (93*3)+(90*2)+(2*1)/6 = 279+180+2/6 = 461/6 = 76.83

III

CONCLUSION:

In this method employee’s what they improved while using the weighted average method they are giving the important to Knowledge –I and Skill – II weight they had given.

III-FACILITIES PROVIDING DURING THE TRAINING PROGRAMME Factors Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Very poor

110

67

17

6

2

Particulars Training material

Mode of training

44

131

22

4

1

Trainer

51

99

47

4

1

Training room

57

102

39

4

0

Ambience

54

96

42

7

3

Food

32

72

65

20

13

5

4

Excellent

3

2

Good

Fair

Poor

67

17

6

1 Very poor

Training material

110

2

Mode of training

44

131

22

4

1

Trainer

51

99

47

4

1

Training room

57

102

39

4

0

Ambience

54

96

42

7

3

Food

32

72

65

20

13

XW

=

Σ Wi Xi Σ Xi Σ Wi = 5+4+3+2+1 = 15

Training material

- (110*5) +(67*4)+(17*3)+(6*2)+(2*1)/15 = 550+268+51+12+2/15 = 883/15 = 58.87

I

Mode of training

Trainer

Training room

Ambience

Food

- (44*5)+(131*4)+(22*3)+(4*2)+(1*1)/15 = 220+524+66+8+1/15 = 819/15 = 54.6 - (51*5)+(99*4)+(47*3)+(4*2)+(1*1)/15 = 255+396+141+8+1/15 = 801/15 = 53.4

II

IV

- (57*5)+(102*4)+(39*3)+(4*2)+(0*1)/15 = 285+408+117+8+0/15 = 818/15 = 54.53

III

- (54*5)+(96*4)+(42*3)+(7*2)+(3*1)/15 = 270+384+126+14+3/15 = 797/15 = 53.13

V

- (32*5)+(72*4)+(65*3)+(20*2)+(13*1)/15 = 160+288+195+40+13/15 = 696/15 = 46.4

VI

CONCLUSION:

In this Facilities providing during the training programme while using the weighted average method they are giving the importance to Training material â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I and Mode of training â&#x20AC;&#x201C;II weight they had given.

6.3.3- CO-EFFICIENT CORRELATION Correlation is a statistical tool which the studies the relationships between two variables, and correlation involves methods and techniques used for studying and measuring the extent of the relationship between two variables. It is a statistical procedure by which we can determine the degree of association or relationship between two or more variables.

Correlation may be defined as a tendency towards interrelation variation and the coefficient of correlation is a measure of such tendency. i.e the degree to which the two variables are interrelated is measured by a coefficient which is called coefficient correlation, it gives degree of correlation. Check whether there is a correlation between Department and present training module satisfaction level & Age and present training module satisfaction level.

I-DEPARTMENT AND TRAINING MODULE SATISFACTION

Training module satisfaction

YES

NO

TOTAL

60

4

64

Department

Production

Quality Maintenance Supply chain Stores Shipping Logistic TOTAL

39 35 14 7 21 9 185

7 3 0 3 0 0 17

46 38 14 10 21 9 202

P

Q

M

S.C

ST

SH

LOG

YES(X) :

60

39

35

14

7

21

9

NO(Y)

4

7

3

0

3

0

0

:

n = 7 X=185 Y=17 n ΣXY - ΣX ΣY r = ________________________ √n ΣX2-(ΣX)2 √n ΣY2-(ΣY)2

X 60 39 35 14 7 21 9 ΣX=185

Y 4 7 3 0 3 0 0 ΣY=17

XY 240 273 105 0 21 0 0 ΣXY=639

X2 3600 1521 1225 196 49 441 81 ΣX2=7113

7*639 - 185*17 r = _________________________ √7*7113-(185)2 √7*83-(17)2 4473 - 3145 r = _______________________ √49791-34225 √581-289

Y2 16 49 9 0 9 0 0 ΣY2=83

1328 r = ______________ √15566 √292 1328 r = ______________ 124.76 * 17.09 1328 r = ____________ 2132.15 r = 0.623

INTERPRETATION: There is positive correlation between departments and present training module satisfaction level.

II- AGE GROUP AND TRAINING MODULE SATISFACTION

Training module satisfaction Age group 25 & below 26 - 30

YES

NO

TOTAL

11 38

0 3

11 41

31 - 35 36 & above TOTAL

61 75 185

25&below YES(X) : NO(Y)

:

8 6 17

69 81 202

26 – 30

31 – 35

36&above

11

38

61

75

0

3

8

6

n = 14

X = 185

Y = 17

n ΣXY - ΣX ΣY r = ________________________ √n ΣX2-(ΣX)2 √n ΣY2-(ΣY)2 X 11 38 61 75 ΣX=185

Y 0 3 8 6 ΣY=17

XY 0 114 488 450 ΣXY=1052

X2 121 1444 3721 5625 ΣX2=10911

4*1052 - 185*17 r = _________________________ √4*10911-(185)2 √4*109-(17)2 4208 - 3145 r = _______________________ √43644-34225 √436-289

Y2 0 9 64 36 ΣY2=109

1068 r = ______________ √9419 √147 1068 r = ______________ 97.05*12.12 1068 r = ____________ 1176.25 r = 0.908

INTERPRETATION: There is positive correlation between Age group and present training module satisfaction level.

FINDINGS

GENERAL FINDINGS:

SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION

APPENDIX

QUESTIONNAIRE

“A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE'S PERCEPTION TOWARDS TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

AT

HINDUSTAN

COCA-COLA

BEVERAGES

PRIVATE

LIMITED” Sir / madam: I am MADANAPALEM RAJESH, doing II year MBA in Jaya Engineering College. As a part of my curriculum I am doing my project on “Employee Perception on Training and Development” in your organization. I request you to kindly extend your earnest co-operation in filling up the enclosed questionnaire. The information provided by you will be kept strictly confidential and will be used for academic purpose only. Thank you, With regards, MADANAPALEM RAJESH

QUESTIONNAIRE Section - I Name

:

Age

: 25 & Below 31-35

[

]

26-30

[

]

[

]

36& Above

[

]

Designation

:

Department

: Production

[

]

Quality

Finance

[

]

HR

[

]

Maintenance

[

]

Supply Chain

[

]

Stores

[

]

Shipping

[

]

IS

[

]

Logistic

[

]

: Below SSLC

[

]

SSLC / HSC

[

]

ITI

[

]

Diploma

[

]

Graduation

[

]

Post graduation

[

]

: 0-3 years

[

]

4-6 years

[

]

7-9 years

[

]

above 9 years

[

]

Experience

: 0-3 years

[

]

4-6 years

[

]

at Coca-Cola

7-9 years

[

]

above 9 years

[

]

Edu.Qualification

Total Experience

____________________________________ [

]

Section - II 1. Have you under gone training programmes in your organization? Yes

[

]

No

[

]

2. If â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Yesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; how many training programmes have you attended in the last 12 months? ______________________________________ 3. Why do you consider training programmes are important?

I- Strongly agree II - Agree V-Neither agree nor disagree FACTORS To develop your skills To improve your knowledge

III - Strongly disagree

I

II

IV- Disagree

III

IV

V

To develop your interpersonal relationship To improve your attitude 4. How frequently are the training programmes conducted? Monthly once

[

]

Quarterly once

[

]

Half yearly once

[

]

Yearly once

[

]

5. What are the training methods adopted by your organization? On-the-job training

[

]

Class room training

[

]

Both

[

]

Other (please specify) ____________

6. Are you satisfied with the training module? Yes

[

]

No

[

]

7. If â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Yesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; training improved your I- To great extent FACTORS Skills Knowledge Interpersonal relationship Attitude

II- To some extent I

III- Never II

III

8. I am confident in handling my day to day activities effectively after the training programme? Strongly agree

[

]

Agree

[

]

Strongly disagree

[

]

Disagree

[

]

Neither agree nor disagree

[

]

9. If â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Noâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the reasons for your dissatisfaction? Trainers are not specialized [

]

No on-the-job training

Language barrier

]

Other (Please specify) ___________

[

[

]

10. Which place do you prefer for training? Training institute

[

]

Training Work shop

[

]

With in the company [

]

Other company

[

]

Other (please specify)_________________________________ 11. No. of days preferred for a training programme? One day

[

]

Two days

[

]

Three days

[

]

Four days

[

]

12. How do you like to rate the facilities provided during the training programme? I- Excellent

II- Good

FACILITIES Training material Mode of training Trainer Training room Ambience Food

III- Fair I

IV- Poor II

V- Very Poor III

IV

V

13. What do you feel about the evaluation procedure followed by the company in the training programme? Excellent

[

]

Good

[

]

Fair

[

]

Poor

[

]

Very poor

[

]

14. From whom would you like to get trained? Training faculty

[

]

Industry supervisors / Managers

[

]

Consultants

[

]

Co-employees

[

]

Other (Please specify) ___________________________________ 15. How do you rate your participation with your colleagues / Faculty during the training programme? Excellent

[

]

Good

[

]

Fair

[

]

Poor

[

]

Very poor

[

]

16. Are you given an opportunity to present the problem before your trainer? Yes

[

]

No

[

]

17. Suggestions ……………………………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………

THANK YOU

TAMIL QUESTIONNAIRE

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[

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II

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] tFg;giw gapw;rp

[

] ,uz;Lk;

[

] kw;wit _____________

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[

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kw;wit ,Ug;gpd; Fwpg;gpLf _______________________________

10.

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11.

12.

[

] gapw;rpf; Tlk; (Training institute)

[

] gapw;rpj; bjhHpw; Tlk; (Training Work shop)

[

] epWtdj;Jld; (With in the company)

[

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[

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[

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I

II

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 P.N Arora & S.Arora

“Stastistical For Management”

 Uma Sekaran

“Research Methods For Business”

 Dr.Subba rao.P 2007, ‘human resource management’ himalaya publishers  The ICFAI Journal of Organizational Behavior “Training and development practices: A study in Indian Public Sector Banks” Volume 4,No.1

WEBSITES:  www.citehr.com  www.google.com


A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE’S PERCEPTION TOWARDS TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT AT HINDUSTAN COCA-COLA BEVERAGES