Issuu on Google+

Sail Scotland

Š Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

key to marina plans

D

bar rubbish bins boat hoist bus stop cash machine chandlery cinema crane customs diesel (cans) diesel pump disabled facilities electrician ferry first aid point fuel (cans) fuel pump gas hotel ice immigration internet landing point laundry marina office marine engineer marine help point mechanic

www.sailscotland.co.uk

P

V

news agent car par petrol (cans) petrol pump pharmacy public phone post office provisions pub pump out point rail station recycling point restaurant rigger sailmaker shore power showers public slipway trolleys visitors mooring visitors berths water toilets weather bureau WiFi yacht club boat yard

credits DENNIS HARDLEY is a professional landscape photographer who has been capturing dramatic images of Scotland and the UK for well over 30 years. With a library of some 25,000 images his work continues to be published worldwide on calendars, books, postcards, CD covers etc. Dennis also has 8 books published featuring his work. With thousands of published images to his name Dennis, along with his son Tony, continue to capture the UK Frame by Frame. Dennis has recently launched his new website www.ineedanimage.com which offers viewers both Royalty Free or Rights Managed image downloads. You can contact Dennis on 01631 720 434 or e-mail: dennis.hardley@btinternet.com

MARC TURNER is a professional photographer and sailor who combined his passions over the past decade to provide stunning imagery of the sport of sailing. While working predominantly within the media as a photojournalist where he has covered a wide variety of news and sports events, he continues to be involved in the sport of sailing through the Clyde Cruising Club, the Scottish Sailing Institute and RYA Scotland. Marc and his father Harry Turner have maintained a substantial archive of racing yachts predominantly on the Clyde. An online search facility and galleries of some major events, offers prints and products as well as Rights Managed and Personal Use Downloads. This is available at: www.pfmpictures.co.uk You can contact Marc Turner on 07798646194 or email: marc@pfmpictures.co.uk

SCOTTISH VIEWPOINT is the official photograhic library of Visit Scotland, the Scottish national tourist agency. Further images can be viewed at www.scottishviewpoint.com

An electronic copy of this brochure can be downloaded at www.sailscotland.co.uk where you can also find further details of events and new developments throughout the season. Front Cover: Piper at Tarbert, Loch Fyne Š Marc Turner. Produced in Scotland by Page Plan & Print, East Kilbride. Tel: 01355 279077 All marina plans have been provided by SailingAlmanac.com they are indicative only, and not to be used for naviagtion

welcome

WE INVITE YOU TO SAIL SCOTLAND, and fall in love with our awe inspiring scenery, fascinating history and friendly people as you explore some of the finest cruising grounds in the world. Scotland offers a wonderful variety of land and seascapes which combine to make a truly unforgettable sailing experience. Ancient kings were crowned in castles that can still be visited today, and you will be amazed by this wildlifelovers paradise with a variety of species from bottlenose dolphins and minke whales to otters and sea eagles, as you sample the country’s natural larder from fresh seafood to whisky from world-class distilleries. With a magnificent coastline of lochs, mountains, islands and beaches, all joined by a clear and uncrowded sea, our waters offer both sheltered sailing and challenging adventures, catering for every mood and experience. To coin a phrase, there is something for everyone: sailing holidays, bareboat and skippered charters, sailing schools, vibrant marinas and harbours, bustling towns, idyllic islands and so much more. All that choice can make it hard to know where to start but, luckily, that’s where this guide comes in. It has been designed to make your planning as easy as possible. Flicking through these pages you will not only be introduced to Scotland’s sailing waters; you will also find stories and views from our visitors and businesses. As if all that wasn’t enough, you will find contact details for a whole host of sailing holiday companies, charters and sailing schools, marinas, harbours and more. Not to mention plenty of ideas to help you get the best possible experience of Scotland – both on and off the water. We look forward to welcoming you for the first time or one of many times. Enjoy every minute as you Sail Scotland in 2014.

Daniel Steel Chief Executive

Sail Scotland

sailing holidays

4

charter and sailing schools

14

firth of clyde

26

argyll and the islands

38

skye and the north west

46

shetland and orkney

54

east coast

58

north coast of ireland

64

scottish canals

68

summary listings

74

trade directory

80

travel information

82

/sailscotland @sailscotland

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

sailing holidays

5

RELAX AND ENJOY THE SCOTTISH SAILING EXPERIENCE The Moray Firth, Highlands © Scottish Viewpoint. whilst a full time professional skipper takes care of the boat and more besides! For those who want to have a holiday afloat, but do not necessarily want the responsibility of chartering or skippering a or West Highland Yachting Week, whilst the option may also exist to boat themselves, one of the many companies offering comprehensive undertake a one-way passage on a few of the boats as they cruise to Sailing Holidays may provide the solution. alternative locations during the course of the season. The skipper is usually the owner of the boat and will often spend the whole of the season afloat taking people on sailing holidays around the coast. Customers may book anything from a single berth to the whole boat, and need not be experienced sailors as the skipper takes responsibility for the sailing and navigation. Guests are welcome to join in as much as they wish, particularly with the washing up, although some boats also have full time crew who will take care of this as well. These holidays are usually fully catered and take place on larger vessels. Cruises may be based around a theme such as wildlife or a tour of some of the many whisky distilleries, whilst others may have a specific aim such as reaching St Kilda or climbing a particular mountain. Many of the boats have a particular ‘speciality’ such as gourmet cooking, walking, mountaineering or adventure sailing; a range of water based activities such as windsurfing, waterskiing or diving are also available on some of the larger boats. Increasingly, some of the vessels are venturing further afield to destinations such as Ireland, the Faroes or even Norway, offering the opportunity for customers to gain experience of passage sailing whilst in the safe knowledge that someone else is in charge. Individual boats may offer guests the opportunity to take part in organised events such as the Malts Cruise, Scottish Islands Peak Race

Sailing holidays are available for different durations, ranging from a short day sail to multi-week trips. The duration offered will often be related to the area in which the boat operates - holidays of a shorter duration are more likely to be available in the Firth of Clyde and closer to the larger settlements where transport links are better, whilst further afield the duration is usually of a week or more. There is also an increasing availability of boats offering Corporate events, be it a day sail or even a long weekend. Most of the skippers will provide informal tuition for those who wish to learn, and some boats are also accredited RYA Training Centres offering a range of theory and practical courses. There is a wide range of boats on offer for these holidays, together with packages for different budgets. The variety of boats also means that visitors can return year after year and have a different sailing experience each time. The available boats include purpose built steel ketches, modern fibreglass sloops and catamarans and wooden classics. Accommodation and levels of comfort also vary from private cabins with en-suite facilities to more communal living. Whether old or new, wooden, plastic or steel, the boats are all fully equipped to ensure that you enjoy your holiday as much as possible whilst taking in the magnificent Scottish scenery and hospitality.

Looking over to North Harris from Scarp © Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd

Grid Reference: 1,2,3,4,6

Enjoy a warm welcome and traditional Scottish hospitality onboard an Oyster 68. Comfortable accommodation in 4 private twin en-suite guest cabins and a spacious deck saloon. Explore the Scottish islands, visiting remote wilderness anchorages, white sandy beaches, ancient castles or an island distillery. Relaxed atmosphere with delicious, fresh local produce. Exhilarating sailing, spectacular scenery and exciting wildlife. Book the whole boat, a cabin or an individual berth.

MOSS COTTAGE, MOSS ROAD, NORTH CONNEL, BY OBAN, ARGYLL PA37 1TX T: 01631 710444 M: 07796 130 180 admin@symoonshadow.co.uk www.symoonshadow.co.uk

Corryvreckan Cruising

Grid Reference: 2,3.

Experience the thrill of big boat sailing with Chris and Von Lindesay aboard their 65’ ketch Corryvreckan. This famous yacht was designed and built for Scottish Chartering and has proven herself over 20 successful seasons and four Atlantic crossings. Exciting sailing and wonderful scenery combine with excellent food and good company to make a very special holiday.

CORRYVRECKAN CRUISING LIMITED PO BOX 9657, OBAN PA34 4WJ T: 0845 2602677 M: 07768 146073 Corryvreckan@dunsfold.net www.corryvreckan.co.uk

New Horizon Sailing

Grid Reference: 1,2,3,4,6

For relaxed or active holidays, adventurous hands-on sailing or RYA Training, join us aboard a fully equipped, comfortable, powerful & sea kindly Oyster yacht. Individuals & groups, beginners & experts return for like-minded company, excellent cuisine, spectacular scenery & wildlife, remote anchorages and a warm welcome from your experienced skipper/ host. Our cruising area includes the Firth of Clyde, West Coast, Mull, Skye, Outer Hebrides, St. Kilda, Orkney, Shetland, the Faroe Islands and Norway.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Contact: Richard Leigh T: 07770 303613 richard@newhorizonsailing.com

www.newhorizonsailing.com

YACHT CHARTER

SAILING HOLIDAYS on the West Coast of Scotland

Sail Lizzie May

7

For the best of Sailing in Scotland, join us onboard Moonshadow of Lorne.

Share a memorable holiday exploring the Scottish Islands on board the Oyster 68 yacht Moonshadow of Lorne. Enjoy exhilarating sailing, good food, stunning scenery and genuine Scottish hospitality in comfort and style. Book the whole boat, an individual berth or a twin cabin.

YACHT CHARTER LTD

Moss Cottage, Moss Road, North Connel, by Oban, Argyll PA37 1TX, Scotland, UK Tel:+44(0)1631 710 444 (Colin Mobile) +44(0)7796 130 180 (Pauline Mobile) +44(0)7766 742 254 Mail: admin@symoonshadow.co.uk

www.symoonshadow.co.uk www.sailscotland.co.uk

cruising the outer hebrides From Barra Head to the Butt of Lewis on board the charter yacht Moonshadow of Lorne The sunlight sparkled on a deep blue sea as we slipped our lines from the pontoon at Kyle of Lochalsh. Heading north under the Skye Bridge, we were finally on our way on the first of two 10 day cruises around the Outer Hebrides.

Butt of Lewis Lighthouse © Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

With eight guests onboard, the loose plan for the first trip was to head out to the west coast of Lewis to explore Loch Roag and visit the Calanais Stones then round the Butt of Lewis and return to Kyle via Stornoway, the Summer Isles and Inverewe Gardens. After the usual welcome, introductions and safety briefing from Colin, we took the afternoon tide north, to the Isle of Rona, where we spent the night in the snug anchorage of Acarseid Mor. The following morning we rounded the top of Skye admiring the tumbling waterfalls and extraordinary rock formations at Kilt Rock and with a good breeze filling in, we were across the Minch and entering the Sound of Harris. Charts and pilot books to hand, everyone kept a good lookout for buoys, transits and soundings as we navigated our way through the northerly Leverburgh Channel. With a birthday to celebrate during this trip, clandestine meetings were already being held amongst the crew to discuss cake, decorations and presents! Out to the west of Harris, we headed north to Loch Leosavay, anchoring off the magnificent Amhuinnsuidhe Castle. The following morning we began to feel the swell of the Atlantic as larger seas rolled in from the south west. A reach up the coast took us to the north side of Scarp where lunch on deck afforded us a good view of the sea foam that was drifting in and swirling round the bay like suds in a washing machine. We romped up the coast that afternoon, arriving at Miavaig in West Loch Roag, where we were hospitably offered an overnight mooring, but the consensus was to opt instead for the seclusion of a neighbouring bay where an inviting white sandy beach had been spotted. With dinner preparations underway, hot showers were taken by some of the crew, while others went ashore to explore the dunes. Our arrival at any evening anchorage is usually

exploring Lewis, visiting, amongst other things, the Carloway Broch and iron age fort on Great Bernera. With impeccable timing, Kenny even got them to the Butt of Lewis to wave to Moonshadow as she sailed by! By late afternoon we were tied up on the pontoon in Stornoway, just in time for a spot of shopping. The ferry arrived as we were finishing dinner and provided some entertainment as we watched it disgorge its cargo of passengers. Kyle of Lochalsh © Gail Derwent.

punctuated with the ceremonial laying of Moonshadow’s creel (lobster pot). On this trip we had two pots onboard as one of our guests, a keen fisherman, had come equipped with his collapsible pot and rod. Friendly rivalry developed as depth, bait and location were constantly debated; tinned tuna did not work nearly as well as mackerel or pollock which had been left to rot in a bucket for a couple of days! Although a lobster proved elusive, numerous crabs and langoustines were caught throughout the trip, which everyone had great fun preparing and even more pleasure eating! The next morning, having motored round to East Loch Roag, the Calanais stones appeared on the skyline. Several hours were spent ashore digesting the informative displays in the Visitor Centre and wandering through the ancient and mysterious site. Somewhat at odds with these remote, mystical surroundings was a horde of Italian visitors who had arrived in force in a dozen camper vans. The next leg of the cruise was to take us round the Butt of Lewis into Stornoway. Three crew members opted to do this trip by road and engaged the services of Kenny, the friendly local taxi driver. The group spent the day

The next day (The Birthday!) dawned sunny and bright and with cake and decorations at the ready, we were all set to begin the celebrations with a sail to the Summer Isles. Arriving at the anchorage on Tanera Mor, we were greeted by the sound of bagpipes drifting across the water. The musician we later discovered, was Murray, a young piper who had wanted to welcome us to the island in time honoured fashion and how lovely it was too! The warm sunshine beckoned us all ashore to explore and a walk up Meall Mor rewarded us with breathtaking panoramic views across the Minch and over the great wildernesses of Coigach and Assynt on the mainland. With lungs full of fresh Summer Isles air, we set sail for Loch Ewe, arriving in good time to get the birthday party started. From here, we were well placed for next morning’s visit to Inverewe Gardens. Created in 1862 by Osgood Mackenzie, this 800 hectare site is warmed by the Gulf Stream and able to sustain many plants from temperate regions of the world. Arriving by sea, visitors can step ashore with ease at the Garden’s jetty. A short sail in the afternoon took us to Badachro, an excellent natural harbour lying 3 km south of Gairloch. After a coffee with old friends the next morning we set off south again to Loch Torridon. Now, I know I said that the sea had not offered up any lobsters to our creels, however a spot of bartering with a local fisherman in Shieldaig (our bucket of mackerel for a couple of his lobsters) was the next best thing. Suffice to say we dined like kings that night. Our run of settled weather was interrupted by a southerly gale on the final day of the cruise and as the pontoon at Kyle was closed to yachts, we diverted to Plockton. With friends in the area providing a taxi service, cars were relocated from Kyle to Plockton for our guests’ departure.

Barra Head Lighthouse © Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

As good weather returned, we headed back to Kyle. The usual round of laundry, cleaning

sailing holidays

and victualling ensued and oh yes, the not so small problem of clearing out a couple of very large jellyfish which had been sucked into the seawater strainers. Working out of Kyle, our only means of transport is a shopping trolley from the local supermarket, but when Colin appeared at the local petrol station with a couple of jerry cans in one, the proprietor laughed and said, “I’ve never had one of those in here before!” Quick as ever, Colin wittingly replied, “It’s got great fuel consumption, but the steering could do with some attention!” Oh, the Highland banter! Our new guests arrived to a cloudless sky, so in cheerful mood we set off to explore the east coast of the Outer Hebrides. Our first landfall was Lochmaddy, where we visited the museum and Arts Centre, a focus for life on North Uist. The following day dawned bright and sunny and our destination was Lochboisdale, the main town on South Uist. On the way south we detoured into the anchorage of Floddaymore between North Uist and Benbecula. The pilot urged caution as strong tides occur at the entrance and it was indeed a bit like shooting the rapids, however we pushed through effortlessly and emerged into a tranquil loch, spectacularly wild and beautiful. A golden eagle, perched on the skyline, surveyed us with its lofty gaze and appeared unperturbed by our presence. A hush fell as we cut the engine to watch a group of seals swim amongst the kelp, their grunts drifting across the calm waters. The day continued with another wilderness anchorage at St Peter ‘s in Loch Carnan where we had lunch on deck in blissful warmth. By late afternoon we were sailing into Lochboisdale, admiring the new breakwater which is being built as part of a major redevelopment of the bay. After a good run of downwind sailing, the wind direction the following morning meant a beat down to Barra. It was worth the

The Stones of Calanais © Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

effort and we arrived off Traigh Mor beach (home to Barra Airport), in time for lunch. The airport here is unique, being the only one in the world where scheduled flights use the beach as a runway. The afternoon saw us picking our way carefully through a shortcut between the islands and, under the watchful gaze of yet more raptors, we approached Castlebay. Anchoring off Kisimul Castle, stronghold of the MacNeils, we had made it in before the ferry. With its arrival in the early evening, carrying fresh food and supplies for the island, we knew that a spot of “late night shopping” at the village store would be possible to top on perishables. We had jokingly called this cruise “Mingulay or Bust”, as we had tried to fulfil the ambition of one of the guests onboard to land on Mingulay on previous cruises, but had been thwarted by the weather. But today we were lucky. Arriving in the bay we were greeted by a host of seals and their pups frolicking in the breakers that surged up the beach. Getting ashore from the rib was a matter of timing as the swell rose and fell beside the rocks. However, under the watchful eye of one of the seals, this was accomplished if somewhat inelegantly! An afternoon of exploration allowed us to visit the ruins of the old village, marvel at the towering western sea cliffs and to chat to the local NTS warden who showed us a photograph of the beach taken in April with every square inch covered in seals waiting

to pup. Quite a sight! Killer whales had also been seen in the area a couple of weeks ago, so we were keeping our eyes peeled. The day ended with a circumnavigation of Berneray, though we kept a good distance off Barra Head Lighthouse as the wind was now whipping up seas which crashed against the impressive cliffs. Time to head for the more sheltered waters off Vatersay, where a beautiful sunset was enjoyed that night. En-route to Eriskay the next day, several fins were spotted - not the killer whales, but basking sharks hoovering up the plankton. Tying up to alongside the local fishing fleet, we took on water from the recently extended pontoon. A walk along the beach for a drink in the Am Politician rounded off that day nicely. The pub is named after the ship which sank with its cargo of whisky and is immortalised in the film Whisky Galore. Then it was onwards to Canna. With the wind abeam and each helmsmen trying to log the highest speed, we blasted across the Sea of the Hebrides at over 10 knots. It was a misty Canna that greeted us. Undeterred, we ventured ashore to explore some of the islands attractions. These included a climb to the clifftop prison, a walk over to the offlying island of Sanday, a visit to the gardens of Canna House with its impressive escalonia tunnel and a walk through the woods to the site of an early Christian monastery and the curiously named Punishment Stone. Returning to Moonshadow via the community shop on the pier, another peaceful night was spent at anchor. Our last island before heading home was Coll, with its quintessentially Hebridean village of Arinagour where we enjoyed evening aperitifs in the pretty gardens of the bustling hotel. As we sailed out of the bay the following morning, we encountered yet more basking sharks and watched as a boatload of scientists engaged in the current shark tagging programme went about their work. After 4 weeks away we sailed back into Dunstaffnage. With goodbyes said and happy memories of our island adventures to the fore, we began preparations for the arrival of our next party of guests.

Mingulay © Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

Pauline Taylor Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd

www.sailscotland.co.uk

9

welcome aboard Have you ever wondered what life is like on a large, crewed sailing yacht with an experienced skipper and mate to take care of your safety and comfort? Join me Pauline, my husband Colin and seven guests on our 68ft yacht Moonshadow of Lorne during a 7-day cruise through the Inner Hebrides. Sailing with us are: Robin and Barbara, a Scottish couple who haven’t sailed before and want to try something new; Rick, a keen photographer and fitness enthusiast and Tom, Shirley, Drew and Diane, a group of friends from England, who sailed to St Kilda with us last year and have returned for some more “island bagging”.

already on the foredeck preparing to lift the anchor. Colin is delighted that, after only two days on the boat, they have learned the routine so quickly and in no time at all the anchor is It’s 7am, the alarm sounds and Colin rouses cleaned and stowed and we’re heading out to himself from a peaceful sleep after yesterday’s downwind passage from the Ross of Mull to our sea again. present anchorage in Canna Harbour. As the generator rumbles into life, that’s the signal that Calm days like today are ideal for whale watching, so as we skirt the shore the crew water is heating up for morning showers. keeps a lookout to seaward but, to everyone’s surprise, we hear the blow of a minke right at By 8 o’clock we are all up and tucking into our backs as it surfaces between us and the bowls of porridge topped with honey, yoghurt shore. and fresh raspberries. Over scrambled eggs and smoked salmon, Colin talks us through the By midday we’re rounding the final headland forecast which confirms that high pressure is into Loch Scresort. While the boys get the establishing itself and winds will be falling light anchor down, the girls prepare to lower the and variable – so short hops are the order of tender into the water. Under a cloudless blue the day. We settle on a plan of sailing over to sky and warm sun we opt for lunch on deck and Rum in time for the afternoon tour of Kinloch settle down to soup, wraps and a chilled rosé Castle. Then, taking advantage of the quiet conditions, we’ll spend the night in atmospheric from Moonshadow’s well-stocked wine locker. Loch Scavaig beneath the dramatic ridge of the Diane keeps her binoculars close at hand as she has spotted some of Rum’s resident population Black Cuillin on Skye. of Manx shearwaters swimming in the bay. Leaving the loading of the dishwasher in the Luck is on our side as a gentle westerly fills in capable hands of today’s “mother watch”, for the afternoon. At the press of a few buttons I head for the galley to make a pot of soup. the sails are unfurled and, as our well-primed Without any prompting, Rick and Robin are crew trim the main and jib, Julie takes the wheel and sets a course for Skye. Drew is keen to hone his navigational skills so he goes below to calculate the tidal heights for the anchorage; there’s not much water to play Eda Frandsen Sailing with in the inner basin, so his workings are checked carefully!

Join us for an unforgettable traditional sailing holiday, exploring the spectacular Outer Hebrides, Small Isles and St Kilda. Hands-on sailing adventures for singles, couples or groups of up to 8 with no experience required. Contact James and Becky. EDA FRANDSEN SAILING T: 01326 567265 M: 07867 500289 crew@eda-frandsen.co.uk www.eda-frandsen.co.uk Grid Reference: 2,3

www.sailscotland.co.uk

As we pass the Island of Soay, Colin talks about the factory which author Gavin Maxwell and his business partner Tex Geddes set up after the war to process basking shark oil. The remains of the buildings and machinery are still standing on the far side of the island. It’s just after 5 o’clock when we motor into Loch Scavaig. The jagged summit of Gairsbheinn towers overhead; seals scatter from their rocky perches and bob up again in our wake, watchful and wary. It’s one of those balmy summer evenings and won’t get dark until after eleven, so it’s agreed that a trip ashore with a walk up to the freshwater Loch Coruisk would build appetites before dinner. With the rib tied up alongside the landing jetty,

we climb the metal staircase and follow the path round the hillside until the loch appears and the dramatic amphitheatre opens up before us. We settle on a rocky outcrop to soak up the beauty of this wild and rugged landscape. When Colin suggests a toast, there are smiles all round as a bottle of Talisker is produced, and of course the only way to drink a Skye whisky is with a bit of fresh Skye water from the loch! Back onboard it’s time for “knock offs” (Australians Wendy & Jonathan sailed with us last May, and introduced us to their traditional word for sundowners!). Colin makes sure we’re getting our “5 a-day” when he serves up jugs of Pimms packed with oodles of fruit, cucumbers and mint – delicious! As evening falls, the candles are lit and we gather round the table for dinner. On the menu tonight are hand-dived scallops served with Stornoway’s famous black pudding, followed by venison from the Island of Seil and poached pears from our family orchard. We raise a glass to ourselves, the sunshine, the seals and the scenery. This is my favourite part of the day, when everyone is together, relaxed and replete and conversation wanders from iPads to politics to puffins. Later, over a wee dram, we show a few of Rick’s photos on the big screen. He has taken some great shots and promises to let us have copies. Another day in the great outdoors is beginning to take its toll and we are all nodding off, but the lure of a beautiful moon draws us on deck for one final look around before bed. A bit of stargazing and identification of a few heavenly bodies, then it’s time to snuggle under our duvets for another good night’s sleep (and Shirley still has a few chapters of her book to finish!). Pauline Taylor Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd www.symoonshadow.co.uk

info@capriceyachtcharter.co.uk Telephone: 01621 785906

sailing holidays

www.capriceyachtcharter.co.uk

Luxury Catamaran Charter on the West Coast of Scotland

9

A unique sailing experience on-board a luxurious 50ft catamaran. Charters include the services of our skipper and hostess and are fully catered, with sumptuous accommodation for up to 6 people, in 3 cabins all with en-suite. The ultimate yacht charter in Scotland, perfect for exploring the beautiful coastline and Hebridean islands with spectacular scenery and fascinating wildlife. The West Coast of Scotland provides some of the most beautiful scenery in the world and cruising in this area is the perfect antidote to the pressures of modern life. Curanta Cridhe is perfect for family sailing holidays, celebration breaks including anniversaries and honeymoons. Also ideal as a base for clan gatherings, attend unique clan events or research your ancestry from the comfort and luxury of Curanta Cridhe. Book the whole boat or a cabin.

“Simply put, there is no better way to see Scotland than aboard Curanta Cridhe. Thank you for making 100 year gathering of the Maclean clan so extraordinary!” Mr JM, USA – June 2012 “A lovely few days on a beautiful boat! Was not expecting the glorious sun, sunsets, scenery in full sun. Fabulous food and fabulous captain. Thanks so much Clara and Mike.” Trish and John, Canada – June 2013

www.sailscotland.co.uk

get into sailing Getting into sailing Sometimes starting out can seem a little daunting; is it for you? What equipment do I need? What you really need is some sound advice. If you’re interested in getting into sailing then here are a few top tips about getting started from what kind of sailing you want to do and where to do it, to how much it costs and which courses are available. What kind of sailing do you want to do? Before you get started you’ll need to have a think about what kind of sailing you want to do; dinghy or yacht sailing. Dinghies are open boats which are suitable for day sailing in a variety of areas both inland and on the open sea. They are fun and exciting whilst bringing you closer to nature. They provide an exciting and cost effective way of getting afloat to experience the thrills of sailing. You could go cruising up the west coast of Scotland or hire a dinghy off the beach for your summer holiday; participate in high octane and fast performance sail racing or just sail on your own for fun. The great thing about dinghy sailing is that it provides one of the cheapest ways to get afloat. It is also the quickest and easiest way to learn to sail as dinghies are easy to rig, anyone can handle them and they are very responsive, providing limitless entertainment for everyone. But remember with dinghy sailing you will get wet, especially when you are learning the ropes! Yacht sailing is extremely diverse and there are opportunities for everyone to participate. The boats are bigger and come equipped with more of your home comforts such as toilets and kitchens and place for you to stay on board and sleep. It’s a great way to get out on the water in warm climates with the family, explore far flung remote places with

Centres, sailing clubs and charter companies throughout the UK and abroad run taster sessions/days providing an ideal opportunity to get out on the water for the first time and help you decide if sailing is for you and if you wish to go ahead and sign up for a course.

friends or you might even try your hand at racing. Yacht sailing is about adventure, exploration, teamwork and fun. It’s relaxing and an enjoyable way to discover new places. What courses are available? The RYA (Royal Yachting Association) offers a whole host of courses from complete beginner right through to professional qualifications. Run through the RYA’s network of some 2,500 recognised training centres both in the UK and abroad, you should be able to find a course to suit you. To get you started many RYA Training

If you decide that yachting is for you then the RYA’s Start Sailing and Competent Crew courses are the perfect way to learn the basic principles of sailing whilst meeting likeminded people and exploring new places in Scotland. The Start Sailing course is designed especially for the complete beginner. During this two day course you’ll get a real hands-on experience and start learning how to steer a yacht, sail handling, rope work and be aware of safety on board. The RYA Competent Crew course is a five day course. You’ll experience living on board and really get to know the boat. Virtually all the course is hands on. You are the crew without you the sails won’t go up and the boat won’t be steered. By the end of the course you should be able to steer, handle sails, keep a lookout, row a dinghy and assist in all the day to day duties on board. You should also have visited some interesting places and had an enjoyable holiday. Scotland offers some of the best sailing in the world so there are endless places to explore from the water. Whether you decide to take a course as part of your holiday or take a course at your local sailing club, there are plenty of locations to choose from. Visit the RYA’s ‘Where’s my nearest’ to find a training centre or a sailing club near you – www.rya.org.uk/ wheresmynearest. Claire Caffrey RYA Scotland www.ryascotland.org.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Day One - Saturday We meet on Stormdancer, a beautiful Oyster 435, at Troon Marina. I’m keen to meet my fellow crew – three Competent Crew and two Day Skipper candidates: Andy is from northern England. He will go on to buy a yacht. Stephen is from Hong Kong and, like me, a complete novice. He will go on to the Day Skipper course and to sail aboard Stormdancer to St Kilda and the Faroe islands. Alice and Tilman live in Switzerland. He has a German skipper’s license and she has only limited experience but they sailed on Stormdancer in Orkney and Shetland last year. Richard, our Instructor, was recommended by my husband who did the same course last year. Over lunch we get to know each other, study charts and weather forecast (windy today but settling down and dry) and discuss a possible itinerary. The pattern for the week will be two or three short passages each day, at least one of them at night and each one skippered by a different person. Stephen, Alice and I, although “only” Comp Crew, will be involved in all aspects of planning passages and handling the yacht. Next we go through a very thorough Joining Brief in which we learn about the yacht and the safety equipment – from horseshoe buoys to EPIRB’s (no I hadn’t heard of them before either!) - and then ‘hands-on’. Kitted out in life jackets and waterproofs (it’s the end of March so still quite chilly), we look at how the yacht is organised at the pontoon. The next three hours or so are spent manoeuvring the yacht under engine and practising berthing in various directions. Tasks are rotated so that I try everything. We go out for a sail, but decide to spend the night back in the marina rather than setting off at dusk in strong winds. Dinner is on board, prepared by Richard with help from the “sous-chef” of the day, whilst the others get on with planning tomorrow’s passage. Day Two We motor out and soon have sails set and engine off for the passage across to Brodick on the Isle of Arran. We learn about reefing and trimming and thoroughly enjoy the sensation of harnessing nothing but the wind, the sails and our own skill to skim along at nine knots – wow! With snow on the mountain tops the scenery is breathtaking. At Brodick we anchor (another first) for lunch, debrief on this morning’s work, learn from each other and plan the next leg. Everything takes a long time but there

marina at Portavadie which is very smart but almost empty and we are spoilt for choice. Day Five Tonight’s objective is Wreck Bay in the Kyles of Bute, which doesn’t bode well! We motor sail (with motoring cone of course) in light winds, pick up a mooring buoy (several times) and stop for lunch. The wind picks up and we goose wing through the Kyles between the mainland and the Isle of Bute to our anchorage which is beautiful and remote. We row ashore in the dinghy before another delicious supper.

is no pressure and we are bringing everyone along at the same pace. For the moment the planning and skippering “pressure” falls onto the two Day Skippers while we learn new knots, handle the wheel, keep a look out and so on. The afternoon is a leisurely sail to Loch Ranza, on the north western tip of Arran, where we anchor for the night – a perfect day. Day Three A fine day with a gentle breeze, so we spend most of the day learning to handle the boat under sail. Richard continues to nurture our skills and we have great fun picking up a “Man over Board” under engine and sail and become rather good at it. Importantly, we start to feel in control having been manoeuvring under engine in the marina and now under sail with snow capped mountains as a back drop. We anchor for an early supper and prepare to sail in the dark to Tarbert, a fishing port at the entrance to Loch Fyne. Sailing at night is a first for most of us and is fantastic - our own self-contained world. Spotting and interpreting lights from other vessels is a challenge and the entrance to Tarbert is interesting to say the least. Lights which seem so obvious on the chart are not easy to spot against the background lights of the town. Coming alongside the pontoon is easy now, although sorting out warps and tying bowlines in the dark is still a challenge! Day Four A slow start. We cover a couple of the Day Skipper course modules (diesel engine maintenance and the weather), learn a few more knots and re-visit the theory of sailing - now I understand! Today we consolidate berthing practice and spend time “pontoon bashing” before heading off to the brand new

Day Six We have wind so sail through a narrow channel towards Rothesay Harbour and practice picking up buoys under sail with everybody having a go at the wheel. During the day we all have a one-to-one de-brief with Richard. After lunch we head to Millport, a town on the island of Cumbrae with a rocky entrance made safe by leading marks to guide us in, and then further south to the ferry port and marina at Ardrossan. It’s dusk and there is some tension because of the poor light, the proximity of rocks and a ferry coming in behind us. We are just lining up the sector light to help us through the tricky entrance when Tilman says quietly “I see a big animal off the port bow”. Eyes strain and then we all see two gigantic dolphins. Richard tells us that they are in fact Orca, although he finds it difficult to believe that we would spot Orca on the Clyde at all, let alone in April – they are normally seen further north and are quite rare anyway. Entry abandoned, no doubt to the relief of the ferry Captain, we sit for half an hour watching the Orcas’ huge dorsal fins as they dive and hunt against the glow of the sun setting over Arran. Relaxing over dinner, we recall the most memorable events of the week. Night passages rank highly, as does fast sailing, close quarter manoeuvring and, of course, the Orcas. It has been a great holiday in excellent company on a lovely yacht. Day Seven For the short run to Troon we handle the boat confidently between us, with Richard very much taking a back seat. Berthing is a non-event, in sharp contrast to our nervous efforts of a week ago. The boat is tidied, certificates written, addresses exchanged, farewells made and we go our separate ways, each determined to use our new skills to best advantage. Sue Vryenhoef sailed with,

New Horizon Sailing www.newhorizonsailing.com

www.sailscotland.co.uk

sailing holidays

competent crew course - a beginner’s view

13

www.sailscotland.co.uk

charter and sailing schools SCOTLAND’S MAJESTIC COASTLINE provides some of the finest sailing waters in the world offering a wonderful variety of land and seascape which combine to make a truly unforgettable sailing experience. Scottish Charter Companies offer visiting sailors a choice of bareboat or skippered sailing holidays, as well as some informal tuition whilst RYA Recognised Training Establishments offer more formal training on a range of accredited courses. Some of the wonderful locations you might visit on your cruise are described in detail in other sections of this brochure but all the Scottish Cruising areas offer a wide variety of exciting places to visit, fabulous scenery, wonderful food and an unmatchable selection of sea-life and birds for company. Bareboat charter is the most popular type of charter available and offers experienced or qualified sailors a cost effective way for a group of friends or family to cruise Scottish waters at their own pace. The majority of: charter companies are located in the Firth of Clyde or on the Argyll coast, and it is also possible to charter from companies located further north and on Skye, Orkney and the east coast. A wide variety of boats Moonshadow in Puilldobhrain © Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd.

15

Amel Maramu ketch ‘Clova’ on charter from Argyll Yacht Charters © Isle of Skye Yachts. © Corryvreckan Cruising Ltd.

are available, including new or nearly new boats from most of the major European manufacturers as well as some more mature boats of a higher pedigree. Most companies are members of the Association of Scottish Yacht Charterers www.asyc.co.uk which offers a five-star service to their customers. Booking through an ASYC member should give you peace of mind, and, in the unlikely event of there being a problem with your holiday they provide a free arbitration service. The majority of charter operators are small to medium sized family run businesses which offer a personal and friendly service and look forward to welcoming you to Scotland. The different companies will also often work together to accommodate larger groups. A typical charter will last for a week, with the changeover day usually being a Friday or Saturday although some companies do offer other options. Multiple week bookings are welcomed by all companies, and offer the visitor the opportunity to venture further west and north to more remote waters. Long weekend charters are also available from many companies, particularly during the less busy times of the season, and are often popular with Scottish based sailors who

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Alba Sailing

Grid Reference: 2,3,6

Perfectly located on the spectacular West Coast of Scotland’s prime cruising ground - no tidal constraints. Great range of well equipped boats from 31’-54’ inc Westerlys. All pontoon berths. Equipment hire. Secure car parking. Family owned and run great personal service. RYA Sailing School. Bareboat and Skippered Charter. In 2014 we will be running a Hebridean Experience Cruise - a 2 week cruise around the more remote parts of the Hebrides - see our website for full details. DUNSTAFFNAGE MARINA, OBAN, ARGYLL PA37 1PX We will also be running the full T: 01631 565630 F: 01631 565620 range of RYA courses - see the charter@alba-sailing.co.uk www.alba-sailing.co.uk RYA page on our website. are able to escape to the water after a busy week at work. Some charter companies are also able to offer boats for racing charter on events such as the Scottish Islands Peak Race or West Highland Yachting Week - insurance requirements are, however, beginning to limit the availability of such boats. Skippered charters are available on a wide variety of boats, with some of the companies that offer bareboat charters also providing

the services of a skipper for all or part of the charter period if requested. This type of skippered charter might appeal to a group of competent sailors who are new to the Scottish waters and would like to gain a gentle introduction for the first few days of the trip and then perhaps complete their cruise as a bareboat charter. They may also offer a newly qualified Skipper or mixed ability party the chance to venture forth with the support of a more experienced skipper if necessary. On

this type of Skippered charter, the charter group will usually arrange the provisioning of the yacht themselves and ensure the Skipper is catered for and there is plenty of space for him/her to sleep on board. More details of catered Skippered Charters can also be found in the Sailing Holidays section of this brochure. One significant difference between Scottish charter companies and those found further afield is that at all charter boats operating in

Argyll Yacht Charters Quality bareboat and skippered charters from our base at Ardfern Yacht Centre, 20 miles south of Oban on the west coast of Scotland, Argyll Yacht Charters offer a range of well equipped and fully maintained sailing yachts for bareboat or skippered charter. Our boats range from 32 to 46 feet in length, and vary in age from brand new performance cruising boats to a more mature blue-water ketch. Argyll Yacht Charters Achnafuaran, Ardfern, by Lochgilphead, Argyll PA31 8QN Mobile 07979 905445 Email info@argyll-yachtcharters.co.uk

www.argyll-yachtcharters.co.uk www.sailscotland.co.uk

A number of the charter companies listed within these pages are also recognised RYA Training Centres. This allows them to offer a full range of RYA courses in addition to both bareboat and skippered charters. Visitors wishing to learn to sail on cruising yachts can do so, on a specific course, or perhaps combine their tuition with a skippered charter holiday on a variety of types of boats. There are also a number companies listed in this brochure which offer RYA Courses only and you will also find some of the companies in the Sailing Holidays section offering combined RYA courses and holidays. Companies which are registered Training Centres are shown by RYA symbol A typical day on a cruising course might start with a review of the weather forecast and the preparation of the passage plan over breakfast. This is then followed with a full days sailing or maneuvering exercises for your © Eda Fransden.

charter & sailing schools

UK coastal waters have to be ‘Coded’ by the Maritime Coastguard Agency. This means that a vessel has to have a certain high standard of safety equipment on board, such as lifejackets, liferaft flares, fire extinguishers, etc., and a further condition of this is that the equipment is regularly serviced. Furthermore, it provides a means by which different vessels are categorized as to the distance they may be sailed from a recognised safe haven or harbour. Most charter boats in Scotland are Coded to MCA Category 2, which means that they can sail up to 60nm from a safe haven. Others may be Coded to Category 1 allowing them to undertake passages of 120nm, whilst a few are Category 0 which allows them to cross oceans! All of the cruising areas described within this brochure, including Orkney, Shetland and St Kilda are reachable in a yacht which is Coded to Category 2. Crews wishing to venture further afield perhaps to the Faeroes or Norway will, however, need a boat which is coded to Category 1. Most companies will give details on their website of which standard of coding their yachts comply with. A list giving more details of what services the various charter companies who are members of Sail Scotland offer can be found at the back of the brochure.

Children strolling in Tobermory © New Horizon Sailing.

17

crewmates, all under the watchful eye of the instructor. Having reached your destination for the evening, you might then have a barbeque ashore with a dram or two, or even continue sailing on through the night to build up your night hours. Inclement weather will provide an opportunity to catch up on the theory side of things. The rest of the crew may already be friends and/or family but even if everyone on board is a complete stranger at the start of the course, you will usually have made firm friends by the end of it. No two courses are the same, and whilst all will cover the required elements of the RYA syllabus they will almost certainly do so in a very different way. The RYA requirement for crews to qualify for its Practical Cruising qualifications – Competent Crew, Day Skipper, Coastal Skipper and Yachtmaster Preparation is five nights on board the yacht. This means that dedicated RYA courses will quite often run from Saturday to Thursday or Sunday to Friday to allow you acquire a certificate at the end of the course. A sailing course in Scotland gives you the opportunity to learn a new skill or improve on an existing one while enjoying fantastic scenery and visiting wonderful places. Many people enjoy their introduction to sailing in Scotland so much that they come back year after year to indulge in their new found passion for sailing, whether it be to further their qualifications or take charge of a boat for themselves.

During the winter period you will also find that several of the Scottish RYA Training Centre’s run shore-based navigation theory courses to support the practical sailing courses they offer during the summer. For anyone keen to learn to sail full details of all RYA training courses and where they are available can be found by visiting the RYA Training Website www.rya.org.uk/ coursestraining. DINGHY SAILING AND POWERBOAT. Scotland also has excellent facilities for those who wish to set sail in their own sailing dinghies or powerboats. Most marinas have a slipway or can assist with launching, and there are numerous slips around the coast and on inland lochs where boats may also be launched. The waters are so suitable for sailing that there are almost 150 RYA recognised clubs in Scotland - a full list can be found at www.ryascotland.org.uk Everyone loves the holiday atmosphere that is in abundance at most Scottish Sailing Schools. Whether you choose a school that is on the coast, an inland loch or an island, you can be sure of excellent instruction and lots of entertainment. Combine the finest scenery and sailing waters together with a wide selection of RYA training courses and you have the best possible range of opportunities for learning afloat, including windsurfing, dinghy sailing, cruising, power boats and racing.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Bavaria Scotland Charters

Grid Reference: 1,2,6

Bavaria Scotland Charters offer bareboat and skippered charters from Largs Yacht Haven. With a fleet of quality German built Bavaria Yachts we are ideally located for cruising on the Clyde, Western Isles, Ireland and the Isle of Man. Winter sailing packages are available as well as corporate events and luxury weekend breaks. Easy access from Prestwick and Glasgow airports. Our fleet includes: 2009 Bavaria 35 Cruiser 2011 Bavaria 45 Cruiser 2004 Bavaria 38

BAVARIA SCOTLAND CHARTERS, LARGS YACHT HAVEN, IRVINE ROAD, LARGS KA30 8EZ T: 01475 686072 enquiries@bavariascotlandcharters.co.uk www.bavariascotlandcharters.co.uk

sailing to the scottish peaks The West and North Coasts of Scotland are justifiably called one of the best Sailing Areas in the World, but the same area is a Mecca for mountain climbers. Goat Fell on Arran; Ailsa Craig; Ben More on Mull; Ulva; the Paps of Jura; the Rum Cuillins; the Black Cuillins of Skye; the Knoydart peninsular; the Shiants; Conachair on St. Kilda; Mingulay; Fair Isle; Foula – these are just some of the Scottish mountains and wild areas loved by climbers, walkers and nature lovers which can only be reached from the sea or where arriving by sea saves a very long walk.

anchorage. We enjoyed dinner watching deer grazing no more than 100 metres from the yacht.

We are fortunate to have sailed to and explored all of these, and more, but one memorable expedition was to the Cuillins of Skye with regular guests wanting to scale the famous ridge. Stormdancer was the only boat anchored at Loch Scavaig, arguably the most impressive anchorage in the UK - with the Cuillins rising almost 1000 metres straight from the

The evening descent was arduous but using the dinghy gave a short cut. The dinner conversation this evening was of rocks, magnificent scenery, the next trip – and aching muscles.

Next morning we woke to blue skies and slight winds and rowed ashore for the start of the walk – a luxury compared to the several rough miles which would normally be necessary.

Richard Leigh New Horizon Sailing www.newhorizonyachts.com

Flamingo Yacht Charters Ltd

Grid Reference: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6

• Bareboat & skippered charter on Firth of Clyde and West Coast. • 14 yachts from 30-47 feet, up to 10 berths. • Wide choice of luxury yachts from Jeanneau, Bavaria, Harmony & Moody. • Easy access by low cost flights to Glasgow and Prestwick • Weekly, weekend and midweek rates available • Helpful friendly staff • ASYC member since 1990

www.sailscotland.co.uk

LARGS YACHT HAVEN, IRVINE ROAD, LARGS, AYRSHIRE, KA30 8EZ T: 01475 686 088 avril.flamingo@hotmail.com www.fy-charter.co.uk

charter & sailing schools

tides

Standing waves in Gulf of Corryvreckan © whirlpool-scotland.co.uk

Tides can be of significant assistance to sailors, whether simply out for a day sail or when trying to put the miles under the keel whilst on passage, as they can often provide a significant ‘lift’ if the timing is right. On the whole tidal ranges are less than most people expect, but there are some areas where the ability to read and use both a tidal stream atlas and tide tables is important. Many sailors are surprised to learn that the strength of the tidal flow is not related to the range (other than being greater during springs than neaps). For example, typical tidal flows of approximately 1 knot within the Firth of Clyde during ‘springs’ (3.1m range) are significantly less than that found in the Sound of Islay (0.6m range, up to 8 knot tides)

Rather than attempt to try and summarise the tidal patterns for the whole country in a few words it is perhaps more useful to try and focus on the important issues. There are several ‘tidal gates’ at which the strength of the tide is sufficient to prevent progress of even a large sailing yacht if the navigator gets their sums wrong. As the flood tide follows a clockwise direction around the Scottish coast the main tidal gates will also be listed in this pattern: Kyles of Bute, Mull of Kintyre, Sound of Islay, Dorus Mor, Gulf of Corryvreckan, Sound of Luing, Cuan Sound, Duart Point (entrance to Sound of Mull), Kyle of Loch Alsh and Kyle Rhea (Skye), Pentland Firth (Orkney) and the inner Firth of Forth. Some of these tidal gates have an infamous reputation- most notably the Mull of Kintyre, Gulf of Corryvreckan (pictures above and

below) and Pentland Firth; peak flows during a spring tide at all three locations can exceed ten knots. At all of the tidal gates, and especially these three, it is very important to ensure that the direction of both wind and tide is the same. It may sometimes be necessary to push against the tide for the last hour of the counter tide in order to achieve a comfortable passage through the gate, as once the tide turns standing waves, overfalls, eddies and whirlpools can quickly develop. At other times the distance that has to be covered (for example the Pentland Firth) may dictate that you simply have to sit back and enjoy the benefits of one of the many anchorages, marinas or harbours whilst you wait for a fair wind and tide ! Tony Bennett, Argyll Yacht Charters www.argyll-yachtcharters.co.uk

© Catima Sailing.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

19

Isle of Skye Yachts

Grid Reference: 2,3,4

Offer Bareboat or Skippered Yacht charter and RYA cruising courses on a fleet of 11 modern yachts from 32ft to 44ft. This Award winning company promises a personal service to their customers and their base at Armadale on the Isle of Skye gives easy access to one of the best cruising areas in the world. NEW for 2014; Bavaria 36 Cruiser.

THE BOATYARD, ARDVASAR, ISLE OF SKYE IV45 8RS T: 01471 844216 enquiries@isleofskyeyachts.co.uk www.isleofskyeyachts.co.uk

Castle Tioram, Loch Moidart Š Scottish Viewpoint.

Spirit of June Yacht Charters We are a family run business with a fleet of seven yachts ranging in size from 39 to 44 feet. Operating from two bases, Ardrossan on the Clyde and Badachro on Loch Gairloch, you are afforded an extensive cruising area covering the whole of the west coast of Scotland including the Inner and Outer Hebrides and St Kilda, weather permitting. One way charters are also available between our two bases. The yachts are available on a bareboat or skippered bases and all fitted with warm air heating, electric windlass and Autohelm. New this coming season is our RYA training facility offering practical courses from competent crew to Yachtmaster. T: 01445 741310 M: 07973 301828 Contact us to book a yacht and enjoy some fantastic scenery and BADACHRO, GAIRLOCH, prolific wildlife. ROSS SHIRE IV21 2AA For more details visit our website.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

peter@spiritofjune.co.uk www.spiritofjune.co.uk

Spirit of June

During our charter around Skye we had been thrilled to see a few distant, ominous shark fins in the stormy grey seas, never imagining that a couple of days later, whilst sailing down the west coast on a much calmer, beautiful summers’ day, we would have an up close encounter of the basking kind! Several basking sharks were swimming so close to the yacht, that we could see their whole, nose to tail, length. And, with the water so transparent, we could clearly see their huge gills and open mouths as they swam so close to the surface. Had we been able to reach the water from the deck of the catamaran, we would have been able to stretch to stroke their massive backs.

A glimpse of those ominous fins a few days earlier, was now transformed into an amazing wildlife encounter with the largest fish found in UK waters. Only intent on having their plankton lunch, they were certainly not a bit interested in us. These enormous species, once sought after for their liver oil, meat and fins majestically swam slowly around and under the yacht,

creating a frenzy amongst our party, with us running around the deck like a bunch of excited school children. One of the many amazing experiences that a charter on the West Coast of Scotland offers - nothing can beat it!! Cathy Cook for Caprice Yacht Charter Ltd www.capriceyachtcharter.co.uk

charter & sailing schools

close encounter of the basking kind

21 ASSOCIATON OF SCOTTISH YACHT CHARTERERS - first choice in Scotland

“Bareboat Charter, Skippered Charter or Sail Training in Scotland. Choose a member of the ASYC.” 4

All ASYC members boats meet or exceed the stringent requirements of MCA Code for commercial use.

4

All ASYC members operate in a professional manner and to the ASYC Code of Conduct.

4

All ASYC members boats have a full and comprehensive level of equipment and will supply a detailed inventory on request. For peace of mind, deposits can be held in a central escrow account, giving total safety for your payments.

4

In the very unlikely event of dissatisfaction with your holiday, the ASYC has a full and independent arbitration service.

4

It couldn’t be easier to book with an ASYC member. Our website lists all the members, their location, and type of charter or training on offer. Complete the general enquiry on line and reach all the members or choose whichever one most suits your needs. You can also link directly to each members website for further details.

ASSOCIATION OF SCOTTISH YACHT CHARTERERS

The ASYC is here to help you - why look anywhere else?

m: 07787 303562 t: 01852 200258 w: www.asyc.co.uk e: info@asyc.co.uk m: 07 787303562 t: 01852 200258 w: www.asyc.co.uk e: info@asyc.co.uk www.sailscotland.co.uk

start ‘em young Having children on board a yacht is a joy – children and boats, sand and beaches seem a natural mix. However, introducing children to sailing needs to be handled very carefully. Every parent knows that it’s all too easy, even with the very best of intentions, to create an experience that will put youngsters off, and leave Mum and Dad recovering lost ground in the future. From time-to-time we see a live-aboard family boat sailing into harbour. Everybody knows what they are doing. The children are helping. There’s no shouting and certainly no tears. The reality for most once-a-year sailors can be rather different. Here are some thoughts and tips based on experience with our own children and grandchildren and from the number of families that have sailed on board and who now continue to enjoy sailing together. Manage expectations Mum and Dad enjoy long passages, the sensation of the yacht driving through waves and the camaraderie that comes with it. Is it reasonable to expect a five year old to have the same interest? Short passages Break up the day. Two hours is an eternity for young children. Short passages please. Time ashore Chances are that the children will remember the shops or the castle more than the sailing. Small towns like Tobermory or Plockton are perfect for children – limited traffic, shops, fishing boats etc. The first time that we had two year olds on board we hardly moved away from pontoons. Stay warm Children become cold very suddenly. At sea it’s always that little bit cooler. Make sure that they wrap up with lots of layers, hats and gloves. Cosy nests There should be somewhere on the boat which the youngster(s) can call their own, a bunk or small cabin with warm duvets. Familiar objects Bring along stuff from home, whatever works – cuddly toys, books, games, videos.

a daily routine of cleaning the cockpit or polishing the steering wheel? Award the children a “Certificate of Competence” at the end of the trip. The RYA has a couple of very good books aimed at young people. Give everybody a task when everybody else is busy, the children should have a coil of rope, be watching the depth gauge, or holding a fender. Use the dinghy We all enjoy messing about in boats and the dinghy is so much more child-friendly. It’s more their size. Get out there with the oars, outboard or whatever and give them as much rope as you can. Supervise You need eyes in the back of the head. Dedicate one person to look after the young crew at all times, not just from the safety angle, but to look out for early signs of boredom or cold. Safety First The last thing that you want is a child put off by a dinged elbow, trapped finger or unexpected dunking. Keep very young

children tethered to the yacht. Wear life jackets at all times (and set the right example) but remember that the type of rigid lifejackets made for very young children can be uncomfortable. We have found with two and three year olds that it’s better to use a harness anchored either to the boat or an adult’s hand, rather than put them through the chin-scraping torture of the life jacket. It’s got to be fun! Let your hair down. Don’t worry about neighbouring boats. The children are on holiday. We have model sailing boats, pirate hats, crab lines, fishing nets and all sorts on board when children are with us.

Beaches I’ve forgotten why I liked beaches as a child – but I did, and so do kids now. They will be delighted to spend hours running, digging, pooling, throwing or whatever. So anchor off a beach.

Timing. Is it too early? Would you better off teaching the children to sail dinghies and postpone the big sailing experience for a couple of years? Would it be better (shock, horror) to sail somewhere less interesting, but warm, to entice the children into the sport

Make the yacht relevant Children like order and discipline. Why not

Richard Leigh New Horizon Sailing

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Skippering a charter yacht is not always fun. Sometimes the charter crew can be a bit hard to take, and often you are covering the same old route that you have done dozens of times before. However, just an odd time, circumstances transpire to make it special. 1st July 2013 was one of those days when everything fell into place.

in company to Tignabruach, so we were able to join in without interfering with any competition.

It was a bright day with a fresh breeze blowing straight at us down the East Kyle and we had a cracking beat, cross tacking with these floating works of art. Our Harmony 42, SWIFT, was in her element in such conditions and we found I was acting as flotilla skipper for a party from ourselves keeping pace with Mikado and Fintra. the ‘American Sailing Association’. By chance It was interesting to note that at 41.5 ft Mikado their week coincided with the 4th Fife was almost the same length as ourselves, Regatta, being held in Fairlie, where these beautiful yachts were built. We had spent the night in Port Bannatyne Marina, whilst the Fifes were in Rothesay but our courses merged as we headed up the Kyles on the Monday morning. This was not a race day for the Fifes, but a cruise

but 100 years apart in technology, and yet their performance was remarkably similar, testament, to the skill and ingenuity of the Fairlie builders. My American crew took turns on the wheel to see if they could gain an advantage, and great sport was had until the ‘contest’ was postponed for the passage through the Burnt Isles. The challenge was resumed until the opposition, reached their goal at Tignabruach. It could have been an anticlimax, once the competition ceased, but it was followed by an exhilarating fetch down the West Kyle, and over to Lochranza. The tour round the distillery was just the icing on the cake. Muir Anderson, Flamingo Yacht Charters Ltd. www.fy-charter.co.uk

yacht charter & sailing schools

fifes fleet provides the american dream

23

www.sailscotland.co.uk

a week on the clyde... …wasn’t enough, reckons Elaine Cameron, who chartered for a week sailing around the Firth of Clyde. Hopefully the summary of her route will give you an idea of some of the things you might experience on a Scottish yacht charter. Saturday (10 nm)

the paddle steamer Waverley overtook us, her paddles beating a steady rhythm as she Arriving at Largs Yacht Haven on a sunny Saturday thundered her way past and through the main afternoon, it was hard to believe that only an narrows channel – only just fitting between the hour after collecting our bags at the airport we buoys! were aboard our home for the week - Avocet, a very comfortable Bavaria 37. A friendly handover ‘We anchored behind the little island at briefing covered all key aspects of the yacht the idyllic anchorage of Caladh, - the only and also gave us some great ideas for lunchtime yacht there - soaking up the tranquility anchorages and overnight stops. of the place and watching the seals and herons.’ Our gear and food stowed, we ventured out from the marina and set course for Port Bannatyne on the Isle of Bute. After lunch we set course for Portavadie on Loch Fyne, reaching down the West Kyle towards the stunning backdrop of the Isle of ‘We were amazed and delighted to see Arran. porpoises, guillemots, and diving gannets so soon after leaving Largs marina!’ Turning west out of the Kyle we punched our way up Loch Fyne, an exhilarating sail which Later, we berthed at Port Bannatyne marina in provided the ultimate feel good factor, arriving at time to watch the sun set behind the low hills of Portavadie feeling refreshed and energised! the island, before retreating into Avocet’s saloon for dinner. Once berthed, we appreciated the marina’s piping hot showers before relaxing in its Sunday (18 nm) contemporary, very comfortable bar and restaurant. Bacon rolls all round, before heading north into the Kyles of Bute. Monday (23 nm) ‘Once in the East Kyle we were astounded by the sheer beauty of the place and at how narrow the Kyle was in comparison to the river - a stark and beautiful contrast.’ As we approached the Burnt Isles narrows,

We awoke to a still morning, not a breath of wind, and motored out onto a glassy Loch Fyne, so unlike the lively conditions we’d encountered the previous day! Hoping to explore the upper reaches of the Loch, we were delighted when a light breeze from the south appeared and built up to a lovely

Kyles of Bute, Burnt Isles Channel © Sailaway Scotland.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

steady wind to push Avocet further up the loch. We were on the look-out for the Otter Spit Beacon which we were to pass to starboard; just beyond that, we headed in towards the Oystercatcher pub and restaurant at Otter Ferry. We picked up one of their visitors moorings and rowed ashore to enjoy a beer and delicious lunch outside on the lawn - bare feet and all! All agreed we could easily have spent another week exploring Loch Fyne – and hopefully we will, another time... An hour or so later it was time to tack our way back down the loch heading for our overnight stop which was the traditional fishing village of Tarbert, Loch Fyne. We berthed Avocet at the visitors pontoon, then meandered around the harbour and into the town, where we enjoyed a bar meal and a bottle of wine, or two. Tuesday (18 nm)

‘Another bright morning and after breakfast ashore, we headed out of Loch Fyne and over to Ettrick Bay on the west side of Bute. Anchored there temporarily - and well off its shelving, mile long sandy beach - we had the whole bay to ourselves.’ A few of the crew celebrated that achievement with a run ashore in the dinghy for coffee & cakes at a little beachside cafe. That afternoon we sailed over to Lochranza, a dramatic loch on Arran’s northwest coast. As we neared its entrance, we drifted really close to a basking shark, weaving its way past us without a backward glance. Both we and it were open-mouthed! Once in Lochranza we picked up a visitor’s mooring, then relaxed in the cockpit marvelling at the high Arran peaks and the sunset glowing red over Kintyre. Next time, we plan to visit the local distillery…

charter & sailing schools

Landing at Ettrick Bay © Sailaway Scotland.

Wednesday (20 nm) A great sail down the Kilbrannan Sound to Campbeltown, pausing only for lunch on a visitors mooring off the tiny fishing village of Carradale. Then we continued south, identifying the lighthouse on the island of Davaar and passing north of that into Campbeltown Loch itself, berthing alongside the town pontoon. After dinner aboard we wandered up to the Royal Hotel for a dram, meeting up with some further-travelled sailors from Norway and Sweden, en route around the Mull of Kintyre. Thursday (24 nm)

25

‘A brisk west wind brought us back down the loch in no time and on towards Lamlash, a beautiful natural harbour on the east coast of Arran. Once safely past Pladda lighthouse, we were able to head north and soon the striking outline of the Holy Isle came in to view.’ Passing that to starboard, we entered Lamlash bay and picked up a visitors mooring for the night. Friday (18 nm) With the breeze building, we hoisted sail in Lamlash bay and left Arran behind, looking back at Goatfell, its highest peak. After passing between the Lesser and Greater Cumbrae islands we anchored at Millport, a pretty town on Great Cumbrae, enjoying lunch and ice-creams ashore before making our final short passage back to Largs. With Avocet safely berthed, we strolled along the coastal path that runs from the marina into the town of Largs, later enjoying a delicious meal at Lounge restaurant, whose chef (we were told...) is regularly to be seen walking down to Largs pier to pick the best of the day’s catch! Saturday Up early to clean the boat, pack up our belongings, hand the yacht back and enjoy a final crew breakfast ashore, before heading home to plan our next cruise… Elaine Cameron chartered with Sailaway Scotland Yacht Charter, out of Largs. www.sailawayscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

firth of clyde

27

THE FIRTH OF CLYDE is one of the largest areas of sheltered deep water in the British Isles, and as a result has been a major centre for recreational boating for well over a century. It is increasingly popular as a playground for local boat owners, as a destination for sailors cruising in their own yachts, and for those seeking a charter yacht holiday, or an intensive tuition course in the finer points of sailing. Much pioneering cruising was done on Scotland’s West Coast, and the Clyde produced some hardy people who went exploring long before there were marinas, or even many harbours. To some extent they were following in the wake of the Viking invaders, who ruled the west coast for centuries before they were finally ousted at the Battle of Largs in 1263. Today the sailing visitor enjoys waters that are unchanged from those far-off days, although the shore facilities are very different! A century-and-a-half ago the development of leisure sailing was just beginning, the Clyde’s designers and builders of yachts both large and small, sail and power, were soon producing

handy craft, and before long were at the cutting edge of international competitive and cruising yacht construction, 2013 will herald the return of many of these beautiful classics to the Firth of Clyde for the Fife Regatta in late June. Today, the emphasis is on participation, whether by owning a boat, chartering, taking a tuition course, or participating in one of the many competitive events that are hosted on the Clyde.

Scottish Series participants rafted up at Tarbert Loch Fyne, Argyll © Dennis Hardley.

afloat, and many destinations, ranging from sheltered bays to busy fishing harbours, to visit. It is this shelter, a feature shared with the West Coast, which makes this part of Scotland so perfect for holiday sailing.

The main Clyde marinas for resident and charter craft are Troon, Ardrossan, Largs, Kip, Rhu, Holy Loch and James Watt Dock, whilst The Clyde’s long lochs penetrate far into the Fairlie Quay is particularly popular for winter Highlands, whilst its outer reaches comprise storage and has developed as a centre for a scatter of islands, each of different size and maintenance. All are easily accessible by public character. Arran is large and mountainous, transport, and the increase in low cost air Bute is smaller and more pastoral, whilst the small islands of Great and Little Cumbrae can travel has encouraged many yacht owners who live elsewhere to keep their yachts in Scottish be circumnavigated in an afternoon. The tiny Isle of Sanda, off the Mull of Kintyre, is unique. marinas, where the availability and lower cost of berthing compared with England’s South Its pub, the Byron Darnton, is busy with Coast, ideally complements the superb cruising visiting sailors, even though the island has no area so close by. This convenient access is not permanent resident population. only good for boat owners; charterers and sailors taking courses also find it easy to join FACILITIES their vessel. More recent marina developments The Clyde has ten large marinas with are now well established at Portavadie in Loch capacity for several thousand boats, a host Fyne and Port Bannatyne on the Isle of Bute. of marine services to offer, a wonderfully Full details of the facilities offered by all of the scenic cruising area in which to enjoy being

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Kip Marina rb Ha our

M

L

e

J

sid

P

ide

urs

rbo

Ha

O

N

Battery and Oil Disposal

F H C

I B

J

G E Workshop D

D

When you are looking for the ultimate base on the Clyde, then nowhere compares to Kip Marina - the premier marina in Scotland. Set in a beautiful location Kip has an excellent sheltered basin and is perfectly positioned for access to Scotland’s finest cruising grounds. Only 30 minutes from Glasgow Airport with direct road and rail links. Full boatyard facilities, chandlery and even free wi-fi.

8

A7

THE YACHT HARBOUR, INVERKIP, RENFREWSHIRE PA16 0AS T: 01475 521 485 F: 01475 521 298 enquire@kipmarina.co.uk www.kipmarina.co.uk

A Marina Entrance

Picnic Area

oad

ip R

erk

Inv

James Watt Dock Marina Com

me

Marina Entrance

rcia

Great Harbour (Commercial)

l

P

Ba

r&

Re

D

Sup Gas

ery

A

ach

ts

B

sta

ura

nt

C

WiFi

D Events

Trolleys Storage

A8

Chandlery

Ea

st H

am

The Sugar Warehouse

ilto

nS

tre

et

Bus Stop

Greenock’s 100 berth James Watt Dock Marina opened in July 2011. Centred around the historic dock, the marina has the latest pontoons, services and security systems. With a depth of over 5.0m, the pontoons can cater for up to 25m vessels; with much larger vessels being accommodated on the dockside. Glasgow Airport is 20 minutes by car, regular train services to Glasgow and Gourock are available from Cartsdyke station and buses stop outside the marina. There are supermarkets, shops, leisure facilities and restaurants nearby. JAMES WATT DOCK MARINA, GREENOCK, RENFREWSHIRE, PA15 2UT Tel: 44 (0)1475 729838 info@jwdmarina.co.uk www.jameswattdockmarina.co.uk

Fairlie Quay Marina

D

Fairlie Quay offers boat owners the largest covered storage facility in the Clyde estuary. This secure site has full boat yard services, an 80 ton hoist and on site contractors for all your servicing needs. Fairlie Quay is ideally situated for Glasgow and Prestwick airports as well as direct road and rail services.

V

storage

V

www.sailscotland.co.uk

MAIN ROAD, FAIRLIE, NORTH AYRSHIRE, KA29 0AS T: 01475 568 267 F: 01475 568 410 enquire@fairliequay.co.uk www.fairliequay.co.uk

One of the most popular destination harbours is Tarbert, where the fishing fleet has to some extent given way to visiting and resident yachts DESTINATIONS of all types and sizes, and where the recently The Clyde is more than just a convenient upgraded pontoon berthing plus a recently playground: it is also the perfect starting opened chandlery and good shore facilities, point for cruises to more distant places. bars and restaurants are an acknowledged Visiting boats arriving from the south or attraction. It is a picturesque village where the Ireland may choose to visit the new marina remains of Tarbert Castle, which is illuminated at Stranraer, where shore side facilities have at night, overlook the village. In 1325 Robert been upgraded as part of the EU funded Sail The Bruce, realising the importance of West project, before venturing further north the isthmus and the necessity to defend it, into the Firth itself. The first fully serviced instructed work to repair and extend the marina on the Firth of Clyde can be found at existing castle which stood on the hill above Troon, from there a popular route is north Tarbert harbour. The castle and its perimeter west, through the beautiful Kyles of Bute to wall are now only grass covered outlines, the Crinan Canal, and then to the Argyll Coast although two walls of the keep built by James and Islands, Skye, and the Outer Hebrides. IV still stand to their original height, dominating Heading south west past Arran and round the the entrance to the harbour and the town. Mull of Kintyre, perhaps calling at Sanda or Campbeltown, is a passage best undertaken Flotilla visits are welcome to Tarbert, in good weather. It leads to the southern and it is a favourite with sailing clubs for Isles of Gigha, Islay and Jura, or alternatively musters and rallies. Berths can be reserved across the North Channel to Rathlin Island, in advance. The town also hosts the Ballycastle and Glenarm, all just a few miles Clyde Cruising Club’s Scottish Series each away, all of which serve as a useful point from spring. This attracts upwards of a hundred which to depart for either the west coast competitive yachts from far and wide for a of Scotland or the northern coast of Ireland long weekend’s racing in the waters of Loch where facilities are also improving. There Fyne, where, although it has few hazards and are many less demanding passages within the gentle tides, the variable wind patterns offers Firth of Clyde. Indeed, one could sail every the racing sailor great challenges. day for a week and not run out of new lochs and anchorages to explore. A short distance across Loch Fyne from Tarbert is the new marina at Portavadie This rich cruising ground has moderate tidal which has almost 250 berths and a full streams and ranges, well marked hazards, range of facilities. It is the perfect gateway and apart from a few popular spots, relatively to some of the best sailing waters in the few other boats. The ‘harbour full’ sign has world and provides a unique backdrop in yet to reach Scottish waters! which to enjoy and explore a variety of safe

anchorages and walk ashore destinations, all within easy reach. The facilities building and the critically acclaimed restaurant and bar are in one of the finest marina buildings in Britain, and the marina also has a range of shorside accommodation available for those who wish to take some time out. The deep water lagoon is protected by a breakwater and is accessible at all states of the tide. The marina will accommodate vessels up to 70ft loa (notice required for larger vessels) with no restriction on draft. Other destinations with pontoon berthing are Campbeltown, Ardrishaig and Rothesay, plus a new facility at Girvan on the Ayrshire coast, part funded by the Sail West project. These towns are strategically placed for the cruising yachtsman. Campbeltown is close to the Mull of Kintyre, and a good port of call arriving from the south, whilst Ardrishaig is the eastern terminus of the Crinan Canal. Girvan lies midway between the harbours of Stranraer and Ayr, whilst Rothesay is a traditional favourite. It is the capital of the beautiful Isle of Bute, which the cruising sailor will enjoy exploring. The principal attraction of the island is Mount Stuart, the extravagant Italianate palazzo of the Bute family, which is open to the public most days. Information is available from Rothesay tourist office close to the harbour. There is also a regular bus service to the property. A short distance north of Rothesay a new marina has been built at Port Bannatyne alongside the existing boatyard. Looking north across Ardmore Point to Rhu and Helensburgh © Scottish Viewpoint.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

firth of clyde

marinas are given in the tabulated summary on pages 78-79 of this brochure.

29

Largs Yacht Haven shallow water

A78

LSC

P

LFl.10s

A Occ.R.10s

Occ.G.10s

Scotland’s finest marina – A TYHA 5 Gold Anchor Marina! Perfectly situated in the sheltered Firth of Clyde for island sailing and access to Glasgow/Prestwick airports (40 minutes). Award winning Scotts bar/restaurant, shops, chandlery, spa as well as 24hr service for diesel, petrol, gas. 70 ton hoist, 700 berths, internal slipway and sailing club. Renowned for helpful staff and friendly atmosphere.

D

B E

CD

F GH JK

shallow water

LM

LARGS YACHT HAVEN, LARGS, AYRSHIRE, KA30 8EZ T: 01475 675 333 F: 01475 672 245

NP

largs@yachthavens.com www.yachthavens.com

Goat Fell from Brodick Beach Isle of Arran © Dennis Hardley.

Holy Loch Marina

Marine Blast

* Sheltered berths * Petrol, Diesel & Gas * Chandlery * Coffee Shop – snacks, soup etc * 23 Tonne Boat Lift * Beautiful Surroundings * Secure Outside Storage & Car Parking * Good Transport Links * Restaurant Adjacent to Marina HOLY LOCH MARINA, SANDBANK, ARGYLL PA23 8QB T: 01369 701800 F: 01369 704749 info@holylochmarina.co.uk www.holylochmarina.co.uk

The Marine Blast app for iPhone and Android. Because we’re sailors we know what you need out on the water. From fuel to chandlers and marinas to insurance. If the marine industry needs it, we’ve got it listed. We’re proud to support marine tourism in Scotland. The Marine Blast app. Everything you need when you’re on the water. Power at your fingertips. M: 07766 116451 info@marineblast.com www.marineapp.co.uk

Portavadie Marina CalMac Cottages

Playarea Bike & Kayak Hire

N

H P

D

G

F E D S

C B A

Marina Entrance

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Portavadie Marina is set in a protected lagoon on Loch Fyne, on Scotland’s west coast. Enjoy stunning facilities, boatyard services and world-class sailing waters at this Five Gold Anchor awardwinning marina. WiFi, 24-hour shower access and laundry facilities are all provided. There is even a family bathroom equipped with TV. Come ashore for restaurants and bars, bike and kayak hire, shop and chandlery, beauty treatments and a range of accommodation. RESTAURANTS & BARS • SHORESIDE ACCOMMODATION • CHANDLERY MUSTERS & EVENTS • WEDDINGS • BEAUTY & WELLNESS PORTAVADIE, LOCH FYNE, ARGYLL PA21 2DA T: 01700 811075 F: 01700 811074 info@portavadiemarina.com www.portavadiemarina.com

Arran and the Kyles of Bute are two other major attractions on a cruise. Arran is often called ‘Scotland in Miniature’ as it has almost all the elements of the whole of Scotland: mountains, castles, beaches, golf courses, a brewery and whisky distilery, and a whole lot more. You can call at Brodick, Lamlash or Loch Ranza, and in each place you will find visitor moorings, plus a landing slip at Lamlash, and a fine new pontoon at Loch Ranza.

The Kyles of Bute is one of the prettiest open water passages in Britain. Its fjord-like channels, or kyles, wind between heather clad hills, past sleepy holiday villages, and through groups of islands, and every half mile or so there is an anchorage to stop for lunch or overnight.

Loch Long is exactly what is says on the chart, but paradoxically Loch Fyne is much longer, at around 40 miles. Loch Long strikes deep into the highest mountains in southern Argyll, locally known as the Arrrochar Alps, and this offers a good opportunity to bag a “Munro”, the term for a mountain of over Ashore the village pubs and restaurants are well 3,000 feet. Loch Goil is a branch off Loch known for their good food and characterful Long to the west, and has two attractive ambience. Here you will meet fellow sailors destinations – Carrick Castle near the mouth enjoying themselves, and locals with a tale to of the loch, and Lochgoilhead at its head. tell of past seafaring exploits and events. Loch Fyne starts south of Tarbert, winds Thinking of getting off the beaten track? its way north past Ardrishaig, and then The Clyde’s long lochs will take you deep continues to places like Otter Ferry, Loch into Scotland’s mountains. The scenery is Gair, Crarae, Furnace, Strachur and Inverary. magnificent, the sailing straightforward, and At the very head of the loch is the well although there are around 5,000 boats on known Oyster Bar, which provides visitor the Clyde, you will easily find a spot where moorings for those intrepid sailors who you are the only one. make it all the way!

firth of clyde

In other places, like Lamlash in Arran, or in the Kyles of Bute, more traditional landing methods – anchoring and going ashore by dinghy – are usual. In many spots local hotels and communities have laid moorings for visitors, whilst smaller pontoon facilities have been installed to assist with landing a dinghy at some locations. These are sometimes free (for patrons), or a nominal charge may made.

2014 Berthing Offers Relax | Adventure | Celebrate +44 (0)1700 811075 info@portavadiemarina.com portavadiemarina.com

31

Set in a beautiful part of Argyll, less than 60 miles from Glasgow, this striking destination is the perfect base for your travels and day trips. – – – – – –

World Class Marina Excellent annual berth holder rates Family bathroom Facilities onsite Gateway to Highlands and Islands Easy access to Crinan Canal

– – – – –

Beauty and Wellbeing Restaurants and Bars Accommodation Charters and Cruises Bike and Kayak Hire

- Regatta rate of £20.00 per boat based on 6 boats or more - Free day berthing - 7 nights berthing for the price of 5, based on full week stay, excludes June, July and August - 3 nights berthing for price of 2, available Sunday – Thursday only, excluding July and August

Quote SailScotland when booking All subject to availability

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Tarbert Harbour Tarbert Harbour is a small picturesque fishing

VQ(9) 10s

Sgeir village situated on the Bhuidhe

rocks

rocks

A C

Harbour Entrance

B

D

E

west side of Loch Fyne with a wide variety of places to eat, drink and shop. The Harbour is accessible at all states VQG of the tide and is one of Scotland’s most sheltered harbours with 160 Finger Berths, 600m of pontoons and mooring buoys available for vessels of varying sizes. The East Pier and Fish Quay are also available for larger vessels. The pontoons are fully serviced and diesel is available at the Fish Quay. Free Wi-Fi and showers provided for residents and visitors. Tarbert Harbour offers very competitive Berthing Rates and Harbour Staff are always happy to advise.

F TARBERT

Fish Quay

HARBOUR

TARBERT (LOCH FYNE) HARBOUR AUTHORITY HARBOUR OFFICE, GARVAL ROAD, TARBERT, ARGYLL PA29 6TR T: 01880 820 344 F: 01880 820 719 info@tarbertharbour.co.uk www.tarbertharbour.co.uk

D

Troon Yacht Haven Marina Entrance QG

A

B

C

D E

P

D

F

G

H I

J K

Shipwright

L

Waste Oil

ad

Sailing School

Situated on the Southern Clyde Estuary, Troon Yacht Haven provides an ideal port for entering the Clyde or for passage making to Ireland and the South. Full facility marina and boatyard with superb communications by road, air, car & sea. The helpful and experienced staff are on hand 24 hours to maximise the enjoyment of boating, and pride themselves on their high standard of customer services.

aig

Ro

troon@yachthavens.com www.yachthavens.com

Harbour Road

Cr

THE HARBOUR, TROON, AYRSHIRE KA10 6DJ T: 01292 315553 F: 01292 312836

Clyde Marina Ltd Montgomerie Pier

Control tower om erie

St

Marina Entrance

Mo ntg

E

Storm Gate Winton Pier

D

Outer Basin

C B

Prin

ces

D

Cal-Mac

A

Arran Ferry

Bar & Restaurant

Terminal Bo

at

ya

rd

Dock Road ad

ur

Chandlery

CLYDE MARINA

www.sailscotland.co.uk

St

Ha

o rb

Ro

Situated on the Ayrshire coast, Clyde Marina is the ideal base for the islands and sea lochs of the Clyde, one of Europe`s most beautiful cruising grounds. The shores and anchorages of Arran, the stunning scenery of the Kyles of Bute, Loch Fyne, the Cumbraes and Bute. We are perfectly positioned. Clyde Marina offers full service facilities and the Clyde`s deepest water marina berthing. CLYDE MARINA LTD, THE HARBOUR, ARDROSSAN, AYRSHIRE KA22 8DB T: 01294 607077 F: 01294 607076 info@clydemarina.com www.clydemarina.com

firth of clyde

scotland’s boat show Every October the focus of the sailing and boating world moves to the Firth of Clyde as Scottish boat show season begins, the biggest of the events being Scotland’s Boat Show which takes place at Kip Marina. The third largest boat show in the UK*, after London and Southampton with nearly 15,000 visitors over the three days, more than 100 pre-owned boats for sale, new boats on display from major manufacturers such as Hanse, Sunseeker and Princess plus marine exhibitors from all over the UK who showcase the latest developments in the boating world. Sponsors RYA Scotland made a huge impact at Scotland’s Boat Show 2013 with their series of workshops, lectures and particularly their on water activity programme which attracted many youngsters on to the water for the first time. On shore, visitors enjoyed the Clyde Lifestyle marquee, a farmers market, displays of luxury motor cars from Rolls Royce and Aston Martin, musical entertainment from the Military Wives of Scotland Choir and even the chance to take helicopter flights over the show and the River Clyde! The last sea loch before entering the river Clyde is the Gare Loch. This was one of the first areas to embrace leisure boating in Scotland and is home to one of the oldest yacht clubs in Britain, the Royal Northern and Clyde Yacht Club at Rhu. The marina at Rhu is also an ideal stopover to explore Scotland’s first national park and its breathtaking scenery.

Each year Scotland’s Boat Show grows in size and plans are already underway for 2014 with special features complementing the official ‘Year of Homecoming’. Scotland’s Boat Show 2014 takes place on 10th, 11th & 12th of October at Kip Marina, Inverkip – to find out more visit www.scotlandsboatshow.co.uk

Glasgow is a fascinating city to visit, packed with history, culture and entertainment events. Now you can see a great city and live in comfort on your own boat.

standard competition for IRC yachts in Scotland. The event also hosts courses for less competitive yachts and one design classes, at a time of the year perfect for honing performance for the summer season regattas. Whilst the event has historically been seen as being suitable for ‘serious racers’ the organisers are again promising restricted sail classes for 2014 as well as passage races which proved to be popular with families and less experienced crews. The regatta is based in the picturesque waters of Loch Fyne with the berthing and regatta centre located in the stunning natural harbour village of Tarbert on the Mull of Kintyre. The event is organised by the Clyde Cruising Club (www.clyde.org) and will take place between the 23rd and 26th May 2014.

One of the benefits of being a tourist by boat in the Clyde area is the relative ease in visiting different places, which are often separated by tens of miles of road, or only linked by air or THE UPPER FIRTH ferry. In a sailing or power boat these journeys Glasgow is hosting The Commenwealth are simple, and as a result very satisfying. And Games from 23rd July – 3rd August 2014, this when you are not sailing? This is a world class is the perfect excuse for the cruising sailor to tourist area, with attractions ranging from venture up the Clyde to the centre of Glasgow. archaeology and castles to distilleries and The Clyde, after years of decline is coming superb restaurants, so it is almost as interesting to life again, and there are potential stopping being ashore as it is fun being afloat. places on the way up the river at Bowling and Clydebank before reaching Glasgow Harbour. Try it. You won’t be disappointed. Here there are pontoons on either side of the river at the new BBC building; they are free to EVENTS use, but should be booked in advance. Whilst Scotland may be best known for the quality of its cruising waters, it also has an The pontoons are upstream of the opening enviable reputation for hosting excellent Millennium Bridge. The pontoon on the north racing and cruising events throughout the bank outside the Crowne Plaza Hotel can be year. These vary in size and competitiveness, booked by calling SECC and the new pontoon but all share the common theme of superb on the south bank at Plantation Quay can be sailing combined with sociable relaxation booked by calling Glasgow City Council. For after the event itself. boats with an air draft of less than 5 metres wishing to go 1 mile further upstream to The premier event of the year is the Scottish the city centre (* maximum clearance under Series (www.scottishseries.com) which the Bells Bridge, Clyde Arc and Tradeston is recognised as one of the UK’s top yachting footbridge at high tide) there are two more regattas and is the largest Scottish yachting pontoons controlled by Glasgow City Council, event. 2014 will be the 40th anniversary of the at the Broomielaw and under George V Bridge. event and competitors travel from around the world to compete in the only international All take visiting craft and all have security suitable for their City Centre locations. To request opening of the Bell’s and Millennium Bridges please call 0141 946 5186 at least 8 hours in advance or when booking a berth.

The Firth of Clyde is also host to numerous other race events throughout the season, some of which are scheduled to encourage boats taking part in the Scottish Series to prolong their stay over three or four weekends. For 2014 the Scottish Series is preceded by the Savills Kip Regatta over the weekend of the 10th-11th May, and is then followed by the Old Pulteney Mudhook IRC Scottish Championships between the 7th and 8th June at Kip Marina. The major end of season event is the Clydeport Largs Regatta Week which runs from the 23rd – 30th August. The larger yacht clubs also host their own series throughout the whole year, with local classes such as the Piper also being catered for, and the season ends with the Autumn Points Race Series hosted by Kip and Largs Marinas during September and October. Full details are available from the Clyde Cruising Club or the Clyde Yacht Clubs Association (www.cyca-online.org.uk) who also have their own handicapping system for non IRC boats.

You can get lots of information on all aspects of sailing in the Firth of Clyde from the Clydeport Leisure Marine Guide, available free everywhere or to download from www.clydeport.co.uk. In particular, it deals with the passage up the river to Glasgow.

Finally, Scotland also hosts a number of prestigious events for the dinghy and keelboat enthusiast. Most of these are hosted by the Scottish Sailing Institute (www. scottishsailinginstitute.com) and are centred around Largs.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

33

40th anniversary scottish series tarbert, loch fyne - 23 may to 26 may 2014

Scotland’s Premier Regatta First class sailing, stunning scenery and fabulous hospitality Celebrating its 40th year in 2014, the Scottish Series provides spectacular sailing for competitors and spectators alike, offering a blend of the best of yacht racing alongside a varied and hectic social programme ashore. This four day event sees visiting yachts from across Scotland, the UK and further afield. As part of the 40th anniversary celebrations the organisers have decided to reinstate the feeder race from Gourock to Tarbert. However unlike the original this race will take place during daylight hours with a morning start off Royal Gourock Yacht Club to enable competitors to get to Tarbert by Friday evening. The regatta is based in the beautiful village of Tarbert and racing takes place in three broad areas of Loch Fyne. There is something for everyone whether you are racing in a strongly competitive IRC spinnaker class or a family crew preferring ‘white sail’. The courses are varied to suit the sailing conditions and include the standard windward/leeward courses as well as triangle, trapezoid and variations of these. On the Sunday take part in the popular inshore coastal race for IRC classes and the Round the Island race which is open to all yachts rated for CYCA handicap- entry can be as part of the series or as a single entry on the Sunday. Tarbert Harbour really comes alive the day before. Soak up the unique atmosphere as you watch yachts, crews and supporters arriving and join the hustle and excitement on the pontoons as crews make last minute adjustments to the rigging or chat to old and new friends. The next day dawns and it’s an early start. If you are ashore watch the spectacular sight as the yachts stream out of the harbour one after the

www.sailscotland.co.uk

other heading for their race areas for an exciting days sailing. Once racing has finished for the day and you have tied up on the pontoons or rafted up take a short stroll to the marquee village on the north shore. Relax and enjoy a drink or two at the bar, meet other crews and catch up on the events of the day. Get the latest results to see where you finished and if you are a winner pick up your prize. Then you can either head back to the boat or walk the short distance to the village for something to eat and drink at one of the many pubs, restaurants and hotels. As night time falls return to your boat to watch the spectacular sunset or head to the marquee village for the live entertainment before retiring for an early start again the next morning. Tarbert, Loch Fyne is easily reached by road and from the main marinas on the Clyde which have good road and rail links to the rest of the UK as well as being close to Glasgow two airports. Don’t delay enter the Scottish Series 2014 now! The Scottish Series is organised by the Clyde Cruising Club. Notice of Race, IRC and CYCA Handicap links, and entry details are on www.scottishseries.com Find out more… Contact: Clyde Cruising Club Suite 101 36, Washington Street, Glasgow G3 8AZ Tel +44 (0)141 221 2774 Fax +44 (0)141 221 2775 Email: office@clyde.org

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Tarbert Loch Fyne, Argyll © Marc Turner.

girvan harbour pontoons Historically the southern part of the Ayrshire coast lacked a suitable stop-off point for visiting yachts, meaning that sailors had to commit to crossing the sizeable triangle formed by Campbeltown, Troon and Stranraer. However the Sail West project has helped to fill this gap by funding the development of a new safe haven, by improving the harbour at Girvan through the installation of 35 modern berths for a range of vessels with electricity and water supplies, secure quayside access and CCTV.

© South Ayrshire Council.

inveraray Inveraray lies on the northern shores of Loch Fyne and is the ancestral home of the Duke of Argyll; Inveraray Castle is open to the public during the summer months and also hosts a number of festivals and events, including the annual Highland Games. The town itself was the first ‘new town’ to be built in Scotland, albeit back in the eighteenth century, and many of the buildings have significant architectural importance.

be handed out before the introduction of the modern penal system, and should ensure a quiet afternoon for over-stressed parents!

Whilst Inveraray does not have any pontoon facilities it is possible to pick up a mooring at the nearby Loch Fyne Oyster Bar at the head of the loch before venturing ashore to sample the seafood at the restaurant. During settled weather boats are also able to anchor off As well as the castle, visitors are able to visit the Georgian Inveraray Jail Inveraray Pier, enabling a visit to be made to the George Hotel in the which is now a museum. This is a particularly popular attraction with town main street, or a tour around one of the old Clyde Puffers which children who can learn about the various punishments which used to are moored at the pier itself.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Sail Scotland from Scotland’s premier marinas. Part of the fun of any adventure is in the planning so why not speak to an expert now and plan your trip from one of Scotland’s premier marinas? All of our marinas have in-house experts who can help tailor make your Scottish experience with advice on everything you will need when cruising some of the world’s finest waters. From exciting itineraries to secluded moorings, take advantage of our in depth knowledge to create your own bespoke sailing adventure. We can even help you find a boat to charter or a waterside holiday cottage to stay in. Get years of our experience with one conversation - call any of our marinas today and ask to speak to an expert or visit us on www.kipmarina.co.uk

Kip Marina, Inverkip, Renfrewshire tel: 01475 521485 info@kipmarina.co.uk www.kipmarina.co.uk

Craobh Marina, South of Oban tel: 01852 500222 craobhmarina@talk21.com www.craobhmarina.co.uk

Fairlie Quay Marina, Largs tel: 01475 568267 info@fairliequaymarina.co.uk www.fairliequaymarina.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

argyll and the islands

ARGYLL AND THE ISLANDS have a larger coastline than that of France, and are regarded by many as one of the finest sailing areas in the world. The plethora of islands ensures that sheltered waters are always available for a pleasant day sail, whilst for those seeking greater adventure it is also possible to undertake longer coastal and offshore passages. The region has much to offer the visiting sailor, with a wide variety of sheltered anchorages together with many moorings, harbours and marinas. In recent years the facilities available have seen dramatic improvements with the installation of several pontoon systems with associated facilities in some of the areas more remote lochs and harbours creating an excellent chain of facilities stretching far to the North. The area is home to all the animals featured in Scotland’s Big 5 during the Year of Natural Scotland 2013 and offers all visitors an excellent chance to see them all in their natural habitats. Sailors arriving from the south or east will usually arrive from one of two directions - the Mull of Kintyre or the Crinan Canal, which has a reputation as ‘Scotland’s Prettiest Shortcut’. Many Scottish sailors will often start their season in the Firth of Clyde and then move through to the west coast for the summer months through this picturesque short cut, and will usually

break their journey at one of the pontoons along the canal to take advantage of the pubs and hotels at Ardrishaig, Lochgilphead, Cairnbaan and Crinan. The journey can be done in as little as four hours, whilst for those who wish to take a more leisurely approach the transit licence allows you up to three days to complete the passage. For those short crewed or just wishing a more relaxed approach to the canal an ‘assisted passage’ service is also now available. The much anticipated new facilities block in Crinan opened in 2013 offering sailors all the amenities required at the end of a canal trip or tiring sea passage. SOUND OF JURA Those arriving from the Irish Sea via the North Channel and Mull of Kintyre, or those visiting from Northern Ireland, will usually sail north via the Sound of Jura. They will often make their first landfall at Islay, Jura or Gigha. All three islands have mooring facilities for the visiting sailor, whilst Islay also boasts pontoon facilities at Port Ellen. Jura (Island of Deer) also has new pontoons at Craighouse (suitable for dinghies) and has upgraded the 16 moorings in the bay. Both Islay and Jura are well known for their distilleries; Islay has a total of eight and Jura has one, most of which have their own moorings or small pontoons for visiting boats. The more pastoral island of Gigha has

39 Craobh Haven © Scottish Viewpoint.

a reputation for fine sandy beaches, and in recent years has also upgraded the offerings for visiting sailors with a large number of serviced moorings and a short stay pontoon planned for 2014. For those who seek a quiet anchorage for the night then Lowlandmans Bay on the east side of Jura offers shelter from most wind directions, whilst Loch Tarbert on the west side of Jura is a favourite with many local sailors. However, seclusion is usually guaranteed, together with stunning sunsets and the opportunity to see the deer come down to the waters edge in the evening and otters hunting along the rocky shore line. For those with an interest in geology the northern shores of the loch also comprise some of the best examples of raised beaches to be found within the UK. Sailors remaining within the Sound of Jura have the option of venturing up West Loch Tarbert or Lochs Sween and/or Caolisport on the eastern (mainland) side of the Sound. West Loch Tarbert extends deep into the Kintyre peninsula, with the head of the loch being less than a mile from the harbour of Tarbert on the eastern side of the peninsula.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

ge

Ardfern Yacht Centre Ardfern Yacht Centre is a marina and full service boatyard with comprehensive onsite Chandlery, situated in an idyllic natural harbour at the head of Loch Craignish at the northern Eilean end of the nshaig Sound of Jura. Providing shelter in all weathers on a choice of pontoons or moorings the marina benefits from the local amentities in the village of Ardfern, all within easy walking distance.

2

00

B8

shallow water

FG FR workshop

Fish Pier D

FW

ARDFERN, by LOCHGILPHEAD, ARGYLL, PA31 8QN T: 01852 500 247 F: 01852 500 624

Fl.G.3s

shallow water

Marina Entrance

office@ardfernyacht.co.uk www.ardfernyacht.co.uk

Fl.R.3s

Craobh Marina Marina Entrance

Craobh Marina is the perfect location for exploring the magnificent West Highlands of Scotland. This unique marina is situated in a natural deep harbour and offers 250 fully serviced pontoon berths and all boat yard services. Personal service from our friendly staff will make you want to return again and again.

Iso.WRG.5s

A B C

D

D

Wast OiI

E

CRAOBH MARINA, by LOCHGILPHEAD, ARGYLL, PA31 8UA T: 01852 500 222 F: 01852 500 252 enquire@craobhmarina.co.uk www.craobhmarina.co.uk

Crinan Basin

Crinan Boat Yd

D

2FG & FR(vert)

Fl.WG.3s

an

in

th pa

ot

fo l na

Ca

Crinan Basin

Cr

14

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Crinan Basin enjoys a unique blend of stunning views, yachts, and fishing vessels landing fresh seafood. The Vic 32 steam puffer adds a majestic presence to the basin. Visitors can walk or cycle along the towpath, watch boats negotiate the 15 locks and enjoy the breathtaking scenery found in this part of the country. It really is the ideal base to stop for a few days and explore everything the area has to offer. A new facility block is currently under construction and will benefit those visiting the canal basin. The build is in partnership with the Sail West project and funding from the INTERREG 1V European Union Regional Development Fund. CRINAN CANAL OFFICE, PIER SQUARE, ARDRISHAIG, ARGYLL PA30 8DZ T: 01546 603210 F: 01546 603941 Office T: 01546 830285 Crinan Sea Lock enquiries@scottishcanals.co.uk www.scottishcanals.co.uk

argyll and the islands

the season. Whilst the town itself does not yet have a marina of its own there is a landing pontoon and 16 visitor moorings located at the North end of Cardingmill Bay; operated by Oban Bay Community Berthing. Full marina services are provided by Oban Marina on the island of Kerrera for which it is advisable to book your berth in advance during peak periods. The marina currently runs a free water taxi to the mainland and town centre, landing at the North Pier in Oban where visiting yachts are also able to lie alongside for short periods. In addition to the usual supermarkets and shops Oban also has a selection of interesting landmarks and view points. A short distance north of Oban there is another marina at Dunstaffnage with on site bar and restaurant. The final facility for visiting sailors in this area is in Loch Creran at Barcaldine Marine which has more than 50 moorings and an embarkation pontoon.

Looking north over Oban Marina, Kerrera to the Firth of Lorne, Argyll © Dennis Hardley.

There are a number of anchorages within the loch, and an old pier at the eastern limit. Loch Sween is the most visited of the three; the MacCormaig Isles at the entrance offer a sheltered anchorage on Eilean Mor with a ruined monastery making an interesting trip ashore. At the head of the loch lies the small village of Tayvallich offering a small shop, café and lively inn which hosts regular traditional music sessions featuring local talent. The village bay offers superb shelter from all wind directions, and has 3 sheltered visitor’s moorings and a few pontoons which are suitable for boats to around 11m, payment can be made for both by use of an honesty box at the gangway. If weather conditions are stable then an alternative anchorage can be found at The Fairy Isles a short distance from the village where a barbeque can be had ashore whilst watching the local seal colony and the occasional Osprey. Further north both Loch Crinan and the Sound of Jura lead into the wonderful sailing areas of Lochs Craignish, Shuna and Melfort. All three lochs boast excellent marina facilities at Ardfern Yacht Centre, Craobh Haven and Kilmelford Yacht Haven respectively, with further yard facilities available at Crinan. Numerous anchorages exist for those who prefer, such as those up the east side of Loch Craignish where shelter is again available from every wind angle. On the west side of the loch you will also find the sheltered loch known locally as ‘The Lagoon’ where, thanks to the Craignish Lagoon Mooring Association (CLMA), a clean bottom anchoring area is defined between red and green buoys. Visitors are

welcome to land at the CLMA slip at the north of the anchorage, convenient to the road side. The CLMA have also made two visitors moorings available for overnight use. These are marked with a yellow V for Visitor, and payment for upkeep can be made by use of an honesty box provided at the slip. The Dorus Mor lies at the south end of the Craignish peninsula and forms the first of the important tidal gates in this area. A general comment is that whilst the tides may be strong at times they are predictable, and provided the visiting sailor can read a tide table and tidal stream atlas they should present no real difficulties. The Loch Melfort Hotel at the mouth of the loch also offers visiting yachts free mornings with pub grub and award winning fine dinning available ashore in a hotel which must have some of the best views in Scotland. FIRTH OF LORNE AND OBAN Travelling north via one of the tidal gates of the Sound of Luing, Cuan Sound (very interesting pilotage) or the Gulf of Corryvreckan brings the sailor to the Firth of Lorne - the island of Mull to the west and the mainland to the east. After passing the islands of Easdale and Luing many boats will stop at the popular anchorage of Puilladobhrainn (Pool of the Otter) from where there is a pleasant evening walk over the hill to the ‘Bridge over the Atlantic’ and the local inn. A short distance further north it is possible to follow the buoyed channel and venture into Loch Feochan and take a mooring at Ardoran Marine in the north west corner of the loch. Oban is the principal town and port of the area; it has most major facilities and is the focal point for many sailing events during

Boats making for the Caledonian Canal will continue north up Loch Linnhe to Corpach, passing the popular anchorage of Port Appin en route, or taking one of the 10 complimentary moorings owned by the Pierhouse Hotel . Further stopping opportunities exist at Loch Leven (for boats able to pass under the Ballahulish Bridge) and at Corran and Fort William during settled weather. SOUND OF MULL Sailors venturing further west will head up the Sound of Mull, passing Duart Castle as they enter the Sound. This is the final tidal gate in the area, and west of here the tides are typically less than one knot. Lochaline lies a short distance further up the Sound on the north shore and, whilst very sheltered, used to require anchoring overnight in deep water. New pontoons were installed in 2012 by the Morvern Community Development Company, allowing visiting boats to berth on the west side of the Loch and for crews

Barcaldine Marine

Service pontoon, 80 moorings, parking, showers, laundry and drying facilities, free Wi-Fi, secure dinghy & outboard stowage, full boatyard facilities , undercover and outside storage, concrete standing with power and water. BARCALDINE MARINE, BARCALDINE, OBAN, PA37 1SE T: 01631 720291 M: 07767 380235 moorings@barcaldinemarine.co.uk www.barcaldinemarine.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

41

tobermory Tobermory is the main town on Mull and is popular with visitors of all ages. Tobermory Harbour offers a range of berthing options including up to 50 visitor berths on the pontoons with excellent shoreside facilities, including toilets, showers, laundry and WiFi at the Harbour Building. Within walking distance of the harbour are an excellent range of restaurants, bars, bank and shops catering for most needs including a chandlery. As well as the Marine Exhibition at the Harbour Building, you can visit a Distillery, Museum,

Arts Centre and Theatre. Visitors can also take beautiful walks in the adjacent Aros Park or to the Lighthouse. Should your visit coincide with inclement weather then Tobermory provides

an excellent base from which to explore Mull & Iona by local service bus or a explore the sheltered waters of Loch Sunart. www.tobermory.co.uk

Beautiful Kiloran Bay on the island of Colonsay Argyll © Dennis Hardley.

hitting the wall - stone skimming on easdale Easdale lies about 200 metres off the Island of Seil, which itself is connected to the mainland by the 200 year-old Clachan Bridge, the “Bridge over the Atlantic”. The island has had a colourful history. Between the 17th and 20th centuries it was an important centre for slate quarrying and had as many as seven working quarries, some being 300 feet below sea level. Together with other quarries on the neighbouring islands of Seil, Luing and Belnahua, the island gave its name to the famous Easdale Slate which was exported to Glasgow, Ireland and beyond. A storm in 1881 flooded the quarries and the last slate was finally cut in the 1950s. One of the disused quarries now forms the perfect arena for the annual World Stone Skimming Championships, which are held in September. An assortment of prizes is awarded to competitors, in particular ‘The Bertie’, named after the event’s founder, presented to the Easdale Islander who skims the furthest and ‘The Old Tosser Walking Stick’, for contestants over 60 with the longest skim. The real champions can hit the back wall of the quarry with ease. We visited the site in July and had great fun perfecting our skimming techniques (some more successfully than others!). Nevertheless, it was agreed that with a bit more practice ‘Team Moonshadow’ might be a real contender in 2014. For more information on Easdale Island, stone skimming and this unique event visit: www.stoneskimming.com.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Pauline Taylor Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd

Tobermory is the main town on Mull and is a popular destination for the majority of visiting boats, particularly those with young children. It has benefited from further improvements to the pontoons and a modern shower block and toilets for visiting sailors in the Harbour Association building. The mooring facilities have also been upgraded and rationalised, and as a result it is now usually possible to avoid having to anchor in the bay on all but the busiest of weeks. The town is a useful refuelling point for both vessels and crew, and has many famous watering holes as well as a distillery. At this point it is perhaps worth illustrating just how useful the tides can be in assisting with passage making along this part of

the coast. Back at Crinan low water is approximately one hour before Oban, and the actual tidal flow turns about one before low water by the shore. The northwest going flood does not turn at Tobermory until 15 minutes after high water Oban. Therefore, by timing your departure from Crinan, Ardfern or Craobh Haven for two hours before low water Oban it is possible to carry a fair tide for over eight hours up to Tobermory. Typical ‘tidal lift’ is well over a knot, increasing the time that one is able to continue with sails rather than engine. Naturally, there is a price to pay for this bonus, and it is that it is usually possible to carry the south east going ebb tide for just five hours or so but, as many find out, this gives more excuses for dropping the hook and relaxing. THE INNER HEBRIDES Venturing west from Tobermory out of the Sound of Mull one is presented with a number of route choices – if time permits then the northern option will take you

around Ardnamurchan and into the sailing waters around Skye and the North West, often via the Small Isles, whilst heading west across the Sea of the Hebrides will take you to the outer islands of Barra, Harris and Uist. For those on a limited timescale it is probable that these destinations will have to wait for another trip, and instead the choice will either be to head west for the islands of Coll and Tiree, or to turn southwards along the western side of Mull. Both routes involve open water sailing, and are often rewarded with sightings of whales, basking sharks, dolphins, porpoise and numerous sea birds.

argyll and the islands

to be able to step ashore. 2013 saw the accompanying facilities block open offering visitors showers, toilets, laundrette and Wifi access. Entrance in and out of the Loch usually requires a favourable tide, which is the case with many west coast lochs.

The Island of Coll has one very sheltered bay at Arinagour, the main town on the island, where there are a limited number of moorings and plenty of suitable anchorages; the moorings were rearranged in 2011 which appears to have improved matters. The neighbouring island of Tiree is better suited to a daytime anchorage as most of the bays are more exposed - the island is most famous

43

www.sailscotland.co.uk

for its very high sunshine hours (more than 1400 per year), sandy beaches and windsurfing. As well as hosting the Wave Classic windsurfing event the Tiree events calander now boosts a multi award winning traditional/folk music festival, held each summer adjacent to the stunning Crossapol Bay beach. The west side of Mull has a number of sheltered anchorages, mostly around the island of Ulva, and sailing along this western coastline allows the Treshnish Isles and Staffa to be visited, home of Fingals Cave. It is possible to anchor and view the cave from either the island or a tender during settled weather, otherwise it will be necessary to lie off and view from afar. Further south lies the island of Iona and its world famous Abbey. The main town on the Ross of Mull is Bunessan, where it is possible to anchor in a number of bays. Visitors are advised to anchor clear of the fairway to the main pier which is used by fishing boats all year round. The peninsula also contains many fine anchorages, including Tinkers Hole and Carsaig, from where the visiting sailor can choose to return home by either heading east through the Torran Rocks to pick up their outward track, or heading south to Colonsay and then on south through the Sound of Islay and back into the Sound of Jura. EVENTS The Clyde Yacht Clubs Association also now includes details of events organised by other west coast sailing clubs and associations that were previously contained on the West Highlands and Islands Sailing Club Association. At present they list more than 30 events, but this increases as the season starts. Whilst many events are for club sailors, there are some which are also suitable for visiting yachtsmen. Ulva, Isle of Mull © Scottish Viewpoint.

The first of these is the Owen Sails/Ardfern Yacht Centre Round Mull race. The race consists of three passages, Oban-Tobermory, Tobermory-Bunessan and Bunessan-Oban, and has both white sail and spinnaker classes. The 2014 event is to take place between the 27th and 29th June, full details are available from www.obansailingclub.org. The largest of the west coast regatta events is the West Highland Yachting Week, which takes place between Craobh Haven, Oban and Tobermory. It is one of those rare regattas that moves from centre to centre during the event, offering competitors an ever-changing scene on 80 miles of coastline along Scotland’s beautiful west coast. An attractive combination of round-the-buoys and passage racing is supported by the regatta’s excellent social programme. 2014 see a major change to the event with the regatta week being removed form its traditional August slot to the week of July 12th – 18th, further changes to the

Tele shot of Eigga and Rhum from Arisaig © Dennis Hardley.

traditional race program are expected before the start of the regatta. Details available from www. whyw.co.uk. Whilst the majority of racing events are of the traditional regatta type, there are other notable events which are worthy of special mention. The first of these is the Scottish Islands Peak Race (www.scottishislandspeakrace.com), a three day event which takes place between the 16th and 19th May 2014. The race starts in Oban by runners from each boat completing a short run around the town; this is then followed by a sail over to Mull where the runners have to scale and descend Ben More before rejoining the boats. Crews then sail down to Craighouse where the runners scale the three Paps; an overnight sail round the Mull of Kintyre to Arran then follows, where runners scale Goat Fell before a final dash across to the finish at Troon. A similar event is the Three Peaks Yacht Race between Barmouth in north Wales and Fort William in Scotland, and which passes through the Argyll cruising waters en route. Competitors have to sail over 389 miles, cycle 18 miles, run 72 miles and climb over 14,000 feet. The event starts on the 7th June 2014, and entry details are available from www.threepeaksyachtrace.co.uk. For the less competitive there is an enormous range of ‘cruising in company’ type events, the most famous of which was the Classic Malts Cruise. This particular event is no longer organised and, instead, the World Cruising Club now organise the Malts Cruise that will start with pre-event activities in Oban on Saturday 11th July. The event ‘proper’ will then start on Sunday 12th July with a parade of sail around Oban Bay before heading northwards up the Sound of Mull to Tobermory and then on around Ardnamurchan to the island of Rum for some traditional entertainment. Crews will then be able to choose their own mini-cruise before meeting up again at the next rendezvous on the Isle of Skye at the Talisker Distillery.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

clyde cruising club sailing directions The CCC Directions are being merged with Imray’s Yachtsman’s Pilot series. The first of these new editions, Firth of Clyde, was published in January 2012 followed soon after by Outer Hebrides in 2013 and the third volume, Ardnamurchan to Cape Wrath, was launched at the 2014 London Boat Show. Work on the final merged edition, Kintyre to Ardnamurchan is currently underway and a totally new volume covering all the Northern Isles and the north coast of Scotland is also in preparation. Updates and amendments to the new Imray books and the existing CCC books that are still current are posted on the Club’s

website, www. clyde.org and on www.imray.com For information about other activities of the CCC and about how to join see: http://www.clyde.org/index.php/content/ view/108/99/ The CCC/ Imray Sailing Directions may be purchased from chandlers, online (www.clyde.org - where sample pages and updates can be viewed) or direct from the Club’s office on 0141 221 2774.

Clyde Cruising Club Publications Limited, in conjunction with Imray, publishes an excellent set of sailing directions which are widely recognised as ‘must have’ for cruising in West and North Scotland. A4 format, clearly drawn plans placed close to the relevant text and spiral binding make the books ideal for cockpit use.

sailingalmanac.com All of the marina plans included in this version of the Sail Scotland brochure have been provided by SailingAlmanac. com, a FREE portable alternative to conventional Almanacs. It’s a website specially formatted for mobile phones that looks and behaves just like an App. Better still, because it’s a website, there’re no downloads and no updates to maintain - you have instant access to the latest information the moment you switch on. Furthermore, it takes up no valuable storage space on your mobile. The Almanac covers the three simple questions every yachtsmen wants to know; What are the short term weather prospects? Where will the tide take me? and using the comprehensive Marina Guide - Where can I spend the night? and if that’s not enough there’s a menu of the UK’s Top 40 Passage Plans. Further sections of the Almanac include a detailed diary of nautical

events, a comprehensive reference section, and there’s a regional breakdown of the UK’s Navigation News. This news primarily focuses on localised navigation news not normally published in Notices to Mariners, and features such news as; lists of defective Nav Aids, buoys temporarily off station, closures to navigation and gunnery range schedules, etc.

the Channel coastline from Ushant to the Hook of Holland. www.SailingAlmanac.com

The Marina Guide is pitched towards the visiting yachtsman and is one of the most comprehensive handheld guides around. Detailed marina plans show the location of all the visitors berths and facilities, and the supporting editorial provides berthing charges for overnight visitors, and pilotage into the marina. SailingAlmanac covers all the UK, including the whole of Ireland and the Channel Islands, as well as

www.sailscotland.co.uk

45

www.sailscotland.co.uk

skye and the north west

47 The coastal waters around Skye, the Outer Hebrides and the North West of Scotland provide a range of cruising grounds with some of the most spectacular landscapes in the world. As with Argyll and the Islands there are plenty of options available, and an almost infinite combination of routes and destinations are possible. Whilst the nature of the sailing has itself not changed, the recent addition of pontoon facilities at a number of locations has made life more straightforward for some visitors.

settled it is also possible to anchor just north of Ardnamurchan in Sanna Bay which makes an excellent lunchtime stop; however, its exposed location does not make it suitable for an overnight stay.

THE SMALL ISLES The Small Isles form a compact cruising ground of their own. Rum is the largest island of the group and is owned by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) who run the island as a National Nature Reserve. The island is formed from an old volcanic plug, and has its own Cuillin (rocky ridge) which is often Rounding Ardnamurchan Point the visiting confused with that on Skye when viewed sailor is rewarded with a rapidly changing from a distance. SNH offer guided day walks vista as first the Small Isles of Muck, Eigg, around the island in the summer looking at Canna and Rum come into view, and then the nature and wildlife of the island. Visitors the even more dramatic skyline of the are also able to follow two small nature trails Cuillins on Skye begin to dominate the horizon. Whilst en route to these areas from laid out around the village of Kinloch where there is also a village shop that is usually open the south a diversion into Loch Moidart is in the evening. A guided tour of Kinloch well worthwhile, with another alternative being to take a mooring at the excellent and Castle is a must - the castle almost exactly as it was left in the 1950’s by the former well equipped boat yard at Arisaig a short owners, the wealthy but eccentric Bullough distance to the north. If conditions are family - www.isleofrum.com. Kyle of Lochalsh with bridge over to the Isle of Skye © Scottish Viewpoint.

Eigg is the second largest island of the group,

Castlebay Island, Barra © Dennis Hardley.

and is owned by a Community Trust which purchased the island in 1997, the most recent of inhabitants in the 8,000 plus years that the island has been inhabited. The community trust organise many musical events during the year to which visitors are invited (details at www.isleofeigg.net). As with Rum the island is rich in wildlife and geology, whilst for a spot of ‘sun and surf’ Laig Beach and the Singing Sands are recommended. Canna is the most westerly of the Small Isles and is owned by the National Trust for Scotland who have farmed it since 1981. Like the rest of the island group Canna has many sites of archaeological interest and has links to the Neolithic, Columban and Viking eras. It has been a bird sanctuary since 1938, and over 150 species of birds have been monitored in the last 40 years. There are now ten moorings in Canna harbour www.theisleofcanna.co.uk. Whilst it may be the smallest of the Small

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

skye and the north west

Kyleakin and the Skye bridge, Highland © Dennis Hardley.

Isles, Muck is also the most fertile, and has been owned by the same family for more than a century. Although small it is also very welcoming to visiting yachts; the island web site www.isleofmuck.com gives directions to the two anchorages on the island, Gallanach and Port Mor. Of the two, Port Mor is much easier to navigate with a clearly buoyed channel, perches at the entrance and a sectored light. The holding in port is also good with a sandy bottom.

Looking towards South Uist from Eilgarry, Barra © Dennis Hardley.

SOUND OF SLEAT AND THE EAST SHORE OF SKYE To the north of the Small Isles the ‘usual’ circuit would be to continue north eastwards up the Sound of Sleat, visiting the fishing port of Mallaig to the east or Armadale to the west – the latter has traditionally been favoured by yachts and offers moorings and other yacht services at Isle of Skye Yachts. However, as part of the Malin Waters Sail West project a step-ashore pontoon facility for up to 40 boats has now been built at Mallaig. Mallaig offers an excellent opportunity to fully re-provision the boat, and is also a useful point for crew changes with good train connections on what was recently voted one of the best railway journeys in the world, and ferry connections to Armadale, Inverie and the Small Isles. A visit into Loch Nevis forms part of the itinerary for many visitors, with the Old Forge at Inverie offering an enticing combination of free moorings, a landing pier, excellent food, drink and entertainment, whilst others will head for Isle Ornsay on the west side of the Sound where the Duisdale Hotel has five moorings. The northern head of the Sound of Sleat is formed by the tidal gate of Kyle Rhea where the mountains literally meet the sea. To the north lies Loch Alsh, with pontoon facilities for visiting yachts available at both Kyle of Lochalsh on the mainland shore and at Kyleakin on Skye - both maintained by the Highland Council. The former offers train connections to Inverness and a good range of shops. The eastern end of the Loch is home to the castle Eilean Donan, whilst

the western end is crossed by the more recent Skye Bridge, under which all but the very largest of yachts can safely navigate (clearance 29m at H.A.T.). Immediately to the north of Loch Alsh is Loch Carron; many cruising boats will visit the picturesque village of Plockton in the south east of the loch, which has pontoon facilities for visiting boats as well as a large number of serviced moorings - pontoons are available for daytime embarkation only. Venturing still further north the busy port of Portree on the north east of Skye is often visited (now with upgraded daytime pontoon facilities and sixteen visitor moorings), www. portreemoorings.co.uk Portree offers a good selection of shore-side facilities but some people will favour the remote island of Rona. Here the most popular anchorage is Acairseid Mhor (Big Harbour) which has one mooring available and a dinghy pontoon. Ashore there are modest facilities and some interesting walks - www.isleofrona.com. Some sailors will choose to head for the eastern (mainland) side of the Inner Sound and perhaps visit Loch Torridon – dinghy pontoon at Shieldaig, Loch Gairloch pontoons available in Flowerdale Bay - or the sheltered anchorage at Badachro. From here the choice is to either continue north along the mainland shore, perhaps as far as Cape Wrath, passing places such as Ullapool (moorings), Lochinver (upgraded pontoons) and Kinlochbervie (pontoons) or visit some of the remote lochs on this part of the coast en route to the Cape, and then perhaps

www.sailscotland.co.uk

49

Mallaig Harbour Jary’s Wharf

30

A8

The Morrison Building

Marina Entrance

on ati St Rd V

HARBOUR OFFICE, MALLAIG, INVERNESS-SHIRE PH41 4QB. T: 01687 462154 F: 01687 462172 PONTOON OFFICE: 07824 331031

y

t Ba

Eas

Mallaig’s new 50 berth yachting pontoon facility is now operational providing an ideal location for experiencing and exploring the magnificent sailing opportunities available on the West Coast of Scotland. Engineering, welding and electronics services available as well as chandlery, fuel and water. Eight visitor moorings also available.

info@mallaigharbourauthority.com www.mallaig-yachting-marina.com

Towards Kyleakin and the Skye Bridge © Dennis Hardley.

Ultimate Skye

Multi Award-winning Hotel & Restaurant Moorings: Lat 57 09.500 N, Long 05 47.700 W DUISDALE HOUSE HOTEL| www.duisdale.com | 01471 833 202

remote archipelagoes Amongst the many hundreds of islands which provide the rich diversity of Scottish cruising waters there are three groups which stand out as being worth of special mention. All are remote, and are really only suitable for visiting during settled weather as their anchorages tend to be susceptible to swell. The most westerly of the trio is St Kilda which is described in detail elsewhere in this magazine and is Europe’s most important bird breeding site. If conditions are suitable for a trip out to St Kilda then it is probable that they will also favour a stop at The Monarch Islands on either the outward or return passage, best known for their seal populations. The final group are The Shiants, which lie off the south east coast of Lewis. Like St Kilda, they also have an internationally important bird population.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

WEST COAST OF SKYE The west coast of Skye is deeply incised and as a result has a number of lochs that are worthy of exploration. The scenery is spectacular, with cliffs that rival those of St Kilda and every loch offering views of the Cuillin and wildlife spotting opportunities. The ferry port of Uig lies at the North West end of the island; south of this there are limited harbours and facilities. Although this areas should be approached cautiously in unsettled weather, Lochs Dunvegan, Loch Bay (moorings), Harport (moorings) and Scavaig are all worthy of exploration, as is the island of Soay.

All of the islands share many common characteristics - stunning scenery, a strong island community and the cleanest air in Europe. Full provisioning services can be found at Stornoway although many facilities will be closed on Sundays. Tarbert, (Harris) and Castle Bay, (Barra) have a selection of shops with some provisions usually available at Lochmaddy, Lochboisdale and Eriskay. Be prepared to find that bread and newspapers are not available every day! Moorings are available at Rodel (Harris), Berneray (North Uist), Lochmaddy (North Uist), Lochboisdale (South Uist), Acairseid (Eriskay) and Castlebay (Barra).

At the head of Loch Dunvegan is Dunvegan Castle, ancestral home of the Clan Macleod. Further south lies Loch Bracadale, guarded to the west by the spectacular pinnacles known as MacLeod’s Maidens; Loch Harport extends to the south east of this and is home to the Talisker Distillery, the only one on Skye. Finally, sailing inside the island of Soay brings the visitor to Loch Scavaig, considered to be one of the most spectacular anchorages in the world. THE OUTER HEBRIDES The Outer Hebrides are well worth a visit if time and weather conditions allow. They are home to some of the finest beaches in the world, although many of these are located on the exposed west coast. The east coast of the islands is where most ports and anchorages are to be found, and is the area most commonly visited by cruising yachtsmen. The island chain runs approximately north to south for some 120 miles, and consists of five major islands and numerous smaller ones. The northernmost islands of Lewis and Harris form the same land mass divided by a narrow isthmus; to the south of the Sound of Harris lies North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist, Eriskay and Barra respectively.

The Shiant Islands lie approximately 5 miles south east of Lewis and are well worth a stop-over enroute from Skye to the outer islands. They are one of the great birdstations of the northern hemisphere, with some 250,000 seabirds, including puffins, guillemots, razorbills, shags and great skuas, arriving there in the summer to breed. The islands are privately owned and, whilst visitors are welcome, they are asked to stay away during the lambing season of April and May each year – see www.shiantisles.net for further details. Harris has the most mountainous landscape of the Outer Hebrides, its name deriving from the old Norse for ‘High Land’. The east coast of the island is typically rugged whilst the exposed west coast has numerous sandy beaches, bordered by the machair lands - best seen in the spring months. A short distance of the west coast of Harris lies Taransay, made famous by the Castaway television series.

skye and the north west

seeking the shelter provided by Loch Erribol to the east, or to venture west once more. Some may choose to cross the Minch to the Outer Isles, possibly heading for Stornoway on Lewis, whilst others will continue down the west coast of Skye.

Harris and the Uist are separated by the Sound of Harris, which provides one of only two remaining breaks in the main body of the Outer Hebrides through which boats can reach the west side of the islands. Although the Sound is almost five miles wide in places it is also shallow and littered with many islands. Extremely careful pilotage is therefore required, together with the detailed Admiralty chart of the Sound. For those prepared to make the effort some of the islands within the Sound are themselves worthy of a visit - most notably Pabbay and Berneray. Fair Isle north lighthouse © New Horizon Sailing.

Lewis is the largest and most populous of the islands; the main port of Stornoway plays a most important role in the lives of islanders, and has a number of pontoons in the inner harbour at which visiting boats can berth. The town also hosts the annual Hebridean Maritime Festival (www.sailhebrides.info). In addition to a rugged coastal landscape and beautiful beaches Lewis also has many world famous archaeological sites including the Iron Age Carloway Broch and Neolithic Callanish Stones.

North Uist, Benbecula and South Uist all lie between the Sound of Harris and the Sound of Barra, and are connected by a series of causeways. The islands each have a distinctive feel, with North Uist being best known for its stunning beaches, rich birdlife and the ferry port at Lochmaddy. Although the smallest island of the three, Benbecula is the second most built up area of the Outer Hebrides. South Uist is the second largest island in the chain; its western coastline is an unbroken white shell beach which is almost 20 miles long. The eastern coast is broken

loch moidart Loch Moidart lies to the north east of Ardnamurchan Point on the mainland shore. On the chart it does not appear to be anything special, and reference to the pilot books will strongly suggest that sailors of a nervous disposition are best advised to give it a wide berth! However, the Loch is a favourite with not only charter skippers and local sailors, but also with international yachting journalists. The entrance is certainly far from straightforward but, provided the rocks guarding the entrance to the north channel have been correctly identified, the hazards are well known and can be easily followed. This is certainly a case where accurate pilotage is more important than being able to use a chart plotter, with the final gap being only ten metres wide, but once you have squeezed through this the Loch opens up to a much larger void. The main anchorage is very sheltered, and offers good holding and total peace and tranquillity.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

51

long weekend from skye As a yacht charter operator, I am often asked by customers what they can do in three of four days cruising from our base at Armadale on the Isle of Skye. I was able to take a short break myself during August and try out one of the options. Joined by friends Susan and Ian who provided and stowed all the provisions on board the Jeanneau 36i “Janet Macarthur”, we set off late afternoon on Saturday heading for Inverie in Loch Nevis. It was a clear sunny day and we had a fantastic sail across the Sound of Sleat. Inverie was busy with several yachts already there but we were still able to find a mooring and to go ashore for an excellent meal at the Old Forge. The plan was to go to Loch Harport on Sunday which is a distance of 40 miles from Loch Nevis so we set off early. Motoring out of Loch Nevis on a pleasant but not particularly sunny day, we saw several porpoises, seals and a rather distant whale. Sailing down to the Point of Sleat under full sail we passed a school of dolphins heading the opposite direction but they didn’t stop to chat! After an excellent sail we dropped the sails just before the entrance to Loch Bracadale as the wind had dropped. Carbost

abundance in Soay Sound. We were arriving at Low Water which made the slightly tricky navigation going into Loch na Cuilce easier as the rocks could be clearly seen below the surface. A space was quickly found among the three yachts already there and the anchor dropped and made secure. It was absolutely flat calm with the yachts reflected in the water so I decided to row ashore and have a short walk up to the lonely Loch Coruisk – although it wasn’t particularly lonely that day

as there were other visitors there! It is an awesome but slightly forbidding Loch and I was quickly reminded of this as a sudden squall arrived and the tourists fled back to their boats! Back on board my friends had been enjoying a relaxing afternoon and by this time the tide flooded enough to get into Soay Harbour for the night. Once we had carefully navigated over the bar and into the pool there was plenty of space to anchor and we had a good meal on board and quiet night. We didn’t have time to go ashore at Soay but there are walks to be enjoyed there and the ruins of the shark factory built by Gavin Maxwell in the 1940s are clearly visible. Tuesday was once again calm and we had a gentle sail back towards the Point of Sleat. We were rewarded by the sight of two minke whales which was a fantastic conclusion to the trip. The three days out sailing had given me a most refreshing glimpse of the fantastic scenery our local area has to offer with good food and company. Charmian Entwistle Isle of Skye Yachts www.skyeyachts.co.uk

is quite a long way up Loch Harport but there is an iconic view of the Cuillins when you arrive. We picked up a mooring outside the Old Inn and went ashore for a seafood meal – this location is also handy if you want to visit Talisker, Skye’s only Distillery. Monday morning was again dry and bright with a light breeze. Motoring out of the Loch we turned back towards the mainland with tempting vistas of the Small Isles now on our starboard side and the dramatic rock formation known as MacLeod’s Maidens behind us. The destination for the day was the head of Loch Scavaig which is one the most dramatic anchorages in Scotland if not in the world. Porpoises and seals were in

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Looking north to Muck, Skye & Eigg from Ardnamurchan, Highlands © Scottish Viewpoint.

by two large inlets, the most significant of which is Loch Boisdale in which visiting yachts can usually find a sheltered safe haven if weather conditions should deteriorate. Work is currently in progress on a marine regeneration project at Lochboisdale and work on the new 50 berth pontoon facility should be complete by spring 2015. South Uist is connected to the Isle of Eriskay by a causeway - Eriskay is the island on which the SS Politician was wrecked, leading to the novel ‘Whisky Galore’. Barra is the southernmost of the major islands which form the Outer Hebrides, and

is perhaps the most representative of the whole group. The island is particularly well known for its ceilidh dances and legendary social gatherings. Visitors who wish to get a sample of island life and landscape can take a ‘round the island’ bus trip from the main town of Castlebay after leaving their boat on one of the heavy duty moorings in the bay. The trip takes an anti-clockwise direction around the island, stopping at the island airport which, due to its beach runway, can only operate at low tide! To the south of Barra lies Vatersay, whose beaches provide a wonderful backdrop to sheltered anchorages on either side of the island. This is the last of the ‘connected islands’; although the island chain continues

ST KILDA Finally, the World Heritage Site of the archipelago of St Kilda is undoubtedly worth special mention. Lying some 40 miles to the west of the Outer Hebrides they are for many sailors their ultimate aim. They may be approached through the Sound of Harris (between South Harris and North Uist), the Sound of Barra (between Barra and South Uist) or the Sounds of Sandray, Mingulay or Pabbay (all to the south of Barra). The southern three sounds offer the most straightforward route but the longest offshore passage to St Kilda, whilst the northern duo offer a more complex (but well marked) route followed by a shorter passage, with the option to call in at the Monarch Isles en route. Settled weather is needed to venture beyond the shelter of the Outer Hebrides but, as with the whole of this area, the potential rewards are well worth the effort - the highest cliffs in Britain, truly spectacular birdlife (over one million birds in total) and the museum on the main island of Hirta. The island is a Dual World Heritage Site, and is managed by the National Trust for Scotland, SNH and the Ministry of Defence, all of which have a presence on Hirta during the summer months (www.kilda.org.uk).

puffin parade on the shiant isles The Shiants are a small group of islands lying some 4 miles off Lewis and 12 miles from the northern tip of Skye. As one of the great bird stations in the northern hemisphere, the cliffs and surrounding skies are filled with guillemots, razorbills, fulmars, kittiwakes, shags and great skuas. But what we really wanted to see were the puffins. Nearly a million of these comical birds appear from the oceans every year, taking up residence in cliff top burrows throughout the British Isles. The puffins start congregating in the waters around their breeding sites in April and generally lay their eggs during May. Throughout June and early July the birds are very active flying to and from their burrows with food for their chicks.

It was too early for the eggs to have hatched, but by July their parrot like beaks would be full of sand eels for the pufflings. A good excuse for a return visit. Pauline Taylor Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd www.symoonshadow.co.uk

The puffins on the Shiants represent one in eight of the British total and 2 percent of the world’s puffins. The islands are also the only place in the British Isles where the Black Plague rat exists in any numbers. Moonshadow visited the islands during a trip to Barra and the Uists in June and we were not disappointed! Despite their tragic-comic expressions, puffins are very approachable and we were able to get within a respectably close distance to admire their colourful tangerine feet, dapper plumage and rolling gait.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

skye and the north west

further to the south with Sandray, Pabbay(s), Mingulay and Berneray (s). Although previously populated, these islands are now a haven for birdlife and each has its own particular story to tell in the ruins that are to be seen (www.barraheritage.com). Many of the skippers rank these amongst their favourite destinations and for good reason. However, they do require settled weather in order to make a safe visit.

53

www.sailscotland.co.uk

shetland & orkney

A DAY’S SAIL from the mainland, Orkney is an archipelago of 70 islands best explored by boat. The Islands are an exciting cruising destination with an abundance of wildlife, history and outstanding coastal scenery. There are secure marinas in Stromness, Kirkwall and Westray, all with good shelter and accessible in all tides. Each marina has dedicated visitor berths and good facilities and one rover ticket allows you to berth in all three. Each of the Islands has its own unique character and local piers and visitor moorings, also included in the rover ticket, mean you can explore them all. For those sailing into Scapa Flow you pass Hoy, the highest, and most unique of the Orkney Islands. Hoy boasts excellent walks out to stunning sea cliffs at St John’s Head, The Old Man of Hoy and up the Ward Hill. Tie up in Longhope and be sure to visit the amazing Lifeboat Museum. Stromness is a picturesque and bustling small town, shaped by the sea. Yards from the historic harbour, the winding streets lead to a range of eateries, local craft shops and galleries. It is the perfect place from which to visit the sites of the west mainland of Orkney, including Skara Brae, the best preserved group of prehistoric houses in Western Europe. A truly special place. Kirkwall, the largest settlement on Orkney has many local shops, restaurants, bars and cafes where you will find warm Orcadian hospitality. It boasts many historical attractions, with St

Magnus Cathedral at its heart. Highland Park and Scapa Distilleries are also within walking distance. The Orkney Sailing Club offer a warm welcome at the Girnel, yards from the marina, with free wifi available and social events throughout the summer. From Kirkwall, follow the Viking Trail to Westray where you will find the smallest of the marinas on Orkney. The welcome there is famous; marina staff will watch you approach and meet you when you arrive. Westray, known as ‘The Queen O’ The Isles’, has it’s own historic sites, RSPB nature reserve, beaches and eating places serving fresh local seafood. Orkney offers superb sailing, whether in the sheltered waters of Scapa Flow or playing the tides while island hopping. Local sailors will be glad to advise you on the best routes and there are excellent sailing guides and other route planning information available at www.orkneymarinas.co.uk. Shetland has much in common with Orkney, including a Viking influence, and a diverse population of seabirds and other wildlife which outnumber the human population by at least a hundredfold! The islands have three National Nature Reserves and four RSPB reserves, together with a variety of native and rare breeds unique to Shetland. Shetland is something of an undiscovered cruising destination, but with yachtsmen increasingly seeking interesting sailing challenges it is finding popularity with sailors from North West

The cliffs of Hoy from Yesnaby © Scottish Viewpoint.

Europe who do not particularly wish to cross oceans. The archipelago has over 100 small islands and 900 miles of coastline, and offers a striking combination of dramatic cliffs and sheltered harbours. Nowhere on the land is more than three miles from the coast, and five millennia of history can be enjoyed at over 6,000 archaeological sites. Tidal ranges are small, typically less than 1.5 metres, although streams can be locally strong, and good pilotage is essential. Like their southern neighbour the island group has also seen a significant increase in facilities for the recreational sailor in recent years. As a result it now boasts four marinas at Lerwick, Bressay, Scalloway and Skeld, with a further 17 small marina or pontoon facilities scattered amongst the archipelago. The capital of Lerwick makes a sensible first port of call for visiting boats - the busy town has everything you might need including plenty of pubs and shops, plus a shipyard for emergency repairs. Full details about Shetland’s marinas and facilities can be found at www.shetlandmarinas.com. Yachting has an important place in the Shetland calendar, with 17 local regattas held every year as well as the Round Foula Race, the Lerwick to Skerries Race and the FjordSailing Shetland Bergen Race which takes place between the 22nd and 28th June 2014.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

55

Lerwick Harbour Lerwick Harbour, the main seaway to the Shetland Isles. Modern, expanded town centre facilities, including pontoon berthing and services accommodate all sizes of vessel. Ease of access to Shetland’s many attractions; spectacular scenery; fascinating wildlife; heritage; culture and fresh seafood. Sail along more than 1,700 miles of coast and join in local and national yachting events. A great place to meet and compete!

LERWICK PORT AUTHORITY, ALBERT BUILDING, LERWICK, SHETLAND, ZE1 0LL T: 01595 69 2991 F: 01595 69 3452 info@lerwick-harbour.co.uk www.lerwick-harbour.co.uk

lerwick and scalloway Marina Entrance

Iso.R.4s

12T

Lerwick.

Boating Club Marina

Marina Entrance Boating Club Port Arthur Visitor’s Berths

Fisheries College

Scalloway.

2FG

Marina Entrance

Fl.G.4s

Scalloway.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

A casual look at the BBC weather map will show the Shetland Isles to be far enough from the Scottish Mainland to be considered a suitable destination for only the most adventurous sailors. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Islands can be reached from the mainland by day sailing, and the numerous marinas that are scattered around the isles offer a choice of safe havens you can run to when the need takes you.

Enjoy Lerwick’s great selection of high quality restaurants, cafes and bars all within easy walking distance of the harbour. Also located nearby is the excellent Clickimin leisure complex. If you wish to find out more about Shetland’s rich heritage & culture then take a stroll along the regenerated historic waterfront and visit the fantastic new five star rated Shetland Museum and Archives.

Lerwick is the capital of Shetland and as the main centre for visiting yachts it is often the first port of call. This bustling town has all you need when making a Shetland landfall - a Tourist Information Centre, Customs, a Coastguard station, helpful staff at Lerwick Port Authority, chandlers, supermarkets, and licensed grocers specialising in marine supplies. If you have a problem, there’s a shipyard, skilled repair engineers and a lifeboat station.

Lerwick Marina is situated at Gremista, at the north end of Lerwick Harbour, about 2km from the town centre. It is run by the Marina Users Association, with whom an arrangement can be made to use a vacant berth for longer, temporary stays.

Lerwick Port Control keeps a 24 hour watch on VHF Ch 12 and visiting craft should contact the duty Port Controller on that channel before entering the harbour. The principal berth for visiting yachts is the 70 metre floating pontoon situated in the heart of town at the Small Boat Harbour. The pontoon offers good shelter and can accommodate up to 7 yachts alongside, and many more when rafted up, at all states of tide. There is an additional pontoon situated in Albert Dock which visiting yachts are welcome to use when not in use by tenders from cruise ships. Dates of use by tenders are displayed on the pontoon and at Lerwick Port Authority’s Office. Just a step along from Victoria Pier is Lerwick Boating Club, where visiting crews are always welcome to take a hot shower, use the laundry and enjoy a drink at the bar with its fine view of the harbour.

Scalloway was the capital of Shetland until the 17th century, and provides a stormproof harbour and everything a visiting yacht requires. The harbour is sheltered from all wind directions by the islands of Trondra and Burra, and can be accessed at all states of the tide and in all weather conditions. When arriving in Scalloway the visitor’s pontoon is near Scalloway Boating Club (SBC) at Port Arthur, on the western side of the outer harbour. Alternative berths are at the club’s marina at Port Arthur, at East Voe Marina by arrangement with the User’s Association, and at Blacksness Pier, on the west side of the inner harbour. The Scalloway Boating Club pontoon and the Port Arthur Marina are close to the Boating Club, which extends a legendary welcome, and Da Haaf restaurant at the Atlantic Fisheries College is a renowned seafood restaurant. www.shetlandmarinas.com

Scalloway

Follow the Viking trail

Lerwick

INVERNESS • WICK • ORKNEY • SHETLAND

• Access between east & west coasts • Day sailings between ports • Serviced marina facilities

Fair Isle

Westray

m

0n

Orkney Stromness

Kirkwall

50

h

nd

Tro

eim

en

g Ber

Wick

nm

290

Stavanger 280nm Gotebo

rg 485

Esb

jerg

nm

427

nm

www.sailnorthscotland.com

Shetland

shetland & orkney

Sail North Scotland

Lerwick Port Authority

na l

Inverness Aberdeen

Fort Augustus

t: +44 (0)1856 871313 e: info@orkneymarinas.co.uk w: orkneymarinas.co.uk

Wick Harbour Authority

Fort William

d

n a l t o c S

t: +44 (0)1955 602030 e: malcolm.bremner@wickharbour.co.uk w: wickmarina.co.uk

Inverness Marina Office t: +44 (0)1463 220501 e: info@invernessmarina.com w: invernessmarina.com

Scottish Canals

Glasgow

61

Orkney Marinas Ltd

Ca on ian Ca led

t: +44 (0)1595 692991 e: sailinginfo@visitshetland.com w: shetlandmarinas.com

Edinburgh

t: +44 (0)1463 725500 e: enquiries@scottishcanals.co.uk w: www.scottishcanals.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

east coast THE EAST COAST OF SCOTLAND has much to offer yachtsmen, be they visitors en route to other cruising areas or sailors who keep their boat in one of the increasing number of marinas or harbour facilities. Until recently the East Coast perhaps had a tendency to be seen as ‘the missing link’ in a potential circumnavigation of Britain, but recent developments mean that it is now as well served as any part of the Scottish (or indeed, British) coastline. The completion of this missing link has resulted in many new marina facilities between the border at Berwick and as far north as Wick. Many of these marinas are within former fishing harbours and, whilst some may be smaller than others, they all offer a warm welcome. Furthermore, many of the ‘unconverted’ fishing harbours are now only too pleased to welcome visiting yachts, meaning that the choice of destination is no longer automatic and a variety of passages may be planned. The popularity of Scotland as a cruising ground for continental boat owners, particularly those wishing to follow the path of Bjorn Larsson and sail ‘The Celtic Ring’, has meant that many visiting boats will now call in to some of the East Coast destinations enroute to either the Caledonian Canal or the Pentland Firth. As some of the facilities are smaller than others it is therefore advisable to check in advance whether or not a berth is likely to be available. Starting in the south, the first pontoon facility can be found at Eyemouth. Once a busy fishing harbour, it is now an increasingly common sight to see visiting yachts lying alongside. Port Edgar is still the main marina facility on this stretch of coast, from where it is possible to cruise the Firth of Forth to destinations such as the new marina at Anstruther on the Fife coast, or further east around Bass Rock. Port Edgar also hosts a busy sailing school, and offers the full range of RYA sailing courses. It also hosts a new skippered yacht charter business which offers a range of packages for customers. The marina is well suited as a temporary home for visitors from the continent who may wish to leave their boat for a few weeks whilst they fly back home from the nearby airport.

Findochty Harbour, Morayshire © Dennis Hardley.

There are further pontoon facilities available along the Forth at Granton which are ideally suited for an excursion into the city centre; the use of the harbour is shared by both the Royal Forth Yacht Club and Forth Corinthian Yacht Club, who have access to both an all tides pontoon and swinging moorings. Further north beyond Anstruther and the Fife peninsula, pontoon facilities are also available at Tayport near to the mouth of the River Tay, and a short distance across the estuary there is now a marina facility at Arbroath. North of this is the longest stretch of ‘pontoon free’ coastline, the next facility being at Peterhead Marina some 60 miles further north. However, this does not mean that there is nowhere to stop as Aberdeenshire Council now encourages yachts to visit many of its harbours along the coast. Some of these are ideally located for exploring Royal Deeside, whilst others offer a range of shops and restaurants in which to relax.

Bass Rock, Firth of Forth © Scottish Viewpoint.

Stonehaven Harbour, Aberdeen © Dennis Hardley.

Turning westwards into the Moray Firth the choice of destinations significantly increases. Both Banff and Lossiemouth boast new marina facilities, complimenting those at Whitehills and the pontoons in the picturesque harbour of Findochty. This stretch of coastline is a popular dolphin watching area, and most crews will be accompanied by dolphins riding the bow wave for at least a short distance. Vessels heading for the Caledonian Canal will head up the Firth into Inverness, passing under the Kessock Bridge en route – note that the bridge has a clearance of 29m, sufficient for most but not necessarily

www.sailscotland.co.uk

59

www.sailscotland.co.uk

east coast

Dysart Harbour, Fife © Dennis Hardley.

all yachts, and that the Canal is usually closed for two hours either side of low water during normal operating hours. Inverness Marina is a relatively new, fully serviced 150 berth marina located outside the canal entrance on the south side of the Firth, with access available at all states of the tide. This, together with a 75 berth marina at Seaport just inside the canal, makes an excellent base for exploring the city of Inverness, or a point for arranging crew changeovers, taking advantage of excellent road, rail and air links. Boats which are heading on up the coast to Orkney or beyond need not venture up the Firth, but may instead head directly from Lossiemouth to Helmsdale where there are pontoon facilities. Alternatively, the passage may be extended as far as Wick where

there is a new marina and plenty of shelter to be had inside the old harbour. This is the final stopping point before rounding Duncansby Head, where the choice is then whether to head west along Scotland’s northern coastline, northwards to Orkney and Shetland, or north east to Scandinavia. The four main marina operators between Inverness and Shetland have grouped together to create the Viking Trail to encourage greater use of the new facilities and open up cruising routes to the northern isles. Full details are available at www. sailnorthscotland.com Whilst the East Coast may be seen as a cruising route to some sailors, for others it represents their home waters and as a result there many activities which take place during

Anstruther Harbour

Ideally situated for exploring the Firth of Forth or for a stopover whilst sailing the east coast. 100 serviced pontoon berths and a wide variety of shops and restaurants adjacent to the harbour. ANSTRUTHER HARBOUR, SHORE STREET, ANSTRUTHER, FIFE, KY10 3AQ T/F: 01333 310 836 tom.fyall@fife.gov.uk

the summer months. One of the best known is the Moray Firth Flotilla which usually takes place in late June. Participating boats work their way down the Moray Firth from Wick to Portsoy, with the intention being to arrive at Portsoy in time for the Scottish Traditional Boat Festival (28th & 29th June 2014, www. stbfportsoy.com). The Festival puts a special emphasis on boat building, restoration and sailing and on associated traditional crafts including knitting, weaving and embroidery and on music and art. The 2014 programme will also include the very popular Food Fayre showcasing all that’s best in Scotland’s food and drink. East Coast Sailing Week (10th – 13th July 2014, www.ecsw.org.uk) is an annual event covering the east coast of Scotland and the

Peterhead Bay Marina

You are assured a friendly welcome at the fully serviced Peterhead Bay Marina. Ideal location for vessels heading along the east coast of Scotland or sailing to/ from the continent. PETERHEAD BAY MARINA HARBOUR OFFICE, WEST PIER, PETERHEAD, AB42 1DW T: 01779 483 600 F: 01779 475 715 marina@peterheadport.co.uk www.peterheadport.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

61

Aberdeenshire Harbours

Grid Reference: 5

Fl.R.1s

Well serviced, picturesque harbours with local facilities, visitor attractions and museums. Ideally placed to explore from Royal Deeside to the Moray Firth, including the Whisky and Castle Trails. Experience a warm welcome at the many restaurants and hotels in the area providing excellent Scottish cruising.

rocks

WC

Fl.R.4s

Ne

wQ

ua

Ra

Mid

dle

ay

White n

5¡T

Fl.4s

Marina Entrance

Je

tty

Jett

y

Old Quay

side

Quay

East W all

danger

shelf

Banff Harbour Marina Gourdon Harbour Johnshaven Harbour Macduff Harbour Portsoy Harbour Rosehearty Harbour Stonehaven Harbour

rocks

53

A9

BANFF HARBOUR MARINA

ilw

y

29

beach

STONEHAVEN HARBOUR

danger

01261 815544 01569 762741 01569 762741 01261 832236 01261 815544 01346 571796 01569 762741

ABERDEENSHIRE COUNCIL, CAPE HOUSE, SEAFIELD STREET, BANFF AB45 1ED T: 01261 813483 F: 01261 812072 george.cameron@aberdeenshire.gov.uk www.aberdeenshire.gov.uk

Arbroath Harbour Ma

St

te

tga

rke

La

ge

rid

b dy

lock Marina Entrance

RNLI

F.R D

F.R

dries

Fl.G3s (F.G occas)

dries

VQ(2)6s

Ld

gL

ts

29

Arbroath Harbour offers 59 floating pontoon berths with water & electricity available. The harbour has showers, toilets & security access. Half height harbour gates maintain 2.5m min. depth of water. Rail and bus connections are only 1km away from the harbour, and quiet fishing town of Arbroath itself offers a variety of pubs and restaurants for visiting crews.

ANGUS COUNCIL HARBOUR OFFICE, LADYBRIDGE STREET, ARBROATH DD11 1PD T: 01241 872 166 F: 01241 878 472 harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk

inverness and moray firth dolphins Inverness has long been regarded as a transitory point for vessels going to and from the West. However with the opening of the 150 berth marina, Inverness can now be regarded as a sailing destination in its own right. Scotland’s east coast is home to a special population of less than 200 bottlenose dolphins, centred around the inner Moray Firth. The waters around Inverness provide one of the best dolphin watching opportunities in the world, and they can often be seen jumping and feeding in the local area, especially during the summer months.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

east coast

Burghead Harbour, Moray © Dennis Hardley.

north east coast of England. Held in rotation in the Tay Estuary, the Forth estuary and waters off the north east English Coast, the event started life in 1987 and has become the East Coast’s premier regatta. The event attracts boats from the Moray Firth, Tayport and England as well as some boats from the Firth of Clyde. The East Coast also hosts a number of club and visitor regattas during the season, with the main focal point being Port Edgar on the Firth of Forth, about 5 miles west of Edinburgh city centre. Further details of these events can be found on www.fyca.org.uk. Forth Rail Bridge © Port Edgar.

caithness and sutherland Helmsdale, Lybster, and Wick are an easy day’s sail north from Inverness. Located in Caithness and Sutherland, the most northerly county on the British mainland, the area is packed with visitor interest and variety. Deserted white sand beaches, sandstone cliffs and offshore stacks, rare wildlife and teeming seabird colonies, all combine to create a spectacular natural environment. Add to this a rich history and culture, sporting thrills that include some of the best cold water surfing in the world, and ancient fishing communities dotted along the coast. From its ancient castles and paleontological finds, to the herring boom harbours, rare wildlife and the exciting maritime history of the Pentland Firth, the area has an exciting and unique story to discover.

63

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

north coast of ireland MALIN WATERS covers the shared maritime area of north west Ireland, Northern Ireland and western Scotland and offers world class sailing waters for all abilities. The area has seen significant investment in marina facilities and moorings in recent years and is the perfect place for weekend and longer cruises. Along the north coast of Ireland, there are seven marinas between the cities of Belfast and Londonderry/Derry, with no more than 20Nm between any two, so the whole coast can be explored in a series of day sails. Belfast Lough is home to two of the largest marinas, Bangor and Carrickfergus, with approximately 800 berths between them and a full range of support services. Their close proximity to Belfast and its transport links make both marinas excellent locations for crew changes and exploring the city. A short distance northwards along the Antrim (Causeway) coast is Glenarm, a smaller marina close to the ferry port of Larne and only a day’s sail from the southernmost Inner Hebridean islands of Gigha, Islay and Jura. Attractions along the northern coast of Antrim include the famous Giants Causeway, the spectacular rope bridge at Carrick-aRede and the Bushmills Distillery. Visiting boats can use pontoon facilities at Rathlin Island en route to the marina at Ballycastle. It provides 74 berths in the inner harbours, with a good many reserved for visiting boats. The harbour has undergone a £5m upgrade to allow access for the ferry service to Rathlin. Heading further west, you can call in at Portrush harbour, with its 40m pontoon for visiting yachts. Further on, entry to the River Bann and onto Coleraine with its three marinas: Seatons, Coleraine and Cranagh is available in favourable weather conditions. However, the river has two training walls making it inadvisable when there are strong onshore winds or heavy swells. The town has a rich heritage including whisky distilling and salmon fishing. Northern Ireland’s westernmost marina is in Londonderry/Derry itself on the banks of the River Foyle, at the head of the expansive Lough Foyle. There is a well marked navigation channel down the Donegal side, used by large ships. Foyle Marina has

Glenarm Marina © Causeway Coast and Glens Tourism.

65 recently undergone a major expansion and can now accommodate up to 60 visiting vessels. Full marina facilities include water and electricity at each berth and toilets / showers on site. There are no harbours or anchorages on the SE side of the Lough until inside River Foyle itself. On the County Donegal (NW) side there are a couple of harbours, Greencastle and Moville, both of which cater for visiting yachts. Carrickarory has a small pier with some room for anchoring, as does Moville, but both are in the run of the tide so beware!

Antrim © Northern Ireland Tourist Board.

Further along the Lough, where it narrows, lies Culmore Bay; a pleasant anchorage out of the main tideway. At Lough Foyle you cross from Northern Ireland into Ireland. The NW shore of Lough Foyle is in County Donegal (Republic of Ireland) and the SE shore is County Londonderry (UK); the two meet in the mudflats at Muff. There are no border

www.sailscotland.co.uk

north coast of ireland marinas Historically, the northern coastline of Ireland has often been regarded as a stopping off point for recreational sailors en-route between southern waters and Scotland or beyond. However significant investment in infrastructure for both the residential and visiting sailor in recent years has served to make the area a cruising destination in its own right. There are a total of seven marinas between the cities of Belfast and Londonderry/Derry; the maximum distance between marinas is less than 20nm, meaning that the whole coast can be explored in a series of day sails. Details of marinas can be found below and online at www.malinwaters.com

Ballycastle Marina Bangor Marina Carrickfergus Marina Coleraine Marina Fahan Marina Glenarm Marina

74 berths 500 berths 300 berths 60 berths 200 berths 40 pontoon berths

0282076 8525 02891453297 02893366666 02870344768 +353(0)749360008 02828841285

restrictions or customs, as both countries are part of the European Common Travel Area, however check stipulations beforehand if travelling with pets.

pontoon berths have been installed with plans to raise to 400 berths. Pontoon mooring facilities are also available throughout the summer at Rathmullan.

Having crossed the border to Ireland, the deserted white sandy beaches, jaw-dropping landscapes, excellent seafood and quiet cosy pubs of Donegal await. The major marina in County Donegal is in Lough Swilly at Fahan, which means ‘sheltered place’ in Irish. The marina is about 12Nm up Lough Swilly from the open sea and a further 2Nm up the sheltered Fahan Creek. 200 fully serviced

Whilst visiting Fahan it is worth exploring County Donegal and the wider north west region, by sea or land. ‘Sliabh League’, the highest sea cliffs in Europe, offer stunning views of the surrounding coastline and the crashing Atlantic waves below. For sailors travelling west of Lough Swilly, anchorages include Tory Island, Burtonport, Killybegs, Mullaghamore and Sligo. It is advised that sailors refer to a published

www.sailscotland.co.uk

www.moyle-council.org www.quaymarinas.com www.carrickfergus.org/marina www.colerainebc.gov.uk www.loughswillymarina.com www.larne.gov.uk/glenarm

guide when visiting these waters. Beyond County Donegal’s extensive coastline, Sligo’s dynamic coastal environment is set against a backdrop of the Ben Bulben and some truly magnificent mountainous scenery. Sligo is also blessed with glassy lakes and beautiful beaches. Sligo Yacht Club is one of the oldest in the country and hosts several annual competitions and training programmes. Giants Causeway © Causeway Coast and Glens Tourism

north coast of ireland

Sail-Explore-Experience

Where natural beauty knows no bounds

Sailing in the Firth of Clyde, by Dunoon

Oban and West Argyll to the Antrim coast and Belfast Lough Beautiful cruising grounds, both in and off shore, with wonderful scenery and a choice of alternative routes available among the southern Hebrides Isles. The perfect way to sample unique island malts, stunning seafood, magical history and genuine culture. Looking across the Firth of Lorne

Firth of Clyde to the Antrim coast and Belfast Lough The return trip fits into a week, or can be done in an active long weekend if the tides are favourable. A round trip outward via the Ayrshire ports taking in the Belfast Lough marinas and Glenarm, and returning via Campbeltown and Lamlash or Tarbert, makes an attractive cruise. Calm waters in the harbour at Tarbert

Campbeltown and the Firth of Clyde to north Antrim and Lough Swilly The crossing from Campbeltown to Rathlin or Ballycastle is 34 miles, or from the anchorage at Sanda only 22 miles. The cliff scenery of Rathlin and from Fair Head to Portrush is spectacular, particularly around the Giant’s Causeway, and the north coast is a well-known hot spot for basking sharks.

Portrush and North Antrim to West Donegal and Sligo This cruise needs three weeks for detailed exploration but will fit into a fortnight. There are visitor moorings at Culdaff, but most yachts make the 42-mile trip from Portrush or Coleraine to Lough Swilly in a single voyage. The islands from Inishsirrer to Aranmore shelter the coast from the everpresent swell, and golden beaches and snug anchorages beckon.

73 Amazing views at Malin Head

IMAGE AND CAPTION TO FOLLOW

Set sail from Portrush

Find out more and register for updates at www.malinwaters.com This project is part-financed by the European Union’s European Regional Development Fund through the INTERREG IVA Cross-border Programme managed by the Special EU Programmes Body.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

© James Stewart Photography.

thehelix.co.uk

Canal Link

The Kelpies

Explore the Heart of the Helix

The Helix Canal provides easy access to the Forth & Clyde Canal and the new Helix facilities are ideal for sailors and other water-based activities. The passage through the Forth & Clyde Canal leads to the outstanding sailing waters of Scotland’s Clyde Estuary and the Western Isles beyond.

The Kelpies Hub is a place to stop and take in the sights as well as a place to make the most of the canal-side facilities. Stand and stare at these imperious giants of Scottish legend as they guard the canal locks at the mouth of Scotland’s Forth & Clyde Canal.

With 500km of cycle paths, a huge path network across Falkirk, opportunities for watersports, great places for events, amazing artworks, allotments and beekeeping, The Helix is a great place to be healthy, be creative and get involved!

VISIT TWO WORLD CLASS FORTH & CLYDE ATTRACTIONS BY BOAT, BOOT OR BIKE

thefalkirkwheel.co.uk

Soar in to the Air!

A Great Day Out

Boat Trips

Sail 35m in the air and travel from the Forth & Clyde Canal, along the Union Canal, and into the heart of Scotland’s capital. Did you know that passage through The Falkirk Wheel is included in your Scottish Canals licence?

The Falkirk Wheel is a fantastic day out with a difference. With boat trips, cafe, gift shop, children’s activity zone, water play park & mini-canal, waterwalkerz, canoeing, bike hire and woodland walks; there really is something for everyone!

You can also experience The Falkirk Wheel by taking one of our boat trips. Sit back and enjoy this breathtaking boat journey from The Falkirk Wheel along the Union Canal. Visit thefalkirkwheel.co.uk for details.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

forth & clyde and union canals Scotland’s Coast to Coast and City to City Link The Forth & Clyde Canal links the Irish Sea with the North Sea running from Bowling, on the Clyde Estuary, to Grangemouth, on the Firth of Forth, providing a unique and tranquil path through some of Scotland’s most densely populated areas. Access to the Firth of Forth is being improved with the new canal extension as part of the £43 million Helix Project. Visit thehelix.co.uk or scottishcanals.co.uk for more details. The Union Canal is bookended by two great modern developments. Linking the Union to the Forth & Clyde Canal at its western end is The Falkirk Wheel, the world’s only rotating boatlift. On the east, Edinburgh’s canal terminus development, Edinburgh Quay is taking shape as a thriving canal centre. FACT FILE The Forth & Clyde Canal is approximately 57km (35 miles) in length with 41 locks. A minimum of 21 hours underway should be allowed, and a further 3–4 hours should be added for the passage from Port Edgar and negotiation of the River Carron to Carron Sea Lock. The Union Canal is approximately 53.5km long (33 miles), and a minimum of 12 hours underway should be allowed. All locks are currently operated by Scottish Canals staff, although assistance by boat crews is required. CHANNEL DIMENSIONS Forth & Clyde Length 19.20m (63ft) Beam 6.00m (19ft 8in)

*please note that beam is 5.00m (16ft 4in) at the new Helix extension. Vessels wider than 5m can use existing Carron Sea Lock to enter the canal.

Depth of Water Max. Headroom Union Canal Length Beam Depth of Water Max. Headroom

1.8m (6ft) 3.00m (9ft 10in)

© Peter Sandground

CANAL LICENCES A range of visitor licences are available which are valid for all Scottish Canals. Full details of great value transit and short term stay packages may be obtained from scottishcanals.co.uk or our Canal Offices. DE-MASTING Yachts will require to de-mast for passage. This service is provided by Scottish Canals at Bowling and the new canal link at The Helix. This is included in your licence fee, however boat crew must carry out all mast work. Independent contractors also operate on the River Carron and at Port Edgar, where a charge will be made at the boat owner’s own cost. Large or complex masts may need to be stepped at one of the Clyde marinas, at the boat owner’s own cost. CHARTS Admiralty chart 2007, 737 and/or Imray C27, C63. © Peter Sandground

PILOTS Forth Yacht Clubs’ Association Pilot Handbook, CCC Firth of Clyde Sailing Directions, Imray Yachtsman’s Pilot – Clyde to Colonsay. HOURS OF OPERATION The canal operates on a seasonal basis: 7 days per week in Spring, Summer and Autumn, with locks and bridges open by arrangement in Winter. TIDAL OPERATION Special note must be taken of the tidal restrictions at the sea locks. Within normal operating hours, Carron Sea Lock and new sea lock is operational 4hrs before to 1hr 30mins after high water, and Bowling Basin is operational +/- 2hrs either side of high water. Contact the Sea Lock Keeper (VHF Ch74) for local advice. Lowland Canals Office Canal House, Applecross Street, Glasgow G4 9SP T: 0141 332 6936 F: 0141 331 1688 E: enquiries@scottishcanals.co.uk

69

21.34m (70ft) 3.35m (11ft) 1.06m (3ft 6in) 2.74m (8ft 10in)

*Channel dimensions can vary at different sections of the canal. Please visit scottishcanals.co.uk to download a copy of the Skipper’s Guide for exact details.

Find your nearestwww.sailscotland.co.uk canal at scottishcanals.co.uk 337 www.sailscotland.co.uk

To Kilmartin Rubha Garbh-ard

Duntrune Castle

Loch Crinan Rubha na Mòine

Ardnoe Point

ewpoint

Black Rock Fl WG 3s 2FG & FR (vert)

Eilean de Mhèinn Crinan Harbour

14

Castle Dounie

Crinan Ferry

Crinan Basin

BELLANOCH MARINA long-term only

Dunadd

Riv e

Crinan Boats

Bird Hide

Islandadd Bridge

16 A8

rA dd

CRINAN

© Dennis Hardley.

Mòine Mhór Nature Reserve

BELLANOCH BRIDGE

DUNARDRY

Barnluasgan

13

12

11

10

Cup & Ring marked Rocks

CAIRNBAAN

9 8

7

6

Fort

5

Cup & Ring marked Rocks

Carn Ban

Achnabreck

Swimming Pool Filling Station Spar shop

P

D

LOCHGILPHEAD

OAKFIELD (MILLER’S) BRIDGE

Water waster

Kilmory (Woodland P 4 Loch Gilp ARDRISHAIG

A

3 ARDRISHAIG BASIN

2FG (v)

2

A83

Fl 6s

© Peter Sandground.

www.sailscotland.co.uk 2

scottish canals

crinan canal Scotland’s Prettiest Short Cut The Crinan Canal meanders through truly magnificent scenery which is rich in history, with many world class heritage sites, a designated wildlife reserve and miles of forest walks and cycle ways. It runs between Ardrishaig, at the north west extremity of the Firth of Clyde, to Crinan on the ‘outside’ west coast, and allows the user to avoid the lengthy passage around the Mull of Kintyre. Though only 14.5km in length there is just so much to see and do from walking, cycling, fishing or just taking time out to explore Knapdale. So step back in time, relax, slow down and stretch those sea legs ashore. FACT FILE The Crinan Canal is 14.5km (9 miles) in length with 15 locks (3 automated) and 7 bridges. Sea locks and main road bridges are operated by Scottish Canals staff. Inland locks are self operated. Assisted passage is available for crews who are short-handed (ie 2 or fewer able crew members), those who are physically unable to operate lock gates and mechanism and inexperienced users who require advice and some help. Please visit scottishcanals.co.uk for more information or contact the Canal Office to book your assisted passage.

Park)

© Peter Sandground.

Due to environmental legislation we are no longer able to provide water hoses. Please remember to bring your own hose.

PILOTS The Clyde Cruising Club produces excellent sailing directions for the Firth of Clyde, whilst the Imray ‘Crinan to Colonsay’ and ‘Isle of Mull and approaches’ pilots both cover the canal. CHARTS Admiralty charts ‘Loch Fyne’ no. 2381, ‘Loch Crinan’ no. 2320 and ‘Crinan to the Firth of Lorn’ no. 2326 all include the canal, as do Imray charts C63, C64 and C65. HOURS OF OPERATION The Crinan Canal operates on a seasonal basis: 7 days per week in peak season, Monday to Saturday during Spring and Autumn and Monday to Friday during Winter. Please check with local Canal Office or scottishcanals.co.uk for exact operating dates and times.

Crinan Canal Office Pier Square, Ardrishaig, Argyll PA30 8DZ T: 01546 603210 F: 01546 603941 E: enquiries@scottishcanals.co.uk

© Peter Sandground.

CHANNEL DIMENSIONS Length 26.82m (88ft) Beam 6.09m (20ft) Draught 2.89m* (9ft 6in) Maximum mast height in the canal is 28.95m (95ft). Please allow for the increase in your draught in fresh water. * We advise owners with vessels deeper than 2.2m draught to contact the local Canal Office.

3

A8

CANAL LICENCES A range of licences are available from short to long term. In addition, explorer licences may be purchased which are valid for all Scottish Canals. Full details may be obtained from Canal Offices or from scottishcanals.co.uk

71

FACILITIES • Bellanoch Marina – fully serviced pontoons and moorings available • Pontoon berthing, showers, parking • Short and medium term licences available at competitive rates • Winter lay-up ashore or afloat

Find your nearestwww.sailscotland.co.uk canal at scottishcanals.co.uk

CITY OF INVERNESS

BEAULY FIRTH

THERE’S THERE’S AA WHOLE WHOLE NEW BOTHY EXPERIENCE NEW BOTHY EXPERIENCE COMING SOON. COMING SOON.

LOCH NESS

FORT AUGUSTUS

KYTRA

SEAPORT MARINA, MUIRTOWN

CLACHNAHARRY

TOMNAHURICH

DOCHGARROCH

CULLOCHY

LOCH OICH

DORES

Great Glen Water Park

LOCH NESS

LAGGAN

Register your interest or find out more at Register your interest www.canalsidebothies.co.uk or find out more at www.canalsidebothies.co.uk LOCH LOCHY

DRUMNADROCHIT

Urquhart Castle

FOYERS

LOCH LOCHY

Introducing Canalside Cottages. Introducing Canalside Cottages. Stunning, historic Scottish holiday Stunning, historic Scottish homes for folk who love toholiday explore homesby forboat, folk who love to boot or bike.explore by boat, boot or bike.

GAIRLOCHY

MOY

BANAVIE

Neptune s Staircase

CORPACH Sea Lock

LOCH LINNHE

FORT WILLIAM

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Booking and enquiries 0141 354 7534 Booking and enquiries enquiries@canalsidecottages.co.uk 0141 354 7534 www.canalsidecottages.co.uk enquiries@canalsidecottages.co.uk www.canalsidecottages.co.uk

FORT AUGUSTUS

1 Nautical Mile 1.15 statute miles 1.85 km

MUIRSHEARLICH

1 Nautical Mile 1.15 statute miles 1.85 km

LOY

LOCH NESS

scottish canals

caledonian canal The International Gateway to Cruising in Scotland The Caledonian Canal offers a coast to coast link through spectacular scenery in the heart of the Scottish Highlands. Stretching from Inverness in the east to Fort William in the west, the canal is approximately 96.5km (60 miles) in length, of which 34.5km (22 miles) is manmade and the remainder being formed by natural fresh water lochs. There are 29 locks and 10 swing bridges along the waterway, all of which are operated for your convenience by trained staff. Users should allow a minimum of two and a half days to transit the canal, and more if you wish to explore further the many attractions of the Great Glen, particularly during our busy summer season. CHANNEL DIMENSIONS Length 45.72m (150ft) Beam 10.67m (35ft) Draught 4.11m (13ft 6in)* *Vessels with draft over 3.8m (12.5ft) are advised to contact the Canal Office before arrival. Maximum mast height in the canal is 35m (115ft) above the waterline, but clearance under the Kessock Bridge on the Inverness Firth is lower at 27.4m (89ft 8in). CANAL LICENCES A range of visitor licences are available which are valid for all Scottish Canals. Full details of great value transit and short term stay packages may be obtained from Canal Offices or from scottishcanals.co.uk. Competitive rates for winter moorings are also available. Obtain your licence and Skipper’s Guide on arrival at the Sea Lock. This guide contains navigational information to help make your transit through the canal safe and enjoyable. You can also download a copy of the Skipper’s Guide at scottishcanals.co.uk FACILITIES Transit berths are available throughout the canal. Toilets, showers and laundry facilities, shore power and water, diesel and pump-out, Wi-fi and local services are all available at various locations along the canal - please check Skipper’s Guide for specific information. NB Due to environmental legislation, we are unable to provide water hoses. Please remember to bring your own hose.

© John G Moore

Admiralty West of Scotland Pilot (NP66). Also in Almanacs published by Imray, Laurie, Norie & Wilson and by the Clyde Cruising Club. CHARTS Eastern Approaches Moray Firth 115, Inverness Firth 1078, Caledonian Canal 1791, Western Approaches Loch Linnhne (North) 2380, Fort William and Corpach 2372 (all Admiralty). HOURS OF OPERATION The Caledonian Canal operates on a seasonal basis: 7 days per week in Spring, Summer and Autumn, and Monday to Friday during Winter. Please check with local Canal Office or scottishcanals.co.uk for exact operating dates and times. TIDAL OPERATION Special note must be taken of the tidal restrictions at the sea locks. Within normal operating hours the locks are operational +/- 4hrs either side of high water. At spring tides the sea locks are CLOSED 2hrs either side of low tide. Contact the Sea Lock Keeper (VHF Ch 74) for local advice. © Peter Sandground.

ACTIVITIES With spectacular scenery, amazing wildlife, and, of course, the famous Scots hospitality, the Caledonian Canal has lots to offer. Explore and the Great Glen by boat, boot or bike, visit the Caledonian Canal Visitor Centre at Fort Augustus, or see if you can spot Nessie. For more ideas visit scottishcanals.co.uk CHARTER HOLIDAYS Cabins cruisers or yachts are available for charter - ideal for those new to boating or an exciting family holiday. Hotel and activity barges also operate on the canal, the ideal way to ‘get away from it all’. Visit scottishcanals. co.uk for details of local operators. You could combine your sailing holiday with a stay in one of our recently restored lock keeper and canal worker’s cottages located along the banks of the Caledonian Canal. Find out more at canalsidecottages.co.uk Caledonian Canal Office Seaport Marina, Muirtown Wharf Inverness IV3 5LE Tel: 01463 725500 Fax: 01463 710942 E: enquiries@scottishcanals.co.uk

73

PILOTS Information is contained in the following publications: The Admiralty North Coast of Scotland Pilot (NP52) and the

Find your nearestwww.sailscotland.co.uk canal at scottishcanals.co.uk

Castle Stalker, Argyll © Dennis Hardley

8

Moonshadow Yacht Charter Ltd

Oyster 68 20 m sloop

4

New Horizon Sailing

Oyster 435 44ft

Northern Light Charters

Zuza 22m Expedition Sailing

Orkney and Shetland

4

Skye and Outer Hebrides

75’ Gaff Cutter

Argyll and Islands

Eda Frandsen Sailing

Firth of Clyde

10 3

4 4 4 4 4

4

4 4

4

4 4 4 4 4 :

4

4 4

2

4 4

4 4 4 4 4

4

4 4 4

8

5

4

4 4 4 4 4 4

2

4

2

4 4

4

8

3

4

Bedding

Cleaning

5

SAILING AREA

Waterproofs

One off 65ft Ketch

Outboard Motors

Corryvreckan Cruising Ltd

Crew/Hostess On Board

3

Fully Catered

6

ASYC member

3

RYA Training School

Discovery 50 Catamaran

Instruction Available

Caprice Yacht Charter Ltd

Racing Charters

No of Heads

EQUIPMENT & SERVICES

No of Guest Berths

BOAT TYPE & SIZE

No of Guest Cabins

COMPANY

4 4 4 4 4

4 4 4

4 4 4 4

4 4 4 4 :

4 4 4 4 4

Northern Wanderer Cruises

Seastream 43 Ketch

3

5

2

4 4

4 4 4 4 :

4

Sails and Summits Ltd

Dufour 455

2

5

2

4 4

4 4 4 4 4

4 4 4 4 4

Key:

4 Provided.

: Optional extra.

OTHER TRADE MEMBERS OF SAIL SCOTLAND BMF Scotland National marine trade organisation. Details at www.britishmarine.co.uk British Waterways Scotland Manages Scotland’s three canals. Details at www.scottishcanals.co.uk Clyde Cruising Club Publisher of cruising guides, and organiser of race events. Details at www.clyde.org Yachting Life Scotland’s national yachting magazine. Details at www.yachtinglife.co.uk

Coastline of Yesnaby, Orkney © Scottish Viewpoint.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

4 4 4

sailing holidays

Telephone

Website

Other Activities on Offer

Tailored Charters, Clan Gatherings

Glasgow

0845 260 2677

www.corryvreckan.co.uk

Charter, Whisky & Walking

Glasgow

01326 567265

www.eda-frandsen.co.uk

Walking, Wildlife, Whisky & Events

4

Glasgow

07796 130180

www.symoonshadow.co.uk

Walking, Wildlife, Whisky & Events

4 4

Glasgow

07770 303613

www.newhorizonsailing.com

Milebuilders, Distillery Visits, RYA Qualifying Passages

4 4 4

Glasgow

01599 555723

www.northernlight-uk.com

Walking, Wildlife & Archaeology Tours

Glasgow

01470 532393

www.northernwanderer.co.uk

Guide for Wildlife & Island Exploration

Glasgow

07941 276186

www.sailsandsummits.co.uk

Wildlife, Whisky & RYA Training Centre

Inland

www.capriceyachtcharter.co.uk

Faroe/Iceland/Norway

01621 785906

Ireland

Glasgow

East Coast

Nearest airport

AS

4 4

4 4

4

75

www.sailscotland.co.uk

COMPANY

EQUIPMENT AND SER

Instruction available

RYA Training school

4

4

4

4

4

Argyll Yacht Charters

9

31-46

9

4

4

4

Bavaria Scotland Charters

2

31-45

10

4

4

4

Catima Sailing Ltd

3

44-50

12

4

4

Clan Charters

5

31-41

8

4

4

Craobh Haven Watersports Ltd

20+

various

Edinburgh Boat Charters Ltd

1

42

8

Flamingo Yacht Charters Ltd

14

30-47

10

4

4

Isle of Skye Yachts

11

32-44

10

4

4

9

32-45

10

New Horizon Sailing

1

44ft

4

Sailaway Scotland

8

35-46

10

Scotboats

3

35+

6

Scotwinds Sailings

1

41

5

4

Spirit of June Yacht Charters

7

39-44

8

4

Key: 4 Provided. : Optional extra.

DINGHY SAILING CENTRES Craobh Haven Watersports, Argyll Port Edgar, South Queensferry, Edinburgh The National Centre Cumbrae, Ayrshire

www.sailscotland.co.uk

4

4

:

4

4

4

:

:

4

4

4

4

4

:

:

:

4

:

:

:

4

4

4

:

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

:

:

:

:

4

4

:

:

4

4

4

4

:

:

:

4

4

4

4

4

4

:

:

4

4

4

4

4

4 4 4

4 4

4

4 4

ASYC member

:

Dinghy school

:

4

4 4

:

4

4

Portway Yacht Charters

4

4

4

Port Edgar Sailing School

Cleaning

Racing charters

10

Waterproofs

Skippered charters

31-46

Bedding

Bareboat charters

14+

Outboard motors

Max. berths

Alba Sailing

No. of boats

Size range (feet)

Boatshare Membership

BUSINESS TYPE

4

4

:

:

4

:

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

:

4

4

4

4

4

4

:

:

:

4

:

charter & sailing schools Provisioning

Firth of Clyde

Argyll and Islands

Skye and Outer Hebrides

Orkney and Shetland

East Coast

Ireland

Faroe/Iceland/Norway

Inland

Nearest airport

Telephone

Website

SAILING AREAS

Spinnakers

RVICES

:

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Glasgow

01631 565630

www.alba-sailing.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Glasgow

01546 603500

www.argyll-yachtcharters.co.uk

4

4

4

4

Glasgow

01475 686072

www.bavariascotlandcharters.co.uk

4

4

4

Prestwick

07711 635923

www.catimasailing.co.uk

4

4

Glasgow

01475 539003

www.clanleisure.co.uk

Glasgow

01852 500665

www.craobhhavenwatersports.co.uk

Edinburgh

0131 554 9401 www.edinburghboatcharters.com

Prestwick

01475 686088

www.fy-charter.co.uk www.skyeyachts.co.uk

4

:

4

4

:

4 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Inverness

01471 844216

4

Edinburgh

0131 331 3330

Glasgow

01369 820120

www.portwayyachtcharters.com

Glasgow

07770 303613

www.newhorizonsailing.com

Glasgow

08455 281011

www.sailawayscotland.co.uk

Glasgow

07767 427554

www.scotboats.com

Inverness

01468 772910

www.scotwinds.co.uk

Inverness

01445 741310

www.spiritofjuneyachtcharters.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

:

4

4

4

:

4

4

4 4

4

4

4

4 4 4

4

4 4

77

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Anstruther Harbour

100

8

Arbroath Harbour

59

6

Ardfern Yacht Centre Ltd

100

20+

Ardoran Marine Ltd

6

Banff Harbour Marina

76

Gas supplies

Fuel berth

Slipway

Boat Capacity

Boat hoist

Shore Power

Toilets/showers

Maximum draught

10

4

4

4

4

20

2.5

4

4

4

4

1km

80

25

3.5

4

4

4

40T

4

4

4

6

40

12

2

4

4

4

12T

6

92

10

1.8

4

4

80

15

2.6

4

4

4

15T

30+

5

4

4

4

50T

12

2.4

4

4

36

4.5

4

4

4

30T

12

5-8

4

4

4

80T

240

5.5

4

4

4

23T

3

4

4

4

45T

4

15T

Barcaldine Marine Clyde Marina Ltd

285

Crinan - Bellanoch Marina

39

Craobh Marina

250

10+

Fairlie Quay Marina

1

1

Holy Loch Marina

250

30+

Inverness Marina Ltd

150

20

50-60

Maximum length

No of moorings

MARINAS and BOATYARDS

No of visitor berths

No of pontoon berths

Tarbert Harbour Š Scottish Viewpoint.

20 6

Isle of Skye Yachts

24 0

25

18

15

0

30

5.1

4

4

4

10T

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

1km

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4 4

4 4

4

4

4

4

James Watt Dock Marina

100

8

Kip Marina

600

40

36

3.5

4

4

4

50T

4

4

4

Largs Yacht Haven

700

20+

30

3.5

4

4

4

70T

4

4

4

Lerwick Port Authority

60

60

50

6

4

4

4

4

4

4

Lochaline Harbour

24

24

4

4

4

4

Oban Marina Ltd

100

60

4

4

4

4

4

Orkney - Kirkwall Marina

95

30

20

2.7

4

4

4

4

Orkney - Stromness Marina

72

24

0

20

2

4

4

4

4

Orkney - Westray

17

7

0

20

3

4

4

4

Peterhead Bay Marina

160

20

23

2.8

4

4

4

Portavadie Marina

230

60

25

4

4

4

4

Port Bannatyne Marina Ltd

108

25

17

2.5

4

4

Port Edgar Marina

280

10

15

2.5

4

4

Seaport Marina Inverness

90

30

45.5

4

4

4

Stranraer Marina

54

9

15

2.5

4

4

Tarbert (Loch Fyne) Harbour

160

100

12

30

5

4

4

Tobermory Harbour Association

45

45

25

30

10

4

4

Troon Yacht Haven Ltd

400

50

50

3

4

4

4

Wick Marina

70

10

25

1.8

4

4

4

www.sailscotland.co.uk

0

16 30

0

4

50T

4

4

4

12T

4

4

4

4

15T

4

4

4.75T

4

4

1km

4

1km

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4 4

12T 50T

4

1km 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

1.5km

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

1km

Tidally constrained

11

Edinburgh

01333 310 836

4

11

Dundee

01241 872 166

www.angus.gov.uk

80

Glasgow

01852 500 247

www.ardfernyacht.co.uk

4 4

4

80

Oban

01631 566 123

www.ardoran.co.uk

1km

4

12

Aberdeen

01261 815 544

www.aberdeenshire.gov.uk

Oban

01631 720 291

www.barcaldinemarine.co.uk

80

Prestwick

01294 607 077

www.clydemarina.com

4

16/74

Glasgow

01546 603 210

www.scottishcanals.co.uk

4

37/80

Glasgow

01852 500 222

www.craobhmarina.co.uk

80

Glasgow

01475 568 267

www.fairliequay.co.uk

4

80

Glasgow

01369 701 800

www.holylochmarina.co.uk

4

12

Inverness

01463 220 501

www.invernessmarina.com

Inverness

01471 844 216

www.isleofskyeyachts.co.uk

4

4

Website

4

VHF channel

Telephone

1km

4

Nearest airport

4

Wi-Fi available

Restaurant/Pub on site

Chandlery

Repair facilities

Petrol available

marinas & boatyards

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

80

Glasgow

01475 729 838

www.jwdmarina.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

80

Glasgow

01475 521 485

www.kipmarina.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

80

Glasgow

01475 675 333

www.yachthavens.com

4

4

4

4

4

12 /16

Sumburgh

01595 692 991

www.lerwick-harbour.co.uk

4

4

80

Glasgow

01967 421783

www.lochalineharbour.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

4

80

Glasgow

01631 565 333

www.obanmarina.com

4

4

4

4

14

Kirkwall

01856 871 313

www.orkneymarinas.co.uk

4

4

4

4

14

Kirkwall

01856 871 313

www.orkneymarinas.co.uk

4

4

14

Kirkwall

01856 871 313

www.orkneymarinas.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

14

Aberdeen

01779 483 600

www.peterheadport.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

80

Glasgow

01700 811 075

www.portavadiemarina.com

4

4

4

37

Glasgow

01700 503 116

www.portbannatynemarina.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

80

Edinburgh

0131 331 3330

1km

1km

1km

4

4

74

Inverness

01463 725 500

Prestwick

07734 073 421

4

4

4t

4

14

Glasgow

01880 820344

www.tarbertharbour.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

16/12

Glasgow

07917 832497

www.tobermoryharbour.co.uk

4

4

4

4

4

80/37

Prestwick

01292 315 553

www.yachthavens.com

4

4

4

4

14

Wick

01955 602 030

www.wickmarina.co.uk

1km 4

4

www.scottishcanals.co.uk

www.sailscotland.co.uk

79

trade directory In addition to the marinas, charter and sailing holiday providers and Scottish Canals which are represented in this brochure the Scottish marine leisure sector is also supported by more than a hundred associated companies whose services cover the complete spectrum of skills and products. Boatbuilders and repairers New Horizons Yacht and Boat Builders Rhu Marina, Rhu, Dunbartonshire G84 8LH T 01436 821555 M 0786 751 2274 E nhbb@btinternet.com E newhorizons.boatbuilders@virgin.net Boat building, repairs, joinery, teak decks, hull and deck fittings, windows and hatches, Flexiteek installers. Boat transport and deliveries MJS Boat Transport Ltd 68 Clairinch, Balloch, Alexandria G83 8SE T 01389 755047 M 07979 806 122 E mjsboattransport@aol.com W mjsboattransport.com Professional boat transport company operating throughout Scotland, UK, Ireland and Europe. Boats to 20 Tonnes. Marine electronics Boat Electrics and Electronics Ltd Kip Marina, Inverkip, Renfrewshire PA16 0AW T 0870 446 0143 E sales@boatelectrics.com W boatelectrics.com Marine electronics supply, installation and service. Based at kip Marina, Troon Yacht Haven and Oban Mike Brown Marine Services Shepherd’s Cottage, Kilninver, Oban PA34 4UU

www.sailscotland.co.uk

T 01852 316111 M 07775 791 162 E info@mikebrownmarineservices.co.uk Experienced mobile multi-skilled technician/engineer: inboard and outboard engines, electrics, electronics, Gas Safe registered. Marine engineers Mike Brown Marine Services Shepherd’s Cottage, Kilninver, Oban PA34 4UU T 01852 316111 M 07775 791 162 E info@mikebrownmarineservices.co.uk Experienced mobile multi-skilled technician/engineer: inboard and outboard engines, electrics, electronics, Gas Safe registered. Marine insurance Giles Insurance Brokers 43/47 Bank Street, Irvine, Ayrshire KA12 0LN T 01294 315 481/315433 E jim.bell@gilesinsurance.co.uk W gilesinsurance.co.uk Scotland’s leading marine insurance specialists, pleasure craft, charter boats, jet-skis, marine trade. Instant quotes and cover available Rigging and riggers Mast and Rigging Services (Scotland) Ltd Kip Marina, Inverkip Renfrewshire PA14 0AS T 01475 522700 E mastandrigging@kipmarina.fsnet.co.uk

W mastandrigging.co.uk Suppliers of all yacht rigging and masts, standing and running rigging, mobile service throughout Scotland Owen Sails Benderloch, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QR T 01631 720485 E info@owensails.com www.owensails.com sailmakers; bespoke manufacture of marine canvas work and upholstery, sail/ covers repair and valetting; rigging service Sailmakers Owen Sails Benderloch, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QR T 01631 720485 E info@owensails.com www.owensails.com sailmakers; bespoke manufacture of marine canvas work and upholstery, sail/ covers repair and valetting; rigging service Surveyors CB Marine Services Coach House 1, Camis Eskan, Helensburgh G84 7JZ T 01436 675378 M 07775 927 370 E colin@cbmarineservices.co.uk W cbmarineservices.co.uk Yacht and small craft prepurchase/ insurance surveys, charters, deliveries, free advice, Scotland wide service

The RNLI in Scotland

This year the RNLI marks the 190th anniversary since it was founded by Sir William Hillary in 1824 and our key message remains loud and clear – we are the charity that saves lives at sea with more than 140,000 lives saved in the charity’s history. We provide a search and rescue service to 100 nautical miles out from the coast of the UK and Republic of Ireland and our lifeboats aim to reach at least 90% of all casualties within 10 nautical miles of the coast within 30 minutes of launch in all weathers.

rescue 24/7, 365 days a year. Also, loyal fundraisers ensure that all of Scotland has lifeboats, equipment and superb training to keep the volunteers safe when they go to save someone else’s life. The RNLI depends on voluntary contributions to fund its search and rescue service and the commitment and dedication of its volunteer crew members. In Scotland there are 842 crew, 363 station management, 73 shore helpers, and 2,264 fundraising volunteers. If you would like to volunteer please call 01202 663234 or look on the internet: www.rnli.org/volunteerwithus

The RNLI, predominantly manned by volunteers, also educates the public about the dangers of the sea and the charity would like to end the preventable loss of life at sea. (On average three people die in UK coastal waters every week) Today the charity has 55 lifeboats based at 47 lifeboat stations in Scotland, ready to launch at any time, in all weathers, to go to the aid of those in distress. In addition the RNLI operates a Flood Rescue Team in Scotland which is made up of around 30 volunteers from RNLI crews, ready to deploy anywhere in the country.

Aith

Lerwick

The types of rescues are extremely variable. A crew could be hauling a dog to safety after the animal falls down a cliff while chasing a seagull (we rescue animals otherwise their owners put their own lives in danger while trying to save their pet), and then going out to rescue oil rig workers from a helicopter ditched in the North Sea. A fire on a boat, a person cut off by tide, recovering a dead body, taking a sick passenger off a cruise ship – volunteers have to be trained in all types of scenarios with some of the training taking place at the RNLI’s HQ which contains a sea survival centre in Poole, Dorset. We have been updating the lifeboat fleet, replacing the Atlantic 75 lifeboats with the new Atlantic 85, each costing more than £200,000. Tighnabruaich, Largs, Kyle of Lochalsh and Queensferry recently upgraded their boats. The 85 is larger and faster than the 75, it can carry a crew of four rather than three and it is fitted with radar and VHF direction finding equipment.

Stromness

Thurso Wick Stornoway Lochinver Leverburgh

Buckie

To make any rescue happen, there has to be a team of volunteers working behind the scenes throughout the day and night, launching and recovering the lifeboat, refuelling it and washing it down and making the boat ready for the next

Fraserburgh

Kessock

Portree

Peterhead Loch Ness

Kyle of Lochalsh

Aberdeen

Mallaig

Stonehaven Montrose Tobermory

Arbroath Broughty Ferry

Oban

Anstruther Kinghorn Helensburgh

Tighnabruaich

North Berwick Dunbar

Queensferry

Islay

An RNLI Coastal Review team tours the coastline every five years to assess the provision of lifeboats and decide whether a different type of boat is required to serve an area. The changing patterns of fishing, the types of boats in an area, and the statistics for the number of shouts are taken into account when deciding upon the future. The RNLI has a new type of lifeboat, the Shannon class, and the first station in Scotland to receive this will be Montrose.

Macduff

Invergordon

Barra Island

Improvements have also been made to lifeboat station buildings. Montrose now has a new station, closer to the community, Queensferry has an eye-catching building underneath the Forth Rail Bridge, and the RNLI has also been building a new station on Islay. A trial station has been set up at Stonehaven, replacing a lifeboat service that had been run by the Maritime Rescue Institute. The RNLI has had a lifeboat station at Stonehaven on two previous occasions. The Maritime Rescue Institute ceased operating after storms damaged their boats.

Kirkwall

Longhope

Arran (Lamlash)

Largs Troon

Campbeltown Girvan

Stranraer Portpatrick Kirkcudbright

St Abbs Eyemouth

Kippford

travel information Airline Information

Ferry Information

BMI Regional T: 0844 417 2600 www.bmiregional.com Fly to Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int)

KLM T: 0871 231 0000 www.klm.com Fly to Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int)

British Airways T: 0844 493 0787 www.britishairways.com Fly to Aberdeen, Barra, Benbecula, Campbeltown, Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int), Inverness, Islay, Kirkwall, Stornaway, Sumburgh, Tiree, Wick

Loch Lomond Sea Planes T: 01436 675 030 www.lochlomondseaplanes.com Fly to Glasgow, Loch Lomond, Oban Bay, Tobermory and others by arrangement

Eastern Airways T: 0870 366 9100 www.easternairways.com Fly to Aberdeen, Stornoway, Wick Easyjet T: 0843 104 5000 www.easyjet.com Fly to Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int), Inverness Flybe T: 0871 700 2000 www.flybe.com Fly to Aberdeen, Barra, Benbecula, Campbeltown, Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int), Inverness, Islay, Kirkwall, Stornoway, Sumburgh, Tiree, Wick Jet2 T: 0800 408 1350 www.jet2.com Fly to Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int)

Ryanair T: 08721 246 0000 www.ryanair.com Fly to Edinburgh, Glasgow (P) Loganair (part of Flybe) www.loganair.co.uk Fly to Benbecula, Campbeltown, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow (Int), Inverness, Islay, Kirkwall, North Ronaldsay, Shetland Islands, Stornoway SAS T: 0871 226 7760 www.flysas.com Fly to Aberdeen, Edinburgh Wizz Air T: 0907 292 0102 www.wizzair.com Fly to Glasgow (Int)

Beach runway at Traigh Mhor, Isle of Barra Š Scottish Viewpoint.

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Caledonian MacBrayne T: 08000 665 000 www.calmac.co.uk Northlink Ferries T: 0845 600 0449 www.northlinkferries.co.uk P & O Ferries T: 0871 664 2121 www.poferries.com Stena Line T: 08447 707 070 www.stenaline.co.uk

Rail Information First Group T: 08457 48 49 50 www.firstgroup.com Virgin T: 08719 774 222 www.virgintrains.co.uk

Coach Information Scottish City Link T: 0871 266 3333 www.citylink.co.uk National Express T: 0871 781 8178 www.nationalexpress.com

www.sailscotland.co.uk

Scotland’s Boat Show 2014 ‘The Homecoming’ 10th, 11th & 12th October www.scotlandsboatshow.co.uk

Kip Marina, Inverkip, Inverclyde, PA16 0AS • +44 (0)1475 521485 • www.kipmarina.co.uk


Sail Scotland 2014