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Villager January 23 pg 01_Villager May 26 pg 01 13-01-22 4:32 PM Page 1

GOOD VISION EQUALS A HEAD START IN LEARNING

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DR. BRIGITTE M. FILION

Celebrating 5 years serving this wonderful community! www.lelunettier.ca

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013

and Township and Surrounding Areas Since 1984 Single Copy $1.00

This Week Russell Township 2013 Winter Programs Only one evening left to register - Jan. 23 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.at Township offices in Embrun. See pages 5 and 6 for more details.

Local fair enlivens area Pamela Pearson Villager Staff RUSSELL — The 5th annual Living Locally Fair was a grand success by all accounts this year. Held on Jan. 19 at St. Thomas Aquanis Secondary School, vendors, exhibitors service providers and groups took over classrooms, the atrium and the gymnasium. In partnership with STA, its students and teachers, the Russell Horticultural Society President, Pegi Holtz commented, “With the help of many volunteers and a group of delightful, hard working students from the school, 1500 people were able to enjoy the day.� Visitors received a free shopping bag to fill with purchases will as they visited with 80 plus exhibitors, listened to speakers or attended food demonstrations. The Society also put on a lunch of homemade soups that was very tasty for a small fee. STA students, under the supervision of teacher Mrs. Jackson and Mrs. Mac, were going around serving coffee to participants and collecting

Friends for Life launch 2013 campaign for Breast Cancer Front from left, Lorraine Dicaire, Ginette Rivet, Marie-Claire Ivanski, 2013 Friends for Life Guest of Honour JosĂŠe Lefebvre of Embrun, Nicole Gosselin-Seguin and Diane Bourdeau. Back from left, Friends for Life sponsors and supporters Armand Beauchamp (Knights of Columbus Grand Chevalier), Claude Lapointe (Marlin Travel), Lawyer Jean Martel and Cindy Landry (Embrun Hydro) on Jan, 16 at the campaigns luncheon launch. Missing is sponsor Dan PichĂŠ (Remax). PJ Pearson Photo items for the local food bank. Holtz also commented it is great way to get out and talk to the members of local community groups and see how you can enrich your life as well as that of your community. “ Holtz also acknowledged and thanked, on behalf of the organizers all those that were able to make this event possible, including the help received from the Township of Russell and the Russell Agricultural Society. “ It is truly a community event and one that we hope to offer again next year.â€?

Panthers open up Embrun Carnival Darren Matte Villager Sports EMBRUN— The Embrun Panthers had the honour of opening up the Embrun Winter Carnival again this year and they did so by hosting the Rockland Nationals on Jan. 18. A large crowd was at the arena to see the official start to the nine day event. Before the game, Panthers

captain Charles-Antoine LabontĂŠ and Rockland captain Paul Corbeil took part in a ceremonial faceoff dropped by Russell Township mayor, J.P. StPierre, Carnival President Dan PichĂŠ and of course the Bonnehomme du Carnival. The game was just one of the events that kicked things off this weekend. Other events included an Ice

Fishing tournament, Dart Tournament, Pool Tournament, Sunday Brunch and street hockey. Events will take place all week leading up to the closing on Jan. 27. “It’s always a great time of year in Embrun with the Carnival and all the activities that go along with it,� said Matt Nooyen, associate Panthers coach. “As for how

it relates to our team, we’ve been pretty comfortable at home all year (11-3) compared to on the road (7-7). But having that extra support certainly gives us that extra boost, especially for the players who are from Embrun, who have been involved with the Carnival their entire lives and understand the traditions that go along with it.�  Continued on page 15

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Page 2 The Villager January 23, 2013

Russell Fire Department Snow and Fire Safety

Vintage snowmobiles to hit the track at Finch Carnival FINCH — The throttle will open on a new addition to the upcoming Finch Winter Carnival, with the First Annual Tri-County Vintage Sled Riders Snowmobile Show. Organized by Sean Mullin, the show is designed to not only show off some vintage snowmobiles, but to raise money for

We are well into the winter season now and have a significant blanket of snow already on the ground. Snow is a fact of life in Eastern Ontario but it does bring forth a number of concerns for fire departments with regards to fire fighting and fire safety. One major concern for fire departments is that access around buildings is greatly reduced by snow. Trying to get a hose line to the rear of a house during a fire is difficult enough — trying to do this through four feet of snow proves to be near impossible. Another concern is that people forget to think about their secondary exits in the winter, especially later in the season when there has been a lot of snow. Who wants to shovel the backyard after you just spent three hours clearing the driveway? Secondary exits are your back-up plan in a house fire. If you are not able to escape by your first choice, then this is all that you have left. Secondary exits are in most cases backyard or patio doors. Often when we get large snowfalls in March people give up shovelling in the hope that a thaw will soon be under way. These secondary exits are very often the victim of this attitude and are left

snow covered. Another concern we have are basement bedrooms. Many homes in Russell have incorporated additional bedrooms in the basement. Being below grade they usually don’t have an exterior door so a ground level window is the only other point of egress. These windows must also be cleared of snow and ice and they should also be checked regularly to make sure they are not frozen shut. As a homeowner you can help yourself and emergency services by ensuring that all exits are cleared of snow and that a pathway to the rear of the home is also cleared. Additionally make sure that your address is not blocked from view by high snow banks or covered by snow if you have a street marker. There is nothing worse than having to look for an address that is hidden from view when responding to a call. Obviously this applies more to medical calls as we can usually figure out which house is on fire without looking at address markers. We can expect to see the snow sticking around for a few more months, so make sure to take a moment and do a quick check around your home and look for these common problems.

This week’s Russell Fire Department Fire Safety Column is brought to you by RFD Fire Chief Bruce Armstrong

Pulmonary Hypertension Canada. The show takes place at the Finch Arena on Sun., Jan. 27 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. and prizes will be awarded for Overall Best original sled, Overall Best restored sled, Overall Best Race Sled, Fan Favourite 1974 or older original, 1974 or older restored, 1975-

1985 original and 1975 – 1985 restored. Trophies are sponsored by Sand Road Maple Camp. Registration fees are $10 for one sled or $20 for multiple sleds and include a loot bag. Proceeds will go to PHC, and in addition, penny jars will be going around for additional fund-raising, so bring your pennies.

Outdoor classroom not housing RUSSELL — On Tues., Jan. 29th at 7 p.m., the Russell Township Planning Advisory Committee is holding a public meeting to discuss the rezoning of a piece of land on Craig Street in Russell and is currently owned by the Upper Canada District School Board and is connected to the Russell Public School playground. This little forest of mature trees would make an amazing outdoor classroom space for the children to learn and to grow. If you support the idea of this land remaining a part of the RPS school yard, please come to this meeting and have your say. For more information, please contact Jacqueline Wyss at 613-445-0259 or jm_wyss@yahoo.ca.

Snowmobiles at Carnival Antique snowmobiles like this 1966 Husky owned by Sean Mullin will be on display at Finch’s annual Winter Carnival. Courtesy Photo

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The Villager January 23, 2013 Page 3

A special thank you to the community Brian Mehr Special to The Villager RUSSELL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; It is with mixed emotions that I would like to announce the sale of the Russell IDA Pharmacy which was effective Dec. 1, 2012. It has been tremendously satisfying, hectic at times, but ultimately rewarding and always a

privilege to serve you. JoAnn and I would like to thank the community for your loyal support over the past 28 years. We would also like to thank our faithful and hardworking staff, some of whom have been with us for more than 20 years. Thank you to the physi-

cians of the Russell Medical Centre and their wonderful staff who have been such supportive and appreciative partners in our effort to provide for our clients. I am very pleased to announce that we passed ownership into the very capable hands of Ian MacNeil. Ian owns two

other pharmacies, one in ottawa and the other in Chesterville. I will continue to work at a reduced schedule for the next while and the rest of the staff will remain unchanged. Thank you very much, once again, for your support over the years and the privilege of serving this fine community. I wish you all good health in the future.

New owner of Russell IDA

Ian MacNeil, left, shakes hands with outgoing owner Brian Mehr. Mehr was owner of the local pharmacy for over 28 years and decided to slow things down with a reduced schedule and the passing ownership over to MacNeil in Dec. 2012. PJ Pearson Photo

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1 - 165 Bay St., Embrun, ON K0A 1W1 Tel. 613-443-5683 Fax 613-443-3285 www.campbellaw.on.ca

NEW TO RUSSELL!

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OPP this week in Russell County In the week of Jan. 14 to Jan. 20, Russell County Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) responded to 87 occurrences. Out of those occurrences, 13 concluded in accusations. As a result, 13 persons were charged with various offences. Motor Vehicle Collisions During the same period Russell County OPP responded to 11 collisions in the area. Out of those 11 collisions, seven drivers were charged for various driving infractions under the Highway Traffic Act Impaired Driver CASSELMAN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; On Jan. 16, , OPP Constable Karim Davis was on patrol on Principal Street in Casselman when he observed a vehicle speeding. The vehicle was stopped and the officer detected a smell of alcohol. The officer investigated the matter and as a result the driver was conveyed to OPP Embrun office

for a breathalyzer test. William, A. Reynen, 59, of Ottawa, will have to appear in court to answer to the following charges of exceeding 80 milligrams Blood Alcohol Content / Motor Vehicle No Insurance ROCKLANDâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; OPP Constable Marc Leblanc was on patrol on Jan. 15 along County Road 17 in Rockland when he stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation. After investigation it was determined that the vehicle was not insured. Stacy Golding, 45, of Alfred-Plantagenet, will have to appear in Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Orignal traffic court for operating a motor vehicle without insurance. Distracted Driving RUSSELL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; OPP Constable Ricky Latreille of the OPP Highway Safety Division was patrolling Concession Street in Russell after OPP received various traffic complaints. During the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m the officer handed

A stink of a mess

out nine traffic violations on Jan. 18. Some of those violations were texting and the use of a cell phone when driving. Every year the OPP dedicates a week on distracted driving throughout the province. Russell County OPP would like to remind everyone that officers will be enforcing the law year round when it comes to operating a hand-held devices such as a cellphone, GPS, iPOD, while driving. Road safety is everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility when it comes to distracted driving. Visit the Ministry of transportation website for more details. Theft of Licence Plate ST. ALBERT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Russell County OPP responded to a theft of a licence plate complaint on Jan. 15. The caller advised that an old licence plate was discarded in the trash awhile ago. On the 15th of this month to the callerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seen here, crews were out to fix an underground water pipe on Church Street in Russell, after it was damaged by construction workers on Jan. 17, who were trying to connect the line to the new condo building. The break caused a sewer back up into the Russell Meadows Community Centre, the Santa Fe and Church Street Apartments. At time of publication, an investigation was still underway as to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;howâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how muchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, but the pipe was fixed by days end and services restored, including a severed telephone line. Some residents of the three buildings are still misplaced, but costly cleanup has begun. The builders expressed their sincere sympathy, in a press conference, to those affected by the accident. PJ Pearson Photo

surprise a traffic violation ticket was received in the mail. Unknown person(s) used her old licence plate in the Toronto area. The OPP would like to remind everyone that the best way to dispose of old licence plates is to return them to a ServiceOntario Centre. If you have any information about any of these matters call CrimeStoppers at 1800-222-8477 or 632-2729.

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LYNN DIGNARD &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG(VWKHWLFLDQ(OHFWURORJLVW  /DVHU7HFKQLFLDQZLWK<HDUV([S By appointment only.

RUSSELL SOCCER CLUB 2013 REGISTRATION Russell Arena Friday, February 1 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9 p.m. AND Sat., February 2 9 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 p.m. We offer House League and Representative Leagues for youth and adults: House League Programs: Youth ages 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 21 years old, and men & women â&#x20AC;&#x153;pick-upâ&#x20AC;? soccer (no experience required) Representative Programs: Youth ages 9 years old and up, and men & women adult teams in various age groups and levels. For information email rsclub@russellsoccer.com or leave a message at 613-445-6666. Go to www.russellsoccer.com for more details.

Villager January 23 pg 04_Villager May 26 pg 04 13-01-22 2:35 PM Page 1

Page 4 The Villager January 23, 2013

1-866-307-3541 FAX: 613-448-3260

& Opinion EDITORIAL

thevillager.editor@gmail.com

7 King St., P.O. Box 368 Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0

CASTORCountry EDITORIAL Standardizing happiness By Tom Van Dusen

Many of us think we know what will make us happy, and in general these aspirations often involve being able to afford what we want, go where we want, and work where our contributions are respected. Our health, family welfare, friends, and the environment are a few of the very many other modifiers. New last week was an announcement by federal Labour Minister Lisa Raitt, the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the Canadian Standards Association, and Quebec’s standards development body of a plan to launch a “voluntary standard on psychological health and safety in the workplace.” The goal of this standard is to help employers make their employees happier. A long standing belief, which is firmly entrenched in our society, is that happy employees are more productive. It appears happiness is in need of a standard, is impacting our productivity, or both. Having happy employees has many benefits in the form of reduced absenteeism and reduced turnover. But it also costs. For example, some ‘happy’ employees tend to enjoy the status-quo so much that they resist changes, or not take on new challenges, as it will upturn their apple cart. Economic situations, like the recent federal job cuts, impact the status quo rapidly, and those that have not changed are not prepared for success in today’s world where agility and embracing change are key essentials for success. Workplace happiness used to be measured in turnover rates – the lower the better. Businesses failed slowly over time, when good workers who felt under appreciated left, weaker workers got promoted by seniority or undermined people hired above them, productivity and efficiency dropped, customers left, and jobs disappeared. So is this new standard supposed to keep good workers happy? Is this standard really going to change bad management and supervisory practices — the real source of workplace dissatisfaction? One could also argue that this standard is meant to help the government recover from its own job cuts and to moderate the impact of losses. This might be a program they should have started back in the fall before the cuts slashed through departments and was felt on the home front. But it is broader in focus, so that is not likely. The real question is how much will this cost employers (including the government)? How many good businesses will adopt the standard and improve, and how many will be driven by employee desires, counter to the other needs of the business to stay profitable and lean during a downturn? How many businesses will start to select employees for layoffs based upon how they use the provisions of the standards? How will this impact the hiring process when the news lately has been that all university students are graduating with a mental health crisis in the making because of debt and workforce uncertainties? A standard sounds good, and is internationally a first, but the voluntary measures only lead to inequality. Those businesses unable to meet the standard as quickly as competitors will lose talent and suffer. The economy, the commute, and other factors affecting the workforce will remain outside of the control of the employer. Some job perks, which were the rewards of long service and loyalty, will now be seen as mental health benefits all deserve, and will cease to be motivators. The role of the employee in their own happiness (voting with their feet, much as customers do) will be enhanced in the short term, but in the next generations will be watered down so that there is no incentive to change unless the new job is closer to home. Pamela J Pearson

Publisher’s Liability for Error The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or

Did you get yours on Monday? Did you get yours on Monday? A hug, that is. Much to my dismay, it was National Hugging Day. I was caught completely off guard. Thank God for the worldly CBC. I only learned about the special day late in the morning because I happened to be listening to the radio. Otherwise, I might have spent the entire day totally oblivious. That’s because nobody came up to me during the course of the day and threw their arms around me. I didn’t get a single, solitary hug. And it’s not because I was hiding out in my North Russell farmhouse afraid that somebody might try to get me in a clinch. I like to think I appreciate a good hug – even a random one – as much as the next guy. I was out and about all day, at Scotiabank, the post office, Pronto, MacEwen’s, the gym in Embrun, Your Independent… and no hug came my way. There wasn’t even a botched attempt. To be fair, I didn’t try to embrace anyone either. If the other person doesn’t know what day it is or doesn’t care, that kind of thing could get you into trouble. Can you imagine, for example, me walking up to Mayor J.P. St. Pierre and throwing my arms around him? He might be perplexed for a couple of reasons, including that he isn’t routinely hugged by reporters. I learned from the Internet that National Hugging Day was founded in Michigan in 1986 and has since spread to several other countries. Jan. 21 was To Editor: The second year of the Kin Club of Russell, chartered Oct. 1, 2011 has been a complete success. The club feels it is well on its way to being established within the township and making a difference for the residents. The Club remains strong at 30 members strong and to date has raised close to $65,000 for the community and cystic fibrosis. However, the success of the club can only be contributed to the generosity and involvement of the township which is unparallelled, as well as the devotion and efforts of its club members. In its second year, the Kin Club of Russell completed the following projects: Deal or No Deal – volunteered to run for the Agricultural Society at Russell Fair; Russell Fair 2011 – Gate duty and 50/50 ticket sales; Russell Fair 2011 – Face painting and Seniors Day; Heritage Day – scavenger hunt & info booth; Marsha Morton Memorial Golf Tournament, raising funds for cystic fibrosis; assistance to the Russell

picked as the date because it’s the midpoint between Christmas and Valentine’s Day when people are believed to be at an emotional low. So that’s my problem! The National Hugging Day web site features a Most Huggable People section listing among others a pizza storeowner in Florida and Ellen Degeneres. My name isn’t on the list. The site even contains a hugging primer, describing the significance of various embraces including the backto-front, the-side-to-side, the bear, the cheek, and the heart-centered hug. A few tips: Always warn the target that a back-to-front is coming their way, don’t bear hug small children or fragile senior citizens and skip the heart hug with total strangers… especially if their life partners are around. While not a national holiday anywhere, the date is recognized by the Hugging Committee of the City of London and by the United States Copyright Office. Why doesn’t Russell Township have a hugging committee? If she isn’t too busy, Connie Johnston could chair it. It could be a Kin Club sub-committee, a good place to start because club members are all natural born huggers. The point of commando hugging is apparently to prompt people to let their emotions flow, man, just like the old hippie days. Hugging can help build up the immune system and decrease the risk of heart disease. A hug or 10 minutes of holding hands can reduce stress and its harmful effects. I hereby draw the line at hold-

ing hands with J.P. for 10 minutes. One person around here who deserves a big group hug is award-winning community sparkplug Lindley McPhail for spearheading the Living Locally Fair at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School for the past five years, a hugely popular event that grows in both exhibitor and visitor participation every year. I spent two solid hours at the fair last Saturday, chowing down on homemade soup, checking out the eclectic mix of booths – I bought some quail eggs – and chatting with cheerful exhibitors and shoppers. Something like 34 crocks of soup and chili were consumed at the show; I chose pumpkin and squash, not a mix, one bowl of each. It might have been the warming effect of the soup, but I’ll tell you, had Jan. 19 been National Hugging Day, there would have been a lot of it going on at Living Locally. The people there were in that kind of mood and it’s kind of a hippie type event to begin with.

LETTERS Editor

Continued on page 7

to the

Association of Performing Arts – operation of bar service for spring and productions; Russell Christmas Parade float entry; raising almost $19,000 for Kaiden’s Care Kits and its entry of the Kits to the Aviva Community Fund Challenge; Living Locally – information booth; February's Rock-Kin The Night Away to raise funds in support of the Portraits of Honour project and for the Military Family Fund; e-Waste Day collection of electronics in partnership with local Knights of Columbus; St. Patty’s Day Trivia Night at Russell House Pub, raised $5,000 for St. Mary’s Church Bell Tower Restoration; Brain Matters – assisted fundraiser in Embrun working the door; offering the Speechcraft program to local students; Breakfast for Dad - a Father’s Day breakfast for local families and in June the club held That 70’s Dance to raise funds for scholarships, donating $1,000 to local stu-

omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.

dents. The club plans to keep with some repeat events this year that were very popular, such as Feb. 2 Trivia Night at Russell House for Russell Rainbow Gymnastics Club, the Rock-Kin the Night Away with Eddy & the Stingrays where the 1950s and 60s will time warp back to the Russell High School on Feb. 9, assisting RAPA Old Mac production on Mar. 2, as well as host-

ing another trivia night on March 16 for Russell High School's electronic billboard and to help 2nd Russell Scouts in one of their last and biggest fundraisers - the March 23 Spring Gala at Russell High School - to attend the Canadian Jamboree in Alberta this summer. The club would like to acknowledge the community support and hopes to continue to seeing them out at the various events. The Kin Club of Russell

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The Villager January 23, 2013 Page 5

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Page 6 The Villager January 23, 2013

Seed growers endorse positive programs at 2013 farm show Tom Van Dusen Special to the Villager OTTAWA — Two stimulating agricultural projects will receive special attention at the 2013 Ottawa Valley Farm Show set for March 12-14 at the Ernst & Young Centre (formerly CE Centre) beside the Ottawa International Airport. At its recent regular meeting, the Ottawa Valley Seed Growers Association, which has sponsored the farm show for the past 86 years, decided to help celebrate this year’s 100th

anniversary of 4-H Canada and to promote “Agriculture More Than Ever” (AMTE), a program devised by Farm Credit Canada. Both initiatives will receive free display space at the show. Seed Growers’ president Bruce Hudson said both were worthy of support because of the positive perspective they place on Ontario and Canadian agriculture. Active in 4-H leadership, Hudson noted the OVSGA already spends thousands of dollars every year funding

Township living it up locally

4-H regional programming, including providing booth space and related services at the annual Farm Show. After listing several 100th anniversary activities that will take place this year, Tammy Oswick-Kearney, 4H Canada special projects officer, told the meeting it could turn out that the launch of the Ontario part of the celebration will occur at the Farm Show. To date, she said, no other events are preceding it. FCC is a key OVFS partner. In establishing AMTE,

it’s striving to underline what it sees as a bright future for Canadian agriculture through success stories about industry members. AMTE will have information pamphlets, tee-shirts, caps and other merchandise available at the 2013 show. Directors made several other decisions concerning the 86th farm show, including confirmation of a quilt display along with annual regional 4-H exhibits and an antique section provided by Vintage Iron and Traditions of Eastern Ontario.

From left, Municipal Councillor and Environmental Advisory committee member Eric Bazinet, Communication and Marketing Officer Melany Chretien and Program Coordinator Philip Surgenson at the Russell Township at the Living Locally Fair held on Jan. 19. PJ  Pearson Photo

Regional seed judging preceding the show will take place at the Greely Community Centre, 8:30-3 p.m., March 9. Winners will be on display at the show and will receive awards March 13. As for commercial booths, the show will be full with 350 exhibitors and at least 20 applications remaining on the waiting list. In other business, the OVSGA granted $750 to help pay for a ceremony recognizing St. Pascal’s Gerard

Savage — a past OVSGA president — with the Franco-Ontarian Agricultural Award of Merit. The association also allocated $300 to Jakob Vogel of Stormont County who’s spearheading the agricultural judging team at Dalhousie Agricultural College. For more information contact Tom Van Dusen, OVFS General Manager, 613-445-3407 or email: tomvandusen@sympatico.c a

Healthy babies, healthy children

advice and services needed to give their children the best chance for healthy development. Expectant and new mothers who need extra help are eligible for home visits from a public health nurse who can provide advice and counselling. Every new mother in Ontario will also receive information about infant and child development, community resources and contacts for local services. With  over 132,000 children born each year in Ontario the addition of 36 new public health to will help in supporting the Healthy Babies Healthy Children program. For more information call the Ottawa Public Health Information line at 613-580-6744 or toll-free at 1-866-426-8885.

G-P-R — Ontario is supporting new mothers in Glengarry-Prescott Russell with the addition of one new public health nurse to help their babies get a healthy start in life according to a press release from G-P-R MP Grant Crack’s office on Jan. 18. The Healthy Babies Healthy Children program identifies expectant or new moms who may be at risk and helps them get the

The Villager January 23, 2013 Page 7

Castor County

Syrian refugees helped with collection

Continued from page 4 The fresh food and local products free-admission fair is so big now that it appears to the casual observer it may have to move to a larger facility. At St. Thomas, it fully occupies the cafetorium, the gym and a clutch of classrooms. But when I put the relocation suggestion to Lindley, her reaction was immediate and adamant: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Locally will always be held at St. Thomas. We have such a good rapport with the school. The location is part of what makes it work. As for running out of room, I had two teachers today offer me their classrooms for next year.â&#x20AC;? How about modifying the free admission? Living Locally gathers non-perishable items for the local food bank but it could also collect a toonie at the door from visitors to support a worthwhile cause such as the organizing costs of Living Locally, or some school project. Or even betterâ&#x20AC;Śa toonie for a hug!

Nelson Zandbergen Villager Staff MOOSE CREEK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; An uprising and bloody civil war against a despotic regime in Syria continues to rage in that Middle Eastern country. In Moose Creek last week, there was an act of sympathy for Syrians displaced by the violence and forced to overwinter in frigid refugee camps located over the border in Lebanon. On very short notice, residents of the North Stormont community and beyond dropped off the equivalent of two pickup truck loads of new clothing and blankets at a temporary collection depot set up by the owners of the Moose Creek Mall, Michel and Vivian Theoret. The couple got involved when they heard that Finch Pizzeria operators Daad Elsaadi and her husband, Abdul Razzak were helping to organize a local collection in aid of Syrian refugees, in cooperation with the Ottawa Muslim Association as well as Daadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother-in-law in Lebanon, Ahmed Mankel, who lives in valley region know for its Syrian refugee

camps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daad was speaking to my wife about it,â&#x20AC;? said Michel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She told us her brother was doing this, and could we help?â&#x20AC;? Vivian and Daad share a link to the Middle East, as Vivianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandparents hailed from Palestine. Michel quickly sent out an email blast to his customers and contacts last week Monday, Jan. 14,, and by Friday the entrance to the mall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; headquarters for the Theoretsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shoe store â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was packed with items. A group from the tSt. Eugene and Vankleek Hill area dropped off a van load of items. One woman from Cornwall alone left 80 blankets. Daad appeared overwhelmed by the support shown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thank enough â&#x20AC;Ś It really touched my heart, and my family, the idea you came up with,â&#x20AC;? she tearfully said to the Theorets. She also emphasized the plight of the displaced Syrians. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just imagine the people sitting in these tents, and they used to have nice homes,â&#x20AC;? she said. Wintertime conditions are

Girls give locks for love RUSSELL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; At our Mother Teresa Catholic Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Love Virtue Assembly on Dec.10. The MTCS Sunshine Club informed the student body about children who require hair pieces/wigs and why they need them. At the assembly, the school recognized students who recently had donated their own hair to the Locks for Love Programâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Natalya Fewtrell, Katherine and Abigail McNair, and Ellison Butler. But the real highlight of the assembly was to actually witness the program in real time as Barbier Castor Barber hairdresser Linda Williams cut sisters Rebecca and Sarah Greer long golden locks off. Teacher Kerry Kennedy states â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were very brave and needless to say very inspirational to all of those who witnessed the event.â&#x20AC;? To even make the event even sweeter for the Greer girls, they raised $370 for the Canadian Cancer Society, as a personal fundraising initiative for cutting their hair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This hair donation was certainly an act of love which will brighten other childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives.â&#x20AC;? said Kennedy.

cold in Lebanon, and the camps got hit with a recent snowstorm, she added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Could we put ourselves in their shoes? You could survive here with good people like Michel and Vivian, in communities like Moose Creek and Finch.â&#x20AC;? The goods went back to Finch and were destined for the Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fifth and latest container shipment to aid Syrian refugees. It was expected to take 19 days to arrive at its destination. Some of the others had gone to camps in Turkey and Jordan. According to the UN Refugee Agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Syria Regional Response, the conflict has created 546,000 Syrian refugees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 152,000 now camped in Lebanon alone.

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Twin sisters Rebecca and Sarah Greer had their long blond locks of haircut off and donated to Locks for Love. The girls in addition raised $370 for the Canadian Cancer Society. Courtesy Photo

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additional info: Just in time for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, the Russell RP Church is excited to host â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Marriage,â&#x20AC;? a dynamic 6-part series on marriage. Singles welcome. Saturday lunch provided. No child care provided. 100 person capacity. Website for details and registration. Contact registrar, Melanie, with questions: 613-443-0808, melaniealexander8@gmail.com.

Villager January 23 pg 08_Villager May 26 pg 08 13-01-22 11:36 AM Page 1

Page 8 The Villager January 23, 2013

Living local proves to be a success

The school was a buzz

The gymnasium at St. Thomas Aquinas School saw a constant stream of Living Locally Fair goers on PJ Pearson Photos Jan. 19.

Jessie Cluett walked around the Living Locally Fair advertising a variety of classroom presentations that were held on Jan. 19 at the fair.

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

Russell Horticultural Society President Pegi Holtz is seen here talking with one of almost 100 vendors at the 5th annual Living Locally Fair on Jan. 19.

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Villager January 23 pg 09_Villager May 26 pg 09 13-01-22 1:33 PM Page 1

The Villager January 23, 2013 Page 9

Puck drop The 2013 Embrun Winter Carnival officially kicked off on Jan. 18 at the Embrun Panthers hockey game. The Panthers welcomed the Rockland Nationals to town to kick off festivities. Here, a ceremonial puck drop takes place at centre ice. From left, Panthers captain Charles-Antoine LabontĂŠ, Russell Township Mayor, J.P. St.Pierre, the Bonnehomme du Carnival, Carnival President Dan PichĂŠ and Nationals captain Paul Corbeil. The Panthers went on to win the game 7-4. Matte photo

EMBRUN JANUARY 18 TO JANUARY 27, 2013 THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013...contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d

12:30 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

11 a.m. 12 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 9 p.m.

and Games, arts & crafts and snowman competition. Location: Maison des Arts. Contact person: Lisa Godard at 613-443-0058 / info@maison-des-arts.com. 1 p.m. Sleigh rides (horses) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cam-Li Farm. Location: Embrun Community Centre & Ball Park Parking Lot. Contact person: Camille PichĂŠ at 613-443-0381. Cost: $2/person 1 p.m. Pool tournament â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Semi-finals & Finals 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. REMAX Hockey Tournament - Women, Old Timers & Intermediate Finals 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinner with music by Louis SĂŠguin. Location: Embrun Community Centre. Contact person: Sarsfield Colonial Home, Chantal Crispin at 613-835-2977. Cost: $9/ adult and $5/children (4-10 years old) 6:30 p.m. Announcement of the winners and prize presentation (50/50) 7 p.m. Closing of the Carnival

7 p.m. 7 p.m.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013 7:30 p.m.

8 p.m.

10 p.m.

Talent show CafĂŠ de Chez Nous. Location: Embrun Community Centre. Contact person: MĂŠlanie ClĂŠment at 613-880-2429. Cost: $10/18 years old plus and $5/children in advance. Advance tickets can be purchased at Studio Shanthaly, 824 Notre-Dame Street. Tickets at the door $15 /18 years plus and $5/children. Embrun Panthers vs. Papineauville Vikings (Junior Hockey). Location: Embrun Palais des Sports. Contact person: Maurice Lemieux at 613-880-7931. Cost: $7/adult and $5/student. DJ night. Cost: $5. **Light lunch will be served**

Bean Bag-Baseball Tournament Finals (continued) Pool tournament (continued) RE/MAX Hockey Tournament â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Elite Finals Dance evening with BROKEN NAILS featuring Maylissa Ouimet. Doors open at 8:30 p.m. Location: Embrun Community Centre. Contact person: Daniel PichĂŠ at 613-443-7769. Cost: $20/ person. Advance tickets can be purchased at RE/MAX office 685 Notre Dame (Beside SUBWAY) 613-443-9901 and at Pierre & Fils Depanneur. **Light lunch will be served**.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Firefightersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brunch. Location: Embrun Community Centre. Served by The Embrun Firefightersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association. Contact person: Daniel Emard at 613-443-5571. Cost: $8/adult and $5/children (4-10 years old). 12 p.m. - 3 p.m. Snow Festival. Free activities for children four years plus Workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tire St-Catherineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (limited spaces â&#x20AC;&#x201C; pre-registration require)

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Villager January 23 pg 10_Villager May 26 pg 10 13-01-22 3:24 PM Page 1

Page 10 The Villager January 23, 2013

EOWC elects 2013 Chair Each January, the 13 members of the Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus (EOWC) also review their activities from the previous year and set their priorities for the coming year. Last week, the members met in Kingston for two days to conduct this important task and shared these issues with MPs and MPPs from across the region. In a Jan. 16 release from EOWC, it was announced that Rick Phillips, Warden of Hastings County, was elected as its new Chair and Ron Holman, Warden of the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville, as its ViceChair. “I am honoured to have been elected Chair by my colleagues. We have a great team and I look forward to working as hard as I can with them over the course of the coming year,” said Phillips. “I am equally delighted that Warden Holman will be our ViceChair. He brings a tremendous amount of insight and leadership to the Caucus, having served previously on the EOWC.” Vice-Chair Holman noted, “This year we are focusing on two key priorities. They are economic development and the strategies needed to support new growth, and continuing our financial sustainability research and analysis on key sectors like water and wastewater, waste management and social housing.” The EOWC has plans to concentrate its economic development strategy components on business retention, skills development, completion of the building

of the Eastern Ontario Regional Network project and the Algonquin land claim, through working with the EOWC partners in the cities, including Ottawa, the federal and provincial governments, agencies like Community Futures Development Corporations, local economic development groups, First Nation leaders and health and education institutions, according to a media release. The caucus’s second priority is financial sustainability. In the past year the EOWC has commissioned significant research on key topics that relate to the challenges and opportunities of keeping municipalities financially sustainable. Last year’s efforts focused on determining the kinds of investments that are needed to address for example the capital improvements for the nearly 88,000 km of the region’s roads and 8,600 bridges. In the case of roads and bridges the data has exposed a growing deficit of nearly $3 billion in needed capital investments. René Berthiaume, Warden of the United Counties of Prescott and Russell stated, “We believe we can make some significant strides forward by zeroing in on the two key priorities, while being prepared to deal with other issues that might arise,” The EOWC is expanding its research for 2013 into other key municipal services that include social housing, waste management, asset management and the roads and bridges fund.

Robinson proceedings stayed Lois Ann Baker Villager Staff CORNWALL — While a Justice of the Ontario courts sided with them and stayed the proceedings against David and Marilyn Robinson, the nightmare is still not over for the couple. The Robinsons had been charged with Cruelty to Animals after O.S.P.C.A. officials questioned the condition of their cattle. Court proceedings do take time, however, lawyer Kurtis Andrews claimed that due to motions filed by the Crown and a delay in setting a court date, the charges should be stayed due to an abuse of process from the prosecution. In her ruling, Justice of the Peace Claire Winchester said she felt the Robinsons’ case had gone on far longer than it should have as it was not a complex case.

Winchester said under the Charter of Rights, the right to a speedy trial is there to minimize the stigma and stress attached to defendants as they await trial. When deciding on her ruling, she said it was a judicial determination, not a mathematical one based on number of days alone. However, since 19 months had already passed and it would be over 25 months before their scheduled court date, she did take the numbers into consideration as well. Winchester said she felt there could have been an earlier court date set, but the Crown brought forward a motion to have Andrews removed as counsel. The motion had been previously denied by Justice Louise Rozon, and Winchester felt the motion brought irreparable harm to the attorney-

client relationship as it put Andrews under suspicion he had done something wrong, and was an unnecessary delay in the proceedings. Winchester found the Robinsons suffered prejudice due to the crown’s delays and said they not only have been hurt financially, but the proceedings had taken a toll on them. She said both exhibited signs of stress, and the longer the proceedings went on, the greater the stress. The Robinson’s reputation as farmers has also been questioned and this added to the stress. The Abuse of Process motion by the defence is based on two principles, societal interest and individual interest, and Winchester said the crown exaggerated by suggesting the motion should be denied because of societal interest. She said

Cookies are sweet for WDMH

there was no direct societal interest to be preserved. In other words, the Robinsons were not charged with an offence that would put society in harm’s way. Winchester also said the Robinsons suffered more in the past 19 months than what the courts could do to them. She added that although the proceedings have been stayed, they have not been exonerated and questions will remain as to whether they were in fact guilty of cruelty to animals. David Robinson was certain the Justice would rule the way she did, but was actually hoping for the motion to be denied as he wanted his day in court to prove his innocence and to have the O.S.P.C.A. answer to what he considered “bullying.” “We are going to go after them in civil court,” he said. WINCHESTER— On Jan. 16, Robert St. Denis, owner of three Tim Hortons — Winchester, Morrisburg, and Long Sault — presented the WDMH Foundation with proceeds, $8,509 from the 2012 Smile Cookies campagin held in September. Staff from the Tim Hortons-Winchester, are seen here presenting the cheque to the WDMH Foundation. From left to right: Barb Zappa, Kathy Barkley,WDMH Foundation representatives Christina Enright and Troy Cross, Holly Bouck and Jennifer Noort. Courtesy Photo

Villager January 23 pg 11_Villager May 26 pg 11 13-01-22 1:54 PM Page 1

The Villager January 23, 2013 Page 11

They came as rivals but left as friends

Top picture: 2013 Strathcona Cup Central Tour players with Russell, Navan and Metcalfe at the Russell Curling Club on Jan. 12 Picture left: From left, Jim Campbell, Scott Tomlinson and Mona Saunders, far right, present Team Captain  Mike Ferguson of Scotland’s Strathcona Cup 2013 Central Tour team with stained glass curling rocks for each member - made by Saunders - at the Russell Curling Club on Jan. 12. Ferguson is owner and manager of the Forfar Ice Rink in Angus, Scotland and curls out of the Edzell Curling Club. Picture right: Scotland Central Team 4 Skip Hamish Lorrain-Smith, left, receives a gift of participating curling club pins from Navan Curling Club Skip Kelly Oka at the 2013 Strathcona Cup games, held at the Russell Curling Club on Jan. 12. Lorrain-Smith is from Fife, Scotland and curls out of Musketeers, St Martins, Edinburgh facilities. PJ Pearson Photos

Correction: In the Jan. 16 The Villager it was stated that Team Scotland sent 64 teams to Canada to play for the Strathcona Cup but should have stated 60 players were sent for the 2013 tour.

D.A.R.T. propels forward space company include enlarging its office space to create a Centre of Excellence, in Hawkesbury, manufacture more helicopter parts locally, develop innovative products, and grow its market reach. Crack stated “D.A.R.T. Aerospace’s expansion means more jobs for families and a revitalized manufacturing base for companies in Eastern Ontario. Thanks to the renewed Eastern Ontario Development Fund, our community is gaining more jobs and more opportunity.” D.A.R.T. Helicopter Services President Mike O’Reilly is quoted, “Our partnership with the Ontario government is keeping our

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27TH FROM 2 - 4 P.M.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Pamela Pearson Villager Staff RENFREW — A team of ladies from the Russell Curling Club competed in Tim Hortons' Master Provincials from Jan. 9 to Jan. 13 at the Renfrew Curling Club. The 2013 provincial wide championship is for curlers aged 60 years or older and had eight final men’s and eight women’s teams competing in a round robin format with winners progressing onto the National Playdowns. The Russell Curling Club team of Skip Raja Wysocki, Third Sharon Courneyea, Second Patsy Waddell and Lead Hazel MacDougall, qualified for the provincials after emerging from zone finals, and having been victorious at the women's regional playdowns held on Dec. 9, 2012 at the Stirling Curling Club. The ladies put forth a great effort but unfortunately won only one - a tight game with Team Peggy Clemison of the Oshawa Curling Club - of the seven played. Wysocki said that there was some tough competition throughout but enjoyed the challenge of playing the other clubs. "There was some lovely curling out there." Wysocki also stated that Renfrew CC was a great host. Overall standings for the Master Women Provincial Championships went as follows: Unionville and Rideau Curling Clubs tied with five wins and one loss, Galt Curling Club finished with four wins and two losses; Ilderton and Brant clubs tied three for three; Brampton had two wins and four losses; and Oshawa and Russell tied with one win and five losses.

The Villager’s Annual Bridal Supplement is now being compiled and will be available mid-February. Book your advertising space before February 1, 2013, by calling 1-866-307-3541, faxing 613-448-3260 or emailing adsrussellvillager@gmail.com

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workforce local while increasing our customer base around the world. D.A.R.T. ’s new manufacturing Centre of Excellence and expanded office space will help us create more leading-edge helicopter accessories and grow our market share.” Ontario is now accepting applications for the renewed EODF from qualified businesses and investors who can grow companies and created 378,100 jobs from the recessionary low in June 2009 and notes that the province has cut taxes on business investment in half, making the province more competitive and encouraging new business investments.

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HAWKSEBURY — As part of the renewed Eastern Ontario Development Fund, the McGuinty government has been partnering with various local businesses to create jobs in the region, it’s latest being with D.A.R.T. Aerospace Ltd. In a release from Glengarry-Prescott-Russell MPP Grant Crack, the Hawkesbury-based helicopter parts manufacturer announced that with the support from the EODF it has been able to expand its operations, keep 100 jobs local to the area and create an additional 10 manufacturing positions. Future plans for the aero-

Senior ladies present at provincial Masters

Villager January 23 pg 12_Villager May 26pg 12 13-01-22 11:39 AM Page 1

Page 12 The Villager January 23, 2013

Deadline 3 p.m. Monday

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Villager January 23 pg 13_Villager May 26 pg 11 13-01-22 1:34 PM Page 1

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SHROVE TUESDAY Pancake Supper. February 12th, 6:00 pm. St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church, 139 Castor St., Russell. $5 adults and $3 children under 12. Come on in and bring a friend!. 27-1

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â&#x20AC;˘Contact Information for The Villager: FOR ADS AND ADMINISTRATION contact us toll free at 1-866-307-3541 or by fax at 613- Michel SĂŠguin prop. (613) 448-3260 or email us at: adsrussellvillager@gmail.com 781-B Notre-Dame 613-445-1835 FOR THE VILLAGER EDITOR email us at: thevillager.editor@gmail.com contact@oldetowneesthetics.com www.oldetowneesthetics.com (PEUXQ21.$: 443-1116 â&#x20AC;˘Make Informed Choices prenatal classes are taking registrations for upcoming class. Call 613445-3852. â&#x20AC;˘The 1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will descend on the Russell Curling Club as its theme for the annual 24-hour Midnight Basement Framing & Finishing Madness Spiel over the two-day period of Jan. 25 and Jan. 26. No experience necessary. Cost per Crown Mouldings team is $100. Contact Darlene Hall Barret at 613-371-7582 or Marc Lebrun voltigeurs@gmail.com Decks & Sheds â&#x20AC;˘Eastern Ontario Maple Information Day at Sand Road Maple Farm, Moose Creek on Sat. Feb. Door & Trim Upgrades 2. The day is put on by the Ontario Maple Syrup Producer's Association. Whether you are a hobbyist or a full time maple syrup producer, this is your opportunity to learn what's new in maple and to network with other avid producers who love to talk maple. Registration Fee is 25 (including lunch); children 12 years of age or younger can attend free. For further information please contact: mapleinfo@easternontariomaple.com or Gary Ivens at 613-527-5234 â&#x20AC;˘Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper on Feb. 12, 6:00 p.m. at St. Mary's Anglican Church, 139 M`ccX^\M\k\i`eXip Castor St., Russell, $5/Adults and $3/children under 12! Come on in and bring a friend! :c`e`Z â&#x20AC;˘For info regarding Russell Meals On Wheels please contact Claudette Geerts at 613-445-2011 Ilk_@im`e^#;%M%D% â&#x20AC;˘Help is needed to reach goal planting 10,000 trees in the township for 2013. The group are ÂĽSMCPropertyMaintenanceÂĽ looking for input and feedback, and would love to partner with community groups and developers. 1108 Concession Street Â&#x2021;6SULQJFOHDQXSVÂ&#x2021;$HUDWLQJÂ&#x2021;/DZQ&XWWLQJ The committee is also looking for â&#x20AC;&#x153;tree huggersâ&#x20AC;? to sit on this committee. Contact Councillor Eric Russell WULPPLQJÂ&#x2021;)DOO&OHDQXSVÂ&#x2021;6QRZSORZLQJ Bazinet at EricBazinet@russell.ca if interested. UHPRYDOÂ&#x2021;:DONZD\VKRYHOLQJVDOW 613-445-5622 â&#x20AC;˘Need an activity to do for March break? New Museum Privilege cards - The Canada Agriculture 613-291-1161 Museum and the Canada Aviation and Space Museum are available for a borrowing period at the Daryle Ross Real Estate Ltd. Russell Library. Passes provide free access to a family of four (2 adults). Other National Capital 7163 Prakway Rd., Greely Region museum passes are also available. Contact 613-445-5331 or mylibrary@russellbiblio.com +#300'*/($P â&#x20AC;˘Russells 55+ Club Euchre every Saturday night at Russell Meadows Retirement in Russell. 7:30 p.m. start. Shuffleboard every Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m. at the arena. Exercise classes every Âł5HURRÂżQJLVRXUVSHFLDOW\´ DARYLE ROSS%3+(%(G Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Russell Arena. Bridge and Euchre every Tuesday 1 p.m. at The Meadows. $VSKDOW6KLQJOHVÂ&#x2021;0HWDO5RRIVÂ&#x2021;5HSDLUV %URNHU â&#x20AC;˘Good Dog Rescue is looking for caring and loving families to foster or adopt small and large 9LQ\O $OXPLQXP6LGLQJÂ&#x2021;6RIÂżW )DVFLD breed dogs. To inquire please call Nelly at 613-445-5405 or Monique at gooddogrescue@live.com. Free Estimates Af_eE`Z_fccj Bus.: 613-821-2369 Visit our website for more information www.gooddogrescue.ca. -(*$++,$*)'.#Iljj\cc=Xo1-(*$++,$-+*/ Toll Free: 1-877-450-4401 â&#x20AC;˘Dump the Dump Now - For more information regarding The Dump the Dump Now campaign, office hours, office location, petitions and signs, please visit the website www.dumpthedumpnow.ca ALE RIMINAL AW or contact by telephone at 613-445-3079. â&#x20AC;˘Russell Lions have medical equipment available free of charge. Wheelchairs, walkers, shower seats, crutches, etc. Contact Lion Jack McLaren 613-445-2131. B.Sc., B.C.L., LL.B. â&#x20AC;˘Bingo Bus to Crysler - Crysler Community Bingo, Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Bus pickup Russell Steve Bakker Community Centre and in front of Scotiabank between 6 and 6:10. 25 Years Experience Metcalfe, ON 613-821-3267 â&#x20AC;˘Take-A-Break Free Playgroup - stroller accessable, St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church, 139 Castor St., 2WWDZD2IĂ&#x20AC;FH /¡2ULJQDO2IĂ&#x20AC;FH bakkercrest@xplornet.com Wednesdays 9 - 11 a.m. Fun, songs, games, exercise and crafts! Infants, pre-schoolers with Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (613) 695-4253 (613) 675-0990 ZZZK\JUDGHURRĂ&#x20AC;QJFRP_ Daycare providers. Vikki 613-496-0222. Email john.hclo@me.com Owner and your Host

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Three wins in three nights allow Vikes to clinch division CASSELMAN— It was another grueling weekend for the St. Lawrence Division-leading Casselman Vikings. For the second time in three weeks they played three games in three nights. In addition, last weekend, the team played three games in four nights. Still, they continue to put up wins showing off how deep they are. This weekend they took wins from Gananoque on Jan. 17 in Casselman, against the Lions in Morrisburg on Jan. 18 and the Rebels in Char-Lan on Jan. 19. Casselman 3 Gananoque 2 Casselman put 13 shots on the Islanders net in the first, compared to 11 that Alexandre Michaud faced, but neither team found the back of the net and it was scoreless after one. In the second, Kyle Beauchamp-Lalonde, who has had the hot hand lately, scored to give the Vikings the 1-0 lead, with assists going to Curtis Chennette and Joel Adam. The Vikings added to their lead in the thied. Simon Cousineau scored 2:27 in, from Devin Desnoyers and Taylor Widenmaier to make it 2-0. Then, while on a power play, Taylor Widenmaier found the net himself, from Desnoyers and Cousineau and it was 3-0. But things were not signed, sealed and delivered for the Vikings and the Islanders mounted a comeback. With just under seven minutes to go, Tyler Murray scored making it 3-1. Then with 50 seconds left, Colin Brown made it 3-2. Luckily for the Vikings, that was as close as Gananoque came and Casselman held on for the 32 win. Michaud made 47 saves for Casselman while picking

up win number 14 on the season; Ryan Kaszuba stopped 36 in the loss. Casselman 9 Morrisburg 3 Casselman took the home side out of the game early as Adam Wensink scored shorthanded just four minutes in. The Vikings continued to pile it on as Sam McLaughlin scored at the 8:09 mark. Just two minutes later, Derek Widenmaier found the net making it 3-0. Eric Evans ended the run as he scored with just over a minute to go in the period making it 3-1. Dylan Dejong got the Lions to within one in the second, but the Vikings came back with three goals by Jody Sullivan, Damien Charette and Sullivan’s second and led 6- 2 heading to the third. Wensink and Derek Widenmaier each scored their second in the third and Kyle Beauchamp–Lalonde got in on the action to stretch the lead to 9-2. Grant Cooper got one back for the Lions with 7:56 to go, but it was too late and the Vikings won 9-3. Casselman outshot Morrisburg 60-28. Phillippe Quesnel earned the win for the Vikings with 25 stops; Ryan Cooper turned aside 51 in the losing effort. Casselman 13 Char-Lan 4 The Vikings made it a perfect three-for-three on Jan. 19 when they showed up in Williamstown and blew out the Rebels. The Vikings 13-4 win showed just how much of a gap there is between the two teams in the standings (13 points separate the Vikings from the second-place Rebels), but also the gap on the ice between the teams. Casselman capitalized on every opportunity in the first. Wensink opened the

scoring 7:42 in, then Taylor Widenmaier made it 2-0 with a short-handed goal. Wensink added his second with 2:08 remaining and Beauchamp-Lalonde sent the Vikings to the dressing room up 4-0 after a powerplay goal with less than a minute in the period. Casselman added two more to start the second from Luc Forget and Maxim St-Pierre. Char-Lan finally stopped the bleeding with a pair from Nick Senseverino and Quinlin MacDonell, but Wensink then added his third and it was 7-2. MacDonell and Nicolas Santor each netted one more for the Rebels before the end of the period, but they trailed 7-4 after two. The Vikings put it out of reach with a six-goal third period highlighted by their power play. Joel Adam and Chennette scored to make it 9-4 and then the Vikings scored three straight on the man advantage. McLaughlin, Chennette and Erik Just all found the net before Wensink added his fourth and the Vikings finished it 13-4. Casselman outshot CharLan 39-34. Michaud picked up the win with 30 saves; Alex Boileau, who came into the game in relief of Rebels starter Quade Smoke, allowed nine goals on 32 shots. The winning weekend allowed the Vikings to clinch the St. Lawrence Division with five games left on their schedule. The Rebels have a game in hand, but would still be a point back of the Vikings even if they won out and Casselman were to lose all remaining games. This week the Vikings will host Winchester on Jan. 24 and visit Akwesasne on Jan. 27.

Metcalfe’s Dawson Fisher’s blast from the point found its way through a screen to give the Jets an early 1-0 lead in an EOJHL match up in Ottawa on Jan 17. The Metcalfe lead was short lived and they went on to lose 4-2 to the Ottawa Golden Knights. Courtesy photo

Alexandre Michaud had a busy night on Jan. 17 as he turned aside 47 of the 49 shots he faced in a 3-2 win against the Gananoque Islanders. The Islanders got 26 of those shots in the third period as they tried to mount a comeback, but Michaud stood his ground and picked up his 14th win of the season. Matte photo

Jets/Knights play homeand-home; visit Clarence OTTAWA – With the third through fifth spots tightening up in the Metro Division of the EOJHL, a lot was on the line Jan. 17 at the Barbara Ann Scott Arena in Ottawa when the Metcalfe Jets took on the Ottawa Golden Knights in the first game of a home-and-home series. Metclafe 2 Ottawa West 4 As the game evolved the Knights continued to pressure Metcalfe in all areas of the ice, and on this night were full marks for the 4-2 win as the Jets were unable to match the compete level of a hungry Ottawa team that had been struggling in recent weeks. The Jets hit the score sheet first at 14:18 of the first period when Dawson Fisher’s shot from the blue line found its way through a screen on the power play. Assists were awarded to Ryan Pike and Josh Gervais. Ottawa evened the score less than a minute later on a goal from Martin Desouza, and then took a 2-1 lead into the first intermission when Mitch Bird tallied at 18:52. After Ottawa’s Phil Edgar extended the home side lead to 3-1 at 1:33 of the second, Metcalfe crept close again with their second power-play goal of the stick of Pike, with helpers from Devon Docksteader and Matt Shaheen. The one goal gap was short-lived however, as Metcalfe took two minor penalties creating a five on three advantage for the Knights who capitalized with a shot from the slot from Bird for his second marker of the night. Ottawa net-minder Devin Tappenden played a solid game in goal kicking out 22 of 24 Metcalfe shots while Eric Drouin absorbed the loss for the Jets stopping 18 of 22 Knights Metcalfe 3 Ottawa West 7

The Metcalfe Jets will be returning to the drawing board with their penalty kill following a 7-3 loss to division rival Ottawa Golden Knights in the back end of the home-and-home. The Jets allowed six power play goals on ten infractions on Jan. 18. The Jets began to run into penalty trouble in the second half of the first and surrendered two power-play markers before the end of the first period with Jeff Gottzman and Ryan Sterling both finding the Metcalfe net. After Philip Edgar scored Ottawa’s third straight manadvantage goal 1:32 into the second frame, Mitch Kellar extended the Knights lead to 4-0 at 10:35 with the only even-strength marker of the game for Ottawa. David Kilrea responded just over a minute later with a powerplay goal for Metcalfe to shrink the deficit to 4-1. Following the second intermission Metcalfe continued to chip away at the Ottawa lead as Scott Fleming and Kilrea, with his second, brought the Jets within striking distance down 4-3 with over 12 minutes left in the game. The momentum gained was lost in a hurry as back-to-back penalties created an extended five-on-three advantage and the Golden Knights fired off three more power play goals in a span of two and a half minutes. Adam Fulton with two of the scores, and Edgar with his second of the night accounted for the balance of the Knights outburst. Devin Tappenden earned the win in goal for Ottawa making good on 20 of 22 Jet shots while Eric Drouin was able to re-direct 21 of 28 Knights shots while being tagged with the loss. Metcalfe 0 Clarence 2 With only nine games left in the regular season, the Jets

now find themselves three points behind the Castors and looking up at the fourth and final Metro Division playoff berth after a 2-0 loss to them on Jan. 20 in Clarence. Working in Metcalfe’s favour are two games in hand on Clarence, and two more games with the Castors, which would be considered “must win”. The slump has coincided with a power outage up front as Metcalfe forwards have had trouble in recent weeks finding a goal when the team needs one to close a gap or even up a game. Case in point was this game where the Castors scored early but the Jets did not have a response for sixty minutes and fell 2-0 with an emptynet marker. Metcalfe’s scoring woes began during a rash of injuries where unfamiliar line mates had to find a way to generate chances as the coaches juggled combinations. It is hoped that now that the team is in large part healthy, some of that early season magic can be re-created with lines that had developed chemistry. The only score of the first fifty nine minutes was recorded by Clarence when Jeremie Gauthier tapped in a rebound into an gaping net at 2:30 of the first period. The Castors sealed the win with an empty net marker with 18 seconds left in the game when Metcalfe pulled starter Eric Drouin in a failed attempt to tie the match. Both goalies played very well with Gianmarco De Meis earning a shut out for the Castors stopping all 28 Metcalfe shots. Eric Drouin, who many times had to block repeated re-bounds, was the star of the game for the Jets stopping 38 of 39 Clarence attempts. The two teams meet again Jan. 25 night in Metcalfe.

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The Villager January 23, 2013 Page 15

Panthers hang on to beat Nationals Continued from the front Embrun 7 Rockland 4 When the puck did drop it was the Panthers who were all over the Nationals. The Panthers were dominating time on the attack but could not beat Rockland goalie Matt Jenkins. After regrouping in their own zone, the Panthers turned it over at their own blue line sending three Nats in alone against Embrun goalie Dana Pollex. Jeremy Auger buried the shot putting the Nats ahead 1-0. The Panthers came right back and found the equalizer. Francis Legault threw the puck in front, from behind the net, to Justin Blanchard. His first shot was stopped but his great coordination hand-eye allowed him to bat the rebound out to the air behind him tying the game at one. Labonté also picked up an assist on the play. Just over a minute later, Jenkins came way out of his net to challenge a shot by Mike Cogan. The first shot was stopped, but the rebound came to Taylor Armstrong, who was behind Jenkins, and he swept the puck home. Before the period was done, the Panthers were unable to keep the puck in at the blue line. Mike Walker grabbed it for the Nats and was off to the races. Cogan tried to catch him, but he was just a step back, Walker scored and it was 2-2 after one. Jenkins was solid for Rockland in the first half of the second period, but the Panthers finally got to him with 6:15 to go as Shane McPhee scored to give Embrun the 3-2 lead. Less than a minute later it was Ryan Kemp scoring to make it a two-goal game. Rockland got to within one when Tyler Ward hit twine, but the Panthers went to the break up 5-3 as Shawn Ennis got one with 26 seconds to go. The Panthers sealed it in

the third. Kemp scored his second, five minutes into the and Dexter period, MacMillan made it 7-3 with 8:16 on the clock. David Labelle got one on the power play with just over two minutes left for the Nats but the game went to Embrun 7-4. Pollex picked up the win; Jenkins was saddled with the loss. After adding another goal and assist, Nooyen commented on the stellar play of Blanchard since joining the team and what he has brought to his line mates. “For the last couple of years, Blanchard has been on our radar. He played his minor hockey with the AAA Wild, and he’s the son of our trainer Steve. We find that he complements Labonté and Legault very well, and together they’ve been playing some pretty good hockey as of late.”

Two in a row Embrun 5 Vankleek Hill 3 The Panthers looked to continue their momentum the following night when they were in Vankleek Hill. Embrun jumped out to a 20 lead thanks to goals by Robbie Gifford and Sean MacDonald. The Cougars got one before the buzzer as Yannick Boudrias cut the lead to 2-1 after one. Kemp restored the Panthers two-goal lead midway through the second, but the Cougars answered that one right away as Charles McKeown lit the lamp. Francis Lafond then made it 4-2 scoring with 7:33 to go in the second. Sebastien Boucher added one more for the Cougars, but Embrun still led 4-3 with one period to play. Legault added the insurance marker in the third and the Panthers held on for the 53 win. Phil Eberley was the win-

ner between the Panthers’ pipes; Anthony Vassal took the loss for the Cougars. Inconsistency has been the story for the Panthers this season, something Nooyen noticed over the past games. At the same time, he did take some positives from the weekend. “Like on so many nights, we struggled to put together a full 60 minutes against Rockland. Just when it looked like we were about to pull away, a mental lapse in our defensive zone let them back in it. As for the highlights of the weekend, it was nice to see Ryan Kemp find his scoring touch again after missing the last few weeks with a knee injury. Furthermore, our penalty kill was outstanding, especially in the third period of the Vankleek Hill game when we had to kill a 5-3 for nearly a full four minutes.” With the win, the Panthers tighten their grasp on third in the league. With six games to go, they are seven points back of St. Isidore for first in their division and five back of Cumberland who sit second. However, the top team in each division is guaranteed first or second spot overall so even if the Panthers do catch Cumberland they still must pass St. Isidore to move up in the standings. Nooyen explains the approach the team is taking to the last few weeks. “Based on how the standings look at the present time and how many games remain, we are aware of the fact we’ll likely finish third. However this isn’t where our focus is or should be. Our main concern right now is to be playing our best hockey heading into the playoffs, and if we are capable of doing that then we should have confidence against whoever we matchup against come the post season.” As it stands now, the Panthers would be looking at a playoff match with those same Nationals, but there is still a lot to be determined. This week the Panthers play host to Papineauville on Jan. 25.

Embrun Panthers forward Shawn Ennis is denied by Rockland Nationals goaltender Matt Jenkins in the second period of their match on Jan. 18. Jenkins slid across his crease and got his glove up to tip the puck in the air as Ennis looks on. Ennis and the Panthers would have the last laugh as he scored what turned out to be the game winner in Embrun’s 7-4 victory. Matte photo

Flyers name Giroux captain PHILADELPHIA— Former Navan Grad Claude Giroux has been named the 19th captain of the Philadelphia Flyers. The team’s general manager, Paul Holmgren, made the announcement on Jan. 15. The 25-year-old Giroux, still makes trips to the area, as he has been a featured guest of the Martin St. Pierre Golf Tournament, at Casselview Golf Course in Casselman, for the past three years. Giroux assumes the role from defenseman Chris Pronger who has been out with a concussion since November of 2011. Scott Hartnell and Daniel Briere will serve as the team’s assistant captains. This will be Giroux’s fifth season in the NHL with the Flyers after being drafted 22nd overall in the 2006 NHL entry draft. Last season, the forward had 28 goals, 65 assists and 93 points for the Flyers. He, along with Briere, spent the lockout in Germany playing for the Berlin Polar Bears of the DEL. In nine games he had four goals and 15 assists. At 25-years-old, Giroux is the fourth youngest cap-

Sponsorship appreciation Kemptville Champs!

The Martel & Sons Mavericks Elite ladies broomball team recently won a tournament in Kemptville on Jan. 19. The team will now turn their attention to the regionals in Cornwall on Feb. 22-23. Here the team poses after their victory. Front: Stacie Duval; middle row, from left: Annelie Lanthier, Erica Savage, Tracy MacGregor, Melanie Lanthier, Jess Nash, Michelle DeRepentigny, Selena Henry, Caroline Ranger, Karstie MacRae; back row: Ina Henry, assistant coach, Stephanie Lanthier, Shauna Lynch, Amy Corvenelli, MJ Vandelaar, Céline DeRepentigny, Tanya Longtin, Marc DeRepentigny, coach.

Courtesy photo

Peter Kruys, Coach of the Russell IDA Warriors Midget B2 Team, presents on behalf of the Russell Minor Hockey Association a Midget B2 team picture to past owner of Russell IDA Brian Mehr in appreciation for his many years of team sponsorship on Jan. 18. PJ Pearson photo

tain in the league behind Colorado’s Gabriel Landeskog (20), Chicago’s Jonathan Toews (24) and Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby

(25, Aug. 7). The Flyers opened up their season on Jan. 19 with a 3-1 loss, at home, to Crosby and the Penguins.

Getting the C

Claude Giroux, seen here at the 2012 Martin St. Pierre Golf tournament at Casselview Golf Course in Casselman, was recently named the 19th captain of the Philadelphia Flyers. Giroux takes over from Chris Pronger and is the fourth youngest current captain in the league. Matte photo

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Page 16 The Villager January 23, 2013

A busy summer turns to a busier 2012 fall and winter Pamela Pearson Villager Staff On the morning of Tues., July 24, Russell County OPP responded to a break and enter at the region’s local food bank — the Good Neighbour’s Food Bank. More than $4,000 of food items were stolen or damaged by either being opened and left to defrost or spilled all over the floor. The community has been donating ever since filling the food bank shelves. The food bank also recently received a donation of 74 children’s snowsuits. While Dr. Darrell Menard was off at the 2012 Olympics this past summer, local day campers of Russell Township’s Camp Extreme also participated in their version of the games during one of the camp’s many themed weekly camps in July at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Secondary School. It was also at the end of July when, after a quiet evening family outdoor movie took place in Chesterville, the town centre turned into a dramatic rescue when a Chesterville man and veteran of the war in Afghanistan, attempted to take his own life. Thanks to the quick actions of a civilian who called 911 and OPP Officer Justin McKenna, Patrick Dusablon was retrieved from the Nation River and has started to receive the care he and his family needs. On Aug. 7 in Limoges, 13 children at the Calypso Water Park became ill due to a chlorine leak in the wave pool’s filtration system. All recovered and no more incidents were reported as swimmers tried to beat the heat at the popular destination. Summer rounded out with the completion of the Embrun Recreation Centre upgrade project and road closures were announced as the United Counties of Prescott and Russell roundabout project at St. Guillaume Road and Notre Dame in Embrun began. The 154th Russell Agricultural Fair started its four day run on Sept. 6 and besides some much needed rain to drench the Level Two drought ground, and the Travelling Farmers educational fibreglass cow being rustled out of the fairgrounds under the cover of darkness on Sept. 7, the fair seemed to go off without a hitch. Luckily the cow was found, fairly unscathed, at the corner of Wade Road and Castor Street just in time for the Metcalfe Fair. The ladies of the Vernon Women’s Institute celebrated its 100th anniversary. The Russell Fire Department, along with a few community partners continued to help out many this past year with its fundraising including the family of Matthew Holmes

and Muscular Dystrophy Canada who received a $10,000 cheque from the annual RFD Boot Drive and Scotiabank Russell Match the Funds program. As students were settling into their daily routine, the schools themselves were receiving their 2011-2012 school year standings from the Education Quality and Assessment Office (EQAO). The report found district schools had met the provincial standards in the core subjects of reading, writing and mathematics. For 30 days, residents raised their voices, taking action to fight the Taggart Miller Environmental Services (TMES) Proposed Terms of Reference for two potential industrial waste sites in the area. TMES handed over the TOR document to the Ontario Ministry of Environment Minister Jim Bradley, who, right before Christmas break, announced his approval, therefore allowing TMES to move forward with the next step of the project - Environmental Assessment. The township, which also had a negative response to the TOR, did make a positive announcement regarding a new addition to the 417 Industrial Park - Megha Holdings Inc., which would help in job creation and generate various contract opportunities for the local construction sector. October also had township administration right on time with the presentation of the first draft of the 2013 Russell Township budget to council. In sports, hockey, cross country running, football and basketball were well underway as soccer was coming to a close. Local wheelchair athlete Patrice “Pico” Dagenais upon his return from the London 2012 Paralympic games was honoured by the township with the naming of an Embrun park after him. The Russell Soccer Club held its 27th closing banquet for the Raider competitive teams and the Embrun Panthers picked up right where they left off at the end of last season as they put forth a dominant performance at the National Capital Junior Hockey League’s Showcase. The St. Thomas Aquinas Ravens, although handicapped by not having a home field advantage this fall, still made it to the championships at both senior and junior levels, with the juniors taking home the title. After capturing their league championship in October, Russell High Timberwolves senior girls basketball team came home with the EOSSAA bronze. As we bundled up, heading into the colder season (although some days it felt like Mother Nature was

playing a trick on us), seven participants vied for the bragging rights of best chili on a blustery day at Oligo Development Group’s first- ever Church Street charity chili cookoff. PC nominee Roxane Vi l l e n e u v e - R o b e r t s o n announced her candidacy for the Glengarry-PrescottRussell riding in the next provincial election. The ServiceOntario centre expansion at the township building in Embrun was completed and the Land Registry Office moved there after closing its historic doors at 1122

Concession Street in Russell, on Nov. 2. That office wasn’t the only thing moving in November as school boards across the provincial public schools were bracing for labour action. Seniors of the community were walking for Alzheimer’s Disease in the Russell Meadows Walkathon, which raised $7,414. With an additional $3,000 from the Scotiabank Russell Match the Funds Program, seniors council at RM will be able to continue providing for their Share Your Dream Program launched back in the spring.

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By the end of November the Christmas season was in full swing as decorations started to go up, the 2nd Russell Scouts were selling trees and parades marched down local streets. The third draft of the 2013 Township budget was presented and passed down by council majority on Dec. 17. The language battle between Howard Galganov and Jean Serge Brisson versus Russell Township came to an end when the Supreme Court of Canada supported the June judgement by the Ontario Court of Appeals supporting the

township’s ability, under the Municipal Act of Ontario, to create a bilingual sign bylaw. 2012 was a year of predications, some old and some new. As a community we gathered in times of strife and supported each other but also had a grand time of it at our events, of which many have become traditions for future generations to carry on and protect. Much like the patchwork quilt made by those who came before us, — each year added makes us bigger, stronger and able to offer a sense of home and security to those who follow.

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The Villager-January 23, 2013