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EVENTS: BIG WIGS, HOLIDAY SCIENCE & TECH DAYS 19 FILM: “AMERICAN HUSTLE,” “NEBRASKA” 22 RESTAURANT REVIEW: FRAICHE BISTRO & DESSERT BAR 11 URBAN JOURNAL: POVERTY, RACISM, AND SEGREGATION

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 31

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DECEMBER 25-31, 2013 Free

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

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Vol 43 No 16

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

Why wouldn’t an oblivious egomaniac be the source of our country’s dumbed-down media?” FILM REVIEW, PAGE 23

City schools overhaul update. EDUCATION, PAGE 6

Rochester neighbors pick public safety projects. NEIGHBORHOODS, PAGE 5

What are YOU doing New Year’s Eve? EVENTS GUIDE, PAGE 17

Unwrapping the Calamari Sisters. THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 18

MEDIA | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

Dialing it down: local media moves WROC Channel 8 and WUHF Channel 31 have shared news content and personalities for the past eight years. But that’s about to change. Beginning January 1, WUHF will instead share a news operation with WHAM Channel 13. WUHF’s contract with WROC is expiring, and WUHF and WHAM now share an owner, at least in part. WHAM and WUHF are not merging; they have an agreement to share news and advertising sales teams. But across the country, similar shared service

agreements have come under scrutiny from media critics who worry they are a subtle form of consolidation. They also worry about the impact on journalism. Locally, journalism is already suffering as a result of the elimination of the reporting staff at the Messenger Post weeklies. But Chuck Samuels, WHAM’s general manager, says the new agreement is not a reduction in voices, but a shift. And the new arrangement could provide opportunities as well, he says.

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Individualism on steroids

My question: whatever happened to the Common Good? (“Divided Nation,” Urban Journal). Does it not say in the Preamble to the Constitution that we the people are to establish justice and promote the general welfare? American individualism has run amuck! We are social creatures. We are an interdependent web. Too many of our “leaders” have forgotten that. RICHARD S. GILBERT

Bipartisan punishment

Now things make sense (“County Republican Wants City to Pass Legislation for Drugfree Zones,” News Blog). Passing drug-free zones would mean more citizens would be arrested, and this would help justify the increase of $1.5 million for the housing of prisoners in the jail. Too bad they are not interested in decreasing the number of people in jail as a way to cut costs, as that would help everyone. ALEX WHITE

Disperse!

Sixteen African-American students from Edison Tech had awakened early on a cold Wednesday morning and caught a bus downtown. At 8:30 they were waiting on Main Street for a school bus to take them to a basketball scrimmage at Aquinas. It was the day before Thanksgiving, and every other student in the city and suburbs had the day off. Some of the Edison students had gone into the store behind them to buy food, and others were hanging outside close by when a Rochester police officer told them to disperse. How must that have felt? Their coach, a counselor at the school, Jacob Scott, was not there yet because he was purchasing juice, fruit, and doughnuts for the team, some of whom he knew would not have eaten. Put yourself in the place of a 16-year-old AfricanAmerican kid trying to explain that you are waiting for the school bus and that your coach will be here any minute. I wonder if I would have moved purposefully slower because I thought I was being hassled. Or maybe I would have muttered something unintelligible under my 2 CITY

breath as indicated in the police report. But police trained to communicate with teenagers would have understood that, even if it did happen, right? Surely the police would understand that there could be no other reason for the team to be there and not in bed on a cold morning when school is not in session. They would understand. But the officer did not understand, and instead of communicating with the kids called for backup, and now four officers, none them black, repeated their demand and told the team to “disperse.” What a strange word. As a person privileged enough to be born white in America, I’m not sure that I’ve heard that word addressed to me. But wait a minute, the team thinks: Here comes our coach, Mr. Scott. The police will listen to him. The coach pulled up and saw that two of his team were in the back seat of a police car and one was being frisked, and the coach told me that his heart was in his throat as he jumped out of his car. But he also told me that even while doing that, he made sure to take off his hat and keep his arms in plain sight because

DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

he knew, had been taught, and has had modeled for him his whole life, that a white authority figure being approached by a black man will view him as a threat. Scott told me that he purposefully slowed his speech down, and since he was headed to a scrimmage and he was not wearing one of his usual suits, he recognized that the white police officers might not view him as the coach and school counselor who knew that all these boys wanted to do was play ball this cold November morning, that they had been told to wait on Main Street and were freaked out by this whole affair. Disperse! That is what he is told. And through it all, he recognizes the context. There have been fights downtown this year, and Main Street has been a trouble spot for police, but things have gotten better as the district worked with the city to change transportation policies. And after all, it was not a school day. There was no reason for 16 African-American kids to be standing at a bus stop at 8:30 in the morning the Wednesday before Thanksgiving unless they had a purpose.

Funding public schools

In memoriam

I am not an expert on education policy, but is it possible that a root cause of our public education budget woes is rising profits that charter schools extract from the education budget that would otherwise go to actually teach our kids something in our PUBLIC schools? (“Vargas Warns Board of $33 million to $46 million budget Gap,” News). Public schooling was never intended to be a two-class system.

What a spectacle! / From around the world / Masters of war gather, / Honoring a man of peace / Revealing the face of hypocrisy; From around the world / enslavers and disenfranchisers gather, / Honoring a man of freedom; From around the world / Power-seekers gather, / Hoping the embrace of well-crafted words / will disguise pretentiousness and self-importance, / Honoring themselves; Look closely / For the Emperor’s clothes....

JOHN JONGEN

DOUG HOENER

Mr. Scott thought that he would clear things up. But instead he was told to get away or he too would be arrested. So Mr. Scott told the rest of his team to slowly walk down to the library and he would meet them there, and he started to call the families of the three young men who had just been arrested – at 8:45 a.m. for leaving home to play basketball on a cold Rochester morning. Not at 11:45 p.m. in front of a nightclub or even at 2:45 on school day. Nope; arrested at 8:45 a.m., with 13 of your teammates looking on, because you did not disperse. Then, two days later, after booking, fingerprinting, hours of waiting in court on Friday feeling helpless because they still could not believe this happened: dropped charges. Just a big misunderstanding. After all, they were black kids standing in a group downtown. And even if they had ID’s and bags filled with basketball equipment, they did not disperse when instructed to. These things take time to work out. You don’t understand the context, we are told. It is not about race.

But every AfricanAmerican who has ever been pulled over for Driving While Black knows that it is about race. And every person born white who thinks about it knows that 16 white kids waiting for a bus on a cold November morning would never have experienced this. As a black teenaged kid in the City of Rochester, how would you feel? And as a professional counselor and coach charged with serving as a role model, how would you feel? And how do you explain to your team and the parents of 16 students that something is broken? And that the break affects not only the 16 kids, it affects us all. Because those kids and their coach will never forget how it felt to be helpless, knowing they were doing nothing wrong and yet experiencing that sinking feeling in their stomach – something few white people will ever feel when told to disperse. JEFF LINN

Linn is Associate Professor of Educational Administration at SUNY Brockport’s Metro Center, where Edison Coach Jacob Scott is taking a Foundations of Educational Leadership class taught by Linn.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly December 25-31, 2013 Vol 43 No 16 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Jim Kempkes, Laura Rebecca Kenyon, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Nicole Milano, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Raymond, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

NEW YEARS EVE

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Our crisis of poverty, racism, and segregation This has to be an almost dizzyingly heady time for Lovely Warren. On January 1, she’ll be sworn in as Rochester’s mayor, the first woman to hold that position. Her administrative appointments are getting positive reviews. Last week, she joined other newly elected mayors at the White House for a discussion with President Obama. But she’s about to inherit a daunting job: running a city that has one of the highest poverty rates – and highest concentrations of poverty – in the nation. Warren certainly understands the problem. On City Council, she has represented some of the poorest neighborhoods in this poverty-heavy city. And obviously, her knowledge of those neighborhoods helped shape her promise that as mayor, she would address the economic development, public safety, and education needs of the city. It helped shape her thinking when she hammered away at the great gap between the “two Rochesters.” Warren can’t bridge that gap by herself. She’ll need the commitment and involvement not just of city residents but also of people throughout the region. She and the larger community have been given a great gift, in the form of this month’s report from the Rochester Area Community Foundation and ACT Rochester. Titled “Poverty and the Concentration of Poverty in the NineCounty Greater Rochester Area,” the report’s principal author and researcher was Ed Doherty – who has his own long experience with Rochester and its challenges. He was the city’s budget director for four years and was commissioner of environmental services for 19. The report is a powerful, sobering document. It notes that Rochester’s poverty rate is “higher than all the principal cities in the nation’s largest metros”: higher than the poverty rate of Miami, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington. It notes that the concentration of poverty itself – in specific neighborhoods in Rochester and in the region’s other urban areas – magnifies the problems that poverty creates. As our news report noted earlier this month, Doherty’s report spells out the multiple ways we got here: African-American migration patterns, sprawl, employment changes. And significantly, Doherty pulls

Rochester’s poverty rate is higher than that of Miami, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Houston, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington.” absolutely no punches in linking our poverty concentration to racism. “While it is important not to equate race and ethnicity with poverty,” writes Doherty, “the correlation in the Greater Rochester area is indisputable.” “Cities have always had sub-areas of concentrated poverty,” Doherty writes, “but the strong attitudes and policies that encouraged racial and ethnic segregation had, and continue to have, a profound impact on our community.” The city’s black population was small until after 1950. But it grew rapidly after that – tripling by 1960, doubling again by 1970, and continuing to grow substantially until 2000. And, Doherty writes, the black population growth was at its greatest “when overt housing discrimination was the norm and substantially permitted by law.” Permitted by law. And practiced routinely because of racial prejudice. Racial discrimination – private and official – limited the choice of both housing and employment, Doherty writes, “even for professionals.” And thanks in part to the discrimination in employment, many of the African Americans segregated in the inner-city neighborhoods were poor. As a result, Rochester has been racially and economically segregated to an extraordinary degree. That segregation continues. Affordable rental housing in the suburbs, Doherty writes, “is nearly non-existent.” There is almost no public housing in the suburbs, and most of it, writes Doherty, “is limited to seniors or disabled persons.” The segregation and discrimination hasn’t been ignored – not totally. Rochester’s 19th Ward Community Association was an early national leader in the fight against real-estate block busting.

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CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Lentini leaving arts council

Sarah Lentini will step down as president and CEO of the Arts and Cultural Council for Greater Rochester in January. Lentini joined the organization in 2000 and has been a prominent advocate for the arts in Rochester, as well as a strong supporter of local artists.

Evans opts out

Malik Evans will not run for a seventh term as president of the Rochester Board of Education. He will continue to serve on the board, however. Board Vice President Van White has expressed interest in the presidency. The board will hold elections in early January.

Rural/Metro to exit bankruptcy

The US Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware has approved Rural/ Metro’s reorganization plan. The ambulance and fire protection service plans to emerge from Chapter 11 in the next few weeks, according to a press release.

on a motion to dismiss bid-rigging charges against Robert Wiesner, husband of County Executive Maggie Brooks. Wiesner’s attorney says the charges should be dropped because Wiesner didn’t have a chance to testify before the grand jury. If the charges are dropped, prosecutors say they plan to present the case to a new grand jury.

Lej fight broadens

Republicans in the County Legislature say that their Democratic counterparts are jeopardizing the Costco project, which is part of CityGate. It all comes down to the county’s yearly projects plan. The GOP needs a Democratic vote to pass the plan, but the Dems are holding out because they want a Legislature-led review of the county’s LDC activities. One of the projects involves the children’s detention center. The center is on the CityGate site and needs to move so Costco can happen, Republicans say.

Wiesner decision pending Acting Monroe County Court Justice Robert Noonan has yet to rule

GET

A new method of determining whether to close the beaches to swimming may be more accurate, officials say. FILE PHOTO

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Testing the waters Monroe County public health officials may have found a better way to determine if and when the county’s beaches should be closed to swimming. The county has long used a model that considers several factors, including recent rainfall, algae levels, the Genesee River’s flow into Lake Ontario, and water cloudiness. The model has been refined over the years, officials say, but there are still times when the beaches are closed unnecessarily. But in 2010, county health officials began working with the US Geological Survey to develop a new, computerized model. Last month, the USGS released a report showing

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DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

that during the 2012 beach season, the computer model was considerably more accurate than the county’s existing model. “Nowcasting,” as it’s called, incorporates a range of variables and uses real-time data pulled from weather data systems or entered into a computer or device at the beach. The computerized model analyzes the data and makes recommendations whether to close the beach, says Brett Hayhurst, a hydrologist at the USGS office in Ithaca. Charlie Knauf, environmental health project analyst for the Monroe County Department of Health, says initial results from the

model are promising. It has the potential to help health officials avoid unnecessarily closing a beach to swimming, he says, or leaving it open when it should be closed. “We would minimize the risk to the public and maximize the recreational opportunity,” Knauf says. But the switch needs the approval of the local Board of Health and the county administration. Knauf says he wants to present the nowcasting system to the board at the end of the winter. The local Board of Health may choose to implement the system, Knauf says, or it may opt for another year of side-by-side comparisons.

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Each quadrant will get $50,000 from the City of Rochester to implement the winning ideas from the Citizen Budgeting for Public Safety program. “I just think a lot of really clever things have come out of it,” says Nancy Johns-Price, administrator of the Southeast Neighborhood Service Center.

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Neighbors pick public safety projects City of Rochester neighborhoods will find out on December 30 which of their proposed projects to improve public safety will get funded. Mayor Tom Richards will make the announcement at 10:30 a.m. in the atrium at City Hall, 30 Church Street. Each quadrant submitted ideas and priorities to improve public safety in their neighborhood, and then residents voted for the ones they liked best. Voting ended on December 16. Each quadrant will get $50,000 from the City of Rochester to fund the winning ideas. The program, which is called Citizen Budgeting for Public Safety, is being run through the city’s Neighborhood Service Centers. “I just think a lot of really clever things have come out of it,” says Nancy Johns-Price, administrator of the Southeast Neighborhood Service Center. The Southeast’s ballot, for example, included ways to calm traffic, and called for the creation of a mapping project to help reduce crime in select neighborhoods. The Northeast quadrant proposed buying specialized vehicles for off-road code enforcement and to patrol trails and other hard-to-reach areas. In order to get funded, the projects had to demonstrate a connection to public safety and

If you say so

The Southeast wants to do more traffic calming projects like 2012’s BouleVART. PHOTO BY MICHAEL E. TOMB

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be able to be implemented within a year of final approval. The winning projects may be carried out by the city, or the city will help find the right organizations or vendors to do the work. Johns-Price says that voting in the Southeast was strong. “For me, it was out of control,” she says. “It was nuts.” While $50,000 isn’t a lot, Johns-Price says the program has other benefits. “What it did was it got people together to have conversations about things that are worrying them,” she says. “And it got us started on some stuff. Even if some things don’t get funded, I believe now that the charge has started, they [the neighborhoods] will go elsewhere to find other outside funding. They’ll write grants and do things, and we’ll find a way of doing it.”

Democrats have managed to pull a bit of information about the county’s internal probe into local development corporations out of the county administration. It turns out it’s not a probe at all, the administration says. It’s a “review.” | The probe-review, which is being conducted by former state Attorney General Dennis Vacco, is one of the central issues in an ongoing skirmish in the County Legislature. | Democrats say the Legislature should be in charge of the internal whatever, not the administration, which has a clear conflict of interest. And they’ve twice blocked a large capital project borrowing plan in hopes of getting Republicans to agree. | Dems also want some info about what Vacco has been doing. | At a special meeting of the Legislature on Friday morning, Deputy County Attorney Dan DeLaus said that Vacco is helping the county review its LDCrelated processes. The county executive is not investigating herself, he said. | Dems tried to get more details, but weren’t allowed to continue their questioning. | After the meeting, County Executive Maggie Brooks offered her own explanation of Vacco’s work. She said he’s doing an internal review of policies and procedures. | “There is no county investigation,” Brooks said.

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AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,293 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,105 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to December 20. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from December 11 to December 17: -- Petty Officer 1st Class James L. Smith, 38, Huffman, Texas -- Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L. Billings, 34, Heavener, Okla. -- Chief Warrant Officer 2 Joshua B. Silverman, 35, Scottsdale, Ariz. -- Sgt. Peter C. Bohler, 29, Willow Spring, N.C. -- Sgt. 1st Class Omar W. Forde, 28, Marietta, Ga. -- Staff Sgt. Jesse L. Williams, 30, Elkhart, Ind. -- Spc. Terry K. D. Gordon, 22, Shubuta, Miss. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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CITY 5

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO PHOTOS | BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Schools overhaul ready for phase two 1

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[1] Bob DiPaola, schools modernization program manager, shows a gutted School 58. [2] Work is complete on School 50. [3] The new media and computer lab at School 50. [4] Future site of School 58’s new cafeteria and kitchen. [5] School 50’s new cafeteria and kitchen. [6] A second story was added to School 50. [7] Christine Richards is assistant principal at School 50.

Some Rochester school officials travelled to Albany recently to meet lawmakers on several pressing issues, including phase two of the massive project to overhaul city schools. School officials gave legislators a brief overview of the roughly $1.2 billion construction project — one of the largest projects in Rochester’s history. The second phase of the multi-phase project will involve 25 schools over 10 years, according to the most recent proposal. Some of the work includes additional construction on schools included in the first phase. Phase two construction is expected to begin in the summer of 2015. Work on the entire overhaul project, which is called facilities modernization, is supposed to be completed by 2024. While the school board has approved the plans for phase two, new state legislation is required to authorize the nearly $450 million required for this portion of the work. State Assembly member David Gantt was instrumental in getting the legislation passed for the $325 million first phase of facilities modernization, and will probably 6 CITY

DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

be called on for a repeat performance. Getting phase two off the ground should be easier than it was with phase one. Then, changes in superintendents led to a series of starts, delays, and revisions to the original building plans, as well as to the list of schools that would be worked on. For example, School 16, an older building located in the 19th Ward, was slated to be closed. But pressure from parents and residents changed those plans. And former Superintendent JeanClaude Brizard significantly altered the plans for several schools in the first

phase so those schools could grow from K-6 to K-8. But the overall project still faces significant challenges. School officials are trying to plan construction for buildings that will meet the district’s future needs, but that future is difficult to predict. Student population is declining as charters continue to eat away at the district’s enrollment. Officials are also trying to make sure the schools they’re remodeling are in neighborhoods expected to have the highest concentration of school-age children going into the future. And there’s the disruption and stress that the project causes teachers, students, and families. While construction is under way in some schools, students and teachers have to be relocated to alternate locations — what the district refers to as “swing space.” And the modernization project is occurring in conjunction with several other

significant changes such as the expansion of instruction time in some schools. Schools 5, 12, 17, 28, 50, 58, Charlotte,

East, and Monroe are all part of the $325 million first phase of facilities modernization. Work has been completed at 50, 17, and Charlotte, and school officials say that, in many respects, they are models of what the public should expect to see with the rest of the work. School 50 is one of the schools that expanded from K-6 to K-8. Fifty-thousand square feet was added to the building, almost doubling its size. Much of the original building was gutted, says Tom Rogér, program director of the Gilbane Building Company, the firm managing the construction project. “We played a little bit of musical chairs,” he says. “The old library became the art room and the old gym became the new cafeteria.” School 50 also has a new kitchen and much of one wing of the building is devoted to arts and music.

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[8] An addition to School 58 will include a new gym. [9] School 17 principal Ralph Spezio and a kindergartner ring the school’s bell. [10] School 58’s construction costs are the highest in phase one.

But one of the most impressive features is a brand new regulation-size gymnasium complete with bleachers and a performance stage built into one end. The ventilation, heating, and electrical systems at School 50 all had to be replaced to meet building code standards, Rogér says. And Superintendent Vargas requested that the plans for several schools include air conditioning — even in the gyms — which is a major expense. Two major factors had to be considered with School 50 as well as with some of the district’s other buildings, Rogér says. The buildings were originally designed at a time when students walked to school, went home for lunch, and didn’t spend as much time inside the buildings as they do today. “We had to look at how these buildings relate to the surrounding neighborhood,” he says. “How they worked then was a totally different situation from how they need to function today.”

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Like School 50, School 17 has been

virtually rebuilt. It has a new addition, as well as a new gymnasium, library, and media center. “We never had a place where kids could sit comfortably and read a book,” says School 17 librarian Ronald Boyd. “Kids come and they look around and ask, ‘Is this the public library?’ They really have responded so positively.” Off to one side of the library is a separate room — a media lab with more than a dozen computer stations, a Smart Board, and a sound system that evenly distributes the instructor’s voice around the classroom even if the instructor is moving from station to station. “The architects did a fantastic job,” Boyd says. “We just love it here.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

DIALING IT DOWN:

LOCAL MEDIA MOVES

MEDIA BY JEREMY MOULE

PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

For the past eight years, the news staff at WROC Channel 8 has also served as the WUHF Channel 31 news team. The content and the personalities on both stations have been the same. But starting January 1, that affiliation will be no more. Instead, WHAM Channel 13 and WUHF will share news operations. WUHF’s contract with WROC is expiring, and WUHF and WHAM now share an owner, at least in part. (And to be clear, the new affiliation doesn’t mean that the 13WHAM news team or either station will become a Fox News operation.) WHAM and WUHF are not merging. The two stations, via their corporate parents, have inked an agreement to share news and sales operations. “We’re not going to try to pretend that it’s some other product,” says Chuck Samuels, WHAM’s general manager. “We’re just going to extend our news brand on to WUHF.” But across the country, similar shared service agreements have come under scrutiny from media critics including journalists, public interest groups, and a few former members of the Federal Communications Commission. Critics characterize the agreements as stealth or covert consolidation — a legal way to get around FCC ownership limits. Generally, the FCC prohibits owning more than one Big Four network television station in a single local market. Critics say that the shared service agreements have the same effect as true mergers. They eliminate local media voices — a term that covers major dailies, weekly newspapers, radio stations, and television stations — and reduce the number of local reporters out on the beat, digging into important issues. A vigorous local media would lead to a better informed public, critics say, and higher-quality dialogue around local and national issues. “We really worry that this [use of the agreements] undermines the local ecosystems nationwide,” says Todd O’Boyle, program director for Common Cause’s Media and 8 CITY

DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

Democracy Reform Initiative. Samuels says that any consolidation associated with shared services agreements already happened in Rochester eight years ago, when Fox Rochester (WUHF) eliminated its reporting staff. What’s happening now is not the elimination of a local media voice, he says, so much as a shifting of voices. Michael Saffran, a communications lecturer at SUNY Geneseo who’s studied media consolidation, agrees. He says he The consolidation that’s happened in the radio industry nationally could serve as a cautionary tale for television, says Michael doesn’t expect the Saffran, a communications lecturer at SUNY Geneseo. shift to change the quantity of local news across the country through what’s known as And like other critics, Free Press says that that gets reported. sidecar agreements. “covert consolidations” can diminish the “I think the net result for the market is quality of local journalism. Earlier this year, the public interest pretty flat,” Saffran says. group Free Press released a report that Sinclair is highly critical of the report. It But with the WUHF-WHAM agreement, heavily criticized the use of most shared says that Free Press ignores the fact that the there’s an ownership overlap that didn’t exist services agreement by station owners. agreements are completely legal and that the with the WUHF-WROC contract. The report said that several of the largest company is operating within the law. Sinclair Broadcast Group, the country’s broadcasting companies used the approach And Sinclair notes that instead of laying off largest television conglomerate, owns in various markets, including WROC news staff and neglecting stations, it’s investing WUHF’s physical facilities and its owner Nexstar. But it took particular in equipment and promotions and is actually broadcasting license, along with WHAM’s aim at Sinclair, since it’s the largest of the hiring newsroom staff. In the 18 months prior physical facilities. And the news and sales employees at WHAM are Sinclair employees. companies and one of the most aggressive in to the report, Sinclair says it added 72 staff its use of the agreements. members to its newsrooms nationally. WHAM’s broadcasting license, however, The report said that between 2011 And in preparation for the changeover at is owned and held by Deerfield Media, a and September 2013, Sinclair went from 13WHAM, Samuels says, four or five news separate company closely linked to Sinclair. owning or operating 58 stations to 161 positions have been added. A Wall Street Journal article published in stations. Sinclair purchased WHAM at the October says that Deerfield is owned by But WHAM’s newscasts are the top-rated end of 2012, and part of that deal hinged Stephen Mumblow, a former banker to in Rochester. And with what Samuels calls on Deerfield buying the station’s FCC Sinclair CEO David Smith. And the two the “shifting of voices” on local television broadcasting license. companies jointly operate stations in markets

airwaves comes another issue. Sinclair is known as a politically conservative corporation, and it’s also been known to use its stations as platforms for politically charged content. Perhaps the most infamous example happened during the 2004 presidential race, when Sinclair directed its stations to show a documentary, “Stolen Honor: Wounds that Never Heal,” which was critical of then-candidate John Kerry’s anti-Vietnam War activities.

“You’re essentially telling the viewer upfront that something is wasteful before you let the viewer make up their own mind,” she says. The local Waste Watch reporting, however, seems solid, fair, and addresses issues of concern across the political spectrum. One segment, for example, focused on the Rochester school district’s teacher evaluation costs under Common Core standards, another on county contracts, and another on implications of new state gun-control laws.

Press, or the Sinclair corporate operation. He’s aware of Sinclair corporate’s reputation, he says, but it’s incumbent on the local news organization to make sure the outside material it airs is balanced in its entirety. As for the news that WHAM produces locally, Samuels says that no station owner has ever told the local organization how to report the news. And the station’s integrity won’t change, he says. “13 WHAM news is as strong as it’s ever been,” Samuels says. “We have some great journalists on our staff, and that’s going to continue.” Discussions about media consolidation

often focus on television or radio stations. But FCC ownership limits are intended to preserve as many local media voices as possible. And it’s increasingly difficult to disentangle the effect that changes in one medium have on others, largely because of shifts in how the public consumes news and information. In particular, television stations and newspapers increasingly compete Chuck Samuels, general manager for WHAM Channel 13, says the station will move its morning and 10 p.m. newscasts to WUHF Channel 31. for local Internet traffic and ad dollars. A bigger concern locally may be the near-silencing of voices Some subtle signs of Sinclair’s leanings While Barnhart is concerned about at the very ground level of journalism. Last have surfaced in 13WHAM’s products. Sinclair’s documented political bent, she says month, Messenger Post Media laid off its The station’s website now carries headlines that she’s confident that her former coworkers entire Monroe County reporting staff. The from the Washington Times and Newsmax, won’t be influenced by any agenda the parent papers since have been filled mostly with both conservative news organizations. And company might have. submitted content from community groups, a couple of times a week, the 13WHAM “They’re going to continue to do a great nonprofit organizations, and politicians, as morning show runs segments featuring job,” she says. “They have great people there. well as with ads. Mark Hyman, a conservative commentator. My issue is the other stuff in the newscast” that’s not produced locally, she says. Former WHAM reporter Rachel Barnhart, “If there’s a harm currently to the number who’s now a reporter and anchor at WROC, Evan Dawson, a 13WHAM anchor and of media news voices, independent news has used her considerable social media voices, in this area, that is arguably worse than reporter who’s leaving at the end of the year presence to comment on Sinclair’s conservative anything going on with the TV stations,” says to become host of WXXI’s 1370 Connection, reputation. And she points to WHAM’s use SUNY Geneseo’s Saffran. says that the station has experienced, locally of Sinclair’s Waste Watch franchise, which the focused people who make the decisions about GateHouse Media purchased the papers corporate parent describes as “an initiative to local newsgathering and content. He says he from Canandaigua’s Ewing family several investigate and report on how our viewers’ local has faith that they’ll continue just as they have years ago. In recent years, the number of tax dollars are spent.” for the years prior to the new agreement. reporters working for the Post papers had shrunk, but the papers were still reporting Barnhart says that simply calling the GM Samuels says that WHAM segments Waste Watch presents an anticonstantly receives material from the outside, on important topics and keeping tabs on government bias. whether it’s from ABC, CNN, the Associated suburban governments, Saffran says.

On the good side, Rochester has two strong radio news outlets in WHAM 1180 AM, which is owned by Clear Channel, and WXXI 1370 AM, an NPR member station, Saffran says. But consolidation is a concern in the radio industry, as well, Saffran says, and could serve as a cautionary tale for TV. After Congress and the FCC loosened station ownership limits, large corporations went on a buying spree. Many radio stations have lost a sense of localism as a result, Saffran says, and format duplication is common. For WHAM, the new arrangement brings

opportunities that Samuels says will benefit viewers. That station’s newscasts are already first in the market in the Nielsen and Rentrak ratings. And while the opportunity to air its broadcasts on WUHF won’t directly boost those ratings, it will potentially provide more exposure. And more viewership means more ad revenue. At the moment, the 13WHAM news team is also airing broadcasts on the channel’s CW network station; that’s where the 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. morning show and the 10 p.m. evening news air. Those broadcasts will move to WUHF, which has a broader reach than their current home. The signal is stronger, Samuels says, and unlike WHAM’s CW network sister channel, it’s accessible to Dish Network subscribers. The Fox network also has a strong sports brand, which may provide opportunities for 13WHAM’s Bills pregame show, Samuels says, and its high school sports show. And while 13WHAM will have a broader platform for its news programs, it will still face competition from the two other commercial television news teams in Rochester: WHEC Channel 10 and WROC Channel 8. Cable channel YNN is another competitor, though it fills its own niche. And outside of news, the stations still program against each other, Samuels says. “It’s the exact same number of news voices as there were before,” Samuels says. “It’s just that instead of WROC’s voice on WUHF, it’s 13WHAM’s voice on WUHF. That really is the only difference here.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

Our crisis continues from page 3

Over the years, numerous citizens groups have pushed for efforts to reduce the city’s rapidly growing school segregation. But their warnings have been ignored. The majority of the citizens of the Community of Monroe seem content to let the segregation and the concentrated poverty continue. And they seem content to let the city deal with many of the resulting problems – housing, public safety, education – by itself. Dealing with the education problem, of course, is essential. We didn’t need Ed Doherty’s report to know that Rochester’s school district is in crisis. Test scores, dropout rates, graduation rates: all are dismayingly bad. Nor did we need Doherty’s report to know that most children in the Rochester school district are poor. But it is a jolt to read the statistics. While the city’s poverty rate is 31.1 percent, Doherty writes, the child poverty level is 46 percent – and the poverty rate of students in city schools is 88 percent. Evidence of our poverty concentration and segregation is hard to avoid. “Rochester is the poorest of Upstate New York’s 430 school districts,” Doherty writes. And just a few minutes away are the districts of high-income communities like Pittsford and Fairport. It is not a coincidence, in other words, that Rochester has one of the nation’s highest rates of concentrated poverty and one of its poorest-performing school districts. The evidence from national research is clear: concentrated poverty takes a terrible toll on children’s education. We won’t be successful in dealing with Rochester’s educational crisis unless we deal with its concentrated poverty. While we can (and should) get some improvements in the school district despite the city’s poverty, Doherty writes, those improvements will be “marginal… narrow and difficult to sustain.” What might we do about our poverty concentration? You know some of the possibilities: metro schools, metro government. And yet even a discussion of those topics causes near panic. No suburban official is calling for housing for the poor. (And we all know what would happen if one did.) Once upon a time, Monroe County political leaders seemed to recognize the need to act as one community, creating a countywide library system, water system…. But the last big effort was the Morin-Ryan Plan, the tax-sharing system developed by the late Rochester Mayor Tom Ryan, a Democrat, and then-County Executive Lou Morin, a Republican. And that was in 1984 – nearly 30 years ago. 10 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

Since then… well, since then, there’s been a lot of talk and not much positive action. The county (Republicans and Democrats alike) has clung to a no-newtaxes dogma, the results of which include reduced funding for day care, elimination of county funding for downtown police, and increased fees for city taxpayers. And while we’re big on giving to charities that help the poor, for the most part those charities treat symptoms, not causes. That’s the way we do things, maybe because it makes us feel better than paying taxes (or, as employers, raising wages). But the long-term solution is to move people out of poverty. That means there’ll have to be many more jobs available – jobs that pay a living wage. And the poor will have to be able to qualify for those jobs. The city can’t address that by itself. Doherty doesn’t offer solutions in his

report. He does point to the success of some communities in other parts of the country, regions that have consolidated governments and school districts. But, he says, “it would be dangerous to pursue such options without detailed study and community engagement.” Regardless, he adds, we’re going to have to consider “a wide range of difficult changes if this deeply embedded concentration of poverty is to be alleviated.” And he lays out the essential first step: “If we are to address the issues described in this report,” he writes, “the Greater Rochester community needs to find a willingness to change. Real and sustained change is not likely to occur from the top unless there is a political imperative. It is also unlikely to rise from the grass roots, given that most of our residents are comfortable and very segregated from those who are not.” And so, writes Doherty: “Real change can come only with greater understanding.” We’re all going to have to understand the depth of this community’s poverty – and that, he says, “requires frank and candid discourse.” And we’re going to have to understand that poverty is a problem for all of us and that it affects all of us: not just the poor themselves and their neighborhoods. “Surely,” Doherty writes, “it is not too hard to comprehend that the impacts of poverty stand in the way of our region’s economic and social success. Those impacts are felt most greatly by our children – and their communities and their schools.” And, he writes, “Our future may be bleak if we do not find a better way.” Merry Christmas, folks.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

URBAN ACTION

Reform blues

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

The bold reform agenda of New York State Education Commissioner John King is increasingly under fire. Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is the latest grenadelobber. | Silver sent a letter to the state Education Department recommending that the massive data-collection program that is supposed to provide detailed information on all students to inBloom be suspended. | The company has received $100 million from the Gates Foundation to collect data that inBloom says can be used to quickly provide districts with more accurate assessment tools. But parents are extremely concerned about who will have access to this personal information and how it will be used. And with information frequently being stolen and systems hacked, parents put little faith in promises of safeguards. | Until recently, King has been able to sidestep criticism about the Common Core curriculum and the new teacher evaluations. But after months of failing to ease the concerns of many vocal parents and teachers, King is dealing with growing resistance instead of less. And the criticism extends to the SED and the Board of Regents. | Another arrow: State Senator John Flanagan has issued a report that recommends slowing down the implementation of the Common Core and reducing the number of tests students take.

Book talk

The Moving Beyond Racism Book Group will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 6, to discuss “1491.” The book by Charles Mann examines science, history, and archeology and provides a radically different view of the Americas prior to Columbus’s landing. The group meets at Barnes and Noble in Pittsford Plaza.

Dining

Mussels with green apple and apple cider cream sauce (left), a caramel pretzel milkshake (middle), and a braised pork shank and garlic-green-onion mash, all from Fraîche Bistro and Dessert Bar on East Ave. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Ces’t bon Fraîche Bistro & Dessert Bar 130 EAST AVE. 319-4313, FRAICHE-BISTRO.COM LUNCH: WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY 11 A.M.-2 P.M.; DINNER: WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY 5-9:30 P.M. & FRIDAY-SATURDAY 5-10 P.M.; BRUNCH: SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 A.M.-3 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY LAURA REBECCA KENYON

Dessert is often a casualty in culinary costcutting. An eatery might work to keep a good steak on the menu, top-shelf liquor behind the bar, and fresh greens in the salad, only to phone it in for the final course. Sometimes literally, by placing an order with Sysco. On the flip side, when a café specializes in desserts, it frequently lets its entree offerings fall to the wayside. Is it worth it to dutifully eat through a ho-hum chicken Caesar salad just to earn dessert? (OK; sometimes the answer is yes.) It’s a breath of fresh air, then, when a restaurant equally distributes its attention across its menu. You’ll find this at Fraîche Bistro & Dessert Bar, which devotes its talent and energy to each item it serves, whether it’s for brunch, lunch, dinner, or dessert. The 9-month-old restaurant on East Avenue is owned by pastry chef Kathy Christa. Christa studied at New York’s International Culinary Center (formerly the French Culinary Institute) and cut her teeth turning out desserts at Henry B’s. While there, she worked with chef Eric Schmeelk, who now serves as Fraîche’s head chef.

Together, Christa and Schmeelk have

created a well-rounded, French-inspired menu, showcasing local products and seasonal flavors. Filet de Boeuf ($26) is so tender you barely need a knife; it yields to the side of a fork. Part of this is due to the cut of beef (tenderloin), part is due to the way it is cut in the kitchen, and part is due to careful pan-searing. All of it adds up to a delicious preparation. It’s served with a demi-glace, sautéed haricots vert (green beans sound so much more elegant in French), house-cut French fries, and a horseradish aioli, prettily presented in a hollowed-out tomato. Equally satisfying is the jarret de pork ($28), a pork shank slow roasted and braised with a balsamic vinegar demi-glace. It’s an impressively tall and mahogany-colored hunk of meat. Like the beef, the pork is mouthwateringly tender. The pork is served on a bed of garlic and green-onioninfused mashed potatoes that are so creamy and smooth, they don’t dare dream of the possibility of lumps. Well-roasted carrots add color and crunch. Mussels ($14) come heaped in a bowl, resting in a pool of apple-cider cream sauce. It’s a portion generous enough for dinner, though it’s listed with the appetizers. Hunks of bacon and green apple are nestled between the shells. The mussels taste clean and sweet — no taste of low-tide here — and work well with sweetness in the apple and the smoke of the bacon. Garlic-bread strips are delicious on their own, but the garlic’s pungency is a bit sharp for the more delicately flavored sauce.

Fraîche’s brunch offers a smattering of its standard lunch offerings, plus dishes specific to the Saturday and Sunday brunch service. You can find salad nicoise, French onion soup, veggie omelets, and a Greek yogurt and granola “Fraîche plate” on both menus. Steak and eggs, stuffed French toast, and breakfast poutine — plus mimosas and bacon bloody Marys — are confined to brunch. The sour-cream-blueberry pancakes are served with orange butter, maple syrup, and a choice of bacon or sausage ($12). The pancakes are more creamy and lush than a standard pancake, owing to the sour cream’s dairy fat. Blueberries literally burst on your tongue, and the orange butter adds an addictive citrusy pop. The torta rustica ($12) is a flaky, savory pie. The crust is sort of a cross between a pie crust and a croissant — golden brown, flaky, lots of layers. It encapsulates a filling of ham, roasted red peppers, mushrooms, spinach, and mozzarella, and somehow manages to be hearty without being heavy. It is served with a small mound of lightly dressed greens and red onions, which provides a nice contrast. (This is another item found on both the brunch and lunch menus.) And now it’s time for dessert. (Did you save room?) The simply named “sundae” ($7) pairs salted caramel ice cream with chocolate sauce and house-made caramel corn. Like Cracker Jacks, the caramel includes salty peanuts, which are a nice foil for the silky ice cream. In addition to chocolate and vanilla milkshakes made with Moonlight Creamery ice cream and Pittsford Dairy milk ($5),

Fraîche offers hard milkshakes: creamy concoctions spiked with alcohol. The caramel pretzel shake ($7) blends vanilla ice cream with housemade caramel, pretzels, and caramel vodka. It’s so thick that your cheeks will pucker when you try and sip it through the straw. (I gave up and used my spoon, which let me eat more, anyway.) Tiny bits of pretzel fleck the shake, making for a sweet, salty, and malty treat. Other hard shake offerings include s’mores, made with marshmallow vodka, graham crackers, and chocolate syrup; and coffee & donuts, which incorporates Intelligentsia Coffee, coffee vodka, and a glazed donut from Donuts Delite. Non-ice-cream dessert offerings include Crista’s personal favorite, a pear and whitechocolate bread pudding ($8) made with croissants; crème caramel ($8); individual Toll House pies ($8) and strawberry shortcakes ($8) topped with an orange crème anglaise. Though Fraîche opened three months prior to The Revelry, it doesn’t seem to have the name recognition that buzzed-about University Avenue restaurant enjoys. If you go for dinner on a Wednesday or Thursday night, or for brunch on Saturday, you won’t have to wait for a table. That’s puzzling; the Fraîche team delivers well-executed dishes, provides an upscale yet comfortable atmosphere, and is staffed by attentive, knowledgeable servers. Take the time to discover this little gem before the rest of Rochester does.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ]

The Chieftains Thursday, March 13. Auditorium Theatre,

885 East Main St. $32-$62. 7:30 p.m. 222-5000. rbtl.org

[ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: Tyzik’s 20th Celebration Friday, March 21 and

Saturday, March 22. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. $15-$92. 8 p.m. 454-2100. rpo.org

Music

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Tribal Seeds Saturday, March 29. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $TBA. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

Clutch

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29 MONTAGE MUSIC HALL, 50 CHESTNUT ST. 7:30 P.M. | $25 | THEMONTAGEMUSICHALL.COM [ POP/ROCK ] What’s really going to make this show is the dichotomy between its headliners. You’ve got Maryland heavies Clutch with its new studio release “Earth Rocker” bringing the brutal yet aerodynamic rock and the groove-centric swirl of its label mates Lionize, resulting in a spine bending, spine melting dose of loud and heavy. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Pickled Brain From Outer Space FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27 ABILENE BAR AND LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 6 P.M. | FREE | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ POP/ROCK ] With so much music to sift through in the digital age, how does a band find an audience? While I don’t have the ultimate answer, I’m pretty sure that originality is a prerequisite. Band name: Pickled Brain from Outer Space. Check. Genre description: sludgy instrumental surf music. Check. Ken Luk (guitar), Wyatt Kaidy (guitar), Hannah Brown (bass), and Ben Panepento (drums) posit a gloriously unorthodox aesthetic, and tracks like “Western Spaghetti” sound as if they could easily score a Frankie Avalon movie directed by Quentin Tarantino. It may be a little dark, and a little silly, but it’s definitely a lot of fun. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

LISTEN UP! CITY + SPOTIFY We know you use Spotify. We know you read City Newspaper. So why not use both of them at the same time? Check out our FREE Spotify playlist to listen to full tracks from bands in our weekly top concert picks, updated every Wednesday! Listen on our site or grab links to the web & desktop versions of Spotify at ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/SPOTIFY

12 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 25 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

King Buffalo FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27 THE BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $5-$7 | BUGJAR.COM [ POP/ROCK ] When a phoenix rises from its allegorical

ashes, it does so as an exact copy of its predecessor. But, when members of renowned Rochester indie rock acts Abandoned Buildings Club (Sean McVay/Dan Reynolds) and Velvet Elvis (Randall Coon/Scott Donaldson) got together to begin their ascent, they had a whole other beast in mind. While King Buffalo still oozes with the hard-hitting riffs and hawkish attitude its progenitors were known for, it is definitely a different animal. It is a veritable stampede of meaty stoner-psych with a recognizable blues bloodline. As resurrections go, this is one you should not miss. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Jon Lewis SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28 BOULDER COFFEE CO, 739 PARK AVE., 8 P.M. | FREE | BOULDERCOFFEECO.COM [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jon Lewis is a local singersongwriter, with a real knack for melody and a gift for writing catchy songs. Lewis cites some of his major influences as Pete Yorn, Rogue Wave, and Matt Costa. Like those aforementioned artists, Lewis has mastered the art of the singer-songwriter genre through writing heartfelt, confessional songs with widespread appeal. Lewis can often be seen playing in local coffeehouses throughout the Rochester area; an environment that suits his acoustic polished tunes very well.

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info.

Hard Rain performed Saturday, December 21, at Nola’s. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Ten years without Unk

[ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

On the rock ‘n’ roll road to ruin, you’ll pass by plenty of bands that came close. Bands that tasted the sorbet but never made it to the big kids’ table. Bands whose legacy is prefixed with an “almost” or suffixed with a “so close.” Rochester hard-rock outfit Hard Rain is a prime example of a group that made it -- as far as I’m concerned -- when the band came together to play its brand of incendiary hard rock in the early 90’s. And the band made it again Saturday night to a packed, borderline frenzied crowd at Nola’s BBQ on Lake Avenue. It was the first time in almost 20 years that Hard Rain --- John Akers, Paul Akers, Erik Welsh, and the nowliving-in-Deutschland Rudy Valentino --- had stood on stage together. Despite the icy conditions and the, well, hard rain outside, the place was a sardine tin, nut-to-butt, floor to the ceiling, jammed up by the stage and swinging from the balcony. The band came out blazing and played as ferociously fun as ever, the only

difference being the radical change in the amount of hair on stage. Back in the band’s initial launch onto the scene, it was hirsute Hard Rain that banged its head under wavy locks. Those waves of hair have since waved goodbye, replaced by three shaved-clean chrome domes up front. Honestly I thought the new look gave the band an ominous presence even more suited to the music. The band played virtually everything off “Peace is not a Fashion,” and vocalist Akers never had to sing alone as everyone in the joint (bartenders and bouncers included) knew all the words. The band was in fine form, never missed a beat, and came on big and loud. There was a hint of nostalgia and a collective reminiscent tear shed when a toast was made to the late, great champion of local music, Unkle Roger. I can’t believe it has been 10 years without Unk. What a fantastic show, what a wonderful night.

— BY LEAH CREARY

ELITE

House of Hair Fashion Celebrating 55 years in business & the holidays!

$20 Off

Highlights/Lowlights/Perms & Tints (For new customers, with this ad)

482-0540 | 920 Merchants Rd. Open Thurs 9-5, Fri 9-3, Sat 8-2

Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Drag Me to My Destiny ft. Destiny Spice. 140 Alex Bar

& Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. Call for info.

A Very TeenSet Christmas ft. The Grinders w/Deathcamp, Televisionaries, El Destructo, and Ian Decay. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Essence of Rhythm Holiday Salsa Party. Lovin’ Cup, 300

Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $5-$10. continues on page 15

Meet the Artist Concert Series! ELDAR

Tues. Feb 11th • 7pm Tickets: $25 Athena Performing Arts Center

BONERAMA

Wed. March 26th • 7:30pm Tickets: $20 Greece Olympia High School Auditorium

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jazz901.org and by calling 585-966-2660 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Music

Red Inc. is a local rock band made up of former students from School of the Arts. Although its members are young, they bring a progressive feeling to the music.

PHOTO PROVIDED

In the red Red Inc. REDINCBAND.COM [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Often in rock ’n’ roll, the best bands have a weak link, a member that comes up short, or a particular dynamic that feels a little flat among the others that sparkle. And we’re not just talking local kids-in-thegarage bands, either. There are major acts with major deficits in their ranks. Hell, The Ramones made a career out of it. But this isn’t about that; this article is about bands that don’t have a weak link, bands that have nothing but ringers in their ranks, bands like Rochester’s Red Inc. Red Inc. --- drummer DJ Ciccaglione, singer Jack Scardino, guitarist Matthew Rapoza, bassist Michael Mayer --- is a hard-rock outfit with progressive leanings. The band’s borderline prog-rock tendencies fly in the face of its pop aesthetic. Traveling below the radar and between genre signifiers frees the band up to let its freak flag fly. “I think it allows us to really challenge ourselves and not be afraid to write complex 14 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

or bizarre or outlandish music,” says Ciccaglione. “We write more progressive, with complex arrangements --- not the standard verse/chorus/verse/chorus.” Red Inc. got rolling a little more than two years ago while its members strode the halls of School of the Arts. And just like the music they pursued, their youth proved a challenge to discriminating eyes and ears. Some just saw them as kids. “I think when people see us at first they have a tendency to write us off,” says Ciccaglione. “‘Oh, they’re young; they can’t be that professional; they haven’t been at it that long. What are they going to be able to do?’ So we have to prove ourselves.” Scardino doesn’t view this as a big problem. “We just do our thing,” he says. “But we have more room to impress people if the bar is lower, I guess.” One of the many people impressed by Red

Inc. was producer and former club owner Bernie Matthews. Matthews first caught wind of the band when it played his club, the now-defunct Tala Vera in downtown Rochester. That says a lot about Red Inc., as tons of great Rochester bands rocked

the Tala Vera stage in the brief time it was open. To Matthews, Red Inc. stood out and above. He liked what the band wasn’t. “He liked that we weren’t writing just pop music, Ciccaglione says. “It was different and outside the boundaries of the three-chord radio thing you hear today.” Matthews approached the band about recording an album, and Scardino says, “we thought that was an excellent idea.” The band’s hard work with Mathews yielded its first and eponymous CD released at the end of September 2013. On the disc Matthews accurately captures the band’s fire. He understood its desire over and above the vague clichés like “alternative” and “progressive” and “modern” --- words that are overused to the point of obsolescence. Scardino agrees. “That’s totally true,” he says. “But the point is we don’t feel like we have to make it fit in a box. So when we start writing a song, it’s going to take its own form, follow its own path, no matter what you call it. I don’t think we’ve intentionally messed something up. Sometimes a formula can lead up to a nice product. We don’t want to go out and make it different

just for the sake of doing so. We just don’t want to be limited by a formula. It’s just got to be good.” “The No. 1 goal is writing the song for the sake of the song,” Ciccaglione says. “Not to be showy or to be complicated.” Red Inc. works hard but doesn’t overthink. This translates well in a live setting, where the quartet doesn’t showboat or resort to histrionics. Red Inc. just knuckles down and rocks. “We rehearse a lot,” Scardino says. “So it becomes second nature and we can have the most fun playing it. The other thing is to remember, it’s just rock ’n’ roll; the music is going to say what it says and you’re going to interpret it in the way you do, and the song is always going to be there. But at the same time if we write a dark song, it doesn’t have to be a dark show.” According to Scardino, Red Inc., though a complex musical entity, doesn’t try to confound, confuse, or lose its audience. It just wants to take them on the ride. “A concert is the audience being in concert with the band,” he says.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26 Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Jon Lewis. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Scottish Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s w/Frankie and Jewels. Avenue Pub, 522

Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Teressa Wilcox Band. Dinosaur

Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s

Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Virtual Trio. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ]

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

Thursday Night Dance Craze Contest W/Floorwax. Lux

Lounge, 666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. Last Thursday of every month, 10 p.m. Free.

Thursday Night Shakedown.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. For the Love Thursdays. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 18+. $3-$12. [ JAZZ ]

Bossa Nova Jazz Thursdays ft. The Charles Mitchell Group.

Espada Brazilian Steak, 274 N. Goodman St. Village Gate. 473-0050. espadasteak.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Chet Catallo & The Cats 7th Annual Holiday Concert.

Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 7 p.m. $20-$23. The D’Jangoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 8 p.m. Free.

Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse

Fowls w/The Tarants, Dive Naked. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Fourth Friday Concert: Music of the Three Wise Men. Ancient

Universal Medicine Studios, 288 Monroe Ave. 256-1841. 7:30 p.m. This concert is part of a series (not funded by any council on the arts) called Fourth Fridays for Music. Donations accepted. Pan de Oro. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. Rusty Kettle. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Deep Blue. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Free The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Johnny Rawls. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 21+. Call for info.

Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Electric Boogaloo ft. DJ Buddy, Jake. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Femme Fatale Fridays Ladies Night ft. DJ Divine.

Renaissance Cafe & Lounge, 719 S. Plymouth Ave. (585) 451-1000. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/ Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub &

Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+.

Photo Shoot Fridaze ft. Ghetto Blasta. T Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake

Ave. 21+. Ladies free until 11 p.m. Call for info. $10. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Facelife Fridays ft. Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Darienne Lake, and Kasha Davis. 140 Alex Bar

& Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. & midnight. Call for info. Trancesend and Victor Gig. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20.

“2012 has been our best year yet. We ended March on a high note with a record breaking week of 175 treatments!! Our ad in CITY Newspaper continues to draw in new patients and has played a vital role in the growth of our business over the last 3 years. We are looking forward to another successful year!”

- Janeane ROCHESTER COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE

[ JAZZ ]

Alvin Ray Jr. ft. Miche Fambro, Pickled Brain From Outer Space. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. Free. Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Dave Berger. Victoire, 120 East Ave. 325-3663. victoirebar.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. James Draught. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 8 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. continues on page 16

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27

Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Flying Boxcar. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free. Full Throttle. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 6710816. flahertys.com. Call for info Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys. com. Call for info. Gavin and Pyntch. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Lap Giraffe. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. Call for info. Mansfield Trio. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Matthew Sieber Ford Trio. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 4:30 p.m. Free. The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes.

Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. Fairport. 598-3820. EagleVale. com. 7 p.m. Free. Two for the Road. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ] Bangarang. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Happy Hour: Archimedes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free. John Akers. TP’s Irish Pub, 916 Panorama Trail. 3854160. 9 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

King Buffalo w/Handsome Jack, and RASH (Cassette Release Show!). Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Mike Pepper, Even Steven. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 6 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd. Penfield. 348-9022. mooseberrycafe. com. 6 p.m. Call for info Open Mic Night. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Push. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. Call for info. RadioNation. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Rubblebucket w/Rich Aucoin. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $15. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

POP/ROCK | RUBBLEBUCKET Brooklyn-based Rubblebucket is a frantic eight-piece rock ‘n’ roll phenomenon. Its influences are wide; world-beat, soulful brass, New Wave, synth-pop, and funk all come together into a polyrhythmic world-beat thunder. The band’s sound — an assault of bass, guitar, B-3 organ, drums, horns, and percussion — isn’t easily placed and as unique as can be. It’s all topped off with a dash of indie-pop for kicks. There may not be pure rock and roll left, but Rubblebucket carries the legacy proudly. Rubblebucket performs Friday, December 27, 8 p.m., at Water Street Music Hall, 204 North Water St., $15, waterstreetmusic.com.— BY FRANK DE BLASE

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Connie Deming . Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Fazool’s Casual Italian Kitchen, 51 Market St. Brockport. 431-3072. 8:30 p.m. Free. Jon Lewis. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 6970235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Tony Padilla. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. 11 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Scandals ft. Monica. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DeeDee’s Wild College Party Winter Break Edition. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. 21+ free until 11 p.m.; 2 for 1 admission w/College ID. [ JAZZ ]

Amanda Montone Jazz Duo. Lemoncello, 137 West

Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

16 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

Bob Sneider Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Dave Berger. Victoire, 120 East Ave. 325-3663. victoirebar.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. Just Jazz. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Smugtown Stompers. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Brad Potter Band. Flaherty’s

Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info. Ernie Capone. Hamlin Station

Joywave w/KOPPS, New Archery, and Pretty in Pink. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$12. Me & the Boyz. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. Call for info. Mike Brown. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Moon Zombies. Thirsty Frog, 511 East Ridge Rd. 7305285. 1thirstyfrog.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5.

Nasty Habit, The Results, and Forte. Montage Music Hall,

50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. That 80’s Hairband. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted [ CLASSICAL ]

Compline. Christ Church,

141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Organ Music: Steve Kelly. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/museum admission. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff

Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. Call for info. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Clutch w/Into Another. Montage

Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. 7:30 p.m. $25. Guitars at The Jar. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Skycats. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 30 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Watkins & The Rapiers. Little

DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W

Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. New Year’s Eve Party. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. Call for info $25. New Year’s Eve. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 4:30 p.m. Call for info. New Year’s Eve Party. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. Call for info $25 New Year’s Eve Party. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. $35-$40.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

[ JAZZ ]

Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Lee Peers. The Titus

Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. titustavern.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

The Ginger Faye Bakers w/DRIPPERS!, and Light Feelings. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31 [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

New Year’s Eve: Gap Mangione New Blues Band, Orient Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Kind Brothers Band New Year’s Eve Blowout. The Beale, 1930

Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

New Year’s Eve ft. Joe Beard, Steve Grills & The Roadmasters.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free.

New Year’s Eve Party w/Ezra and the Storm. The Beale,

693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ COUNTRY ]

New Year’s Eve w/Flint Creek. Finger Lakes Casino

& Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info.

New Year’s Eve Party ft. Sonny Brown Band. The Rabbit Room,

61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

New Year’s Eve w/The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 4 p.m. Call for info.

The Swooners w/Andy Calabrese Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. Call for info. Free. [ R&B ]

The LPs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar &

Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

New City Slang, The Freeek!.

Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3. New Year’s Eve ft. John Akers. TP’s Irish Pub, 916 Panorama Trail. 385-4160. 8 p.m. Free.

New Year’s Eve Bash w/Swamp Moose. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

New Year’s Eve Party w/The Kind Brothers. The Beale, 1930

Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 8 p.m. Free. New Year’s Eve w/Shine. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $7.

New Year’s Party w/Johnny Lee, The Mix. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. 21+. $5.

Rock in 2014 w/Galileo Band, DJs. Nola’s Restaurant &

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Rock-n-Roll Burlesque Ball w/ The TeenSet 45 Crew. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 21. $2.

[ EVENTS ] COMPILED BY TREVOR LEWIS

So, 2013. That happened. Congratulations! If you’re reading this you’ve survived another year on this planet. If you’re reading this and you didn’t survive, then I guess that means the zombie apocalypse that we keep hearing about is finally upon us. That’s even more reason to spend this New Year’s Eve eating huge quantities of food, drinking too much, and generally making a fool of yourself on the dance floor. Thankfully there is ample opportunity this Tuesday, December 31, to do just that. Dozens of area restaurants, nightclubs, theaters, and other venues have great NYE programming that runs the gamut from family-friendly fare to wild drag shows. If we missed an event please add it to this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Comedy

Geva Comedy Improv’s New Year’s Eve Comedy Spectacular! Live music, actors, comedy, champagne toast at midnight, and dance party after the 10:30 p.m. performance. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Ave. Shows at 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. $25. 2324382. gevacomedyimprov.org. Kevin Meaney The Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Shows at 7:30 & 10 p.m. $20. Late show includes champagne toast at midnight. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. The Capitol Steps present “Fiscal Shades of Gray.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Shows at 6:30 & 10 p.m. $45-$75. 389-2170. artscenter. naz.edu. Unleashed! Improv Presents: New Year’s LOL. Music, laughs, and the year in review, improvised from audience suggestions. Appropriate for ages 12+. Lounge at the Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 8 p.m. $12-$18. 461-2000 ext. 236. jccrochester.org. Village Idiots Comedy Improv New Year’s Eve Explosion. Village Idiots Pillar Theater, 274 N. Goodman St. Shows at 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m., & 10:30 p.m. $10-$20. 797-9086. improvvip.com.

Dance

Village Squares’ New Year’s Eve Square Dance with the Hip Boot Boyz. St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$12.50. 381-5049. squaredancingrochester.org.

Music

Gershwin Uncorked! At JCC CenterStage. Performances of “Rhapsody in Blue” and other Gershwin classics. Ages 12 and up. 1200 Edgewood Ave. $18-$26. 7 p.m. 461-2000, jccrochester.org. Joe Beard with Steve Grills & The Roadmasters on New Year’s Eve at Dinosaur BBQ. Mississippi blues at 10 p.m., then stay for free champagne and red beans and rice at midnight. 99 Court St. 3259127. dinosaurbarbque.com. Live Jazz on New Year’s Eve at Bistro 135. With the Andy Calabrese Trio and a mashup

of The Swooners & Something Else featuring Wiley O’ Riley, Johnny Cummings, Kyle Vock, Paul Mastriani and Champagne Brown. 135 W. Commercial St. 5 p.m.-1:30 a.m. 662-5555. bistro135.net. Live Music at The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar. Music from Ezra and the Storm at South Ave. location (689 South Ave.), and The Kind Brothers at Webster location (1930 Empire Blvd.). 8 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Visit The Beale’s Facebook page for more information. New Year’s Eve at Sticky Lips BBQ. Featuring headliner Tommy Brunett Band, with Public Market Band. 830 Jefferson Road. $15. Doors at 9 p.m. 292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. Rock ‘n’ Roll Burlesque Ball w/ Teen Set 45 Crew. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 21+ bugjar. com.

Special Events

Belgian New Year Celebration at Victoire. Four-course meal with beer pairing specials. Celebration starts at 5 p.m. 120 East Ave. Call 325-3663 for menu and price details. victoirebar.com. Bristol Mountain’s New Year’s Eve Celebration. Fireworks, torchlight parade, music, bounce house, and arts and crafts. Ski and ride until 10 p.m., then enjoy the parade and fireworks to follow until 11 p.m. 5662 Route 64, Canandaigua. $75 for a family of three, $27 for each additional member. 374-6000. bristolmountain.com. Finger Lakes Casino and Racetrack’s New Year’s Eve Celebration. Hot seats 11 a.m.-11 p.m., fireworks at midnight, and more. State Route 96, Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Golden Ponds’ New Year’s Eve Buffet. Dinner buffet, five hours of premium open bar, hors d’oeuvres at 10 p.m., champagne toast at midnight, and continental breakfast. 500 Long Pond Road. 6 p.m. $49.95. Reservations required. 723-1344. goldenpondspartyhouse.com. Happy New Year Game Day at Penfield Public Library. Ring in the New Year with a rousing

family game. For children ages 5 and up, accompanied by an adult. Refreshments will be served. 1985 Baird Road. 2 p.m. Must register online. 340-8720, www3.libraryweb.org/penfield. Lux Lounge’s New Year’s Eve Party. Tell 2013 to “Beat it!” with fancy hats and noisy things. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 5 p.m.-4 a.m. 232-9030. lux666.com. New Year’s Celebration at One Nightclub and Ultra Lounge. Watch the Times Square ball drop live from the 40-foot screen. 1 Ryan Alley. $10 cover, free before 10 p.m. Alcohol will be served until 4 a.m., and the club will stay open until 4:30 a.m. VIP tickets available. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. New Year’s Eve 2014 at The Diplomat Banquet Center featuring Ruby Shooz. Hors d’oeuvres, deluxe buffet, beverages, hats and noisemakers, champagne toast at midnight, and continental breakfast. 1 Diplomat Way. 8 p.m. $52.95 plus tax. 647-1566. diplomatbanquetctr.com. New Year’s Eve 2014 at Amaya. Open seating 5-6:30 p.m., prixfixe dinner and complimentary glass of wine, $35. Dinner and dance party starting at 7:30 p.m. ($60). Dancing continues until 1 a.m. Amaya Bar & Grill, Tops Brighton Plaza, 1900 S. Clinton Ave. Amayabarandgrill.com. New Year’s Eve at Blu. Dinner and drink specials all night long. Ring in the New Year with live DJ music from Steve Lo upstairs and live music by the Dirty Pennies downstairs starting at 10 p.m. 250 Pixley Road. 247-0079, blurochester.com. New Year’s Eve at Blu Wolf Bistro. $100 per couple includes a three-course meal including choice of three gourmet entrees and a bottle of champagne. Watch the ball drop on television and enjoy other festivities. 657 Park Ave, 270-4467. New Year’s Eve at the Rabbit Room. Bring in the New Year with dinner and live music. Five-course tastings and a la carte options. 5:30-9 p.m. Make reservations by calling 582-1830. New Year’s Eve at The Revelry. Five-course meal for $59 with the option to add wine pairings for $30. Dinner served until 11

p.m. and limited late-night menu until midnight. Celebratory toast at midnight. 1290 University Ave. 340-6454. therevelryroc.com. New Year’s Eve at Tilt Nightclub. Hosted by Megan Carter from 98PXY. Free party favors, champagne toasts at midnight, and continental breakfast at 2:30 a.m. Performances by DeeDee Dubois, Samantha Vega, and Miss Delicious. Music by Mighty Mike. 444 Central Ave. Doors open at 10 p.m., bar serves until 4 a.m. $10 cover for 21 and over, $20 cover for under 21. See Tilt’s Facebook page for details. New Year’s Eve Bash at the Lovin’ Cup featuring music by Shine. 300 Park Point Drive. Threecourse dinner specials and champagne toast at midnight. Doors at 8 p.m., music at 9 p.m., party until 4 a.m. $10. 292-9940. lovincup.com. New Year’s Eve Celebration at the Old Toad. Three-course beer and food pairing. Dinner 6-9 p.m. Reservations required. Champagne toast at 7 p.m. for the British New Year, and at midnight for the American New Year. 277 Alexander St. 6:30 p.m. $50-$60. 232-2626. theoldtoad.com. New Year’s Eve at Espada. Choose from two set menus plus a couples’ option including a bottle of wine or prosecco. Fourteen cuts of meat and a premium salad bar, plus much more. 5 p.m. $45-$175. 274 N. Goodman St., 473-0050. New Year’s Eve Downtown Celebration. Free family open skate at Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink 6-8 p.m.; free adult open skate 9-11 p.m. At 7 p.m. free DJ dance party with Jimmy C’s Music Machine, giant bounce houses, obstacle course, airbrush tattoos, photo booths, magician, clowns at Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E. Main St. 10 p.m. fireworks finale. Free parking at South Avenue, Court Street, Sister Cities, and Washington Square garages. 428-5990. cityofrochester.gov. New Year’s Eve Overnight at YMCA-Bay View. Overnight event with swimming, late-night movie, snacks, and breakfast. YMCABay View, 1209 Bay Road. 6 p.m.-9 a.m. $30-$45, $20-$35 for half night (6 p.m.-12:30 a.m.). 671-8414. rochesterymca. org/locations/bay-view. New Year’s Eve Party 2014 at the Radisson Hotel Rochester Riverside. Live performance from Cherry Bomb and DJs spinning all night. Hors d’oeuvres start at 8 p.m. followed by dinner buffet and desserts. Five-hour open bar, party hats, and noisemakers, and midnight champagne toast. 120 E. Main St. Party-only packages $95-$195, overnight packages $155-$265. 546-6400. rochesternewyearseve.com.

New Year’s MMXIV at Vinyl Nightclub. All-inclusive VIP package includes five-hour open bar, champagne toast, and full hors d’oeuvres. 291 Alexander St. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. See Vinyl’s Facebook page for more information. New Year’s Party at Bowl-A-Roll Lanes. Five two-hour bowling sessions available at 12:30 p.m., 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., and 9:30 p.m. Pizza, pop, prizes, and surprises. 1560 Jefferson Road. $7-$36. Reservations/ deposits required. bowl-a-roll. com. New Year’s Party at Skylark Lounge. Featuring various DJs throughout the night; free champagne toast at midnight. 40 S. Union St. DJs start at 9 p.m. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. New Year’s Party at Jeremiah’s on Monroe. Purchase tickets for all you can drink from 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Tons of prizes and giveaways all night. $40-$60. 461-1313, jeremiahstavern.com New Year’s Celebration at Tap and Table. Set menu including three courses and a champagne toast for $68 plus tax and gratuity. Doors open at 4:30 p.m., reservations from 5-10 p.m. Fireworks at 10 p.m. 319-3388 New Year’s Party at The Daily Refresher. No cover charge, drink specials. 293 Alexander St. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 360-4627. See Facebook event for details. Noon Year’s Eve. Countdown to noon, family-friendly festivities. Ireland Room of Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Ave. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 889-2200. www3.libraryweb.org. Noon Year’s Eve Party with Professor Klutzo at Central Library. Join Professor Klutzo and his puppets for a fun program. At noon, watch the ball drop and create a storm of noise! Free for all ages. Kate Gleason Auditorium. 11 a.m. 115 South Avenue, 428-8150. Prepps’ New Year’s Eve Party. Private party on New Year’s Eve 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Open bar, food, champagne, live DJ, and more. All-inclusive tickets for $50 at the bar in advance. 655 Monroe Ave. See Facebook for details. Quaker Steak and Lube New Year’s Eve Kids’ Party. Kids 10 and under eat free with each adult entrée purchased. Face painting, arts and crafts, and kids’ karaoke from 5-8 p.m. Sparkling juice toast at 8 p.m. 2205 Buffalo Road. quakersteakandlube.com. Rocking New Year’s Eve Vintage Beer Social/Free Countdown Bash with Krypton 88. Beer social begins at 9 p.m., free music at 10:30 p.m. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. $18 for beer social. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com.

Tandoor of India’s Special New Year’s Eve Buffet. Belly dancing 5-9:30 p.m. 376 Jefferson Road. $27.99/person, children 10 and under half price. 427-7080. tandoorofindia.com. Tapas 177 New Year’s Eve Party. Four-course menu with seating times 5:30-7:30 p.m. or 9-9:30 p.m. $70 per person plus tax and tip (excludes drinks). DJ dance party until 4 a.m. with DJ Flex. 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. Town of Henrietta Family New Year’s Eve Party. Doors open at 6 p.m., fireworks start at 9:15 p.m. $5 admission, kids 2 and under free. Fair and Expo Center, 2695 E. Henrietta Road. Henrietta.org. Woodcliff Hotel and Spa’s New Year’s Eve. Midnight fireworks, champagne toast, live music from Gap Mangione & the New Blues Band and the Orient Express Band, dinner in Horizons Restaurant, and more. 199 Woodcliff Drive. Varying couples packages ranging from $309 to $499. 381-4000. woodcliffhotelspa.com.

Sports Basketball: Rochester Razor Sharks vs. Buffalo 716ers. Blue Cross Arena, 1 Memorial Square. 7 p.m. $5-$25. ticketmaster.com.

Theater

“Big Wigs” Kasha Davis and Aggy Dune perform a Las Vegas-style show complete with impressions of Cher, Tina Turner, Joan Rivers, and more. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 9 p.m. $18-$26. 461-2000. jccrochester.org. New Year’s Eve at Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Performances of 70’s/80’s musical “Take Me Home” (20 Windsor St., 6:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m., $40$45); mentalist Marc Salem’s “Mind Over Rochester” (540 E. Main St., 3, 7 & 10:30 p.m., $25-$35); and a show TBD at the Winton Place location (3450 Winton Place). Later shows include desserts, prize drawings, toasts, etc. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.org. ShakeCo Presents “Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions” by Edwin A. Abbott. A play that follows the adventures of a twodimensional square, whose view of reality is shaken when he meets the impossible: a threedimensional sphere. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 7 p.m. Suggested donation of $6. muccc.org. “Waiting at the Crossroads Café” Local Broadway belters Janine Mercandetti and Robyn Fazio bring back their popular show from the 2013 Rochester Fringe Festival. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. 7 & 9:30 p.m. $35. 454-1260. Bftix.com.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

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[ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Another Christmas With the Calamari Sisters: Feast of the Seven Fishes” is the latest in the series of campy, irreverent musical-comedy shows featuring bickering (but loving) sisters Carmela and Delphine Calamari, hosts of Brooklyn public-accesstelevision cooking program, “Mangia Italiano.” The characters, created by Jay Falzone, Dan Lavender, and Stephen Smith, have been charming audiences over the past several years with their delightful mix of parody and cabaret-style drag performance. Even with that mouthful of a title, their new show is a crowd-pleaser, as instantly comforting as a heaping plate of home-cooked pasta bolognese. The pleasantly silly plot of “Another Christmas” finds the sisters taping their holiday special and preparing to host a party to which they’ve invited a number of popular celebrity chefs. The party is their attempt to redeem themselves from a disastrous trial audition with the Food Network, which has led to a somewhat adversarial relationship with anyone associated with that particular channel. Along the way, the sisters cook, perform renditions of some familiar Yuletide chestnuts, gossip about their family, and engage in a bit of “Gift of the Magi”-esque present swapping involving Carmela’s cabaret costumes and Delphine’s beloved meat grinder, Leon. It all culminates in a frantic finale as the sisters demonstrate their world-famous ability to cook seven different fish dishes in under seven minutes. This was my first experience with the Calamari sisters, and I came away impressed with the wit and talent that has gone into every inch the production. This is a show that knows exactly what it wants to be and does it extremely well. Sure, it’s broad, loud, and traffics in a heavy dose of schticky Italian-American humor, but the way the creators have built an entire world for their characters to

18 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

inhabit reveals that the sisters are remarkably fully realized comedic creations. There’s even a “Previously On…” paragraph of text included in the program setting up the events leading up to the beginning of this show, and it’s likely there’s even more connections linking the sisters’ previous shows. It’s this attention to detail that allows these women to come to life, and after four different programs, the actors know these characters like the back of their hands. I’m sure there’s a fair amount of formula behind the structure of Carmela and Delphine Calamari return in “Another Christmas with the various shows, but the Calamari Sisters: Feast of the Seven Fishes,” now showing at it’s a testament to the RAPA’s East End Theatre. PHOTO PROVIDED entire production that it never feels that way. found myself being pulled up on stage The Calamaris have a during a Friday night performance. gift for rapid-fire banter, and the show Audience participation is a key never stops moving (though Carmela’s component of the show, allowing “Around the Globe” cabaret number does the actors to showcase their improv go on just a bit too long). abilities as they riff off the participants’ On the subject of attention to detail, reactions. I was called upon to help out it must be said that the kitchen set, in during Carmela’s absence at the start of which all of the action takes place, is the second act (my tablemates assured a remarkable bit of scenic design. It’s me that my assistance was crucial to full of little touches that make it feel Delphine’s rousing rendition of “Santa surprisingly homey, like a real, livedBaby”). Many thanks to Delphine, in kitchen — right down to specific who made a typically stage-phobic character names appearing on each of individual like myself feel slightly less the Christmas stockings. petrified in front of an audience. I’ll even forgive the fact that, unlike my This is a show that goes a long way in fellow participants, I didn’t leave the demonstrating the truth in the idea that stage with a snack for my trouble. it’s not what you say, but how you say it Even without the benefit of that really matters. In less skilled hands, appearing on stage, it’s hard not to be the stereotypes and “un-PC” humor of the Calamari sisters might be off-putting, won over by the Calamari sisters. Their “Feast of the Seven Fishes” features a but it works within the context of the mix of ingredients that blend together show’s universe. It helps that the sisters into something that’s sweet, festive, and don’t discriminate in who they choose to a little tacky. In other words, it feels a target, so it never comes across as mean lot like Christmas. spirited in any way. There’s such big-hearted, infectious enthusiasm on display, that it’s a joy to immerse yourself in this world for a couple hours. Full disclosure: I got immersed a little more than most when I

KIDS | HOLIDAY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DAYS AT RMSC

Close out 2013 in an educational way by bringing your kids to the Rochester Museum and Science Center’s Holiday Science & Technology Days this weekend. The event is geared to kids and designed to foster interest in some of the fascinating fields of science. Local scientists and organizations will be on hand to offer demonstrations in a wide variety of fields, including physics, chemistry, and engineering. There will be the chance to meet live animals and learn about valuable ways to protect the local environment while taking part in hands-on activities that will educate and engage. Holiday Science and Technology Days will run from Friday, December 27, to Monday, December 30, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave). Regular museum admission costs $11-$13. For more information visit rmsc.org or call 271-4320. — BY COLIN MCCOY

Art Exhibits

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ OPENING ] Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Marsh Madness: Wonders of Wetlands. Through May 4. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. In an array of work created by members of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators (GNSI), Marsh Madness: Wonders of Wetlands demonstrates the principal task of the science illustrator—to create accurate renderings of scientific subjects. In this exhibit, nearly forty scientific illustrations of birds, turtles, plants and other natural subjects found among the freshwater wetlands of Upstate New York and the Adirondacks are depicted in both traditional and digital formats. These illustrations precisely show proportions, coloration and anatomy of a subject. They communicate complex descriptive information in an aesthetically appealing way and aid the viewer by providing intricate detail. In addition to the artwork, a variety of taxidermy wildlife will be on display. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. Tracie Doerner. Through Feb 28. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Fluid Motion.” On view: “Reverence,” among the original oil on canvas by British artist Paul Bennett. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. internationalartacquisitions. [ CONTINUING ] Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. AKA Peaceful Heart: Sumi-e and Prints by Dennis W. Burns. Through Dec 31. 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Contemplating Nature:

Works by Four Contemporary Painters. Connie Ehindero, Paul Garland, Kurt Moyer, Rick Muto. Through Jan 4. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery. com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Michael Wedge: “Metropolis.” Through Dec 30. 413-1278. blackradishstudio. com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “Stillness & Dance.” Through Feb 28. Reception Jan 8, 5-6:30 p.m. 275-3571. facebook.com/ BridgeArtGallery.URMC.; “Play.” urmc.rochester.edu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: Topher Martin. Through Feb 5. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Visual Discourse” Photography by Community Darkroom Photographers. Through Jan 10. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. 325-3145 x144. mharochester. org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “Hope in my Pocket.” Through Dec 30. Katherine Weston, Sherry Tulloch, and Kaitlin Roney. 6375494. kaitlin.roney@gmail.com. differentpathgallery.com/. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “Camera Rochester Holiday Show.” Through Jan 5. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. cotton@EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. episcopalseniorlife.org.

Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “A Collection of Thoughts and Dreams” by Christine Sisak and Diane Tank. Through Dec 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Fuego Coffee Roasters, 167 Liberty Pole Way. Images From the New Nature. Drawings, paintings, and sculpture by Robert Frank Abplanalp. 315-244-2415. thinklikeme@gmail.com. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. “The Art of Deception.” Dec 20-Jan 31. Closing reception Jan 31, 7-9:30 p.m. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail. com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Jan 12: “The History of Space Photography” and “Astro-Visions.” Through Feb 16: “Lossless.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. “Deconstructing Scapes” by Zahra Nazari. Through Jan 19. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester.edu/hartnett. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Nutcrackers.” Through Dec 31. The holiday experience is celebrated in Sam Paonessa’s original oil on canvas “Nutcracker” series. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. Through Jan 27: “See Us Now..Greater Rochester’s AsianAmerican Community” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 208-8614. info@ apaaroc.org. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Scott Matyjaszek. thelittle.org. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Art of the Book. Artist Books and Altered Books. 428-8053. libraryweb.org/ artofthebook. Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, 1115 E Main St. Main Street Artists’ First Friday open studio show and sale. First Friday 4-9 p.m. will kick off a month-long exhibit of works by Linda M. Cala of East Rochester. Jazz by Ralph DeBergalis & Co. will be performed. Work by other members of the Main Street Artists will also be on display and for sale. 233-5645. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. Main Street Arts, 20 W Main St., Clifton Springs. Rochester Area Fiber Artists. Through Dec 29. 315-462-0210. mstreetarts@ gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery. com.; “Fabulous Fibers.” Through Dec. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 315-462-0210. mstreetarts@gmail. com. mainstreetartsgallery.com.; “Landscape: Subject and Stimuli.” 315-462-0210. mstreetarts@gmail. com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Memory Theatre.” Through Dec 29. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 3253145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. Art Crescendo: Mill Gallery 2013 Members Exhibition. Through Feb 15. Monday 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue 2-5 p.m., Wed 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. millartcenter.com.

My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “Art Therapy” by Cheryl and Don Olney. Through Mar 31. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley on Park Avenue. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Six dynamic Albert Paley maquettes (small studies) designed for his most ambitious sculpture installation, Paley on Park Avenue. Also on display are Paley’s furniture designs, mix-media pieces by Red Wolf, and new original works by Adam Colangelo and Eduard Gurevich. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Also “The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen,” photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen in Apartment One. Wed & Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Ock Hee’s Choices. Through Dec 28. Work by fine jewelry designers: Loraine Cooley, LeAnne Marquis, Cathy Thomas, Jan Kellner, Linda Lawrence. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 624-4730. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. Watson Art Show? This!. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. A collection of drawings, prints, & collages by Watson, a Rochester illustrator. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Winter Reflections.” Through Jan 31. Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Tue-Wed 8 a.m.-10 p.m., ThuSat 8 a.m.-11 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan 11. 271-5885. oxfordgallery. com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St., Canandaigua. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan 6. 3940030. prrgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Altered States of Rochester: A Neo-colorist series of paintings by Darren Thomas Brennessel. recordarchive.com. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Justin Fondrie Photography. 7949798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 23rd Annual Members Exhibition. 461-2222. info@rochestercontemporary.org. Rochester Regional Community Design Center, 1115 E. Main St. “Connection: Spaces, Places, & the Urban Fabric.” Through Jan 10. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2710520. rrcdc.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Travel Stories: 19th Century--Present. Through Dec 27. 275-4477.; “Nurturing Inquiry.” Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 275-4477. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 732-0036. shoefactoryarts.com. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. Adult Art Show. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. The Pittsford Art Group..

FILM | “GREMLINS” DOUBLE FEATURE

When purchasing an adorably furry, exotic pet for your child from an antique shop, it’s best to heed the three very important rules that come with it: don’t expose your Mogwai to bright light, don’t allow it to get wet, and don’t feed the beast after midnight (no matter how much it pleads with its puppydog eyes). With such a set up, you just knew that each rule was going to be broken in quick succession — so the story goes in the 1984 horror-comedy classic, “Gremlins,” and its 1990 sequel. Many of us were seriously creeped out by the supposedly unrelated Gremlin-look-alike robot toy, “Furby,” which was all the rage almost a decade later. You can relive Joe Dante’s tale of an innocent gift gone awry at the New Year’s Eve double feature at the Dryden Theatre (George Eastman House, 900 East Ave.). On Tuesday, December 31, “Gremlins” will be screened at 7 p.m., followed by “Gremlins 2: The New Batch.” Tickets are $8, or $6 for members and students with ID. For more information, call 271-3361 or visit dryden.eastmanhouse.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Through Dec 27. Tue-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Bruce Bozman: Island Color. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts@gmail. com. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Tea Pottery, 1115 E. Main St., suite 420 door #2. Maggi Bartlett: Handbound Books and Paper Creations. Through Dec 31. 4698217. tpotter51@hotmail.com. University of Rochester, River Campus. Chester Carlson and 75 years of Xerography. Through Jan 1. Carlson Science and Engineering Library. 275-4461. mengel@library.rochester.edu. rochester.edu. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Drawing From Life...An Eccelctic Show.” Through Dec. 442-6450. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Alumni Biennial Exhibition: The Art, Music, and Poetry of Rand Darrow. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Call for Artwork [ WED., DECEMBER 25 ] 6x6x2014. Through April 20, 2014. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Artwork entries due Apr 20, or postmarked by Apr 19 461-2222. info@ rochestercontemporary.org. Both Ends of the Rainbow. Through Jan. 10, 2014. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Schweinfurth Art Center seeks Cayuga County Senior Citizens for Annual Exhibit. Artwork should be delivered to the Art Center

Wed-Fri, Jan 8–10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m 315-255-1553. mtraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. Call for Art. Ongoing. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Ongoing. The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. We are offering several exciting exhibit options. Please include the following in your email: 3 to 5 jpeg images representative of your style, artists statement and short bio 6452485. outsidetheboxag@gmail. com. outsidetheboxag.com. Call for Art. Ongoing. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. Please include the following in your email: - 3 to 5 jpeg images of current work Artist statement - CV/Resume Kindly indicate whether you are submitting available work or work that is representative 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call for Artists. Ongoing. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Call for Artists to Interview for TV. Ongoing. Show: The Art of rctv-15 201-292-7937. team@ foreveraryes.com. Call to Artists. Through Dec. 31. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op is seeking artists from the Rochester region to exhibit their work at Starry Nites Café shoefactoryarts.com. Calling All Local Artists. Ongoing. Lori’s Natural Foods, 900 Jefferson Rd Artists wanted to participate in our consignment program. Email a bit about you and your work 424-2323. stephanie@lorisnatural.com. lorisnatural.com. continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

Art Exhibits Design Showcase 2014. Through Dec. 31. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. Submission Deadline Dec 31. A juried exhibition open to design firms and individual design professionals. Selected works will be exhibited in Feburary 2014 473-4000. artsrochester.org. For the LOVE of (sub)urban ART; an exploration of the urban/surban life. Through Feb. 1, 2014. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Submission deadline Feb 1. Exhibitions Feb 7-28 at Outside the Box Art Gallery, 1000 Turk Hill Rd., Bldg #9, Fairport, and Create Art 4 Good Studios, 1115 East Main St., Rochester. Drop off submissions: @Outside the Box Art Gallery; during regular gallery hrs. Jan 25-31, or @Create Art 4 Good Studios; Jan 26 4-8 p.m., Jan 28 4-8 p.m., Feb 1 9 a.m.-1 p.m $15 for two pieces. 6452485. Susan@CreateArt4Good. org, outsidetheboxag@gmail.com. outsidetheboxag.com. Go Art. Ongoing. The GeneseeOrleans Regional Arts Council is seeking artists interested in exhibiting their work in four galleries 343-9313. info@goart. org. goart.org.

Comedy

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Mike Dambra. Dec. 26-28. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Todd Youngman opens. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., DECEMBER 27 ] Multifaceted: The Rob Campbell Comedy & Variety Show. 7 & 9 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. $10. 371-2283. mightypr1@gmail.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 28 ] Polite Company: Edna & Agatha’s Holiday Extravaganza. 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10$12 866-811-4111. muccc.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] Geva Comedy Improv: New Year’s Eve Spectacular. 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd gevacomedyimprov.org. Kevin Meaney. 7:30 & 10 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster $20 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. Unleashed! IMPROV presents: New Year’s LOL. 8 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Ages 12+ $12-$18 461-2000. jccrochester.org.

Dance Events

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] New Year Dinner Dance. Dec. 31. St. Mary’s Ukrainian Orthodox Church, 3176 St. Paul Blvd. Dinner & dance $25 students, $50 adults. Dance only $15. Cocktails 6 p.m., dinner 7 p.m., dancind 8 p.m 342-6424. stmarysuoc.org. Village Squares’ New Year’s Eve Square Dance with the Hip Boot Boyz. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. St.

SPECIAL EVENT | KWANZAA CELEBRATIONS

Celebrate the African cultural holiday of Kwanzaa this year by taking part in a series of special events organized by the Rochester Kwanzaa Coalition. The theme of this year’s celebration is “Black to the Future,” which places special emphasis on the role of the black youth in carrying on the African cultural legacies. There will be events on each day of Kwanzaa (December 26-January 1) that revolve around the seven core principles of the holiday, known collectively as Nguzo Saba. Each day of Kwanzaa corresponds to one of these core principles and on each day there will be an event related to the themes and celebrations of that day. Activities include African dancing, storytelling, movie screenings, and readings from local authors. For more specific details about activities, schedules, and venues call 355-8888 or visit the Facebook page of the Rochester Kwanzaa Coalition at facebook.com/ RochesterKwanzaaCoalition. — BY COLIN MCCOY Thomas’ Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 381-5049. squaredancingrochester.org.

Festivals [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Kwanzaa Celebrations. Dec. 26Jan. 1. Dec 26, 6-9 p.m.: Umoja. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Dec 27, 2-5 p.m.: Kujichagulia. Wheatley Community Library, 33 McCree Way. Dec 28, 2-5 p.m.: Ujima. Gannt Center, 700 North St. Dec 29, noon-5 p.m.: Ujamaa. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Dec 30, 2-5 p.m.: Nia. Rochester Museum Science Center, 657 East Ave. Dec 31, 6-9 p.m.: Kuumba. Memorial AME Zion Church, 529 Clarissa St. Jan 1: Imani. Celebrate at home with family and friends deloresradney@hotmail.com Also: First Community Interfaith Institute, Inc., 219 Hamilton St. Daily celebrations Dec 26-Jan 1 at 6 p.m. Finale: Kwanzaa feast held at St. John’s Home, 150 Highland Ave. Bring a dish to pass, no pork dishes fciirochester.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] New Year’s Eve Celebration. 6-11 p.m. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Square. Free ice skating 6-9 p.m., adult-only skate 9-11 p.m 4287541. cityofrochester.gov/nye.

Kids Events

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ WED., DECEMBER 25 ] Let’s Move! Let’s Play! SchoolBreak Week. Through Jan 5. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Go through physical challenges as you make your way through the museum exhibits. Closed Christmas day. Mon–Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m Included in museum admission

20 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

$13.50, free to kids under 2 and members 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Edgerton Model Railroad Club Open House. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St Display of 4 historic O-gauge layouts built in 1950 by Rochester and the PAL with accessories for visitors to operate. Vintage and current locomotives. Wintage and local interest items on display Free 428-6769. Edgerton_ Model_Railroad@yahoo.com. edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com. The Heart of a Snowman. Dec. 26. The Refinement Studio, 55 Canterbury Rd. Ages 5-7 Thursday, 12/26 and Tuesday, 12/31 at 10 a.m. Ages 8-10 12/31 at 1 p.m $15 244-2228. therefinementstudio.com. Teen Movie Makers. 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free, register 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Winter Break Disney Live Action Movies: Mary Poppins. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Disney classic Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 27 ] Eddie the Elk and the Twelve Days of Christmas. 1 & 3 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. No shows December 22 Included in museum admission: $11-$13 271-4320. rmsc.org. The Magic Guy. 10:30-11:15 a.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. All ages Free 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Winter Break Disney Live Action Movies: Enchanted. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

[ SAT., DECEMBER 28 ] Stories for Sheepdogs. Dec. 28. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd 10:30 am. Read stories to Emmie the Shetland sheepdog. Bring your own book or pick one from the library 336-6062. aholland@ library.org 10:30 a.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd All ages 336-6062. aholland@libraryweb.org. Tail Waggin’ Tutors. Fourth Saturday of every month, 11 a.m. Maplewood Community Library, 1111 Dewey Ave. Free 585-428-8220. margaret. paige@libraryweb.org. maplewoodcommunitylibrary.org. Winter Break Disney Live Action Movies: Homeward Bound. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 29 ] Family Fun Craft: Noisemakers. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 30 ] Widget the Reading Dog and Her Pal Joey. 3-4 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Winter Break Disney Live Action Live Movies: Beverly Hills Chihuahua. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] Annual New Year’s Eve Family Bash. 6-9 p.m. Southeast Family YMCA, 111 E Jefferson Rd The event will kick off with a pizza and salad dinner, followed by family crafts, games, roller skating, bounce houses, cotton candy and piñata fun. This New Year’s Eve Bash, which is open to the community, will also include a New Year’s Eve toast. The maximum number for family registration is six people $12-$17 each/$45-$60 per family, register. rochesterymca.org/family-newyears-eve-bash. Noon Year’s Eve. 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Ave. Family-friendly festivities and a noon-year’s eve countdown to ring in the New Year 889-2200. chililibrary.org. Noon Year’s Eve Party with Professor Klutzo. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Join Professor Klutzo and his puppets for a fun program. At noon, watch the ball drop and create a storm of a noise!. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Winter Break Disney Live Action Movies: The Shaggy Dog. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Loom Bracelet Making. 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. The Refinement Studio, 55 Canterbury Rd. Ages 5-7 at 10 a.m., and ages 8-10 at 1 p.m $15 244-2228. therefinementstudio.com.

Literary Events

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Poems for Lunch. noon. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Learn to

become a good reader of poetry. Local poet and teacher, Kitty Jospe, offers a selection of poems and guides a discussion about them. No registration required. Drop-ins and brown bag lunches are welcome. Held in the Literature Study Room on the 1st floor of the Rundel Memorial Library building Free 428-8375. carol.moldt@libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org.

Recreation

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ WED., DECEMBER 25 ] GVHC Event. 9:30 a.m. Philbrick Park, Panorama Plaza, Penfield. Easy 4 mile hike Free 544-3387. gvhchikes.org. Ice Skating. Through March 31, 2014. Genesee Valley Sports Comeplex, 131 Elmwood Ave. The rink season will run through March 2014 (closing date TBA). Open skate schedule: Sun 2:30-3:45 p.m., Mon-Fri noon-1:15 p.m., Fri (16+) 1011:15 p.m., Sat 5-6:15 p.m. Adult skate Tue-Thu 10:3011:45 a.m $2-$7.50 428-7889. cityofrochester.gov/gvpsc/ Through March 15, 2014. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Square. Ice rink at 353 Court St. Visit site for complete list of open skate schedules 428-7541. cityofrochester.gov/mlkmp. [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. WedFri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m Suggested donations of 3$ per person, 10$ per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 28 ] GVHC Event. 10 a.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Easy/ moderate 5 mile hike Free 4750923. gvhchikes.org. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5, first time member use free 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/ helmernc. Winter Birds and Bird Feeding. 1 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd This program will help you identify the birds at your feeder and show you ways to create simple feeders Free 315-947-6143. snc@co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook. com/sterlingnaturecenter. [ SUN., DECEMBER 29 ] GVHC Event. 1 p.m. Black Creek Park, Woodside Lodge lot, Chili. Moderate 5 mile hike Free 2544047. gvhchikes.org. Wolf Creek Valley Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Castile Entrance Gate. Will car pool. Bring lunch $8 parking fee 493-3625. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] New Year’s Eve Skate at MLK Park. 6 p.m. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Square. Free admission. $3 skate rental. Family skate from 6 to 8 p.m.; 16 and over skate from 9 to 11 p.m Free-$3 4287541. cityofrochester.gov.

[ WED., JANUARY 1 ] First Day Hikes. 1 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge half hour early to register. Hot chocolate and cookies at 3 p.m. Two levels: families with younger children and families with older children $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Event. 10 a.m. Pittsford Plaza, Monroe Ave. Easy/ moderate 5 mile hike, Pittsford loop Free 475-0923. gvhchikes. org. Year List Jump-Start. 8 a.m. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Bird watching event by Rochester Birding Association. Meet at 8 a.m. in one of the several parking lots on the west side of the outlet at the north end of Irondequoit Bay or at 8:45 a.m. in the Lake Shore Boulevard parking area between Log Cabin Road and Zoo Roads Free 671-9639. rochesterbirding.com.

Special Events

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ WED., DECEMBER 25 ] 49th Christmas Gathering. Dec. 25. Liesl Gaesser, 48 Metropolitian Dr. Pizza. Wear comfortable clothes. All Welcome Free 733-6213. LieslG@ymail.com. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. ReCraft the Holidays EcoBazaar, Swap & Sustainable Saturday. Ongoing, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Free admission 288-7564. events@ rochestergreen.com. Used Fiction Book Sale and LP Giveaway. Through Dec. 31. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through Dec 31. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat noon-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. A wide variety of hardcover and paperback fiction will be on sale with most items one dollar or less. Vinyl LP record albums of many musical genres are available to the public at no charge. Proceeds support the library’s programs and activities Free 428-8350. Rebecca.Fuss@ libraryweb.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Screening: “Mortal Instruments.” 2:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Snacks are welcome. Rated PG-13 Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. [ FRI., DECEMBER 27 ] Family Movie Matinee. 2 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Watch a family friendly movie on the big screen in the community room. For all ages Free 359-7092. Holiday Science & Technology Days. Dec. 27-30, 11 a.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Join local scientists and organizations to explore hands-on activities Included in museum admission: $11-$13 271-4320. rmsc.org. Screening: “A Wife Alone.” 3:15 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $6-$10 highfallsfilmfestival.com.

[ SAT., DECEMBER 28 ] Diva’s Las Vegas. Dec. 28-31. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Rochester’s fabulous duo, Kasha Davis and Aggy Dune, return with an all-new show and a weekend filled with your favourite divas. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue New Year’s Eve 9 p.m $18-$24 461-2000. thebigwigsshow.com. East Side Winter Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Indoors at 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. eastside. activities@rochester.rr.com. Screening: “The Rabbi’s Daughter.” 7 p.m. Congregation Beth Sholom, 1161 Monroe Ave Followed by discussion with director, Racheli Vasserman $12, register 473-1625. bethsolomsisterhood@gmail.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 29 ] Brighton Winter Farmers’ Market. 1 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. 2698918. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Holiday Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 30 ] Teen Movie Matinee. 2 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Enjoy a movie matinee with your friends. Free popcorn. For teens ages 13 and up Free 359-7092. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] 2014 New Year’s Eve Party. 5 p.m. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd Henrietta Music, dinner, toast. $30, register. Entrance and Midnight Toast is just $10 per person 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 2nd Annual New Year’s Eve Bash. 4 p.m. Diplomat Party House, 1956 Lyell Ave Ticket includes open bar, dinner, champagne toast @ midnight, noisemakers, dancing, prizes $55, register 5028238. psiomegazetasroc@gmail. com. psiomegazetasroc.org. Last Night Perry 2013. 5 p.m. Perry Elementary Middle School, 50 Olin Ave. Safe, fun, alcohol-free, family-oriented New Year’s Eve celebration $5, $20 maximum for family of 5 2375375. lastnightperry.com. New Year’s Eve. 10:30 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. With Lady Au Pair’s Valley of Vixens. Burlesque show and aerial arts 454-2966. bugjar.com. New Year’s Eve Celebration and Fireworks. 7 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Festivities inside the Convention Center, and fireworks just outside of it from 9:50-10:15 p.m Free cityofrochester.gov. New Year’s Eve Dinner and Double Feature at the Dryden Theatre. 7 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Featuring “Gremlins” and “Gremlins 2” $6-$8 2713361. dryden.eastmanhouse.org. New Year’s Eve Overnight. Dec. 31. YMCA Bay View, 1209 Bay Rd 6 p.m.-9 a.m. $30 members, $45 guests, of half night (6 p.m.12:30 a.m.) at $20 members, $35 guests. Swimming, a late night movie, snacks, breakfast 671-8414. rochesterymcs.org/ locations/bay-view.

THEATER | BIG WIGS: DIVAS LAS VEGAS

If you’re not already familiar with the Big Wigs, it’s a highenergy, Las Vegas-style impersonation show featuring Rochester drag queens Aggy Dune and Kasha Davis. In their show, Dune and Davis don glamorous outfits and big hair as they hit the stage impersonating a series of iconic divas; think Cher, Tina Turner, Madonna, Joan Rivers, Bette Midler, and many more. The duo will perform three shows this week at the Jewish Community Center (1200 Edgewood Ave.). You can catch the duo on Saturday, December 28, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, December 29, at 2 p.m. And if you’re looking for a particularly glamorous way to ring in the new year, head out Tuesday, December 31, at 9 p.m. The show will feature all the energy and exuberance you have come to expect from the group with a little added flare for the New Year’s celebration. Tickets are $18 for students, $24 for members, and $26 for non-members. For more information visit thebigwigshow.com or jccrochester.com. — BY COLIN MCCOY New Year’s Eve Party. 5:30-7:30 & 9-9:30 p.m. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. Four course dinner, 2 hours per reservation $70 plus tax, tip, and beverages, register 262-2090. tapas177. com. 6:30 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $55-$70, RSVP 594-8882. iaccrochester.org. Rock the Walls New Years Eve. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. Rock Ventures, 1044 University Ave. Alcohol free New Year’s Eve event offered by local veterans. *Belay/Rope training classes at 7, 8, & 9 p.m. $12 for all ages at the door. $10 advance tickets available frontline-discount. com/Register. Temple Emanu-El’s New Year’s Eve Wine and Music Dinner and Gala. 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Temple Emanu-El, 2956 St. Paul Blvd. The event is a fund-raiser to benefit Camp Good Days and Special Times, a Mendon, NY camp for adults, children and families touched by cancer $55, register 366-4180. auntjudyg@rochester.rr.com. emanuelrochester.org. Tilt’s Official New Years 2014 Party. 10 p.m. Hosted by 98PXY’s Megan Carter. Featuring Tilt-A-Whirl Drag performances by DeeDee Dubois, Miss Delcious & Samantha Vega, music by DJ Mighty Mic, confetti prize blast with $1500 in cash & prizes at 1 a.m. Free party favors, complimentary champagne toast at midnight. Serving until 4 a.m. Free continental breakfast at 2:30 a.m Cover for 21+ $10, admission for 18-20 $20 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Free Spaghetti Dinner. 2-5 p.m. Covenant United Methodist

Church, Culver Rd Reservations are not required. Everyone is welcome 654-8115.

Theater “Another Christmas with the Calamari Sisters: Feast of the Seven Fishes.” Through Jan. 31. RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St. Thu Dec 26 at 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue Dec 31 at 2 p.m $25-$65. 325-3366. rapatheatre.org. “Bad Buddhist,” by Solomon Blaylock. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. An irreligious but mystically inclined monologist looks at Buddhist philosophy through the window of Tibetan and Sanskritic calligraphy and explores the disconnect between (largely) noble ideals and the messiness of being human. Informative/ funny/vulgar/cathartic. Mature audiences only $5. 957-6251. muccc.org. The Capitol Steps. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave $45-$75. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. “A Christmas Carol.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through December 28. Thu Dec 26, 2 & 7 p.m., Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 p.m. & 7:30p p.m. (“Home for the Holidays,” a special free performance for Military Families and Veterans) Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Gershwin Uncorcked.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Pianist/vocalist Elliot Sneider uses narrative and music to explore the lives of George and Ira Gershwin against the changing landscape of America. $18-$22. 461-2000. jccrochester.org.

“Good Rockin’ Live: A Salute to Sun Records.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Good Rockin’ Xmas Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Good Rockin’ Live Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $23-$33 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Mark Salem’s Mind Over Rochester.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8:30 p.m., Tue 3, 7, & 10:30 p.m $25 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “My Gal Patsy/Josie Waverly.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Tue 7 p.m. My Gal Patsy, 10 p.m. Josie Waverly. $25-$30 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. ShakeCo Radio Theater: “Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Tue 7 p.m. Pay what you will. muccc.org. “Take Me Home.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri-Sat 8:30 p.m., Sun 6 p.m., Tue 6:30 & 10:15 p.m $26-$33 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. “Waiting at the Crossroads Cafe.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. Tue & & 9:30 p.m. $35 4541260. bftix.org. “What’s So Important About Being Earnest?” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave ShakeCo Classic Theater. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 2 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $5$7.50 866-811-4111. muccc. org.

Theater Audition [ WED., DECEMBER 25 ] 2 Pages/2 Voices. Through Jan. 3, 2014. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Each play must be no more than 2 pages and contain no more than 2 characters, and include the word “fox” Submissions due January 3, 2014. Winning plays announced January 16. Performances January 27, 8 p.m wab.org.

Workshops

Due to the holiday, event details may change. Please call ahead. [ WED., DECEMBER 25 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices”. Ongoing, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 26 ] Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 31 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 24

Con men conning con men “American Hustle”

outrageously extreme, in part through the sheer zaniness of subject and theme. (R), DIRECTED BY DAVID O. RUSSELL In that opening scene, Irving Rosenfeld NOW PLAYING (Christian Bale) painstakingly arranges an elaborate hairdo, involving a comb-over and a [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA toupee, a comical moment that suggests the vanity of the man and the deception of his deeds. Irving Based on a true story, “American Hustle” informs the audience that he owns a string of dryopens in a semi-documentary manner, with a cleaning shops, runs a sideline in fake paintings, line of on-screen prose providing the location and augments that with some not entirely — the Plaza Hotel in Manhattan — and the clear business in bilking people through false date — November, 1978. Some intermittent investments. He also introduces his accomplice voice-over narration from the two major and lover, Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams), a characters throughout the movie continues former stripper who shares Irving’s ambitions and the documentary tone. After that, however, larcenous instincts; their alternating narration both action and people grow increasingly, even moves the plot through flashbacks, showing the events that led up to their arrest by the FBI, in the person of agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper). In exchange for leniency, DiMaso pressures the couple to participate in a scheme to nail a batch of politicians for corruption, which brings the movie’s plot up to the moment of Amy Adams and Christian Bale in “American Hustle.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY

Irving’s coiffure. They embark on an operation aimed at the mayor of Camden, New Jersey, Carmine Polito (Jeremy Renner), who wants to bring gambling casinos to Atlantic City in order to boost employment and reinvigorate the state’s economy. To entrap some members of Congress, they also use an agent impersonating an Arab sheik, who promises to bankroll the plan to the tune of $2 million, introducing yet another level of trickery. All of this maneuvering initiates a number of conflicting, often comical plots — DiMaso constantly cajoles his boss into paying for luxury accommodations, fancy cars, a jet plane, and providing the $2 million. He also falls in love with Sydney and tries to squeeze Irving out of the operation, thus advancing his own career. At the same time, since the whole plan involves political corruption, gambling casinos, and a lot of money, the mafia naturally joins the game, raising yet another level of deception and danger. The various double and triple crosses, the pervasive sense that everybody lies and assumes another identity, and the various threats to life and limb paradoxically keep tipping the movie over into comedy. Irving’s dizzy wife, Rosalyn (Jennifer Lawrence), cannot work in her kitchen without accidentally setting it on fire; the excitable, aggressive Richie, who bullies his boss, actually lives with his mother and creates his own elaborate hairdo. The notion that everybody works a confidence game on everybody else, that con

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Give them what they want “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY ADAM MCKAY NOW PLAYING

“Nebraska” (R), DIRECTED BY ALEXANDER PAYNE NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

men con each other, leads to some surprising and laughable twists and resolutions to an essentially funny movie about some serious subjects. Director David O. Russell exploits the era of “American Hustle” carefully and conscientiously, showing the distinctive clothing, the awful disco music and dancing, and yes, the hairstyles of a time that seems long, long ago. Amy Adams and Jennifer Lawrence, both beautiful young women in different ways, wear dresses with enough cleavage to challenge the Grand Canyon. Much of Christian Bale’s performance in effect grows out of his loud, clashing wardrobe and his oversized eyeglasses, which become a reiterated characterizing prop. Although just about everyone goes way over the top much of the time, Bale’s acting deserves a good deal of praise, especially in its demonstration of his remarkable versatility. After playing the lean, laconic, haunted protagonist of “Out of the Furnace,” he impersonates a flamboyant, fasttalking confidence artist from the Bronx with absolute conviction. He clearly gained a lot of weight for this part — contrasting with his previous role, his Irving Rosenfeld is paunchy and physically unimpressive, faintly ridiculous even in serious moments, yet working his character so thoroughly that he deceives the audience as fully as his fellow hustlers. His character, along with all the others in “American Hustle,” the complicated scheming, and its surprising results, suggest the truth of W.C. Fields’s dictum, “You can’t cheat an honest man.” As it turns out, few of those populate this movie.

“Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy” took audiences by surprise when it opened nearly a decade ago, in the summer of 2004. The 70’s-era tale of Will Ferrell’s dimwitted, sexist newsman was a minor hit at the box office and has only grown in popularity in the years since. Many of its more memorable lines (“You stay classy, San Diego”) have seeped into the cultural consciousness, and its loose, improvisational feel has influenced seemingly every major film comedy since. Now Burgundy returns in “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues.” Just as in the first film, the barest hint of a plot is merely a framework upon which to hang a non-stop barrage of jokes, and the biggest surprise is how many laughs Ferrell and writerdirector Adam McKay continue to be able to wring out of the premise. Only a few years have passed in the film’s world, which picks up at the dawn

The news team reunites in “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues.” PHOTO COURTESY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

of the 1980’s. When Burgundy is fired from his job co-anchoring the news with his wife, Veronica Corningstone (Christina Applegate), he’s approached with an offer to join the brand-new, first-ever 24-hour news channel, Global News Network. His first action is to make a cross-country trek to round up his former news team: ladies’ man field reporter Brian Fantana (Paul Rudd), closeted sportscaster Champ Kind (David Koechner), and simpleton weatherman Brick Tamland (Steve Carell). With the dream team back together, they change the face of American media with a simple question: “Why do we have to tell people what they need to hear? Why don’t we tell them what they want to hear?” There’s something about Ron Burgundy being singlehandedly responsible for all of the worst aspects of our current 24-hour news cycle that just feels right, and it’s this ingenious concept that gives the film its best material. Why wouldn’t an oblivious egomaniac like him be the source of our country’s increasingly dumbed-down media? The new “Anchorman” film maintains the original’s shaggy, spontaneous tone — both films feel like the cast and crew got together and started filming with only the most basic idea about what they were going to do. Relying on the cast’s (considerable) improvisational talents leads the film down weird, often nonsensical paths, but it works. Still, clocking in at two hours, McKay is perhaps a little too in love with every joke his actors come up with, and there’s no question the film could have used a heavier hand in the editing room. Ron Burgundy is arguably Will Ferrell’s most iconic role; there’s no one better at playing doltish blowhards, and this is a role he was born to play. The new characters are something of mixed bag, however. Kristen Wiig is quite good as a suitably odd love interest for Carell, as is a very orange James Marsden as a rival GNN anchorman, but both their plotlines ultimately feel unnecessary. Burgundy pursues a romance with GNN’s black station manager, Linda

Jackson (the incredibly game Meagan Good), and the racial humor involving her character is by far the least successful aspect of the film. It’s not that the jokes are especially offensive, but more that we’ve seen similar material dozens of times before. It’s mildly amusing, but I expect a bit more inventiveness and creativity from an “Anchorman” film. Veteran character actor Bruce Dern plays

Woody Grant, an aging, unemployed alcoholic convinced he’s won a million dollars in a mail-order sweepstakes in “Nebraska,” Alexander Payne’s darkly comic fable of dreams unfulfilled. After several attempts to set out on foot from his home in Montana, his exasperated son David (Will Forte, in an understated performance) agrees to drive him to Nebraska, where Woody believes his winnings await him. David indulges his father mainly to shut him up, but also as a means to spend more time with the man before he disappears completely into senility. Perpetually in a fog, Woody utters few words, but Dern plays him with a hangdog wistfulness that conveys a great deal with a single glance. He’s justifiably getting lots of Oscar buzz for his performance, but June Squibb is equally good as his put-upon wife, Kate. She gives shading to a character who at first appears nothing but a nagging shrew, but gradually reveals the love and shrewd fair-mindedness laying below the surface. I’ve read accusations of Payne’s condescension toward the midwestern culture he depicts, but I never sensed him looking down on these characters. There’s a sincerity in first-time screenwriter Bob Nelson’s script that dispels any sense of superiority. It’s worth noting that Payne was himself born in Omaha — not that that precludes a vendetta to skewer his own people — but I felt a definite affection and empathy for the characters. They’re each recognizably human, and all yearning for something slightly better for themselves that’s too often just beyond their reach.

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Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] 47 RONIN (PG-13): Keanu Reeves stars as the leader of an outcast band of samurai on a mission of vengeance for the murder of their master. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster. BLACKMAIL (1929): Alfred Hitchcock directs this thriller about young woman who’s blackmailed for her murder of an attempted rapist. Dryden (Sat, Dec 28, 8 p.m.) GREMLINS & GREMLINS 2: THE NEW BATCH (1984, 1990): Mischievous creatures terrorize a small town, and then the Big Apple, in Joe Dante’s amazing comedic horror films. Dryden (Tue, Dec 31, 7 p.m.) GRUDGE MATCH (PG-13): Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro star as retired boxers who agree to one more fight to settle an old rivalry. With Kim Basinger, Alan Arkin, and Kevin Hart. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta JUSTIN BIEBER’S BELIEVE (PG): This concert film offers an “unprecedented” and “unfiltered” behind-thescenes glimpse into the life of the pop “music” star. Culver, Henrietta, Eastview LETHAL WEAPON (1987): Richard Donner’s classic action flick stars Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as two cops who team up to stop a dangerous drug ring. Dryden (Fri, Dec 27, 8 p.m.; Sun, Dec 29, 2 p.m.) MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM (PG-13): Idris Elba stars as former South African president Nelson Mandela in this biopic of the influential leader’s remarkable life. Culver, Henrietta, Pittsford THE MANXMAN (1929): Alfred Hitchcock also directs this silent drama about two boyhood friends who find themselves in love with the same woman. Dryden (Thu, Dec 26, 8 p.m.) THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (PG): Ben Stiller directs and stars in this adaptation of James Thurber’s story, about a man who dreams of a life of adventure and finally gets to actually live it. With Kristen Wiig, Sean Penn, and Adam Scott. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster A WIFE ALONE (NR): This locally filmed thriller follows a woman’s scheme to rob a group of corrupt businessmen, including her husband, in order to start a new with life her female lover. Little (Fri, Dec 27, 3:15 p.m.) THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (R): Martin Scorsese directs and Leonardo DiCaprio stars in the outrageous true story

of Jordan Belfort, a corrupt stockbroker brought down by the FBI. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown [ CONTINUING ] 12 YEARS A SLAVE (R): Chiwetel Ejiofor stars in this film based on the true story of Solomon Northup, a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery. Also starring Michael Fassbender, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Pittsford, Tinseltown ABOUT TIME (R): When a young British man learns he can time travel back through his life, he uses it to improve to romantic prospects. With Rachel McAdams and Bill Nighy. Movies 10 AMERICAN HUSTLE (R): David O. Russell directs this black comedy inspired by the ABSCAM scandal of the 1970s, which involved the entrapment of several high-profile U.S. politicians. Starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, and Jeremy Renner. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES (PG-13): Ron Burgundy and the rest of the Channel 4 news team return, ready to take New York, and the first 24-hours news channel, by storm. Starring Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, Christina Applegate, and Kristen Wiig. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY (R): In this follow-up to 1999’s “The Best Man,” a group of college friends reunites for Christmas after 15 years apart. Starring Taye Diggs, Morris Chestnut, Terrence Howard, Nia Long, and Sanaa Lathan. Culver, Greece, Tinseltown THE BOOK THIEF (PG-13): A young girl is sent to live with a foster family in WWII Germany in this adaptation of Markus Zusak’s popular novel. Starring Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson. Canandaigua, Geneseo CARRIE (R): Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”) directs this “re-imagining” of Stephen King’s novel, with Chloë Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore portraying the loveable mother-daughter duo at the heart of the tale. Movies 10 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture book, this time involving an island of food/animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Movies 10 DELIVERY MAN (PG-13): Vince Vaughn stars as a

man who learns that due to a mixup at the fertility clinic, his donations 20 years prior have resulted in him being the father of 533 children. Also starring Cobie Smulders and Chris Pratt. Cinema, Greece DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG): A former supervillain is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to spy on a dangerous new super criminal in this animated sequel. With the voice talents of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Russell Brand, and Ken Jeong. Movies 10 DHOOM 3 (NR): A young man seeks revenge for the murder of his father in this Hindi action thriller. Henrietta DON JON (R): Joseph GordonLevitt makes his big screen debut as writer/director with this comedy about a ladies man who finds that real-life ladies have difficulty competing with the ones in his pornos. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, and Tony Danza. Movies 10 ESCAPE PLAN (R): Wrongfully imprisoned in a futuristic, high-security jail, Sylvester Stallone must team up with fellow inmate Arnold Schwarzenegger to break out. So it’s pretty much a documentary. With Jim Caviezel and Vincent D’Onofrio. Movies 10 FROZEN (PG): A young princess goes on an epic journey to find her sister, whose powers have trapped their kingdom in an eternal winter in this animated Disney musical. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, and Josh Gad. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Eastview THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG-13): In the second installment of Peter Jackson’s epic trilogy, hobbit Bilbo Baggins continues his quest to help a group of dwarves reclaim their homeland, and confronts a mighty dragon in the process. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster HOMEFRONT (R): Jason Statham stars in this stars as a retired DEA agent who moves his family to a small town, only to run afoul of a local meth druglord played by James Franco. With Winona Ryder and Kate Bosworth. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Tinseltown THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13): The middle chapter of The Hunger Games finds an uprising against the Capitol beginning as a result of the events in the first film.

Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG13): Fresh off the success of “The Conjuring,” director James Wan returns to the saga of the haunted Lambert family. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, and Barbara Hershey. Movies 10 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R): The Jackass gang is back for this hidden camera road trip movie, starring Johnny Knoxville as a very unconventional grandfather. Movies 10 LAST VEGAS (PG-13): Four old friends travel to Las Vegas together to throw a bachelor party for the last of them to finally get married. Starring Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, and Kevin Kline. Cinema, Movies 10 NEBRASKA (R): Bruce Dern stars as an elderly Missouri man convinced he’s won a million dollars in a sweepstakes, and Will Forte is the son who reluctantly agrees to drive him to Nebraska to collect his winnings. With Bob Odenkirk, Stacy Keach, and June Squibb. Little, Pittsford OUT OF THE FURNACE (R): Christian Bale stars as a

down-on-his-luck steel worker who takes matters into his own hands when his younger brother mysteriously goes missing. With Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck, Zoe Saldana, and Forest Whitaker. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown, Webster PHILOMENA (PG-13): Judi Dench stars in this drama about a journalist (Steve Coogan) who helps an elderly woman search for her son, who she was forced to put up for adoption decades earlier. Little, Pittsford PRISONERS (R): An all-star cast heads up this thriller about a group of parents who take matters into their own hands after their daughters are kidnapped. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, Maria Bello, and Paul Dano. Movies 10 SAVING MR. BANKS (PG13): Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson star in this behind-the-scenes story of Walt Disney’s struggle to to convince author P.L. Travers to allow him to adapt her popular children’s novel, “Mary Poppins.” Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG13): The heroic Norse god is back, battling to save the

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

world from a shadowy enemy intent on its destruction. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Natalie Portman, Idris Elba, and Christopher Eccleston. Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA CHRISTMAS (PG-13): Madea gets roped into helping a friend pay her daughter a visit in the country. Hijinks ensue. Starring Tyler Perry, Kathy Najimy, Chad Michael Murray, and Larry the Cable Guy. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster WALKING WITH DINOSAURS 3D (PG): A young dinosaur must rise to the occasion and lead his herd in this animated adventure story. Featuring the voices of Karl Urban, John Leguizamo, and Justin Long. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster WE’RE THE MILLERS (R): A small-time pot dealer hires strangers to pose as his family in order to not arouse suspicion while making his way across the Mexican border with a shipment. Starring Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, and Ed Helms. Movies 10

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AFTERNOON

Join us for a Special NEW YEAR'S EVE Menu

Served 5pm - 10pm Appetizers: Sopa del Dia Shrimp Tostada Bites Steak and Bacon Picaditos Entrees: Cilantro and Pepita Crusted Tuna Fruit and Nut Stuffed Pablanos Chimichurri Flank Steak Tequila-Apple Braised Half Chicken

M OV I E R E V I E WS & SHOWTIMES

Desserts: Mixed Berry Chimichanga Chocolate Flan

rochestercitynewspaper.com /MOVIES

Reservations Encouraged.

Now Serving Sunday Brunch!

rochestercitynewspaper.com /MOVIETIMES

93 Alexander St.

in the South Wedge

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

181 Mount Vernon Ave. Great Charming Little Victorian. Large Lot, Garage, Garden. 2bdrm, 1ba. Updated Kitchen, HW floors throughout, Fresh paint throughout. Wood-burning stove. Basement has high ceiling, can be used as workshop/studio. Walking distance to Highland Park. $119,900

1481 Bushwood Circle, Webster:

$389,900, 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 2890 ft2, 2.5 car garage, in-law apt, in-ground pool, treed yard with a stream, etc.... A must see - Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724, Re/Max Realty Group 218-6802.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Start your celebration with a good foundation!

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Prudential Discover Real Estate Jeannine Meilman 585-503-5968

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

Search. Buy. Sell.

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

Home and Garden Professionals & MASONRY

WINTER IS HERE! • Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt Fully Insured

ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. Shared Housing Automotive

DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com.

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

Vacation Property

585-287-0692

585-734-8444 Trusted quality service since 1994!

ROOF LEAKS? Home Repair Specialist! • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Flat Roofing • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

703-7738

Affordable

Home Improvements

SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 772-581-0080, www.beach-cove. com. Limited seasonal rentals

Season’s Greetings from

WWW.COMPLETEPAINTING.NET

Clarence and the entire team would like to thank you for your business and wish all a Happy and Prosperous New Year! Satisfying Customers for over 30 Years

Fully insured • Accepting All Major Credit Cards

Call

414-3692

Once Over

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

CERTIFIED HOME & ROOF INSPECTOR Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

Commercial & Residential 10 year labor warranty on all workmanship

Do it right the first time

Call: 458-ROOF

(7663)

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

26 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Home Services

AAAA AUTO RECYCLING And Fast Cash for your cars, vans and trucks. Up to $800. Free towing. Any condition. Up to $5,000 for newer cars. www. cash4carsrochester.com 585-482-2140 ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH 4 CARS TRUCKS AND VANS. Up to $800 running or not, more for newer models. We’ll be there in 30 minutes. 585-482-9988 www. cash4carsrochester.com CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Auctions AUCTIONS: Buy or sell at AARauctions.com. Contents of homes, businesses, vehicles and real estate. Bid NOW! AARauctions.com Lights, Camera, Auction. No longer the best kept secret.

For Sale BABY STROLLER $7 585-4905870

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK CASE dark mahogany 30” wide, 71” tall, 12” deep, 5 shelves $49 585-490-5870 BRONZE HORSE FIGURINE 13” long, 10 1/2 tall. Has engraved saddle / mane/ detailed $25 585880-2903 CHAPS, HORSEBACK RIDING wear over pants, child size, black, leather suede, VGC 28” long legs, 13 x14 waist, zippers on legs $12 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EXERCISE BIKE Heavy duty excellent condition $42 585490-5870 GERMAN SHEPHERD sign on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585-490-5870 KITCHEN TABLE Round, glass. 41” diameter 31”t all with chrome frame $49 585-490-5870 LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-360-2895 PORCELAIN FIGURINE (German Shepherd) for 50’s or 60’s $25 585-880-2903

Groups Forming ATTENTION FLASH SOCCER FANS! The Western NY Flash

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357

Mob is gathering to prepare for the 2014 season. Join us! For more info find us on Facebook or contact us wnyflashfans@gmail. com

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS. Jam & Play out, call & say hello, any level & any age ok. I play keyboards - organ B3 Style Call 585-266-6337 Martino NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. &

continues on page 28

Traditional on Trafalgar

46 Trafalgar Street

46 Trafalgar Street blends desirable modern updates with coveted early 20th century charm. Located in the historic Sibley Tract in the vibrant “Urban by Choice” 19th Ward neighborhood, this spacious home offers all of the convenience of urban living while maintaining a quiet and cozy neighborhood feel. An active neighborhood association and a great group of neighbors await the new owners of 46 Trafalgar. The Sibley Tract features many well-maintained homes that showcase the architecture of the period. The columned front porch, which spans the width of the house, draws you in. It’s large enough for a porch swing, al fresco dining, and more during Rochester’s summer months. As you open the front door, gorgeous original hardwood floors abound. A versatile entry space is to the left of the entrance and a warm and inviting living room is to the right. The living room features a bay window that allows the south-facing sun to pour through. Flanking the retro gas furnace are beautiful leaded glass windows. Exiting the living room through the original pocket doors leads into the spacious dining room with original fixtures, beautiful coffered ceiling and a second bay window. The beautiful woodwork carries through with the floors, doors, and trim. Next door, the kitchen has been tastefully updated to complement the historic character of the home. Off the back of the kitchen is a spacious butler’s pantry, and access to the back deck. First floor laundry is an added bonus!

The dual staircase is accessible from both the entry in the front and the kitchen. As you head upstairs the high ceilings and hardwood floors continue. The second level has four good-sized bedrooms, each with an unexpectedly large closet (with windows!). A back bedroom also has a small open deck, perfect for a quiet morning cup of coffee. A fully updated bath, built-in hallway linen closet, and laundry chute round out the second floor. The third level is a completely updated master suite with large bonus space, perfect for an office or luxurious closet and dressing area. The bedroom area is spacious enough to accommodate the king size bed of your dreams. Finishing off this incredible master retreat is a fully updated bathroom. The home has been updated top to bottom, including a new roof, electrical, hot water heater and new boiler, while maintaining the handsome original radiators. Both the exterior and interior feature fresh paint, while the interior maintains the exquisite wood trim throughout. This 1, 952 square foot home is situated on a 0.13 acre lot with a single car detached garage, with recently updated driveway and sidewalks. Listed for $129,900, realtor Adrienne Kllc at RE/MAX is available for showings immediately by calling (585)248-6212. by Anika Lindquist Anika is a staff member of The Landmark Society.

23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Legal Ads > page 27 transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121 VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585328-4121 Experienced please.

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting MakeA-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today! HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment HELP WANTED make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) SEEKING PTs, PTAs, OTs, COTAs and SLPs to work in SNF settings for full-time, part-time and per diem positions. Submit resumes & salary requirements to careers@ betterhealthcare.com

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http:// www.rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152

MEN’S LIFESTYLE MEDICATIONS FDA Approved - USA Pharmacies. Remote TeleMedicine Physician. Safe • Secure • Discreet. Calls Taken 7 days per week Call ViaMedic: 888-786-0945 Trusted Since 1998 (AAN CAN) SAWMILLS from only $4897.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN) WHY BE ALONE FOR THE NEW YEAR? Meet new friends or start a new relationship! Call LIVE WIRE! It’s Fun, Free and Easy! Call Now! (585)333-3003

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/4130827

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419

28 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help TrapNeuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-7874209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 ST. JOSEPH’S HOUSE invites volunteers to live and work at our soup kitchen/shelter. This is essential, rewarding, hard work. Call Tim @ 314-1962

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a liquor license has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer at retail for on-premises consumption in a tavern under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law: LOCK #@ BREWING COMPANY, LLC DBA: LOCK 32 BREWING COMPANY 10 SCHOEN PLACE, PITTSFORD, NY 14534

Articles of Organization of limited liability company, Jones Development West, LLC ( LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 22, 2013. Certificate of Change was filed with Department of State on December 19, 2013. Monroe County is the county within which it will have its office; its principal business address is 683 Gillett Rd. Spencerport, New York 14559 The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as it agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 683 Gillett Road, Spencerport, New York 14559 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC. The purpose of the LLC is the ownership and management of commercial real estate.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Shorewater Group V, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Shorewater Group VI, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE [ Notice of Formation of Upstate MUA Chiropractic, PLLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 11/15/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 309 Exchange Blvd., STE 100, Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PAZ GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 57 ERIE, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 39 State St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purpose.

[ NOTICE ] FISCHER BACKFLOW PREVENTION & PLUMBING SERVICE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/06/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PO Box 16391, Rochester, NY 14616. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Golden View Ranch, LLC, Arts of Org filed with SSNY on 11/13/13. Off. Loc.: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 2888 SwedenWalker Rd., Brockport, NY 14626. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] H&H Automotive, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/15/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 358 Lighthouse Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Home Pros Contracting, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 25, 2013. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Home Pros Contracting, LLC, PO Box 24913, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Mister Cat Records LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/8/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 25622, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of Foreign LLC: D K Pinnakle Enterprises LLC. Auth. filed with NY Dept. of State: 9/25/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. LLC formed in MI: 6/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205. MI addr. of LLC: 5281 Silverstone Dr., Comstock Park, MI 49321. Cert. of Org. filed with Director, Dept. of Licensing & Regulatory Affairs, PO Box 30054, Lansing, MI 48909. Purpose: any lawful act.

Henrietta, NY 14467 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

Place, Pittsford, NY 14534, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of 921 PPR, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7450 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of FSI BAY POINT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AL’S MAINTENANCE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 328 Jordan Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI M Outparcel LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of BRICK ROAD LLC, filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/8/2013, County office location: Monroe, SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 34 Solmar Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purposes: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of FSI SANDY CREEK FUEL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of DR. MICHAEL BANG, DDS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Dentistry.

Notice of Formation of JML HOUSING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 Ericsson Street, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of East Henrietta 2755, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of KEN & RUTH MICHAEL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 105 College Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of This Is Edvin LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/04/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 41 Branchbrook Drive,

Notice of Formation of EJE Newcomb LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Michael A. Newcomb, 4 Schoen

Notice of Formation of LAWRENCE PARK, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 7 Lawrence St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

[ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Jim’s Akorn Acres, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 12/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1301 Five Mile Line Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine and liquor license has been applied for by G & X Enterprises Inc. dba,Tllted Kilt Restaurant , 1175 Jefferson Rd, Rochester, NY, 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MEETRA SPA LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/19/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to MEETRA SPA, LLC 74 LILAC DRIVE APT 3 ROCHESTER, NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LiDestri Properties Management, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/11/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 815 W. Whitney Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: ZARPENTINE CATERING, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of the State of New York on November 22, 2013. The office of the limited liability company shall be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process served upon him or her c/o 2951 Mt. Read Boulevard, Rochester, New York 14616 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LLC Tungsten Corporate Advisors, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 18, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 114 Upper Mountain Ave. Montclair, NJ 07042. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of North Ridge 405, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northpoint Automotive & Marine, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 70 Cliff St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 99 Van Voorhis Ave. Rochester NY 14617 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RIDDLE ASSOCIATES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 555 North Winton Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ridge Road 5247, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580,

principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SIBLEY REDEVELOPMENT PHASE III LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SIBLEY REDEVELOPMENT PHASE IV LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process

may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOLOMON’S CHOICE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1769 Redman Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stone Street Pub, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TEMIDA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of

NY (SSNY) on 12/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC: 1146 Pittsford Mendon Center Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472.. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tipping Point Communications, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 277 Alexander Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Wireless Communications, LLC Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 08/22/23. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

cont. on page 30

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE

IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2013 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on December 18, 2013, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on December 18, 2013. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including February 23, 2014, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges.

Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of All persons having an interest in the real property described in the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person. judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rabbit Moon LLC Art. of

ROBERT J. BERGIN Corporation Counsel rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Legal Ads > page 29 copy of process to LLC’s principal business location at 268 Sandringham Rd, Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VandeSande Controls Engineering, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/13, becoming effective on 01/01/14. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 11 Erie Crescent, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Kerry Court Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th

Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rochester Rattlers, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MA on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA and principal business address: 20 Guest St., Boston, MA 02135. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of the Commonwealth, One Ashburton Pl., 17th Fl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] of Formation of Ontario Properties of NY LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1456 E River Rd Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of Sonehan Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13.

Paul Novak Media LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/2/2013. LLC’s office is in

Adult Services

Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 651 Cumberland Way, Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PowerSirj Productions LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State (SSNY) on 11/26/2013. The SSNY is designated as the PowerSirj Productions LLC agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: P.O. Box 19754, Rochester, New York 14619. Office Location: Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] PSD, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York 14620-1402. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] THE GROOMER’S OUTLET, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, Attn: LLC Manager, 3160 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta, NY 14460. General Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Fred’s Auto Repair, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/2013. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 9 Oakwood Lane, Scottsville, NY 14546. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BTMPM, LLC ] BTMPM, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville

30 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013

Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-MS Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-LW Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-TL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-HL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon

whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-DH Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-2L Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] East Ridge CDE Properties, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 27, 2013 with an effective date of formation of November 27, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ Notice of Formation of NORTON AUTOMOTIVE CENTER, LLC ] Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/08/13. Office of location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent if LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 45 Exchange Blvd. Ste 713, Rochester,

NY 14614 . Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Roc Rooms & Rentals LLC ] Articles of Organization with Secretary of State of NY on 4/30/2008. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-2055 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Ronald J. Nothnagle, Peter J. Nothnagle, as Executor and Individually; Suzanne Steiner; People of the State of New York; United States of America, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 8, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 8, 2014 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 261 Park Lane Drive, Webster, NY 14580; Tax Account No. 078.06-2-71 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9177 of Deeds, page 529. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68,605.32 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013 Todd J. W. Wisner, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-6629 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Rodney B. Malone; Royce Malone; Amanda Malone, Defendants.

Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 12, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 14, 2014 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town/Village of East Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 322 East Elm Street, East Rochester, NY 14445; Tax Account No. 152.23-1-49, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10613 Page 502; lot size 40 x 121.Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $96,147.49 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013 Daniel Mastrella, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, against Dorothy M. Coleman, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 10/24/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, State of New York on 01/13/2014 at 10:00AM, premises known as 94 Adrian Road, Rochester, NY 14622 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL No.: 62.19-3-54. Approximate amount of judgment $87,796.62 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 2012-13710. Michael A. Burger, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: November 14, 2013 1070836

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

The Entrepreneurial Spirit

— “It will be sort of my unique factor,” said indulgent customer Lucy Luckayanko, describing her then-upcoming $3,000 eyeball jewelry implant from New York City’s Park Avenue Laser Vision -- the insertion of a piece of platinum between the sclera (the white part) and the clear conjunctiva. Actually, said the shop’s medical director, Dr. Emil Chynn, to WNEW-TV in November, it’s “pretty safe.” [WNEW-TV (New York City, 11-20-2013] — Restaurant Startups: (1) Japan’s “cat cafes” allow the pet-starved to relax while dining by caressing house kittens that roam the facilities, but similar eateries have opened recently featuring owls (the Fukurou Sabou in Tokyo, Owl Family in Osaka). (The owls are not caressable and easily spooked by excessive noise.) (2) Liu Pengfei’s Five Loaves and Two Fish restaurant in Fuzhou, China, is losing money rapidly despite overflow dining crowds, according to a December China Daily report, because he allows customers to pay only what they wish. (They must also wash out their bowls.) “I want to continue,” he said, “as I believe the feeling of trust is contagious.” [News Limited (Sydney), 11-5-2013] [China Daily, 12-4-2013]

Cutting-Edge Science

— It may be a cliche of domestic conflict, but physicists recently, earnestly, tackled the dynamics of toilet bowl “splash back.” A stream delivered by a standing male, because it travels five times farther than a seated male’s, produces a splash easily reaching seat and floor -- even without factoring in the “well-known” Plateau-Rayleigh instability -- the inevitable disintegration of a

liquid stream “six or seven inches” after its formation. Short of recommending that men be seated, the researchers (speaking to a November conference) suggest “narrowing the angle” by “standing slightly to one side and aiming downwards at a low angle of impact.” [BBC News, 11-6-2013] — The Human-Rodent Connection: University of British Columbia researchers, intent on judging whether blocking dopamine D4 receptors can reduce the urge to gamble in subjects other than humans, claimed in October to have devised a test that works on the dopamine receptors of rats -- especially those with a gambling problem. With a slot machine-like device dispensing sugar pellets, the researchers claimed they offered rats measured risks and even determined that rats are more likely to take risks immediately following a close loss (as are humans). [Science Daily, 10-29-2013]

Least Competent Criminals

Not Ready for Prime Time: (1) An already-distinctive man (367 pounds) was arrested in Everett, Wash., for a December grocery store shoplifting because he was also wearing an easily noticed purple sock and over two hours later was still wearing it when police caught up to him and questioned him. (2) A 23-year-old woman was arrested in Crestview, Fla., in November for shoplifting a “toy” from an adult store -- before inquiring about a job there. She had professed her innocence until shown the surveillance video, when she said (according to the police report), “Oh, my God. Look at what I’m doing. ... I’m gonna cry.” [The Herald (Everett), 12-4-2013] [Daily News of Northwest Florida, 11-15-2013]

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 26 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Getting caught up in the nostalgia that creeps in as a year comes to a close will put you at odds regarding affairs of the heart and how you actually feel about someone. Don’t make a hasty decision based on situations that unraveled during troubled times. TAURUS (Apr 20-May 20): Travel and getting together with people who share your vocational interests or who are involved in the same events, organizations or activities as you will lead to love and romance. Love at first sight is possible, but take time to let things develop naturally.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your unpredictable nature will draw interest, attention and leave everyone wondering what you are going to do. Sharing your thoughts and desires will prompt someone as diverse as you to step up and challenge you to an interesting and passionate adventure. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be surprised whom you run into this week. Sparks will fly, and a chance to discover someone from a different perspective will come into play. Proceed with caution: Too much, too fast can lead to a dead end and a broken heart. Communi-

cate and built on a solid base. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Let the festivities continue as you dance your way into the heart of someone who falls for your bravado. Chemistry is likely to bring about a fast and passionate encounter that can result in some tough decisions. Protect your reputation and your heart. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let someone from your past cloud your vision. Look forward to a new and exciting meaningful relationship that offers equality, companionship, passion and working toward the same goals. Love and romance are within reach if you accept

invitations that are geared toward meeting new people. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Confusion is likely to come between you and finding a suitable partner. Step back and observe how someone responds to you in different situations, and you will realize that it’s probably best to keep looking for love. Expect an ex to offer too little, too late. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Participation is all that’s required if you want to find someone special. A past relationship that never got to develop will get a second chance. Take the time to find what you have to offer, and you will discover you have a

very special connection. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll attract attention with your outgoing manner. Be careful not to jump too quickly if someone sounds like the perfect match. A partner with a chameleonlike personality is likely to try to find a way into your heart by falsely portraying to be everything you want. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s not the best week to find love, but it is a time to end old ways and begin new ones that will make you more readily available to falling in love in the future. That doesn’t mean you can’t go out and have fun.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll attract lovers who carry plenty of emotional baggage. Before heading down that path, find out if any past attachments are still an issue. Getting enticed into a secret affair will not help your self-esteem. Don’t let chemistry lead to a disaster. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your problem won’t be a lack of romantic opportunity, it will be having trouble deciding on who is best for you. Don’t let uncertainty or ulterior motives take over, leading you into the arms of someone who may not have enough of what you need to hold your interest.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

32 CITY DECEMBER 25-31, 2013


December 25-31, 2013 - City Newspaper