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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

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Vol 42 No 14

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 14

News. Music. Life.

It would be nice if the theater was downtown. But not at any price.” NEWS, PAGE 4

What about the bikes? NEWS, PAGE 5

A crisis for youth in crisis. NEWS, PAGE 6

Blackfriars’ “It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 20

A very filthy Christmas: John Waters is coming to town. INTERVIEW, PAGE 26

FEATURE | BY ERIC REZSNYAK | PAGE 10 | ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

Dodging the digital bullet The way you watch movies has changed, and you probably haven’t even noticed. For more than 100 years film has been synonymous with motion pictures. But if you see a new movie in a big-screen chain theater today, what you’re seeing is likely being projected digitally, the information embedded in a hard drive and beamed on to the screen by a very expensive, very complicated piece of equipment. The shift to digital has its perks. But the major reason why movie theaters are switching — being forced, some say — to digital projection comes down

to money. Most of the major theater chains have already embraced the switch to digital projectors. But given that the formats require totally new machines, which can cost anywhere from $60,000 to $150,000 per screen, that leaves smaller independent cinemas with a real financial burden. In Rochester, The Little, Dryden Theatre, and The Cinema are all in the process of making the leap to digital. But even as they prepare for this major shift, area film professionals debate digital’s impact on artistry, archiving, and business.

Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Let MCC move the Damon Center

I am the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of the College at Mount Holyoke College, and I would not be where I am today were it not for Monroe Community College. During a recent visit to Rochester for my induction into the MCC Alumni Hall of Fame, I learned the exciting news about the college’s effort to relocate its downtown campus. This relocation – finally a campus students can call their own –is encouraging news and long overdue! I began my college education as a nontraditional student at MCC’s Damon City Campus in the mid-1990s. In addition to needing a college experience that taught me how to be a college student, I needed access to an institution that was in the downtown area and that would allow me to continue working full time. MCC was the right choice and taking classes at Damon was the best decision I could have made. In my role at Mount Holyoke, I oversee everything related to student life on campus. I have seen first-hand the impact of quality services, facilities, and environments on student learning. I have learned that the institutions that commit the necessary time, energy, and resources to creating an exceptional college experience do the best job of inspiring student success and preparing our future leaders. By developing this new campus and expanding programs and services, MCC will be creating the kind of environment and experience that will serve students and  City

the community for many years to come. As I thought about my recent visit, the honor that was bestowed upon me, and my time as a student at MCC, it struck me that a new downtown campus can only enhance the college’s role in the community. As an institution of opportunity, MCC helps people, like me, change their lives, and this strengthens all of Greater Rochester. That is exactly the kind of place we want our family members to begin their college education. That is exactly the kind of place we want as a launching pad for all careers. It is my sincere hope that the people and leaders of Monroe County will see the same opportunity I see and do all they can to support MCC. Let us work together to create a downtown campus that students and the city deserve. CERRI A. BANKS, SOUTH HADLEY, MASSACHUSETTS

The RPO conflict

I would like to take issue with some of the assertions made in your opinion piece “Let Remmereit Go” (December 5). There were many problems and significant staff turnover prior to Arild’s arrival. The consultant hired by the RPO, in fact, held all three parties responsible: the music director, the CEO, and the board of directors. There were specific recommendations for each of these players. Ms Rice in her statement implies that only the music director was asked to address issues, and that he has failed and hence he is being fired. That is patently untrue. I know this, because I was on the board of the RPO and resigned in October in protest regarding the manner in which the board meetings and activities were being conducted. KISHAN PANDYA

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

Although Mary Anna Towler says that she has talked with people on both sides of the controversy, her article provides not one scrap of new information to support the conclusion that firing the conductor was “the only thing” the RPO board “could do.” Whatever new insight she may have gleaned from her conversations, she has chosen to withhold from her readers. Does Towler agree with RPO chairperson Elizabeth Rice (in her WXXI radio interview) that the “general public does not need to know” what went on “behind the scenes” that led to the board’s decision? Some journalism! Towler also writes that Remmereit’s supporters “seem to have heard only one side of this conflict.” Actually, so far the RPO’s audience has very little solid information to go on from either side regarding the roots and progression of the conflict to its truly awful outcome. Remmereit, through his lawyer, claims that the RPO’s management treated him in a “demeaning” and “dismissive” manner that created a “hostile work environment,” but what did this actually involve? On the other side, the board’s statements focus on a process by which it says it attempted to resolve conflicts that remain largely unspecified. In this environment of very limited reliable information, it is easy to jump to conclusions that may be ill founded. But as of now, the board has not made a convincing public case for a decision that will deprive the RPO and its audience of an excellent conductor who, in his brief time here, has brought much new vitality to Rochester’s classical music scene. Remmereit did not arrive here with a reputation as an arrogant prima donna who is impossible to work with, and it is hard to imagine how he turned into one over the last year, while at the same time winning over much of the public and leading such fine performances. If there is any chance of saving Remmereit for Roch-

ester, concerned citizens need to act now, not just passively accept the board’s statements or Towler’s equally vague assurances that “the board did the right thing.” This is why over 900 people (and counting) have signed the online petition protesting Remmereit’s dismissal and calling for reconsideration of a decision that carries such severe financial and cultural costs. WAYNE WILLIS, ROCHESTER

Mary Anna Towler’s response: I didn’t withhold anything from readers. I wrote what I knew – including that people on both sides of this issue, with the same information, have reached different conclusions. (See former board member Kishan Pandya’s comment above.) In Mary Anna Towler’s recent editorial favoring Arild Remmereit’s contract termination, my attention was drawn to her statement: “The board has tried for more than a year to set things right. Initially, board leaders tried to remedy the situation themselves. But, they say, the problem grew worse….” Having this information, one might logically wonder who to blame for the failure. It is known that the leadership, a significant time before the crisis became public, blamed Remmereit. However, isn’t it also possible that they reacted to the developing crisis ineptly and lost control of a situation that might very well have been handled more effectively by others? Unless the RPO leadership is infallible (which can fairly be ruled out), might it not be possible to conclude that it is they who should be fired rather than the RPO’s Music Director? DAVID PERLMAN, BRIGHTON

Until Remmereit, the best RPO conductor was Erich Leinsdorf, who conducted here in the 1940’s. Under Leinsdorf, the RPO was electrifying, better than most big-city orchestras. The RPO couldn’t keep Leinsdorf, any more than

the Red Wings could keep Stan Musial. Leinsdorf went on to a brilliant career, ending as conductor of the Boston Symphony. Remmereit is better than Leinsdorf, and today’s RPO is better than the 1940’s RPO. Remmereit is also much better in the community than Leinsdorf. The problem seems to be money. There’s a ton of talent in this town, and there must be a hot-shot marketing guy who can market Remmereit and the RPO well enough to make ends meet. Recordings, increased ticket prices, whatever. There’s got to be a way. We’ll never again have a talent like Remmereit. Hey, he could be better than Stan Musial! JOHN LUDINGTON, WEBSTER

It was the right decision. Period. It’s easy for folks to liken the situation here to Minnesota, Atlanta, Chicago, and other orchestras around the country. But the fact of the matter is, this situation couldn’t be more different. This is not about management putting the kibosh on great art. Ticket sales were down, musicians and staff were hurting, and some musicians have even expressed online that they did not enjoy Remmereit’s programming – it didn’t challenge them, and it wasn’t enjoyable to play. The orchestra is about the musicians, and Remmereit’s army seems to have no regard for that. Remmereit and Owens could have worked out individual differences. However, the RPO’s statement makes it clear that Remmereit caused tensions with people across the organization. This includes musicians and staff members – the piss-poor folks who are being paid absolutely nothing yet have still devoted their lives to the RPO. If the decision truly took years to make, it’s clear that the wounds were deep and not fixable. It’s time to move on. TORI

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly December 12-18, 2012 Vol 42 No 14 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

urban journal | by mary anna towler

Fee faux outrage Let me say a word in support of Maggie Brooks. I didn’t vote for her for Congress or for county executive, and this newspaper didn’t endorse her for either one. But I’ve been amused at Monroe County Democrats’ piling on about her latest budget and the fees snuggled away inside it. By the time you read this, the Republican-dominated County Legislature will probably have approved the budget. Once again, Brooks isn’t raising the property-tax rate. But she is increasing some fees: the “chargebacks” that help finance Monroe Community College, for instance. And she’s charging suburbanites a fee for snowplowing. The Dems hooted, insisting that the fees are really taxes by another name. Sure they are. But the Dems’ outrage seems a bit faux to me. It isn’t Brooks’ fault that she resorts to this sleight of hand. She’s been forced into it – by all of us taxpayers. And I’d bet that the Dems would do the same thing if they were in charge. Politicians at every level of government are scared witless to raise taxes. So as expenses go up – for many legitimate reasons – politicians look for ways to pay for them without getting run out of town. Thus the fees and other shenanigans. I called my own county legislator, Paul Haney, a Democrat, and asked him if he didn’t think the county needed to raise more revenue. His answer: Yes. But when the Dems spoke out after Brooks released her budget, there was not a word of understanding; no sympathy whatsoever. Haney agrees that Dems wouldn’t be any more likely to raise taxes forthrightly than the Republicans – because voters think taxes are un-American. “Unfortunately,” said Haney, “the political discourse over the last 10 years has drilled into their heads that we don’t need additional revenue in government. How you reverse that I don’t know. The first 10, 20, 50 politicians who stand up and say it are gonna be executed.” Rational voters understand the need for more taxes. Government shouldn’t spend our money foolishly, but when costs go up, revenue often must, too. Nationally, of course, political leaders are in a big hoohah over taxes, with conservatives leading the charge. We heard little conservatism, though, when George Bush took us into war, didn’t raise taxes to pay for it, and actually set about reducing them. There’s more than one kind of conservatism, of course. A conservatism

Dems wouldn’t be any more likely to raise taxes forthrightly than the Republicans – because voters think taxes are un-American.”

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that believes in paying for what you buy is different from a conservatism that believes the less fortunate could get jobs and join the ranks of the well-to-do if they’d just buck up. To that second type of conservatism, starving the social welfare programs makes perfect sense. Here at home, though, something else helps drives the spending decisions: county officials simply don’t have much wiggle room. A huge amount of the county’s money goes to social services. That’s simply fact. Also fact: county officials don’t control a lot of what they spend. Other levels of government are in control. Maggie Brooks isn’t kidding when she says that we have a lot of unfunded mandates – programs and services that the state, for instance, says we have to provide but doesn’t fund, or doesn’t fully fund. So Brooks has to find a way to balance the budget by scrutinizing what’s left. She can cut some of those things, or she can get taxpayers to give the county more money. So I have a proposal for the Dems: Fess up on this. And see if you can’t find a few Republicans who agree with you that more revenue is needed. Then go out together and explain why. Explain what programs the county funds – and why we need those programs. Talk about things like education at Monroe Community College, child care for lowincome workers, housing for the poor, snowplowing, the arts. Explain that they are a community investment – in quality of life and in the future. I’d bet many local taxpayers would understand. And maybe you could start a trend. (Hope springs eternal.)

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City 

[ news from the week past ]

Development deal for Midtown Tower

Larry Glazer of Buckingham Properties and Bob Morgan of Morgan Management will combine forces to redevelop Midtown Tower. The $55 million plan will create up to 182 rental housing units in the tower, as well as three to five stories of commercial space. Mayor Tom Richards also announced that the city will begin gathering public input on a new master plan for downtown. There will be public meetings in January, and an online survey can be found at cityofrochester.gov/CenterCity.

Rochester train station proceeding

State Department of Transportation Commissioner Joan McDonald said she expects construction on a new Rochester train station to begin sometime next year. The project, which the state is managing, has received $26.5 million in funding commitments from the federal, state, and city governments. The state has also put together a steering committee, which includes Mayor Tom Richards and House Representative Louise Slaughter, to

guide the station’s design. The station will be owned and operated by Amtrak. Project website: www.dot.ny.gov/rochesterintermodalcenter/

News

Big buy for RoCo The Rochester Contemporary Art Center has a permanent address for the first time; RoCo has purchased the building that currently houses its galleries and studios at 137 East Avenue. Executive Director Bleu Cease says he hopes the mortgage will be paid off in five years, and has set up a Future Fund for donations.

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Mayor: city will not go all out for theater

Same-sex marriage goes to court

The Supreme Court announced that it will weigh in on two cases: Proposition 8 — which is California’s ban on samesex marriage — and the Defense of Marriage Act. The announcement is not a surprise; legal scholars have predicted for several years that the fate of the marriage-equality movement would be determined by the country’s highest court. The Obama administration has argued that DOMA is unconstitutional. The court is expected to hear the cases sometime in the spring.

Rochester Mayor Tom Richards: the city could never pay for a new RBTL theater on its own. FILE PHOTO

Don’t expect the City of Rochester to swoop in with a sweet offer to convince RBTL to build its new theater in downtown Rochester. If RBTL is serious about going to Irondequoit, Mayor Tom Richards says, it’ll go with his blessing. “I’m trying to be consistent with respect to what I think the civic responsibility is to this project,” he says. “It would be nice if [the theater] was downtown. It would be nice it if was in Midtown. But not at any price. Because while it’s important, it’s not necessarily the most important thing.” Developer Scott Congel has agreed to build a 3,000-seat theater for RBTL as part of his massive Medley Centre project. Congel would also pay off the debt on the Auditorium Theatre, which RBTL owns, and pay for renovations to the Aud. RBTL would continue to own the Aud, which would be used for smaller performances. RBTL has not raised money to demonstrate that the theater project

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is credible, Richards says. For a $70 million to $80 million theater, the RBTL would need to come up with approximately $10 million or $20 million in private funds, Richards says. RBTL would also have to find a way to cover any operating deficits the theater incurs, he says. RBTL board chair Arnie Rothschild says the organization has never tried to raise money for a new theater in the city. City officials haven’t expressed a real interest in the project, he says. Richards says the whole thing shouldn’t fall on the city’s shoulders. Even though the Aud is in the city, a new theater would serve the broader region. But no one — politicians, Monroe County, state government, Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council — is stepping up with money or offers of support for RBTL’s new theater, Richards says.

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In the Rochester area, several communities have developed plans to make their streets more hospitable to cyclists. For example, the city developed an extensive plan that includes bike lanes, shared-use street markings, and places for cyclists to lock up their bikes. Rochesterarea cycling advocates say state transportation officials should take a similar planning approach.

TRANSPORTATION | BY JEREMY MOULE

POLITICS | by jeremy moule

What about the bikes? A group of bicycling advocates wants to know why a State Department of Transportation planning document does not include investment in cycling and pedestrian projects. The document emphasizes several other transportation modes, says Brian Kehoe, executive director of the New York Bicycling Coalition, and he’d like to see sections devoted to bicycling and pedestrian infrastructure, too. He says the document also ignores the state’s new complete streets law, which requires road projects to incorporate all modes of transportation, including cycling and walking. “Millions of people walk and bike in New York State and we need to serve them,” Kehoe says. In the Rochester area, several communities have developed plans to make their streets more hospitable to cyclists. For example, the city developed an extensive plan that includes bike lanes, shared-use street markings, and places for cyclists to lock up their bikes. Rochester-area cycling advocates say state transportation officials should take a similar planning approach. It’s the state that has the final word on road features and improvements near some of the area’s major intersections, says Richard DeSarra, a Rochester-area cycling advocate.

Activists say state plan should include bikes. FILE PHOTO

DOT spokesperson Beau Duffy says the document in question is not a capital plan, which would include a detailed list of projects. Rather, it’s an overview of investment in four categories – including construction and local roads and bridges – that the department is required to submit to the New York Works Task Force, Duffy says. He says the DOT is committed to cycling and pedestrian infrastructure and has projects in the pipeline incorporating those elements. The projects will appear in the capital plan, he says. (Kehoe says accommodating cyclists and pedestrians should be a focus of state transportation officials at all levels of planning.) Duffy also says that the DOT is developing projects with the complete streets law in mind. “We just want everyone to understand that our commitment to bike-ped has not changed,” Duffy says.

O’Brien to join Dems Incoming State Senator Ted O’Brien says he’ll conference with Democrats, not the Independent Democratic Conference, when he heads to Albany in January. | “I feel an obligation to conference with the Democrats when I’m elected as a Democrat,” O’Brien said during a phone interview last week. | He said he’s had collegial conversations with IDC members Jeff Klein and Dave Valesky, and that he expects he’ll be able to work with Governor Andrew Cuomo, IDC members, and his own conference to advance issues, including a minimum-wage increase. He said he’s willing to work with anyone who’ll help him advocate for Monroe and Ontario counties. | The IDC and the Senate’s Republican Conference have reached an agreement for coalition control of the Senate. Klein and Republican Dean Skelos will serve as leaders of their respective conferences, and will share leadership responsibilities, such as setting agendas and making appointments to boards. And every two weeks they’ll alternate serving as the Senate’s temporary president. | For the time being, O’Brien is still serving in the County Legislature. He said he doesn’t know when he’ll step down from that position, only that it’ll happen by December 31.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

2,165 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,073 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to December 3. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from November 26 to December 3: -- Lance Cpl. Anthony J. Denier, 26, Mechanicville, N.Y. -- Sgt. 1st Class Darren M. Linde, 41, Sidney, Mont. -- Spc. Tyler J. Orgaard, 20, Bismarck, N.D. —

iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

SOCIAL JUSTICE | BY JEREMY MOULE

A crisis for youth in crisis The Hillside Family of Agencies stopped providing emergency housing for homeless and runaway youth earlier this year. The shelter, which operated since the 1970’s, has seen a considerate drop in state funding over the last several years. Hillside received $107,437 in runaway and homeless youth program funding from the state in 2008, and $29,150 in 2012. The state money goes to the Rochester-Monroe County Youth Bureau, which distributes the funding. In 2011, Hillside’s emergency shelter program served 31 young people. Hillside tried to keep the shelter going, but it also lost $100,000 in federal grant money, and that’s what ultimately did the program in, says Tess MahnkenWeatherspoon, a staff member at the agency. (She says Hillside plans to reapply for the federal grants in the hope that it can resume providing emergency housing.) Hillside still gets some runaway and homeless youth funding through the county youth bureau. It is used to provide case management services for homeless and runaway youth at its drop-in center, Mahnken-Weatherspoon says. Hillside is not the only agency to lose runaway and homeless youth funding. The state’s made drastic cuts to the funding, which is directed through local youth bureaus, over the past several years. It’s cut funding for other youth bureau programs as well. For example, the Rochester-Monroe County Youth Bureau, which is a county department, will receive approximately 59 percent less state aid in 2013 — $801,882 — than it did in 2006, when it received approximately $2 million. Kelly Reed, commissioner of the County Department of Human Services, says the cuts have led her to shrink youth bureau staff. And the department has reduced the size of all of its contracts, though some more than others. The county has tried to preserve runaway and homeless youth funding for shelters, however, Reed says. In 2013, Reed plans a different approach. The youth bureau, which will be called the Office of Youth Development, and the Office for the Aging will be combined to create the Office of Intergenerational Support. Both will still exist as defined entities, which will allow the county to continue receiving certain state funding. “We’re done waiting to hear what’s going to happen with the funding and we’re planning forward,” Reed says.  City

DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

The merger sounds technical and bureaucratic, and in a sense it is. But Reed says the plan has distinct benefits. For example, it’ll allow the county to better plan intergenerational events and programs similar to its Intergenerational Fishing Derby at Powder Mills Park and an annual holiday ball, Reed says. The merger has an operational benefit, too, she says. Someone will be appointed primary director of the new office and that person will be in charge of financial management, Reed says. The director will also search for new funding sources. County officials say they expect to

receive $165,672 in state runaway and homeless youth funding for 2013. That’s down approximately 51 percent from the $336,821 the county received in 2006. As a result, county spending on contracts for homeless and runaway youth services has fallen from $381,499 in 2006 to $148,108 in 2013. In 2006, the programs served 1,550 youth, but the county expects to serve 890 in 2013. Anecdotally, shelters for homeless youth nationwide are reporting increased demand, says Jeff Kaczorowski, a children’s advocate and president of the Children’s Agenda. And locally, the demand is high enough that some youth are placed in adult shelters or hotel rooms, he says. The Center for Youth also gets runaway and homeless youth funding through the county youth bureau. And like Hillside, the center has seen that money decrease, though federal funding is helping preserve services, including the center’s emergency shelters. But the teens that the center serves are staying longer on average than in the past, says Elaine Spaull, the center’s executive director. The shelter served approximately 140 youth in the first six months of 2012, but had to turn away dozens of youth in need, Spaull says. The center offers temporary shelter for youth in crisis, though much of the runaway and homeless youth funding

Jeff Kaczorowski (left), executive director of The Children’s Agenda, and County Legislator Carrie Andrews, say that they are concerned about generally decreasing funding for youth programs. FILE PhotoS

it receives goes toward intervention and counseling services. “Without that positive youth development piece, it doesn’t have as much traction because it’s more of a short-term intervention than a long-term fix,” Spaull says. The Center for Youth also gets youth

bureau funding for programs aimed at preventing homelessness, bullying, drug and alcohol abuse, and violence. Other community and social service organization receive funding for similar programs. And the Rochester-Monroe County Youth Bureau also supports youth leadership programs. But as a result of state cuts, the bureau is spending less on those programs, too. Carrie Andrews, the County Legislature’s Democratic leader, says the trend of decreasing youth bureau funding and spending worries her. While that’s happened, other youth programs — arts, recreation, and after-school programs — have lost funding, she says. “There’s becoming a void of programming for young people and it doesn’t seem like it’s the right time to leave such a void,” Andrews says. “We really need to step up our efforts in this area.”

Kaczorowski says the city, in particular, is struggling with youth violence, low graduation rates, and high teen pregnancy rates. The state and county should be increasing investment in youth programs and ensuring that programs receiving money are high quality and effective, Kaczorowski says. He says his organization is willing to work with the county to secure funding and to help it guide investments toward effective programs. “A loss of youth bureau funding, given what’s going on for youth, is a problem,” he says. And Andrews says that, ultimately, she’s optimistic about Reed’s plan to form the Office of Intergenerational Support. “Obviously, young people need assistance and we should have good, effective programs,” she says. “And if what we’re doing now isn’t working, then we should revamp it. So perhaps this is a step in the right direction.”

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Not the same old Rochester selection. FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT Coming Due by Year End

Use it or Lose it!

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Artists for fracking ban

The Flying Squirrel Community Space hosts a showing of the documentary film “Dear Governor Cuomo” at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, December 15. Filmmaker Jon Bowermaster captures a unique collaboration of musicians, artists, scientists, and activists as they come together in Albany one evening to press Cuomo to keep the ban on fracking. The film will be shown at 285 Clarissa Street.

ROC Rochester nonprofits

ROC the Day is a 24-hour online event allowing all residents of the Greater Rochester nine-county region to give to the nonprofit of their choice. All of the money donated on Wednesday, December 12, will help local people and nonprofit organizations. Many of the area’s nonprofits are holding events and demonstrations, too. For example, Rochester Greenovations, 1199 East Main Street, will have music and entertainment from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. They will also display their Tiny House Project. For information on activities and how to give: www. roctheday.org.

CITY NEWS BLOG

Palestine discussion

RIT Students for Justice in Palestine and the Rochester District of the International Socialist Organization will present “Gaza and the New Middle East: the Struggle for a Free Palestine Continues,” a panel discussion at 7 p.m. on Thursday, December 13. Muna Taha, local activist and first-generation Palestinian American, and activist Ashley Smith will discuss the issues and take questions. The meeting is at RIT, building 76, room 1125.

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

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Dining sits next to bhindi masala, which is next to a steaming tray of dal, and a pan full of kidney beans and black lentils that may convince you that chili does not actually need meat to be delicious. Then, a chorus line of Indian-buffet favorites: navratan korma, chicken curry, vegetable vindaloo, saag paneer, chicken makhani, and tandoori chicken legs. An assortment of Indian desserts — I tend to favor the creamy kheer because everything else is tooth-achingly sweet — bring up the rear. There’s nothing — with the exception of

Selections from the dinner buffet at Royal India Fine Indian Cuisine in Henrietta. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

The royal treatment Royal India Fine Indian Cuisine 368 Jefferson Road 730-7360, royalindiaroc.com Lunch Tuesdays-Fridays 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Saturdays-Sundays 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Dinner Tuesdays-Saturdays 5-10 p.m., Sundays 5-9:30 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

It is not Christmas at Royal India. Crouched on the edge of the commercial sprawl that is Henrietta, Royal India sits apart from the celebration of America’s No. 1 consumer holiday, an oasis in a desert of faux holiday cheer. Mommy is not kissing Santa Claus here. Nor is anyone bemoaning giving their heart away last Christmas. They are too busy refilling their plates from what is arguably one of the best, and the cheapest, Indian buffets in town. And then going back for seconds, and then thirds of standards like chicken makhani and navratan korma, and harder-to-find dishes like Hyderabadi eggplant curry or chaat. It’s not Christmas here, but it doesn’t have to be: Royal India’s buffet is a balm for your aching soul and depleted wallet any day of the year.

When Jasvir Grewal, a native of Punjab who most recently lived and worked in Buffalo, decided to move to Rochester to open up an Indian restaurant of his own, he picked a nearly ideal location for his new enterprise: about a half-mile from RIT and right next door to Spice Bazaar, the largest Indian grocery store in the area. But he also opened up in one of the most competitive areas of the county in terms of Indian food. Four excellent Indian restaurants — three of them offering superb buffets — are within a mile of his restaurant, and the kitchen door of one of the best of them abuts Royal India’s parking lot. According to Grewal’s daughter Jaspret Kaur, her father initially priced his menu — and his buffet — in accordance with what everyone else was charging. But he quickly amended his business strategy, lowering his prices to appeal to cash-strapped students, relying on volume to make up for the smaller price tag (lunch buffet costs $7.95, $10.95 for dinner). So far that strategy has paid off. It would be very difficult to find a better or more filling lunch anywhere in Rochester for less than you would pay to do a couple of loads of laundry at the laundromat. Royal India does not get by on its looks,

though. The restaurant’s décor is a

hodgepodge of the various other restaurants that have inhabited the space before it. The lighting is dim. The music coming out of the speakers is a little scratchy. Everything looks more than a little battered and tired. Everything, that is, except for the magisterial buffet of Indian food that forms an L around one side of the room. A small salad bar full of lettuce, tomato, cucumber, and red onion shares space with a compact chaat bar, offering spiced potatoes, puffed-up pieces of papadum, potato and pea samosas, and the usual trio of chaat sauces — a creamy white yogurt sauce, mint and coriander chutney, and a tangy dark brown tamarind sauce. All of it is exceptionally fresh-looking and tasting (even the dough on the samosas still had a bit of crunch to it, something that’s not easy to do on a buffet). Assuming you haven’t already filled your plate, and your stomach, to capacity in this the smallest part of the buffet, turn right and you will be facing trays full of crispy onion bhajia (deep-fried fritters made from onion and lentil flour) and medu vada (a savory analog of the doughnut also made with lentil flour). These, in turn, are next to trays of rice with green peas or rice with cumin seeds (jeera rice). And then comes a long parade of curries. Masala eggplant

the eggplant — that makes this buffet stand apart from its peers at first glance. But dig in and you’ll notice that it tastes a bit fresher than the average, the flavors are bright and clean rather than muddy. The navaratan korma, for instance, has the typical bag of frozen vegetables as its base, but Grewal also adds in a generous amount of very fresh cauliflower florets to give the dish some body. The chicken makhani, often made in Indian restaurant kitchens by adding spices to canned tomato soup, has a real depth of flavor and a nice round mouth-feel without the tinny aftertaste of the shortcut version of the dish. The spinach in the saag paneer even retained a bit of its green color — an indication that some, if not all of the greens, in the dish were fresh rather than frozen. I was also gratified to discover that the paneer, a homemade cheese, had the slightly loose texture of fresh-made cheese rather than the denser, spongy feel of the massproduced version of the product. But about that eggplant I mentioned earlier: if you eat nothing else when you visit Royal India, the baingan masala entrée ($12) is not to be missed. For those familiar with Indian food as a source for creamy sauces in which to dip bits of naan, this dish — more Punjabi than southern Indian — is a drier curry. The sauce takes a backseat to the tiny eggplants, onions, and tomatoes that have been stir-fried in it. I’ve had baingan masala before, but all of the other versions have cut the eggplants in half, resulting in mushy eggplant and ultimately a soupy mess of a dish. Keeping the vegetable whole allows the flavors to concentrate, and the eggplant to obtain an almost meaty texture that is eminently satisfying. Against the smoky, tangy background of the sauce, the faint bitterness of the eggplant stands out sharply, balancing and ultimately unifying the best dish on this, or any, Indian buffet I’ve sampled in the Rochester area.

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City 

 

DODGING THE

DIGITAL

BULLET

                                                                    FEATURE

 BY ERIC REZSNYAK

PHOTOS

 BY MIKE HANLON

                                                                    he way you watch movies has changed, and you probably haven’t even noticed. For more than 100 years film — actual, physical film, much of it produced by Rochester’s own Kodak — has been synonymous with motion pictures. But if you see a new movie in a big-screen chain theater today, what you’re seeing is likely being projected digitally, the information embedded in a hard drive and played on to the screen by a very expensive, very complicated piece of equipment. It has more in common with a song on your iPod than it does with the reels and canisters that captured the films of the 20th century. The shift to digital has its perks. The picture is arguably cleaner and crisper; the film can be shown hundreds of times and never look any different (whereas film can easily become scratched, dulled, or damaged over time). But the major reason why movie theaters are switching — being forced, some say — to digital projection comes down to money. A digital copy of a film costs approximately 10 percent what it costs to print and ship a physical film, and when you’re talking about hundreds, even thousands of copies of a major Hollywood production, those percentages add up fast. That’s why studios like 20th Century Fox — which puts out the “X-Men” and “Star Wars” movies, and even the recent “Lincoln” and “Life of Pi” — announced to exhibitors that it would stop distributing 35mm film prints in the near future. IHS Screen Digest Cinema Intelligence reports that all major studios are looking to stop using conventional

T

10 City DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

35mm prints in the United States by the end of 2013, and globally by the end of 2015. Most of the major theater chains have already embraced the switch to digital projectors. But given that the formats require totally new machines, which can cost anywhere from $60,000 to $150,000 per screen, that leaves smaller independent cinemas with a real financial burden. If they don’t make the technological jump, there will be no new movies for them to show in the foreseeable future. And coming up with five figures for equipment that will only marginally impact the customer experience is hard to swallow. Earlier this year the National Association of Theater Owners estimated that 20 percent of the cinemas in the United States, which account for up to 10,000 screens, would not be able to convert to digital, and would likely close. But here’s the good news: in Rochester, our local independent cinemas are ready for the challenge. Art-house cinema The Little, the George Eastman House’s archival Dryden Theatre, and neighborhood film house The Cinema are all in the process of making the leap to digital, and one local indie filmmaker has even taken the industry shift as an opportunity for a savvy business move he hopes will benefit both indie theaters and filmmakers. But even as they prepare for this major shift, area film professionals debate digital’s impact on artistry, archiving, and business.

I

t borders on ironic, but the local

independent theater that’s furthest along in the digital conversion is the archival Dryden Theatre, which specializes in

showing films from the art form’s storied past. On January 2, following a New Year’s Day screening of “Cinema Paradiso,” the Dryden will close for two months as it undergoes the third phase in a decade-long renovation project. When it reopens on March 2, the theater will be totally overhauled with new, larger seats, more legroom in the balcony, a darker color scheme for the walls and carpets, new accessibility functions for the deaf and hard-of-hearing, and a new Barco digital projector. (Also, brace yourself, cineasts: there will be no Eastman House Oscar Party this year.) Caroline Yeager, assistant curator of motion pictures, said in a press release: “A key component of this project is the museum’s commitment to honor the aesthetic choices of filmmakers by projecting moving images — analog and digital — as they were meant to be seen. Acknowledging the ascendency of digital formats while continuing to showcase historic film prints is crucial for sustaining the Dryden’s role as one of the oldest leading archival screening venues.” The digital projector will share the Dryden projection booth with reel-to-reel Kinoton 16mm/35mm projectors and 35mm Century nitrate-rated projectors dating from when the Dryden was constructed in 1951. The Dryden is one of only five theaters in the country still equipped to project nitrate films, which are potentially combustible. Yeager says that the staff at the Eastman House saw the need for digital projection capability coming several years ago, and had been working to secure funding for the project from state grants and individual donors as

part of the ongoing Dryden renovation plans. Digital Cinema Package — the official term for the new digital film format — is simply what’s happening with the industry, Yeager says. There are elements of the digital shift that Yeager embraces as a film fan. In March she attended screenings as part of the Film Forum in New York City’s “This Is DCP” series that helped to demystify digital projection. One of the films she saw was a digitally remastered and projected version of the 1953 classic “From Here to Eternity.” She was almost rapturous in describing how the black-and-white movie shimmered in digital, noting that it never looked that good in any film print that she saw. But there are also elements of the forced shift to digital that she finds problematic. It dictates to artists the format used to deliver their work. She notes that visual artists aren’t told that they can only work in pastels or watercolors, but the move to DCP means that even if a filmmaker shoots in 35mm film — which some, including director Christopher Nolan of the recent “Dark Knight” trilogy, strongly prefer — it will have to be transferred to digital if the film has any hope of serious distribution. Even the process of making a movie can change with digital, as new cameras can keep shooting for longer takes without the issue of running out of film, she notes. “For some filmmakers, it’s a joy,” Yeager says of digital. “But it is changing the way we even talk about films. Is it even film anymore? It’s really just moving images. Some are just calling it ‘cinema.’ It’s a brave new world.” One element of the digital conversion that Yeager and other archivists find especially

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For the issue of December 26, 2012

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troubling is what it means for preserving cinematic works. Physical film could last for 800 to 900 years if stored properly, she says. (Incidentally, the oldest film in the Eastman House collection dates back to 1893.) Storing digital files is already proving tricky for archivists, and then there’s the issue of whether equipment that can play current formats will even be around in a decade or so. When’s the last time you saw an 8-track player or a Betamax? “It’s a bad idea to switch altogether,” Yeager says. To underline the importance of something more permanent than a series of zeros and ones saved to a disc, Yeager mentions how MGM approached the George Eastman House to use the original CMY negatives of both “Gone With the Wind” and “The Wizard of Oz” when creating the 70th anniversary Blu-ray versions of both films, so that they could get the best possible picture. “Always go back to the negatives. There’s always more information there,” Yeager says. (In a weird intersection of film and digital, the visual information in the negatives was perhaps too good, as modern imaging capabilities now allow some of the films’ formerly hidden flaws to show up, such as wig lines on the Munchkins.)

W

ith five screens to its name, The

Little is arguably the independent cinema in Rochester most challenged by the digital conversion. DCP projectors range from $60,000 to $100,000 per screen,

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Caroline Yeager (opposite) is the assistant curator of motion pictures at the George Eastman House. The museum’s Dryden Theatre (ABOVE) will close in January and February for a major renovation, including the installation of a digital projector. Digital, she says, “is changing the way we even talk about films. Is it even film anymore?”

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meaning that the Little could be looking at up to $500,000 in new equipment, depending on brands, how far the screen is from the projection booth, and a host of other technical questions. The DCP setup also involves computer servers, satellite links, and other equipment that probably hadn’t even been conceived of when the projectors currently serving the theater were built more than two decades ago. As of now, the Little has only 35mm projectors, says Chris Hogan-Roy, who has been lead projectionist at the theater for three years. But plans call for the Little to start transitioning to DCP projectors — in this case NEC models, with Dolby sound systems — slowly, theater by theater, with the hopes of the first being installed by May or June. The timeline depends on money, which hinges on the fundraising efforts of WXXI, which entered into a long-term affiliation with The Little nearly a year ago. Norm Silverstein, president of WXXI, says so far the partnership with The Little has gone “even better than we expected,” citing increased box-office sales and the ability for the station to host special events and screenings at the East End theater. Looking ahead to 2013, Silverstein says that a major campaign is being launched with the goal to raise $1 million for improvements to the Little. Part of that is $80,000 to $100,000 per theater for digital conversion. “We’ve already had some issues with prints; it’s already hard to get a good print for continues on page 12 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11

DIGITAL BULLET

The Keep Indie Visible campaign 

continues from page 11

certain films,” Silverstein says. “Going forward this will become more apparent.” “The biggest thing we want to do is retain film,” says Hogan-Roy. “The digital age is coming, but we’re a small art-house theater, and a lot of the films we get are only available in 35mm. We want to be able to provide the whole experience: digital cinema, 35mm, and other formats.” For The Little, with its multiple screens, slow and steady may be key financially, especially given how quickly technology tends to become outmoded in an iEverything world. “The digital age is constantly changing,” Hogan-Roy says. “Putting these projectors in all at once, and then a year later there are upgrades… that’s a very hard concept to spend all this money and then I need to upgrade my equipment. When we start theater by theater, it’ll be better to see the new things.” He is encouraged by the fact that indie theaters across the country have been flexing their collective muscle in this process, and getting some concessions from distributors and equipment manufacturers. “Indie theaters have a lot of pull. In the end distributors need us,” he says. So, for instance, he says that NEC has already made sure that its equipment is upgradable, which he says should make it more affordable. “There are still a lot of theaters running 35mm,” he says. “That’s a beautiful format that should never be ruined. Digital will be great for a lot of reasons. A lot of filmmakers shoot on digital and had to transfer it before. But I don’t think digital will ever match film. It’s a beautiful, beautiful format right when you see it. Digital will show you that, but it will also change the game, too. People are playing with frame rates. People are looking at it digitally instead of artistically.” (For example, Peter Jackson’s “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” which opens this weekend, is screening in select theaters at 48 frames per second instead of the standard 24.) 12 City DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

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Chris Hogan-Roy (ABOVE) is the lead projectionist at The Little. “There are still a lot of theaters running 35mm,” he says. “That’s a beautiful format that should never be ruined. Digital will be great for a lot of reasons, but I don’t think digital will ever match film.”

“Overall, I think digital or 35mm, it’s the film,” says Hogan-Roy. “If the film is not good, it doesn’t matter if it’s 35mm or digital. That’s one strong point The Little has: We play great films. Maybe our audience will notice [the shift to digital projection], but if they don’t, that’s good. They’re noticing the films and stories.” Silverstein says that a request has been made to the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council for $250,000, which would “go a long way toward getting this project started,” he says. The results of those grant proposals have not yet been released, but Silverstein says he is optimistic.

W

hile the Dryden and The Little

are planning to keep their existing film projectors to use alongside the new digital ones, that won’t be an option for neighborhood theater The Cinema. Local realestate owner John Trickey took over ownership of the Clinton Avenue film house in May. He calls himself a longtime supporter of the Cinema, having been a patron since he was a college student in the 1980’s. Trickey says he was charmed by the fact that “it’s different from other theaters; other theaters are kind of sterile, and the Cinema had a more homey feel.” The Cinema currently uses a 35mm platter projector, but “we’re on limited time,” Trickey says. “We have about a year before we need to be switched over to digital.” The problem is that, due to the size of its current projector, “we’re going to have to remove our 35mm equipment so that they come in and install digital equipment.” Trickey says that the quote he’s been given for the new set up will be $62,000 to $65,000, and that he accepts that he’ll just have to find a way to pay for it. The interesting wrinkle is that, since he’s taken over the theater, Trickey has been working

Theaters aren’t the only part of the film industry affected by the shift to digital. Independent filmmakers are watching the move carefully, and some are wary of how the changes in distribution could further reduce already limited screening opportunities for their movies. But one local production company is taking the challenge and turning it into an opportunity that it hopes will benefit independent theaters, filmmakers, and filmgoers. Rochester-based filmmaker Rich Angell (“Sophomore,” “After,” “Drivers Wanted”) and his business partner, John Maggio, have started the Keep Indie Visible campaign. The plan is to identify 50 independent cinemas across the country that are at risk due to the costs associated with the switch to digital projection, create partnerships with them, and in exchange for financial assistance with the theaters’ digital conversion, bring them in as part of what would emerge as essentially a direct indie-film distribution network. Angell says that the changes going on in the industry make one-off indie film projections less financially viable. His solution was to create a film fund to produce a slate of 12 to 15 films over five years. Some will be produced right here in Rochester, Angell says, while others will be picked up from film festivals and other sources. Theaters that become part of the Keep Indie Visible project will get digital-projection equipment through KIV’s digital installer Sonic Equipment Company, with the caveat that they must screen a certain number of the project’s related films for a certain period of time — the rest of the screening decisions are left to the individual theaters’ discretion. At the end of the five-year agreement, the digital equipment stays with the participating theaters. There’s also a crowd-sourcing component involved with Keep Indie

to show more archival or specialty films, instead of solely focusing on the quasi-second-run titles that have made up the majority of the double features for the Cinema’s recent history. So, for instance, he’s done two successful midnight screenings of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” a John Waters double feature, and also recently showed “Cinema Paradiso.” And he wants to do more of that in the future. “That’s what I wanted to reintroduce to the Cinema, Trickey says. “When I used to go back in the 1980’s, that was the big reason I went there — the programming was all over the board.” There are times of the year when Hollywood’s output is not the strongest, Trickey says, and he wants to be able to show “older classics that maybe some of the younger generation was never able to see, or even the older generation would like to see in a theater.” But, as Trickey notes, some of those movies you can only get on 35mm. And since he’ll have

Visible through fundraising website indiegogo.com, although the campaign was still in draft form at press time. While the branding on Keep Indie Visible’s website is all about saving independent theaters, “Ultimately this is a business venture,” Angell says. “It’s not just altruistic; we don’t have deep pockets. We can’t just go around saving theaters. We’d love to do that, but at the end of the day it is a business.” “It’s win-win-win,” says Maggio. “For filmmakers, for us as distributors, for the theaters. The theaters not only get equipment, but they can show modern studio films, alternative content, and we give them a healthy cut — it’s 50/50. And filmmakers get a chance to show movies in these theaters they wouldn’t be able to otherwise.” Angell says that Keep Indie Visible is “really trying to diversify the theaters we’re talking to,” he says. “Ideally we’d love to be in 50 states, one theater in each state, and build off that to two or three.” In November Angell said that Keep Indie Visible was in the process of working with 25 theaters, specifically naming The Screen in Santa Fe, New Mexico; the ART Theater in Hobart, Indiana; and The Castro Theatre in San Francisco. Locally Angell says KIV has approached the Dryden about some kind of a partnership. Angell says, “The big thing locally is our heart is here, and our goal in Upstate New York and Rochester specifically is to foster independent filmmaking and the little industry we’ve been able to build here. Lots of people are excited about filming here. Hopefully this not only allows us to convert independent theaters, but with our network of theaters across the country, to continue to push filmmaking locally. Keep Indie Visible was originated out of necessity for us as film producers to better make our movies.”

to get rid of his platter projector to make room for digital, that means he’ll have to either find another film projector that might work in the same space as his impending digital equipment, or resort to showing films via DVD — although he notes that not every film has made even that technological jump. “There are a couple of films out there that I like that never made it onto DVD,” Trickey says. If theaters are forced to show movies via DVD, it also raises the question of why people should go to the cinemas at all. “A lot of people wonder why they don’t just watch on their screens at home,” says The Little’s Chris Hogan-Roy. That’s part of why he thinks it’s important to continue to preserve the physical film format. “I think 35mm will have a renaissance, too. That’s what happens in the art world, and that’s what films are. We’re moving forward, because that’s how the industry is going. But we’re clinging on because that’s who we are. The movies aren’t going to change; it’s just the way they’re projected.”

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Upcoming  [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Young Jeezy Saturday, January 12. Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $40-$60. 8 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com  [ Pop/Rock ] Daughtry, 3 Doors Down Saturday, February 9. Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $39.50-$55. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com

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[ Soul ] 70s Soul Jam Friday, February 15. Rochester Auditorium Theatre. 885 East Main St. $50. 7 p.m. 222-5000. rbtl.org

DJ Energon Cosplay Friday: The Hobbit Friday, December 14 Vertex Nightclub, 169 N. Chestnut St. 10 p.m. | $3-$8 | 232-5498

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] For most people December 14 will

be just another Friday. But to the legions of “Lord of the Rings” fans, it marks the release of the first of the long-awaited “Hobbit” movies, and a return to MiddleEarth on the silver screen. If you aren’t too sleepy from seeing the film at midnight (like the good hobbit you are), make sure to head on out of your hobbit hole under the hill and down to DJ Energon’s cosplay hobbitthemed dance party Friday night. Throw on your best dwarf beard, hobbit feet, or Gandalf hat (Oppa Gandalf style, anybody?) and get ready to party like a bunch of immortal elves. — BY WILLIE CLARK

Marbin Thursday, December 13 Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. | Free | 325-9127, dinosaurbarbque.com [ JAZZ FUSION ] When guitarist Dani Rabin unleashes a

guitar solo, it ranges from the subtlety of Pat Metheny to the raw histrionics of Jimi Hendrix. Rabin is equally matched in his seemingly limitless range by saxophonist Danny Markovitch, with whom he started Marbin in 2007. The power quartet is rounded out by furious drummer Justyn Lawrence and dynamic bassist Jae Gentile. If fusion is your cup of tea, Marbin will pour it on. — BY RON NETSKY

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14 City DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Mojo Monkeyz. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Sauce Boss. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds played Saturday, December 8, at Water Street Music Hall. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

98 PXY Jingle Jam Friday, December 14 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square 6 p.m. | $35-$75 | 758-5300, 98pxy.com [ HIP-HOP/ROCK ] Top 40 station 98 PXY is throwing

its annual holiday concert this week. The 2012 Jingle Jam will feature a slew of chart-topping performers and an after party at Tilt Nightclub following the tunes. Grammy-nominated hip-hop artist Flo Rida, whose 2007 single “Low” earned him worldwide recognition, is the biggest name on the marquee. Boys Like Girls, the young, power-pop quartet from Andover, Massachusetts, is among the headliners as well. The Ready Set (electropop), Boston’s Boy Sammy Adams (rap/hip-hop), and British dance-pop vocalist Rita Ora round out the night’s bill. Call the box office or go to 98 PXY’s website for deals on ticket packages. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Break Out Tour 2012 Sunday, December 16 Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 9:30 p.m. | $5, 21+ | 232-7550 [ HIP-HOP ] Act Live is back in town this week,

wrapping up the northeast-spanning Break Out Tour 2012. All manner of MCs, DJs, rappers and what-haveyou will bring the party. A large delegation from Boston includes the headliner Du-KaRan as well as Ediquette and Kinetik Dialekt. There’s even “our boy” from Philly, DJ Games. Also look for a large smattering of our local talent, including Rigz, the intriguingly named Fresh Fingaz, and The CREEPS featuring Reece Q. — SUZAN PERO

Swing, swang, swung The Salamanders had an album out a while ago called “Livestock in the Livingroom” (and by “a while ago” I mean 1992), and that’s kind of how I feel when I’m digging a show at Abilene, corralled in with all my roots-rock brethren and sisteren. Tuesday, December 4, was no different as Nashville’s Black Lilies brought a definite pump and groove to its acoustic-centered rockacana. It was beautiful and had a perfect electric tingle brought on and brought out by the steel/ guitar player as he wrung out well-balanced notes and made them boogie and cry along with some of the livestock in attendance. Friday night was the thriller for me as twang-master Bill Kirchen swing, swang, and swung his guitar like a six-string battle axe in front of a nearly overflowing Lovin’ Cup. He was particularly on fire with his trademark call-and-response fluidity and charming self-deprecation. And since I’ve surrendered my guitar to disease, Kirchen invited me up to sing some Leiber and Stoller with him and the band. It meant more that he will ever know. What a class act. I left the Cup on a cloud and floated over to Sticky Lips Juke Joint, where The Filthy McNastys were laying it down and stomping on it before picking it back up

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[ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: A Cup of Good Cheer, Madrigalia. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 12:10 p.m. Free.

[ review ] by frank de blase

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again. A few folks fought the urge to dance, and lost. The twin-guitar attack of Gregg Cole and TC Cummings was monstrous as they traded off slick and slippery slabs of salacious slide guitar. There’s a little throwback going on here, and I’m not the only one to make an Allman Brothers reference — not just from the guitars, but from the rhythmic groove and vocal growl as well. A totally red-hot, no-shit band. Saturday night’s performance by New York City’s Hollis Brown at Water Street Music Hall was captivating for the most part — with the exception of a few illplaced covers — and reminded me quite a bit of Whiskeytown. The band was in a unique position, as nobody knew what to expect. These guys will definitely draw the next the next time they hit town, as I witnessed hips and feet and legs responding to their sound — not because they were supposed to, but because they felt it. Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds was the big draw of the night and opened its set like a firing squad. Horns and horns and a harmonica I couldn’t hear laid the way for Sister Sparrow’s bouncy alto and boundless energy. It was effortless R&B-tinged funky soul without cliché or pretense. But it was huge. Size is everything.

[ DJ/Electronic ] 12/12/12: Zombie Apocalypse!. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut Street. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $5/$8. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band w/Captain Marvel. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. continues on page 17

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15

Music

Brad Lubman will conduct two orchestras simultaneously as part of Musica Nova’s upcoming tribute concert to recently deceased modern composer Elliott Carter. PHOTO COURTESY PAUL COLEMAN

The rhythms of time Musica Nova Friday, December 14 Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. | Free | 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

“It’s weird to talk about him in the past tense.” With that heart-felt sentiment, conductor Brad Lubman references the recent death of legendary American composer Elliott Carter. “He was 103 and lived an extremely long and fruitful life,” says Lubman. “At a certain point, you thought he was going to live forever.” On December 14, Lubman will conduct Carter’s “Double Concerto for Piano and Harpsichord with Two Chamber Orchestras” with the Eastman School of Music’s Musica Nova, including guest artists Angela Jia Kim at the piano, Daniel Pesca at the harpsichord. Scheduled before Carter’s death in November of this year, the performance will become a tribute to his memory. Carter (1908-2012) came late to composing by today’s standards, although he went on to compose and win coveted accolades for more than 60 years. He majored in English at Harvard University for his undergraduate degree, before earning a master’s degree in music. Under an early influence of American composer Charles Ives (1874-1954), his later musical studies included three years with Nadia Boulanger in Paris in the 1930’s. Carter earned his 16 City DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

doctorate in music from the École Normale Supérieure (Paris). By 1960, he won his first Pulitzer Prize; a second followed in 1973. Carter was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1963, and the American Academy of Arts & Letters in 1969. He was awarded an American National Medal of Arts in 1985, and the French Commander of the Legion of Honor the same year. Although Carter composed modern music, Lubman says one of Carter’s favorite pieces was a section from Mozart’s “Don Giovanni,” composed in 1787, when three orchestras play simultaneously. The December 14 program will also feature two works written in 2011, by American composers Charles Wuorinen (b. 1938) and John Zorn (b. 1953). Fred Sherry, cello, will be the guest soloist in work written for him by Zorn, titled “À Rebours” (“Against the Nap”). According to Lubman, “Carter, Zorn,

Wuorinen. It’s like saying Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. You could say these are the 20th century and 21st century composers coming out of New York City, the way we say the others were the First Viennese School.” Musica Nova is a new-music ensemble at the Eastman School of Music with its own origins in that early to mid-1960’s timeframe in which Carter was composing the “Double Concerto.” Lubman became music director of the group in 1997. Earlier this year, Musica Nova, in conjunction with Ensemble Signal, performed a concert that included the Pulitzer-winning “Double Sextet” by Steve Reich — a piece that also involves two

ensembles with a single conductor — which brought down the house in Kilbourn Hall. Lubman met Carter on several occasions, twice working with him in rehearsals of Carter’s works, once in the early 1990’s in NYC for a piece called “Triple Duo” and then again the late 1990’s for his opera, “What Next?” He describes Carter as “a wonderful, charming, and erudite man and musician.” Tempo is the hallmark of Carter’s compositions, and not just “tempo” in and of itself, but the idea of having several, different tempos going on spontaneously. Lubman says, “In almost all of Carter’s music, the different tempos are engineered to fit into one beat for the conductor, meaning that if I’m conducting in 3, Carter will give different polyrhythms to different instruments which, mathematically speaking, are in different tempos.” Speaking specifically of the upcoming performance of the “Double Concerto,” Lubman put into words the coda in the last three to four minutes of the piece. On the stage will be two, separate, different ensembles — one associated with the piano, the other with the harpsichord. Lubman, atop the conductor’s podium, will be in the middle. And, during the coda, Lubman says, “The ensemble on my right is in 3 and to my left the ensemble is in 2 or 4, depending on how you count it. I conduct simultaneously in 3 in the right hand and 2 or 4 in the left.” According to Daniel Pesca, a composer

and pianist who will perform at the harpsichord for the “Double Concerto,” “the hardest part of all is conducting the

damn thing.” Pesca credits Lubman’s “absolutely unshakable sense of pulse” as the key to the anticipated success of the performance. Pesca says, “The rhythm of the music just kind of vibrates from [Lubman’s] body through the air. He feels rhythm in a very bodily way, but stays rooted in a sort of physical groundedness.” The juxtaposition of Carter’s use of a piano and a harpsichord in the same work is not lost on Pesca, who says, “The tension comes from how these things really don’t mix. There’s a dialogue between these two instruments that’s very fraught with tension, which finally explodes into chaos.” Pesca takes his interpretation of the “Double Concerto” even further, passionately defending that Carter’s music, including this work, is just as relevant today as it was when it was first written in 1961. “It’s incredibly complicated on the surface,” says Pesca. “Once you listen beyond that and get more into the language of the piece, you realize there is a human drama being played out. The harpsichord has its own orchestra, as does the piano. These are the generals with their own little battalions, and in the background is a really large spread of percussion instruments that at various points in the piece threaten to overtake it by sheer volume as if moving towards anarchy.” Pesca double-majored in piano and composition for both his bachelors of music degree from the Eastman School of Music in 2005 and his masters of music from the University of Michigan in 2007. He is currently studying at ESM for his DMA. Pesca says, “The thing that motivated Carter was his vision, and he found a way.” Pesca pulls Russian composer Igor Stravinsky into the conversation on Carter’s merits. “I want to quote Stravinsky on this piece. Stravinsky said it was a masterpiece of American music. Stravinsky had rather finicky tastes, so this gives you a sense of how pivotal this piece is.” Perhaps the best argument in support of Pesca’s argument that Carter is timeless is that Carter’s “time” was quite literally up to three months before his death, when his final composition to be released was “12 Short Epigrams for Piano.” Lubman relates to Carter “aiming for what he always wanted,” which was for music to reflect the time period in which he lived. “Carter was always saying this in interviews: in an older time of horse-drawn carriages, times were simpler, there was one pace, there was a unified rhythm. But, in the 21st century in a big city, very often you can find a multitude of things not related and you perceive them all and they are each in their own tempo,” says Lubman. “This is the hallmark of all of Carter’s work.”

Scott’s Piano Studio

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12 Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] The Abominable Snowband. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free. Twelve. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. 288-7564. Noon. Call for info. Warrior Soul w/Heatseeker. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Richard Buckner w/Nick Young. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $15-$17. [ Blues ] Night Fall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: The Four Seasons. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82. Spotlight on Faculty: Holiday Prism II. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 7 p.m. $5. [ Jazz ] Annie Wells. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 7 p.m. Call for info. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. The Djangoners w/The Silver Threads. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$8. Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Marbin. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. The Public Market Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free Soul Express. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free.

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HAP PY HOLI DAYS! SINGER/SONGWRITER | Richard Buckner

As the Americana idiom moves closer and closer to its flamboyant stage — more electricity and speed — it’s nice to have anchors like Brooklyn-based Richard Buckner, who remains on the acoustic side of the street. Comparisons have been made to Townes Van Zandt and the other patron saints of the road-weary, whiskey-soaked, hardcore troubadours. Nick Young fills out the bill.

A Holiday Concert

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Richard Buckner performs Thursday, December 13, 8 p.m. at Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $15-$17. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ Reggae/Jam ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ Pop/Rock ] Divinex w/Cammy Enaharo. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Serge & Friends w/Drew Moore & Steve Melcher. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 6 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Greg Townson. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 5:30 p.m. Free. Pujol w/Routine Involvements. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10. Skyview. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Third Degree. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 7:30 p.m. Free.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Big Blue House. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Big Leg Emma’s w/Watkins and the Rapiers. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $8-$10. Bogs Visionary Orchestra CD Release. Bernuzio Uptown

Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 8 p.m. Call for info. CCE Session Second Friday. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free. Even Steven. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Frankie and Jewels’s Acoustically Speaking. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Eric and the Bluesbirds. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Ezra & The Storm w/The Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 5 p.m. Free. Jony James Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Amadeus Chorale: Twas the Night Before Christmas. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7 p.m. $10. Four Voices. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 8 p.m. $5-$20. Laura Schweibacher Christmas Recital. Hochstein at Canandaigua, 435 East Street. 396-3778. 7 p.m. Free.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17

ROCK | Pujol

CLASSICAL | Madrigalia

CAJUN | C’est Bon

Nashville-based trio Pujol rocks hard and cranks out Southern-fried garage-punk boogie as competently as the Colonel fries chicken. Lead singer Daniel Pujol is prolific and his band has a certain je ne sais quoi that’s charmed the ears of folks including Jack White, who produced the group’s B-side single “Too Safe.” Pujol strips its raw, energetic sound down to a bare minimum of guitar fuzz, rumbling bass, pounding drums, and a go-for-broke attitude. But what’s really got this joint jumping is Daniel Pujol’s snarling vocals that make you wonder if he’s ever dug the Chesterfield Kings. Routine Involvements opens. Shakedown DJ’s to follow bands at 11 p.m.

Offering comfort in the familiar, this weekend Madrigalia puts on two performances of its annual holiday concert, “Ring Out, Wild Bells!” Program selections on the “bell” theme include “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” “Ding Dong! Merrily on High,” and “Carol of the Bells.” Joining Madrigalia for the Friday evening performance will be the Third Church Ringers bell choir. Madrigalia, now in its 36th season, is a chamber ensemble, performing works across the centuries and styles.

’Tis the season, or you might say the a-cajun, for the Rochester Cajun Zydeco Network’s annual Christmas party, this year with C’est Bon. The band is made up of five gals — all stars from other area zydeco outfits — and one lone dude on the drums set to rock the dancehall. They call it hard-rockin’, foot stompin’, girl-powered Cajun dancehall music. Call it whatever you like, but no one will hear you over the happy feet on the hardwood. Wheee!

Madrigalia performs Friday, December 14, 7:30 p.m. at Third Presbyterian Church (4 Meigs St.) and Sunday, December 16, 4 p.m. at Downtown Presbyterian Church (121 N. Fitzhugh St.). $5-$15. 230-2894, Madrigalia.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

C’est Bon performs Saturday, December 15, 8 p.m. at Harmony House, 58 E. Main St., Webster. $12. rochesterzydeco.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Pujol performs Thursday, December 13, 8:30 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $8-$10. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14 Musica Nova. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free. Rochester Gay Men’s Choir: Joyful and Triumphant. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 8 p.m. $6-$15. [ Country ] JD & Rolling South. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon Hobbit Cosplay Party. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. NiteFall. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free Soul Express. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 4583090. 6 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Westview Project with Doug Stone, sax. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Brian Lindsay Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $3. Cry To The Blind w/Falling Forward. Water Street Music

18 City DECEMBER 12-18, 2012

Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. Instead of Sleeping w/Silverfish, There I Say is Lightning, and Alberto Alaska. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Kaiser Solzie w/Through the Crowd, Bearfoot Brothers. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. 21+. $5. Los Luchadores. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. $5. Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info. Poison’d w/Red,White & Crew. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Run For The Roses w/Fire Wheel. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Seabreezers. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9:30 p.m. 2nd Annual Surf-rock Holiday Extravaganza 21+. $5. The Shakedown w/The Vassar Brothers. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Veluxe. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 10:30 p.m. Free Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 11 p.m. Call for info. Wild Bill Pileggi. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Acoustic Brew. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.

Charity Bash: Deck the Deck with Bough of Holly and Challah. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 7 p.m. $4 off admission w/clothing or food donations. $6-$8. Holiday Carols Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free Jim Lane. The Brewery, 8 West Main St. 6247870. 9 p.m. Free. Meghan Koch and the Gentlemen Callers. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Peg Nolan. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. SENSE-ational Concerts ft.The Dady Brothers. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 1 p.m. $5. Tony Padilla. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Joe Beard. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3. Mitty & The Followers. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. The Natalie B Band. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Anonymous 4. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 8 p.m. $45-$60. Finger Lakes Chorale. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. $5.

The Lyric Chorale: Ave Maria: Images of Mary. St. Louis Church, 60 South Main St. 7:30 p.m. $12-$18. RESTisNOISE: Noisy Cabaret. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. 5 p.m. Free. Rochester Gay Men’s Choir: Joyful and Triumphant. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 8 p.m. $6-$15. Rochester Oratorio Society: A Garland of Carols. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. $20. RPO: The Four Seasons. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82 RPO: The Four Seasons. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82. Tim Schramm, organ. Wesley United Methodist Church, 2009 Dewey Ave. 865-3816. 7 p.m. $10. Voices of Cobblestone. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. 389-0220. 2 p.m., 7 p.m. $10-$20. [ Country ] Slow Riders. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] DeeDee’s Wild College Party. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11 p.m. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 10 p.m. $5.

La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra. St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 585-4423544. 6:30 p.m. $10-$15. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. GRR Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 8 p.m. Free. Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra. St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 585442-3544. 6:30 p.m. $10-$15. Side Project. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ R&B ] We the People w/The Mighty High & Dry. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Ayy Brooks w/Krisus. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. [ Pop/Rock ] The Driftwood Sailors. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. $3-$6. Holiday Havok. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jellyroot w/No Division, The Beaumonts. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Mansfield Ave. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Order of Dragon. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Call for info. Peter House, Baby Shark, and MD Woods. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after Stage Two. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Tavern Christmas Party. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. Call for info. The Tins w/Poetry for Thieves, The Branch Davidians, and The Red Lion. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Tryst. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music Sundays: Wingin’ It. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Four-4-Time. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free (donations accepted). Festival of Lessons and Carols. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave.,. 2605035. 3 p.m. Free. Finger Lakes Chorale. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. $5 The Irondequoit Chorale: The Wondrous Story. Irondequoit United Church of Christ, 644 Titus Ave. 3 p.m. $8-$12. Scott’s Piano Studio Sounds of the Season: A Holiday Concert. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. 2 p.m. $5-$10. Third Sunday Concert with the Italian Baroque Organ: Festive Holiday Concert. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 5:30 p.m. $5-$10.

Are you A Cancer Survivor

With Trouble Sleeping? CLASSICAL | Rochester Oratorio Society

Joining together for a worldly holiday concert is the Rochester Oratorio Society ensemble, Resonanz, with guest soloists from the Rochester Lyric Opera (Susan Cotroneo, soprano; Matthew Swensen, tenor). Founded in 1945, the Rochester Oratorio Society numbers approximately 145 voices, and their smaller ensemble, “Resonanz,” is a subset of approximately 40 singers. Diverse carol selections will be presented, including African-American composer William Grant Still. WXXI classical radio personality Julia Figueras will offer nostalgic readings. Maestro Eric Townell will conduct. ROS presents “Garland of Carols” Saturday, December 15, 7:30 p.m. at Linehan Chapel, Golisano Academic Center, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. $10-$25. 473-2234, ROSSings.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA [ Jazz ] Joe Santora and Curtis Kendrick. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. Michael Vadala Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18

[ Pop/Rock ] Dick’s Birthday Party w/Danny Blue. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 2 p.m. Call for info. Sage’s Birthday Show ft. The Icarus Account, The September Campaign, Storm the Bay, and Inneriot. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $2 for unders (limited entry), donations accepted.

[ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Nathan Leigh w/Baby Shark, Cory Kesselring. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. The Voice(s) - A Capella Competition!. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Monday Retro Dance: David Lee Rad, DJ Cub. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free 21+, $10 unders.

We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue. How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Artisan Craft and Music Night: Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Professor’s Nightmare Before Christmas. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. midnight. Call for info. [ Pop/Rock ] Eluveitie w/WinterSun, Varg. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $15. SLEEPER4GENT w/The Big, Pat Buchanan’s Hearse, and Airport Scene. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

[ Pop/Rock ] Continental. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 8 p.m. $5-$7. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19

Theater

Art Exhibits

Brian Doran, Peter J. Doyle, Linda Loy, Jake Purcell, and Mary Tiballi, then gather around two microphones and, employing different voices, bring to life nearly two dozen different characters. Meanwhile Baxter mans a table full of foley devices to recall doors shutting, heels clicking, wind blowing, and the other familiar sounds of Bedford Falls. The audience serves as a live studio audience for the show-within-a-show, so the actors know that we are there. Some of them, especially Tiballi, even interact a bit with the crowd during their “off” moments, a nice touch that reminds us that we’re watching multiple levels of storytelling. That’s also called to mind when pages from the script (the show is presented script-inhand, which again makes sense given the format) go flying at a key moment, leaving the actors scrambling on stage, and one moment between Loy and Doyle that I’m relatively certain was a mistake but which both handled with humor and skill. Dapper Jake Purcell is perfectly cast in the Brian Doran, Linda Loy, Mary Tiballi, and Jake Purcell (pictured, left to right) in “It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play.” PHOTO BY DAN HOWELL

Bells will be ringing “It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play” Through December 22 Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. $27 | 454-1260, bftix.org [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

A successful holiday show should balance familiarity and freshness. It should be able to evoke feelings of nostalgia, to take audiences back to happy childhood memories of this time of year. (That is the only possible explanation for the continued airings of that dreadful “Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town” TV special from the 1970’s.) And it should feel new enough that it doesn’t seem like you’ve already seen it a hundred times over. Blackfriars Theatre satisfies all those conditions with its holiday show for 2012, “It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play.” It tells the story immortalized in Frank Capra’s classic 1946 film, which is still a Christmas staple that pulls solid ratings on broadcast TV and packs the Dryden for its annual screenings. But it does so with a twist. It’s presented as a live radio play being broadcast from late 1940’s/early 1950’s New York City. A troupe of five 20 City december 12-18, 2012

actors and one stage manager bring to life all of the story’s characters and scenes via voice acting and sound effects. Radio plays have increasingly been popping up in local theaters; the Shakespeare Company has been presenting them for more than a year at MuCCC. They’re a smart way to tell complicated stories that strip out the need for a huge cast, expensive sets, and difficult-to-achieve special effects. And indeed, the program for “Wonderful Life” notes that writer Joe Landry came to this format after he tried to do a traditional stage adaptation of the story but production costs “skyrocketed.” Turning the show into a radio play makes for an engaging, briskly paced version of George Bailey’s story, and infuses it with bits of whimsy and mid-century charm. Fans of the original film version will find much to like here, and those who have never seen it will have no problem following the story. The show opens with stage manager Dave

Baxter — who usually works behind the scenes at Blackfriars and other local theaters, but for this show remains on stage the whole time — gathering his actors for the broadcast on WBFR. The actors, played by local actors

George Bailey role. His program bio mentions that he is a fan of the original film going back to childhood, and Jimmy Stewart’s iconic delivery colors his portrayal — but it never feels like a rip-off or caricature. There’s a real vulnerability in his performance, and his George remains sympathetic even when he’s in full self-destructive meltdown mode. Peter Doyle possesses a seemingly endless range of voices to call from, and the play even gives him a few occasions in which he engages in prolonged conversations with himself. His announcer voice has that beautiful lilt associated with classic radio. Brian Doran is the most animated member of the cast, bringing quite a bit of physicality to his voiceover work. His voice for Clarence the Angel is borderline parody, but then again, so is the Clarence from the film. As mentioned earlier, Tiballi is the actor who most plays up the live-studio-audience aspect of the show. That, coupled with the chemistry she enjoys with Purcell, makes sense: she’s not just playing a sweet, mannered Bedford Falls housewife; she’s playing an aspiring starlet, and it all works. Linda Loy also brings a little unspoken storyline to her actress character, who sneaks in at the absolute last second. Was that stray hair throughout the show intentional? I suspect it was. Speaking of, the crisp costumes and period styling by director Jack Haldoupis will make you long for the days when people actually dressed so elegantly. The simple but effective set evokes New York City at Christmastime. If you can’t get to the big city, taking in this show is the next-best option for a grown-up, yet sweet, Christmas celebration.

[ Opening ] “The Irondequoit Bay Bird Party” by Lucinda Storms. Thu., Dec. 13, 6-9 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Paintings and art glass jewelry. recordarchive.com. “If the Shoe Fits,” Artwork by Carmine Monzo. Wednesdays-Fridays Hirsute Salon and Gallery, 51 Atlantic Ave Through Jan 18. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Dec 14, 7-9 p.m Free. 585-244-1111. info@ frankiesteinz.com. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Sun., Dec. 16, 2-4 p.m. and Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. Reception Dec 16 2-4 p.m 244-9892. [ Continuing ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “A Celebration of Growth” Art Gala by GlobeMed. Through Dec. 15. Through Dec 15. Reception Dec 1, 7-10 p.m. paperless. ly/101b1B3. 1975ish.com. 34 Creative Arts Center and Gallery, 34 Elton St. Eleventh Annual Faculty and Student Exhibit and Sale. Through Dec. 22. Studio Through Dec 22. Reception Dec 7 737-5858. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Joy in the Atmosphere” by Richmond Futch. Through Dec. 31. Through Dec 31. Reception with live music and open painting Nov 2, 6-9 p.m 729-9916. Art/Music Library Gallery, University of Rochester River Campus. Phillia Yi. Through Jan. 18, 2013. Through Jan 18. rochester.edu. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. ongoing. artandvintageonmain.com. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave.“Kurt Moyer: New Arcadia,” A Solo Exhibition of Paintings. WednesdaysSaturdays, 12-5 p.m Through Jan 12 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Catching Dreams.” Through Jan. 13, 2013. Featuring the work of Bonnie Evangelista, Becky Harris and Chris Horn Free. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Roc The Casbah: A Tribute to the Clash. Through Jan. 31, 2013, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. THE LOBBY PRESENTS. Vintage Propaganda from the Collection of Jim Malley (Mercury Posters) and Clayton Cowles illustrations of The Clash $7 opening night only.

Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Edges of Books.” Mondays-Fridays, 1-5 p.m Through Dec 14. Reception Oct 4, 5-7:30 p.m 475-3961. rit.edu. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225. Holiday Show with Maggi Bartlett & Amy Brand. Through Dec. 22. Opening Parties: Dec 7 5-9 p.m. & Dec 8 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Continues through December 22nd. Featuring Melinda Friday, Marie Verlinde Nye & Sabra Wood. 414-5643. catclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope.” Through March 2, 2013. 271-5920. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Senior Showcase. Through Dec. 15. Through Dec 15. Reception Dec 8, 4-6 p.m 594-6442. roberts.edu. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Nature Scapes: Far and Near,” photography by Lois Trieb at My Sister’s Gallery. Through Jan. 6, 2013, 10 a.m. Through Jan 6 Free. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Beautiful Ruins” by Paula Peters Marra. Through Jan. 31, 2013. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. WinterCraft annual holiday show and sale. Mondays-Saturdays Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m 271-5183. geneseearts. org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Watercolor World” by Sylvie Culbertson. Through Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 3850298. friendlyhome.org. Gallery r, 100 college ave.“Creative Process: from ideation to realization.” Through Jan. 4, 2013. Through Jan 4. Reception Dec 7 6-9:30 p.m 2563312. galleryr99@gmail. com. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. Steven Lee-Davis. Through Dec. 28. Printing and Book Arts Center. Through Dec 28. Reception Dec 7 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. The Faces in Wood by Charles Jaffe. Through Dec. 31. Through end of Dec. MonWed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Reception Nov 10 6-8 p.m 461-2230. melissa@genesee.coop. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “60 from the 60s.” Tuesdays-Sundays Through Jan 27. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 271-

ART EVENT | Hearts and Crafts/Holiday Bazaar at the Yards

Craft fairs and bazaars are excellent resources for the gifter who perpetually searches for the most unique presents each year. This weekend there are a few you can stop by to find a special surprise for the lucky folks on your list. Begin the weekend shopping at the Holiday Bazaar at The Yards Saturday, December 15, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Offerings such as letterpress printings, drawings, sculptures, and jewelry will be available, and more. Just some of the vendors you can expect to see are the Press Villains, The Andrew Cho Art Show, The Knotty Owl, The Black Arts Studio, Interstellar Love Craft, and MR. PRVRT. Additionally, the exhibit “Continental Breakfasts” will be on display during the event, with artist Lisa Barker on the premises to answer any questions. The Yards is located at 50-52 Public Market. Check The Yards page on Facebook for details. After your shopping warm-up at The Yards, check out Hearts and Crafts Holiday Handmade Market at Java’s Café (16 Gibbs St.) on Sunday, December 16, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. A variety of goods from 18 local artists will range from jewelry to letterpress to cozy winter wear, and more. Familiar vendors will include Sweet Pea Felts, GreenGirl Press, Collier Craft, Vintage Refashioned, and others. Sip a belly-warming beverage while knocking some gift items off your list. Check Hearts and Crafts on Facebook for more info. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON 3361. eastmanhouse.org. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m $5-$12. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Sanaa, Stories of Life. WednesdaysSundays Through Jan 6: “Sanaa, Stories of Life,” “Perspectives,” “A Glimpse of the World.” Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat noon5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Suite 106. “A Circle of Friends: New Work by Five Full-Time, Long-Time Artists.” Through Dec. 24. Through Dec 24 by appt. Opening party Dec 7 429-0211. richard@richaraerni.com. richardaerni.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Holiday Show 2012. Through Dec. 23. Through Dec 23. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Nov 30 and Dec 7 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “American Landscape” by Marcella Gillenwater. Through Dec. 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.,

Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “VOYAGEz” artworks by Zanne Brunner. MondaysSaturdays and Sat., Dec. 15, 7-9 p.m Through Jan 10. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Dece 15, 7-9 p.m brunner@gmail.com. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Holiday Event. TuesdaysThursdays, Saturdays Through Dec 24. Tue, Thu, and Sat 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Wed 4:30-7:30 p.m. Unique artistically crafted gift items 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 10: “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. In Lockhart Gallery: “Framing Edo: Masterworks from Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views.”Continues Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu. continues on page 22

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485 LANDING ROAD NORTH • 482-5372 *installation not included

22 City december 12-18, 2012

Art Exhibits Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. “Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. Through Jan. 7, 2013. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Nature Scapes: Far and Near,” photographs by Lois A. Trieb. Through Jan. 6, 2013, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Through Jan 6. Reception Dec 7 5-7 p.m 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Deborah Ronnen Fine Art Presents “Contemporary African American Printmakers.” WednesdaysSundays Through Dec 21. Sun 12-5 p.m., Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. Gallery closed Nov 2223. Reception Nov 9, 5-10 p.m 389-5073. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 5 p.m. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Spirit & Essence” with Dan Malczewski & Peter Secrest. Through Dec. 31. Through Dec 31. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Reception Dec 1. 6244730. ockheesgallery.com. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Holiday Open House. Through Dec. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Christmas. Reception Dec 1 6452485. outsidetheboxag@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ outsidetheboxag. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Tuesdays-Saturdays Continues through Jan 5. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Through Jan 6. Reception Nov 9, 6-8 p.m 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Celestial Songs: Sculpture by Tarrant Clements. TuesdaysSaturdays Through Dec 22. Tue-Fri noon-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m 232-8120. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St Carla Bartow. ongoing. Opening Fri Oct 19, 7-10 p.m. carlasswanktank. blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 22nd Annual Members Exhibition. Wednesdays-

DANCE EVENT | Red Hot Holiday Ball

If learning how to swing dance is on your Christmas list this year, be sure to check out Groove Juice Swing’s 6th Annual Red Hot Holiday Ball on Friday, December 14. The holiday event, which runs 7-11 p.m., will be catered toward new swing dancers in the community. Along with free admission, you’ll also receive a free beginner lesson, snacks, and plenty of holiday cheer. After one lesson, you may find yourself in need of new dancing equipment. Fortunately, a raffle will feature gifts and certificates from local swing-dance organizations, South Wedge businesses, local musical artists, and more. No partner or experience is necessary. If you’re feeling particularly spirited and in the giving mood, feel free to bring some baked goods to share. Amid dancing the night away, you’ll also have the opportunity to watch debut performances from Groove Juice Swing, and Rochester’s new all-girl dance troupe, The Flower City Follies. Tango Café Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom) is located at 389 Gregory St. For more information visit groovejuiceswing.com. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Sundays Through Jan 13. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. Reception and special announcement Thursday Dec 6, 6-10 p.m., First Friday reception Friday, Dec 7, 6-10 p.m. Closed to the public for Holidays: Dec 26-28. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Dale Inglett. Through Jan 3, gallery hours Mon, Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Nov 15 1-3 p.m genesee. edu/gallery 343-0055 x6490. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Rochester Art Club Retrospective Exhibition. Through Dec. 20. Through Dec 20 in the Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery of the Skalney Center. Honoring deceased memebers of the RAC. Reception Nov 30, 6-8 p.m rochesterartclub.org. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. “... and to All a Good Night!” Art Exhibit. Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m Through Dec 19. Receptions Dec 7 5-10 p.m., Dec 8 11 a.m.-5 p.m shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Pittsford Art Group Holiday Show. Through Dec. 28. Through Dec 28. Opening Reception Thu 6-8 p.m., First Friday 6-9 p.m 461-4447. lumierephoto.com.

University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Neil Montanus. MondaysSaturdays and Thu., Dec. 13, 5-7 p.m Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Dec 22Jan 6. Reception Dec 13, 5-7 p.m 475-2404. jleugs@ rit.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “Imaginations: Space and Time, Drawings and Paintings by Debra Stewart.” Through Dec. 20. Through Dec 20. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon5 p.m. Thu artist’s talk, Fri reception 785-1369. naegelbr@flcc.edu. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. “Continental Breakfasts: a three year photographic collaboration.” Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.2 p.m Photos by Lisa Barker and Anna Peters Wehking. Through Jan 12 attheyards@gmail.com. continentalbreakfasts. wordpress.com.

Call for Artwork [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] 6x6x2013. Through April 21, 2013. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org.

Rochester Movie Makers Mind2Movie 72 Hour Film Competition. Through Jan. 17, 2013, 6:30 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 72 hours to make a film - can you do it? On January 17, teams receive a random prop, character, and situation and have only 72 hours to write, film, edit, and produce a final short film. Cash prizes include a $300 first place prize and a $100 second place prize rochestermoviemakers.org. Submissions Sought for Geva Theatre’s Annual Young Writers Showcase. Through March 5, 2013. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Deadline March 5. The theatre is seeking plays and playwrights for its Young Writers Showcase to be held Saturday, May 4, 2013 in Geva’s Nextstage. The showcase gives young area playwrights between the ages of 13 and 18 the opportunity to take their scripts from page to stage in a script-inhand, reading format with the help of Geva actors, directors and dramaturgs 232-1366 x3034. youngwriters@gevatheatre. org. gevatheatre.org.

Art Events [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] WinterCraft. MondaysSaturdays The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue MonWed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m. Annual holiday sale featuring artwork made by local artists. Items include ceramics, paintings, prints, photographs, and book arts 5852715183. geneseearts. org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] Holiday Bazaar at The Yards. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. 9 a.m.-4 p.m attheyards@gmail. com. heartsandcraftsmarket. wordpress.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] Hearts and Crafts Holiday Handmade Market. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Java’s Café, 16 Gibbs St. 585-232-4820. heartsandcraftsmarket. wordpress.com.

Comedy [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Stand Up Comedy Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave Do you want to perform stand up comedy? Well you should. Because you’re funny. And cool. Bring your best jokes and a best friend. Sign up at 7. Show starts 7:30 FREE. 5856970235. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Paul Morrissey/Brian Herberger. Dec. 13-15.

FILM | WXXI Screens “Downton Abbey”

If you’re impatiently awaiting the January 6 TV season premiere of Emmy Award-winning drama “Downton Abbey,” WXXI is planning an event with you in mind. On Sunday, December 16, WXXI will host three screenings of the show’s Season 3 premiere at the Little Theatre (240 East Ave.). For those unfamiliar, the popular series is a BritishAmerican, post-Edwardian drama set in the fictional estate of Downton Abbey. The story follows the lives of the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants, and is rife with “wrenching social changes, romantic intrigues, and personal crises,” per the press release. Enthusiastic fans already scooped up seats for the noon and 4 p.m. screenings, which are now full, but additional screenings were added by the organizers. The event is free to attend, so reserve your seat for a 2 p.m. or 5:30 p.m. screenings ASAP by calling 258-0200. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] ImageOut presents A John Waters Christmas. 7:30 p.m. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. Legendary filmmaker and storyteller John Waters rides into Rochester on his sleigh full of smut spreading Christmas cheer with his critically acclaimed one-man show, “A John Waters Christmas.” Waters’ monologue explores such topics as perverted gifts, religious fanaticism for Santa Claus, and an unhealthy love of true crime holiday horror stories $35 advance $45 door. 2712640. imageout.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 18 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. Free. laughriotcomedy.com.

Dance Events [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:45-11pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing. Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner

dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. $4 (or free if it’s your first time!). 585-271-4930. lindyjam. com. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Dance Lab East. 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects 99 cents. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. [ FRI., DECEMBER 14 ] The 6th Annual Red Hot Holiday Ball. 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. Free. 845-706-2621. groovejuiceswing.com. PUSHinterPLAY. 7:30 p.m. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Free. pushtheatre.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] Fandango at the Tango. 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. “The Nutcracker.” Dec. 1516, 3 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Flower City Ballet. $10-$20. 3252114. flowercityballet.com. Stand Up and Dance. 2 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Frances Dances. $7. 249-0354. franceshare@yahoo.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] English Country Dancing. 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23

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Allens Creek Rd English Country Dancing, live music, called dances. $7-$8, under 17 free with adult. 244-2468. fbcrochester.net. Tap Dance Jam Session w/Live Music. third Sunday of every month, 2 p.m Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. s!. $5. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. Tap Dance Jam Sessions. third Sunday of every month, 2 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. $5. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 18 ] Stardust Ballroom Dance Series. 7:30 p.m Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St $3. 4286769. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries.

Festivals [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Holiday Shopping Night. 5-8 p.m. Downtown Fairport. Refreshments, holiday displays, festive atmosphere. finditinfairport. com.

Kids Events [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Mini Gingerbread House Creation. 10-11 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 3-5 Free, register. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org. Preschool Storytime. Thursdays, 10-10:30 a.m Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 35. Registration required. (No storytime the week of November 19.). 359-7092. Storytime with Mike. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 9:30 & 10:30 a.m Free. 227-4020. bn.com. Toddler Storytime. Tuesdays, 10:30-11 a.m Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd For 18 months to 3 year olds with an adult. Registration required. (No storytime the week of November 19.). 359-7092 10:30-11 a.m Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 18 months to 3 years with adult. Free, register. 3597092. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Evening Family Storytime. 6:30 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd 336-6062. aholland@ libraryweb.org. Holiday Treats for Teens. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 12-18. Free, register. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org. Pajama Time Storytime. 7 p.m Brighton Memorial

24 City december 12-18, 2012

DANCE | “PUSHinterPLAY”

Did you miss the chance to see PUSH Physical Theatre this fall at Rochester’s premiere First Niagara Fringe Festival? This week provides another opportunity to see the buzzed-about local group. On Friday, December 14, at 7:30 p.m. PUSH and the National Institute for the Deaf will debut two new works in progress, “Red Ball” and “Giovanni.” The two pieces are part of a new collaborative project, entitled “PUSHinterPLAY of Art, Culture and Technology,” that will be performed at RIT’s Robert F. Panara Theatre (1 Lomb Memorial Drive). The new show will incorporate technology like iPads and 3D projection, expanding PUSH’s hybrid art form even further. In fact, “Red Ball” was inspired by the use of iPads and other digital technology. “Giovanni,” based on Tomie dePaola’s book, “The Clown of God,” relates the French legend of an orphan, and formerly famous juggler, who sacrifices himself to bring smiles to a statue of Mary and baby Jesus during Christmas. This particular performance will utilize 3D projections onto scrims and innovative slowmotion juggling through PUSH’s own bit of magic. In addition to these new works, PUSH will bring back some Fringe performances, like “Natural World,” “Aviation,” and “Web.” Admission is free, and no tickets are necessary. For more information, visit pushtheatre.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. All ages with a caregiver 784-5300. brightonlibrary. org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 14 ] Storytelling with Mike. 10:30 a.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Free. 227-4020. bn.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] Breakfast with Santa hosted by Bryant & Stratton College. 10 a.m.-noon. Henrietta Campus, 1225 Jefferson Rd (292-5627) and Greece Campus, 150 Bellwood Dr (720-0660). RSVP by 12/13. Cookie Decorating. 11 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Ages 8-12. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Dino Days. Sundays Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. Eddie the Elk and the Twelve Days of Christmas. Sundays, 3 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum

admission $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” 10 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Breakfast with the Grinch is sold out $5. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Literature Live: Gingerbread Man. Dec. 15-16. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m 263-2700. museumofplay.org. Polar Express Train Rides. Sundays, 3:30, 4:40 & 5:55 p.m Medina Depot, 530 West Ave., Medina. $23-$45. 798-6106. railroadmuseum.net. Tail Waggin’ Tutors. 11 a.m.noon. Central Library, Secret Room, 115 South Ave. Ages 4-12. Read a story to a dog. Bring your own book or read one of ours 428-8150. libraryweb.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] Breakfast with Santa. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Mooseberry Café in Penfield. Proceeds to the Penfield Ecumenical Food Shelter. Kids under 10 eat free and get a free organic candy cane

RSVP. 348-9022 9 a.m.2 p.m. Mooseberry Cafe, 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. Proceeds benefit Ecumenical Food Shelter in Penfield. Bring your own cameras and cell phones for photos. We are also accepting canned goods (and nonperishable foods) for the shelter $10, kids under 10 eat free, RSVP. 348-9022. Family Fun: Christmas Storytime with Ms. Tonia. 1:30-2 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. libraryweb. org. [ MON., DECEMBER 17 ] Happy Holidays Party with Charlie & Checkers. 6:307:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Join Charlie the Cowboy and Checkers the Clown for their holiday themed show featuring special holiday magic, juggling, and Checkers’ giant holiday balloon. Free. 247-6446. Happy Holidays Party with Charlie and Checkers. 6:307:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. [ TUE., DECEMBER 18 ] Evening Craft Series for Tweens. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 8-13. 247-6446 6:30-7:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. For ages 8-13. The craft will be “Christmas Jewelry”, and can be completed in an hour. Free, register. 247-6446. Teen Tolkien Tuesdays. 68 p.m Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Tolkien movie marathon to get you ready for the premier of The Hobbit movie. Recommended for 13+,

SPECIAL EVENT | “Let it Snow”

Despite seeming aesthetically opposed, both figure skating and ice hockey require dexterity, strength, and grace. Regardless, when I heard about an upcoming event that combines the two types of athletes in a choreographed performance, I pictured a funny beauty-and-the-beast-type mash-up. On Sunday, December 16, at 4 p.m., Premier Skating Academy and the Wease Cares Children’s Fund will present a choreographed figure-skating program entitled “Let it Snow.” The Rochester Americans hockey team, Amerks alumni, and local college hockey players will perform with the choreographed figure skaters. The event will take place at The Sports Centre at MCC (2700 Brighton-Henrietta Townline Road). Tickets cost $5 and all proceeds will benefit Wease Cares Children’s Fund. Purchase tickets ahead of time, or the day of the show at the front desk at The Sports Centre. For more information, call 424-4625 or visit tscmcc.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY but call for feature details. Grades 6-12 Free. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ WED., DECEMBER 19 ] Time for Tots. 10:15-11:15 a.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 1-5 with caregiver. 247-6446 10:15-11:15 a.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. For ages 1-5 with a caregiver. 247-6446.

Lectures [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] December Nerd Nite! 7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. Suggested $5 donation/person to a different charity selected each month. 262-2336. facebook.com/ NerdNiteRochester.

[ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Building Our Media: a critical discussion series on independent media. 7-9 p.m Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Rochester.Indymedia.org. Free Lecture: Ivy League for Free? 12:30 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Lunch is available before the lecture for $6 Free, register. 340-8655. penfield.org. Gaza and the New Middle East: The Struggle for a Free Palestine Continues. 7 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Campus Building 76, Room 1125 (North Side of Campus). Featuring Guest Panelists: Muna Taha, First Generation Palestinian-American, Local activist, and Ashley Smith, Journalist, Steering Committee Member of the United National Antiwar Coalition. Free. truthtob@gmail.com. Neighbors Next Door: Alzheimer’s Disease: Managing Challenging Behaviors. 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 17 ] Worldly Approach to Wine Seminar Wine Myth #6: Norton is Gone. 6 p.m. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Road $45-$55. 223-4210 x2. casalarga.com.

Literary Events [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave Free. 319-5999. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337

East Ave Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 319-5999. Rochester Public Library’s Annual Holiday Fiction Used Book Sale. Mondays-Fridays Bausch & Lomb Public Library Building, 115 South Ave. Through Dec 31. MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m 428-8322. libraryweb.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] The Greater Rochester Russell Set. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Michael Brown on Christopher Lasch and the Vocation of the Intellectual. $3, free to members. 4155925. tmadigan@rochester. rr.com. wab.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] Christmas Readings. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 17 ] The Sun Magazine Discussion Group. third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 18 ] Book Discussion: “The Whistling Season” by Ivan Doig. Dec. 18-19. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks. com. Readers Theater: “Romeo and Juliet.” 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

[ WED., DECEMBER 19 ] Reading Jane (and Other Female Authors). 3:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside! Tuesdays-Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org. A T rex Named Sue. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $11-$13. 271-4320. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Open Ice Skating. ongoing. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink. Daily 12-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m. Adults Only daily 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m. (Fri-Sat til 8:50 p.m.). 428-7541. cityofrochster.gov/skating. Roc Cirque presents Whirly Wendsday. 7 p.m. genesee valley park, elmwood ave Join the fun at Rochester’s premier spin toy meet up. Hooping, poi, juggling, fire performances, and much more. Live DJ’s are playing during the session to help you stay moving. Extra hoops and poi are available free. (585) 683-5734. continues on page 27

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25

N O RT H F I E L D

Interview

DESIGNER GOLDSMITHS

with your family, whether they’re the most loving family in the world or the worst. There is such a thing as a verbal-abuse whistle that I say you should bring to Christmas. You have to make a deal: you can get on my nerves, I can get on yours, so think before you speak. As soon as someone doesn’t, you blow that whistle.

Our Rings are different Check out our video at northfieldgoldsmiths.com

700 Park Ave. Rochester, NY 14607 Phone: 585.442.2260 Website: Northfieldgoldsmiths.com

Do you actually enjoy the holidays on a personal level?

I do! Yes, to be honest, now I can really pay for my party — I’m doing 16 shows! I’m like a drag queen on Halloween at Christmas time. If it’s the holidays, I’m working. What kind of an audience did you have in mind when you were writing this show? Who do you think will most appreciate John Waters’ take on Christmas?

LADIES NIGHT!

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This weekend indie filmmaking legend John Waters — the man behind “Pink Flamingos” and “Hairspray” — will perform his one-man show about the holidays. “I guess I like Christmas because it can be such an emotional rollercoaster,” he says. PHOTO PROVIDED

Desperate holiday living A John Waters Christmas Sunday, December 16 Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. 7:30 p.m. | $35-$45 | imageout.org [ INTERVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

COOK I E S (AND OTHER SWEETS)

F O R T H E H O L I D AY S

745 Park Avenue 241-3120 • Open 7 days 26 City december 12-18, 2012

The two may seem incongruous, but John Waters and Christmas are actually a perfect match. It’s the time of year where children are encouraged to sit on the laps of portly, oddly dressed strangers. Anyone who has seen “Pink Flamingos” can guess that Edith Massey’s character would likely be a big fan of eggnog. And that old seasonal chestnut was obviously written about Waters’ late, luminous star. “O night Divine”? A fitting tribute to Glenn Milstead. The man who brought you a drag queen eating actual dog feces, Kathleen Turner bludgeoning a woman to death with a leg of lamb, and other warm-and-fuzzy cinematic moments is coming to town this week to offer his unique take on how adults can survive the stressful holiday season. Pro tip: before heading off to grandma’s house, make sure to pack your

verbal-abuse whistle along with your hip flask. And also your back-up hip flask. ImageOut, Rochester’s LGBT Film & Video Festival, is bringing in the one-man show starring the cult-film icon, best-selling author, and overall provocateur. Waters recently did a phone interviewed with City and shared some of his thoughts on Christmas, the state of the independent film industry, and whether we’re now living in a John Waters world. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: You are an unabashed fan of Christmas. What about the holiday appeals to a man who has previously been referred to as “the Pope of trash”?

John Waters: Well, I’m the pope, aren’t I? That implies some sort of tradition. That implies some sort of religious fervor. I guess I like Christmas because it can be such an emotional rollercoaster. I try to talk about in my show about how you can’t avoid it — it is impossible to avoid it. No matter what religion you are, what sexual preference, rich, poor, Democrat, Republican, you can’t avoid it. So I’m trying to tell you how to get through it, how to deal with it. How to deal

My audience has always been the same for 40 years. It’s people who are smart, who are funny, who have a healthy skepticism about authority, and at the same time maybe don’t fit in their own minority. But they’ve always felt like being outsiders. I’m trying to tell them to be outlaws and insiders. Who wants to be an outsider anymore? Everybody wants to be. You’ve been reportedly working on a children’s Christmas film, called “Fruitcake,” for years…

Well, I haven’t been working on it, that’s the issue. I’ve been trying to get it made. So instead what I’ve been working on is a book, since I’ve had a lot more success in that world. “Role Models,” my last book, was a best seller. So I’m writing a book now about how I hitchhiked across America by myself in May. But yes, the children’s Christmas movie I’m still trying to get made. Who knows if I ever will? I mean, I’ve made 16 movies. It’s not like I haven’t spoken. On that note, you’ve spoken about how American independent cinema is in a really difficult position right now. Do you think that will change or improve any time soon?

It’s not in a bad state if you’re a young person starting out in cinema. It’s in a much better state for you, because they’re looking now for the next kid who will make a movie for $50,000. They weren’t when I was doing it, but now they are. The problem with me is I have routinely made independent movies that cost $5 million, which used to be thought of as a moderate price for an independent movie, a union movie with movie stars. I don’t want to go backward, I did that. I’m not going to be a faux revolutionary. continues on page 32

Recreation [ FRI., DECEMBER 14 ] Winter Warrior Training Program. Tuesdays, Saturdays Tuesdays at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Brighton, 2210 Monroe Ave. Fridays at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Ridgeway, 2522 Ridgeway Ave., Saturdays at 8 a.m. (locations change each week). $10. 697-3338. training@ fleetfeetrochester.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] 38th Annual Letchworth Silver Lake Christmas Bird Count. Dec. 15. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Contact Douglas Bassett before 12/15 for territory assignments. 4933625. GVHC Hike. 6:30 p.m. Merchant-Main Plaza lot, 2300 East Main, easy Christmas lights walk. 4820549. gvhchikes.org. Reindeer Run 5K. 8:30 a.m. Hosted by the National Museum of Play at The Strong, starting on Pitkin and Broad St, with 90% of the course on the Inner Loop, and finishing at the museum $25-$30, register. yellowjacketracing.com. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5. 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Empire Blvd lot next to Macgregors, strenuous/hilly 5 mile hike, Lucien Morin Park. 5443387. gvhchikes.org. Rochester’s Christmas Bird Count. Dec. 16. Call for details. 671-5690.

Special Events [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] 12-12-12 A Celebration of the 12 Days Before Christmas. Dec. 12-23, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Road 2234210 x2. casalarga.com. 19th Annual Dickens Christmas Festival. Through Dec. 16, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Shops on West Ridge, 3200 W. Ridge Rd. Through Jan 1 Free admission. 3680670. shopsonwestridge. com. Class Candy Cane Sale & Museum Fundraiser. Through Dec. 14. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St 315-9464943. waynehistory.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County,

RECREATION | Christmas Bird Counts

The sweetness of birdsong is something that we perhaps take for granted in our daily hustle. For me, it has mostly become white noise unless I catch a few spare, slow moments for a walk. Many birds have already migrated toward warmer climates, but there are plenty of tough guys who’ll stick out the winter with us. Learn more about our area’s winter wildlife and help assess their numbers with one of the upcoming Christmas bird counts. The 38th annual Letchworth Silver Lake Christmas Bird Count will take place all day on Saturday, December 15, at Letchworth State Park in Castile. If you’re interested in participating, call Douglass Bassett at 493-3625 before the day of the event for a territory assignment. On Sunday, December 16, the 109th Rochester Christmas Bird Count will take place all day in a 16-mile radius centered at Dewey Avenue and Stone Road in Greece. Visit birding.aba.org and select Rochester to find a list of numbers of area leaders to call for more information. Inexperienced observers will be teamed up with the more experienced. A 7:30-9 p.m. tally will take place after a 6 p.m. dinner (bring money) held at the Charbroil Restaurant at the corner of Island Cottage Road and Edgemere Drive.

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Even if you can’t get out to count birds in the field, consider watching your feeder for some time during the day, and then phoning in your count, as all data is helpful. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Roc the Day. Dec. 12. Visit roctheday.org or call 800242-0248, choose a local organization to support, and donate. Turning Points. 3:305 p.m. An information Center for families whose lives have been touched by Incarceration. Join us to share information, resources, and support Free. 328-0856. turningpoints4families@ frontier.com. Volunteer for Girls Rock! Rochester. Currently looking for a few more folks to join the year-round volunteer staff & help plan for camp 2013 girlsrockrochester. com. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] The August Group & MCC Sponsor Career Fair and Networking Event. 2-5 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd augustgroup.org/careerfairs. Career Fair & Networking Event. 2-5 p.m. Monroe

Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd augustgroup,org/careerfair. Holiday Market with Santa Appearance. 6-10 p.m. Soulstice Artisan Market, 632 North Winton Rd soulsticeartisanmarket.com. Inspirational Film Series: “Young at Heart . You’re Never Too Old to Rock!.” 6:30 p.m. Lightheart Institute, 21 Prince St. $12. lightheart.com. Public Hearing on RCSD Facilities Master Plan. 7-9 p.m. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St Coffee & Conversation with the Superintendent: December 13 7-9 p.m., Parent Advisory Council Meeting: December 17 6 p.m., Coffee & Conversation with the Superintendent: December 18 5-7 p.m rcsdk12.org. Rocfestivus. Dec. 13-15. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St Thu 6 p.m. 2nd Annual Municipal Keg

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Special Events Tree Lighting. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. [ FRI., DECEMBER 14 ] “13WHAM Spectacle of Lights.” Sundays, 5:309:30 p.m Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Proceeds benefit the Golisano Children’s Hospital. Admission: $5 per car per entry, buses extra. Tickets available at Irondequoit Town Hall irondequoit.org. Big Screen Adventure: Coral Reef Adventure. Sundays. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 4 p.m., sat 2:30 & 4:30 p.m., Sun 1, 2, & 4 p.m., also Mon Oct 8 2:30 & 4:30 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Film Friday: “Puppy Paws.” 10 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. Film: “Mooz-lum.” 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Film: Mooz-lum. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free/$5 suggested donation. 563.2145. thebaobab.org. Holiday Laser. 4 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Ages 5+. $6-$7. 2711880. rmsc.org. Yuletide in the Country. Sundays Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Fri 5-8:30 p.m., SatSun 1:30-7:30 p.m. Tours are $22/$18 members with $3 off for reservations made for Friday, Nov. 30. A exquisite dinner buffet catered by D& R Depot is available for $30/$16 youth 4-16 2948218. gcv.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] “Christmas ‘Round the World.” 10 a.m.-7 p.m. East Rochester, various locations. Free. 248-6389. erchamber.org. 90s Laser Show. 9:30 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $6-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. FIlm: “Hidden Colors.” 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Holiday Cookie & Goodies Sale. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Trinity Reformed Church, 909 Landing Rd North 381-5330. Holiday Family Portrait Sittings. Dec. 15-16. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb

28 City december 12-18, 2012

Memorial Dr. Crossroads building on the RIT campus (please park in S Lot). Fundraiser for the university’s annual Big Shot photography project. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Following the sitting, a CD of images will be given to each family. Each family can have its photos printed at a location of their choice. Following the sitting, a CD of images will be given to each family. Each family can have its photos printed at a location of their choice. $25-$60 depending on amt of people. 475-2716. Holiday Laser Show. 11 a.m. & 4:30 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Saturdays and Sundays, plus some school holidays. Check online calendar. $6$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Schedule/. Holley Trolley Rides. Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Through Dec 16. Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus on Sunday, December 2, 2-4 p.m $4-$5. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Rochester Amateur Radio Association: FCC exams for ham radio licenses. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m RIT campus, Building GLE Room 3139 [Park in lot J]. Bring a pen and pencil, two forms of ID including one with a picture. If you are upgrading: Bring your original, and a copy, of your current amateur radio license; or unexpired Certificates of Completion Free. 289-3801. ken@ w2krh.com. Star Show: Curiosity on Mars. 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Also Mon Oct 8, 1 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] Basic Old-School Dungeons and Dragons Gaming Group. third Sunday of every month. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St All ages and skill-levels welcome Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Holidays at the Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. Italian Holiday. 2-7 p.m. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Road 223-4210 x2. casalarga.com. Last Call After Fall Family Day Arts & Crafts Fair. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Dancencounters, 215 Tremont St Vendors, dancing, musical performance. $3 admission. franceshare@ yahoo.com. Last Minute Market. 11 a.m. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. 585-3602920. lastminuterochester. blogspot.com.

“Let it Snow” Choreographed Figure Skating Featuring the Amerks. 4 p.m. The Sports Centre at MCC, 2700 Brighton-Henrietta Townline Road. Benefits Wease Cares Children’s Fund. $5. premierskatingacademy@ gmail.com. Long Season Winter Famers’ Market. 1-4 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd Cost of goods. swfarmersmarket.org. Screening: “Downton Abbey” Season 3 Premiere. 12, 2, 4 & 5:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Free, register. 258-0200. wxxi.org/ communitycinema. Winter Solstice Dinner Party and Vegan Cookie Exchange. 5:30 p.m. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd Bring a vegan dish to pass and cookies $3, free to members. 234-8750. rochesterveg.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 18 ] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Mime Show. 12:45-1:50 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr In room B240 on the second floor of the main classroom building. Free. 785-1623. flcc.edu.

Sports [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] Rochester Americans v. Toronto Marlies. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater 10-Minute Play Festival. Wed., Dec. 19, 1:151:50 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Stage 14 on the second floor of the FLCC Student Center. Free. 785-1623. flcc.edu. “A Christmas Carol.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Dec 23. Wed Dec 5-Thu 7 p.m., Fri 7:30 p.m. Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun noon & 4:30 p.m., TueWed Dec 12 7 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Stage 14 $10, $25 per family 7851205. flcc.edu Through Dec. 19. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Dec 23. Wed Dec 12-Thu 7 p.m., Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun noon (audio described) and 4:30 p.m., Wed Dec 19 2 & 7 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org Dec. 19-23. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Dec 23. Wed Dec 19 2 & 7 p.m., Thu 7 p.m. (sign interpreted), Fri 7:30

p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun noon & 4:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “A Christmas Wonder.” St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $16.50, discounts for groups. achristmaswonder.org. A Christmas Wonder. St. John Fisher College, Student Life Center, 3690 East Ave., A Christmas Wonder recounts the story of the birth of Jesus Christ using music, dance, choir, narration, live action tableau $16.50 GA; $13.50 groups of 5+. 385-8325. achristmaswonder.org. “The Desk Set.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through December 23. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$20, register. 244-0960. muccc. org. “Handle with Care.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Dec 31. Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 2 p.m., Thursdays 7 p.m., New Year’s Eve 6 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “It’s a Wonderful Life” A Live Radio Play. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Dec 22. Thu Dec 13 7:30 p.m., Fri Dec 14 8 p.m., Sat-Sun Dec 15-16 2 & 8 p.m., Thu Dec 20 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat Dec 21-22 8 p.m $27. 454-1260. bftix.org. “A John Waters Christmas.” Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. $35-$45. 760-8383. imageout.org. “Motherhood: The Musical.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. Rochester Fringe Play Reading Series: “Love Song.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Free admission; donations accepted at door. 520-2940. bftix.org. “Seussical, the Musical.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Fri 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $16-$25. 3892170. artscenter.naz.edu. “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Dec 16. Wed Dec 5-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 12 7:30 p.m. | Wed Dec 12Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $35. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “A Tuna Christmas.” RAPA, 727 E. Main St Greater Rochester Repertory Companies (GRRC). $15-$25. 325-3366. rapatheatre.org. The Wondrous Story. Irondequoit United Church of Christ, 644 Titus Ave The Irondequoit Chorale.

$8-$12. 266-5018. theirondequoitchorale.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] The Gregory Kunde Chorale is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info line: 377-7568. gregorykundechorale.org. Motherhood: The Musical. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Make appointment for audition. Those auditioning should prepare two contrasting contemporary musical theatre pieces not exceeding 5 minutes in length. An accompanist will be provided. Those called back will need to come prepared with appropriate dance attire admin@ downstairscabaret.com. downstairscabaret.com. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Auditions for “All This and Moonlight.” 7 p.m. St Mark and St John Episcopal Church, 1245 Culver Rd Out of Pocket Productions. Roles available for 2 men and 4 women, ages 20-40 269-4673. outofpocketproductions.org.

Workshops [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages. Free, register. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 13 ] Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair massage, and music. 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Donations accepted. 392-3601. rochesterunitarian.org. Employment Town Hall Meeting. 7 p.m. Center for Disability Rights, 497 State St Free. 598-4862. dderusso@rcil.org. bit.ly/ EmploymentTownHallMTG. [ FRI., DECEMBER 14 ] Starting Your Own Business. 2 p.m. Wachuku Foundation for Humanitarian Aid, 130 White St Free. 957-4117. wachuku@gmail.com. wfha.us. [ SAT., DECEMBER 15 ] Effective Black Parenting Workshops. 9 a.m.-noon. Carter Street Community Center, 500 Carter St This free, 15-session series uses the Effective Black Parenting(tm) curriculum and is based on an AfricanAmerican orientation to parenting. It teaches a series of child management skills from within a Black frame of reference to help parents. The program reflects more than a decade of research and field-testing and is derived from the

writings of African-American parenting scholars. It is one of the only curriculums that is inclusive of AfricanAmerican history and culture and it is a great tool for all Black parents. Registration limited to the first 25 parents for each session Free, register. 428-6360. Rochester Academy of Science Life Sciences Section. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Herbarium workshop in basement. Ask staff to call ext. 368. 334-0977. epixley@rochester.rr.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 16 ] Fiddle Workshops & Jam Sessions. 1-5 p.m. 111 Milburn St $10, register. dick@dickbolt.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 17 ] Family Development Class: “What Do You Want for Your Child?” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages. Free, register. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 18 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. The African World History class provides an ongoing experience of the contributions and achievements Africans and African-Americans have made throughout history. The class uses the historical experiences of African peoples to highlight the cultural values we share. Stay tuned and check the Baobab website for further details $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Family Development Class: “Who’s Listening?” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children ages 5-12. Free, register. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ WED., DECEMBER 19 ] Family Development Class: “Will My Child Still Love Me?” 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school age children. Free, register. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29

Film Times Fri Dec 14-Thur Dec 20 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 1, 4; FLIGHT: 9; THE HOBBIT: 7:15; also Fri-Sun 12:45, 4; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 7; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 1, 4; THE HOBBIT: 3D 7:15; also Fri-Sun 12:45, 4; 2D 7:15, 8:15; also Fri-Sun 12:45, 1:45, 4, 5; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 9:10; LIFE OF PI: 7, 9:35; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 4; LINCOLN: 7:15; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 4:15; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5; RED DAWN: 9:20; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 7; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5; SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also Fri-Sun 1, 4; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7; also Fri-Sun 1, 4.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. THE MASTER: 7; also Sat-Sun 3:45.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ARGO: 9:45; BREAKING DAWN: 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:20, 10:05; THE COLLECTION: 10:40; FLIGHT: 12:15, 4:10, 7:25, 10:35; THE HOBBIT: 3D 11 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 12:20, 1, 3, 3:20, 4, 4:35, 7:10, 8, 9, 9:30; 2D 10:40 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 12, 12:40, 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, 5, 6, 6:20, 6:50, 7:30, 10; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 4:25, 10:30; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:05, 6:45, 9:40; 2D 3:45; LINCOLN: 11:30 a.m., 3:35, 6:55, 10:25; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 3:55, 10:10; RED DAWN: 1:05, 3:55, 6:55, 9:35; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 4:05, 9:35; 2D 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 6:40; SKYFALL: 12:10, 3:50, 7, 10:20; WRECK-IT RALPH: 11:10 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:15, 10:15. continues on page 33

A movie about the making of a movie [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Hitchcock” (PG-13), directed by Sacha Gervasi Now playing

Long after his death, Alfred Hitchcock remains a surprisingly powerful presence in the cinema. Reruns of his extremely successful 1950’s television series turn up regularly on one of the cable film channels; a recent made-for-TV movie, “The Girl,” about his relationship with Tippi Hedren, who starred in “The Birds” and “Marnie,” now plays on HBO; and right on its heels, a theatrical feature, another movie about a Hitchcock movie, simply called “Hitchcock,”

has just opened. The director apparently constitutes a one-man cinema renaissance. Based on some of the immense amount of information about the best known and most written-about director in film history, “Hitchcock” deals with the production of “Psycho,” one of his most successful and important pictures, which appeared in 1960, capping the richest and most creative decade in his remarkable career. While showing the several kinds of difficulties he encountered in bringing Robert Bloch’s novel, based on the actual crimes of a particularly gruesome serial killer named Ed Gein, to the screen, it also delves into Hitch’s own personal idiosyncrasies and his relationship with his wife and collaborator, Alma Reville. The marital story, most of it fictional, works much less well than the known facts about the making of a groundbreaking film that transformed the horror genre, conferring a new dignity and significance on an often scorned form. Constantly battling the ridiculous production code of the motion-picture industry, Hitch

Anthony Hopkins in “Hitchcock.” PHOTO COURTESY FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

ATTENTION FILM FANS

Starting with our Wednesday, December 19 issue, CITY Newspaper will no longer be running film times in print. Instead, you can find accurate, up-to-the-minute times for all area theaters on rochestercitynewspaper.com or on CITY’s mobile site. Keep reading CITY every week for film reviews, blurbs, & theater information and post your own reviews online!

(Anthony Hopkins) created some innovative methods of circumventing the censors, including tricky camerawork and inspired visual metaphors; in fact, in some ways the censorship inspired some of his most inventive cinematic ploys. To avoid the sight of a knife actually penetrating a nude Janet Leigh (Scarlett Johansson) in the famous shower scene, for example, he employed dozens of quick cuts, depending on the power of suggestion and his own skill at audience manipulation. Arguing that it was essential to the plot, he also convinced the censors to allow an actual toilet — and, shockingly, a flush — for the first time in Hollywood history. We’ve come a long way. As the picture progresses, the making of “Psycho” displays some of the director’s well known fascination with violent death, sexual deviance, and icy blondes, along with some of his personal traits — a kind of sad voyeurism, the need to control his leading ladies, alcoholism, the constant substitution of food for sexual gratification. By frequently showing dreams and fantasies in which Hitch converses with Ed Gein, the script magnifies his idiosyncrasies into something like a dangerous pathology. Almost unrecognizable beneath pounds of prosthetic avoirdupois, Anthony Hopkins handles the character’s wit and drollery with a nice offhand skill, but rather exaggerates his emotional side into hysterical melodrama. Often speaking directly to the audience in the manner of the television show, he captures precisely the thick,

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Throwing the switch [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Other Son” (PG-13), directed by Lorraine Levy Opens Friday at the Little

“Scrooge & Marley” (NR), directed by Richard Knight Jr. Screen Tuesday at the Little

plummy voice, the carefully articulated speech, the asthmatic wheeze of the master in a performance that seems as much impersonation as acting. As Hitch’s neglected and longsuffering wife, Alma Reville, who wrote or consulted on many of her husband’s pictures, Helen Mirren looks a good deal more attractive than the original, but conveys Alma’s obvious intelligence and her perfectly understandable resentment at playing second fiddle to the great man. Her tentative, unconsummated relationship with a sycophantic screenwriter (Danny Huston) never seems convincing, except as an indication of her bitterness and unhappiness. Aside from dramatizing material from the several biographies and the scores of critical studies, much of the success of “Hitchcock” grows out of the careful casting of a variety of actors as the crew of accomplished people who helped bring Hitchcock’s vision to the screen. Scarlett Johansson makes a quite acceptable Janet Leigh and Jessica Biel in a blonde wig very closely resembles Vera Miles, the actress Hitchcock believed “betrayed” him by resisting his efforts to control her career. As Anthony Perkins, the immortal Norman Bates of “Psycho,” James D’Arcy delivers the most convincing impersonation of them all — he looks uncannily like the actor and speaks with the same nervous hesitancy, the same winning sincerity, the same quirky speech rhythms and twitches. If “Hitchcock” affects his career as “Psycho” did Perkins’s, D’Arcy may be doomed to playing an assortment of neurotics and crazed killers.

Generally speaking, there are three distinct types of fantasy stories. The most blatant are the tales that take place entirely in a make-believe world filled with fantastical sights and populated by inhuman beings that could never exist in reality. Then there are the stories set in the real world but which add extraordinary elements like magic or supernatural beings. The final variety are the most subtle, taking place in the real world and focusing on the actions of realistic people, the fantasy element making itself known through characters that behave in ways that real people most likely wouldn’t. These are stories that tend to present the world the way most of us wish it was. “The Other Son,” a sensitive — if often contrived — drama falls into this last category. When 17-year-old Joseph (Jules Sitruk), an introverted aspiring musician, submits to a routine blood test as part of preparations for his mandatory service in

Jules Sitruck and Mehdi Dehbi in “The Other Son.” PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COHEN

the Israeli military, doctors are bewildered to discover that the boy’s blood type doesn’t match that of his parents. A follow-up test confirms that he couldn’t possibly be the son of Orith and Alon Silberg, who have raised him from birth. Investigation leads to the revelation that in the chaotic aftermath of a missile attack that hit the hospital where Orith had given birth, doctors inadvertently switched her newborn baby with that of Leila and Said Al-Bezaaz, a Palestinian couple who were delivering at the same time. Orith and Alon’s infant, meanwhile, was raised on the West Bank, and has grown into gregarious pre-med student Yacine (Mehdi Debhi). Each set of parents are brought together to be informed of the mistake, forcing them all to decide how best to cope with the news and how, or even if, they should tell their sons. From this unlikely setup, “The Other Son” examines as realistically as possible the ramifications of finding out that the child you’ve raised for 17 years isn’t actually your flesh and blood. Of course, the two boys eventually do find out the truth, and despite resistance from both fathers, the boys’ natural curiosity about one another and the life they may have lead slowly draws their families together, forcing them to confront the prejudices that have been ingrained in them through generations of conflict and hatred. On their own, each boy crosses the border to attempt to get to know his birth family, eying one another alternately with jealousy and brotherly affection as they strike up a friendly relationship. It’s in this middle section, as each boy is thrown into an identity crisis, that the strong, charismatic performances by Sitruk and Debhi really shine. The switched-at-birth plotline has been done so many times, it’s a wonder that no one has thought to place the

children on opposite sides of the IsraeliPalestian conflict until now. That very real tension adds a weight to the story that it otherwise might not have had. Though the premise seems ripe for over-the-top melodrama, French director and co-writer Lorraine Lévy does her best to ground things in an honesty that keeps the film from becoming overly preachy. Even so, as the film reaches an ending that veers ever-so-slightly into schmaltz territory, the tale ultimately boils down to a “Can’t we all just get along?” plea for tolerance. Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” is

already one of the most popular fantasy tales of all time, with countless cinematic adaptations — everyone from Patrick Stewart to Vanessa Williams has filled the miserly shoes of Ebenezer (or Ebony) Scrooge — so any new variation on the tale has to prove its worth by bringing something fresh to the table. “Scrooge & Marley,” screening for one night next week at The Little, adds a campy, queer twist to the proceedings that doesn’t quite justify its existence, but it’s got enough rough-around-the-edges, let’sput-on-a-show charm to get you into the holiday spirit. This time around Scrooge is played by David Pevsner as a bitter old queen running a gay piano bar in downtown Chicago. Pevsner takes the opportunity to chew the scenery like it’s his job, referring to his clientele as “the riff raff” and barking lines like “caring doesn’t pay the bills!” before the inevitable change of heart following visits by the infamous ghosts of Christmases Past, Present, and Future. The Ghost of Christmas Present (played by “Make Me a Supermodel”’s Ronnie Kroell) has Scrooge take a couple whiffs of poppers in order to travel back in time, so that should tell you right away if you’re in the target demographic for this film.

MEDIA GROUP

THE BELLS OF ST. MARY’S

Friday, Dec. 14, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 16, 2 p.m.

Revisiting his role as Father O’Malley from Going My Way, Bing Crosby produces what could be the highlight of his career. O’Malley and Sister Mary Benedict (Ingrid Bergman) disagree on how to run St. Mary’s Elementary School, but through every adversity they work to find common ground. When tragedy strikes close to the school, it brings them closer than ever. (Leo McCarey, US 1945, 126 min.)

OUR DAILY BREAD Saturday, Dec. 15, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Happy Holidays

We are what we eat. But do we really “see” what we are eating? With almost no dialogue and a gorgeous cinematography, this haunting exploration of European food factories lays bare the ethical dilemmas of nutrition in the industrial world. There is no advocacy message here, neither for organic farming nor animal rights; images are allowed to speak for themselves, with a sobriety and a compassion rarely seen in a work of non-fiction. (Unser täglich Brot, Nikolaus Geyrhalter, Austria 2005, 92 min., German and Arabic w/subtitles)

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John Waters continues from page 26

But they’re looking. If you’re a young person, it is the very best time ever to get your movie made, because the equipment — everybody could make a movie on their cell phone and it could end up playing in a movie theater. So, that’s good! I’m not complaining. Because if they said to me now, “You could make ‘Fruitcake,’” I don’t know what I’d do. I’m booked for the next year and a half. I hope I’ll make it, but who knows if I will.

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Switching gears, you’ve always had an interest in documenting extreme human behavior and the fringes of human society. Given that shows like “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo” are cultural touchstones, and that Kim Kardashian became a pop-culture icon largely because of a sex tape, are we now living in a John Waters world?

Here’s the thing: I refuse to know who the Kardashians are. Every time I get to an article about them, I turn the page. I do know who Honey Boo Boo is, although I’ve never seen the show. I’m against reality television. Not that you shouldn’t watch it; I don’t care if you watch it. I have no interest because it seems mean spirited. It’s asking you to look down on your subject matter. And really, who is the fool? They’re making money and you’re wasting your time. My movies, even if you hate them, I don’t think you can say that I asked you to look down on my characters. I asked you to look up. And that’s the big difference. I don’t believe that reality-show fame is real fame. I know that many people love reality TV. But I find something about it is distasteful in a bad way. It’s bad bad taste. It’s asking the audience to feel superior. I never feel superior to my subject matter. You spent a portion of your summer hitchhiking across America. Why did you do it?

It was 11 days in May. It was an adventure! I used to hitchhike a lot when I was young. I wanted to give up control. I wanted to see, How far does fame go? I wanted to write another book, and the first two parts of the book are little novels of me imagining in my fantasy the very best that could happen between rides, and the very worst that could happen. And then I did it for real. Did you enjoy the experience?

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Yes, but you’ll have to read the book to get the details. That was the coming attractions, in case you didn’t know. And I hope it’s better than that, because now when I go to the movies, the trailers aren’t coming attractions. They’re warnings not to see the films. Looking back on all your projects, stretching back to even before “Pink Flamingos,” do you think those works still stand up? Would you remake any of them if you could?

I wouldn’t remake any of them, no. Well, I guess it would be funny to see “Pink Flamingos” remade a children’s animated movie. Without the sex it would work. For a while there all the children’s best-seller lists were gross — you know, “snot this” and grossout battles. And that’s what “Pink Flamingos” is. Divine was a clown. Divine was a “Jackass” boy before Johnny Knoxville. So, I think those movies were kind of innocent, if you took the sex stuff out. And believe me, nobody was masturbating watching them. So you could take the sex out without any trouble. You mention that Divine was kind of a “Jackass” boy before there was “Jackass.” That ties back to my earlier question. Do you think that our society now has caught up to what you were doing back then? What was cutting edge has now became mainstream?

Bad taste has become American humor, in a way. I think a lot of times, though, Hollywood makes bad-taste movies that are not funny. They just try to be gross too hard. It’s easy to be gross. I was trying to be funny, I was trying to be witty. I was trying to change how you think about something by making you laugh. I’m for some of those. I like “The Hangover,” I like “Bridesmaids.” But a lot of times I think they’re not so funny. But I don’t begrudge them. I wish my movies made that much money. But my movies, embarrassingly, only really played in wealthy, intelligent neighborhoods. I always wanted them to play in grindhouses and drive-ins, but they flopped there, because there was irony. People didn’t go see exploitation movies because they thought they were so bad they were good, they went to see them because they thought they were sexy. They weren’t looking at the outfits in “Faster Pussycat,” they were masturbating. There’s a big difference. What inspires John Waters now?

I read seven newspapers a day. I’m always interested in people’s behaviors, and the behavior of people who think they’re normal but act the most insane is what draws me the most. Those are the characters I’ve made movies about. You’re an indie icon, but you’ve experienced some significant mainstream success. As you go forward as an artist, where do you see yourself fitting in in that spectrum?

I’m just trying to keep going and make the next thing. I never think this one’s going to be more commercial or less commercial, or this one’s going to be mainstream. I never plan that. I just make the next thing I’m obsessed by. And I’m thankful that I’ve been able to have this career for 40 years. People say that art is what you get away with, and I’ve been getting away with it for a long time.

Dryden Theatre

Henrietta 18

Pittsford Cinema

271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 12/12Wed 12/19. THE LAST PICTURE SHOW: Wed 12/12 8; GREAT EXPECTATIONS: Thur 12/13 8; THE BELLS OF ST. MARY’S: Fri 12/14 8, Sun 12/16 2; OUR DAILY BREAD: Sat 12/15 8; REPULSION: Tue 12/18 8; SHERLOCK JR.: Wed 12/19 8.

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. BREAKING DAWN: 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35; FLIGHT: 5:20; HITCHCOCK: 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10; THE HOBBIT: HFR 3D: 11 a.m., 12:20, 3, 4:20, 7, 8:20, 10:50; 3D 12, 12:40, 1:30, 3:40, 4, 7:40, 8, 8:40, 9:20; 11:50; 12; 2D 11:20 a.m., 1, 2:30, 3:20, 4:40, 5:40, 6:30, 7:20, 9, 9:40, 10, 10:30, 11:20; KHILADI 786: 5; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 11:45 a.m., 2:20; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:05, 6:35, 9:30; 2D 3:05; LINCOLN: 11:50 a.m., 3:15, 6:40, 10:05; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; RED DAWN: 12:10; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 4:45, 9:50; 2D 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 7:25; SKYFALL: 11:10 a.m., 12:30, 3:50, 7:10, 10:40; WRECK-IT RALPH: 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05.

383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ANNA KARENINA: 1:20, 4:10, 7, 9:50; ARGO: 2:20, 5, 7:40; THE HOBBIT: 3D 12:50, 4:25, 8; 2D 2:55, 6:30, 10; also Fri-Sun 11:20 a.m.; HITCHCOCK: 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40; also Fri-Sun 12:20; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 10:20; LIFE OF PI: 3D 7:30, 10:20; 2D 1:40, 4:35; LINCOLN: 1:30, 4:40, 7:50; THE OTHER SON: 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45; also Fri-Sun 12. SKYFALL: 1, 4:05, 7:10, 10:15;

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 1, 4; THE HOBBIT: 3D+2D 7:15; also Fri-Sun 12:45, 4; LIFE OF PI: 3D 7, 9:30; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D FriSun 1, 3, 5; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BREAKING DAWN: 11:10 a.m., 1:55, 4:40, 7:25, 10:15; THE HOBBIT: 3D 11 a.m., 1:30, 3, 5, 5:30, 7, 9:30, 10:45; 2D 11:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 4:15, 7:30, 8, 9, 10; LIFE OF PIE: 3D 3D 12:45, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; LINCOLN: 12:05, 3:20, 6:50, 10:05; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45; RED DAWN: 11:20 a.m., 1:50; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:35, 9:55; SKYFALL: 11:50 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:50; WRECK-IT RALPH: 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  ARGO: 7 (except Sat/Tues), 9:40; also Sat-Sun 12; ANNA KARENINA: 6:30, 9:10 (no 6:30/9:10 showing on Sunday); also Sat-Sun 3; THE GREY VIDEO: Sat 12/15 4, 7; HITCHCOCK: 7:15, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30; HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS: Sat 12/15 10, 12:30; LINCOLN: 6:15, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12, 3:10; THE OTHER SON: 6:45, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:20; SCROOGE & MARLEY: Tue 12/18 7.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ARGO: 12:40, 4:05, 7:10, 10:05; BREAKING DAWN: 11 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:10; THE COLLECTION: 12:35, 2:50, 5:05, 7:25, 9:45; FLIGHT: 12:10, 3:30, 6:35, 9:35; THE HOBBIT: IMAX 3D 11:30 a.m., 3:15, 7, 10:45; HFR 3D 12:15, 4, 5:30, 7:45; 3D 1:45, 9:15; 2D 10:45 a.m., 1, 2:30, 4:45, 6:15, 8:30, 10; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:35, 10:05; LIFE OF PI: 3D 3:45, 6:55, 9:55; 2D 12:45; LINCOLN: 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:45, 10; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 11:10 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10; RED DAWN: 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 7:20, 9:40; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 2:45, 7:50; 2D 12:05, 5:20, 10:15; SKYFALL: 12, 3:30, 6:40, 9:50; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 1:40, 9:30; 2D 11:05 a.m., 4:15, 6:50.

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE BELLS OF ST. MARY’S (1945): In this holiday favorite, Bing Crosby’s Father O’Malley faces off against Sister Mary Benedict (Ingrid Bergman) over how to operate the Catholic school they run together. Dryden (Fri, Dec 14, 8 p.m., and Sun, Dec 16, 2 p.m.) GREAT EXPECTATIONS (1946): Legendary British auteur David Lean’s critically lauded adaptation of the Charles Dickens novel. Dryden (Thu, Dec 13, 8 p.m.) THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS (2000): Director Ron Howard and star Jim Carrey bring Dr. Seuss’ beloved children’s holiday classic to nightmarish cinematic life. Little (Sat, Dec 15, 10 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.) THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971): Jeff Bridges stars in director Peter Bogdanovich’s high school coming-of-age story set in smalltown Texas in the early 1950s. Co-starring Cybill Shepherd, Cloris Leachman, Ellen Burstyn, and Randy Quaid. Dryden (Wed, Dec 12, 8 p.m.)

OUR DAILY BREAD (2005): A lushly photographed, nearly dialoguefree examination of factory farms across Europe. Dryden (Sat, Dec 15, 8 p.m.) REPULSION (1965): Roman Polanski’s psychological horror film stars Catherine Deneuve as an emotionally unstable young woman left alone in her apartment to face down the demons of her past. Dryden (Tue, Dec 18, 8 p.m.) SCROOGE & MARLEY (2012): It’s a gay old time with this new, queer cinematic take on Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”. With Bruce Vilanch, Judith Light, and Rusty Schwimmer. Little (Tue, Dec 18, 7 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] ANNA KARENINA (PG-13): This opulent adaptation of the Tolstoy classic, from director Joe Wright and Oscar-winning screenwriter Tom Stoppard, stars Keira Knightley as one of literature’s best-known adulteresses, married to Jude Law’s aristocrat but consumed by an affair with Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s dashing cavalry officer. Little, Pittsford ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck costars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Culver, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE COLLECTION (R): This sequel to the 2009 horror flick “The

Collector” calls upon the only man to have escaped from a serial killer to rescue his next victim from the psycho’s fortified hideout. Culver, Tinseltown HITCHCOCK (R): Anthony Hopkins takes on the title role in this biopic that uses the filming of 1960’s “Psycho” as a backdrop for a love story between the Master of Suspense and wife Alma Reville (Helen Mirren). Co-starring Scarlett Johansson, Danny Huston, and Jessica Biel. Henrietta , Little, Pittsford KILLING THEM SOFTLY (R): Brad Pitt and his “Assassination of Jesse James...” director Andrew Dominik reteam for this crime flick about a gangland enforcer investigating a heist pulled off during a Mob-controlled poker game. With Richard Jenkins, Ray Liotta, and James Gandolfini. Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE OTHER SON (PG-13): This French drama from writer-director Lorraine Levy tells the story of two young men, one Israeli and one Palestinian, who discover they were accidentally switched at birth. Little, Pittsford

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A WARM AND Loving couple is waiting with open arms to adopt your newborn. Expenses paid. Please call Andy and Brian 1-888-637-1417 or www. andyandbrianadopt.com

MIDDLESEX 25 acres just off the grid. All woods, no immediate neighbors. Potential panoramic view of Canandaigua Lake. Seasonal road. Loads of privacy. $2800/acre. 585-7558871 ONEONTA, NY area 2,600 sq ft Farm house 5 BR, 2 Baths on 5 acres. Views 1,120’ Elevation $109,000 Owner financing.  More Land available www. helderbergrealty.com  CALL: 518-861-6541

ADOPT Loving and stable home for your baby. Beautiful life, much love to share. Devoted, married couple. Expenses paid. Call for information, Gina/ Walt: 1-800-315-6957 ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future.  Expenses paid.  Private.  Legal.  Jenny 1-866-751-3377

Automotive

Commercial/ Office Space

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888201-8657www.CenturaOnline. com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903

BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $30 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim ELAINE’S ESTATE FURNISHINGS 2750 Monroe Ave. & Clover Lanes. 20-50% off Holiday sale on all Furniture, Artwork, Lamps, Orientals, China and gifts. WednesdayFriday 12-5pm, Saturday 12-4pm. We also conduct Household/Moving Sales. 2694638 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 STEEL BUILDINGS 6 only 20x20, 25x30, 30x38, 40x54, 45x74, 60x140 Must Move Now! Selling for Balance Owed! Still Crated/Free Delivery! 1800-211-9593 x30 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585-225-5526

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a second lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

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EXPERIENCED FEMALE JAZZ Vocalist looking for a pianist or a small group to perform music from the 30’s to today, with a Mad Men era emphasis! Serious musicians only. 233-5551 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Looking For... XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Miscellaneous Notices FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S.

HAVE A $1000 IDEA TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE IN AMERICA? SUBMIT IT TODAY AT http://www.peopleschoice. org TO WIN CASH+TRIP TO KICKOFF. REGENSTRIEF INSTITUTE WILL CONDUCT STUDY ON WINNING IDEA.

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN. www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

Wanted to Buy

REACH 5 MILLION hip, forward-thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. christine@rochester-citynews. com

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

LAND AND FARMS WANTED Serious cash buyer seeks investment property, 200 acres and up, with or without mineral rights.  Brokers welcome.  For immediate confidential response, call 607-5638875 ext.13 or e-mail alan@ newyorklandandlakes.com. WANTED: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www. yearbookusa.com or 214-5141040

BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

Victorian Gem in Historic Naples 10 Cohocton Street

SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Mind Body Spirit GIVE THE GIFT Of Wellness Buy 1 class package and get the 2nd for 50% off. Yogawithnora.net

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Selling Homes one yard at a time.

One of the most picturesque communities in the Finger Lakes region is the village of Naples, nestled in the hills, just south of Canandaigua Lake. Its remarkable architecture, tree-lined streets, and quaint village business district have been enjoyed by residents and visitors, alike, for decades. Many of the historic homes here have been rediscovered and rehabilitated by owners who were drawn to these buildings by their ornate details and outstanding craftsmanship. The Queen Anne style house at 10 Cohocton Street is an excellent example of this type of careful rehabilitation, carried out over the past 31 years by the current owners. The lovely, 1880s residence is one of the signature houses on this highly visible street. Its elaborate woodwork, porch, and window details are greatly enhanced by the historic paint colors on the exterior. The elegant front door, with original hardware and doorbell, is highlighted by a beautiful stained glass window, that, together with similar windows on the staircase, bring in ample light to the handsome front hall. The front staircase has a spectacular and unusual banister with spindles that echo the Eastlake style of woodwork so popular in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. The first floor includes two parlors and a dining room, where hardwood floors, decorative moldings, and an elegant fireplace create a welcoming area for family and

friends. The dining room is further highlighted by a large bay window, window seat, and elaborate spindled frieze that dates from the original construction of the house. The spacious kitchen features two large, early-20th-century wall cabinets that provide both storage space and historic interest in this room. A modern laundry room, powder room, and rear staircase to the second floor are located just off the kitchen. The second floor has four bedrooms, including a two-room master suite. The full bathroom on the second floor is a spacious and relaxing refuge that combines historic details with modern conveniences. A walk-up attic and a full basement offer additional storage. This .35-acre property includes a secluded brick patio at the rear of the house and a partially fenced yard. The distinctive, gambrel-roofed barn retains its original detailing and interior. A modern, two-car garage has been added to the barn. Listed at $145,900, this 2,292-square-foot house is ready and waiting for a new owner to move in. It is listed by Kenn Murray of Nothnagle Realtors (585) 374-6560. by Cynthia Howk Cynthia is the Architectural Research Coordinator at The Landmark Society of Western New York.

Tamara Lynn Bald • Your Real Estate Coach Realtor® • 585-857-1616 • TamaraLynnBald@gmail.com

706 East Avenue • Rochester NY 14607 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35

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585-244-3329 ext. 23

36 City december 12-18, 2012

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SBG Properties LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12.. Off. loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Sunleaf Drive, Penfiled, NY. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 144 Village Landing #192, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] CORNWALL ROCHESTER NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/31/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606,which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-14282 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. The Estate of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell; Any persons who are heirs or distributees of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; Board of Managers of the Scarborough House Condominium; Matthew Korytko; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 22, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on December 19, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 1000 East Avenue, Unit 106, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.37-1-2./106, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10047 of Deeds, page 66. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $42,134.50 plus but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2012Dean J. Fero, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585 324-5767

[ NOTICE ] First Residential Properties, LLC has filed Art. Of Org. with the Sec’y of State on 11/1/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated

cont. on page 41

[ NOTICE ] 1634 BHTL LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/6/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Bruce Coleman, P.O. Box 10608, Rochester, NY 14692. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 3800 RIDGE ROAD WEST LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of limited liability company. Beat the Wave, LLC (LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 9, 2012. Monroe County is the county within which it will have its office; its principal business address is 103 River Street, Rochester, New York 14612. Its purpose is to serve, or provide services to foreign parents and their high school and college age students who attend educational institutions in the United States within the metropolitan area of Rochester, New York. The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as its agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 103 River Street, Rochester, New York 14612 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC [ NOTICE ] Chi Soo Design LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 72 Knollwood Dr, Roch, NY 14618. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] JAS PRO PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/7/12. Office location:

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Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 AN INTERNATIONAL COMPANY Expanding in your area seeks serious individuals interested in pt/ft business opportunity call 570 856 1315 or e-mail nansk55@gmail. com or visit www.goherbalife.com/ decnorm/en-US DRIVER - $0.03 enhanced quarterly bonus. Get paid for any portion you qualify for: safety, production, MPG. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary!

Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) OWNER OPERATORS CDL with 1-year driving experience. Home every other day. Competitive mileage pay. Dedicated runs, recessionproof freight. Contact Jennifer for information: 866-242-4974 PSYCHOLIST - RELOCATION Seeking Psychologist for a prominent human services agency that supports people with developmental disabilities in the Catskill Mountain region.  Become expert in our proactive philosophy and positive approach, assist in the development and monitoring of positive, proactive plans, and train and support staff in areas of teaching and behaviorism.  Learn more at  HYPERLINK “http://www.delarc.org” www. delarc.org   Qualifications include Ph.D. inPsychology, licensed to practice in NYS, and valid Driver’s license; experience with people w/ disabilities preferred.  Send resume to:  The Arc of Delaware County, 34570 State Highway 10, Walton, NY  13856 or e-mail delarc@ delarc.org.

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 5467220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

HORSE SANTUARY in Pavilion, NY requests volunteers during holiday season. Volunteers must love animals. Call Chris at (585) 5848210 for more information. LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal

and written communication skills. Call 242-6547 VOLUNTEERS ARE STILL NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays.org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www.campgooddays.org VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately!

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Rochester Worships 2012

CHRISTMAS MASSES for ST. FRANCES CABRINI PARISH at

THERE’S A PLACE FOR YOU AT... 25 Westminster Road Rochester NY 14607

across from Eastman House

585-271-2240 www.stpaulsec.org

Our Lady of the Americas Church

864 E. Main Street | Rochester, NY 14605 December 24th

4:00pm

English (Family)

December 25th

10:30am

Spanish

St. Michael’s Church

869 North Clinton Avenue | Rochester, NY 14605 December 24th 7:30pm Spanish (Family)

Annunciation Church

1754 Norton Street | Rochester, NY 14621 December 24th 6:00pm English December 25th 9:30am English

“The Love of God enfolds you . . .” ~ Our prayer for you at Unity of Rochester ~ CHRISTMAS EVE CANDLELIGHTING: Dec. 24, 7:30 p.m.

Music, Meditation and Message

NEW YEAR’S EVE BOWL BURNING: Dec. 31, 7:30 p.m.

Release the old, Bless the new

SUNDAY CELEBRATION 11:00 a.m.

Unity

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

“Wherever you are, God is.” 38 City december 12-18, 2012

COME TO OUR HOUSE FOR CHRISTMAS!

THE SIGHTS, THE SOUNDS, THE CELEBRATION CHRISTMAS EVE December 24th Children’s Service & Holy Communion, 3:30 p.m. Family Service & Holy Communion, 5:30 p.m. (Child care available) Christmas Carols & Anthems, 10:30 p.m. Festive Holy Communion, 11 p.m. CHRISTMAS DAY December 25th • Carols & Holy Communion, 10 a.m. LESSONS & CAROLS FOR CHRISTMAS December 30th, 10 a.m.

Join us for Worship every Sunday at 8 & 10 a.m.

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Rochester Worships 2012 A spirit of joy, A place of welcome

Mary Magdalene Church 401 Main St., East Rochester, NY 14445

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T U A L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

Christmas Eve 7pm

Children’s Time | Choir Anthems | Carols by Candlelight

Christmas Eve Mass Schedule 4:00 Family Mass with Navity Play 11:00 Tradional Christmas Eve Mass Located on the corner of Elm & Main Streets Adjacent to the East Rochester Fire Hall

Rev. Dr. Deborah Roof, P A ST O R

Look for the candles in the windows

www.marymagdalenechurch.org

121 N. Fitzhugh St. | 585.325.4000 | downtownpresbyterian.org

2 9 V I C K PA R K A ROCHESTER, NY

Sunday Services 10:30 AM

All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing • Third Weds ~ 7PM

World Peace & Winter Solstice Service, Dec. 21 at 7:30PM Bowl Burning, Dec. 31 from 6-7PM For more information and schedules

www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

The Spiritualist Church of Divine Inspiration Holiday Schedule: Christmas Service Sunday, December 16, 2012 - 10:30 AM (Bring A Dish to Pass) New Years Eve Service Burning and Releasing Ceremony Monday, December 31, 2012 7:00 PM Tile Ceremony

(Affirming Our Goodness for the New Year)

Sunday, January 6, 2012 - 10:30 AM

27 Appleton Street Rochester, NY 14611 585-328-8908 www.churchofdivineinspiration.com

with your Presbyterian neighbors Calvary St. Andrews Presbyterian Parish

68 Ashland St Rochester 14620 585.325.4950 calvarystandrews.org In the heart of the South Wedge Christmas Eve 6:00pm Joyous Christmas Pageant and Communion 11:00pm Candlelight Communion Christmas Day 10:00am Celebration Communion

Dewey Avenue Presbyterian Church

2009 Dewey Ave, Rochester 14615 (in the chapel of Wesley United Methodist Church) 585.254.1140 • www.dapconline.org Christmas Eve 6:00pm Potluck 7:30pm Lessons and Carols

Brighton Presbyterian Church 1775 East Ave, Rochester 14610 585.473.5876 • Brightonpresby.org Christmas Eve at 6:30pm

Downtown Presbyterian Church

121 N Fitzhugh St, Rochester 14614 585.325.4000 www.downtownpresbyterian.org Christmas Eve 7:00pm Carols, Chancel Choir, Children’s Time, Candlelighting

Lakeside Presbyterian Church

75 Stutson St, Rochester 14612 585.663.0644 • Lakesidepresny.org Christmas Eve 7:30pm Candle Lighting Service

Laurelton United Presbyterian Church

335 Helendale Rd, Rochester 14609 585.482.9200 Christmas Eve 7:00pm Candlelight Service Christmas Day Informal Worship at 10:00am

Third Presbyterian Church

New Life Presbyterian Church

4 Meigs Street, Rochester, 14607 585.271.6513 www.thirdpresbyterian.org Christmas Eve 4:30pm Festival of the Nativity 8:00pm Communion Service 11:00pm Lessons and Carols broadcast on 91.5 FM and WXXI.org

South Presbyterian Church

Trinity Emmanuel

243 Rosedale St, Rochester 14620 585.473.1240 Christmas Eve 7:00pm Candle Lighting Service

4 E Henrietta Rd, Rochester 14620 585.271.5078 • SouthPC.org In the heart of Collegetown Christmas Eve 7:00pm Candlelight Celebration, Carols & Communion

9 Shelter Street, Rochester 14611 585.235.5967 Christmas Eve Service 7:30pm Lessons & Carols with Communion

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39

CITY OF ROCHESTER

FORECLOSURE LISTING PROPERTY ADDRESS

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER. LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2012 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on December 12, 2012 the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list is published herewith. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list.

0070 0262 0265 0470 0100 0104 0128 0132 0297 0307 0219 0222 0162-164 0298-300

0426 0445 0924 0001 0134 0030-30.5

0037 0077 0094 0054 0073 0073 0176 0207-209

0335 0424 0543 0179 0436 0091-93

All persons having an interest in the real property described in the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges. A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including February 19, 2013, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges. Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person.

ROBERT J. BERGIN

CORPORATION COUNSEL PROPERTY ADDRESS 0043 0392

ABERDEEN ST ABERDEEN ST 0184-186.5 ADAMS ST 0141 ALBEMARLE ST 0448 ALEXANDER ST 0012 ALGONQUIN TER 0226 ALPHONSE ST 0104 AMBROSE ST 0108 AMBROSE ST 0245 ANDREWS ST 0430 ANDREWS ST 0086 ANGLE ST 0028 APPLETON ST 0160 ATKINSON ST 0378 AUGUSTINE ST 0071-73 AURORA ST

OWNER

LIEN AMOUNT

LAU SHING S RAYMOND MCCALL J C & GLORIA & GILBERT OLIVIA WEIR RICHARD E MAIN STREET VINEYARD LLC MCAULEY JAMES H JR/BOON DONNA

FORDE BERTINA E LEO FRANCE1 LIVECCHI CHARLES R PJ MAN HOLDINGS INC TESSEMA DEMISSE & TESHOME ERIC

RCT HOLDINGS INC SHARK HOUSE LLC BARIEL LLC COLT RICHARD L TAROMINO JACK

1,903.83 1,379.87 5,549.22 127.53 295.21 1,443.76 1,670.95 771.91 1,650.99 8,485.41 9,374.76 3,853.46 2,208.01 249.00 3,909.08 2,292.33

40 City december 12-18, 2012

ACCOUNT NUMBER 120.740-0002-020.000/0000 KH 120.720-0002-019.000/0000 PI 121.450-0001-014.000/0000 LN 090.670-0001-046.003/0000 UT 106.740-0002-039.000/0000 TA 120.420-0001-055.000/0000 NK 106.330-0002-004.001/0000 ME 105.600-0001-050.000/0000 KU 105.600-0001-052.000/0000 MG 106.790-0001-033.000/0000 QD 106.720-0001-073.001/0000 QU 105.660-0002-004.000/0000 NK 120.490-0002-092.000/0000 RO 121.370-0001-034.000/0000 NJ 090.650-0001-011.000/0000 LQ 106.270-0001-027.000/0000 PP

0195 0102-104 0142-144 0152-154

0104 0065 0236 0524 0536 0774 0015 0205 0213 0326 0341-343

0375 0029 0022 0055 0292 0171 0065-67

0054 0348 0573 0023 0602 0034R 0038-42

0183 1623 0121 0118 0045 0064 0190 0239 0453 0109 0377 0520 0533 0545 0051-53

0136 0070 0071 0023 0147 0190 0265 0367 0277 0146 0221 0229 0036 0073-75

0049 0016 0019 0025 0109 0140 0178 0069 0544-548

0761 0075-77

0047 0103 0551-559

0800 0895

OWNER

LIEN AMOUNT

ACCOUNT NUMBER

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PROPERTY ADDRESS

0900 0935 0951 1222

OWNER

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ACCOUNT NUMBER

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LIEN AMOUNT

ROGER MILGROM TRUST SANTIAGO REINALDO HUERTAS CARMEN DEUTSCHE BANK NATL TRUST CO AMERICAN MADE SEASONS INC TWIN BEECHES ASSOC INC STATHE VIVIAN & DEAN STATHE MICKLE FROST JEANETTE A & JERRY SR HARRINGTON EARL L JR & PAMELA MCCLANEY JOSEPH A STUCCO LLC MCCOY ENTERPRISES INC LEE DAVID R & SUSAN J GITSIS ILIAS ADNER DWIGHT D SHELTON WILLIE B MCCLANEY JOSEPH A III GREEN VOILET WILSON JOHN & JENNIFER ALLISON THOMAS J RODRIGUEZ ENTERPRISES HILL CONLEY/ALICIA EB FAMILY IRREVOCABLE TRUST PAULK ALLEN WINN SUZANNE JOHNSON LERON BREEDLOVE MILDRED A MARTORANA JACK J MEE FREDERICK & PAMELA MAMMARELLO DANIEL A/MARGARET M O BRIEN RICHARD B/THERESA A HERNANDEZ HIPOLITO TOUSSAINT YOLETTE SMITH RAY M & BARBARA J JONES WILLIE JONES WILLIE & LULA V DIAZ RAMON LUIS JR MARSHALL JOHN P MANSFIELD ANN A BOWSER DANIEL A & FREDA/CALVIN CUNNINGHAM JOHN ALLEN LUCIUS MAHER JAMES CAVALLUCCI MIOSOTYS CANTIN THOMAS G & JANE M PANESSA MICHAEL J NA FOOD PRODUCTS LLC RACE EDWARD MALSEGNA MARY HADES PROPERTIES LLC SURACI GREGORY A SPENCER GERALD JR DAVIS CARMEN MOORE VINCENT SMEDLEY BELINDA E JOHNSON MICHAEL ARMOUR BRUCE PICARRETO BRANDON OCASIO ADAM/NIEVES DILMARIS SCHWIND FREDERICK J ROCHESTER RHINOS STADIUM LLC ROCHESTER RHINOS STADIUM LLC MCCOY ENTERPRISES CARRASQUILLO LUIS ORNELAS RAYMOND/CECILIA BROUGHTON ROBERT L & GWENDOLYN DEFAZIO DEBORAH M & US BANK NA MORRISON CHARLES K HUSSAIN ARSHAD BUSH DAVID MACLEOD COLIN B SANCHEZ FRANCISCO BURTON III ALBERT L THIBEDEAU KEVIN P ROBINSON TAKISHA S PELOW DONALD & SUZANNE COCO’S REVENGE LLC COCO’S REVENGE LLC PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD WALTHOUR STUART A JAMES AGUSTIN & GLADYS CHAVEZ MICHAEL A UDYAK VLADIMIR FRANKLIN GENERAL FRANKLIN GENERAL HAIDAR NICANOR SCOTT VICTORIA C HARBOUR PORTFOLIO V1 LP MCCLANEY JOSEPH A III LUMPKIN TIMOTHY 1024 DEWEY AVENUE LLC REASER EULALIA C VALPERGA JENNIFER SENG YANY/MENG RATANA AARON DAVID SHARKHOUSE LLC NORTHRUP MICHAEL JOSEPH KILIMNICK JOSEPH/ZOUR RONEN FARRON DOREEN HERRING DEMETRIUS M LAPINE FELIX V TOLBERT TASHA TIBERIO EUGENE J WAGES BRINCE APONTE FELIX

ACCOUNT NUMBER 2,475.68 1,242.28 1,985.27 244.94 8,038.3 51.79 573.11 3,910.95 2,269.60 2,864.44 49,835.15 7.90 1,994.0 1,428.22 7,215.58 1,446.70 1,056.55 1,386.08 1,668.06 683.00 30.07 625.40 986.57 289.96 1,870.52 1,017.99 272.06 3,033.59 842.00 325.00 1,390.44 2,583.01 1,093.36 1,263.40 1,462.05 1,409.93 624.33 5,508.86 1,846.60 2,443.30 1,188.57 248.00 1,543.01 12,191.71 1,349.43 2,585.57 852.49 1,298.92 2,045.08 8.50 695.55 1,720.50 864.00 1,967.38 1,552.44 1,942.44 1,346.25 2,499.42 2,293.58 1,234.80 4,323.64 3,154.24 637.66 1,852.87 1,152.54 2,050.64 621.75 1,435.05 562.80 2,282.53 789.00 801.00 1,198.62 3,553.89 608.02 748.00 39.86 1,544.81 10,071.57 6,477.17 357.89 1,454.79 1,770.30 2,387.18 1,744.45 943.25 1,691.09 1,953.17 664.00 1,497.00 593.93 1,234.53 3,042.80 487.27 310.57 2,989.12 1,831.43 2,333.18 2,990.59 894.00 7,543.95 4,151.28 1,611.17 3,467.04 1,000.58 822.95 1,970.86 2,333.96

091.650-0003-076.000/0000 VA 091.730-0001-029.000/0000 SB 106.300-0002-025.001/0000 NA 106.310-0001-047.000/0000 OV 106.310-0001-050.000/0000 KK 105.430-0002-027.035/0000 VP 090.830-0002-018.003/0000 TV 090.830-0002-013.004/0000 RA 060.760-0001-056.000/0000 RY 047.770-0001-061.000/0000 RF 120.430-0002-051.000/0000 LN 106.600-0003-020.002/0000 LZ 106.230-0004-053.000/0000 OX 091.720-0004-081.000/0000 RU 105.270-0002-033.000/0000 NQ 107.780-0001-076.000/0000 VA 106.660-0001-035.000/0000 PY 105.270-0002-003.000/0000 LO 105.260-0002-007.000/0000 OB 105.740-0002-016.004/0000 SM 106.340-0003-032.001/0000 NV 105.430-0001-010.000/0000 IN 105.350-0004-071.000/0000 PS 105.420-0001-019.000/0000 OR 105.340-0003-059.000/0000 TD 105.650-0001-003.000/0000 LQ 091.790-0003-045.000/0000 UH 092.780-0001-028.000/0000 TU 105.680-0002-046.001/0000 TI 106.730-0001-048.000/0000 RY 105.700-0001-017.000/0000 NN 105.350-0001-033.001/0000 NK 106.270-0002-043.000/0000 OR 120.330-0002-025.000/0000 LZ 105.550-0003-005.000/0000 NY 106.490-0001-012.001/0000 NS 106.490-0001-013.000/0000 NP 106.420-0003-023.000/0000 MO 107.800-0003-050.000/0000 NM 091.670-0004-015.000/0000 RP 106.440-0003-001.000/0000 KO 105.510-0003-032.000/0000 MD 106.220-0003-053.001/0000 OS 091.640-0003-059.000/0000 VK 091.640-0003-068.000/0000 VJ 121.780-0001-002.000/0000 LU 120.270-0002-012.000/0000 KK 105.650-0002-032.000/0000 NP 105.570-0004-075.000/0000 UG 105.580-0003-045.000/0000 RZ 106.680-0001-053.000/0000 QS 106.520-0002-032.000/0000 MH 107.370-0001-043.000/0000 OU 105.680-0001-068.000/0000 US 105.600-0002-034.000/0000 MY 106.410-0004-025.000/0000 OF 091.730-0002-071.000/0000 QH 091.690-0004-024.000/0000 SK 091.610-0002-017.000/0000 PH 091.620-0001-048.000/0000 RX 091.660-0003-005.000/0000 PW 105.750-0002-083.001/0000 TA 105.750-0002-082.002/0000 TD 106.660-0002-063.000/0000 RE 106.660-0002-072.000/0000 RD 105.840-0003-006.000/0000 PK 120.580-0003-048.000/0000 TB 105.490-0001-033.000/0000 OQ 121.360-0001-062.000/0000 NO 107.610-0001-016.000/0000 NN 107.610-0001-022.000/0000 LH 107.620-0001-013.000/0000 LT 107.620-0001-018.000/0000 PK 106.590-0003-057.000/0000 UX 106.600-0002-078.000/0000 SZ 060.440-0003-043.001/0000 PD 090.390-0001-032.000/0000 OH 090.390-0001-034.000/0000 PT 106.570-0002-038.000/0000 SU 106.570-0002-039.000/0000 TN 106.500-0001-003.000/0000 JM 106.420-0002-038.000/0000 QH 135.480-0001-013.000/0000 NT 091.730-0001-078.001/0000 VQ 091.730-0001-081.000/0000 QJ 090.420-0002-016.000/0000 NW 106.300-0003-016.000/0000 MV 106.300-0004-047.000/0000 QG 092.770-0001-008.000/0000 RZ 120.710-0004-047.000/0000 QT 105.350-0003-003.000/0000 LS 105.350-0004-050.000/0000 NP 105.350-0004-054.000/0000 QN 105.350-0004-055.000/0000 RG 106.410-0002-038.003/0000 SK 106.410-0004-012.000/0000 LI 091.460-0001-040.000/0000 MZ 091.630-0002-004.000/0000 NG 120.760-0002-002.000/0000 LF 120.760-0002-003.000/0000 LY 090.420-0001-037.000/0000 PJ 120.260-0001-001.000/0000 HY 105.820-0003-014.000/0000 NU 060.600-0002-044.000/0000 NM 121.770-0001-022.000/0000 MT 105.650-0001-001.000/0000 KE 106.430-0001-028.000/0000 PK 106.350-0003-017.000/0000 PR

PROPERTY ADDRESS 0253 0083 0166-168

0400 0042 0048 0003 0274 0365 0036 0164-166

0029 0024 0022 0043 0153 0001 0022 0025 0138 0140 0043 0052 0368 0693 0050 0202-204

0740 1179 0059 0009 0104 0039 0069 0075 0010 0060 0098 0007-7.5

0065 0054 0020 0032 0659-663

0556 0035 0044 0143-145

0029 0009 0010 0038 0773-777

0795 0883 0601-603 0660-668

0014 0029 0031 0101 0017 0025 0043-45

0083 0003 0005 0049-51

0231 0049-51

0037 0253 0279 0043 0541 0125 0066 0019 0103 0030 0357 0021 0005 0050 

ROSEWOOD TER ROTH ST ROYCROFT DR ROYCROFT DR S WASHINGTON ST S WASHINGTON ST SANTEE ST SAXTON ST SAXTON ST SCRANTOM ST SECOND ST SELYE TER SENECA AV SEVENTH ST SHELDON TER SHELTER ST SHERER ST SILVER ST SILVER ST SILVER ST SILVER ST SIXTH ST SKYLANE DR SMITH ST SMITH ST SOBIESKI ST SPENCER ST ST PAUL ST ST PAUL ST ST STANISLAUS ST STANTON ST STENSON ST STUNZ ST STUNZ ST STUNZ ST SULLIVAN ST SYKE ST TAYLOR ST TERRY ST THIRD ST THORN ST THORNDALE TER THORNDALE TER THURSTON RD TREMONT ST TREYER ST TREYER ST UNIVERSITY AV VAN STALLEN ST VETTER ST VINAL AV VIOLETTA ST W BROAD ST W BROAD ST W BROAD ST W MAIN ST W MAIN ST WABASH ST WADSWORTH ST WADSWORTH ST WALNUT ST WANDA ST WARNER ST WATKIN TER WATKIN TER WAYNE PL WAYNE PL WEAVER ST WEBSTER AV WELD ST WENDELL ST WEST AV WEST AV WEST HIGH TER WESTFIELD ST WHITNEY ST WIDMAN ST WILBUR ST WILDER ST WILKINS ST WILKINS ST WOODROW AV WRIGHT TER YORK ST

OWNER

LIEN AMOUNT

HANNON WILLIAM C/THOMAS M LAZARUS JASMINE SIMPSON SHARON LE THUY THU CONTE ROBERT CONTE ROBERT JEROME JESICA S OPHARDT ANDREW P O NEILL KEVIN BAEZ TERRIANE F QUINTERO QUINTERO & MAY ANN LEON REMONA 24 SENECA AVENUE INC LETS INVEST UK LTD ELLIOTT BARBARA JONES JAMES J JR M D A INC EVELAND MICHALINA WATT HOWARD J & MARIA L TAF GROUP LLC TAF GROUP LLC KEARSE SINCERRAY STERNIUK HELEN JONES MYOUNGJIN & AGAPE LAKOMY LEWIS C O SULLIVAN PATRICK & PATRICIA MORRISON CARMEN REYES CARMEN MINISTERIOS CIUDAD DE REFUGIO HOLT ANETRA BENT LLOYD MANGOLD PROPERTIES LLC MIJARES EDDY DETHERAGE JAMES M DETHERAGE KIMBERLY L ATKINS WARREN GUCK TERESA M L/U & J & B REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS ROCH FATHERHOOD INITITIVE INC PEREZ MANUEL STATHE MICKLE HLS PROPERTIES INC ZEKARIA AFENDI HINDS HERBERT GRIFFIN DOROTHY STEBBINS ROCCO HUNTER JENNIFER 4507 E HENRIETTA ROAD LLC WOODS CURTIS ALLEN FRANKLIN I/JENNIFER HAIN CHARLES ODELL BUGGS MAJOR HENRY CARSON SHERI L YEOMANS MARSHALL L HARDY PROPERTIES INC T W JONES DEVELOPMENT STONECREST INCOME & OPPOR W & M CORPORATION W & M CORPORATION ROBINSON REGINALD NESMITH CAMECHIA GRIFFIN ANDY & WALKER PHILIP M ROCHE GERARD VAZQUEZ-COLON SHEENA MCCOY ENTERPRISES INC LEVEL 3 INVESTMENTS LLC CHAMBERS REUBEN CALLAHAN JACK J COOPER WILLETTE G SPAHIC DZENAN & LYUBOV CARROLL JONATHAN P/GERTRUDE J TALBOT KENNETH CLARK ELROY JR SLOAN DANIEL & KERRI CURRY LESLIE PARKS WILLIE PEARL WILLIAMS LAYMONE PHOMMACHANH HUANGKHANH AARON DAVID PONDER ELIJAH HUD OGLESBY BRENDA TABTEK LLC3

ACCOUNT NUMBER 313.00 107.540-0001-031.000/0000 MD 1,305.66 106.290-0002-007.001/0000 QN 1,713.73 091.820-0001-072.000/0000 QJ 478.00 091.830-0001-074.000/0000 SG 80,705.53 121.300-0001-045.000/0000 LV 6,680.53 121.300-0001-043.000/0000 KJ 1,485.73 105.490-0002-025.000/0000 QA 1,525.40 105.830-0002-051.000/0000 OE 6,218.37 105.750-0001-015.000/0000 OE 1,483.05 106.370-0002-031.000/0000 MX 2,426.98 106.510-0002-072.000/0000 OQ 66.96 090.830-0001-020.000/0000 LN 409,330.22 091.630-0001-011.000/0000 LD 463.53 106.600-0002-043.000/0000 NG 42.51 135.320-0002-043.005/0000 RT 599.39 120.830-0001-012.000/0000 KK 16,931.36 120.400-0001-001.000/0000 GE 1,058.59 120.350-0001-027.000/0000 NR 767.35 120.350-0001-026.000/0000 MY 201.50 120.350-0001-043.001/0000 MZ 1,844.68 120.350-0001-044.002/0000 OO 468.00 106.600-0002-068.000/0000 SH 267.00 091.740-0001-034.000/0000 PN 4,756.24 105.680-0003-023.000/0000 PN 710.84 105.830-0001-010.000/0000 KB 496.00 091.730-0001-056.000/0000 RY 2,846.22 105.680-0001-018.000/0000 RG 4,319.91 106.450-0001-031.000/0000 LV 4,310.25 105.280-0002-032.000/0000 NI 1,530.61 091.650-0003-045.000/0000 SF 1,100.69 120.620-0001-049.000/0000 QK 171.25 105.300-0001-017.001/0000 MV 2,091.18 107.450-0003-045.000/0000 RA 1,706.02 107.450-0003-038.000/0000 SN 456.29 107.450-0003-037.000/0000 RU 2,371.00 106.300-0002-032.000/0000 KR 2,990.72 120.330-0002-026.000/0000 MS 923.79 120.340-0002-058.000/0000 QR 2,083.32 120.350-0003-052.000/0000 NI 2,069.98 106.590-0002-059.000/0000 VT 1,331.76 090.830-0002-010.000/0000 LL 2,951.84 120.490-0001-084.000/0000 RS 1,316.74 120.490-0001-082.001/0000 RC 12,064.51 135.320-0001-013.000/0000 KV 1,250.40 120.510-0002-049.000/0000 QF 1,802.81 106.300-0001-014.000/0000 KD 796.08 106.220-0004-047.000/0000 QS 1,119.00 106.810-0001-014.000/0000 MM 4,727.32 091.710-0003-022.000/0000 NI 205.19 106.580-0002-006.001/0000 QN 21.74 092.540-0002-011.000/0000 MD 1,803.56 121.690-0003-065.000/0000 TK 2,106.06 105.750-0002-049.000/0000 TU 2,519.37 105.750-0002-046.000/0000 RP 1,216.09 105.750-0002-019.000/0000 RS 8,486.61 120.440-0001-004.000/0000 KB 11,624.12 120.430-0001-026.001/0000 NI 1,600.56 106.520-0002-022.000/0000 LP 621.80 106.410-0004-062.000/0000 OU 312.63 106.410-0004-063.000/0000 PN 2,683.30 105.750-0002-027.000/0000 QY 825.00 091.640-0001-073.000/0000 RE 846.00 105.650-0001-014.000/0000 NB 1,894.20 106.330-0003-040.000/0000 LU 751.47 106.330-0003-031.000/0000 LV 897.96 120.580-0002-013.000/0000 MS 312.89 120.580-0002-014.000/0000 NL 744.22 091.710-0002-070.000/0000 OS 867.00 107.530-0001-041.000/0000 MK 225.32 106.730-0001-008.000/0000 PE 1,617.09 107.450-0003-015.000/0000 OY 501.00 120.490-0001-006.000/0000 NQ 2,953.63 120.490-0001-003.000/0000 LL 1,614.47 135.260-0001-019.000/0000 QN 1,636.94 135.310-0001-070.000/0000 MJ 1,061.03 105.820-0003-077.000/0000 UD 1,146.33 106.400-0001-039.000/0000 PO 380.97 120.550-0001-051.000/0000 MD 1,707.26 120.270-0002-028.000/0000 PM 2,528.76 106.230-0002-033.001/0000 ND 1,733.33 106.250-0001-027.000/0000 OT 50.14 107.560-0001-018.000/0000 QS 3,753.03 106.430-0001-005.000/0000 LV 479.85 120.420-0002-073.000/0000 NY

> page 36 Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 57 James Moore Circle, Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KALPIN’S AUTO CARE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Nicholas Kalpin 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613. [ NOTICE ] MANAGED SERVICES TEAM LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 72 Cascade Drive, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Local Seasons LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/24/2012. County: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to LLC. 2160 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation Design Builders of Monroe County LLC. Articles of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 Universtiy Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 749 Rutgers, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AMERIGLIDE OF ROCHESTER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Atimesa Studios LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location:

Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Salil Athalye, 7 Brewster Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, also the registered agent.. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aus & Ang Snead LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 116 Polaris St. Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brody Brighton Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Brown Simmons LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10/18/2012. Office Location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 21 Lawndale Terrace, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BURRIS CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Clearview Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Button Lofts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Clemente Greece Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DAVE

cont. on page 42 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41

Legal Ads > page 41 JACKZON PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 115 Briar Wood Lane, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DHD 1530 Jefferson, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of domestic professional service limited liability company (PLLC) Name: RICHARDSON ARCHITECTURE, PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal Office of PLLC: 597 Shady Glen Circle, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy

of process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which PLLCs may be formed under the New York PLLC Law.

against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o William S. Ruby, Esq., 70 Linden Oaks, Suite 300, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JA PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/2012. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 E. Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Owning and managing real estate.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of L&B Fabricators, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 10/31/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 W. Main St., STE 246, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kingsland, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: TACS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 728 East Ave., Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of KULIG, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: GORGEVIEW PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on October 29, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated

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as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Steven E. Cuthbert, 124 Gorsdline Street, Rochester, New York 14613. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MAMASAN’S MT. HOPE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o LeThi-Be Walters, 2800 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MAXIM MINI MART LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC : 264 Clifford Ave., Rochester, NY 14621 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Monroe Managing Member, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mr. Mark Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Owen Webster Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Queued LLC. Art. of Org. filed SSNY on 9/27/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC: 190 Presque St. Rochester, NY 14609 Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RAM NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER APARTMENT MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State

42 City december 12-18, 2012

of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER MANAGING MEMBER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rose Dream Homes LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Robert G. Lamb, Jr., Esq., 1 East Main St., 510 Wilder Bldg., Bldg. 1, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SO ROCHESTER INVESTORS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOIL STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 36 Draffin Rd., Hilton, NY 14468-9708. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Monroe Fluid Technology, Inc. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOLEADO, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 363 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 292 Fair Oaks Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Thrombophilic Consultants LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/12. Office location, County of Monroe. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be

served and mailed to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Av., Ste. 202. Brooklyn, NY, 11228 . Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VASALOS HOLDING CO. LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1239 Lake Point Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Vista Golf Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Vista Golf, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WESTSIDE DRIVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 5656 Chili Riga Center Road, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Whittermore Point Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Canal Front Capital Management, LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10 Little Acorn Cir., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC formed in DE on 11/14/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Canal Front Capital Management, LLC, 10 Little Acorn Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o

Business Filings Inc., 108 West 13th St.,Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of DYNAMAX IMAGING, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/24/12. Princ. office of LLC: 37 Coach Side Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Gregory J. Mascitti, Esq., c/o LeClairRyan, 70 Linden Oaks, Ste. 210, Rochester, NY 14625, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Jeffrey W. Bullock, Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Simplifile LC. Fictitious name: Simplifile ERecording LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Utah (UT) on 6/26/02. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 4844 North 300 West, Ste. 202, Provo, UT 84604, also the principal office address and the address to be maintained in UT. Arts of Org. filed with the UT Division of Corporations and Commercial Code, 160 East 300 South, P.O. Box 146705, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6705. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE BERRY COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 11/16/11. Princ. office of LLC: 160 Inverness Dr. West, Ste. 400, Englewood, CO 80112. NYS fictitious name: BERRCO ADVERTISING, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Arts. of Org. filed with CO Dept. of State, 1700 Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of True Wireless, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/8/12. NYS fictitious name: True Wireless, LLC of Texas. Office location: Ontario County. Princ. bus. addr.: 3124 Brother Blvd., #104, Bartlett, TN 38133. LLC formed in TX on 7/8/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be

served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc. (NRAI), 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. TX addr. of LLC: c/o NRAI, 1021 Main St., Ste. 1150, Houston, TX 77002. Cert. of Org. filed with TX Sec. of State, P.O. Box 13697, Austin, TX 78711. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] QUINZI PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/10/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Peter Quinzi 822 McKinley St. East Rochester, NY 14445 Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] STUDIO QI, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/25/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. [ NOTICE ] VNotice of Formation of Jefferson Road DOT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/28/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: FLOUR MAGAZINE LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/26/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O FLOUR MAGAZINE LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 216 MAGNOLIA, LLC. Articles o f Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/2012. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 15 Grace Marie Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION CROSBY ABSTRACTING SERVICES, LLC ] NOTICE OF FORMATION Crosby Abstracting Services, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

Legal Ads SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o the Company, 14 Red Lion Road, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2111 EMPIRE BLVD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 2111 Empire Blvd LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/9/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 849 Lehigh Station Road, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 36 JEFF, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 36 Jeff, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 5/8/2008. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 25454, Rochester, NY 14623. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BACK OF 1075, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is Back of 1075, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The street address of the limited liability company’s office is 1023 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on December 31, 2010. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon

him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. Attn: James T. Townsend, Esq. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] CARPETNOMICS OF WNY, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on November 2, 2012 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 83 Dessie Heights, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PITWEB CMM, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is PITWEB CMM, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 11/13/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 7 Mount Eagle Drive, Penfield, NY 14526. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Greater Rochester Breast Surgery, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 2, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 2235 South Clinton Avenue in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2235 South Clinton Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine and the providing of medical services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMOKE SIGNALS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Smoke Signals Performance Products LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized

to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-15044 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union f/k/a Eastman Savings and Loan Association Plaintiff, vs. James C. McCoy a/k/a James McCoy; City of Rochester; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance TCD-Child Support Enforcement Section; Beneficial New York, Inc.; People of the State of New York o/b/o The City Court of Rochester; Winston Brown, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 22, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 7, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 159 Woodbine Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619; Tax Account No. 120.65-1-5, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8068 of Deeds, page 190. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $33,156.93 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2012 Leticia D. Astacio, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Antonio Masci and Iginio Masci, Plaintiffs vs. David Oliver, et al, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated November 13, 2012, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at a public auction at the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, on December 27, 2012 at 9:00 a.m., premises known as 1133-1135, 1139-1141, 1143-1145 and 1147-1149 Shoecraft Road, Webster, New York 14580. Described as follows: All that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as Lots 230, 231

and 232 of Shoecraft Farms as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 258 of Maps at page 22 and 23. Also, all that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as LotR153A of the Shoecraft Farms Subdivision, as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 278 of Maps at page 8. Approximate amount of judgment: $672,439,97, plus interest, disbursements, fees and costs from the date of the Referee’s Report, October 17, 2011. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index Number 2011-5941. John J. Considine, Esq., Referee Charles J. Genese, Attorney at Law Post Office Box 688 Webster, New York 14580

Fun

[ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Midfirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Traycie L. Calhoun, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/7/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at Monroe County Office Bldg, at W. Main Street, Rochester, State of New York on 01/15/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 127 Perinton Street, Rochester, NY 14615-3141 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 090.30, BLOCK: 1, LOT: 41. Approximate amount of judgment $90,975.12 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 13297/2010. Kristine Demo Vazquez, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: November 16, 2012 1002418 12/12, 12/19, 12/26, 01/02/2013 [ NOTICE OF STRATEGIC CHANGE & INNOVATION, LLC ] Strategic Change & Innovation, LLC was filed with SSNY on 10/05/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 315 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 35 ]

[ NOTICE OF ZYAIR PROPERTIES, LLC ] Zyair Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 09/14/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 133 Rosemary Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.

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December 12-18, 2012 - City Newspaper