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EVENTS: HOLIDAY KICK-OFFS, “NO DANCING ALLOWED” 19 CLASSICAL: HOLIDAY MUSIC PREVIEW 16 RESTAURANT REVIEW: VICTOIRE

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ART REVIEW: “ART OF THE BOOK” 24 FILM: “RED DAWN,” “LIFE OF PI” 30 URBAN JOURNAL: THINKING BIG

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 39

lindsay lou AND THE FLATBELLYS

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NOVEMBER 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012 Free

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 10

Vol 42 No 12

News. Music. Life.

The American people need to take charge of their future.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Lacrosse and the Iroquois identity. NEWS, PAGE 4

Rodent holds cancer clues. NEWS, PAGE 5

Medley Centre and RBTL: Do we dare to believe? NEWS, PAGE 6

Lighting strikes twice: Garth Fagan and Wynton Marsalis reunite. DANCE, PAGE 18

PROFILE | STORY AND PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE | PAGE 12

The Pickpockets busk a move The Pickpockets is a beautifully rag-tag busker outfit straight out of Tin Pan Alley, boasting a faded sepia romanticism and nostalgic charm. The instrumentation is stark yet achingly beautiful. It’s the blues of hobos riding the rails, the sound of dwindling optimism and migration found in the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression. Though it might seem somewhat out of place and out of time, this 21st century Rochester outfit sees a connection. “I think we kind of sympathize with that era with our own financial endeavors,” says drummer John

Lake. That’s probably why they became pickpockets in the first place. The band calls what it does “Speakeasy Top 40,” and blames its antiquity and affinity for vintage on its instruments. “It kind of happened naturally,” says violinist/ guitarist Phillip Herford. “Playing in the street with an accordion and a violin, that sound is going to kind of take control.” “It’s what the instruments do naturally,” Lake adds.

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We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Election reflections

An obscene amount of money was spent on the political campaigns leading up to the elections of November 6, 2012. This is all the more troubling when we learn that many people were denied the right to vote, were prevented from voting in the best possible circumstances, or had their ballots declared invalid. We obviously have not heeded the lessons of November 2000. How can we make sure that these longstanding problems will finally be corrected, four years hence? 1) As so much money is being channeled into campaigns, purportedly to correct so much that is awry in our society, the law should require that one-third of this money be transferred to the state or federal government – depending upon the nature of each campaign – to allow for the opening of more polling places and the updating of our voting tools, so that everything is in perfect working order next time around. Surplus revenue should go to our public schools. 2) Spending more than one hour in line to cast a vote is unacceptable. People need to receive timed tickets as they take their place in line to vote, and after one hour, the state government will pay a fine to each person who is in line for more than 60 minutes, which will increase by 50 percent of the original amount with each additional half hour. This will provide the states with a much-needed incentive to get their houses in order. Ideally, we should find new, secure, and efficient ways to cast our votes, without having to travel to polling places. 3) Let us make voting mandatory, as it is in a number of other democracies. The American people need to take charge of their future, and that act begins inside the voting booth. Like it or not, politicians decide where we are heading. Ignoring them isn’t the answer. Having an informed electorate that understands the choices available to it, and chooses the best among these, is a step in the right direction. Those who do not vote will be fined if they do not have valid

November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

excuses. These fines will generate revenue allowing us to improve the voting process. Surplus revenue should go to our public schools. 4) Since there is still confusion in some places as to what constitutes proper voter identification, let us finally introduce the identification card in this country. We can learn how to implement this, as well as much else, from our friends in Europe. Ignoring well-functioning models, just because they are not our own, isn’t the answer. 5) All attempts to intimidate or mislead potential voters about their voting rights should be investigated to the full extent of the law, and those who are found guilty should be severely fined. Voting is a basic civil right. The revenue from these fines should go to the public schools that are educating the citizens of this country and that are in need of greater support. Once we have achieved this, we will be on the right track. MICHAEL AMY, ROCHESTER

The RBTL deal

We don’t need another theater; we need the stores or a community center with good security and a caring property owner (“Medley, RBTL Have Theater Deal,” News). Congel does a lot of talking and gets nothing done. I’m frustrated and fed up with the entire mess! JUNI MOON

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com RBTL can keep “believing” in one hand and, well, you know what in the other and see which gets filled first. These are two phantom developments combined into one, and neither will ever see fruition. DAN PALMER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com This sounds a lot like Republican math to me. MAX FENSTER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com At some point our Big City dreams come face-to-face with our smallish mid-sized city realities. We are no longer a town of corporate headquarters (New York’s taxes took care of that), or of entrepreneurial wealth (we chased them out of the state with our anti-business bureaucrats ranging from DEC to DOL to... well, you name it), or civic “can-do” pride (witness the endless squabbling over just about everything in this town). We are a shrinking city in an imploding Upstate New York economy with no light at the end of the

tax-and-spend, highest-in-the-nation-taxes, let’s-kill-industry-to-savethe-planet tunnel. Give it up, Arnie. Or take your dreams and move to a growing economy like Texas or, well, pretty much anywhere other than New York, Illinois, California, or the other bankrupt states. B SARBANE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Praise for ‘Motherhood the Musical’

Couldn’t disagree with Adam Lubitow more on his disappointing review of Downstairs Cabaret’s “Motherhood the Musical.” As an “old man” and grandfather to four granddaughters, 8 years and under, I must report that both my wife and I found the production and the cast very musical, entertaining and realistic in its theme. The three mothers and the motherto-be were high energy and very talented. We would encourage both women and men to see this show while it’s still here. HOWARD GOLOVE, HENRIETTA

Republicans’ history

Perhaps Mr. Grella should spare his readers his prescient historical observations about Republican racism and stick to the theatric (“Lincoln,” Movie Review”). The 13th Amendment passed the House with 100 percent of Republicans in favor and only 23 percent of Democrats. The 14th Amendment, granting full rights of citizenship to freed slaves, passed the House and Senate without a single Democratic vote. For the next 100 years, it would be the Republican platform fighting for minority rights, not the Democrats. In fact, Democratic President Woodrow Wilson ordered the firing of all Negro workers in the southern Navy shipyards and the re-segregation of the federal workforce, previously desegregated by Republican Teddy Roosevelt. Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt vetoed the only anti lynching legislation to pass Congress in 1934. Sidling up to current rhetoric and pseudo-intellectually giving it historical context only serves to expose the folly of Mr. Grella’s history education. Perhaps he should consider reserving his reviews to the follies rather than espousing folly. GERRY W.

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 28 - December 4, 2012 Vol 42 No 12 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

urban journal | by mary anna towler

Thinking big

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“Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men’s blood and probably themselves will not be realized.” Chicago architect and Grade-A dreamer Daniel Burnham may or may not have said that, depending on which source you believe. Regardless, I love the statement, particularly because of its appropriateness to cities and city planning (which is what Burnham was referring to when he said it, if he said it). And so it pops into my mind every once in a while, when I read about some new development plan. Burnham had big plans and big dreams about Chicago, some of which came true and helped make it the impressive lakefront city that it is. If we don’t dream big, if we are timid, we miss opportunities. We don’t inspire. We think small. And we create small, safe stuff. The question is, when are big dreams worth pursuing? And when are they irresponsible risks? One current case in point: the plan to build a theater for the Rochester Broadway Theatre League at Medley Centre, formerly known as Irondequoit Mall. RBTL chair Arnie Rothschild, who’s been the driving force behind the push for a new theater from the get-go, wanted the theater to be on the Midtown site, downtown. But he couldn’t convince city officials that RBTL had enough money to build and operate a theater, and Mayor Tom Richards was afraid that city taxpayers would end up holding the bag. So RBTL will head to Irondequoit – if. And while Rothschild disagrees, seems to me there’s a really big “if ” involved. As our Jeremy Moule lays out elsewhere this week, according to Rothschild, Medley Centre owner Scott Congel has agreed to build the theater and have RBTL operate it. But Congel announced in 2008 that he would turn Medley Centre into a grand, multi-purpose development, with retail, a hotel, restaurants, and apartments. None of that has begun yet. So should we sniff and snicker? Or does this thing have potential? Is this something good for Greater Rochester? Is it thinking big? I’ve never thought that redeveloping Irondequoit Mall was good for Greater Rochester. Our population isn’t growing. We don’t seem able to accept that, but facts are facts. All the construction we’re getting in the suburbs – the retail explosion around Eastview Mall, the Reserve development eating up open space in Brighton, the redevelopment of Irondequoit Mall – all

All the construction we’re getting in the suburbs, if it’s successful, will come at the expense of development elsewhere.” of that, if it’s successful, will come at the expense of existing retail, residential, and office development elsewhere. We’re just shifting stuff. Facts are facts. You can look at this as simple capitalism at work. Survival of the fittest. And yes, it’s an example of that. But it’s also an example of thinking small. Focusing on individual businesses and little, individual parcels of land that make up the five counties of Greater Rochester. If we looked at the bigger picture, if we tried to plan the kind of community that would be the healthiest, the strongest, the most attractive and most livable, would we design a place where beautiful open space was replaced by development that population trends didn’t support? Would we design a community in which government encouraged one suburb to rob from another? Would we design a community where taxpayers subsidized suburban shopping malls because the developers couldn’t make it if we didn’t? It’s foolish to dream too big – and to anchor our dreams in gossamer. But once in a while, we ought to dream and plan really big – not big projects, but big ideas. And underlying all of our dreams ought to be a big picture, a thoughtful, this is what we want to be – and what we could be, long-range view. If we were really making big plans, we wouldn’t even be talking about a theater at Irondequoit Mall – or planning to try to rescue that shopping complex. (If we had been making really big plans for the past 40 years, we’d have a thriving Midtown.) What kind of community do we want? Isn’t that important?

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

[ news from the week past ]

UR, union come to terms

After months of touchand-go negotiations, the University of Rochester and the Service Employees International Union have reached a tentative agreement on a new contract. The union represents nearly 1,800 service workers at the UR. Workers cannot talk about the agreement until after a vote is taken on Thursday, November 29.

More waiting in fracking review

Governor Andrew Cuomo said the state will miss a November 29 deadline to finalize proposed regulations for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Because of the delay, the proposed regulations could be subject to another public comment period. The delay is because the state is just starting its review of fracking’s health effects.

New Party producers

Mayor Tom Richards wants to hire Up All Night Productions to produce and manage the city’s Party in the Park summer concert series. If Council agrees, Up All Night will get a threeyear contract, replacing previous contractor, the Springut Group. Com-

 City

plaints about the concert series range from the location — a parking lot on Exchange Boulevard — to the quality of the acts.

News

Bus station begins

Ground was broken for Rochester’s new $50million transit center on St. Paul Street. The enclosed, one-story facility will span the block between South Clinton Avenue and St. Paul, and will include 26 bus bays. The station should open in 2015.

CULTURE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Iroquois identity

City looks for health-care savings

The City of Rochester, with agreement from union leaders, will establish a self-funded health insurance program that, Mayor Tom Richards says, could save the city $13.4 million over three years. The program kicksin on January 1, 2013, and will be administered in its first year by MVP Health Care. The plan will be managed by a committee made up of members of the city administration and union leaders. Health-care costs are one of the fastestrising parts of the city’s annual budget.

November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

Ansley Jemison is assistant coach of the under 19 Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team. PHOTO PROVIDED

The Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team was turned back just as team members were about to board a plane to the United Kingdom to participate in the 2010 International Lacrosse Championship. Assistant coach Ansley Jemison found out that British officials wouldn’t accept team members’ passports because they were issued by the Haudenosaunee or Six Nations, a league of Native Americans of North America. “In past years, we traveled to Great Britain and most of the Commonwealth countries, and we never had a problem,” Jemison says. “We always traveled as our own sovereign nation under our own flag.” The incident, which drew international headlines, prevented the team from playing even though it was ranked fourth in the world. Since then, the team has traveled to other countries, but Haudenosaunee passports remain problematic despite the 1794 Canandaigua Treaty between the Six Nations and the US government.

The treaty recognizes the sovereignty of the Haudenosaunee and protects their right to govern themselves, Jemison says. Jemison will give a lecture, “Denying Identity: The Ongoing Passport Issue,” at Nazareth College at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 29, in the Shults Center. Tickets for the event, presented by Friends of Ganondagan, are $10 for Ganondagan members, $15 for non-members, and $5 for students. Jemison says he understands that recent events have led to concerns about national security, but preserving cultural identity is an extremely sensitive historical issue for Native Americans. And the passport problem exacerbates the issue, he says. Northeastern Native Americans are widely viewed as the originators of lacrosse, Jemison says, so it’s more than just a game. Lacrosse has deep historical roots, and was used for sport, developing character, and settling disputes, he says.

When blind mole rats grow cancer cells, they secrete large quantities of a “suicidal protein” called interferon beta. And the interferon quickly kills the cancer cells. In naked mole rats, a specific gene makes cancerous cells hypersensitive to overcrowding and stops the cells from multiplying.

MEDICAL RESEARCH | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

FUNDING | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Underground cure

LGBT grants

When it comes to cute and cuddly, mole rats are challenged by almost any standard. The blind mole rat is only slightly more appealing than its toothy, hairless distant kin, the naked mole rat. But both rodents share a remarkable characteristic that compensates for their lack of physical beauty: they may be the only mammals on earth naturally resistant to cancer. Researchers at the University of Rochester, Professor Vera Gorbunova and Assistant Professor Andrei Seluanov, recently discovered how blind mole rats ward off the disease. And it’s surprisingly different from the discovery they made three years ago concerning naked mole rats’ cancer resistance. The team, which also includes UR researchers Christopher Hine, Xiao Tian, and Julia Ablaeva; Andrei Gudkov at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo; and Eviatar Nevo at the University of Haifa in Israel believe their findings could lead to more effective cancer treatments in humans. When blind mole rats grow cancer cells, they secrete large quantities of a “suicidal protein” called interferon beta. And the interferon quickly kills the cancer cells. In naked mole rats, Gorbunova’s team discovered that a specific gene

Funding is a serious challenge for many of the region’s nonprofit organizations. But Rochester’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community got a boost recently from an organization that, in a unique twist, comes from the LGBT community. | For the first time, the LGBT Giving Circle of the Rochester Area Community Foundation provided grants to nonprofit organizations serving the needs of the LGBT community. Five organizations — Image Out, Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus, Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies, Temple Sinai, and Volunteer Legal Services of Monroe County — received grants totaling nearly $9,000. | The Community Foundation has been providing grants to the LGBT community for years, says Executive Director Jennifer Leonard. But the Giving Circle, which was created last year, gives the LGBT community the ability to pool resources with other members of the community, she says. The Giving Circle is a powerful tool, she says, that can grow annually. | The LGBT Giving Circle has about 50 members, and the organization’s goal is to help nonprofits working to highlight diversity and strengthen the LGBT community. LGBT giving circles have been created in cities throughout the country.

A blind mole rat. PHOTO PROVIDED

in the rodent makes cancerous cells hypersensitive to overcrowding and stops the cells from multiplying. “What’s interesting about these two rodents is how they came to a solution, but approached it in two different ways,” Gorbunova says. Mole rats are important research subjects because they have unusually long lifespans, she says. Subterranean creatures with few predators, mole rats can live 20 to 30 years, so instead of evolving to ward off enemies, they’ve developed mechanisms for fighting illness, Gorbunova says. The blind mole rat’s interferon secretion is of special interest to Gorbunova because humans produce interferon, too, mostly as an anti-viral agent. Finding out what triggers interferon production in the rats may lead to finding a similar immune response in humans, she says.

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2,158 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,072 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 26. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from November 12 to November 24: -- Staff Sgt. Rayvon Battle Jr., 25, of Rocky Mount, N.C. -- Sgt. Channing B. Hicks, 24, of Greer, S.C. -- Spc. Joseph A. Richardson, 23, of Booneville, Ark. -- Lance Cpl. Dale W. Means, 23, of Jordan, Minn. -- Petty Officer 1st Class Kevin R. Ebbert, 32, of Arcata, Calif. —

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City 

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Proposed RBTL theater hinges on Medley progress

Rochester Broadway Theatre League would continue to own the Auditorium Theatre, though developer Scott Congel plans to build RBTL a new theater at Medley Centre in Irondequoit (pictured). PHOTO BY JEREMY MOULE

The news leaked out (or was leaked) early last week: Medley Centre developer Scott Congel plans to build the Rochester Broadway Theatre League a new 3,000-seat theater. Congel and RBTL have an agreement in principle on the deal, though the two parties are still hashing out a long-term operating agreement. The deal’s basic terms, however, are in place. Congel didn’t return calls, but RBTL board chair Arnie Rothschild says that under the agreement, Congel will build the theater as part of his Medley Centre redevelopment project. RBTL, in turn, would lease the facility and use it to present large touring productions. The deal would fulfill a longheld goal of RBTL officials: a bigger, stateof-the-art theater for the organization to operate. RBTL wouldn’t own the theater and the organization wouldn’t have to raise money to build it. Congel would pay off the approximately $1.4 million debt on the Auditorium Theatre, which RBTL owns. He would also pay for renovations to the Aud, which RBTL would continue to own and use for smaller performances. “Obviously, [Congel’s] got a lot of stuff that he’s got to get done,” Rothschild says. “But this is pretty exciting for our community.” But if the theater proposal sounds too good to be true, there’s reason. The whole thing hinges on Medley Centre’s redevelopment, a project that some observers are skeptical of. Congel bought the property in 2008 and for the past several years, it’s sat idle, with only two department stores operating. Congel hasn’t yet secured financing for the project, and hasn’t fully met the terms of a tax-incentive agreement with local governments.  City

November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

Rothschild says he expects Congel to break ground on the project this spring; RBTL would start performances two years after. And Rothschild says he’s confident that Congel will get the project done. “I would point to the success that his family has had all over the Northeast in everything they’ve done,” he says. The Congel family has developed successful malls around the Northeast, including the upscale Walden Galleria in suburban Buffalo and Destiny USA in Syracuse (although in smaller scale than was originally proposed). Congel, however, is redeveloping Medley Centre outside of his family’s firm. Rochester Broadway Theatre League has

been trying to get a new theater for more than a decade, and several prior proposals — including one that was part of the former Renaissance Square project and a more recent proposal for the Midtown site — never made it off the ground. A larger theater would attract newer touring shows, Rothschild says. He says that RBTL wants Rochester to have “the kind of venue where everything comes here right off Broadway.” The Medley Centre proposal provides other benefits, compared to the Auditorium Theatre, Rothschild says. It’s more accessible to the semis that carry travelling productions from town to town. The parking is easier to access and more of it is available. And the theater would be built to accommodate the type of large productions RBTL brings in. The Auditorium Theatre’s cramped stage is an issue for a lot of productions, Rothschild says. The Aud would still be owned and programmed by RBTL. It’d be renovated so that it has fewer seats — 1,500 as opposed to 2,400 — and it would be air conditioned.

Rochester Broadway Theatre League board chair Arnie Rothschild and promoter Albert Noccolino inside the Auditorium Theatre. FILE PHOTO

Rothschild says there are plenty of shows better suited for a 1,500-seat theater. They wouldn’t be Broadway blockbusters, but rather less-produced shows like “Nunsense” or other types of entertainment like comedy or dinner theater, he says. “The product is pretty limitless,” he says. Medley Centre has displayed indications of

struggling, but recently the project has shown a sign or two of life. Congel has made the yearly payments required under his PILOT agreement — an in-lieu-of-taxes agreement — with the Town of Irondequoit, the East Irondequoit school district, and COMIDA, the Monroe County industrial development agency. But that agreement contains investment and construction milestones, and Congel has to pay penalties if he misses them. The first milestone passed in April, at which point the developer was supposed to have invested $90 million. Congel submitted documents claiming he invested $93 million, and COMIDA agreed with his assessment. The East Irondequoit school district did not, however. Last week, the district voted to execute the provision of the PILOT agreement that requires Congel to make a supplemental penalty payment. The board says he owes $827,722, of which $550,000 belongs to the school district. “It’s our obligation to enforce the PILOT,” John Abbott, the district’s deputy superintendent, told the board just prior to its vote. The next day, during its regular monthly meeting, the COMIDA board voted on a measure to extend the milestones by three years. The measure also gives Congel six months to pay $3 million he owes into escrow;

$500,000 is for the Town of Irondequoit and $2.5 million is for COMIDA. Last week, Abbott said the school district isn’t sure how the COMIDA move affects its pursuit of the supplemental payment. And, he said, the district maintains that COMIDA can’t change the terms of the PILOT agreement without getting the town and school district’s permission. COMIDA tried to make a similar change previously, but after the district threatened to sue, it rescinded. At last week’s COMIDA meeting, Eugene Caccamise, president of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers Local No. 3, mentioned a potential investor for part of Medley Centre. Representatives from the AFL-CIO’s Housing Investment Trust have talked with Congel about investing in a 40-story apartment complex on the Medley Centre site, says Caccamise, the building trades’ representative on the COMIDA board. The Housing Investment Trust is essentially a mutual fund. It invests union pension funds in housing projects — particularly affordable, senior, and specialneeds housing — with the goal of making some money back. It also expects that union workers would do the construction work. Last week, a spokesperson for the trust said she wasn’t aware of any involvement with the project, but that an investment typically wouldn’t be announced until it’s final. Caccamise also spoke about Congel’s credibility as a developer, and said he’s been involved with successful projects across the Northeast. The East Irondequoit school district, he said, is putting obstacles in Congel’s way. “I think [Medley Centre’s] going to move forward,” Caccamise says. “He’s pushing it very hard.”

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Not the same old Rochester selection. FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT Coming Due by Year End

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

2929 MONROE AVE • 442-0123 • Appointments Suggested

Are you A Cancer Survivor

With Trouble Sleeping? We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue. How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after.

Anti-war toys demonstration

Genesee Valley Citizens for Peace will hold a demonstration against the sale and purchase of war toys for holiday gifts from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, December 1. The GVCP holds the demonstration annually and asks supporters to bring non-violent toys to the event, which is at Wegmans Plaza, Route 20A, in Geneseo.

Stop the drones rally

Several anti-war groups

will hold a protest against the use of drone warfare from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28. Some of the drones used in Afghanistan are operated out of Hancock Field near Syracuse. The protest is at Twelve Corners Park in Brighton.

Eco-friendly holiday gifts

Rochester Greenovation will hold an Eco Bazar for the holidays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, December 1. The bazar will feature artwork made from recycled and repurposed materials from local artists and businesses, as well as holiday candy and baked goods. The event is at 1199 East Main Street.

Lectures on Arab culture and Islamophobia

Nazareth College will present two lectures by Stephen Sheehi, associate professor of Arabic and Arab culture at the University of South Carolina. Sheehi will discuss “Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28, at the Naz Arts Center. His second lecture, “The Arab Spring and Foundation of Modern Arab Identity,” is at 12:15 p.m. on Thursday, November 29, in the Golisano Academic Center.

Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study  City

November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

CITY NEWS BLOG

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND

Dining

A Belgian endive salad (left) and a Belgian sausage sandwich with frites from East Avenue’s Victoire. PHOTOS BY MIKE HANLON

Wins and losses Victoire 120 East Ave. 325-3663, victoirebar.com Monday-Saturday 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m., Sunday 4 p.m.-2 a.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Rochester has needed a good Belgian beer bar for at least a decade — which, coincidentally, is almost exactly the amount of time that I’ve lived here. Despite the excellent beer bars and microbreweries that have bred like rabbits across the region in recent years, the lack of a true Belgian joint has been a noticeable void in the city. About five months ago the partnership that owns Murphy’s Law took over the basement space on East Avenue most recently occupied by Alexandria, transforming it into a chunk of Oud Brussel. At first glance, it looks like they succeeded admirably. The bar room is cozy, full of dark wood paneling and half-timbered walls. Enameled beer signs in French line the walls, lit from above like Stations of the Cross for beer acolytes. And the row of gleaming taps behind the bar — the labels written on tiny chalkboards to emphasize just how fresh the

beer is here — are a thing to behold. There’s even a bas-relief of the Manneken-Pis on the sign outside. A statue representing a toddler having a pee is as potent a branding statement of Belgian beer bars worldwide as the Golden Arches are for bad hamburgers and cultural imperialism. Partners John Diamantopoulos and Tom Masachi engaged Ryan Dalton (who also acts as executive chef at Murphy’s Law) to develop the menu and oversee the kitchen at Victoire, which the staff pronounces “victory” rather than the French version of the word. Dalton hung more than three quarters of the menu on moules frites, the quintessential combination of steamed mussels and french-fried potatoes that’s as Belgian as a Trappist monk. The mussels at Victoire are pretty amazing. You get a pound of plump and tender shellfish per order, ever so slightly briny but never fishy, and there wasn’t a single bad one in any batch I sampled. The cooks at Victoire go farther than the usual white wine or beer with some sort of aromatic combination that you get everywhere in Belgium. Instead they work with a palette that includes charred tomatoes, bacon, housemade sausage, bleu

cheese, coconut milk, lemongrass, spinach, lobster broth, champagne, and cream, as well as more familiar ingredients like shallots, leeks, garlic, thyme, and other herbs, turning out flavorful and sometimes arresting combinations of flavors. You will be very grateful for the plateful of toasted french bread that comes with each order, allowing you to fish half-melted bits of bleu cheese or savory slices of sausage out of the broth after that last black shell has clattered into the bowl of empties. Add in a snifter full of Brooklyn Brewing Company’s Fiat Lux (a witbier with plenty of hops, some lime zest, and coriander to zip things up a bit) or a darker Gulpener Mestreechs (a combination of a Flemish brown ale and a Dortmunder bock with some wild yeast thrown into the mix making it lip-smackingly tart), and you have as much of a meal as you will ever need. Victoire has atmosphere, it has sensational

beer, and the mussels are exceptional. But moules without frites are like ground rounds without hot sauce, and the frites at Victoire are sadly subpar. I sampled the fries three times, once even stopping in during a time when I knew the kitchen wouldn’t be

overtaxed so that I could try them at their best. On my first visit the fries were pallid, limp, and cool, even though the mussels were still boiling when the pot hit the table. On my second visit, I specifically asked that they serve the fries crispy. Instead, they came out virtually burned — cooked to a dark mahogany brown, crunchy from the surface all the way through, and oil-soaked. The third time I tried the fries, with dinner on a not-very-busy Wednesday night, they were dark brown, oily, and somehow still floppy. I know a thing or two about making fries — I do it at home as frequently as my wife will allow it — and not even the errors here were consistent, each of them pointed to specific but distinct failures in the preparation or delivery process. I understand from talking to Diamantapoulos and Dalton that they are looking into the matter and hope to solve the mystery soon. I very much hope that they can. A superlative order of moules-frites is a thing apart, and well worth waiting for. Mussels are easy to make well, and they are fast — five to seven minutes from the time the order is submitted to when it heads out to the table. Good fries take longer, and they require careful attention to the process and timing. The same is true for making a good onion soup, or a good beef stew. Both dishes demand good technique and attention to tiny details at every step of their preparation to achieve something special. The onion soup at Victoire, a meager portion served in a cast-iron pot, lacked that sort of attention. The onions were undercooked — odd for a soup whose primary ingredient is caramelized onions cooked until they nearly dissolve — and it tasted like someone had added a fistful of sugar to it (perhaps to speed the cooking of the onions), rendering it virtually inedible. Similarly, the Belgian carbonnade, a beef stew enriched with potatoes, onions, and spinach served over egg noodles, suggested a lack of care. The beef was stringy, the potatoes were slightly undercooked, and the bright-green spinach languished in a salty broth bereft of roux — or even starch from the potatoes or noodles — to transform it into a passable sauce. The overall impression was less a stew simmered long and slow than a sauté pan full of ingredients quickly heated and doused with soup before being rushed out of the kitchen. Even the two tiny fried potato and cheese croquettes atop the dish were disappointing; nicely crunchy but overwhelmingly salty. None of the problems at Victoire are insurmountable. In time, the restaurant will overcome its growing pains and get its frites together. I’ll have another beer while I wait.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

Upcoming [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Future, Yo Gotti Saturday, January 5. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St. 9 p.m. $40-$60. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

Music

[ Classical/Pop ] RPO: Classic Bond Friday, February 15-Saturday, February 16. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82. 454-2100. rpo.org [ Folk/Rock ] Indigo Girls Saturday, March 2. Hochstein School of Music, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. 8 p.m. $36.50-$75. greentopiafestival.com.

Jean Grae

Thursday, November 29 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive 8:30 p.m. | $12-$15 | 292-9940, lovincup.com [ HIP-HOP ] Jean Grae isn’t a household name, but if you

know hip-hop you likely know Jean Grae. A daughter of South African jazz musicians, she was raised in NYC and is an alumna of the High School of Performing Arts. Her songs including “My Life” and “Love Thirst” from “Jeanius with 9th Wonder” take me back to my favorite acid-jazz-tinged hip-hop tunes from the 90’s. Leave it to Jean Grae to take a rhyme and a beat and give it life. She’ll headline Roc the Town 3.0 with DJ Chris G, DJ Tim Tones, Hassan Mackey, Sub-Soil, Moses Rockwell, JD Riggz, Show Money and others. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Boregore Friday, November 30 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 9 p.m. | $20-$25 | 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com [ ELECTRONIC ] Boregore has that kind of music that

makes you feel like you need a shower — but in a good way. With a dash of chip music, a snappy synthetic beat, and raps that sound suspiciously like grime with a twist of sexual frustration, the overall effect is glittery until the beat drops — at which point all bets are off and it’s about to get filthy. While the lyrics are certainly…suggestive, there is no doubt that these are some catchy mixes, and they have attracted such artists as Miley Cyrus and Diplo. Local DJs Keto and Prophet will be opening with their eclectic mixes, hers of house music and his of dub mixes. — BY SUZAN PERO

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Mike “Slo-Mo” Brenner w/Hoagy Wing. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Trans-Siberian Orchestra Wednesday, December 5 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square 7:30 p.m. | $32.75-$60.75 | bluecrossarena.com [ HOLIDAY ] The Trans-Siberian Orchestra has been

bowling over audiences with its elaborate concerts and unique musical style for almost 20 years. This extremely ambitious outfit, founded in 1993 by composer/ producer Paul O’Neill, incorporates classical, orchestral, symphonic, and progressive components into a hard rock and heavy metal aesthetic. The band has sold more than 7 million albums and even more concert tickets as it has redefined the limits of the “rock opera.” This year’s winter tour will be the live debut of “The Lost Christmas Eve,” the final installment of the group’s holiday trilogy. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Green Jelly Friday, November 30 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $15-$18 | 454-2966, bugjar.com [ ALTERNATIVE ] What began as Green Jello, the world’s

worst band, in Buffalo, New York, Green Jelly relocated to Hollywood and scored a surprise hit with “Three Little Pigs.” The group’s decades-long career has been characterized by a twisted sense of humor that leaves no cow sacred. The band’s initial reputation for food fights or songs about serial-killer breakfast cereal characters might not be everybody’s cup of soup, but it might be just right for you and your pumpkin. Psyopus and Beard Without a Moustache open. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

World Inferno Friendship Society played at The Club at Water Street Saturday, November 24. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Life boats and fractured waltzes [ review ] by frank de blase

AudioInflux’s rock and roll pumps for

sure. I love when bands sort of fall onto a stage, morphing the sound check into the first number. Drums, guitar, and voice were noodling one minute, the show was underway the next. Sure, AI grooves — as it did Wednesday, November 21, at Sticky Lips Juke Joint — but just dig how far back it reins in the back beat. That’s the part that makes your backbone slip. Some friends had raved rabidly about O’Death, so I rolled the dice and rolled over to the Club @ Water Street on Saturday to dig on this downstate ensemble and show headliners World Inferno Friendship Society. O’Death was positively brilliant, with just the right amount of acoustic fervor and joyous doom. It was as if the ship was going down and the band didn’t care. It was a funeral parade that swirled and spilled into the rabid crowd that didn’t seem to mind that there weren’t enough life boats. If O’Death was the gateway to the afterlife, Brooklyn’s World Inferno Friendship Society was the band to

greet the people when they got there, swirling with futuristic throwback and pomposity. The music ebbed and flowed like a fractured waltz. It was speakeasy clandestine and cool, yet raved hard enough for the rockers in the crowd with their grasping, outstretched hands. The Chinchillas dropped a new CD on the heads of a big crowd at Abilene later on that night. The set was a cross section of all of the band’s tongue-incheek genius and bar-band slouch. I remember being at the band’s release party for “Let’s Wake up and Make Love” at Friends and Players back in the 1990’s, and was catapulted back to those days when the band dug it out and let it run around the room. If you think the blues aren’t dramatic enough, just dig Steve McNally’s digits as they dance over the B-3 keys. It was a groovy digital display as McNally walked the keyboard as part of Joe Beard’s band at the Dino on Saturday. A beautiful blend of elegance and drama boiled beneath the rest of the band’s chug and cruise.

[ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Fat City. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. [ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Soo Yeon Kim, soprano. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Bill Tiberio. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10. Key Dreamers. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 13

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Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206B” or go to www.bcrc.us rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11

Busk a move

Local band The Pickpockets got its start busking at the Public Market. Although it has gone on to play actual concerts, its members continue to play for change on Saturday mornings. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Pickpockets

W/Catl and Jenna Giuliani Thursday, December 6 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. | $7-$9 | bugjar.com  thosepickpockets.bandcamp.com

[ PROFILE ] By Frank De Blase

The Pickpockets is a beautifully rag-tag busker outfit straight out of Tin Pan Alley, boasting a faded sepia romanticism and nostalgic charm. The instrumentation is stark yet achingly beautiful. It’s the blues of hobos riding the rails, the sound of dwindling optimism and migration found in the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression. Though it might seem somewhat out of place and out of time, this 21st century Rochester outfit sees a connection. “I think we kind of sympathize with that era with our own financial endeavors,” says drummer John Lake. That’s probably why they became pickpockets in the first place. The band calls what it does “Speakeasy Top 40,” and blames its antiquity and affinity for vintage on its instruments. “It kind of happened naturally,” says violinist/guitarist Phillip Herford. “Playing in

the street with an accordion and a violin, that sound is going to kind of take control.” “It’s what the instruments do naturally,” Lake adds. The Pickpockets first hit the scene a little over a year ago, playing at the Rochester Public Market “for gas money and sandwich money,” according to Lake. The band was invited to perform at indie performance space The Yards, and it was suggested that the boys invite singer Shannon Scally to tag along and fill the vacant vocal slot. It all clicked. The bare-boned accordion of Joel Dow, Herford’s fiddle and guitar, along with Lake’s junkyard-with-a-pulse drums percolated splendidly beneath Scally’s torchy warble and coo. The quartet first tackled period standards like “Minnie the Moocher” and “Sixteen Tons.” “Joel knew a lot of old tunes,” says Herford. “So it was a good starting point for us. We played some old tunes from the 20’s and 30’s; the Prohibition era. Then Shannon brought some of her originals.” “Dark, old time, storytelling stuff,” Scally says. As the band do-si-do’d, transitioning in order

to take ownership of its sound, it couldn’t shed its busker roots. The savvy step-right-up

12 City November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

bravado remained. The street corner was in the band’s blood, even when it played indoors. “Playing on the street you have to connect with the people going by,” says Lake. “You have to be enjoyable.” It also requires a grab bag of different approaches. “We’re probably three or four different bands,” Herford says. “When we play galleries or house shows where there’s a lack of room to dance, we have a very acoustic storyteller sound. When we play a bigger venue like The Bug Jar we play much louder and faster.” The band flies in the dynamic dust found floating between its already minimalist strain, something Dow and Herford picked up in the noise scene while in the instrumental combo Pegacide. “Particularly atmosphere,” says Dow. “I think we’ve gotten an understanding of that in the noise scene. I think this is a refreshing break entirely at the other side of the spectrum. Instead if hiding behind a bunch of weird electronic equipment — like me and Phil have done for a long time — I’m playing instruments I don’t completely know how to play. It’s kind of like jumping in the water and then learning how to swim. The Pickpockets captivate when performing

live. The intensity builds rapidly as the band

adheres to setting the hook quick, a trick learned from its tenure on the street. There’s no bottom end to speak of, except for the emotional depths plumbed by Scally, who dances like a demon coquette, switching off from an undulating slither to a seething stomp as she slowly succumbs to the music. She’s not the only one. “We have a lot of fun,” Lake says. “We get people dancing on the tables.” “Often we’re wide-eyed and surprised at the reactions we get,” says Dow. There’s little that can curb the enthusiasm. The band is hardcore, busking in the blustery outdoors even during the winter months when there’s no snow-tire equivalent for banjo strings. “You find the gloves that work the best,” says Lake. “And you get good at tuning on the fly,” says Herford, whose early-morning busker motivation at the group’s Public Market gig is to initially get up enough tips for a breakfast sandwich (that takes “a good 45 minutes,” he says). Meanwhile Scally keeps her pipes hot by nursing on a big mug of Earl Grey. In keeping with its outmoded roots, The Pickpockets plan on releasing a cassette soon (what, no 78s?), and to continue to busk a move on happy feet with its joyful noise, both indoors and out.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28 Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Meghan Koch and the Gentleman Callers. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. The Phatkatz Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St. 243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Asher Roth. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $17-$25. [ Pop/Rock ] Paxtor w/The Pickpockets, Attic Abasement, and Holy Smith!. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Linday Lou & The Flatbellys. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $8-$12. [ Blues ] Night Fall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info.

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Lindsay Lou Rilko’s lyrics celebrate big, bad, quirky Jim Thompson-esque characters fleshed out and set to music. Her tales of moonshiners, bank robbers, and other assorted American renegades get a kick and a giddy-up from her Michigan-based Flatbellys. The band keeps it fresh with frequent trips into pop territory peppered with bluegrass gold. Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys perform Thursday, November 29, 9 p.m. at Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $8-$12. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble. United Methodist Church of North Chili, 2200 Westside Dr. 7 p.m. $5-$10. Women of Note Holiday Concert. Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Ave. none. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Country ] The Skiffle Minstrels w/White Woods. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 8 p.m. $5. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. RIPROC: Ocupanther, Rella. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5-$15. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3.

[ Jazz ] David Chisholm Orchestra. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 7:30 p.m. Free. The D’Jagoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. EROS Guitar Duo. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free.

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[ Karaoke ] Karaoke at Center Cafe. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 14

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29 Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Call for info. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ] Coupe De Villes. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Roc The Town 3.0 ft.Jean Grae. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. $12-$15. [ Reggae/Jam ] Reggae Thursday. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ Pop/Rock ] Cravin’ Bliss. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$8. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. John Payton Project. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Nimrod Wildfire Video Shoot. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5. Such Gold w/After the Fall, Pentimento, Drug Church, and Gunnar Stahl. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:15 p.m. $10-$12.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Nancy Perry Live. O’Neill’s, 5324 St Paul Blvd. 342-8752. 6 p.m. Free. Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Peg and “The Fiddler.” Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St.,. 545-4258. 7 p.m. Free. 14 City November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

CLASSICAL | HOOK AND HASTINGS ORGAN CONCERT

This Friday night, the Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative unveils the newest addition to its organ restoration project: an 1893 Hook and Hastings Organ, recently installed in Christ Church. Music will be performed by organists Edoardo Bellotti, David Higgs, Stephen Kennedy, and William Porter, as well as the Christ Church Schola Cantorum. According to Higgs, chair of the Organ and Historical Keyboards Department at Eastman School of Music, “the organ’s unique, burnished sound gives listeners the opportunity to hear music from the Romantic period performed on a historically appropriate instrument.” The inaugural concert of the 1893 Hook and Hastings Organ takes place Friday, November 30, 8 p.m. at Christ Church, 141 East Ave. Free. 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Dan Schmitt. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. John Weyl. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] An American Romantic in Rochester: Inaugural Concert of the restored 1893 Hook and Hastings Organ. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. 8 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Borgore. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 9 p.m. $20-$25. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Alan Murphy Trio. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Amadna Ashley. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 9 p.m. Call for info. Calle Uno. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $3. Cool Club Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Double Standard w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione and the New Big Band. Bishop Kearny Auditorium, 125 S. Kings Highway. 7:30 p.m. $25.

Last Friday Jazz Heritage Series: Culture Clash. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 7 p.m. $10. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Williamson, NY. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Anchorage Nebraska w/Birds in Mines, The Fevertones. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. Call for info. Define Normal w/The Fear of Falcons. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. The Fools. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Call for info. Friday In America. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Green Jelly w/ Psyopus, Beard Without a Moustache. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $15-$18. Hawea CD release. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $5.

Mansfield Ave w/Jambox. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info. Push. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saint Diablo w/Rainline, AFR. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Sound Awake, The Moho Collective. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Vilipend, Meek is Murder, Burn Everything. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Bill Staines. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. John Whelan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. $10. Mudd Creek. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. The Prickers. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $6-$9.

Popa Chubby w/The Filthy Brothers Blues Band, The Deep Blue Dream. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $12-$17.

BLUES | POPA CHUBBY

Popa Chubby’s (a.k.a. Ted Horowitz) blues are as big as the man himself. This New York City badass gooses the blues with punk fury as well as bluesifying classical stuff from Bach to “The Wizard of Oz.” Picture Howlin’ Wolf pickin’ on “Jesu Joy Of Man’s Desiring.” Who knows; if Chubb was in the choir loft, maybe I’d still go to church. Adding to the show’s Bluealluias will be The Filthy Brothers Blues Band and Deep Blue Dream. Popa Chubby performs Saturday, December 1, at 9 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $12-$17. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ Blues ] Carolyn Kelly Blues Band CD Release Party. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free.

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[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. Erotic Synergy (Upstairs). ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Sexy Ultra Lounge Saturdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. Call for info.

[ Jazz ] Bob Sneider. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. The Westview Project with Doug Stone, sax. Pomodoro, 3400 Monroe Ave. 271-5000. 7 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Sunny Brown Band. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hedges Restaurant, 1290 Lake Rd. 265-3850. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ Pop/Rock ] Abazagorath w/Nokturnal Hellstorm, Order of the Dead, and Cosmic Sea. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $10. continues on page 17

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15

Classical

Rochester’s classical-music groups will put on a host of holiday concerts over the next month. FILE PHOTO

Silver bells, decked halls, and more [ GUIDE ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

This time of year is filled with wonder and with dread. Whether you like to cook and shop or you don’t, your feet and your wallet quickly poop out. So why not support a local musician and treat yourself and your loved ones to a classical concert (or two)? Between music-school graduates and professional musicians, Rochester is teeming with outstanding musical offerings. And, during the holidays, many smaller groups perform, such that there are as many suburban offerings as city offerings from which to choose. Here’s a look at a selection of upcoming holiday-music offerings from classicalmusic groups in the greater Rochester area. Did we miss something? Add it to the comments section of this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com. Wednesdays at noon bid you welcome to the Hochstein School of Music & Dance for the “Live from Hochstein” concert series (50 N. Plymouth Ave., noon, free) that is broadcast on WXXI 91.5 FM. Take an hour away from holiday stress to enjoy holiday music for horns (December 5) and “A Cup of Good Cheer”

with Madrigalia (December 12). While we’re on the subject of Hochstein, if you head out early to the shops, stop by the school’s annual “performathon” at Eastview Mall Saturday and Sunday, December 1-2 (noon-6 p.m., free). Hochstein students and faculty offer additional concerts during the holidays, so check the website at hochstein.org. You can also kick off the season at “With Joyous Note” performed by the Genesee Valley Orchestra & Chorus (GVOC.org). On Saturday, December 1, the group presents Giovanni Battista Pergolesi’s “Magnificat” and Kirke Mechem’s “Seven Joys of Christmas,” along with other seasonal favorites (7:30 p.m.; $10-$12; Perinton Presbyterian Church, 6511 Pittsford-Palmyra Road, Fairport). The Amadeus Chorale also has several concerts planned this holiday season, including performances December 1-2 with the Spencerport Community Chorus (Saturday at 7 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m.; free; Historic White Church, 65 Church St., Spencerport) and a “’Twas the Night before Christmas” concert event on Friday, December 14 (7 p.m.; $10; Penfield High School, 25 High School Drive, Penfield). See TheAmadeusChorale.org for more information.

16 City November 28 - DECEMBER 4, 2012

While you’re in Penfield, don’t miss the Sunday, December 2, holiday concert of the Penfield Symphony Orchestra, David Harman, conductor. Selections include Mendelssohn’s “Reformation Symphony,” along with holiday favorites for orchestra and handbell choir (7:30 p.m.; $12-$14/free for students; Penfield High School; PenfieldSymphony.org). Your first chance to hear Handel’s “Messiah” is on Sunday, December 2, presented by the Rochester Chamber Orchestra, with the Festival Singers and the Bach Children’s Chorus (7 p.m.; $10-$25; Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth St.; RochesterChamberOrchestra. org). The “Messiah” can next be heard on Saturday, December 8, this time by the Rochester Oratorio Society with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra (7:30 p.m.; $18-$65; Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre; RPO.org). Choices really do abound for December 2, as offerings also include Concentus, a women’s chorus, in its concert “Make We Joy” at Asbury First United Methodist Church. The concert is followed by a reception and the release of the Concentus new holiday CD. (3 p.m.; free; 1050 East Ave.; Concentus.org). Two venues offer too many concerts to list: Eastman School of Music and the University of Rochester. Among the ESM offerings are the Eastman Philharmonia with a concert on Monday, December 3, that includes Wagner, Mozart, and Brahms (8 p.m.; free; Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre). On Friday, December 7, under the baton of William Weinert, catch the Eastman-Rochester Chorus and the Eastman School Symphony Orchestra in a concert “Rule Britannia,” including Vaughan Williams’ “Dona Nobis Pacem” (8 p.m.; free; Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre). Consult esm. rochester.edu for a comprehensive calendar with concert details. The University of Rochester Music Department has concert offerings like Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” on Saturday, December 1, presented by its symphony orchestra (8 p.m.; free; Strong Auditorium), Britten’s “Simple Symphony” by its Chamber Orchestra on Tuesday, December 4 (8 p.m.; free; Strong Auditorium), and a holiday celebration of gospel choir and brass choir on Friday, December 7 (3 p.m.; free; Goergen Building). Check the website at Rochester.edu/college/ MUR/concerts for additional details. You may already know the elegant Italian Baroque organ at the Memorial Art Gallery for its weekly Sunday afternoon concerts. On Sunday, December 6, organist Michael Unger and others from ESM will lead a festive holiday concert with singers and instrumentalists, including an audience sing-

along (5:30 p.m.; $5-$10; 500 University Avenue; mag.rochester.edu). Unger could do with his own website so that you don’t miss two other opportunities to hear his thoughtful programming of organ music. Catch him on Sunday, December 9, at the Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word church for holiday music, including a rarely performed cantata by Reinhard SchwarzSchilling (7 p.m.; $10 suggested donation; 597 East Ave.). Just in case you’re too hurried at the holidays, put Unger on your calendar for Sunday, January 6, again at the Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word for a program that includes Benjamin Britten’s “Ceremony of Carols” and selections from John Rutter’s “Dancing Day” (7 p.m.; $10 suggested). Where would the season be without the angelic voices of Musica Spei? The group is performing a cappella on December 6 & 7 in a concert titled “Evermore and Evermore: Carols Then and Now,” featuring old tunes and the standard hymns written around them (Thursday 12/6 at St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 28 Lincoln St., Pittsford, 7:30 p.m.; Friday 12/7 at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Dansville; wp.MusicaSpei.org). Don’t miss out on classical music recitals being presented in churches; many are independent of any religious services. For example, at the Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, you can find the trombone quartet Inner City Sliders with festive music of the season on Friday, December 7 (7 p.m.; free will offering; 1200 S. Winton Road, Brighton). If you’re looking for something truly different, how about a “flash mob” holiday concert at Eastview Mall with Cordancia on Saturday, December 8, at 4 p.m.? Keep an eye on cordancia.org for more information; it’s under wraps until then. If by Sunday, December 9 you’re after some solid classical music to take a break from muzak on your car radio, settle into a seat at the Memorial Art Gallery for chamber music of Rachmaninoff and Beethoven performed by the Argos Trio presented by Chamber Music of Rochester (7:30 p.m.; $10-$30; ChamberMusicRochester.org). Other vocal groups fa-la-laing this time of year include Madrigalia, which this year performs two concerts, on Friday, December 14, at the Third Presbyterian Church (7:30 p.m.; $5-$15; 4 Meigs Street) and Sunday, December 16, at the Downtown Presbyterian Church (4 p.m.; $5-$15; 121 N. Fitzhugh St.). Both concerts include the Third Church Ringers. Learn more and purchase tickets at Madrigalia.org.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1

Another choral group to chase away hum-bug is the Lyric Chorale, and its concert may be the most interesting holiday offering this season. Titled “Ave Maria: Images of Mary,” the group selected a program that includes Bach’s “Magnificat in D,” along with settings of “Ave Maria” by Mendelssohn, Jessica Franchi, and Franz Biebl, as well as other Marian choral works. Performances will be held on Saturday, December 15 (7:30 p.m.; $12-$18; St. Louis Church, 60 Main St., Pittsford) and again on Sunday, December 16 (2:30 p.m.; $12-$18; Faith Lutheran Church, 2576 Browncroft Blvd.). For more information visit LyricChorale.org. Circling back to the Rochester Oratorio Society for a moment, you can also hear the group in a performance titled “Garland of Carols” at the Linehan Chapel at Nazareth College on Saturday, December 15 (7:30 p.m.; $10-$25; ROSSings.org). That same night Nazareth will host a holiday concert of Medieval music by earlymusic group Anonymous 4 in the Arts Center (8 p.m.; $30-$60; 4245 East Ave.; artscenter.naz.edu). If you’re still up for another concert, how about the Irondequoit Chorale, in a Christmas cantata by local composers Nancy Price and Don Besig, titled “The Wondrous Story.” It’s being performed on Sunday, December 16 (3 p.m.; free; Irondequoit United Church of Christ, 644 Titus Ave.). Find details at TheIronequoitChorale.org. While its performances of “The Nutcracker” have concluded for the year, with the annual “Holiday Pops” program the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra Pops will bring four energetic performances with Jeff Tyzik at the conductor’s podium. The orchestra will be joined by the Festival High School Chorale for the program, which runs Friday, December 21-Sunday, December 23 at Kodak Hall ($10-$79; RPO.org). Tidying up the holiday calendar is Vox Lumine, coming into town from Fillmore, NY, with three concert offerings December 20-23, advertised as familiar songs of the season “[to] bring back a flood of memories of joyous celebration” (Thursday 12/20 at Third Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh St.; Friday 12/21 at St. Peter and Paul Church in Hamburg; Saturday 12/22 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 48 Perrin St., Fairport; all performances start at 7:30 p.m.). Check VoxLumine.org for more info.

Going For the One. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $4-$7. Good Time Charlie. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Goods w/Extended Family. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Jellyroot. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. MoChester. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 10 p.m. 21+. $4. Polluted Moon. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Springer. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info. State Radio. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $17-$20. Swamp Moose. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Teagan and the Tweeds. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music Sundays: Brian Clancy. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Celtick Christmas Concert. Parkminster Presbyterian Church, 2710 Chili Ave. 2478039. 3 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Compline w/Candlelight Concert. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 8:30 p.m. Free. Concentus: Make We Joy CD Release. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. 3 p.m. $10. Holiday Celebration concert. Penfield High School, 25 High School Drive. 872-0774. 7:30 p.m. $14 - adults; $12 - seniors; students free. Penfield Symphony Orchestra: Holiday Celebration. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7:30 p.m. $12-$14. [ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. Call for info. Free. Grazyna Auguscik, Paulinho Garcia. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus. 275-9898. 3 p.m. Free. Michael Vadala Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 9248000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.

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This Boston-based alternative trio was founded by singer/ songwriter Chad Urmston (also a member of the Vermont jamband Dispatch) in 2002. Urmston disbanded Dispatch earlier that same year at the height of the group’s popularity and began pouring his energy into State Radio. The former has since reunited, but that has not stopped latter’s awesome onslaught of reggae-inspired indie rock. The State Radio sound is a marked departure from Dispatch’s folk-and-jam-based formula. Radio is a mixture of roots, reggae, ska, punk, and straight-forward rock. Since its inception a decade ago, the band has released a slew of EPs and live recordings, as well as four solid studio efforts, the most recent of which, “Rabbit Inn Rebellion,” came out earlier this year. State Radio performs Saturday, December 1, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $17-$20. 3255600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. [ Pop/Rock ] Desert Noises w/MD Woods, Hideout, and There I Say is Lightning. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 3 [ Acoustic/Folk ] The Voice(s) - A Capella Competition! Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Alphonso William. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. The Westview Project. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] Penfield Rotary Big Band Swing Dance. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8655. 7:30 p.m. $1. Scott Krier. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Creature Feature w/Meanagers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4 [ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Kilbourn Concert Series - Raphaella Smits, guitar. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10-$20.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17

Dance

“Lighthouse/Lightning Rod,” the new piece being premiered locally by Garth Fagan Dance, is a new collaboration between Fagan and musician Wynton Marsalis. PHOTO PROVIDED

Trust and shared vision Garth Fagan Dance Through December 2 Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. $40-$55 | 389-2170, artscenter.naz.edu garthfagandance.org [ PREVIEW ] BY CASEY CARLSEN

Garth Fagan Dance is home from its travels for the Rochester premiere of a new collaboration between Tony and Olivier Award-winning choreographer Garth Fagan and Grammy Award-winning jazz great Wynton Marsalis. The piece, “Lighthouse/ Lightning Rod,” is the second collaboration between Fagan and Marsalis; the first — “Griot New York” — was created by the duo back in 1991 and fast became a beloved staple of the Fagan repertoire. “Lighthouse/Lightning Rod” received a healthy round of accolades from New York City dance critics during its world premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in September. Time will tell whether the piece possesses the staying power of “Griot New York.” Five out of the eight sections of “Griot” will be presented to Rochester audiences this week along with the entirety of Fagan’s new piece.

The two works are not intended as companion pieces, however. They are, Fagan acknowledged in an interview earlier this month, separate entities, united only in that they each boast scores by Marsalis. Rochester audiences will not have the luxury of the Wynton Marsalis Septet’s live accompaniment during the local performances, but our city can lay claim to setting the scene for the blossoming of the two artists’ creative partnership. It is a story Fagan has told many times. He encountered Marsalis wandering along East Avenue more than 25 years ago — the musician was distraught after a band dispute — and Fagan staged an impromptu company performance for him that marked the beginnings of their working friendship. It’s a friendship that Fagan says is based on trust and shared vision. The collaboration for “Griot New York” started with a poem Fagan had written in the voice of an African storyteller, also called a “griot.” The poem served as Marsalis’ peep hole into Fagan’s vision; it guided his composing. With “Lighthouse/ Lightning Rod,” Fagan gave his friend little more than the title of the proposed piece and a few basic guidelines. “I told him only that I needed sprightly marine-based music. Fifteen minutes of

18 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

adagio for the memory section and 15 minutes of electric music for the lighting-rod section. I wasn’t clear yet about the middle section,” Fagan says. “Wynton gave me nine sections of music, told me to do what I wanted with it, and left for Europe. That’s a big gift from a composer. He trusted my vision and my ear.” Fagan divided the music and his choreography into three separate but connected sections, calling the first “Lighthouse,” the second “Memories,” and the third “Lightning Rod.” He so loves one section of the music that, in “Memories,” he uses it twice, first in a rhythmically experimental solo for Norwood “P.J.” Pennewell that encompasses super-fast footwork and legato arms; and then again in the next section that depicts a ménage a trios between dancers Natalie Rogers-Cropper, Nicolette Depass, and Vitolio Jeune. (This will mark a return to the stage for Rogers, director of the Garth Fagan Dance School, after a seven-year hiatus.) “Griot New York” and “Lighthouse/

Lightning Rod” can both be considered abstract pieces of dance, but with some very concrete images. Fagan describes the former as a loose depiction of urban struggles during the 1990’s, with topics including

poverty and AIDS. His new work explores the dualistic relationships between danger and security, between emotional balance and emotional depth and growth. It was the idea of a lightning rod itself that first captivated him. “It’s intriguing that positive things exist in dangerous areas. Tumultuous ocean waters and rocky areas are not to be fooled with, but lightning rods can protect. In all our lives there are lightning rods and lighthouses. Like with kids. A parent knows what the lightning rod is to calm that child down. Or when you’re having a bad day, you know where you need to find that lighthouse or lightning rod — maybe a cup of tea, maybe a glass of wine,” he says. The abstract is rendered concrete by Guggenheim fellow Alison Saar’s edgy set design, her striking sculptures rising from the stage. “Never did it occur to me that her lighthouse would be an 18-foot tall woman with one breast out,” Fagan says. “So beautiful and poetic. But it was too tall for our purposes. It spread out the focus between the dancers and itself too much, so we refined it a bit to better suit the stage.” Saar’s work also adds impact to the ménage-a-trios section in “Memories,” in which a sort of brambly headed sculpture — fence? hedge? — with glowing red eyes seems to bear witness to the intimate encounter. The last section of “Memory” pays tribute to important Fagan dancers who have died, as well as touches on slavery. “I reflect back on slavery, but not the blame-game slavery. I focus on two women healing each other, loving and supporting each other, while running around them you see people in pain and terror,” Fagan says. The section ends with another nautical image, a ship pulling across the stage while the two women, Lindsay Renea and Shanon Castle, physically support each other. Costume designer Mary Nemecek Peterson, who worked on the musical adaptation of “The Lion King,” also deserves a nod for her emotionally evocative creations, especially in the frenetically wrought “Lightning Rod” section that opens with the whole company — except Pennewell — on stage. Solos, trios and quartets resonate with electric energy. It is FAST. Or, as Fagan puts it, “They really boogie up a storm.”

e t a l o c o Ch ines &V

Art Exhibits [ Opening ] 6th annual Rochester AIDS Memorial Quilt. Nov. 30-Dec. 7. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. equalgrounds.com. Holiday Show 2012. Nov. 28-Dec. 23 and Fri., Nov. 30, 5-8:30 p.m. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through Dec 23. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Nov 30 and Dec 7. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. Rochester Art Club Retrospective Exhibition. Nov. 30-Dec. 20. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Through Dec 20 in the Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery of the Skalney Center. Honoring deceased memebers of the RAC. Reception Nov 30, 6-8 p.m. rochesterartclub.org. Visualizing Vacancy. Fri., Nov. 30, 6 p.m., Sat., Dec. 1, noon and Sun., Dec. 2, noon. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. An MFA thesis Exhibition by Laura Minor. The exhibit takes a look at the issues surrounding mass vacancy in the city of Buffalo, NY. Opening Reception November 30th, 6-9pm. In the Siskind Gallery at VSW (entrance at 421 University Ave). (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. “A Celebration of Growth” Art Gala by GlobeMed. Dec. 1-15. 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Through Dec 15. Reception Dec 1, 7-10 p.m. paperless. ly/101b1B3. 1975ish.com. “Continental Breakfasts: a three year photographic collaboration.” Sat., Dec. 1, 6-10 p.m. and Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Yards, 5052 Public Market. Photos by Lisa Barker and Anna Peters Wehking. Through Jan 12. attheyards@gmail. com. continentalbreakfasts. wordpress.com. Holiday Open House. Dec. 124, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Through Christmas. Reception Dec 1. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag@gmail.com. facebook.com/outsidetheboxag. “Spirit & Essence” with Dan Malczewski & Peter Secrest. Reception Sat., Dec. 1, 125 p.m. and Dec. 1-31. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Through Dec 31. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Reception Dec 1. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. [ Continuing ] 2Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. Sharon Stiller, Painter. Through Nov. 30. 271-6111. 2chicboutique.com. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Honeoye Falls-Lima Central School District Art Department members. Through Nov. 30. Through Nov 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Nov 2, 6-9 p.m. 244-9892.

ART | “New Arcadia”

The concept of Arcadia — which in art alludes to the Utopian vision of pastoralism — is not a new one. Originally a region in ancient Greece, the name has been adopted by countless modern places and is used to reference longing for peaceful perfection in works that range from literature to music, film, and fine art. AXOM Gallery’s new exhibit, “Kurt Moyer: New Arcadia,” (pictured) is a solo exhibition of paintings celebrating the figure frolicking in the idyllic landscape, dwelling contentedly in that perfect, eternal moment. Moyer’s modern take on the “bather” subject includes nonchalant nudes lolling together in sun-dappled, creekdivided woods and swimsuit-clad revelers serenely exploring the surf. The show runs November 30-January 12 at Axom Gallery (176 Anderson Ave., Suite 303). See it Wednesdays–Saturdays, noon-5 p.m., or by appointment. An opening reception will take place Friday, December 7, 6-9 p.m. Admission to the gallery is free. For more information, call 232-6030 x23, or visit axomgallery.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Joy in the Atmosphere” by Richmond Futch. Through Dec. 31.Through Dec 31. Reception with live music and open painting Nov 2, 6-9 p.m. 729-9916. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. ongoing. artandvintageonmain.com. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Paintings 2012: William F. Seller. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Nov 30. 4734000. ArtsRochester.org. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. Rochester Art Club Fall Art Exhibition. Through Nov. 30. 585 278 7501. rochesterartclub.org. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr. The Ecology of Food: Past, Present, Future. Through Dec. 5. Through December 5. Reception Oct 3 5-7 p.m. Additional talks Wednesdays 2:30-3:30 p.m. geneseo.edu/ galleries. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Catching Dreams.” Through Jan. 13, 2013. Featuring the work of Bonnie Evangelista, Becky Harris and Chris Horn. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Edges of Books.” Mondays-Fridays, 1-5 p.m. Through Dec 14. Reception Oct 4, 5-7:30 p.m. 475-3961. rit.edu.

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Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope.” Through March 2, 2013. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Leave Your Dryer Lint Outdoors so a Squirrel Can Enjoy the Warm Bits of Sweaters You Love. Through Nov. 30. Through Nov 30. Katharine Clemens senior solo exhibition. Reception Nov 9, 6-9 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. “Dimensions” by Rick Hirsch/ Jane Shellenbarger. Through Nov. 30. Through Nov 30. Reception Nov 9, 5-7 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Pieces of Me” New Work by Mary Moore. Through Nov. 30. Through November 30. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Watercolor World” by Sylvie Culbertson. Through Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Gallery r, 100 college ave. Patti Ambrogi and Own Butler Photographic Exhibition. Through Nov. 28. Through Nov 28. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. The Faces in Wood by Charles Jaffe. Through Dec. 31. Through end of Dec. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19

Art Exhibits p.m., Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Reception Nov 10 6-8 p.m. 4612230. melissa@genesee.coop. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “60 from the 60s.” Tuesdays-Sundays. Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display/Festival of Trees. Through Dec. 12. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. University of Rochester

Studio Art Faculty Exhibition. Through Dec. 9. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon5 p.m. 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. iGallery Kathy Clem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St., Suite 312. “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. Through Dec. 8. Continues through Dec 8. Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m. igallerykathyclem.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Original Oil Paintings by American artist David Kerstetter. Mondays-Sundays. Through Nov 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,

Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Mosaic Show: Arena Art Group. Through Nov. 30. Through Nov 30. Reception Nov 9, 7-9 p.m. zannebrummer@gmail.com. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Holiday Event. TuesdaysThursdays, Saturdays. Through Dec 24. Tue, Thu, and Sat 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Wed 4:30-7:30 p.m. Unique artistically crafted gift items. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. Exposed: Rochester’s

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Hidden Victims of Homelessness. Mondays-Fridays. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov. Lockhart Gallery at SUNY Geneseo, 28 Main St. “From the Permanent Collection: Then and Now.” TuesdaysSundays. Through Dec 10. Tue-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. 245-5813. geneseo.edu/galleries. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. “The Heirloom,” Art by Mara Ahmed. Through Dec. 7. thelittle.org. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. “Art of the Book.” Through Dec. 9.

Through Dec. 9. 428-8053. libraryweb.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. Wednesdays-Sundays. Through Feb 10. Continues Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. Lockhart Gallery: “Framing Edo: Masterworks from Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views.” 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Through Dec 1: “Painting Tuscany.” Landscape paintings by

HOLIDAY W I N E TA S T I N G Stop in during the Open House and enjoy a selection of wines especially suited to the season. And stop back to make your holiday selection at one of Rochester’s best wine & liquor stores.

Rebecca DeMarco, Denise Heishman, Jane O’Donnell, Sara O’Donnell, Betsy Taylor, and Rosalee Bedian. Through Jan 7:“Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Nature Scapes: Far and Near,” photographs by Lois A. Trieb. Through Jan. 6, 2013, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Through Jan 6. Reception Dec 7 5-7 p.m. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Deborah Ronnen Fine Art

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20 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

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Presents “Contemporary African American Printmakers.” WednesdaysSundays. Through Dec 21. Sun 12-5 p.m., Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. Gallery closed Nov 22-23. Reception Nov 9, 5-10 p.m. 389-5073. Our House Gallery, Veterans Outreach Center Inc., 459 South Ave. “An Open Mind.” Through Nov. 30. Through November 30. Month-long photography exhibit capturing the joy and beauty of what life is like for the thousands of responsible pet owners in our community who own and embrace pit bulls as

valued and cherished family members. Reception Oct 26, 6-9 p.m. pittyloverescue@ gmail.com. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Holiday Show and First Anniversary. Through Nov. 30. 654-2485. facebook. com/outsidetheboxag. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Through Jan 6. Reception Nov 9, 6-8 p.m. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Celestial Songs: Sculpture by Tarrant Clements. TuesdaysSaturdays. Through Dec 22.

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Tue-Fri noon-6 p.m., Sat noon5 p.m. 232-8120. Plastic, 650 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7 p.m. 563-6348. plasticforever.com. Primitive Impressions, 4 Livingston County Campus. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Carla Bartow. ongoing. Opening Fri Oct 19, 7-10 p.m. carlasswanktank.blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Dale Inglett. Through Jan. 3, 2013. Through Jan 3, gallery hours Mon, Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. genesee.edu/gallery Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep. 30, 2013. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Nathan Lyons: Photographs 1957-2012. MondaysSaturdays. Through November 30. Hours Tue, Thu 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Wed, Fri, Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447. lumierephoto. com. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street. “Low Fidelity.” Through Dec. 9. Through Dec. 9. Hours Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Reception Oct 25, 46 p.m. 395-2805. brockport. edu/finearts. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “Pitch Man” Hank Willis Thomas. Thursdays-Sundays. Through Dec 9. Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun 12-3 p.m. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. Webster Library, 980 Ridge Rd. Webster Art Club Fall Show. Through Nov. 29. Through Nov 29. Awards Reception Nov 10, 2-4 p.m. 872-7075. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Human Nature: Interpretations of the Seasons” Mixed Media Drawings by Torey Hamlin. MondaysFridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. brockport.edu/finearts. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands

Dr. “Imaginations: Space and Time, Drawings and Paintings by Debra Stewart.” Through Dec. 20. Through Dec 20. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. Thu artist’s talk, Fri reception. 785-1369. naegelbr@flcc.edu. [ Call for Artwork ] 6x6x2013. Through April 21, 2013. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Art Drop Off Day. Tue., Dec. 4, 3-8 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. 802-5741. grassrootsgallery@gmail.com. thegrassrootsgallery.com.

Art Events [ Thursday, November 29 ] Artist Talk and Reception with Nathan Lyons. Thu., Nov. 29, 6-8:30 p.m. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. 461-4447. lumierephoto. com. “Downstairs and To The Left.” Thu., Nov. 29, 6-8 p.m. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Art & Art History Faculty and Staff. A participatory performance of Indeterminate Hikes+ immediately following reception will be lead by Cary Peppermint + Leila Nadir | echarttech. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. The Exquisite Corpse. Through Nov. 29. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Continues through Nov. 29. Opening night 5-9 p.m. 3770132. outsidetheboxag.com. [ Friday, November 30 ] Networking Mixer for Creatives. Fri., Nov. 30, 7-10 p.m. Tajze Wine and R&B Lounge, 139 State St. A warm, comfortable, fun setting for creative people looking to meet new contacts and have an amazing time while they do it. All are welcome. 210-8202. facebook.com/ NylaEventPlanning/events. [ Saturday, December 1 ] Annual Wassail Bowl and Sale. Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Presbyterian Church, 24 Park Place, Geneva. 315-7895151. genevahistoricalsociety. com. Curator Tour at VSW and Nazareth College. Sat., Dec. 1, 12-3 p.m. “Contemporary African American Printmakers” at Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery (389-5073 or caapinformation@gmail.com), and “Pitch Man: Hank Willis Thomas” at Visual Studies Workshop (442-8676 or info@ vsw.org). Eastside Y Crafts for a Cause. Sat., Dec. 1, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Eastside Family YMCA, 1835 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd. Holiday Craft Show. Local artists will be selling

DANCE | BioDance “No Dancing Allowed”

BIODANCE, a local contemporary dance company that choreographs with an emphasis on social, political, and environmental issues, will premiere its fifth anniversary season on Friday, November 30. The title piece, “No Dancing Allowed,” is a collaboration between BIODANCE and University of Rochester professor and sculptor Allen Topolski. A trip through history back to the 1940’s will allow the company to revisit a time when “No Dancing Allowed” signs started going up across the country after the federal government began taxing dancing in nightclubs. Topolski’s metal sculptures and period set pieces paired with a mix of popular dances from the 1940’s will help the audience experience World War II’s effect on American culture. Additionally, the season opener will reprise “Liebeslieder” (“Love Songs”). The piece, featuring BIODANCE and the Rochester Oratorio Society’s small ensemble Resonanz, moves the dance company into a classical and contemporary direction set to compositions by Brahms. A portion of the performance will be “Love at First Waltz,” a work first presented during the First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival. The performance starts at 8 p.m. at Hochstein Performance Hall (50 N. Plymouth Ave.). Tickets range from $8 to $25 and can be purchased at the door or at biodance@ frontiernet.net. For more information visit biodance.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON holiday décor, paper crafts, photography, children’s items, jewelry, bath and beauty products, knit items and much more. The crafter’s booth fees benefit the Y’s Invest in Youth Campaign. rochesterymca.org. Holiday Craft Bazaar. Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Zion Episcopal Church at the four corners in Palmyra. 315-8795735.

Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. 288-7564.

Holiday Open House. Sat., Dec. 1, noon. Jerry Williams Creative Arts and Framing, 506 Long Pond Rd. 12 Different artist on display including jewelry, handpainted glass, photography and painting. Refreshments provided. 225-1323. jerrywilliamspictureframing. com/. Irondequoit Art Club Holiday Art & Craft Sale. Through Dec. 1. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. Sat Nov 24 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m., Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-8:45 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5:45 p.m., Sat Dec 1 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 787-4086. aholland@libraryweb.org. irondequoitartclub.org. ReCraft The Holidays Eco Bazaar. Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m.

[ Sunday, December 2 ] Christmas Craft Show. Sun., Dec. 2, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 2711050. Holiday Artist Gift Buying Event. Sun., Dec. 2, 1 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2622336. facebook.com/ VeritasRochester.

[ Saturday, December 1Sunday, November 2 ] More Fire Annual Holiday Sale. Through Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Place. Glass and ceramic ornaments and more, glass blowing demos. 2420450. morefireglass.com.

[ Wed., December 5 ] 4th annual Holiday Boutique. Wed., Dec. 5, 6-9 p.m. Cobblestone Creek Country Club, 100 Cobble Creek Rd., Victor. All proceeds benefit the Victor/Farmington Food Cupboard. 869-5056. pinestonerlp@aol.com. continues on page 22

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21

Comedy [ Wed., November 28 ] Stand Up Comedy Open Mic. Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. Do you want to perform stand up comedy? Well you should. Because you’re funny. And cool. Bring your best jokes and a best friend. Sign up at 7. Show starts 7:30. 585-697-0235. [ Thursday, November 29Saturday, December 1 ] Orlando Jones. Nov. 29Dec. 1. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us.

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[ Saturday, December 1 ] Pandas and Fake Snow: “We’ve been Forced to do a Christmas Show.” Sat., Dec. 1, 9:30 p.m. The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St. 797-9086. facebook.com/ PandasAndFakeSnow. Unleashed! Improv: Time Continuum Explained in Mime..Maybe. Sat., Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. facebook.com/ unleashedimprov. [ Tuesday, December 4 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. Tuesdays, 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. laughriotcomedy.com.

Dance Events [ Through December 2 ] Garth Fagan Dance. Through Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m., Through Nov. 30, 8 p.m., Sat., Dec. 1, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 2, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. [ Wed., November 28 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY. Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:45-11pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing. Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. 585-2714930. lindyjam.com. [ Thursday, November 29 ] Dance Lab East. Thursdays, 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects. 2708106. theskylarklounge.com. [ Friday, November 30 ] BIODANCE: “No Dancing Allowed.” Fri., Nov. 30, 8 p.m. Hochstein Performance

22 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

LIT | The Beets Farewell Reading

Rochester’s literary scene is as rich as any other area of its arts, boasting a large number of authors and poets, many of whom are known nationally and internationally. The Beets is a group of poets made up of Tricia Asklar, Jan Wenk Cedras, Charlie Coté, Kitty Jospé, Paulette Swartzfager, and Sally Bittner Bonn, who have been writing together for the past six years, and have collaborated with PUSH Physical Theatre and worked on a play performance at MuCCC. Collectively, the individuals have been published in more than 100 journals, chapbooks, and anthologies, and have read their work at countless venues. Cedras and Asklar will soon be leaving our city, but you can join The Beets in honoring them as they set out on new adventures. A farewell reading will be held on Thursday, November 29, at 7:30 p.m., at Writers & Books (740 University Ave.). The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 4732590 or visit wab.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. biodance.org.

p.m. Park Avenue. parkavenue.org/events.html.

[ Friday, November 30Saturday, December 1 ] Akoma N’toaso African Dance and Drum Ensemble. Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 7 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. ntoaso.org. 563-5050. muccc.org. New Dancers Showcase. Nov. 30-Dec. 1. Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive. brockport.edu/finearts.

[ Friday, November 30Sunday, December 2 ] Creche Festival Weekend. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Concert with Gap Mangione Nov 30, 7:30 p.m., at Bishop Kearney Auditorium, 125 S. Kings Highway in Irondequoit ($25-$30). Other events Sat-Sun include carols, breakfast with St. Nicolas, Creché Building Workshop, and Dady Brothers concert, at Sacred Heart Cathedral, 296 Flower City Park. 254-3221. cathedralcommunity.org.

[ Saturday, December 1 ] Fandango at the Tango. Saturdays, 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. [ Sunday, December 2 ] English Country Dancing. Sundays, 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd. English Country Dancing, live music, called dances. 244-2468. fbcrochester.net.

[ Saturday, December 1 ] Dansville’s Winter in the Village. Sat., Dec. 1, 9 a.m. Downtown Dansville, 126 Main St. facebook.com/ DiscoverDansville.

Kids Events

Festivals

[ Wed., November 28 ] Handcrafting Holiday Cards and Tags with Kim Romig. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 12-18. 2258951. greecelibrary.org. Legos Club. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 5-12. Hear a story, then build with our Legos. 2476446. Teen Game Night. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30-8 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092.

[ Thursday, November 29 ] Park Ave Holiday Open House. Thu., Nov. 29, 5-9:30

[ Thursday, November 29 ] Challenger Center: Family Missions. Thu., Nov. 29,

[ Tuesday, December 4 ] Stardust Ballroom Dance Series. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. 4286769. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries. [ Wed., December 5 ] “Great Russian Nutcracker” Moscow Ballet. Wed., Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 800745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 697-1942. rmsc.org. Christmas Crafts for Kids. Thu., Nov. 29, 10-11:30 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Children of all ages. 225-8951. Kwanzaa: Celebration of Family, Community, and Culture. Thu., Nov. 29, 4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Movie Night: J.R.R. Tolkien Fantasy Film Fest Vol 1. Thu., Nov. 29, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. The original Hobbit movie. 247-6446. [ Friday, November 30 ] Film Fridays. Fri., Nov. 30, 10 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. A family program, popcorn is served. This week our film shows Little Nemo, his flying pet squirrel Icarus, and his friend Professor Genius journeying together to Slumberland. 247-6446. [ Saturday, December 1 ] Book Signing Featuring Children’s Book Author Ron Mazzarella. Sat., Dec. 1, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. liftbridgebooks.com. Christmas with Santa. Saturdays. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St., Spencerport. Breakfast seatings 9, 10, 11 a.m. & noon. 349-2090. springdalefarm.org. [ Saturday, December 1Sunday, December 2 ] Eddie the Elk and the Twelve Days of Christmas. Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Polar Express Train Rides. Saturdays, Sundays, 3:30, 4:40 & 5:55 p.m. Medina Depot, 530 West Ave., Medina. 798-6106. railroadmuseum.net. Trains, Trains, Trains. Sat., Dec. 1, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 2, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. O-Gauge Tinplate Trackers. 225-8951. [ Sunday, December 2 ] Dino Days. Saturdays, Sundays. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Family Fun: Game Day. Sun., Dec. 2, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Sun., Dec. 2, 3-5:30 p.m. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St. Bring your camera to take your photos. 637-3645. [ Monday, December 3 ] Amerks Visit with the Moose. Mon., Dec. 3, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

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RECREATION | Roc Orienteering Scrooge-O

Anyone who’s seen or read “A Christmas Carol” knows that Ebenezer Scrooge’s sour attitude can be contagious. The Rochester Orienteering Club represents his infectious nature in a unique way at its Annual Scrooge-O. Participants are given maps of a park and compete to find key locations in the dark while simultaneously avoiding “Scrooge.” Several Scrooge competitors will track down participants to tag, and subsequently take their score cards, thereby converting tagged individuals into the next “Scrooge.” It’s like that old playground game “It,” but with a holiday twist.

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This year’s Scrooge-O will take place Saturday, December 1, at Powder Mills Park (154 Park Road, Perinton). At 5 p.m. the club will host a pot-luck dinner, followed by the club’s annual meeting, and then the competition. Participants will have one hour to complete the event. All ages and skill levels are welcome, and the event is free to the public. Be sure to dress in your most warm, yet most flexible and stealthy clothing, in order to evade Scrooge. A flashlight will be helpful in the dark, but don’t let it give you away. For more information call 377-5650 or visit roc.us.orienteering.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. 225-8951.

Lectures [ Thursday, November 29 ] An Artist Conversation between Garth Fagan and Alison Saar. Thu., Nov. 29, 7 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Peace Theater (room A14). 3892170. artscenter.naz.edu. Building Our Media: a critical discussion series on independent media. Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Rochester. Indymedia.org. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Dr. Nate Riddle. Thu., Nov. 29, 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. “Denying Identity: The Ongoing Passport Issue.” Thu., Nov. 29, 7-9 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Featuring guest speaker Ansley Jemison, assistant coach and assistant general manager for the Under 19 Iroquois Nationals lacrosse program. 742-1690. ganondagan.org/programs/ LectureSeries.html. Native American Heritage Month Concert and Talk withw Radmilla Cody. Thu., Nov. 29, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Rochester

Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Vignelli Center for Design Studies, adjacent to James E. Booth Hall. 475-4982. Property Owners to Hear Police Chief. Thu., Nov. 29, 6:30 p.m. NYS Coalition of Property Owners and Businesses, Inc. Eagles Club, 1200 Buffalo Rd., Gates. 703-7444. Rochester AIA Society: Lecture: Dr. Karol Wight on “Ancient Glass and Cameo Glass of Ancient Rome.” Thu., Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Titanic: A Cultural Phenomenon. Thu., Nov. 29, 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Steve Piper, member of the Titanic Historic Society, will explore the history of the Titanic, why she sank, who or what was to blame and why her sinking become a cultural phenomenon. 359-7092. What You Should Know About Osteoporosis, its Prevention, and Treatment. Thu., Nov. 29. Rochester General’s Linden Oaks Medical Campus 20 Hagen Drive, Suite 100. 9226637. [ Monday, December 3 ] “Daredevils in Petticoats” with Julie Cummins. Mon., Dec. continues on page 25 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23

Art and range from existing objects warped to weave a new tale, to books created entirely by the artists, to sculptural forms that only allude to the book in the vaguest sense. The fascinating show is well worth an hour’s gander, but regrettably, while many of the pieces beg to be held, paged through, and discovered, the delicate works are — understandably — set behind glass, with only a few pages open to viewers. The exhibit showcases the works of local

Detail of “16 Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” by Lynn Skordal, part of Central Library’s “Art of the Book” exhibit, now showing in Lower Link Gallery. PHOTO PROVIDED

Voices whispering in the leaves “Art of the Book” Through December 9 Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. libraryweb.org/artofthebook Monday-Wednesday & Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 1-5 p.m. [ REVIEW ] by Rebecca Rafferty

I recently read a brilliant Carl Sagan quote regarding the existence of books as “proof that humans can work magic,” in that they are a tool by which we have broken “the shackles of time,” through which we are able to hear the voice of another human, across millennia, and gain from what they have learned about any subject at all. Many of us feel this way about reading — we speak

of being transported through story — but perhaps forget the simple fact that we are, for a space of time, privately joining our mind with that of another. The current exhibit at Central Library’s Lower Link Gallery celebrates the book as a tool, and as an object of art, with a juried display of dozens of artists’ books and artist-altered books. “The book is an enduring symbol of knowledge and freedom, two basic components of all public libraries in the world,” says Patty Uttaro, director of the Rochester Public Library & Monroe County Library System, in a provided statement. Uttaro echoes Sagan’s statement that books are magic, citing their use not only in recording history, but as modes of educating people across time and also “inciting history-making events.” The space is filled with tomes that tell stories both personal and on a global level,

24 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

and distant artists, including some by the Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition. AlMutanabbi was a street in Baghdad named for the Iraqi poet, and was lined with bookstores and stalls. In 2007, a car bomb exploded and killed 30 people, injured more than 100, and destroyed the street. The Coalition invited letterpress printers and artists from all over the world to produce broadsides and books for a project called “An Inventory of Al-Mutanabbi.” Among the locally made works that represent the project is “Shadows of Loss” by Kristine Bouyoucos, a mixed-media, accordion-fold work in which the artist imagines the murdered Al-Mutanabbi booksellers as bright bodies, like reverse silhouettes, “living eternally in a shadow world, gone to our eyes, but with voices that can be heard through the books they were selling,” per the artist’s statement. Another particularly moving work under this theme is the grief-stricken “That Day on Al-Mutanabbi” by Barbara Fox, its splay of pages open to alternating pages of Arabic calligraphy and printed English with poetic phrases that express horror, anguish, and brewing hatred, and may certainly be applied to far more than one single day and one single event. Book artist extraordinaire Scott McCarney, is included in this show with his paper chandelier-esque “Hanging Index No. 20, Last Lines of Poetry,” which won the best in show award during last year’s “Art of the Book” exhibit. A printed and framed facsimile of McCarney’s Al-Mutanabbi book, “Material Meditation on Mending AlMutanabbi Street,” is hanging in the annex hallway of the Lower Link Gallery. But the show isn’t filled only with elegiac

testimonies to tragedy. There are countless works that explore small situations with quiet wonder or humor, or celebrate fleeting beauty. Sue Higgins Leopard is known for her gorgeously constructed works with dreamy, meandering musings. Included here is her hand-dyed, handpainted, feather-light “flutter” book, “Hummingbird,” a tactile and visual

exploration of a poem of the same name by Rochester poet Ruth Kessler. Ania Gilmore’s “Library of Alexandria” is a hollow book form set open to reveal a space packed with stained scrolls wound tight, burned, and forever closed to us, a tribute to the tragic loss of knowledge from ancient Africa that was destroyed by the Romans. “Entomological Studies: Terrible Beauty” by Nanci Rosenberg-Nugent is full of beastly bugs, some nearly the size of your fist, which the artist describes as “hidden gems” and has pinned to the pages to resemble a 3D science textbook. Best in show for the artist-book category went to San Francisco-based Bettina Pauly, for her playful “The Wild Book,” which features an accordionfolded tunnel of pink borders and empty centers, layered with rubber-stamped kitchen tool imagery stitched into the book in a way that creates a flurry of activity flying in the open space, familiar to anyone who has ever worked in a commercial kitchen, as the artist has. Rochester artist Linh Truong’s “Fire Fly

Path” is similar in that it features an accordion stack of framing pages, leaving an open center tunnel. But this time it is the frames that are prominently featured, each painted to look like trees and greenery. When all but the cover is closed, the book looks like a peaceful, magical pathway through the woods. Mary Housel-Demanchick’s enigmatic “Am I Ruined?” explores a different sort of lost-in-the-woods, and is made up of six white boxes lined with black satin, each holding an object relating six accompanying paintings and a few lines of text regarding voodoo, the church, or the little girl who asks the question. “The Book of Life Ch. 5: We Are Vulnerable (Rejoice)” by Mary Hazlewood contains a paper sculpture set into a space cut into the open book, in which a skeleton embraces a nude girl under a flowering tree. The artist’s straightforward message is about our abject denial of the fact that we are not invincible or immortal, and her belief that accepting the shallow scope of what we get gives more depth to the experiences we may have. If you’re interested in participating in “Art of the Book” 2013, the deadline for entries is set for July 2013. Look for details in February at libraryweb.com/ artofthebook.

Lectures 3, 12 & 2 p.m. Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, 17 Madison St. $25 for luncheon lecture at noon, $15 for tea lecture at 2 p.m. susanbanthonyhouse.org. Travelogue: Christmas in Nevada with Christy Simons. Mon., Dec. 3, 2-3 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446.

Literary Events [ Wed., November 28 ] Book Discussion: “The Submission” by Amy Waldman. Wed., Nov. 28, 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Brownbag Book Discussion: “Cutting for Stone” by Abraham Verghese. Wed., Nov. 28, noon. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8375. libraryweb.org. James Kennedy readings from “The Order of Odd-Fish.” Wed., Nov. 28, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. 4732590. wab.org. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works. 319-5999. Titles over Tea: “The Quiet American” by Graham Greene. Wed., Nov. 28, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com.

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[ Thursday, November 29 ] The Beets Poetry Reading. Thu., Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. wab. org. [ Saturday, December 1 ] The Big Pencil Awards Night 2012. Sat., Dec. 1, 6-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590 x107. wab.org. Science Fiction Book Group: “Watchmen.” Thu., Nov. 29, 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. liftbridgebooks.com. [ Saturday, December 1Sunday, December 2 ] Book Signing: Rebekah Ruth (Cummings) “Where the Pink Houses Are.” Sat., Dec. 1, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ Sunday, December 2 ] History Book Club: “God’s Chinese Son: The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom of Hong Xiuquan” by Jonathan D. Spence. Sun., Dec. 2, 2-3:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. liftbridgebooks.com. Poetry Reading: Martin Willitts and Linda Griggs. Sun., Dec. 2, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. [ Monday, December 3 ] Ideas and Authors: “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” by John Boyne. Mon., Dec. 3, 7-8:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25

Literary Events [ Tuesday, December 4 ] Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. NXT Chapter Book Group: “Ready Player One” by Ernest Cline. Tue., Dec. 4, 7-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ Wed., December 5 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works. 3195999.

Museum Exhibit [ Through January 6 ] A T. rex Named Sue. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-4320. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ Ongoing ] Open Ice Skating. Ongoing. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink. Daily 12-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m. Adults Only daily 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m. (Fri-Sat til 8:50 p.m.). 428-7541. cityofrochster.gov/skating.

[ Wed., November 28 ] Crepuscular Walk: Full Moon Over the Gorge. Wed., Nov. 28, 4 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Bring a flashlight and a picnic supper. 493-3625. Roc Cirque presents Whirly Wendsday. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. genesee valley park, elmwood ave. Join the fun at Rochester’s premier spin toy meet up. Hooping, poi, juggling, fire performances, and much more. Live DJ’s are playing during the session to help you stay moving. Extra hoops and poi are available. (585) 6835734. [ Saturday, December 1 ] GVHC Hike. Sat., Dec. 1, 9 a.m. Durand Zoo Road lot, moderate 5 mile hike. 2273180. gvhchikes.org. ALSO 1 p.m. Genesee Valley Park ice rink lot, leisurely 2 hour hike. 319-5794. gvhchikes.org. Old Growth Forest Visit: Bishop Woods and Dark Woods. Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Bring lunch, will car pool. 4933625. Rochester Jingle Bell Run/ Walk. Sat., Dec. 1. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., Walk/Run begins at 10 a.m. 264-1480. jbrrochesterny.kintera.org.

Rochester Orienteering Club: annual dinner, meeting, and Scrooge-O. Sat., Dec. 1, 5 p.m. Powder Mills Park. roc. us.orienteering.org. Saturday Snowshoeing. Saturdays, 1-3 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm.

Special Events [ Through January 1 ] 19th Annual Dickens Christmas Festival. The Shops on West Ridge, 3200 W. Ridge Rd. 368-0670. shopsonwestridge.com. [ Wed., November 28 ] Free Science Show, Ice Cream Social. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30 p.m. Bishop Kearney High School, 125 Kings Highway South. Bishop Kearney science teacher Rob Burke, along with students and alumni, will demonstrate dozens of exciting science experiments, such as liquid nitrogen, alcohol cannons, clock reactions, chemiluminescence, exploding hydrogen balloons, and colorful acid reactions. 3424000. bkhs.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub. com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Wednesdays, 3 p.m. Cornell Cooperative

Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. Inside the Alchemy: A Closer Look at the 2012 Gold Lions. Wed., Nov. 28, 6-9 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. rafconnect@gmail.com. rafconnect.org. Rochester Business Networking Event. Wed., Nov. 28, 7:30-9 a.m. Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail. Enjoy coffee, conversation & connecting. Bring a friend. rochester-tipclub-nov2012. eventbrite.com/. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30 p.m. Piranha Sushi Bar, 682 Park Ave. 370-4774. rochesterwinos.com. [ Thursday, November 29 ] “Art & Copy” screening by Tom Proietti. Thu., Nov. 29, 7-9 p.m. St. John Fisher in Nursing 100, 3690 East Ave. Presented by Tom Proietti and Heather Erwin. humanette66@gmail.com. An Artful and Elegant Holiday Shopping Party. Thu., Nov. 29, 7 p.m. Denton Cottier & Daniels, 349 West Commercial St. This festive shopping party benefits the Food Bank and will include various independent vendors from the Rochester Area. RSVP by phone. 586-3020. Grand Opening of Turning Points. Thu., Nov. 29,

3-5 p.m. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 350 Chili Ave. An information Center for families whose lives have been touched by Incarceration. 328-0856. turningpoints4families@ frontier.com. Inspirational Film Series: “Emmanuel’s Gift.” Thu., Nov. 29, 6:30 p.m. Lightheart Institute, 21 Prince St. lightheart.com. Movie Night: J.R.R. Tolkien Fantasy Film Fest. Thu., Nov. 29, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Rated PG-13. Prepare for the release of the new Hobbit movie adaptation by viewing the original 2001 film from the trilogy, shown on Gates Public Library’s LCD projection screen. Beginning Nov 29, the second and third movies will be shown on subsequent Thursdays. 247-6446. Pluta FoundationTrés Chic Fashion Show. Thu., Nov. 29, 11:30 a.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Ave. Annual fashion show to benefit Pluta Cancer Center patients. Featuring fashions from Jane Morgan’s Little House in Auroro, NYand TwirlyGirl provided by People’s Pottery in Pittsford. 4860571. plutacancercenter.org. Rochester Movie Makers General Meeting. Thu., Nov. 29, 6:30 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St. rochestermoviemakers.org.

[ Friday, November 30 ] 6th Annual Holiday Giftaway. Fri., Nov. 30, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Brockport Elks Lodge, 4400 Sweden Walker Rd. At this event they will distribute toys to any family in need. 395-9833. chrissygreenny@ gmail.com. Metro Justice Alternative Fair. Fri., Nov. 30, 5-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Holiday shopping that supports sustainability and fair trade. 271-9070. metrojustice.org. [ Friday, Novmeber 30Saturday, December 1 ] Holiday Boutique at the Museum. Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 2, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. Multi-Cultural Potluck. Fri., Nov. 30, 6-9 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave. We ask that guests bring a dish to pass, enough to feed five people, or a donation of $5. 461-1000 x237. kja64@ cornell.edu. mycce.org/. [ Friday, November 30Sunday, December 2 ] Cayuga Lake Wine Trail’s 19th Annual Holiday Shopping Spree. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Cayuga Lake

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Wine Trail. 800-847-5217. cayugawinetrail.com. Yuletide in the Country. Fridays-Sundays. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Fri 5-8:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 1:30-7:30 p.m. Tours are $22/$18 members with $3 off for reservations made for Friday, Nov. 30. A exquisite dinner buffet catered by D& R Depot is available for $30/$16 youth 4-16. 2948218. gcv.org. [ Saturday, December 1 ] 12th Annual World AIDS Day Benefit Concert and Panel Discussion. Sat., Dec. 1, 7-9 p.m. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 5462826. 34 th Annual Holiday Bazaar. Sat., Dec. 1, 9 a.m. Charles Carroll School 46, 250 Newcastle Road. 288-8008. 90s Laser Show. Saturdays, 9:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Annual Holiday Bazaar. Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Geneseo United Methodist Church at Rte. 63 and Court St., Geneseo. 243-3160. Corn Hill Holiday House Tour. Sat., Dec. 1. Corn Hill, Lunsford Circle. Tour eight historic homes decorated for the holidays. 262-3142. Guitar and Amp Demonstration with Jonathan Dretto. Sat.,

Dec. 1. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. One day sale. 5443500. houseofguitars.com. Holiday Laser Show. Saturdays, 11 a.m. & 4:30 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Saturdays and Sundays, plus some school holidays. Check online calendar. 271-1880. rmsc. org/StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Schedule/. Holiday Market. Sat., Dec. 1, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Gannett Gym, 519 Allens Creek Road. 381-4560 x226. lfurbush@ allendalecolumbia.org. Light up the Holidays. Sat., Dec. 1. Lighting of the Liberty Pole (4:30-5:10 p.m.), Holiday Parade (5:15 p.m.) and the Season Opening of Manhattan Square Park. cityofrochester.gov. Prohibition Night. Sat., Dec. 1, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. Email nancy@scotlandyardpub.com for a secret password to get into the event. Come dressed for the occasion. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Star Show: Curiosity on Mars. Saturdays, 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Also Mon Oct 8, 1 p.m. 271-1880. rmsc.org. World AIDS Day Banquet. Sat., Dec. 1, 6 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Vignelli

Center for Design Studies, located at 73 Lomb Memorial Dr. 210-4217. lsualkimia.org/ AIDSbanquet. World AIDS Day Candlelight Vigil and Service. Sat., Dec. 1, 5 p.m. Corner of Upper Falls and Hudson Ave. 210-4126. jdozier@acRochester.org. [ Saturday, December 1Sunday, December 2 ] Christmas at Tinker Nature Park. Dec. 1-2, 12-3 p.m. Tinker Nature Park, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free admission, Donations of used ink cartridges and cell phones accepted at the nature center for recycling. 359-7044. Gifts of Love 31st Annual Ornament Sale. Dec. 1-2. St. Louis Church, 60 S. Main St., Pittsford. 381-6872. stlouischurch.org/ornaments. Holiday Barrel Tasting. Dec. 1-2, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. Keuka Spring Vineyards, 243 State Route 54 (East Lake Road). 315-536-3147. keukaspringwinery.com. Holley Trolley Rides. Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.4 p.m. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd. Through Dec 16. Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus on Sunday, December 2, 2-4 p.m. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. [ Sunday, December 2 ] Holidays at the Market. Sundays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester. gov/publicmarket. Long Season Winter Famers’ Market. Sundays, 1-4 p.m. Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. swfarmersmarket.org. Native American Family Day. Sun., Dec. 2, 12-5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 256-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Petpalooza’s Annual Holiday Show. Sun., Dec. 2, 11 a.m.4 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. Toy Show and Collectible Sale. Sun., Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St. 442-5700. [ Monday, December 3 ] CEI’s Community Salute to the Environment. Mon., Dec. 3, 4:30 p.m. RIT Louise Slaughter Building, 111 Lomb Memorial Dr. 262-2870. ceinfo.org. “Magic in the Making.” Mon., Dec. 3, 6-8 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Visit the set of A Christmas Carol and see where actors rehearse the productions that appear on our stages. Meet the talented artisans who work tirelessly offstage to make things happen onstage: see what it takes to put a production together: discover the intricacies of

lighting a show, designing sound, designing and making costumes and props, and much more. 232-1366. gevatheatre.org. [ Tuesday, December 4 ] 41st Annual Candlelight Night. Tue., Dec. 4, 4-9 p.m. Tree lighting ceremonies, caroling and carriage rides in the village streets and shops. pittsfordcommerce.org/events. East Side Winter Market. Tuesdays, 3-6 p.m. 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@rochester. rr.com. Festivus. Tue., Dec. 4, 5:30 p.m. HSBC Auditorium, 100 Chestnut St Tue., Dec. 4, 5:308 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. digitalrochester.com. Harvesting Seeds of Justice Dinner. Tue., Dec. 4, 5:30 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Featuring Reverend Dr. Marvin A. McMickle and Ms. Librada Paz. 485-8627. ruralmigrantministry.org. [ Wed., December 5 ] Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Wednesdays, 3 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. RDDC Vision-Future Luncheon. Wed., Dec. 5, 11:45 a.m.1:30 p.m. Rochester Riverside

Convention Center, 123 E Main St. Featuring County Executive Maggie Brooks and Mayor Tom Richards. 5466920. rddc@rddc.org.

Sports [ Wed., November 28 ] Rochester Americans v. San Antonio Rampage. Wed., Nov. 28, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com [ Friday, November 30 ] Roc City Rumble Mixed Martial Arts Showcase. Fri., Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m. Dome Fair & Expo, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd. First fight at 7:30 p.m. 471-0566. tntfights.com. Rochester Americans v. Toronto Marlies. Fri., Nov. 30, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ Saturday, December 1 ] Roc City Roller Derby Season Championship. Sat., Dec. 1, 6 p.m. Dome Fair & Expo, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd. rocderby.com.

Theater The Accidental Hero. Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. continues on page 28

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Theater “A Christmas Carol” Previews and Opening. Through Nov. 28. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Previews Friday Nov 23-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (open-captioned performance) & 7 p.m., Tue 7 p.m. Opening night Wed Nov 28 7 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “A Christmas Carol.” Nov. 28Dec. 5. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 23. Wed Nov 28 7 p.m. (opening night), Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun noon & 4:30 p.m., Wed Dec 5 7 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical.” Saturdays, 2 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. TYKEs. Through Dec 9. Dec 2 is ASL Interpreted. 461-2000. jccrochester.org. Little Shop of Horrors Auditions. Mon., Dec. 3, 6:30 p.m. RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St. Please prepare 2 contrasting songs, 32 bars. (1 vocal selection should be from the show). Prepare a 1 min monologue, and come prepared to dance. 325-3366. “Mauritius.” Nov. 30-Dec. 2. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Through Dec 8. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 395-2487. brockport.edu/finearts. Memphis. Through Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Nov. 30, 8 p.m., Sat., Dec. 1, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 2, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. \. 222-5000. rbtl.org. Motherhood: The Musical. Nov. 29-Dec. 2. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Necessary Targets” stage reading. Wed., Dec. 5, 5 p.m. Dansville Public Library, 200 Main St. Two American women, a psychiatrist and a writer, travel to Bosnia to help women refugees confront their memories of war. Both emerge deeply changed as they confront their own fears in the face of violence, resiliency and war. Based on interviews conducted by Eve Ensler (Vagina Monologues) with numerous women who survived the Bosnian war. 585 335 6720. jillian5757@yahoo.com. “Peter Pan.” Fridays, 7 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sundays, 5 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St. Continues through Dec 9. 324-3535. “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” Through Nov. 28. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 9. Wed Nov 21 & Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Nov 28 7:30 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre. org Nov. 28-Dec. 5. Geva

SPECIAL EVENTS | World AIDS Day Commemorations

Just a few decades ago, AIDS could not be mentioned in a phrase without an enormous stigma accompanying the word. Today, more people realize that people living with this disease should be treated as respectfully as any other. World AIDS Day will take place on Saturday, December 1, in an attempt to raise awareness about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the people who continue to fight it. In Rochester, members of the Lambda Sigma Upsilon Latino Fraternity, Inc. and Latinas Promoviendo Comunidad/Lambda Pi Chi Sorority, Inc. will raise awareness and funds to benefit AIDS Care at the first World AIDS Day Banquet at RIT. The banquet will be held on Saturday at 6 p.m., with proceeds going toward AIDS Care’s comprehensive medical care and research, supportive services, testing, and other health initiatives for the community. Tickets are $20 for students and $30 for community members, including a meal and special HIV presentation. (Vignelli Center for Design Studies, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive; lsualkimia.org/AIDSbanquet.) The Faith Community Alliance of Greater Rochester, Inc., AIDS Care, Black Leadership Commission on AIDS in Rochester (BLCA), Threshold at The Community Place of Greater Rochester, Inc., and the MOCHA Center will gather for a Candlelight Vigil to recognize the day and raise awareness about HIV/AIDS. The vigil will begin Saturday at 5 p.m. on the corner of Upper Falls and Hudson Avenue, followed by a service led by Rev. Dr. Frederick Johnson at 6 p.m. at the First Genesis Baptist Church (292 Hudson Ave.). For more information, contact Jackie Dozier at 210-4126 or jdozier@acRochester.org. Additionally, the 12th Annual World AIDS Day Benefit Concert and Panel Discussion will be presented by Doing the [Positive] Thing, Rochester Victory Alliance, AIDS Care, OUTlandish, and Equal Grounds. The event takes place Saturday 7-9 p.m. at First Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. Guests include Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus, Steve Farrington, Rochester Victory Alliance, and AIDS Care staff. Buy tickets at Equal Grounds, OUTlandish, or at the door for $5-$15. Proceeds benefit AIDS Care. For information check acrochester.org. Don’t miss the 6th Annual Rochester AIDS Memorial Quilt displayed in Equal Grounds Coffee Shop (750 South Ave.). The quilt will be at the shop Friday, November 30, through Friday, December 7. For questions, email john@equalgrounds.com. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 9. Wed Nov 28-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 5 7:30 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. The Sound of Music. Nov. 29-Dec. 2, 2 & 6 p.m. Best Foot Foward. Jefferson Rd School, 15 School Lane, Pittsford. 389-0220. bestfootforwardkids.com.

The Super Sparkly Sugarplum Revue. Fri., Nov. 30, 7 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 1, 11 a.m. & 4 p.m. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St. Bring a new unwrapped toy or roll of holiday paper for NHS Operation Santa and get $1 off your ticket price (at point of purchase). 3749032. bvtnaples.org. “A Visit from St. Nicholas or The Night Before Christmas.

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Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313. Through Nov 9. 861-4816. tickets@ blacksheeptheatre.org.

Theater Audition [ Wed., November 28Thursday, November 29 ] “Bugsy Malone.” Nov. 28-29, 6-9 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St. Grades 5-8. Performances February 1-10. 935-7173. mjtstages.com/auditions.html. [ Monday, December 3 ] “Little Shop of Horrors.” Mon., Dec. 3, 6:30-9:30 p.m. RAPA, 727 E. Main St. Call to schedule an audition. Prepare 2 contracting songs, 32 bars, one from the show; and 1 minute monologue. Wear clothes and shoes to dance. 8511997. raparocs@gmail.com. rapatheatre.org/auditions/. [ Tuesday, December 4 ] Auditions. Tue., Dec. 4, 4-6 p.m. Spotlight Studio, 3 Railroad St., (corner N. Main St.), Fairport. Call for appointment. Casting all male and female singers and actors for Joey & Maria’s Comedy Wedding, The Soapranos, Westside High School Comedy Reunion, Nunsense, I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change and more. 865-4200. info@joeyandmaria.com. joeyandmaria.com.

Workshops [ Wed., November 28 ] Family Development Class: “Did You Hear What I Said?” Wed., Nov. 28, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school age children. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ Saturday, December 1 ] Effective Black Parenting Workshops. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon. Carter Street Community Center, 500 Carter St. This free, 15-session series uses the Effective Black Parenting(tm) curriculum and is based on an AfricanAmerican orientation to parenting. It teaches a series of child management skills from within a Black frame of reference to help parents. The program reflects more than a decade of research and fieldtesting and is derived from the writings of African-American parenting scholars. It is one of the only curriculums that is inclusive of African-American history and culture and it is a great tool for all Black parents. Registration limited to the first 25 parents for each session. 428-6360. [ Saturday, December 1Sunday, December 2 ] The Art of Blending. Dec. 1-2, noon. Ravines Wine Cellars,

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SPECIAL EVENTS | Holiday Season Begins

As we swing into December and toss the turkey scraps behind us, this week a variety of festivities will take place to help us ring in the holiday season. On Thursday, November 29, the 19th Annual Park Avenue Holiday Open House will run 5-9 p.m. Enjoy holiday decorations, holiday music, horse-drawn wagon rides, hot roasted chestnuts, holiday characters, and more as you peruse shops from Alexander Street to Culver Road. The opening ceremony takes place at the green at Barrington Street with the lighting of the Christmas tree and Menorah. From 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. you can also visit Santa at 600 Park Ave. The street will not be closed to traffic, so be cautious and responsible. For more information, visit park-avenue.org/events.html. Take part in Rochester’s traditional Liberty Pole Lighting on Saturday, December 1, 4:30-5:10 p.m. As Mayor Richards switches on the lights of the Liberty Pole outside of the Sibley Building (corner of East Avenue and East Main Street), listen to holiday favorites from School No. 54 and Prime Time Brass. Santa and holiday characters will be available for photos. Then, continue the holiday spirit with a parade to Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink for the ribbon-cutting ceremony, complete with free open skate 5:30-8:30 p.m. (limited skate rental, $3/person), free horse-drawn wagon rides, and other activities. 428-7992. cityofrochester.gov/libertypolelighting. On Tuesday, December 4, experience Pittsford Village Merchants and Pittsford Chamber of Commerce’s Candlelight Night 4-9 p.m. in the Village of Pittsford. This annual holiday celebration includes live music, carolers, horse-drawn wagon rides, visits with Santa, and the lighting of village Christmas trees. Various merchants will offer holiday treats and specials. For more information visit townofpittsford.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON 400 Barracks Rd. Join Winemaker Morten Hallgren for a journey into the realm of winemaking as he presents the history of Cabernets from a European perspective, before it came to the New World. 607292-7007. [ Sunday, December 2 ] Journaling for Success. Sun., Dec. 2, 1:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ Monday, December 3 ] Family Development Class: “20 Minutes to Effective Parenting Communication Skills.” Mon., Dec. 3, 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children ages 3-6. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ Tuesday, December 4 ] Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. Tuesdays,

6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. 698-7784. The CrepExperience: Crêpemaking classes. Tue., Dec. 4, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Simply Crepes, 101 South Main Street. 208-5486. simplycrepes.com/Events. Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” Tue., Dec. 4, 68 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 1, 4.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 4, Sat-Sun 1; FLIGHT: 7, 9:35; also Fri-Sun 4; Sat-Sun 1:15; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 7:10, 9:10; also FriSun 5:10, Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; LIFE OF PI: 3D Sat-Sun 3:30; 2D 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 4, SatSun 1:15; LINCOLN: 7:15, 8:15; also Fri-Sun 4:15, Sat-Sun 1:15; RED DAWN: 7:10, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 4:10; Sat-Sun 1:10; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D: Fri-Sun 6; Sat-Sun 1:30; 2D 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5, SatSun 1, 3; SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also Fri-Sun 4; Sat-Sun 1; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5, Sat-Sun 1, 3.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. JOHN WATERS DOUBLE FEATURE FRI: PECKER 7; HAIRSPRAY: 8:30; PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 7; SatSun 4:30; SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN: 8:45.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ARGO: 12:50, 3:55, 6:45, 9:30; BREAKING DAWN: 12:30, continues on page 32

The Axis of Evil chops the Northwest [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

Those who revere Ronald Reagan as a man who walked on water, then changed it to wine, conveniently forget the Cold War paranoia he “Red Dawn” cultivated and the butchery he condoned. (PG-13), directed by Dan Bradley Although possibly slightly less hysterically Now playing rightist than its predecessor, the remake traffics in the same sort of fearmongering, basing its The original “Red Dawn” appeared in 1984, plot on an invasion by one of the “Axis of and like many works of popular art provides a Evil” countries invoked by George W. Bush useful glimpse of the temper of its time. During as a way of retaining his hold on the office he the Reagan administration’s orchestration of stole. Before the story itself begins, the movie a systematic slaughter of leftists, liberals, and shows a long, crowded montage of television other supporters of land reform and democracy news reports of the contemporary events that all over Central America, the movie posited an create the context for its action. News stories of invasion of the United States from Nicaragua; economic collapse, international financial crises, the president even warned that the hordes from electronic terrorism, etc. provide a modicum the South could threaten Brownsville, Texas. of verisimilitude to a generally incredible fiction. No less preposterous than the first film, this “Red Dawn” shows a massive airborne attack by North Korean forces on the American Northwest, assisted by the Russians, who take the East Coast. Late in the picture some awkward exposition reveals that Josh Peck, Josh Hutcherson, and Chris Hemsworth in the remake of “Red Dawn.”

some advanced cyber-attack destroyed the U. S. power grid, neutralizing all communications and preventing counterattack, supposed to explain the impotence of the largest and best-equipped military force in the world in the face of such an invasion. Once again, a bunch of high-school students calling themselves the Wolverines after their football team, this time in Spokane, Washington, escape into the wilderness and form a guerilla force to resist the occupying forces. Led by Jed Eckert (Chris Hemsworth), a Marine home on leave, and his younger brother Matt (Josh Peck), the gang embarks on a campaign to fight the invaders, ambushing Korean troops, assassinating officers, stealing weapons and vehicles, planting bombs, and freeing their friends and neighbors from concentration camps. As Jed tells them, in Iraq he and his comrades were the good guys; now the Wolverines are the bad guys practicing a war of stealth and terror. Once the Wolverines learn some essential lessons in matters like marksmanship, bomb making, and hand-to-hand combat from Jed, most of the rest of the movie, unsurprisingly, consists of a series of fierce gun battles, automobile chases, and the usual explosions. Some of their methods, like car bombs, improvised explosive devices, setting one explosion to be followed by another, and so on, come right from the American experience in the Middle East. Though outmanned and outgunned, the Wolverines prove themselves

PHOTO COURTESY OPEN ROAD FILMS

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able students of contemporary history, successfully resisting the superior forces of a highly trained military. “Red Dawn” combines its barely believable premise of cyber-attacks on the United States with an even much less believable notion of an invasion and occupation of the country; of course, if like the recent, defeated candidate for president, one believes the Russians represent the major geopolitical threat to America, then it all makes sense after all. The first movie suggested a handy right-wing fantasy, complete with endorsements of the Second Amendment right out of NRA pamphlets; this one descends into a familiar adolescent sentimentality, with sweet teenage relationships occasionally clogging up the violent action, notably one of those storybook romances between Matt Eckert, the high-school quarterback, and a pretty cheerleader (Isabel Lucas). The picture finally provides a kind of initiatory experience for Matt, who learns some painful lessons of suffering and loss, but also develops into manhood. He grows from high-school kid, resentful younger brother of a tough Marine, to a full-fledged leader of fighters, spouting the plangent platitudes of patriotism we’ve all heard so often for so long. Anyone who actually believes in the imminent risk of an invasion by the combined forces of Russia and North Korea should start building a bunker and accumulating weapons, ammunition, and provisions for the future — there’s still a lot of land in Idaho.

One of the most talented filmmakers working today, Ang Lee has had a fascinating career. While most directors of his skill usually settle into a distinct aesthetic, Lee remains something of a chameleon, jumping genres and subject matter, apparently content to take on whatever stories happen to capture his interest. From “Sense & Sensibility” to “Brokeback Mountain” and the underrated “Hulk,” I can’t think of a filmmaker with a filmography as varied. Now Lee brings his unique sensibilities to adapting Yann Martel’s best-selling, Booker Prize-winning novel, “Life of Pi,” transforming the metaphysical adventure tale into a visually stunning 3D epic work of art. A middle-aged Pi (Irrfan Khan, “Slumdog Millionaire”) narrates his story, speaking to a young writer who is keen to turn the man’s astonishing life into a novel. The conversation between the two men frames the main plot and we return to their conversation throughout the film. Pi begins by describing his childhood in Pondicherry, India, where

Richard Parker and Suraj Sharma in “Life of Pi.” PHOTO COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

his family owns a zoo within the city’s botanical gardens. Raised Hindu, Pi is a thoughtful child, filled with a spiritual curiosity that manifests itself as an obsession with exploring various religions, including Christianity and Islam. He connects with specific aspects of each, picking and choosing the ideals that most speak to him and crafting a faith that is uniquely personal. His intense spirituality occasionally puts him at odds with his more pragmatic father, but it’s this faith that will eventually allow Pi to survive the hardships he must endure. When Pi is a teenager, his family is forced to sell its zoo and leave the country. Taking many of the animals with them, they board a Japanese boat setting sail for Canada. Tragedy strikes several days into the journey, and an immense storm sinks the ship in an awe-inspiring sequence rendered all the more harrowing in 3D. Separated from his family, Pi manages to climb into a lifeboat, where he is able to ride out the storm. It’s not until the weather clears that Pi discovers, to his horror, that his family’s Bengal tiger — dubbed Richard Parker — is also aboard the boat. The majority of the film takes place over the course of the 227 days that Pi and Richard Parker are adrift in the Pacific Ocean. The journey begins as an intense tug of war as man and beast size up one another. It quickly becomes clear that neither beast nor boy has any plans to leave the safety of the boat, and slowly a mutual respect emerges, as boy and tiger learn from one another, each adapting in their own ways to their newfound situation. Newcomer Suraj Sharma gives a marvelous performance as teenaged Pi, vital in a film in which he’s basically alone onscreen for the majority of the running time. It’s all the more remarkable considering he doesn’t have

a single previous acting credit to his name. His major co-star, Richard Parker, is an astounding digital creation that is never less than completely realistic, and one that manages to reinforce one of the film’s central ideas, that all animals have souls. You never doubt for a minute that Sharma is stuck in the middle of the ocean with a wild, and sometimes bloodthirsty, jungle cat. Ang Lee’s artful use of special effects allows him to depict awe-inspiring sights, including all manner of sea life, a fleet of beautiful bioluminescent jellyfish, and a mysterious island populated entirely by meerkats. He also constantly shifts the ways in which the ocean itself is presented, at times as a smooth pane of glass reflecting the bright clouds above, so that Pi appears to be surrounded on all sides by the heavens, and alternately as dark, deep, and dangerous. It’s a brilliant decision, and prevents the film’s stark setting from becoming monotonous. Under Lee’s assured guidance, the use of 3D never feels like a cheap gimmick and, like Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo,” it demonstrates the possibilities of the format when a masterful filmmaker is given a new set of tools with which to tell a gripping story. Here it’s used as a means of further enveloping the viewer within the story’s fantastical world, though Lee isn’t above milking the 3D for effect (be prepared for plenty of tiger flying at your face). Like the novel on which it’s based, the film functions as an allegory about religious tolerance and man’s relationship with God, and Lee doesn’t shy away from the spiritual side. But don’t let that scare you off. Whatever your feelings on faith, the film’s thrilling story of survival and stunning visuals more than qualify the film as one of the year’s best.

PRINCESS MONONOKE

Friday, Nov. 30, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 2, 2 p.m.

Miyazaki’s epic story of conflict and balance has been universally acclaimed by critics and broke the box office record on its original release in Japan. While defending his village from a demonic boar-god, the young warrior Ashitaka becomes afflicted with a deadly curse that grants him superhuman power in battle but will eventually take his life. Traveling to find a cure and meet his destiny, he meets San (Princess Mononoke), a girl raised by wolf-gods in the sacred depths of the Great Forest. Mononoke is a force of nature, riding bareback on a great white wolf and terrorizing the human outpost of Iron Town. (Mononoke-hime, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1997, 134 min.)

Photo courtesy Photofest

[ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

DIE HARD

Saturday, Dec. 1, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Miyazaki

New York cop John McClane plans to visit his estranged wife and their children in Los Angeles for Christmas, but when she can’t pull herself away from a corporate party, they get separated in a terrorist attack near the top of Nakatomi Tower. Trapped in the building, McClane must stop the terrorists to save his wife, save his marriage, and save Christmas! This summer action hit propelled Bruce Willis into the tough-guy pantheon. (John McTiernan, US 1988, 131 min.)

Happy Holidays

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31

1, 4:05, 4:35, 7, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15; FLIGHT: 12:25, 4:15, 7:20, 10:30; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:15, 12:45, 3:25, 6:55, 7:25, 9:50; 2D 4:10, 10:20; LINCOLN: 12:20, 3:35, 6:50, 9:25, 10:05; RED DAWN: 1:15, 4:20, 7:40, 10:35; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 1:05, 4, 4:30, 7:15, 9:40; 2D 12:35, 1:35, 5, 6:35, 7:45, 10:10; SKYFALL: 12:10, 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:40, 7:10, 9:55, 10:25; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 1:10; 2D 3:45, 6:30, 9:35.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 11/28-Wed 12/5. THE WRONG MAN: Wed 11/28 8; WHEN HARRY MET SALLY: Thur 11/29 8; PRINCESS MONONOKE: Fri 11/30 8, Sun 12/2 2; DIE HARD: Sat 12/1 8; A GIRL IN EVERY POT: Tue 12/4 8; THE PURPLE ROSE OF CAIRO: Wed 12/5 8.

RALPH: 3D 4:45, 9:55; 2D 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 7:25.

Film Previews

Henrietta 18

[ OPENING ] ANNA KARENINA (PG-13): This opulent adaptation of the Tolstoy classic, from director Joe Wright and Oscar-winning screenwriter Tom Stoppard, stars Keira Knightley as one of literature’s best-known adulteresses, married to Jude Law’s aristocrat but consumed by an affair with Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s dashing cavalry officer. Little, Pittsford THE COLLECTION (R): This sequel to the 2009 horror flick “The Collector” calls upon the only man to have escaped from a serial killer to rescue his next victim from the psycho’s fortified hideout. DIE HARD (1988): The Dryden’s “Happy Holidays” series begins with — hey! Don’t scoff. Why is NYPD detective John McClane even at LA’s Nakatomi Plaza to do battle with Eurotrash? Because it’s Christmas Eve, and he’s trying to patch things up with the wife. Dryden (Sat, Dec 1, 8 p.m.) A GIRL IN EVERY PORT (1935): This silent Howard Hawks comedy features Louise Brooks as a crafty golddigger who comes between a pair of sailors (Victor McLaglen and Robert Armstrong) in Marseilles. Dryden (Tue, Dec 4, 8 p.m.) KILLING THEM SOFTLY (R): Brad Pitt and his “Assassination of Jesse James...” director Andrew Dominik reteam for this crime flick about a gangland enforcer investigating a heist pulled off during a Mob-controlled poker game. With Richard Jenkins, Ray Liotta, and James Gandolfini. Canandaigua, Eastview, Pittsford, Tinseltown PRINCESS MONONOKE (1997): Hayao Miyazaki’s recurring theme exploring our relationship with nature is at the forefront of this animated period piece about a young warrior who becomes involved in the struggle between the supernatural guardians of a forest and the humans who consume its resources. Dryden (Fri, Nov 30, 8 p.m., and Sun, Dec 2, 2 p.m.) WHEN HARRY MET SALLY... (1989): Rob Reiner directs the late Nora Ephron’s smart, funny, and Oscarnominated script about a man (Billy Crystal) and a woman (Meg Ryan) navigating their often complicated friendship. Dryden (Thu, Nov 29, 8 p.m.)

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. *No film times by press time*

The Little 258-04 240 East Ave.  ARGO: 7, 9:25; also Sat-Sun 3:20, Sun 12:20; ANNA KARENINA: 6:30, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 12, 3; A LATE QUARTET: 7:10; Sat-Sun 12:30; LIFE OF PI: 6:50, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12:50, 3:40; LINCOLN: 6:40, 9:45; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 3:10; THE SESSIONS: 9:40; also Sat-Sun 3:30.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. *No film times by press time*

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor BREAKING DAWN: 12:40, 4, 4:40, 7:30, 9:55, 10:40; FLIGHT: 12:25, 4:05, 7:15, 10:25; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 12:35, 4:35, 7:05, 9:40; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:45, 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 7:40, 10:05; 2D 4:45, 10:35; LINCOLN: 12:30, 1:10, 4:30, 7, 8, 10:20; RED DAWN: 1:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:15; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 12:55, 4:25, 6:55, 9:35; 2D 1:25, 5, 7:45, 10:10; SKYFALL: 12:20, 12:50, 4:10, 6:45, 7:20, 10:30; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 4:20; 2D 1, 4:50, 7:25, 10.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; FLIGHT: 7, 9:35; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; LIFE OF PI: 3D 7, 9:30; 2D Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; 2D 7, 9; SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BREAKING DAWN: 12:15, 12:45, 3:50, 7, 7:30, 10:15; FLIGHT: 12:25, 3:35, 6:45, 9:50; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:35, 7:45, 10:20; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:35, 1:05, 3:40, 6:40, 7:10, 9:35; 2D 4:15, 10:10; LINCOLN: 12:05, 3:20, 6:50, 10:05; RED DAWN: 11:35 a.m., 2:20, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 12:55, 4:10, 7:05, 9:30; 2D 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 4:55, 7:35, 10; SKYFALL: 12:30, 3:30, 4:05, 7:15, 9:45, 10:25; WRECK-IT

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ANNA KARENINA: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 10; ARGO: 2:20, 5, 7:40; BREAKING DAWN: 1:35, 4:15, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:40; FLIGHT: Fri-Sat 10:20; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:10; LIFE OF PI: 3D 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; 2D 1:50; LINCOLN: 1:40, 4:50, 8; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 4:30; also Fri-Sat 9:10; 2D 2:10, 6:50; SKYFALL: 1, 4:05, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 10:20; WRECK-IT RALPH: 1:20, 4, 6:40; also Fri-Sat 9:10.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ARGO: 1, 7:10; BREAKING DAWN: 11:30 a.m., 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15; FLIGHT: 12:15, 3:25, 6:30, 9:35; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 12:05, 6:50; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:30, 10; LIFE OF PI: 3D 1:05, 2:35, 4:05, 7:05, 8:35, 10:10; 2D 11:40 a.m., 5:35; LINCOLN: 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10; RED DAWN: 12:10, 1:20, 2:30, 3:55, 5:10, 6:25, 7:40, 8:55, 10:05; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 1:25, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20; 2D 12, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15; SKYFALL: IMAX 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:10; TAKEN 2: 4, 10:05; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 12:40, 6:15; 2D 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. *No film times by press time*

32 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

A scene from the animated film “Rise of the Guardians.” PHOTO COURTESY Paramount Pictures THE WRONG MAN (1956): Henry Fonda stars for Alfred Hitchcock in this truth-based noir about a mild-mannered bassist whose life begins to unravel after he’s misidentified as a holdup man. Co-starring Vera Miles. Dryden (Wed, Nov 28, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Culver, Little, Tinseltown FLIGHT (PG-13): Robert Zemeckis’s first live-action film since 2000’s “Cast Away” is a drama with Don Cheadle, John Goodman, and Denzel Washington as an airline pilot who saves a flight from crashing, only to have the ensuing investigation into the equipment malfunction reveal something troubling. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG-13): Kevin James, Salma Hayek, and Henry Winkler lead the cast of this comedy about a biology teacher who tries to raise much-needed funds for his cash-strapped school by becoming a successful MMA fighter. Tinseltown A LATE QUARTET (R): Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener, and Christopher Walken star in the debut feature from Yaron Silberman, a drama about the upheaval that ensues among a closeknit group of classical musicians when one of them receives a lifechanging diagnosis. Little LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak

with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER (PG-13): Writer-director Stephen Chbosky adapts his semi-autobiographical coming-of-age novel about an introverted and troubled freshman who is befriended by a pair of seniors. With Logan Lerman, Ezra Miller, and Emma Watson. Cinema RED DAWN (PG-13): North Korea replaces the Soviet Union as the bad guy in this remake of the 80’s classic (was it really?) about a bunch of teenagers who band together to save their town from invading forces. With Chris Hemsworth, Josh Peck, and Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Tinseltown RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG): Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin, and Isla Fisher provide some of the voices for this animated adventure about what happens when Jack Frost joins up with Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, and others to prevent an evil spirit from taking over the world. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo,

Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN (PG-13): This absorbing documentary explores what happened when two South African fans set out to discover the fate of their musical hero, enigmatic 1970’s singersongwriter Rodriguez. Cinema THE SESSIONS (R): From writer-director Ben Lewin comes this drama starring John Hawkes as a man in an iron lung who hires a professional sex surrogate (Helen Hunt) to help him lose his virginity. Costarring William H. Macy. Little SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (PG-13): Honestly, if you need a description, you’re not interested. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a videogame bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent

maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

2BDRM APARTMENT Upstairs unit. Off-street parking and Attic for daytime use. Available December 1st. Rent is $650+ RG&E Call 414-4718

Houses for Sale

DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888. MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $440 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

Land for Sale 20 ACRES FREE Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN)

Lost?

Find your way home with

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Retirement Property DELAWARE: For Sale Several NEW Ranch Homes! 55+Peaceful Country setting with all amenities included. Low 100’s, low taxes Call Today: 302-659-5800 www. bonayrehomes.com and www. lenapebuilders.net

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future. 

Expenses paid.  Private.  Legal.  Jenny 1-866-751-3377 PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if adoption is your plan, choose from loving, pre-approvedm families. Call Joy: 866-922-3678. www. ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903 BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $30 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a second lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 EXPERIENCED FEMALE JAZZ Vocalist looking for a pianist or a small group to perform music from the 30’s to today, with a Mad Men era emphasis! Serious musicians only. 233-5551 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share

continues on page 34

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

TO ADVERTISE IN OUR

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION

CALL CHRISTINE AT

244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL

SEE OUR

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 33

CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM SEE PAGE 34 OF THIS WEEK’S ISSUE

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33

Home and Garden Professionals ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

FALL/WINTER

CONTRACT SPECIALS Limited Contracts Available. • DISCOUNTED YARD CLEAN-UP W/SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT INCLUDED: starting at $350 • SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT: starting at $200 • SINGLE-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $45 • 2-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $75

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Home Improvements

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414-3692

Big Dog Problem; Small Dog Problem

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs. Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

No Problem! Combine obedience & behavior training to create a great relationship with your dog. It’ll make life easier for both of you.

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& MASONRY

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Fully Insured

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

34 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Miscellaneous FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. GET A FREE VACATION BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to Dvar. Maximize your IRS deductions and help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-338-6724 HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings. At 1-800-653-2276 or WWW. Woodfordbros.com SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

HAVE A $1000 IDEA TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE IN AMERICA? SUBMIT IT TODAY

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

585-734-8444

Lost and Found

Notices

Michael Mincher Serving Monroe County since 1977

TRUSTED & RECOMMENDED FOR 25+ YEARS

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

• Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting

• Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089

All Phases of Home Improvements

SUN WORLD CONSTRUCTION

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including:

> page 33 laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 See Page 22 of this week’s issue

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads AT http://www.peopleschoice. org TO WIN CASH+TRIP TO KICKOFF. REGENSTRIEF INSTITUTE WILL CONDUCT STUDY ON WINNING IDEA.

and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee

Wanted to Buy

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY WANTED: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www. yearbookusa.com or 214-5141040

BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate,

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Affordable Living off Park Avenue

21 Girard Street

Just east of Culver Road is a stretch of Park Avenue that is a little quieter and more residential than the main drag. Known as the ABC Streets Neighborhood, this friendly area is where realtor Ellen Carr grew up and where she is lovingly selling her parents’ home. Accessible and affordable with recent electrical upgrades, 21 Girard Street combines the craftsmanship and charm of 1910 with the solidarity and expansiveness of 21st century potential.

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A large columned porch and brightly painted red front door proclaim that this is a Colonial Revival home, where comfort is king and family and guests are welcome. In the entryway, notice the original inlay of red tile. Place your hand on the wooden knobs to your right to reveal a hidden coat closet. The central foyer showcases some of the home’s loveliest features—a sunny bay window, a warm radiator (included in almost every room in the house) and original quartersawn oak hardwood floors. Off to the right of the foyer, through an original pocket door, enter the living room with its crown moldings. Notice the brickwork of the original working fireplace. Continue through a decorative archway and stop to gaze at the sunny beauty and craftsmanship of the dining room’s bay window seat and coffered ceiling. First-time homeowners will be happy to know that all the kitchen and basement appliances (including a stove and refrigerator purchased

in the last five years) are included in the cost of the house. Add the many shelves and cupboards of the expansive butler’s pantry and you have the perfect setting to create a feast. Sleeping quarters reign on the second floor—with its four hardwood-floored bedrooms. Original linen closets can be found in both the hallway and tiled full bath. Before leaving this level, notice the three season sleeping porch, ideal for enjoying the evening sunset. Ellen Carr remembers playing in the house’s unfinished attic. This expansive area with lots of storage space would also make a great quiet bedroom and bath. Carr’s fondest memories are of how easy it was to walk to places while living in this house. “You would literally walk out the front door to go to Wegmans and museums, the Dryden Theatre, Martin B. Anderson elementary school and now the Park Avenue Festival.” Also close are I-490, Cobbs Hill Park, downtown and major bus routes. Listed at $139,900 by Ellen Carr of Nothnagle Realtors, (585) 733-6252, this house is 1860 square feet in space. For more information and pictures, visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R195689. by Janet Collinge Janet lived on Park Avenue between Girard and Faraday Streets in the late 1980s. Currently, she can be found in the Neighborhood of the Arts.

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CITY rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

SERVICES

Answer the call. Seasonal Drivers

Kelly Services® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. FedEx expects to have its busiest day in history on Monday, Dec.10, when it moves a projected 280 million shipments globally. For the overall holiday season between Thanksgiving and Christmas they expect an increase in personnel by approximately 20,000.

BE PART OF THIS RECORD BREAKING SEASON! Minimum six months experience driving like-sized commercial vehicle within last three years required. One year commercial driving experience strongly preferred. • 21 years or older • Customer service skills Inquire in person: Mon-Fri 10-am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY 14585 or email resume to: Tempupny@yahoo.com EOE

36 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

Employment

disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000.

AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 5467220 ex 4854.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

AN INTERNATIONAL COMPANY Expanding in your area seeks serious individuals interested in pt/ft business opportunity call 570 856 1315 or e-mail nansk55@gmail. com or visit www.goherbalife.com/ decnorm/en-US

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with

HORSE SANTUARY in Pavilion, NY requests volunteers during holiday season. Volunteers must love animals. Call Chris at (585) 5848210 for more information. LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org

ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547 VOLUNTEERS ARE STILL NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays.org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www.campgooddays.org VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter

at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately!

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is Zolala, LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on October 16, 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 656 Kayleigh Drive, Webster, NY 14580 [ LEGAL NOTICE VG CAPITAL GROUP LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Capital Group LLC was filed with SSNY on July 20, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 10N2 ASSOCIATES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 100 Cummings Center, Suite 333C, Beverly, MA 01915. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 3800 RIDGE ROAD WEST LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] BROOKDALE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS FABRICATION, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] CGS WEBSTER MACHINING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CORNWALL ROCHESTER NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/31/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606,which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] EAGLE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-14282 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. The Estate of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell; Any persons who are heirs or distributees of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; Board of Managers of the Scarborough House Condominium; Matthew Korytko; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 22, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on December 19, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold

and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 1000 East Avenue, Unit 106, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.37-12./106, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10047 of Deeds, page 66. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $42,134.50 plus but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2012Dean J. Fero, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KALPIN’S AUTO CARE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Nicholas Kalpin 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613. [ NOTICE ] KING PROPERTIES NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/17/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Lead Pipe Productions LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/16/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC at 23 Maricrest Drive., Rochester, NY 14616. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Legal Notice of Formation of LLC. Long Pond Road II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gerald

F. Stack, Esq., Hiscock & Barclay, LLP, One Park Place, 300 South State Street, Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose: any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] MANAGED SERVICES TEAM LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 72 Cascade Drive, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Peter Ferrari, 6 Dover Ct., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form of SAGER DRIVE PROPERTIES, LLC Art. of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 University Ave. Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Blue Wave Properties, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 19 Eaglesfield Wy, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Local Seasons LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/24/2012. County: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to LLC. 2160 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities.

County LLC. Articles of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 Universtiy Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AMERIGLIDE OF ROCHESTER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Atimesa Studios LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Salil Athalye, 7 Brewster Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, also the registered agent.. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Brown Simmons LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10/18/2012. Office Location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 21 Lawndale Terrace, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BURRIS CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Clearview Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by PARMA JOHNNYS LLC dba PARMA JOHNNY, 1600 LYELL AVE SUITE C., Rochester NY 14606, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CASUALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation Design Builders of Monroe

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of domestic professional

service limited liability company (PLLC) Name: RICHARDSON ARCHITECTURE, PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal Office of PLLC: 597 Shady Glen Circle, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which PLLCs may be formed under the New York PLLC Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JA PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/2012. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 E. Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Owning and managing real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JJ ZEBs, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/6/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 388 Mason Road, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of KULIG, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o William S. Ruby, Esq., 70 Linden Oaks, Suite 300, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of L&B Fabricators, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 10/31/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 W. Main St., STE 246, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 140 VINAL, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has be en designated as

agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 415 Murwood Lane,Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MAXIM MINI MART LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC : 264 Clifford Ave., Rochester, NY 14621 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MDMS Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 194 Old English Dr., Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MFP 126 CAYUGA STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN HOLT RD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evan & Fox, LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of One Way Enterprises I LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to One Way Enterprises, 8376 Merriman Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RAM NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12.

Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Property Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Real Estate, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER APARTMENT MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER MANAGING MEMBER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROW HOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: J. Loftus, 69 Cascade Dr., Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37

Legal Ads > page 37 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOIL STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 36 Draffin Rd., Hilton, NY 144689708. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Monroe Fluid Technology, Inc. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOLEADO, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 363 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 292 Fair Oaks Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Thrombophilic

Consultants LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/12. Office location, County of Monroe. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and mailed to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Av., Ste. 202 Brooklyn, NY, 11228 . Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Vista Golf Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Vista Golf, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman 3445 Winton

Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WESTSIDE DRIVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 5656 Chili Riga Center Road, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Whittermore Point Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of AdvizeX Partners I, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE

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on 9/20/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 9724 Wolf Creek Dr., Irving, TX 75063-5032. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Canal Front Capital Management, LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10 Little Acorn Cir., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC formed in DE on 11/14/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Canal Front Capital Management, LLC, 10 Little Acorn Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Business Filings Inc., 108 West 13th St.,Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of HCP SH ELP2 PROPERTIES, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE BERRY COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 11/16/11. Princ. office of LLC: 160 Inverness Dr. West, Ste. 400, Englewood, CO 80112. NYS fictitious name: BERRCO ADVERTISING, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Arts. of Org. filed with CO Dept. of State, 1700

38 City november 28 - december 4, 2012

Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of True Wireless, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/8/12. NYS fictitious name: True Wireless, LLC of Texas. Office location: Ontario County. Princ. bus. addr.: 3124 Brother Blvd., #104, Bartlett, TN 38133. LLC formed in TX on 7/8/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc. (NRAI), 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. TX addr. of LLC: c/o NRAI, 1021 Main St., Ste. 1150, Houston, TX 77002. Cert. of Org. filed with TX Sec. of State, P.O. Box 13697, Austin, TX 78711. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] QUINZI PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/10/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Peter Quinzi 822 McKinley St. East Rochester, NY 14445 Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] STUDIO QI, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/25/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618.

October 23, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The street address of the limited liability company’s office is 1023 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on December 31, 2010. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. Attn: James T. Townsend, Esq. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2111 EMPIRE BLVD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 2111 Empire Blvd LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/9/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 849 Lehigh Station Road, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] CARPETNOMICS OF WNY, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on November 2, 2012 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 83 Dessie Heights, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Back of 1075, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is Back of 1075, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Rochester Brainery LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the

Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to theLLC at 119 Sylvester Street, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Barbara and Michael Hanna Family, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Greater Rochester Breast Surgery, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 2, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 2235 South Clinton Avenue in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2235 South Clinton Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine and the providing of medical services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMOKE SIGNALS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Smoke Signals Performance Products LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Antonio Masci and Iginio Masci, Plaintiffs vs. David

Oliver, et al, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated November 13, 2012, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at a public auction at the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, on December 27, 2012 at 9:00 a.m., premises known as 1133-1135, 1139-1141, 1143-1145 and 1147-1149 Shoecraft Road, Webster, New York 14580. Described as follows: All that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as Lots 230, 231 and 232 of Shoecraft Farms as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 258 of Maps at page 22 and 23. Also, all that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as LotR153A of the Shoecraft Farms Subdivision, as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 278 of Maps at page 8. Approximate amount of judgment: $672,439,97, plus interest, disbursements, fees and costs from the date of the Referee’s Report, October 17, 2011. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index Number 2011-5941. John J. Considine, Esq., Referee Charles J. Genese, Attorney at Law Post Office Box 688 Webster, New York 14580 [ NOTICE OF STRATEGIC CHANGE & INNOVATION, LLC ] Strategic Change & Innovation, LLC was filed with SSNY on 10/05/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 315 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ZYAIR PROPERTIES, LLC ] Zyair Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 09/14/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 133 Rosemary Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.

Fun [ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD No Do-Overs: By 2009, James Washington believed he had gotten away with a 1995 murder, but then he had a heart attack, and on his deathbed, in a fit of remorse, he confessed to a confidant. (“I have to get something off my conscience,” he told a guard in the jailhouse where he was serving time for a lesser, unrelated offense.) However, Washington miraculously recovered from the heart attack and tried to take back his confession, but prosecutors in Nashville, Tenn., were unfazed. They used it to augment the sparse evidence from 1995, and in October 2012 the now-healthier Washington was convicted of the murder and sentenced to 51 more years in prison.

Government in Action

— Among the federally funded projects highlighted in the “2012 Waste Book” of U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn were a $325,000 grant to develop a “robosquirrel” (to help study the somehowconfusing interaction between squirrels and rattlesnakes) and a $700,000 grant by the National Science Foundation for a New York theater company to create a musical about climate change and biodiversity (which actually opened this year, in Kansas City, and included among its concepts, according to one critic, “flying monkey poop”). Abuses of the food stamp program were also detailed, such as by one exotic dancer who, while earning $85,000, drew food stamps in an amount roughly equivalent to the sum she spent on “cosmetic enhancements.” — While the Department of Veterans Affairs remains under criticism for inadequate funding for personnel disabled in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, it spent in 2010 more than $5 million on train-

ing conferences just to teach bureaucrats how to administer parts of its latest collective-bargaining contract, according to an October report in the Washington Examiner. In fact, reported the Examiner, $34 million in payroll goes to department officials who work mainly on union-related activities.

Great Art!

— “I wanted to create a self-portrait that was completely stripped of ... visual prejudice,” said Polish-born New York artist Martynka Wawrzyniak, who thus chose the medium of “smell” for her gallery showing in New York City (running through mid-November). For starters, she “scientifically extracted” her hair oils, armpit perspiration and tears (to protest humans’ cloaking themselves in deodorant soaps and laundry powders), and blasted visitors with whiffs of it as they entered the gallery. — Because We Can: The Tate Liverpool museum in England was host on Oct. 19 to artist Kerry Morrison’s Bird Sheet music project in which she laid down a giant blank musical score sheet under a tree and waited for birds to make “deposits” on it, which she took to represent “notes” that composer Jon Hering plans to play straight, as the “sound” of the blackbirds.

Police Report

Michael Carrier, 45, was arrested for soliciting prostitution in New Milford, Conn., in August -- not resulting from a police sting, which is usually how arrests for that crime are made. In Carrier’s case, he was disturbing other customers at a Friendly’s restaurant because, being hard of hearing, he was shouting to the prostitute the terms of their prospective business arrangement.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 33 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t make promises you cannot keep. Someone will not respond kindly if you change your mind or back away after showing affection. Be careful not to share too much information regarding your personal past, present or future considerations. Proceed with caution, integrity and fairness. TAURUS (Apr 20-May 20): You’ll attract serious-minded, intense partners looking for more than just a meaningless affair. Security, stability and setting up lifelong goals with someone looking for equality as well as the same standard of living and

life goals is in the stars. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Confusion mixed with deception and intrigue will lead to a relationship that will offer excitement initially, but, in the end, you are likely to have second thoughts about continuing to engage in an emotional relationship that is not based on honesty or fair play. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You attract attention as well as interesting partners with plenty to offer. Engage in events and activities that are geared toward meeting people from different backgrounds, and you will discover how well you blend in. Don’t

be afraid to make a commitment if you meet someone special. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t play games when it comes to affairs of the heart. You’ll be faced with a partner who is too serious, jealous or restrictive. It’s nice to be loved, but you are likely to attract someone eager to possess and control your life. Proceed with caution. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Keep your emotions neatly tucked away while you cruise for the perfect partner. You have to base your findings on substance, not physical attraction, if you want to meet someone who can match you every step of the way, and in the

end go the full lifelong distance. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get out and enjoy what life has to offer. Travel, sign up for an interesting course or attend a conference, and you will come in contact with people who can alter the way you view relationships and how you want to live your life in the future. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll attract partners due to your mysterious and unusual approach to love, relationships and life. Listen carefully to what others have to say and to offer you, and you will find that you are attracted to someone with deep desires. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Open up about your life as well as your likes and dislikes. Frank discussions about the way you feel will attract someone’s attention. Don’t pass by a potential partner who may be too shy to make the first move. Gatherings that entail helping others will lead to love. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Call the shots and show how capable you are of getting things done, and you will attract someone who admires your strength, courage and leadership. There will be plenty of opportunity to meet someone through work or events that are geared toward open discussions.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t go out with someone for the wrong reason. Being in a relationship is a two-way street. There must be equality and a basic understanding that allows you to work together and toward similar goals. A one-sided connection must be avoided at all costs. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are ready to become seriously involved with someone who can and will contribute as much as you to a long-lasting union. Love is in the stars, and a commitment is heading your way. It’s time to sign a personal contractual agreement with someone special.

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November 28 - December 4, 2012 - City Newspaper