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EVENTS: “THE NUTCRACKER,” “MEMPHIS” 23 THEATER: “MOTHERHOOD THE MUSICAL” @ DCT 22 FILM: “LINCOLN,” “SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK” 30 URBAN JOURNAL: JUDGING PETRAEUS

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

HARVEY SORGEN

Vol 42 No 11

OCEANS OF INSECTS

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 14

News. Music. Life.

“I know I have a good feel.” MUSIC, PAGE 16

Irondequoit’s after Congel. NEWS, PAGE 5

SWAN’s big budget boost. NEWS, PAGE 4

MCC here or there? NEWS, PAGE 6

Inside the Strath’s swanky new restaurant. DINING, PAGE 13

INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | ILLUSTRATION BY AUBREY BERARDINI

Women of a lesser God The Rev. Roy Bourgeois probably isn’t the Vatican’s favorite priest. A longtime member of the Maryknolls, an order known for its missionary work in some of the most troubled parts of the world, Bourgeois is on the brink of excommunication from the Catholic Church. His defiant refusal to recant his support for the ordination of women conflicts with the Vatican’s “men only” tradition. The Vatican’s position is discrimination, Bourgeois said, and like racial segregation, is ultimately doomed.

“Who are we as men to say that our call from God is authentic, but your call as women is not?” he said. Bourgeois will be in Rochester on Tuesday, November 27, for a showing of the documentary film by Jules Hart, “Pink Smoke Over the Vatican.” The controversial award-winning film explores the Roman Catholic Womenpriest movement. In a recent telephone interview, Bourgeois discussed his uncertain future with the Vatican, his support for the ordination of women, and how his tour in the Vietnam War drew him closer to God.

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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Lessons from Nuns on the Bus

I recently had the opportunity to spend the day with the Nuns on the Bus caravan as we toured inner-city agencies working with Rochester’s poor, homeless, and hungry. This was part of a nationwide effort by many orders of nuns to shine a bright light on issues of poverty in this country, on the policies that promulgate poverty, and the need for our communities to become involved in the resolution of suffering of those less fortunate. As I traveled with the Sisters of St. Joseph, Sisters of Mercy, and the School Sisters of Notre Dame, we heard the stories of homeless children, children murdered on the streets of Rochester, and children without enough food to eat. We met adults who depend on food pantries, food kitchens, and shelters. And we met many volunteers who dedicate their lives to making life bearable for the 57 percent of Rochester’s children living in poverty and the 25 percent of Rochester’s adults dependent on these services. I was strangely uplifted and encouraged by the positive attitude of all these nuns who have dedicated their lives to the impoverished. It is a strange juxtaposition from the image of nuns swatting our knuckles with rulers to see these women holding the hands of those in need. It was pointed out that today’s political climate is a dangerous environment for our population living in poverty, with no one speaking for them in the halls of Congress. No candidates speak to the need to return to the War on Poverty to save lives. Instead, we speak of war in the Middle East. Our Republican colleagues openly speak of cutting programs that aid the poor, that educate this population and give them access to health care. They speak as if the entire population of the unfortunate would rather take handouts than take care of themselves and their families. They speak as if we have no responsibility for our neighbors. The Democrats talk and have not done enough. They speak of  City

November 21-27, 2012

programs to improve nutrition, education, and social structure, but little has changed. The Nuns on the Bus have taught me that poverty is a crime. The criminals are our politicians, and we aide and abet this criminal activity. It is our responsibility as citizens to support the needs of everyone in this country and not let a single child go to waste. These are our children. And now I consider these Nuns my Sisters. Every four years I hear the cry for reform in our government, but I hear the cry of the homeless and the defenseless every day. Elections come and go; we get excited and then we get tired. It is time to hold our elected officials to their promise to make life better for everyone of us. Too many of our children don’t have time for us to wait. JOHN L. GHERTNER, SODUS

Lies and politics

Mary Anna Towler laments the “ugliest campaign” she can remember, claiming that Mitt Romney lied (“The Next Four Years,” Urban Journal). I don’t remember any lies he told, but for the sake of argument, let’s assume he did. Conveniently left out of Towler’s piece was Senator Harry Reid – I’m sure under orders from Obama – calling Romney a tax cheat. Maybe in Ms. Towler’s archives is the political promo where a laid-off worker claimed that his wife died because of Romney’s business policies. And of course there’s Obama’s campaign head charging that “Romney is a felon.” Now that is ugly. Towler quotes Eugene Robinson saying Republicans talked about “taking the country back.” That has nothing to do with race, color, or origin. It has to do with ideology. Conservatives want to take the country back from the liberals. Starting in 2001, Democrats said the same thing regarding President George Bush; they wanted to take the country back from Republicans. We can now look forward to four more years of being Obama-sized. SAM PALERMO, ROCHESTER

The overriding problem

Regarding your “Next Four Years” column, you note the disunity of the electorate and the population and hope that the president can be a unifier.

I don’t think it’s impertinent to mention that Orwell’s “1984” proposes that the national unity you seem to want requires an outside enemy. If I’m not mistaken, a number of our leading politicians are engaged in a search for that entity. Should we encourage them? I think not. STEPHEN LEWANDOWSKI, CANANDAIGUA

Selling America

There is not one thing in this article about restricting union rights to buy elections (“America for Sale,” News). Not only do they contribute cash but they also provide “volunteers,” often workers who are being paid by the unions. If a corporation isn’t a person, neither is a union. The mainstream media doesn’t have to buy ads. They just slant their stories to promote the candidates they favor. JHONALY50

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Prioritizing city dollars

On Mayor Tom Richards’ request for funding for a school-district truancy program: This is already someone’s job at the RCSD. That person needs to step down and let the district use their salary to pay for this. It is truly amazing that funds can be found for redundancy, but not for teachers, books, supplies, technology, the arts and sports, etc...

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 21-27, 2012 Vol 42 No 11 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News

The advantages of natural gas

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City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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Natural gas has decreased CO2 emissions in the USA by displacing coal use, also mercury, particulates, and solid waste (“Is a Natural GasFueled Industrial Boom Good for the Planet?” News Blog). Natural gas is the future of energy. It is replacing dirty old coal plants and dangerous, expensive nuclear plants. It will fuel cars, vans, buses, locomotives, aircraft, ships, tractors, air conditioners, engines of all kinds. It costs far less. It will help keep us out of more useless wars, where we shed our blood and money. It lowers CO2 emissions. Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

urban journal | by mary anna towler

Judging Petraeus If we had expected some kind of news lull after the election, we sure didn’t get it. The fall of David Petraeus pretty much dominated the news last week – and how could it not? The story’s subjects included a popular, highprofile general turned CIA director and two young, self-promoting and apparently loopy women. And the rest of us, I suspect, were ready for some entertainment. But there’s a serious issue underneath all that theater: Did Petraeus need to resign? My initial thought was, yes. His marriage and his affairs are nobody’s business but his own, but it becomes our business if his behavior puts the nation’s security at risk. And at first, it seemed that it might – particularly given what we’ve learned about his women friends. Petraeus seemed to be a prime blackmail target. But then I came across the following in a Washington Post opinion piece by John Prados, a senior research fellow at the National Security Archive: “The ostensible concern about the Petraeus affair was the potential for blackmail. Yet it is far-fetched today to think that a foreign government would contrive an operation to ensnare a CIA employee through an affair, a foreign-spy spouse or an allegation of homosexuality. Our enemies are unlikely to bother with such complicated schemes. Instead, they buy information — the method that has remained tried and true — or attempt to hack it from the datarich computer networks that the government is spending billions to defend.” Maybe we need an unemotional discussion about this. Based on what, besides their official accomplishments, should we assess public officials? Does their private behavior tell us anything significant? When Gary Hart was hoping to get the Democratic presidential nomination in 1987, I decided that if stories about his philandering were true, that disqualified him – particularly when he dared the media to catch him. It just seemed an indication of appallingly bad judgment. But Bill Clinton’s affair with an intern was hardly an example of emotional maturity and sound judgment. Neither were John Kennedy’s multiple extra-marital interests. Affairs – some flagrant, some milder – haven’t been rare among presidents. Dwight Eisenhower, Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson…. But many of us figure that their accomplishments outweigh their personal weaknesses. (And since none of us were on the inside of those marriages, the “weakness” charge is risky.) Johnson’s a particularly intriguing example, since unfaithfulness pales in

Based on what, besides their official accomplishments, should we assess public officials? Does their private behavior tell us anything significant?” importance to things like his vote stealing and the Vietnam War. And yet with that deeply complicated man, we also got the Voting Rights Act, two Civil Rights Acts, Medicare, and Medicaid. And he pulled together a traumatized country following John Kennedy’s assassination. Some media commentators have suggested that by having an affair with his biographer, David Petraeus betrayed the trust of the American people. I don’t know. Seems to me we’re sometimes pretty selective about what we consider “betrayal.” And if these commentators are expecting perfection in our leaders, I have some disappointing news for them. BTW: if we want to focus on something

genuinely important, how about the role and the activities of the agency Petraeus recently led? Intelligence gathering is crucial to national security, but the CIA has a particularly sordid history of stepping way outside of that role – fostering coups of duly elected governments of other nations, for instance. And a recent article in The Nation warns of the increasing militarization of the CIA. The agency “has strayed from intelligence to paramilitary-type activities,” Jeremy Scahill writes. Scahill offers this quote from Philip Giraldi, a retired career CIA case officer: “A considerable part of the CIA budget is now no longer spying; it’s supporting paramilitaries who work closely with JSOC [the US military’s Joint Special Operations Command] to kill terrorists, and to run the drone program.” The CIA “is a killing machine now,” Giraldi told Scahill. The role of the CIA and what this country is willing to do as part of – or under the guise of – fighting terrorism: Now there’s something worth talking about. And worth dominating the national news. rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

[ news from the week past ]

Sibley deal done

The sale of the Sibley building downtown to Boston-based WinnDevelopment is final. Sale price was $5 million. The historic building will be converted to mixed use with retail, office space, and housing. MCC will stay in the building for the next five years, but may move after that. The previous owners of the Sibley building were deeply in debt to the city, and Mayor Tom Richards has said the city will probably never be paid.

Brooks proposes budget

Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks proposed a $1.2 billion budget for 2013. The property tax rate would remain $8.99 per $1,000 of assessed value. The budget increases the cost of zoo admissions by about $1, and also raises the amount taxpayers are charged to fund Monroe Community College. The Legislature will vote on the budget next month.

Andrews to lead Dems

Democrats in the Monroe County Legislature elected Carrie Andrews to serve as minority leader, the top post in their caucus. The position

UMI

was previously held by Ted O’Brien, who was recently elected to the State Senate. Legislators Willie Joe Lightfoot and Cindy Kaleh are assistant Democratic leaders.

News

Area job growth slows

The Rochester region is adding private sector jobs, but job growth is slowing. According to the State Labor Department, Rochester added 3,200 jobs last month, led by health care and technology positions. But declines in manufacturing and construction jobs have offset gains in other industries. After leading the Upstate metros in job growth most of this year, Rochester was surpassed by Albany in October.

Extension for Kodak reorg

A US bankruptcy court granted Kodak six additional weeks, to February 28, 2013, to develop its reorganization plan for emerging from bankruptcy. Some of Kodak’s unsecured creditors opposed the idea, saying they do not believe the company will become solvent.

Children do their homework at SWAN’s offices off Genesee Street in southwest Rochester. Photo by MIKE HANLON NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

SWAN plans growth At a time when many neighborhood organizations are tightening their belts, Robert Walker-Smith, new executive director of the Southwest Area Neighborhood Association, says his goal is to nearly triple the group’s annual budget from $1.2 million to about $3.5 million over the next 18 months. Where will the extra money come from? SWAN will likely pursue federal grants for the first time, Walker-Smith says, and the group has been “pretty successful” drumming up private donations. Walker-Smith, who grew up in southwest Rochester, spent 10 years at Xerox and has also worked

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at the YMCA and Rochester Institute of Technology. The bigger budget would allow SWAN to expand its programming, he says. The group serves 171 children through its after-school programs and other offerings, and Walker-Smith says he wants to grow that number to between 350 and 400. SWAN would also have more programs for seniors, he says, like bringing in life coaches to help seniors with health challenges, money management, and other issues. “There’s so much opportunity in the southwest,” he says. Walker-Smith says SWAN would also use the extra money

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to provide more food vouchers. Shortage of food is one of the biggest issues facing people in the southwest, he says. “The impact of hunger and poverty is real,” Walker-Smith says. “You’d be amazed at what a hot meal does for a child.” SWAN kicks-off its expansion with the opening of a computer and training center on Monday, December 3, in SWAN’s offices off Genesee Street. The center will help adults build resumes and do job searches and provide homework and tutoring assistance for youth. It will also be open to the public on select hours for general use.

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Arnie Rothschild, chair of Rochester Broadway Theatre League’s board, says that Scott Congel has agreed to build a 3,000-seat theater, which would be leased and programmed by RBTL, in Medley Centre. RBTL wouldn’t have to raise any money — the sticking point that has prevented RBTL from getting a new theater up to this point.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

DEVELOPMENT | by jeremy moule

Medley, RBTL reach deal on new theater It’s a busy week in Medley Centre news. First, the East Irondequoit school board approved a measure requiring Medley Centre developer Scott Congel to pay several hundred thousand dollars for missing an investment milestone. And now, Arnie Rothschild, chair of Rochester Broadway Theatre League’s board, says that Congel has agreed to build a 3,000seat theater, which would be leased and programmed by RBTL, in Medley Centre. RBTL wouldn’t have to raise any money — the sticking point that has prevented RBTL from getting a new theater up to this point. Congel would also pay off RBTL’s debt on the Auditorium Theatre, which would be renovated into a smaller theater, Rothschild says. RBTL would still own and program the Aud, he says. Many in the public remain skeptical of the Medley Centre project. Physically, the site shows no signs of progress. The mall proper is vacant except for two remaining department stores. And the East Irondequoit school district is enforcing a provision of the developer’s payment in lieu of taxes agreement that requires Congel to make a payment if he fails to meet a development milestone.

Apartments OK’d A proposed apartment complex in the Village of Pittsford is a step closer to construction. | On Monday, the Village Board voted 3 to 2 to approve the site plan and required permits for an upscale apartment complex at 75 Monroe Avenue, the former Monoco Oil site. | Mayor Bob Corby and Trustee Paula Sherwood voted in opposition, while Trustees Tim Galli, Trip Pierson, and Lorie Boehlert voted in favor. Corby and Sherwood say the project doesn’t fit the scale or character of the village. | The vote was the end of years of negotiations between the board and the developer, a Mark IV subsidiary. | Many residents have pushed back against the project, saying it’s too big and incompatible with the character of the village. Monday night, residents filled the 160-person room to capacity at Pittsford Sutherland High School where the meeting was held. | The proposal still needs approval from two village boards, the Planning Board and the Architectural Preservation and Review Board. The Planning Board will look at the project’s layout and site design, Corby says. The APRB will review the architectural style, he says.

Congel was supposed to have invested $90 million in the project, which includes apartments, retail, and at least one hotel, by April 30. But district Medley Centre. FILE Photo officials say he missed the mark by about $25 million. Now they want him to pay an $827, 722 fee, of which approximately $550,000 would go to the district. The money is due in January, when Congel makes his annual PILOT payment. But the issue may not be over. COMIDA says Congel has invested enough in the project. The difference of opinion is significant because Congel could sue the district to prevent assessment of the extra payment. Despite the issue with the school district, Rothschild says he’s confident Congel will move forward with the Medley Centre project, including the theater.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

2,154 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,075 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 16. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from November 5 to 12: -- Spc. Daniel L. Carlson, 21, Running Springs, Calif. -- Staff Sgt. Kenneth W. Bennett, 26, Glendora, Calif. -- Capt. James D. Nehl, 37, Gardiner, Ore. -- Sgt. Matthew H. Stiltz, 26, Spokane, Wash. —

iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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City 

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Reckoning day nears for MCC campus The future of Monroe Community College’s downtown campus might become clearer next month, or not. A year ago, the college’s Board of Trustees voted to move MCC out of the Sibley building in downtown Rochester. Board members recommended purchasing and renovating buildings in Kodak’s State Street complex, transforming that property into the new Damon City Campus. But funding for the $72 million project depends on the County Legislature, which must approve borrowing the money. Republicans and Democrats expect that the first bond resolution will come up for a vote in December. But here’s the catch: the legislation may not get the votes it needs to pass. Legislature Democrats say they have questions and concerns about the proposal, and they have the ability to block the bond. MCC officials say the renovated Kodak site would be a better environment for students and faculty. They say that it’d be safer, that the college would be able to build better classrooms and public spaces, that the school would have vastly more space to work with, and that the site would have dedicated parking. They also say that buying and renovating the Kodak space is $10 million cheaper than buying and renovating the school’s space in the Sibley building. But Mayor Tom Richards, who does not have a direct say in the campus’s location, wants MCC to stay in the Sibley building. He says the campus and its students would benefit, and benefit from revitalization efforts at Midtown. Richards has been the most vocal critic of the Kodak move, raising questions about everything from the school’s space needs to potential complications from Kodak’s bankruptcy. And he’s said it’s easier for students to get to the Sibley building than to the State Street complex. Legislature Democrats share many of Richards’ questions and concerns. “We’re trying to do our due diligence and get the answers that we need,” says Carrie Andrews, a Democratic legislator and the caucus’s leader. (Monroe Community College President Anne Kress was scheduled to brief Democrats about the proposal early this week.) Republican Majority Leader Anthony Daniele says his caucus hasn’t done an internal vote, but its members do appear to support MCC’s plan to move. That’s not to say that Republicans lack concerns, but they have been less vocal than Democrats. MCC spokesperson Cynthia Cooper says that college officials have been contacted by legislators on both sides of the aisle. Republicans have focused less on issues around Midtown revitalization and more on financial concerns. Daniele says the Legislature’s role is primarily fiscal and not to decide where the MCC campus should go.  City

November 21-27, 2012

The underlying funding issue is technical,

but crucial. To buy and renovate the Kodak property, the college needs to borrow money. But the county funds the college, so the borrowing has to be done through county government, which issues the bond. But a bond measure requires approval from two thirds of the Legislature, which means 20 out of 29 legislators have to vote in favor. The Legislature has 18 Republicans and 11 Democrats, so at least two Democratic votes are needed to pass the bond. And that’s if all Republicans vote in favor. Democrats have a list of concerns regarding the project, a primary one being Kodak’s bankruptcy and its effect on the MCC deal. But MCC officials downplay that concern. “The county and the college have engaged bankruptcy lawyers to give us an informed opinion on that,” says MCC’s Cooper. “The guidance we’re getting is that this should not be an issue for us in terms of the sale of the property.” But Democrat Legislator Ted O’Brien says his worries about the bankruptcy go beyond the sale of the site. For example, the deal would give MCC shared use of a Kodakowned parking lot. But what happens to that agreement, O’Brien asks, if Kodak doesn’t exit bankruptcy as expected? (Last week, a judge gave the company until February to file a plan to emerge from bankruptcy.) Utilities are another issue. The properties MCC would buy from Kodak include utility infrastructure for the whole complex. Democrats are concerned that MCC could get stuck maintaining the infrastructure or essentially acting as a utility company. College officials say the utilities are part of ongoing negotiations with Kodak. Dems also question why college officials want to purchase significantly more space than is occupied by the current campus. But Cooper says the college wants to grow some of its programs.

MCC’s options: Kodak (left) or the Sibley building (right). PhotoS by MATT DETURCK

Some Democratic legislators also say that the Sibley building is a more convenient location for students who rely on buses; a new downtown bus station is being built next to the Sibley building. But many students would have to transfer buses in order to reach the Kodak site, says Legislator Cynthia Kaleh. Republicans want more accurate cost comparisons and data, Daniele says. They want to know the cost of fixing up and remaining in the Sibley building versus buying and renovating the Kodak site, he says. They also want to know how much the move would cost, and they want five to 10 years of operating cost projections for the sites, Daniele says. The Legislature typically approves borrowing

for its capital improvement plan the same night it approves the budget every year. This year’s budget vote is on Tuesday, December 11. If the usual approach is used, borrowing for the MCC downtown campus proposal will be lumped in with other CIP borrowing for things like road and water infrastructure maintenance. But that leaves a glaring, unanswered question pertaining to the downtown MCC campus proposal: What happens if the bond doesn’t pass? It could delay or halt construction projects planned for 2013. But it would probably also have implications for the campus location. O’Brien says Democrats

need to evaluate whether voting down the bond creates a risk that the downtown campus would be eliminated entirely. Cooper wouldn’t say what college officials would do if the bond vote fails, just that there’s no set process dictating a next step. She says college officials are focused on getting the legislators to see their vision for the Kodak site and trying to get the votes needed to pass the bond. Democrats say they want the MCC proposal to get its own vote, so if enough legislators aren’t on board, they won’t hold up other routine yet important projects. They’ve asked the Republican leadership to break the proposals apart. O’Brien says Republicans haven’t shot the idea down, but they also haven’t agreed to it. Daniele says one possibility could be amending the bond resolution’s language so that it’s not site specific. That would require legislators to pass an amendment. Mayor Richards says including the MCC project with the bonding resolution for the county’s other capital projects creates an artificial problem. There’s nothing stopping the county from making the MCC bonding its own vote, he says. “This whole process is unnecessarily confrontational,” Richards says.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

Women To say that the Rev. Roy Bourgeois is a thorn in the Vatican’s side is probably an understatement. Bourgeois is a Roman Catholic priest with the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, an order known for its missionary work in some of the most troubled parts of the world. Bourgeois has a long history of social activism. But it is his support for the ordination of woman, in particular, that could get him excommunicated from the church. For priests, excommunication means they can no longer receive the sacraments, such as Holy Communion. And they can’t administer the sacraments or other duties of a priest. Elderly priests who are excommunicated can also suffer financially, since they can be barred from receiving a pension. Bourgeois will be in Rochester on Tuesday, November 27, for a showing of the documentary film by Jules Hart, “Pink Smoke Over the Vatican.” The showing is at 7 p.m. at the Cinema Theater, 957 South Clinton Avenue. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance at Spiritus Christi, or $12

of a

Lesser God

at the door. The controversial awardwinning film explores the Roman Catholic Womenpriest movement, an international effort that prepares and supports women called to the priesthood. Bourgeois, who is featured in the documentary, will join panelists, the Rev. Mary Ramerman, a founding member of Spiritus Christi, and the Rev. Jean Marie Marchant, who is also featured in the documentary, for a discussion after the film. Both women, though not recognized by the Roman Catholic Church, are ordained priests. The discussion will be moderated by Lynne Staropoli Boucher, director for the Center for Spirituality at Nazareth College. After spending several years in Bolivia working with the poor, Bourgeois was arrested and deported in the 1970’s after being accused of attempting to overthrow that country’s dictator, General Hugo Banzer. He became an outspoken critic of US foreign policy in Latin America following the rape and murder of four American nuns by a Salvadoran death squad. He protested the activities of the School of the Americas after some of its military graduates were accused of committing human rights violations in Latin

American countries. He’s the founder of SOA Watch, an anti-war and social justice movement, and he’s spent several years in federal prisons as a result of his many protests. In addition to receiving the Purple Heart following a tour in Vietnam, Bourgeois received the Gandhi Peace Award and the Pax Christi USA Pope Paul VI Teacher of Peace Award, and he was nominated in 2009 for the Nobel Peace Prize. In a recent telephone interview from his home in Columbus, Georgia, Bourgeois said the Catholic Church is in crisis. The Vatican’s stance on women’s ordination is discrimination, he said, and its recent crackdown on the Leadership Conference of Women Religious is “arrogant.” The Vatican was critical of the LCWR for not being more outspoken against issues like abortion and same-sex marriage. Bourgeois said the Catholic Church needs to change to remain relevant. He’s saddened that more Catholics are not speaking out on behalf of women who are called to the priesthood, but he said he’s confident change will come eventually. The following is an edited version of the discussion with Bourgeois.

INTERVIEW BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | ILLUSTRATIONS BY AUBREY BERARDINI

 City

November 21-27, 2012

ITY: You strongly support allowing women to become priests. Did you think this way when you joined the priesthood? Or did you arrive at the idea later in life?

Bourgeois: Growing up as a traditional Catholic in Louisiana, I never questioned our church’s teachings. But then I joined the military after college during the days of the Vietnam War. And that experience in Vietnam really was a turning point in my journey. Death and suffering was close to me, and my faith became more important. I felt this call to the priesthood, but I didn’t know what to do with that feeling. So I talked to an Army chaplain and I asked him to help me discern what I should do. He told me about the Maryknoll order. And within a year, it became very clear that I wanted to pursue my calling. So I went about my work in Bolivia, the US, and elsewhere. And for many years, I never questioned the teachings about women priests. But through my work, I was speaking out against what was happening in the School of the Americas, basically going to hundreds of Catholic churches, colleges, and peace groups about this injustice involving the SOA and US foreign policy in Latin America. And I started meeting these devout Catholic women who shared [with him] their call to the priesthood. My first response was, “That’s our tradition [to exclude women].” I look back on that, and I am embarrassed. But in the seminary, we never once questioned why women couldn’t be priests. It was our church’s teaching that only baptized males could be priests. And that was it. And here’s what it came down to: I started thinking about that word “tradition.” And as I started listening to these women, I remembered my childhood. I went to 12 years of segregated school. In our little Catholic church, the last five pews were for our black members, and for some reason I saw a connection. It was racism, and I didn’t question it. I kept meeting these women, and I started staying awake at night thinking about this connection. My own evolution isn’t based on complicated theological theory. It comes down to two simple questions: First, don’t we as Catholics profess that we are created in the image and likeness of God, and that God created us, men and women, of equal worth and dignity? And second, we all say from the pope on down that the call to be a priest is a gift that comes from God. And that

was my experience in the middle of wartorn Vietnam. I somehow felt that I was being called to do this. And as a male, I could. But these women could not, even though the call they were experiencing was the same as mine. And the question I will bring to Rochester is the same question I ask wherever I speak, and that is, “Who

whether it’s because of race, gender, or sexual orientation, is not of God. These teachings are of men.

So you see the exclusion of women as discrimination, and like all forms of discrimination, an abuse of power?

We say that we were created in the

women and others don’t quite equal us who are white priests, bishops, and cardinals. It’s been reversed, and really God is there to carry out our beliefs. I saw this exclusion of women to the priesthood as a grave injustice against women, but also a grave injustice to the church and, of course, our allloving God. Then I had to ask, “What do I do?” And what I came to is this: Silence is the voice of complicity. And I’ve been calling on my fellow priests and Catholics to break their silence. What helped me was that I began to see how I had become a member of a very privileged group, all male, mostly white. It’s a very powerful culture. And what I have learned in this struggle for gender equality is that we can’t talk about sexism, racism, or homophobia without addressing the issue of power. And in the church there are men who are very powerful figures in this clerical culture, and we’ve become addicted to power. The church that we live in and advocate is not really the model that Jesus talked about. So I can’t be silent no matter the consequences.

Should priests, men and women, be allowed to marry?

Definitely. Even within my own Maryknoll community, we’ve had hundreds of our members who have left, a number of them very good friends, because they couldn’t marry. My friend Paul, while in Bolivia, fell in love with a Bolivian woman. He made a decision to pursue this love and marry, and he was forced out of Maryknoll and out of the priesthood. Marriage, too, has become a form of sexism; women have become the enemy. And we’ve lost some of our best missionaries and priests. We’re only punishing ourselves.

Should women be allowed to become bishops, cardinals, and popes, too?

are we as men to say that our call from God is authentic, but your call as women is not?” I began to see with real clarity how our church’s teaching is rooted in sexism. And for me, sexism, like racism and homophobia, is a sin. No matter how hard we may try to justify it, discrimination against others,

likeness of God, but the problem I see in the church, and this is not recent, is that we have created God in our image. And this all-powerful God who we profess to love becomes a little God, who somehow does not see everyone of equal worth and value. Somehow this God prefers white men and straight men. And somehow

Yes. I don’t see anything wrong with that at all. Two nuns of the four who were raped and killed in El Salvador were [my] friends. And I thought if any of these courageous women who are true martyrs for the faith, who went to El Salvador knowing how dangerous it is, felt the call to the priesthood, they would have been rejected. continues on page 10

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City 

Women of a lesser God continues from page 9

I think about how incredible that is. And I think of all the men who don’t compare to the compassion and witness that they gave to helping the poor, but could be priests simply because they are males.

hen we see something that’s wrong, the question is: What do we do? Saint Paul said faith

Jesus is often portrayed as the original activist. Should priests be activists for social justice? Or should they be conformists and purveyors of the church doctrine, which some would argue is what keeps the faith alive?

It’s not about being an activist or a conformist. The answer to that question really involves conscience. Even as a young child, the priest would come in for an hour a week in our little segregated school and talk about the primacy of conscience. Our conscience is our lifeline to God; it urges us to discern and do the right thing. When we see something that’s wrong, the question is: What do we do? Saint Paul said faith without action is dead. A priest said to me, “Roy, I support the ordination of women, but I can’t go public.” I said, “My friend, your silence means nothing. You’ve blessed the injustice.” About Jesus being an activist: He spoke the truth. He lived the life that love is supposed to be about: compassion, service to the poor, justice, and humility. You know that saying, “If you want to be first with God, then get in the back of the line.” Humility in our society is getting lost. I don’t think we’re called to be activists. I think all we’re called to do is be men and women of integrity and to identify ourselves. If we believe, as many of my fellow priests and Catholics say, that women should be ordained, come out.

Many Catholic churches and schools have closed in this region and across the country over the last 30 years. Is there less interest in the Catholic Church in the US? And if so, is it because of the church’s position on issues like ordaining women and contraception?

Without a doubt. I hear this everywhere I go. Catholics come up to me and say they have children who have gone to Catholic

10 City November 21-27, 2012

without action is dead.

— The Rev. Roy Bourgeois schools and sometimes colleges. And [the children] come home and say, “Mom, dad, how can you stay with the church? They are so anti-women and so anti-gay.” You see, young people today are so much more educated, and they are less willing to accept teachings without questioning. Does this also explain the shortage of priests?

My own sister, a traditional Catholic, said this doesn’t make sense. In New Orleans, they closed 30 churches last year, not because of the hurricane, but because they don’t have enough priests. Next year at Maryknoll, we’re calling an emergency meeting. We’re gathering our members from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the US at great expense, but we have to do it because we are in a crisis. And our order is not alone. The sex scandals have shaken our church right to the foundation. But the crisis we’re in is not about the scandals alone. We’ve long had a drop in vocation to the priesthood.

The Vatican has cracked down on the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, a group representing many Catholic nuns in the US, for not speaking out against same-sex marriage, women’s ordination, and abortion. What’s the impact of efforts like that?

I think what happened to the nuns really clarifies the problem, in a sense. The problem is patriarchy and sexism, but it’s been going on for 2,000 years. This is nothing new. This has been covered in the Catholic press, but there’s also an article, “The

Sisters’ Crusade,” in the latest issue of Rolling Stone. And what you see in that article is the same as what I hear from my friends and in my travels: [the crackdown] was a turning point for nuns. It emboldened them. First there was an investigation of the LCWR, an all-female organization, by a mostly male group from the Vatican. For three years [they] investigated the nuns. They accused [the LCWR] of causing a scandal for the church. It was so offensive. It was so unjust and cruel, and what you saw was a lot of nuns for the first time break their silence. And many Catholics, too, didn’t like what they saw happening to these women. When our Maryknoll community meets, we’ll be mostly older white men; our average is something like 75. And there’s no hope for that kind of church. We’re moving into a future that doesn’t look like that, and some of us can’t adjust.

You’ve been threatened with excommunication. Where does that stand?

I was notified by the Vatican three years ago. They said I had 30 days to recant my position in support of the ordination of women or I would be excommunicated automatically. I wrote back focusing on this issue of the sacredness of conscience and the problem of sexism that’s rooted in this teaching. I never got a response back until a few months ago. The Vatican instructed Maryknoll to kick me out if I didn’t recant. I’ve been in the community for 40 years, and it’s not clear what my standing is with the Vatican. But Maryknoll has assured me that I am a member priest. And I go about my work in ministry as I’ve done before,

and speaking as I will speak in Rochester in support of women’s ordination. I don’t know what the future holds for me as a priest in the Catholic Church. But I do know that my conscience will not allow me to recant what I truly believe. I do know that trying to stop the ordination of women is like trying to stop the abolition of slavery or the women’s suffrage movement. Many tried, but they failed. I’ve been very disappointed at the silence of many of my fellow priests. I see how fear is dominating our church right now. They [priests] fear speaking out, fear excommunication, and fear losing the pension. And I’m very sad to see how our church is using that word “excommunication” as spiritual violence.

How did your experience with war prepare you to be a better priest?

I didn’t know it at the time, but Vietnam was preparation for living out my faith, including confronting my church’s teachings. I was wounded there, and I lost many friends there. But what I came to was sort of an ability to confront fear. In Bolivia, it was very dangerous under dictatorship. Living there with the poor, where many were killed or imprisoned, the fears came again. I was arrested. Yes, I was afraid, but I didn’t allow my fear to paralyze me. I learned and grew from it.

Given your experience working with the poor in Latin America, do you think the US’s foreign policy during the last half of the 20th century has any relationship to the immigration problems we experience today?

Our foreign policy — the violence, the brutality of their military, which we’ve armed and trained at the SOA — has caused such suffering and death to the people in some of these countries. I mean, I too would want to flee. I would want to get out of there with or without my family. So many who have come here [and now have children born here] were forced to come here by our foreign policy. We need to understand that if we lived under those conditions of extreme poverty, brutality, and fear, we would be fleeing.

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Two weeks ago I gave a lecture about three hours from [Atlanta], and before I left, they took me to a work camp. There were about 100 field workers, mostly from Mexico on a three-month visa, living eight to 12 in a trailer. They were picking peppers, getting up very early in the morning and working until dusk, six days a week. Many of us don’t know what it means to work in the heat, hunched over in a field 12 hours a day, day after day earning very low wages. The challenge we face in America today is ignorance. Many of us don’t know the plight of the poor. We usually don’t meet them. And I think there is a connectedness to many of these issues, whether it’s the conditions in Latin America, immigration, and even women’s ordination. We don’t take the time to meet and talk to people, and to know what it’s like to be in their situation. If we did, I think many of us would be more understanding.

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What is the future of the Catholic Church under Pope Benedict XVI, who is quite conservative?

That’s the big question. We don’t know. I thought a few years ago of resigning. But I’m in the camp that refuses to leave. We are the church. God speaks through all of us. And I hate to say this, but many of our leaders are bullies. And I never did like a bully, not in Latin America or in the Catholic Church. They are not the owners of the church. They’ve kind of hijacked the Gospel, and if we leave bullies to abuse their power, nothing will change. I feel a lot of hope. I’m blessed because wherever I go, I find kindred spirits who refuse to allow these men at the Vatican who keep claiming as they did recently to the nuns that “We are your bosses, and only we can speak for God.” I mean, what arrogance.

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12 City November 21-27, 2012

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Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

note speaker. The event is at 2131 Elmwood Avenue. Tickets: $50 per person. Contact Laura Lecour at (845) 485-8627.

Award recipient honored

Design projects recognized

Temple B’rith Kodesh will host the Harvesting Justice Dinner to honor Librada Paz, the 2012 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award recipient, at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 4. Paz is a member of the Rural Migrant Ministry, which focuses on eradicating violence and human rights violations against farmworkers and migrant laborers. The Rev. Marvin A. McMickle, president of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, is the key-

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will honor recipients of its 2012 Reshaping Rochester Awards from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 6. The awards recognize projects and initiatives that positively impact Rochester residents, businesses, and neighborhoods through intelligent design. Garth Fagan is the keynote speaker. The event is at Cutler Union at the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Avenue. Tickets,

$50. Contact www.rrcdc. org or 271-0520.

Landlords talk with RPD chief

The New York State Coalition of Property Owners and Businesses will hold a meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 29. Rochester Police Chief James Sheppard will answer questions about neighborhood concerns and police support for business and property owners. There will also be a presentation on increasing energy efficiency in rental properties. The event is at the Eagles Club, 1200 Buffalo Road in Gates. It is free for members and $20 for non-members.

Correcting ourselves The 2012 Holiday Guide events calendar incorrectly reported that the Flower City Ballet’s production of “The Nutcracker” December 15-16 will feature the Brighton Symphony Orchestra. It will not.

Dining by Hudson Whiskey. There’s no cover, but you’re gonna need the secret password; email nancy@ scotlandyardpub.com to get it, and visit scotlandyardpub.com to learn more.

Getting fresh

Longtime Food Network star and chef Tyler Florence will be at the Eastway Wegmans (1955 Empire Blvd.) on Thursday, December 6, at 5 p.m. to sign copies of his brand-new book, “Tyler Florence Fresh,” dropping December 4. It focuses on fresh, everyday foods prepared in innovative and delicious ways. Visit wegmans.com for more details.

Holiday happenings

From CHAR, the new steakhouse located in the renovated Strathallan: roasted baby beet and pear salad (left); 25oz Angus ribeye with smoked bleu cheese and bacon butter (center); roasted brussels sprouts with applewood smoked bacon, parsnips, and chestnut butter (right). PhotoS by MATT DETURCK

Meat and sleep [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Throughout time, weary travelers have been able to procure meals and lodging at the same establishment, though the food can sometimes taste mostly of convenience. Ideally, the in-house restaurant should enhance a hotel’s reputation; think Escoffier at London’s Savoy, Ducasse at Monte Carlo’s Louis XV, or Robuchon at Manhattan’s Four Seasons. Here in Rochester the Strathallan has been setting the bar for hotel dining, and now that its approximately $20 million renovation is complete — the new name is Strathallan, a Doubletree by Hilton — CHAR Steak & Lounge is stoking its two-ton, woodburning grill. “Contemporary steakhouse” is how general manager Jason Reiss describes CHAR, locally owned by David Christa and Bob Morgan, as well as restaurateurs John Diamantopoulos and Mark Chiarenza. CHAR is an impeccably appointed space that manages to be sleek and cozy all at once, with overstuffed chairs, roomy booths, subtle pastel mood lighting, and retro lounge music. Behind the scenes, though, executive chef Jeremy Nucelli’s bustling kitchen

handles three meals a day; the breakfast buffet stays consistent with the Hilton brand, but at lunch and dinner, “We really get to put our own stamp on it,” says Reiss. This means classic raw-bar selections; beautifully composed salads like roasted baby beet, radicchio, and pear ($8); and homemade pastas such as a sublime squidink spaghetti alla chitarra in a spicy tomato brodetto, with seafood, saffron, white wine, and toasted garlic bread crumbs ($18/$27). And look for a few inventive fowl entrées, along with plenty of meat. “We’re really focusing on the steaks,” says Reiss, who mentions the acclaimed STK family of restaurants as an inspiration for CHAR’s blend of steakhouse and cocktail lounge. Seared over 900 degrees’ worth of applewood and hickory embers, the beef options range from a petite 4 oz. filet mignon ($18) all the way up to a monster 48 oz. porterhouse ($89). Lunch at CHAR is a scaled-back — but no less appealing — version of its dinner menu, with soup, salads, pasta, risotto, and fish, as well as a few sandwiches, like a roasted turkey club ($12), with bacon, arugula,

tomato, and avocado on honey whole-grain bread. Craft cocktails are available, as is a selection of wines by both the bottle and the glass, both of which Reiss plans to expand on as CHAR settles into its juicy groove. Says Reiss, “We didn’t reinvent the wheel by any means, but it’s a really good wheel.” CHAR Steak & Lounge is located inside the Strathallan at 550 East Ave. It serves lunch 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and dinner 5-10 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, 5-11 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, and 4-9 p.m. Sunday. Bar open until 2 a.m. Prices range from $8 to $96. For more information, call 241-7100 or visit charsteakandlounge.com.

Speakeasy

All you shebas and sheiks may want to don your swankiest period garb and hoof it on over to Scotland Yard Pub (187 St. Paul St.), on Saturday, December 1, for Prohibition Night. SYP reopens as a speakeasy at 8 p.m., with live music, sassy surprises, and 1920’sinspired libations, including the Scofflaw, Batch 19 beer (from Coors’ pre-Prohibition recipe), and Ripper whiskey, created for SYP

It’s time again for Holidays at the Market, happening 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on three consecutive Sundays — December 2, 9, and 16 — at the Rochester Public Market (280 N. Union St.). Vendors will be selling crafts, decorations, gifts, and, of course, food, as well as the largest selection of holiday trees, wreaths, and fresh garlands found in Western New York. The Lake Ontario Wine Trail celebrates Christmas Around the World during its third annual Holiday Tour noon-5 p.m. Saturday, December 8, and Sunday, December 9, with seven stops featuring food and wine pairings from countries like Italy, France, Denmark, and Mexico. Tickets are $10 each or two for $15 and can be purchased at the starting winery. Click over to lakeontariowinetrail.com for more information.

Open

The Daily Refresher is now open in the

old Blue Room location at 293 Alexander St., serving beer, wine, and cocktails both classic and original, along with appetizers, soups, salads, and sandwiches, like the toasted-cheese varieties named in honor of newspapers. Hours are Tuesday-Thursday 4:30 p.m.-midnight and Friday-Saturday 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m.; call 360-4627 or visit thedailyrefresher.com to learn more. Jackie Powers’ Orange Glory has crossed the Genesee River. The popular East Avenue spot is expanding to a second location in the Times Square Building, at the corner of Exchange and Broad. It’s open MondayFriday 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The menu of sandwiches, soups, salads, and baked goods is the same at both Glories; visit orangeglorycafe.com for more info. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13

Upcoming [ Folk ] Father John Misty Saturday, January 12. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. $15-$17. 3525600, waterstreetmusic.com. [ Pop/Rock ] The Pink Floyd Experience Wednesday, February 20. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 8 p.m. $30-$35. 232-3221, rochestermainstreetarmory.com. [ Country ] Miranda Lambert, Dierks Bentley Friday, March 1. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. $28-$52.75. 758-5300, bluecrossarena.com.

Harvey Sorgen /Omar Tamez

Monday, November 26 Bop Shop Records, 1460 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. | $10 donation | 271-3354, bopshop.com [ JAZZ ] Drummer Harvey Sorgen has propelled the

bands of greats like Ahmad Jamal, Dave Douglas, and Anthony Braxton. In the rock realm he’s played with Hot Tuna, Bob Weir, and the Allman Brothers Band. Mexican-born guitarist Omar Tamez has enhanced performances by Reggie Workman, Sonny Fortune, and Rashied Ali and produced a classical CD of music by contemporary Mexican composers. When Sorgen and Tamez get together as a duo at the Bop Shop who knows what aspects of such rich and varied careers will emerge? — BY RON NETSKY

Primate Sunday, November 25 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | Tickets TBD | bugjar.com. [ HARD ROCK ] Not quite a year ago, Mastodon guitarist

and Rochester ex-pat Bill Kelliher was recording Atlanta grindcore band Primate. Apparently the man is hands-on. By the time recording was finished, Kellier had joined the band. The heavy heroes in Mastodon were in post-tour cool down, and Kelliher still wanted to play. He describes the band as being more aggressive (?!!) than Mastodon. The band is currently shopping an EP around. Low Pan, Night Terror, and To The Deep add to the destruction. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

14 City November 21-27, 2012

Music

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dady Brothers w/Amy Montrois. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 5 p.m. Free. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info. Frankie and Jewels’s Acoustically Speaking Thanksgiving Eve. The Avenue Pub, 522 Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 7 p.m. Call for info. Peg Dolan & Sharon McHargue. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 9 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Thanksgiving Eve Fundraiser Bash for Devyn Rose! w/ Teressa Wilcox, The Filthy Brothers Blues Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 7 p.m. $5.

Krypton 88 played Abilene on Saturday, November 17. photo by FRANK DE BLASE

Eastman at St. Michael’s Church Sunday, November 25 St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 2:30 p.m. | Free | 274-1100

Delicious delinquency [ review ] by frank de blase

[ CLASSICAL ] Since 2009, students at the Eastman

School of Music have presented concerts at St. Michael’s Church, under soaring archways and ceiling covered with art, amidst wood carvings with gold leaf, and light streaming through Austrian stained-glass windows. Classical music in the setting of an 1888 Gothic Revival church is sure to delight all the senses. On November 25, the concert will feature the string duo of Hirono Sugimoto, violin, and Philip Borter, cello, performing works of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach, Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály, and Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

The Chinchillas Saturday, November 24 Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way 8:30 p.m. | $5-$7 | abilenebarandlounge.com [ AMERICANA ] The Chinchillas is a gem of an alt-

country/roots-rock/Americana band that should be on the lips and iPod of every fan of heartfelt lyricism and lonesome twang. Instead this fantastic foursome wallows beneath gray skies in relative northeastern obscurity. The band has just released “Something Beautiful,” an eight-song pleasure platter on Jargon Records. It rocks throughout with heavy doses of Peter Anvelt’s cynicism and the casually dismissive attitude of a band that’s kicked around long enough to suffer from acute don’tgive-a-shit-itis. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

I’m not fooling when I tell you The Fools ain’t foolin’. Sure, the name might come off as dismissive, but this band positively rocked my ass Thursday night at the Dinosaur, where more heat was coming off of Mickey Ames’ guitar than from the smoker out back. This long-haired cat is in the Rochester electric church; the local pantheon of guitarists like Dave Riccione, Steve Grills, Greg Townson, Bill Rebis, Todd Krasz, Gordon Munding, Steve Green, Brian Mason, Bobby Henrie, and Kurt Johnson who nightly drag Rochester rock ’n’ roll fans across their laps and spank ’em. The Fools rock and wail with a Bay-area boogie reminiscent of a time when starships were still airplanes, and the blues were something you had for real. Singer Mary Ellen Hayden sings through serious pipes not unlike the late Miss Joplin. The band was funky and rocking and an overall blast. Dig it as soon as you can, fool. Caught a bit of Joe Bonamassa’s set Friday night at the Auditorium Theatre. Bonamassa has played the venue enough that he’s really able to work the theater’s sensitive acoustics and put on a blistering show. He’s a tremendous

player with contemporary chops that ultimately keep the blues alive. But I find his songs rather boring. I’m sure I’ll catch hell for that as everyone in attendance was picking up what he was laying down, but his songs lack a certain fire and threat that I like in the blues. His guitar playing more than makes up for it, though — it’s savage, yet slick and flashy. He even dug into the library to tear up a cool version of Chuck Berry’s “Carol.” Back at the Dinosaur, the Salt City’s Turnip Stampede was stampeding the kids with its jam/groove/Stevie Wonder-esque sound. This band plugs in just enough jam to keep the crowd on its feet. Abilene was packed Saturday night for a triple-bill rockabilly riot staring Toronto’s Royal Crowns, one of the finest dealers in classic bop and twang I know worldwide. Krypton 88 has jettisoned the country and has returned to the delicious delinquency of its three-piece roots. The trio played like its players’ heads were on fire and their asses were catching as little pieces of rug were cut all night.

[ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. [ Country ] Sending Station. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Annalyze, DJ Naps. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. 757-752-8370. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. continues on page 17

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Lovin’ Cup 300 park point drive at RIT 292-9940 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15

Music back-to-back “24 Hour Party People” and “Control,” the two movies about Joy Division. So like 4 o’clock in the morning I’m like, “I’m going to write a Joy Division song.” It’s the song “God Help Us All” on the album.   What bends your ear the most?

The influence is mostly 60’s guitar rock, that’s where my heart has always been. I love psychedelic rock and this band has really allowed me to cut loose on that stuff more than Static Cling did. Stuff like Pink Floyd. I also think there’s some Grateful Dead-Quicksilver-Jefferson AirplaneCountry Joe influences in there. When we played Grassroots, the sound tech said I played more like a sax player. And I thought that was really cool, because if there’s anybody I’ve tried to play like, it’s Pharaoh Sanders. Where does IRO belong, the studio or the stage?

Definitely on stage What are you most proud of with this band? Infrared Radiation Orchestra is a new-ish project started by Kim Draheim (pictured), formerly of bar band Static Cling. Photo by FRANK DE BLASE

One big song Infrared Radiation Orchestra Friday, December 7 Tommy’s, 145 Railroad Ave., Newark 9 p.m. | call for tix | 315-331-0714, reverbnation.com infraredradiationorchestra [ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

Kim Draheim’s battered guitar is your library card — or perhaps more accurately, your passport — to rock ’n’ roll. After plundering the region for more than 25 years in the guitar-centric hard-rocking bar band, Static Cling, Draheim has reemerged with The Infrared Radiation Orchestra, a classic bar band in the tried and true trio set-up. This Seneca Fallsbased threesome — Draheim, along with Barry Wayne Miller (drums) and Jerry Congdon (bass) — cruises the traditional side street of virtually every road to rock. Leaning heavily on doses of psychedelic and garage rock, the band covers and creates seamlessly. Exhibit A: the band’s new Jargon Records release “Preparing 16 City November 21-27, 2012

the Feast of Skeldon.” But where do the preexisting influences end and the band begin? We asked Draheim, who got on the phone to answer a few questions and explain how it’s all just one big song. An edited transcript of the conversation follows.   CITY: How did Infrared Radiation Orchestra come to be? Kim Draheim: I was becoming increasingly

frustrated with Static Cling. Cathi [band member Cathi Lee Otis] was having some health issues and was getting out of the band, and also I was getting a lot of flack about direction. I was still very emotionally attached to it, but my wife said, “Why don’t you start a side project?” What my wife didn’t tell me was that Static Cling was going to be over soon. She could see it coming and I couldn’t. So I started a side project and, indeed, within a couple of months Static Cling was done. Having another band softened the blow.   How was the transition?

For 25 years with Static Cling I was essentially writing for a three-piece. My writing has evolved with that three-piece

sound in mind, so it was a really easy transition. I ended up with some guys who are excellent singers, so we have three different vocalists. We’re doing a lot more with harmonies than with Static Cling. What Cathi and I were doing was more counter-melodies, criss-crossing, countermelodies. With Infrared I’m doing a lot of straight harmonies.   You guys seem to draw from everywhere and everyone.

You know, there’s an old quote from Robbie Robertson from The Band that really sums up how I’ve always felt. He said that if you want to create something original, you better listen to nothing else or everything else. And I’ve been the everything else side of that coin. There’s a little bit of everything in there.   But you make it your own, right?

There’s one song on the album — I’m kind of curious how many people will pick up on this… One thing I haven’t done too often in my life is consciously try to write a song that sounds like another band. I was sitting up all night watching

I know this may come off a bit arrogant, but there’re only a handful of bands that are the real thing, and I think people sense that. That’s why I enjoy doing double bills with bands like Anonymous Willpower, because I think they’re one of those bands, too.   You’re also an amazing guitar player.

Well, I keep hearing that. I think I’m limited technically, but I do have touch. I know I have a good feel.   What makes Infrared Radiation Orchestra the Infrared Radiation Orchestra?

This is going to repel some people… We’re a cover band basically, but we’re not a cover band. I mean, I enjoy arranging songs almost as much as I like writing originals. I enjoy being in a band that gets the fact that it’s all the same. It’s like the hippie bands used to say: it’s all one big song. Whether I wrote it, or Jagger/ Richards wrote it, or Irving Berlin wrote it — it’s what you do with it that matters.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23

Lawrence Street Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Heat, A-Pub Live, Whiskey River, and Grotto Nightclub. Call for info. Night Before Thanksgiving Party. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Call for info. Free. Ken Snyder & Trace Wilkins. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7:30 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry Live. O’Neill’s, 5324 St Paul Blvd. 342-8752. 6 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] Andy Calabrese Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Bill Tiberio Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Bob Henley. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. Call for info. Free. Soul Express. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St. 243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ Reggae/Jam ] Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad w/Kevin Kinsella, Mosaic Foundation, and Josh Netsky Band. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 8:30 p.m. $10-$12.

METAL | PIRATE TOY FUND BENEFIT

ALTERNATIVE | WORLD/INFERNO FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY

It’s not every day that you mix pirates with metal and not expect a plundered merchant ship or broken barstool. On Black Friday, Monty’s Krown will host a benefit concert for the Pirate Toy Fund. The premise of this event is simple: your donation of one new store-bought toy gains you entrance to the show, and collected toys are distributed to needy children. The line-up features four bands: ambient/alternative rockers Oceans of Insects (pictured), brutal — meaning good — pyros Burn Everything, doom metal/ stoner-rock trio Chillum, and extreme metal heads Bleed The Messiah. Toys are mandatory, pirate speak is optional.

World/Inferno Friendship Society isn’t as much a musical group as it is a sign of Judgment Day. Led by lead singer/master of ceremonies Jack Terricloth, the Brooklyn orchestra-circus-rock-tent revival features a rotating cast of performers that creates a klezmer/jazz/ska/soul-fueled party. There’s never a dull moment on the dance floor when a smidge of punk is added to an already up-tempo fiery combination of musical theater and show tunes. Fellow Brooklyn alt-country band O’ Death co-headlines this concert. The quintet is rooted in rustic American folk and burns with intensity a la Tom Waits. Wild Yaks opens.

Pirate Toy Fund Benefit takes place Friday, November 23, 8 p.m. at Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. Admission is the donation of a toy. 271-7050. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

World/Inferno Friendship Society performs Saturday, November 24, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. $15-$18. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Thunder Body CD Release. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 10 p.m. $10-$15.

DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. RIPROC: Harmony Flo, Tim Tones. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5-$15. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3.

[ Pop/Rock ] 1st Annual Toast To The Troops ft. The Good Rats, The Sound Remains The Same, Dave McGrath. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 4 p.m. $10-$45. Download. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Extended Family w/Audio Influx. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. Free. H8 Machine:Turkey Bonanza. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Inugami. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Mulu Lizzy, Punishing Timmy. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315483-9570. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. Rainline w/Jim Drew. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $5-$7. British Rock Tribute Night: The Blastoffs w/BML, Amanda Lee Pears & The Driftwood Sailors. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $6. Rocket Fuel Launch Party ft. Chelsey & Whit. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. 7 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after.

Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Thanksgiving Eve Party: Me & the Boyz. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info. That Party Band. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Tryst. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22 *Due to the holiday some events may not be taking place. Call ahead to confirm.* [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Night Fall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Keeyo. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info.

[ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. The D’Jagoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke at Center Cafe. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe

Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Call for info. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Reggae/Jam ] Reggae Thursday. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm.

[ Blues ] Trilogy. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] RPO: The Nutcracker. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 2 & 7 p.m. Michael Butterman, conductor. Rochester City Ballet, Jamey Leverett, artistic director. Bach Children’s Chorus, Karla Krogstad, director. $10-$75. [ DJ/Electronic ] Black Friday 2012 ft. DJ Hollywood. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. 757-752-8370. 9 p.m. 21+. $5 before 11 pm. Black Friday Pitch Black Black Tie Affair. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Post-Turkey Day Apocalyptic Electronic Music Extravaganza. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 10 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Al Chez and the Brothers of Funk Big Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $10. continues on page 18

[ Pop/Rock ] Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 Captain Marvel. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Chris Wilson. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Phatkatz Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Coupe De Villes. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Black Friday Food Drive ft. Terawatt, Joe E and the Jam Factory, Shawnee Boyeee. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 4:30 p.m. Free. Black Friday Pirate Toy Fund Benefit ft. Oceans of Insects, Burn Everything, Chillum, Bleed the Messiah. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 8 p.m. One new store bought toy. Fishbone Soup w/Mike Z & Paul Amorese. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Good Time Charley. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Harmonica Lewinski w/Stoney Lonesome. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$8. Hemi Cuda. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 10 p.m. Free. 18 City November 21-27,

FUNK | UNIVERSE SHARK

EXPERIMENTAL FUNK | DOPAPOD

As the band’s moniker not-so-subtly implies, its music will take a bite out of you. Universe Shark is the proud progenitor of what it calls “carnivorous space funk.” This fearsome foursome takes cues from the independent Buffalo music scene as well as the ever-expansive “jam band” brand. The band’s eclectic and energetic mix of jazz, rock, blues, and funk exhibits a finely coordinated balance between “specificity and improvisation.” Since its formation in the summer of 2008 the group has played close to 200 shows in a little less than four years, and the hard work is paying off. Jeff Miers from The Buffalo News writes that the quartet’s live sets are consistently “taking on a life of their own and moving fluidly through interconnected pieces populated by epic instrumental interplay.” The band is currently in the midst of finishing its debut studio effort, which is due out at the end of the year.

This Brooklyn quartet bends genre boundaries as easily as a toddler with ESP bends cutlery. Like many bands in the “jam” scene, Dopapod’s incessant touring schedule has honed the group’s sound as well as expanded its fan base. The band’s flurried intensity, deep, concentrated grooves, and superior technical musicianship has wowed audiences at a number of big festivals, including Bonnaroo, StrangeCreek, and Camp Bisco. The band incorporates a whole spectrum of sound, from disco and jazz to funk and progressive rock, highlighted by searing guitars and an intoxicating interplay of bass and synthesizer. The most recent releases, “I Saw Live Dopapod Evil Was I” and “Drawn Onward,” put forth the entire package.

Universe Shark performs Saturday, November 24, 9 p.m. at Dub Land Undergound, 315 Alexander St. $5-$10. 232-7550. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. Plan ‘B’, Affixxtion. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info. Post Turkey party w/Gator Face, Retrospective. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Start Making Sense. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $10-$12. Sweating Off the Drumsticks: An 80s Exercise Themed Dance Party ft. KOPPS, Aminals, Kids & Explosions, Gin & Bonnets, and Dance Tunes by Lulu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$9. Upstate w/SpaceJunk. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $5. Wild Horses. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Geoffe Harder. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Heidi Little. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Lovin’ Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Big Blue House. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. 2012

Meg Gehman, Bill Welch, Lisa Bigwood, and Jerry Fazone. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. Call for info. Sullivan Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] The Cellar Dwellars. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Third Degree. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] RPO: The Nutcracker. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 2 & 7 p.m. Michael Butterman, conductor. Rochester City Ballet, Jamey Leverett, artistic director. Bach Children’s Chorus, Karla Krogstad, director. $10-$75. [ Country ] Doublecross. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3. JB & Company. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Dopapod performs Wednesday, November 28, at 9 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $10. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. [ DJ/Electronic ] DIGDUGDIY Party ft. Makoto, Bobby Fischer, The Archaeologist, and Ramblin’ E Moore. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 10 p.m. $3. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Nate Carr. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Call for info. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Artisan Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Cool Club Jazz. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Frank’s Rat Pack. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. GRR Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Temple. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Mojo Monkeys. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 8 p.m. Call for info. Roc Soul Jam w/Matthew Corey & Friends, DaShon Davidson, ramblin’ e.moore, and Christian Nizy. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. [ Pop/Rock ] The Audacity w/Big Eyes, Love Pork, Dick Snare, and Maudlin Maladies. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. The Chinchillas. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Ernie Capone. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Fever. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. 21+. $4. The Frequency. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Loud & Proud. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Push. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Smooth Talkers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Spacelords. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Waiting Room. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $10$12. World/Inferno, O’ Death w/Wild Yaks. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $15-$18.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music Sundays: Kevin Reynolds & Ken Snyder. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Four-4-Time. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free (donations accepted). Eastman At St. Michael’s: Hirono Sugimoto, Philip Borter. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 325-4041. 2:30 p.m. Free. RPO: The Nutcracker. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 2 & 7 p.m. Michael Butterman, conductor. Rochester City Ballet, Jamey Leverett, artistic director. Bach Children’s Chorus, Karla Krogstad, director. $10-$75. [ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. Call for info. Free. Day Break. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 20

Holidays atGallea’s! est.1957

COOKOUT! Saturday, Dec. 8th • 11am- 4pm

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25 Joe Santora and Curtis Kendrick. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 4 p.m. Call for info. [ Pop/Rock ] Gene Cornish and Friends. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 5 p.m. Free, can donations accepted. Primate (Bill, from Mastadon) w/Lo-Pan, Night Terror, and To the Deep. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $10-$12.

Rally in the Alley: Roc Entertainment Teen Showcase. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 4 p.m. $10-$12.

[ Blues ] Tony Giannavola. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26

[ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Mondays ft. Miss T., Lady Z., Team A. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Fresh Squeezed Singer Songwriter. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Maria Gillard. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] Harvey Sorgen, Omar Tamez. The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. 8 p.m. $10. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Don Christiano: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. Spirit Family Reunion w/ Clinton’s Ditch. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $8-$10. [ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

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[ Jazz ] Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke w/DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Karaoke with Tina P. Wintonaire, 628 Winton Road North. 730-8350. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free.

Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Hunting for Teeth w/High Drags, Upstate, and The Yummies. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

[ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. Fat City. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Mike “Slo-Mo” Brenner w/Hoagy Wing. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8.

[ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Soo Yeon Kim, soprano. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Call for info DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 2729777. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free.

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Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Bill Tiberio. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10. Key Dreamers. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Meghan Koch and the Gentleman Callers. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. The Phatkatz Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Asher Roth. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $17-$25. [ Pop/Rock ] Paxtor w/The Pickpockets, Attic Abasement, and Holy Smith!. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

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Theater that is, after all, called “Motherhood the Musical,” but the narrow focus of subject matter shouldn’t be an excuse to not making the characters into fully realized people in their own right. There are glimpses of real insight, like the moments of terror the new mother experiences just after she gives birth and attempts to breast feed for the first time, suddenly gripped by the realization that she doesn’t entirely know what she’s doing yet. But that all-too-brief moment of honesty is short-lived, quickly substituted for broad jokes about nipple biting. The actresses portraying these women

The cast of “Motherhood the Musical,” now on stage at Downstairs Cabaret Theatre’s Winton location.

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Word to your mother “Motherhood the Musical” Through January 13 Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Place $26-$39, 325-4370, downstairscabaret.org [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

There are certain theater shows that you decide to see because you want to learn, to be challenged, or surprised or moved in some way. Other shows you see because you need a pleasant, inoffensive entertainment to which you can take your grandmother that won’t rile her up too much. The forgettable “Motherhood the Musical,” currently playing at the Downstairs Cabaret Theatre’s Winton Place venue, falls squarely in the latter category. It’s unfortunate, as motherhood is a complex subject near and dear to all our hearts, and one that’s ripe with dramatic and comedic potential. What little narrative there is in “Motherhood” centers around a group of female friends getting together to hold a surprise baby shower for the youngest

member of their group, Amy, who is expecting her first child. The shower setting serves as a clothesline to hang a plethora of musical numbers as the women compare notes about the trials and tribulations that come with raising a family. It’s a sort of a “What To Expect When You’re Expecting” with jazz hands. Admittedly, I am not part of the show’s target audience (it’s worth noting that it comes from the producers of the highly successful “Menopause the Musical”). But certainly I can appreciate a well-told story about modern matriarchs if it’s done with wit or intelligence. Sadly both are in short supply here. Writer Susan Fabisch is content to settle for the formulaic rehashing of sitcom-level cliches about how women are required to be multi-tasking superheroes while the men in their lives are lazy, useless dolts. It feels like a missed opportunity. What is perhaps most problematic about the show is its need to reinforce the notion that a woman’s identity begins and ends with being a mother. These women don’t appear to have any hopes, ideas, dreams, or aspirations outside of motherhood. That may seem like an unfair criticism to raise against a show

are clearly talented and do what they can with the material they’re given. In particular Jewel Lucien’s fantastic voice is capable of wringing the most emotion possible out of “Every Other Weekend,” divorcee Tasha’s big ballad about sharing custody of her children and finding herself in a position she never thought she’d be in again, as she tentatively steps back into the dating pool. It was one of the rare songs that stood out among the nearly 20 others that I struggled to recall just hours after seeing the production. Lisa Manuli and Jen Chada each earn laughs in their roles as a terrified mother-to-be and jaded mother of five, respectively. Though she gives a valiant effort, I found it difficult to buy Ilona Ahearn’s performance as a workaholic lawyer, but that may have more to do with the fact that we never see her character actually do any work related to her job. The show’s director and choreographer, Lisa Shriver, keeps things moving at a brisk pace; the show is certainly lively. But your enjoyment for the production will be entirely dependent on how hilarious you find breast-pump-related humor and songs about incontinence, all presented in the most inoffensive way possible — this is a show that can’t even bring itself to explicitly state what MILF stands for. Still, judging by the cheers, laughter, and nods of recognition from the audience at the performance I attended — unsurprisingly made up mostly of women of a certain age — the majority of the room seemed to get a kick out of the communal experience of seeing their daily lives turned into musical tribute. There’s value in that, and maybe that’s enough. But frankly, I think Mom deserves better.

Art Exhibits [ Opening ] Holiday Event. TuesdaysThursdays, Saturdays. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Through Dec 24. Tue, Thu, and Sat 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Wed 4:30-7:30 p.m. Unique artistically crafted gift items. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. “Human Nature: Interpretations of the Seasons” Mixed Media Drawings by Torey Hamlin. Mon., Nov. 26, 5-8 p.m. and Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. brockport.edu/finearts. [ Continuing ] *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* “60 from the 60s.” TuesdaysSundays. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. Through Jan. 7, 2013. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. 6247740. millartcenter.com. “Altered States” by Betsy Phillips. Through Nov. 25. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through Nov 25. Hours Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Nov 2, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. Ongoing. Plastic, 650 South Ave. TueSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7 p.m. 563-6348. plasticforever.com. Art of REIGN: Fine art illustration by Trish Annese & Sharon Jeter. Through Nov. 24. Cat Clay, Suite 225, Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Through Nov 24. Hours by appt. only. Reception Nov 2, 5-9 p.m. catclay.com. “Art of the Book.” Through Dec. 9. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through Dec. 9. 4288053. libraryweb.org. Brian O’Neill & David Dorsey. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Through Nov 24. Hours TueFri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m. Reception Oct 27 5:30-7:30 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Carla Bartow. Ongoing. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Opening Fri Oct 19, 710 p.m. carlasswanktank. blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. “Catching Dreams.” Through Jan. 13, 2013. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Featuring the work of Bonnie Evangelista, Becky Harris and Chris Horn. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

ART EVENTS | HOLIDAY ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW

For many shoppers Black Friday is the official start to the holiday shopping season. Sleep in and search for something a little more unique this year by shopping around at the many local arts and craft fairs that will be occurring this weekend. More Fire Glass Studio is hosting its Annual Holiday Open House and Sale on Friday, November 23, Saturdays, November 24 and December 1, and Sunday, December 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, and will feature live glassblowing demonstrations in addition to a gallery filled with handmade ornaments (pictured), jewelry, beads, vases, bottles, bowls, platters, tea-light holders, and more. Gifts start at $6. 80 Rockwood Place. 242-0450. Morefireglass.com. Looking for crafts with a bit more edge? Visit the annual Second Storie Market Saturday, November 24, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Visual Studies Workshop (31 Prince St.). The market seeks to bring more modern arts and crafts to the community, so you’re sure to encounter something out-ofthe-ordinary while perusing the wares. Vendor specialties include jewelry, pottery, stationery, paintings and drawings, clothing, and more. 309-5371. secondstorie.net.

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A variety of handmade goods will be featured at Irondequoit Art Club’s Holiday Art & Crafts Sale. From Saturday, November 24, to Saturday, December 1, artists will sell pieces like handcrafted jewelry, art prints, fiber art, hand-dyed silks, stained glass, and more. Admission is free, and entertainment and demos will be featured throughout the sale. The event will be held at the Pauline Evans Public Library at 45 Cooper Road. For full schedule, call 787-4086 or visit irondequoitartclub.org. The Rochester Folk Art Guild will also present its annual Holiday Festival of Crafts Friday, November 23, through Sunday, November 25. Wood furniture, pottery, oriental rugs, graphics, natural fiber clothing, weaving wood, and more will fill the Harley School (1981 Clover St.) 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $2, or free with a printed invitation. For more information, call 5543539 or visit rfag.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Celestial Songs: Sculpture by Tarrant Clements. TuesdaysSaturdays. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Through Dec 22. Tue-Fri noon-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m. 232-8120. “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. Wednesdays-Sundays. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 10. Sat Nov 17 opening party $25. Continues WedSun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. “Clouds in My Coffee..” Through Nov. 24. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10

p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com. Dale Inglett. Through Jan. 3, 2013. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Through Jan 3, gallery hours Mon, Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Nov 15 1-3 p.m. genesee. edu/gallery Through Jan. 3, 2013. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Through Jan 3. 343-0055 x6490. gallery@ genesee.edu. genesee.edu/ gallery. continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23

DANCE | “THE NUTCRACKER”

Towering Christmas trees, toys that come to life, and visions of sugarplums — the wondrous images that “The Nutcracker” ballet evokes always put me in the holiday spirit. For the 14th consecutive year, the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Rochester City Ballet, and the Bach Children’s Chorus have combined forces to present Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” to ring in the holidays. From Friday, November 23, through Sunday, November 25, audiences can experience the classic ballet at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre (26 Gibbs St.). To celebrate RCB’s 25th “silver anniversary” season, splashes of silver will be woven into costumes and props throughout Sunday night’s show. Audience members can keep track of the interspersed moments of silver for a chance to win two tickets to RCB’s spring show. Fans on Facebook and Twitter will also have an opportunity to win tickets to the Sunday evening show by answering “Nutcracker” trivia questions. Visit facebook.com/ rochestercityballet to participate and look behind-the-scenes at costumes and rehearsals. Performances take place Friday through Sunday at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets range from $10 to $75 and can be purchased at the RPO Box Office at 108 East Ave., by phone at 4542100, or online at rpo.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON

Art Exhibits Deborah Ronnen Fine Art Presents “Contemporary African American Printmakers.” WednesdaysSundays. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Through Dec 21. Sun 125 p.m., Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. Gallery closed Nov 22-23. Reception Nov 9, 5-10 p.m. 389-5073. “Dimensions” by Rick Hirsch/ Jane Shellenbarger. Through Nov. 30. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Through Nov 30. Reception Nov 9, 5-7 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. The Ecology of Food: Past, Present, Future. Through Dec. 5. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr. Through December 5. Reception Oct 3 5-7 p.m. Additional talks Wednesdays 2:30-3:30 p.m. geneseo.edu/ galleries. “Edges of Books.” MondaysFridays, 1-5 p.m. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Dec 14. Reception Oct 4, 5-7:30 p.m. 475-3961. rit.edu. Exposed: Rochester’s Hidden Victims of Homelessness. Mondays-Fridays. Link

Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov. The Exquisite Corpse. Through Nov. 29. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Continues through Nov. 29. Opening night 5-9 p.m. 3770132. outsidetheboxag.com. The Faces in Wood by Charles Jaffe. Through Dec. 31. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. Through end of Dec. MonWed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Reception Nov 10 6-8 p.m. 461-2230. melissa@genesee.coop. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. TuesdaysSaturdays, 7 p.m. Primitive Impressions, 4 Livingston County Campus. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. Through Dec. 8. iGallery Kathy Clem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St., Suite 312. Continues Nov 2-Dev 8. Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7-9 p.m. igallerykathyclem.com.

24 City november 21-27, 2012

“Framing Edo: Masterworks from Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views.” WednesdaysSundays. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. In Lockhart Gallery. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. “From the Permanent Collection: Then and Now.” Tuesdays-Sundays. Lockhart Gallery at SUNY Geneseo, 28 Main St. Through Dec 10. Tue-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. 245-5813. geneseo.edu/galleries. “The Heirloom,” Art by Mara Ahmed. Through Dec. 7. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. Holiday Show and First Anniversary. Through Nov. 30. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. 654-2485. facebook.com/ outsidetheboxag. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Through Jan 6. Reception Nov 9, 6-8 p.m. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Honeoye Falls-Lima Central School District Art Department members. Through Nov. 30. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Through Nov 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Nov 2, 6-9 p.m. 244-9892. “Imaginations: Space and Time, Drawings and Paintings by Debra Stewart.” Through Dec. 20. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Through Dec 20. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. Thu artist’s talk, Fri reception. 785-1369. naegelbr@flcc.edu. “Joy in the Atmosphere” by Richmond Futch. Through Dec. 31. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. Through Dec 31. Reception with live music and open painting Nov 2, 6-9 p.m. 729-9916. “Kaleidoscope.” Through March 2, 2013. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. Leave Your Dryer Lint Outdoors so a Squirrel Can Enjoy the Warm Bits of Sweaters You Love. Through Nov. 30. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Through Nov 30. Katharine Clemens senior solo exhibition. Reception Nov 9, 6-9 p.m. adifferentpathgallery. com. “Lost Birds: Sculptures by Todd McGrain.” TuesdaysSundays. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Oct 21: “Ideas in Things.” | Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. Sat., Nov. 24, 6-10 p.m. Art and Vintage on Main, 101

Main St., East Rochester. artandvintageonmain.com. “Low Fidelity.” Through Dec. 9. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street. Through Dec. 9. Hours MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Reception Oct 25, 4-6 p.m. 395-2805. brockport. edu/finearts. “Majestic Landscapes” Featuring M.S. Park, and new artists, Steven Walker, and David Jackson. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Through Nov 27. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep. 30, 2013. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. Mosaic Show: Arena Art Group. Through Nov. 30. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Through Nov 30. Reception Nov 9, 7-9 p.m. zannebrummer@gmail.com. Nathan Lyons: Photographs 1957-2012. MondaysSaturdays. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through November 30. Hours Tue, Thu 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Wed, Fri, Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. “Nature Scapes: Far and Near,” photographs by Lois A. Trieb. Through Jan. 6, 2013, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Jan 6. Reception Dec 7 5-7 p.m. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. “Nature Scapes: Far and Near,” photography by Lois Trieb at My Sister’s Gallery. Through Jan. 6, 2013, 10 a.m. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Jan 6. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. “An Open Mind.” Through Nov. 30. Through November 30. Our House Gallery, Veterans Outreach Center Inc., 459 South Ave. Month-long photography exhibit capturing the joy and beauty of what life is like for the thousands of responsible pet owners in our community who own and embrace pit bulls as valued and cherished family members. Reception Oct 26, 6-9 p.m. pittyloverescue@ gmail.com. Original Oil Paintings by American artist David Kerstetter. MondaysSundays. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Nov 30. MonFri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. “Painting Tuscany.” Through Dec. 1. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Through December 1. Landscape paintings by Rebecca DeMarco, Denise

FILM | MIYAZAKI SERIES

In 2002 Japanese filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki captured the attentions of worldwide audiences with his Academy Awardwinning film, “Spirited Away” (pictured). Over the next two weekends the Dryden Theatre will conclude its month-long program highlighting five of Miyazaki’s films. On Friday, November 23, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, November 25, at 2 p.m. the theater will show “Spirited Away,” and on Friday, November 30, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, December 2, at 2 p.m. screenings of Miyazaki’s 1997 film “Princess Mononoke” will be held. Join Chichiro and her quirky friends on their adventure in “Spirited Away,” then help warrior Ashitaka fight a deadly curse with the help of San in “Princess Mononoke.” The Dryden Theatre is located inside the George Eastman House at 900 East Ave. Screening cost $6-$8. For more information call 271-3361 or visit dryden.eastmanhouse.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Heishman, Jane O’Donnell, Sara O’Donnell, Betsy Taylor, and Rosalee Bedian. Reception October 19 6-8 p.m. millartcenter.com. Paintings 2012: William F. Seller. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Through Nov 30. Opening reception, Nov. 2 from 5-9 p.m. 473-4000. ArtsRochester.org. Paintings 2012: William F. Sellers. Mondays-Fridays. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Through Nov 30. Gallery closed Nov 7, 22, 23. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Patti Ambrogi and Own Butler Photographic Exhibition. Through Nov. 28. Gallery r, 100 college ave. Through Nov 28. 256-3312. galleryr99@ gmail.com. “Pieces of Me” New Work by Mary Moore. Through Nov. 30. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Through November 30. gallery@equalgrounds.com. “Pitch Man” Hank Willis Thomas. ThursdaysSundays. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. Through Dec 9. Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun 12-3 p.m. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. Rochester Art Club Fall Art Exhibition. Through Nov. 30. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. 585 278 7501. rochesterartclub.org. Sharon Stiller, Painter. Through Nov. 30. 2Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 271-6111. 2chicboutique.com. Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display/Festival of

Trees. Through Dec. 12. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Dec 12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “This Gentleman Bamboo” by Dennis Burns. MondaysSaturdays. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Through Nov 24. Hours are Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 20, 12-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. “Three Meat Stew: A Photographic Medley.” Through Nov. 25. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Through Nov 25. Featuring Don Menges, George Wallace, and Gil Maker. Reception Nov 9, 6-9 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. 732-0036. shoefactoryarts.com. University of Rochester Studio Art Faculty Exhibition. Through Dec. 9. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 275-4188. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. Webster Art Club Fall Show. Through Nov. 29. Webster Library, 980 Ridge Rd. Through Nov 29. Awards Reception Nov 10, 2-4 p.m. 872-7075. [ Call for Artwork ] 6x6x2013. Through April 21, 2013. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org.

Art Events *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Friday, November 23Saturday, November 24 ] More Fire Annual Holiday Sale. Nov. 23-24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Place. Glass and ceramic ornaments and more, glass blowing demos. 242-0450. morefireglass. com. The Rochester Folk Art Guild Holiday Festival of Crafts. Nov. 23-24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 25, 11 a.m.5 p.m. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770. folkartguild.org. [ Friday, November 23Sunday, November 25 ] Artist Open House and Holiday Sale. Nov. 23-25. Flying Whale Studios, 143 William St., Geneva. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. flyingwhalestudios.com. [ Saturday, November 24 ] Red Cross Craft Show. Sat., Nov. 24, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Geneseo Armory, Rte 39, 34 Avon Rd., Geneseo. 2437029. redcrossnorth.org. Second Storie Indie Market. Sat., Nov. 24, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. 309-5371. secondstorie.net.

[ Saturday, November 24Saturday, December 1 ] Irondequoit Art Club Holiday Art & Craft Sale. Nov. 24Dec. 1. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. Sat Nov 24 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m., Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-8:45 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5:45 p.m., Sat Dec 1 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 787-4086. aholland@libraryweb.org. irondequoitartclub.org.

Comedy *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Wed., November 21 ] Joel Lindley and Friends. Wed., Nov. 21. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Call for more info. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. Stand Up Comedy Open Mic. Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. Do you want to perform stand up comedy? Well you should. Because you’re funny. And cool. Bring your best jokes and a best friend. Sign up at 7. Show starts 7:30. 5856970235. Thanksgiving Comedy Jam. Wed., Nov. 21, 8 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. Thanksgiving Comedy Jam features D.L. Hughley, Bill Bellamy, and other talent. 222-5000.

[ Friday, November 23Saturday, November 24 ] Hail to the Chief: GCI’s Great Big Election. Nov. 23-24, 10:30 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382. gevacomedyimprov.org. Harris Stanton. Nov. 23-24, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ Saturday, November 24 ] An Improvised Christmas Carol. Sat., Nov. 24, 7 p.m. Shake on the Lake Pop-Up Theater, 12 Lake St. facebook.com/ shakeonthelake. Polite Company: The Leftovers. Sat., Nov. 24, 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. pcimprov. com. muccc.org. [ Tuesday, November 27 ] 55th Annual Fall Guy Roast Dinner “Roasting Jody Gage.” Tue., Nov. 27, 5:30 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. sandscharities.org. Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. Tuesdays, 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. laughriotcomedy.com.

Dance Events *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Wed., November 21 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing

Dance. Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY. Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:45-11pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing. Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. 585-271-4930. lindyjam.com. [ Thursday, November 22 ] Dance Lab East. Thursdays, 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. [ Friday, November 23Sunday, November 25 ] The Nutcracker. Nov. 23-25, 2 & 7 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100. rpo.org. [ Saturday, November 24 ] Fandango at the Tango. Saturdays, 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. Thanksgiving Dance Weekend. Fri., Nov. 23, 8 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 24, 9 a.m. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St. Contra & English Country Dancing, Live Music - Elixir, Andrew & Noah

Van Norstrand, Frivolity & Noteworthy. thanksgiving@ cdrochester.org. [ Sunday, November 25 ] English Country Dancing. Sundays, 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd. English Country Dancing, live music, called dances. 244-2468. fbcrochester.net. [ Tuesday, November 27Sunday, Decemeber 2 ] Garth Fagan Sance. Nov. 27Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m. and Nov. 28-30, 8 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170. artscenter. naz.edu.

Kids Events *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Friday, November 23 ] Film Fridays: Brave. Fri., Nov. 23, 10 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. A family program, popcorn is served. 247-6446. Film: “Ratatouille.” Fri., Nov. 23, 2:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. Jawbone Puppet Theatre & Poncili Company’s Magic Puppet Bus Tour. Fri., Nov. 23. 127 Railroad St. Puppetmaking workshop 46 p.m., live performance 8

p.m. Free show admission to workshop attendees. The Night Before Christmas. Fri., Nov. 23, 2 & 3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Second Annual Scooby-Doo Movie Marathon. Fri., Nov. 23, 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Snacks are welcome. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ Saturday, November 24 ] Breakfast with St. Nick. Sat., Nov. 24, 9:30, 10:30 & 11:30 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. 294-8218. gcv.org. Christmas with Santa. Saturdays. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St., Spencerport. Breakfast seatings 9, 10, 11 a.m. & noon. 349-2090. springdalefarm.org. Little Buddies Film: “Curly Sue.” Sat., Nov. 24, 10 a.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Santa Train Excursions. Sat., Nov. 24, 10, 11:30 a.m., 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society Station Museum, 8 E. High St. 869-1498. lvrrhs.org. [ Saturday, November 24Sunday, November 25 ] Literature Live: Brother Bear. Nov. 24-25. The Strong continues on page 26

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[ Sunday, November 25 ] Family Fun Movie Day: Arthur Christmas. Sun., Nov. 25, 1:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. Free Kids’ Wreath or Swag Making Workshop. Sun., Nov. 25, 3-5 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd. Must be accompanied by adult. 223-1222. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. The Great Hanukkah Giveaway. Sun., Nov. 25, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. Crafts, story times, drama program. 4610490. jewishrochester.org/ pjlibrary. Teen Anime Days. Sun., Nov. 25, 1:30 p.m. and Mon., Nov. 26, 1:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Miyazaki films and snacks, manga door prizes while they last. Make a Soot Sprite. Draw your own chibis. Open to grades 6-12. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ Tuesday, November 27 ] Teen Movie Night: The Avengers. Tue., Nov. 27, 6:30 p.m. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ Wed., November 28 ] Handcrafting Holiday Cards and Tags with Kim Romig. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 12-18. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org.

Lectures *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Wed., November 21 ] Victor Historical Society & Valentown Garden Club Speaker Series. Wed., Nov. 21, 2 p.m. Legacy at the Fairways, 681 High St. “Telling Our Stories to Remember Victor’s Past” with Frank Tischer. 924-7043. [ Thursday, November 22 ] Building Our Media: a critical discussion series on independent media. Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Rochester. Indymedia.org. [ Sunday, November 25 ] Sunday Forum: Healing 26 City november 21-27, 2012

KIDS | HOLIDAY TRAIN RIDES

The beloved children’s book “The Polar Express” made a lasting impression on many when it was published in 1985. Perhaps that’s why so many people now associate train rides with the holiday season. If you’re a fan of the book, and can still hear those crystal-clear bells, there are many opportunities to have your own holiday train ride adventure this winter. For a true “Polar Express” experience, check out Medina Railroad Museum’s Polar Express Train Ride. Read along with the story, meet Santa, sing carols, and enjoy hot cocoa and treats. A special gift will be offered to each child, and pajamas are encouraged. Rides will run Saturdays and Sundays November 24 through December 23. Departure times 3:30 p.m., 4:40 p.m., and 5:55 p.m. Tickets cost $23-$45. Rides leave from the Medina Depot at 530 West Ave. in Medina. For more information call 798-6106 or visit railroadmuseum.net. Visit the New York Museum of Transportation for Holly Trolley (pictured) rides on an authentic 85-year-old trolley car Saturdays and Sundays November 24 through December 16. Rides operate every half-hour starting at 11:30 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. The ride will feature a stop at Remelt’s Evergreen Acres, giving visitors an opportunity to view Christmas trees, wreaths, and decorations. No reservations required. Price included with museum admission, $4-$5. The museum is located at 6393 E. River Road, Rush. For info check 533-1113 or nymtmuseum.org. Another option is to visit with Santa with the Finger Lakes Railway and the Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society. On Saturday, November 24, trains will run on the former New York Central Railroad “Auburn Road” branch line for a 12-mile journey from Shortsville to Canandaigua that will last one hour. Departures are at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2:30 p.m., and 4 p.m. Snacks, beverages, and gift items will be sold at the station and onboard trains. Tickets cost $12. Departs from the Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society, 8 E. High St., Shortsville. 869-1498. lvrrhs.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Spaces/Healing Practices. Sun., Nov. 25, 9:45 a.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street. Citing scientific breakthroughs and personal explorations, Diane King discusses alternative treatments that activate bio-defense and promote healing. 325-4000. [ Tuesday, November 27 ] Florida Panhandle and Mobile Alabama with Joyce Roeder. Tue., Nov. 27, 7-8 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org.

Literary Events [ Wed., November 21 ] American Wars: “Empire of the Sun” by S.C. Gwynne. Wed., Nov. 21, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com. Pure Kona Open Mic. Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. [ Sunday, November 25 ] Books and Bagels. Sun., Nov. 25, 10 a.m. Temple EmanuEl, 2956 Saint Paul Blvd. You bring the books and we bring

the bagels. Come to discuss an interesting book that you have read or come listen to others share what they have recently read. 248-0509. emanuelrochester.org. [ Tuesday, November 27 ] Book Discussion: “The Submission” by Amy Waldman. Tue., Nov. 27, 1:30-3 p.m. and Wed., Nov. 28, 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. James Kennedy reading and book signing “The Order of Odd-Fish.” Tue., Nov. 27, 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. 585 278 7501. bn.com. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ Wed., November 28 ] Brownbag Book Discussion: “Cutting for Stone” by Abraham Verghese. Wed., Nov. 28, noon. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8375. libraryweb.org. James Kennedy readings from “The Order of Odd-Fish.” Wed., Nov. 28, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590. wab.org. Pure Kona Open Mic. Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works. 319-5999. Titles over Tea: “The Quiet American” by Graham Greene. Wed., Nov. 28, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com.

Museum Exhibit *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Through January 6 ] A T. rex Named Sue. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-4320. rmsc.org.

Recreation *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Daily ] Open Ice Skating. Ongoing. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink. Daily 12-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m. Adults Only daily 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m. (Fri-Sat til 8:50 p.m.). 428-7541. cityofrochster.gov/skating. [ Thursday, November 22 ] 41st Webster Turkey Trot. Thu., Nov. 22, 10 a.m. Webster Park, Holt Rd., Webster.

THEATER | “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”

Charles Dickens’ classic tale of London’s most sour and greedy miser who has a change of heart at Christmas is coming back to Rochester this week. For several years Geva Theatre Center (75 Woodbury Blvd.) has upheld this holiday tradition, and will revive it starting Friday, November 23, and continuing through Sunday, December 23. This year’s “Carol” will be based on the 2010 adaptation of the Dickens story by Mark Cuddy, the production’s director, featuring music and lyrics by Gregg Coffin. Returning cast members from years past include Guy Paul as Ebenezer Scrooge, Jim Poulos as Bob Cratchit, Melissa Rain Anderson as Mrs. Cratchit, Ned Noyes as Fred, and Remi Sandri as the Ghost of Jacob Marley. In addition to the showing on Friday at 7:30 p.m., performances will run this weekend on Saturday, November 24, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, November 25, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets start at $25. For more information and full schedule of shows, call 232-4382 or visit gevatheatre.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON yellowjacketracing.com/ webster-turkey-trot. GVHC Hike. Thu., Nov. 22, 8 a.m. Mendon Ponds Nature Center lot. Moderate 5.5 mile hike. 750-8937. gvhchikes.org [ Friday, November 23 ] GVHC Hike. Fri., Nov. 23, 10:30 a.m. Irondequoit Town Hall rear parking lot. Moderate 7 mile hike, Durand west side. 475-0923. gvhchikes.org [ Saturday, November 24 ] GVHC Hike. Sat., Nov. 24, 1 p.m. Greece Canal Park, Millennium LZodge parking lot. Easy/moderate 5 mile hike. 475-0923. gvhchikes. org. Old Growth Forest Visit: Dehgayasoh Valley Woods. Sat., Nov. 24, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Bring lunch, will car pool. 4933625. [ Sunday, November 25 ] GVHC Hike. Sun., Nov. 25, 10 a.m. Turning Point park, end of Boxhart St off Lake Ave. Moderate 5 mile hike. 8657835. gvhchikes.org. [ Wed., November 28 ] Crepuscular Walk: Full Moon Over the Gorge. Wed., Nov. 28, 4 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Bring a flashlight and a picnic supper. 493-3625.

Special Events *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Through December 2 ] 19th Annual Dickens Christmas Festival. Through Nov. 25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Through Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Shops on West Ridge, 3200 W. Ridge Rd. Through Jan 1. 368-0670. shopsonwestridge.com. [ Wed., November 21 ] Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Wednesdays, 3 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. [ Thurday, November 22 ] 2nd Annual After Nap Thanksgiving Party. Thu., Nov. 22, 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 7305030. scotlandyardpub.com. [ Friday, November 23Sunday, November 25 ] Complimentary Holiday Weekend Family Tours. Nov. 23-25, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. As part of its holiday tradition, continues on page 28

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NEW EVENTS EVERY DAY, ONLINE AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

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28 City november 21-27, 2012

Special Events Casa Larga Vineyards will be offering special tours of its winery operations during the upcoming holiday season. 223-4210. casalarga.com. [ Saturday, November 24 ] Bet the Farm Wine Luncheon. Sat., Nov. 24, noon. Aurora Inn, 391 Main St., Aurora. 315-364-8888. innsofaurora.com/food-wine/ epicurean-events/. Edgerton Model Railroad Room Open. Last Saturday of every month, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. 428-6769. edgertonmodelrainroadclub. com. Fall Dinner & Dance. Sat., Nov. 24. St. Mary’s Ukrainian Orthodox Church, 3176 St. Paul Blvd., Irondequoit. Cocktails 6-7 p.m., dinner 7 p.m., dancing 7:30 p.m.-midnight. 7484202. Holiday Laser Show. Saturdays, 11 a.m. & 4:30 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Saturdays and Sundays, plus some school holidays. Check online calendar. 271-1880. rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Schedule/. Preparing for the Holidays the 19th Century Way. Sat., Nov. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. 5386822. gcv.org. South Wedge Record Fair. Sat., Nov. 24, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 271-6785. needledroprecords.com. [ Sunday, November 25 ] Holley Trolley Rides. Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.4 p.m. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd. Through Dec 16. Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus on Sunday, December 2, 2-4 p.m. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Long Season Winter Famers’ Market. Sundays, 1-4 p.m. Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. swfarmersmarket.org. Roc The Arts. Sun., Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Rochester Massage Alliance, 1598 Penfield Rd. Unique holiday gifts from local crafters. rochestermassagealliance. com. [ Monday, November 26 ] Gerontology Club Welcomes Elderly Care Expert to Lecture. Nov. 26. 7 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 389-2446.

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[ Tuesday, November 27 ] East Side Winter Market. Tuesdays, 3-6 p.m. 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3489022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com.

p.m., Tue-Wed Nov 21 7 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre. org Nov. 21-28. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 9. Wed Nov 21 & Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Nov 28 7:30 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org.

Theater Audition

THEATER | “MEMPHIS”

The surge in rock musicals in recent years has only left audiences wanting more. In 2010 “Memphis” saw this demand and delivered, winning four Tony Awards that year, including Best Musical, Best Original Score, and Best Book. The Broadway hit will come to Rochester’s Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) Tuesday, November 27, through Sunday, December 2. In the form of some “roof-raising rock ‘n’ roll,” “Memphis” tells the tale of Huey Calhoun, a young, white Tennessee DJ in the 1950’s who falls in love with rock ‘n’ roll and a spirited black singer — two major taboos. Look for lots of scorching rock and blues numbers, and some equally energetic dancing and singing. Performances take place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, at 8 p.m. on Friday, November 30, at 2 & 8 p.m. on Saturday, December 1, and at 1 & 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, December 2. Tickets cost $27.50-$67.50 and are available at the Auditorium Theatre Box Office, by phone at 800-745-3000, and online at ticketmaster.com. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Ribbon Cutting for Tonja’s Personal Touch Hair Salon Featuring Headz Up Hats. Tue., Nov. 27, 12-1 p.m. Headz Up Hats, 524 Mt. Hope Ave. 442-7680. headzuphatsstore.com. [ Wed., November 28 ] Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. Wed., Nov. 28, 6:30 p.m. Piranha Sushi Bar, 682 Park Ave. 3704774. rochesterwinos.com.

Sports *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Wed., November 21 ] Rochester Lancers v. Chicago Soul. Wed., Nov. 21, 7 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com. [ Friday, November 23 ] Rochester Americans v. Albany Devils. Fri., Nov. 23, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com Fri., Nov. 23, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ Saturday, November 24 ] St. Bonaventure Men’s Basketball. Sat., Nov. 24, 4 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

[ Wed., November 28 ] Rochester Americans v. San Antonio Rampage. Wed., Nov. 28, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com Wed., Nov. 28, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater *Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* “A Christmas Carol” Previews and Opening. Nov. 23-28. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Previews Friday Nov 23-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (opencaptioned performance) & 7 p.m., Tue 7 p.m. Opening night Wed Nov 28 7 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Memphis. Nov. 27-29, 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. \. 222-5000. rbtl.org. Motherhood: The Musical. Nov. 23-25. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place . Fri-Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” Through Nov. 21. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 9. Wed Nov 14-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3

The Gregory Kunde Chorale is looking for male voices. Wednesdays. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info line: 377-7568. gregorykundechorale.org.

Workshops

For the Holidays

• Beautiful Centerpieces • Ornaments Galore • Unusual Gifts

• Exceptional Service

360 Culver Road | 271-0610 Mon.-Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 11-3

*Due to the holiday, some venues might be closed. Please call ahead.* [ Wed., November 21 ] Family Development Class: “Who’s Listening?” Wed., Nov. 21, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school age children. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. SAT Practice Test. Wed., Nov. 21, 12:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Bring a calculator & two #2 pencils. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a snack if you wish. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary. org. [ Monday, November 26 ] Family Development Class: “What’s the Magic Word?” Mon., Nov. 26, 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. . For parents of children ages 3-6. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org [ Tuesday, November 27 ] Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. Tuesdays, 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St . 6987784 Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” Tue., Nov. 27, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. . For parents of school-age children. 3253145 x131. mharochester. org

YOU’RE A REAL EYE OPENER For the person who has everything...

[ Wed., November 28 ] Family Development Class: “Did You Hear What I Said?” Wed., Nov. 28, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. . For parents of school age children. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

2929 Monroe Ave. 442-0123 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29

Film Times Fri November 23-Thu November 29

Film

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. ROBOT & FRANK: 7; SEVEN PSYCOPATHS: 8:30; Sat-Sun 4:30.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ARGO: 3:25, 9:35; BREAKING DAWN: 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12, 1:45, 2:15, 4, 4:30, 5, 6:45, 7:15, 7:45, 9:30, 10, 10:30; FLIGHT: 11:50 a.m., 3:30, 6:35, 9:45; LIFE OF PI: 3D 11:45 a.m., 12:15, 4:05, 7, 7:30, 10:05; 2D 4:35, 10:35; LINCOLN: 12:30, 4:15, 8; RED DAWN: 11:05 a.m., 12:25, 1:40, 4:20, 6:50, 7:20, 10:15; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 5:10, 7:25, 9:50, 10:20; 2D 11:10 a.m., 12:10, 1:35, 2:35, 4:10, 6:55, 7:55, 9:20; SKYFALL: 11:20 a.m., 12:05, 2:30, 3:20, 6:40, 7:10, 9:55, 10:25; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 12:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10; 2D 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7:05, 9:40.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor ARGO: 10:30; BREAKING DAWN: 11:15 a.m., 12, 1, 2, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15; FLIGHT: 12:20, 4:05, 7:20, 10:25; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:15, 12:45, 4:20, 6:45, 7:15, 10:10; 2D 3:10, 9:40; LINCOLN: 12:05, 3:35, 6:55, 10:20; RED DAWN: 11:35 a.m., 2:20, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05; 2D 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:10, 9:35; SKYFALL: 11:45 a.m., 12:50, 3:15, 4:10, 6:50, 7:25, 10, 10:40; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 4:30, 9:55; 2D 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 7:05.

The war over the Civil War [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“Lincoln” (PG-13), directed by Steven Spielberg Now playing

Of all our presidents, Abraham Lincoln dominates motion pictures; simply as a character in film, in fact, he ranks in number of appearances up there with such luminaries as Sherlock Holmes and Dracula. (Honest Abe actually encountered some of Dracula’s relatives in the ridiculous “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” of a few months back, and of course dealt with them handily). In his new movie, “Lincoln,” Steven Spielberg therefore confronts

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BREAKING DAWN: 11:15 a.m., 12:55, 2, 4, 4:45, 7, 7:35, 9:50, 10:20; FLIGHT: 12:25, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:35, 1:40, 3:30, 6:35, 7:30, 9:30; 2D 4:35, continues on page 32

one of the most revered figures in our past, one of the most familiar chapters in American history, and the formidable challenge of a long cinematic tradition. The director concentrates his focus on a few months in 1865, as both sides in the Civil War recognized its inevitable outcome, though continuing the butchery, and sought some way to make peace. Aside from the war itself, Lincoln’s major struggle involved his efforts to persuade the Congress to pass the 13th Amendment, declaring the equality of black Americans with their white counterparts. The Senate had already passed the bill, but the Congress, dominated by a coalition of conservative Republicans, for a number of reasons, most of them racist, resisted mightily (sound familiar?). As a result of its particular and rather specialized subject, much of the movie reflects a kind of inside baseball, a close study of the intricacies of governmental behaviors in the day. Lincoln (Daniel DayLewis) and his cabinet meet frequently, arguing about his commitment to the amendment, the

Daniel Day-Lewis in “Lincoln.” PHOTO COURTESY DREAMWORKS PICTURES

by Kathy Bransfield $90

methods to obtain passage, and the tricky business of secret discussions with representatives of the Confederacy suing for peace. Lincoln also enlists a slick team of wheeler-dealers led by W. N. Bilbo (James Spader) to wheedle, threaten, bribe, and corrupt those Congressmen opposed to the amendment. Since Spielberg bases the work partially on Doris Kearns Goodwin’s history, “Team of Rivals,” much of the action stumbles through a clutter of scholarly detail. Since the playwright Tony Kushner wrote the screenplay, far too much of it relies on static, talky, enclosed scenes, full of long, dull, often repetitive conversations. Lincoln must convince his cabinet, especially the skeptical William Seward (David Strathairn), of the moral and political importance of the amendment, which precipitates innumerable arguments among the group, some of them surprisingly disrespectful. The liveliest parts of the film, remarkably, show the Congress in session, a rowdy group of tobacco chewers and vulgar shouters who happily insult their opponents with some wonderfully eloquent phrases while passionately arguing their views. The most powerful orator among them, Thaddeus Stevens (Tommy Lee Jones), a radical Republican and dedicated Abolitionist, leads the fight for passage, throwing rhetorical hand grenades at his opponents with sheer delight in the joy of battle. Avoiding the scenery chewing of “Gangs of New York” and the enigmatic narcissism of “There Will Be Blood,” Daniel Day-Lewis resolutely (and refreshingly) underplays the title role. As anyone

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Partly cloudy “Silver Linings Playbook” (R), written and directed by David O. Russell Coming soon

“Step Up To The Plate” (R), directed by Paul Lacoste Screens Saturday at the Dryden

expects, his Lincoln is thoughtful, introspective, and tormented, dealing with his unstable wife (Sally Field), a son (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) he wants to keep out of the war, and the manifold problems of overseeing a terrible conflict and controlling a recalcitrant Congress. Frequently quoting odd, irrelevant lines from Shakespeare, telling long folksy stories that often puzzle his listeners, he also however seems sly and even Machiavellian, a clever operator on the rough-and-tumble political stage of 1865. Just about everyone in the large supporting cast performs remarkably well, most of them underplaying like the star, but Tommy Lee Jones simply owns all of his scenes, gleefully abusing his enemies in Ciceronian speeches in the House, manipulating the weaklings he must win over, ardently and eloquently arguing his just cause; at times he appears far more engaging than Honest Abe. James Spader, of all people, provides another pleasant surprise, a slick worker doing Lincoln’s dirty work as if he enjoyed the great game of corrupt politics. Despite a story whose triumph and tragedy is known by every schoolchild, the movie maintains its appeal throughout by mixing humor into some of the most serious moments, showing the sometimes ignoble means that Lincoln employed to accomplish his aims. For all his experience and skill, Spielberg misfires at the end, somehow failing to recognize his own thrilling climactic moments and concluding on a disappointing downbeat, as if he missed the point of his own movie, a point we can all understand.

It was literally a dark and stormy night when I saw David O. Russell’s latest, “Silver Linings Playbook,” but that hurricane rain at least helped to rinse away some of the feeling that I had been utterly, completely used. Maybe you too have experienced that tawdry sensation of watching a film, laughing and crying at the appropriate times, only to have it suddenly occur to you that you’ve invested yourself in a lazy, manipulative fairy tale, one almost totally devoid of substance. And I can’t really pinpoint what ultimately yanked me from the escapism, but it made me wish for something more truthful and much less misogynistic. Russell’s follow-up to 2010’s Oscarwinning “The Fighter” stars Bradley Cooper as Pat, who we meet as he’s leaving the Philadelphia psychiatric ward he was sentenced to after beating his wife’s

Bradley Cooper in “Silver Linings Playbook.” PHOTO COURTESY THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

lover. It’s a premature exit, we learn, but the bipolar Pat’s plan is to bunk with his mildly smothering parents (Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver) until he gets back on his feet, a task that includes winning back his estranged wife. Nearly everything that Pat does is with an eye toward that romantic delusion, including the dinner he attends where he trades unfiltered screwball banter with the gorgeous Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a snappish young widow with her own big issues. And as more details about Tiffany emerged, I realized what was happening here: yet another variation on what film critic Nathan Rabin dubbed the Manic Pixie Dream Girl, a male-fantasy archetype who redeems troubled boys with her bold, quirky ways. Tiffany is pushy, hot, argumentative, a tiny bit violent, and of course bisexual, having been fired from her last job for having depression sex with everyone at the office. (Because giving her a less demeaning exit wouldn’t enable Pat to defend her honor.) And Tiffany’s final amazing quality is somewhat of a plot point that I won’t give away. It’s usually men who write characters like this, and there is rarely much honesty to these fabrications, designed to attract lost, horny dudes but in real life too obnoxious to keep them for long. But I digress. Wait; no, I don’t. Remarkably clichéd and borderline offensive in its simplistic handling of mental illness, “Silver Linings Playbook” unfolds exactly as you would expect it to, with tranquil interludes, mad dashes, a politically correct assortment of acquaintances, and some super-screechy family drama. There are probably some excellent performances within all that noise; De Niro in particular does compelling work as Pat’s OCD dad, a frustrating role that, again, doesn’t seem like anyone real. Julia Stiles is wasted as Tiffany’s castrating sister, though none

of the female parts — including “Animal Kingdom” nominee Weaver as Pat’s helplessly doting mom — are terribly flattering. And for his first non-“Rush Hour” role in 15 YEARS, Chris Tucker gets to show white people how to dance. Now, you probably can’t tell from reading this that by the denouement I was as choked up as the rest of the audience, the contrivances having worked their calculated magic. Movies like “Flirting With Disaster” and “I Heart Huckabees” have shown Russell to be a very interesting filmmaker, but “Silver Linings Playbook,” adapted by Russell from a novel by Matthew Quick, is not only sort of generic, but sadly uninspired. The highlight of the movie might actually be Cooper; he transforms those big blue eyes of his into something palpably unhinged, and he sustains it throughout the film. His Pat feels lived-in and broken, though not irreparably so, pinning his hopes on what didn’t work before because the choice between familiarity and fear is a tricky one. Blend the peek at the creative process

in “elBulli: Cooking In Progress” with the familial concerns of “Jiro Dreams Of Sushi,” and you’ve got “Step Up To The Plate” (or the better French title, “Entre Les Bras”). It’s a lovely, lyrically shot documentary that spends four seasons with renowned chef Michel Bras as he prepares to retire from his restaurant in Aveyron and pass his formidable legacy — along with three coveted Michelin stars — onto son Sébastien, a 40something family man who inherited his father’s exacting talent. There are a few unnecessarily extended interludes of the two men thinking, but, fortunately, even more scenes of them bickering, which illustrate what we suspect: Michel respects Séba as a peer, and he’s nowhere near ready to stop raging against the dying of the [pilot] light.

SPIRITED AWAY

Friday, Nov. 23, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 25, 2 p.m.

Miyazaki’s Academy Award®-winning masterpiece Spirited Away helped redefine the possibilities of animation for American audiences and a generation of new filmmakers. Wandering through an abandoned carnival site, 10-year-old Chichiro is separated from her parents and stumbles into a dream-like spirit world where she is put to work in a bathhouse for the gods, a place where all kinds of nonhuman beings come to refresh, relax and recharge. Combining Japanese mythology with Through the Looking Glass whimsy, Spirited Away cemented Miyazaki’s reputation as an icon of inspired animation and wondrous, lyrical storytelling. (Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 2002, 125 min.)

Photo courtesy Photofest

[ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

THE WRONG MAN

Wednesday, Nov. 28, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Miyazaki

Hitchcock based this gripping, often overlooked thriller on the true story of an unassuming bass player (played by a remarkably austere Henry Fonda) whose life becomes a nightmare after he’s misidentified as a hold-up man. As the evidence against him mounts, his world begins to crumble — as does the sanity of his wife (a stunning Vera Miles). (Alfred Hitchcock, US 1956, 105 min.)

True Crime

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31

10:25; LINCOLN: 12:05, 3:25, 6:45, 10:05; RED DAWN: 11:35 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 7:55, 10:35; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5, 7:45, 10:10; 2D 11:25 a.m., 1:50, 4:20, 7:10, 9:35; SKYFALL: 12:15, 12:45, 3:40, 4:10, 6:50, 7:20, 10, 10:30; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 4:50, 9:55; 2D 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 7:25.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. ARGO: 8:40; BREAKING DAWN: 11:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 1:20, 2:20, 2:50, 3:20, 4:20, 5:20, 6:20, 7:20, 8:20, 9:20, 10:20, 11:10, 12 a.m.; FLIGHT: 12, 3:15, 6:25, 9:30; JAB TAK HAI JAAN: 2:25, 6:05, 9:40; LIFE OF PI: 3D 11:35 a.m., 1:30, 2:50, 4:25, 5:50, 7:25, 9, 10:30, 11:40; 2D 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 10; LINCOLN: 11:55 a.m., 3:25, 6:45, 10:10; RED DAWN: 11:05 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 6:35, 7:40, 9:25, 10:25, 11:55; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 11:40 a.m., 2:30, 3:10, 5:10, 8, 10:35; 2D 11 a.m., 12:40, 1:40, 4:20, 6:10, 7:10, 9:40, 11:55; SKYFALL: 11:10 a.m., 12:10, 2:40, 3:40, 6, 6:30, 7, 9:10, 9:45, 10:15, 11:20; SON OF SARDAAR: 11:15 a.m.; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 1:10, 3:50; 2D 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05.

The Little 258-04 240 East Ave.  ARGO: 7 (except Tue, Wed.),

9:30; Sat-Sun 12:10, Sun 3:10; CURLY SUE: Sat 11/24 10; A LATE QUARTET: 6:50, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 3:20; LIFE OF PI: 6:40, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30; LINCOLN: 6:30 (except Mon), 9:40; also Sat-Sun 12, 3; SOLAR MAMAS: Mon 11/26 7; THE SESSIONS: 7:20, 9:35; also SatSun 12:50, 3:50; TOM WOLFE: GETS BACK TO BLOOD: Sat 11/24 3, Tue 11/27 7.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ARGO: 2:20, 5, 7:40; also FriSun 11:40 a.m., Fri-Sat 10:20; BREAKING DAWN: 1:35, 4:15, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:40; FLIGHT: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 10:20; LIFE OF PI: 3D 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; 2D 1:50; LINCOLN: 1:40, 4:50, 8; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 4:30; also Fri-Sat 9:10; 2D 2:10, 6:50; also Fri-Sun 11:50 a.m.; THE SESSIONS: 12:25, 3:10, 5:25, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:05; SKYFALL: 1, 4:05, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 10:15; WRECK-IT RALPH: 1:30, 4, 6:40; also Fri-Sat 9:10.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ARGO: 11:30 a.m., 4:55, 10:10; BREAKING DAWN: 11:15 a.m., 12:15, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15; FLIGHT: 12:20, 3:50, 7:05, 10:10; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 11:50 a.m., 6:50; HOTEL

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

32 City november 21-27, 2012

TRANSYLVANIA: 10:25 a.m.; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12, 1:40, 3:10, 6:25, 8, 9:35; 2D 10:30 a.m., 4:50; LINCOLN: 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10; RED DAWN: 11 a.m., 12:10, 1:25, 2:40, 3:55, 5:10, 6:25, 7:40, 8:55, 10:05; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 12:05, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15; 2D 10:45 a.m., 1:25, 4:05, 6:40, 9:15; THE SESSIONS: 11:55 a.m., 5, 9:55; SKYFALL: IMAX: 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:15; NON-IMAX: 10:15 a.m., 1:30, 2:35, 4:45, 8:05, 9:30; TAKEN 2: 2:25, 7:45; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 2:15, 7:20; 2D 10 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:20.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. ARGO: 4:40; BREAKING DAWN: 12:30, 2, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7, 8; also Fri-Sat 9:30, 10:30; also Fri-Sun 10 a.m., 11:15 a.m.; FLIGHT: 1:45, 4:50, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:50; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12, 3:15, 6:30; also Fri-Sat 9:15; 2D 1:30, 4:20, 7:30, also Fri-Sat 10:15; also Fri-Sun 10:30 a.m.; LINCOLN: 1, 4:10, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 10:20; RED DAWN: 2:45, 5:15, 8:15; also Fri-Sat 10:25; also Fri-Sun 11:45 a.m.; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 12:15, 1:10, 2:30, 3:30, 5, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30; also Fri-Sat 10, 11; also Fri-Sun 11 a.m., 11:45 a.m.; SKYFALL: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 9:50, 10:40; WRECK-IT RALPH: 1:20, 2:15, 4:05, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:40; also Fri-Sun 10:15 a.m., 11:30 a.m.

Apartments for Rent 2BDRM APARTMENT Upstairs unit. Off-street parking and Attic for daytime use. Available December 1st. Rent is $650+ RG&E Call 414-4718

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BONNIE AND CLYDE (1967): Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty play the legendary Depression-era couple who robs banks in Arthur Penn’s then-controversial crime flick, now considered a taboobusting landmark in filmmaking. Dryden (Wed, Nov 21, 8 p.m.) AN INN IN TOKYO (1935): This early neorealist silent film by Japanese auteur Yasujirô Ozu is a tale of survival about an unemployed workman and his two sons who cross paths with a widow and her young daughter. Dryden (Tue, Nov 27, 8 p.m.) A LATE QUARTET (R): Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener, and Christopher Walken star in the debut feature from Yaron Silberman, a drama about the upheaval that ensues among a close-knit group of classical musicians when one of them receives a life-changing diagnosis. Little LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster

RED DAWN (PG-13): North Korea replaces the Soviet Union as the bad guy in this remake of the 80’s classic (was it really?) about a bunch of teenagers who band together to save their town from invading forces. With Chris Hemsworth, Josh Peck, and Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG): Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin, and Isla Fisher provide some of the voices for this animated adventure about what happens when Jack Frost joins up with Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, and others to prevent an evil spirit from taking over the world. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): The latest from David O. Russell (2010’s “The Fighter”) is a comedy-drama about a former teacher (Bradley Cooper) who gets entangled with a troubled young woman (Jennifer Lawrence) after his release from a mental institution. With Robert DeNiro, Jacki Weaver, and Chris Tucker. SPIRITED AWAY (2002): The first anime film to win an Oscar was Hayao Miyazaki’s adventure about a young girl who enters an alternate reality where her parents have been turned into pigs, forcing her to outsmart a witch and save her family. Dryden (Fri, Nov 23, 8 p.m., and Sun, Nov 25, 2 p.m.) STEP UP TO THE PLATE (2011):

ART GALLERY AREA Writers & Books neighborhood. Bright, Large 1bdrm apartment, with study and high ceilings, laundry. Available now. $650/month+ utilities. 908-510-0269 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice

neighbors, laundry, convenient to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888.

maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $440 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806

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[ CONTINUING ] THE SESSIONS (R): From writerdirector Ben Lewin comes this drama starring John Hawkes as a man in an iron lung who hires a professional sex surrogate (Helen Hunt) to help him lose his virginity. Co-starring William H. Macy. Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster

Classifieds Shared Housing

THE

This documentary allows us to observe as acclaimed French chef Michel Bras decides to retire and turn over his Michelin three-star restaurant to his son Sébastien, who has been working with him for 15 years. Dryden (Sat, Nov 24, 8 p.m.) TOM WOLFE GETS BACK TO BLOOD (NR): This documentary spends time with the literary giant in the iconic white suit as he researches his latest novel in Miami. Little

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-3838888

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Land for Sale 20 ACRES FREE Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN) 25,000 SQUARE FOOT BARN + 15 ACRES ONLY $89,900! Bring your horses- it’s ready to go! Level, open land with beautiful views! Additional 60 acres next door available at a discount! Call (888)701-7509. www.newyorklandandlakes.com ABANDONED FARM + 60 ACRES- $79,900! Beautiful trout stream, awesome valley views, quality hardwood timber, great hunting! Below market price! Call (888)905-8847. www.newyorklandandlakes.com FORT PLAIN NY: 33.4 acres hilltop view $69,000.  9.3 acres panoramic views $22,000. 3.6 acres $13,000. Owner financing Great Investment www. helderbergrealty.com  CALL, Henry Whipple: 518-861-6541 HUNTING LAND / CABIN BARGAIN 3 Acres w/ “Cozy Cabin”-$19,995 or $157/ month* 5 Acres w/ Adirondack StyleCabin-$29,995 or $236/month* State land close by, great hunting, fishing & snowmobiling. Call 1-800-2297843 or visit LANDANDCAMPS. COM *20% down, 8.49% rate, 15 years

Commercial/ Office Space

Retirement Property

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

DELAWARE: For Sale Several NEW Ranch Homes!

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

continues on page 34

MIND K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

BODY Light-Filled House SPIRIT Awaiting a New Family THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23

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See Page 12 of this week’s issue

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

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Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Greece: 480 Shorecliff Dr. $116,500. 2054 sq ft, 3 bed 2.5 ba Split level. Lots of updates.

RochesterSells.com

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Laura Casserino

RE/MAX Realty Group Real Estate Professional LauraCasserino@Remax.net 880-8350

150 Dorchester Road Wide windows let in abundant light to the spacious rooms of the two-story home at 150 Dorchester Road. Built in 1914 and located in the heart of Browncroft, one of Rochester’s proudest and loveliest neighborhoods, this five-bedroom, 2,436 square-foot dwelling awaits a family that will enjoy its many assets. New owners might also be pleased to learn that the house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Browncroft Historic District, allowing repairs and updates to the home to qualify for the state Historic Homeowner Tax Credit program. A wide, columned entrance porch provides an elegant welcome to this well-designed home. The front door and inside vestibule are both enhanced by graceful leadedglass sidelights. Throughout the house the gleaming hardwood floors and classic crown and baseboard molding define the rooms. In the living room, a working fireplace is flanked by substantial bookcases with diamondpatterned leaded-glass doors. The pattern is repeated in the three decorative windows on the side of the room. A bay window looks out on the serene streetscape. The large front hall leads to an unusual feature: an original downstairs bedroom with a complete bath and a large closet. From the hallway a generous stairway, with a landing lit by tall windows, leads upstairs. There, the four ample bedrooms and a full bath will easily house a large family. A smaller family will find welcome space for an office. The unfinished attic offers an opportunity for expansion.

Downstairs, the dining room is noteworthy for its handsome walls set off by wide panels topped by a dish rail. On the attractive curved ceiling are narrow bands of wood, carved in a fruit and flower motif. A bay window with window seats and two large front windows complete this appealing room. Between the dining room and the kitchen is an old-fashioned pantry with glass-fronted cabinets that extend from the counters to the ceiling. The kitchen opens to the back hallway where a stairway leads to the basement, with a workbench, washer and dryer, and storage shelves at the ready. The back door leads to a compact yard bordered by perennials. The garage, built in 1975, can hold two cars with room to spare. This house has been owned by generations of the Kaiser family. Its best-known resident was Dr. Albert D. Kaiser [1887-1955], one of the most distinguished and influential pediatricians and public health officers in Rochester in the 20th century. 150 Dorchester Rd. is listed through Mark Siwiec of Nothnagle Realtors for $209,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving. com/property/R191834 or contact Mark at marksiwiec@gmail.com, 585-218-MARK. by Mitzie Collins Mitzie teaches music history through the Eastman Community Music School and lives in the 19th Ward.

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33

Home and Garden Professionals FALL/WINTER

CONTRACT SPECIALS Limited Contracts Available. • DISCOUNTED YARD CLEAN-UP W/SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT INCLUDED: starting at $350 • SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT: starting at $200 • SINGLE-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $45 • 2-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $75

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ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. > page 33

DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience FULLY INSURED LEAD CERTIFIED

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Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including:

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• Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

WINTER IS ON ITS WAY! Clean your chimney for the upcoming burning season!

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

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• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

SUN WORLD CONSTRUCTION Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting

INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs. Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

(585) 328-3832

Michael Mincher Serving Monroe County since 1977

Affordable

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414-3692

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ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

34 City november 21-27, 2012

DISCOVER DELAWARE’S distinctive, gated community.  Larger than life amenities - equestrian facility and Olympic pool. New Homes mid $40’s. Low taxes. Brochures available  1-866-6290770 or www.coolbranch.com.

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Ceilings & Drywall

Fully Insured

Master Elite workmanship at wholesale pricing.

55+Peaceful Country setting with all amenities included. Low 100’s, low taxes Call Today: 302-659-5800 www. bonayrehomes.com and www. lenapebuilders.net

100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future.  Expenses paid.  Private.  Legal.  Jenny 1-866-751-3377 PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if adoption is your plan, choose from loving, pre-approvedm families. Call Joy: 866-922-3678. www. ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org.

Automotive 1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE SS 396/350HP, original, $7400 OBO, email or call for details: dychyar8@ msn.com / 607-214-0053. ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda

Lost?

Find your way home with SEE OUR

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 33

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903 BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480

band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089

BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com

THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a second lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

Jam Section

MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784

2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call

CHECK OUT

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Fast and easy-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! • Clickable links to business websites • and many more features!

go to

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM and click on

“CLASSIFIEDS”

CITY

585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. GET A FREE VACATION BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to Dvar. Maximize your IRS deductions and help teens in crisis. Call: 1800-338-6724 HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings. At 1-800-653-2276 or WWW. Woodfordbros.com NEW INVENTIONS and Product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-428-5116 Today. Fee-based service. SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N THE SOMALI COMMUNITY In Western NY is looking for a volunteer sewing instructor for a small refugee class meeting Thursdays, 12:30-4:15, 71 Parkway, Rochester. Contact: Sadiya Omar, 585-576-7329.

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. Liar Obama ruins U.S. economy, responsible for 8.3% unemployment rate, encourages class envy and racial division. Pits gay against straight. His record sucks. Worst president ever. Vote this American hating fraud out! 585-747-2699

Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck. Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214-514-1040

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 AN INTERNATIONAL COMPANY Expanding in your area seeks serious individuals interested in pt/ft business opportunity call 570 856 1315 or e-mail nansk55@gmail.com or visit www.goherbalife.com/decnorm/en-US

DRIVER $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashionn Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) MARKET RESEARCH Participants Wanted Need market research

continues on page 36

IS Business/Systems Analyst Systems analysis for Finance and Procurement. Functional & technical exp with MasterSaf finance and tax functions and Softway import & export, Nota Fiscal. Resume to Eleanor Lathan, Carestream Health, Inc., 150 Verona Street, Rochester, NY 14608 attn: job #1122B.

SERVICES

Answer the call. Seasonal Drivers

Kelly Services® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. FedEx expects to have its busiest day in history on Monday, Dec.10, when it moves a projected 280 million shipments globally. For the overall holiday season between Thanksgiving and Christmas they expect an increase in personnel by approximately 20,000.

BE PART OF THIS RECORD BREAKING SEASON! Minimum six months experience driving like-sized commercial vehicle within last three years required. One year commercial driving experience strongly preferred. • 21 years or older • Customer service skills Inquire in person: Mon-Fri 10-am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY 14585 or email resume to: Tempupny@yahoo.com EOE rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 35 participants to evaluate local establishments.  Apply FREE: shop. bestmark.com or call 800-969-8477

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for

citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 5467220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers.

Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org HORSE SANTUARY in Pavilion, NY requests volunteers during holiday season. Volunteers must love animals. Call Chris at (585) 5848210 for more information. HUNDREDS OF VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. A mandatory volunteer training is

required for all new volunteers, which will be held on a date to be determined at the Camp Good Days’ Headquarters in Mendon, for those wishing to volunteer in the Rochester area. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays.org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www.campgooddays.org. LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to

improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 2426547 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a

36 City november 21-27, 2012

small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

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Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is Zolala, LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on October 16, 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 656 Kayleigh Drive, Webster, NY 14580 [ LEGAL NOTICE VG CAPITAL GROUP LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Capital Group LLC was filed with SSNY on July 20, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 10N2 ASSOCIATES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 100 Cummings Center, Suite 333C, Beverly, MA 01915. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1665 PENFIELD ROAD LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 75 Langpath Rd., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 5, 2012. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC, PO Box 183, North Chili, New York 14514. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. Please direct all correspondence to the address below. [ NOTICE ] 3800 RIDGE ROAD WEST LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail

a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] BROOKDALE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS FABRICATION, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS WEBSTER MACHINING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CORNWALL ROCHESTER NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/31/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606,which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] EAGLE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-14282 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. The Estate of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell; Any persons who are heirs or distributees of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may

be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; Board of Managers of the Scarborough House Condominium; Matthew Korytko; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 22, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on December 19, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 1000 East Avenue, Unit 106, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.37-12./106, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10047 of Deeds, page 66. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $42,134.50 plus but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2012Dean J. Fero, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KALPIN’S AUTO CARE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Nicholas Kalpin 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613. [ NOTICE ] KING PROPERTIES NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/17/12. Office in Monroe

Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Lead Pipe Productions LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/16/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC at 23 Maricrest Drive., Rochester, NY 14616. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Legal Notice of Formation of LLC. Long Pond Road II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gerald F. Stack, Esq., Hiscock & Barclay, LLP, One Park Place, 300 South State Street, Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose: any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] MANAGED SERVICES TEAM LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 72 Cascade Drive, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Peter Ferrari, 6 Dover Ct., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form of SAGER DRIVE PROPERTIES, LLC Art. of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 University Ave. Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Blue Wave Properties, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of

process to 19 Eaglesfield Wy, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Local Seasons LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/24/2012. County: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to LLC. 2160 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by OPA! ROCHESTER INCORPORATED dba OPA AUTHENTIC GREEK KOOZINA,1175 Jefferson Rd., Rochester NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by DAMACA INC dba Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Road., Fairport NY 14450, County of Monroe, for a Sports Bar & Grill. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Brewski’s LLC dba Brewski’s Food & Drinks, 5019 W. Ridge Road, Spencerport, NY 14559, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by PARMA JOHNNYS LLC dba PARMA JOHNNY, 1600 LYELL AVE SUITE C., Rochester NY 14606, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an order by the Supreme Court, Monroe County, on the 31st day of October 2012, bearing Index #12-11780, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, grants me the right, effective on the 31st day of October, 2012, to assume the name of Jarrett Walker Metzger. My present address is 245 Chartwell Court, Rochester, NY 14618; the place of my birth is Rochester, New York; my present name is Jarrett Kade Walker.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation Design Builders of Monroe County LLC. Articles of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 Universtiy Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Almar Affiliate Marketing, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 136 Princess Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AMERIGLIDE OF ROCHESTER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Atimesa Studios LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Salil Athalye, 7 Brewster Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, also the registered agent.. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Brown Simmons LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10/18/2012. Office Location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 21 Lawndale Terrace, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BURRIS CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Clearview Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CASUALS

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JA PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/2012. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 E. Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Owning and managing real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JJ ZEBs, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/6/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 388 Mason Road, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of KULIG, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o William S. Ruby, Esq., 70 Linden Oaks, Suite 300, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of L&B Fabricators, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 10/31/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 W. Main St., STE 246, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name:WISEMEN ENTERPRISES LLC. Articles of Organization file with Secretary of State of New York on: 05/31/2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State of New York shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at

67 Elwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is RT Fitz LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on July 6 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 580 Colebrook Drive Rochester, NY 14617 6. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 140 VINAL, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has be en designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 415 Murwood Lane,Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MAXIM MINI MART LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC : 264 Clifford Ave., Rochester, NY 14621 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MDMS Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 194 Old English Dr., Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MFP 126 CAYUGA STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

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Legal Ads > page 37 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN HOLT RD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evan & Fox, LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of One Way Enterprises I LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y

of State (SSNY) 9/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to One Way Enterprises, 8376 Merriman Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RAM NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon

Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Property Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Real Estate, LLC, Art.

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of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER APARTMENT MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROW HOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: J. Loftus, 69 Cascade Dr., Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOIL STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 36 Draffin Rd., Hilton, NY 144689708. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Monroe Fluid Technology, Inc. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Thrombophilic Consultants LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/12. Office location, County of Monroe. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and mailed to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Av., Ste. 202 Brooklyn, NY, 11228 . Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WESTSIDE DRIVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

38 City november 21-27, 2012

SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 5656 Chili Riga Center Road, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Whittermore Point Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of AdvizeX Partners I, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 9/20/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 9724 Wolf Creek Dr., Irving, TX 75063-5032. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Canal Front Capital Management, LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10 Little Acorn Cir., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC formed in DE on 11/14/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Canal Front Capital Management, LLC, 10 Little Acorn Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Business Filings Inc., 108 West 13th St.,Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of HCP SH ELP2 PROPERTIES, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.

of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE BERRY COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 11/16/11. Princ. office of LLC: 160 Inverness Dr. West, Ste. 400, Englewood, CO 80112. NYS fictitious name: BERRCO ADVERTISING, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Arts. of Org. filed with CO Dept. of State, 1700 Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] QUINZI PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/10/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Peter Quinzi 822 McKinley St. East Rochester, NY 14445 Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] STUDIO QI, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/25/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2111 EMPIRE BLVD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 2111 Empire Blvd LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/9/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 849 Lehigh Station Road, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Back of 1075, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is Back of 1075, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be

in Monroe County. The street address of the limited liability company’s office is 1023 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on December 31, 2010. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. Attn: James T. Townsend, Esq. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] CARPETNOMICS OF WNY, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on November 2, 2012 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 83 Dessie Heights, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Rochester Brainery LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has

been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to theLLC at 119 Sylvester Street, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Barbara and Michael Hanna Family, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMOKE SIGNALS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Smoke Signals Performance Products LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF STRATEGIC CHANGE & INNOVATION, LLC ] Strategic Change & Innovation, LLC was filed with SSNY on 10/05/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 315 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ZYAIR PROPERTIES, LLC ] Zyair Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 09/14/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 133 Rosemary Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.

Fun [ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD In October, state alcohol agents, assisted by local police in full riot gear, pointing their weapons, raided a bar in Largo, Fla., to shut down the latest gathering of the venerable Nutz Poker League, even though its players do not wager. (They meet at bars and restaurants, where management gives winners token gifts in exchange for the increased business.) A prosecutor told the Tampa Bay Times that Florida law defines illegal “gambling” as any game that permits players to win something -- even if they don’t have to “ante up.” The raid (during which players were ordered to keep their hands where the officers could see them) came after a months-long undercover investigation.

Recurring Themes

— Among the most creative illegal behaviors are those of clever smugglers -- or immigrants trying to enter a country illegally. In September, two Moroccans tried to smuggle a Guinean man into Spain at the Melilla border in north Morocco by disguising him as a Renault car seat. One Moroccan drove, with the passenger perched on a seat in which the foam had been removed to make room for the Guinean. A police spokesman called the attempt “novel.” — India’s notorious bureaucracy records deaths particularly ineptly, to the advantage of men seeking an alternative to divorce. They find it easier merely to swear out a death certificate on one wife so they can marry another, but that means the first wife will face years, and maybe decades, of campaigning to convince officials that she is not dead. BBC News chronicled the plight of Ms. Asharfi Devi, now 64, in September as she was finally declared “alive” after being deserted by her husband at age 23 and ruled dead at age 40. After Devi finally earned a hearing and brought relatives and evidence to the village council, deliberations took eight more months. Notwithstanding the ruling, the husband stuck to his story.

— Puzzingly, adults continue to accidentally ingest improbable objects, often seemingly unaware of what they did. Lee Gardner, 40, of Barnsley, England, swallowed a plastic fork 10 years ago, but said he “forgot” about it until violent stomach pains forced him to the hospital in August. And British student Georgie Smith, 19, became the latest person to accidentally swallow a regular-sized toothbrush (though the first doctor she consulted told her he couldn’t spot any “toothbrush” on an X-ray). (With kids, the phenomenon is more understandable. Sinus-suffering Isaak Lasson, 6, of Salt Lake City was finally diagnosed in August to have accidentally stuck a Lego piece up his nose three years ago, and Hector Flores Jr., 7, of New York City, was found in October to have swallowed the whistle mechanism of a plastic duck, causing him to tweet when he laughed.) — Again this year, a serial drowning made the news (where one jumps in to rescue another, and a third is needed to rescue the first two, and a fourth, and none survives.) In Ulster, Northern Ireland, in September, rugby player Nevin Spence, along with his brother and father, died in a slurry tank on the family’s farm, and their sister, who also attempted a rescue, was hospitalized. Officials said they could not determine the order in which the men entered the pit until the sister was well enough to talk. — Darren Hieber, 33, became the most recent person to choose drastic means to reconcile with an ex. Twice Hieber, of Onawa, Iowa, arranged to have himself shot in order to win his ex-wife’s sympathy. The first hit man shot Hieber in the leg, but the wife still ignored him, and a second job was arranged in March, with two different shooters, but that failed, also. Adding to his frustration, Hieber was sentenced to 10 years in prison in August because it is illegal in Iowa to have yourself shot.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 34 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t jump to conclusions when it comes to love. Reserve judgment, do your research and wait for signs that will help you recognize whether you are considering someone who will have a positive or negative influence on your life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Opposites do attract, and you are likely to find that you are faced with trying to decide whether you can spend the rest of your life with someone who has little in common with you. Focus on what does attract you and if it’s sufficient. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Avoid moving too quickly if someone

entices you. Truth and motives will be questionable. Don’t fall for smooth talk or a hard-luck story. Keep your wits about you, and do your research before you jump into an intimate situation that might lead to heartache. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Socialize and enjoy the company of people who share your interests and beliefs. Sticking to traditions that you are comfortable with will help ensure that you choose someone who will fit into your lifestyle easily. Love is highlighted, so don’t be shy -- make the first move. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Travel to a

destination that will be conducive to reconnecting with an old flame or will bring you the opportunity to meet someone exotic or unusual. Change is what you need in order to lift your spirits and forget darker days. It’s time to play. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Emotions will be close to the surface, and discovering someone who intrigues you and holds your interest for hours on end is in the stars. Travel to meet someone new and discuss your personal plans and life goals. Greater stability and security is within reach. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t be disturbed by a change of plans.

Go with the flow, knowing that what doesn’t work out is a blessing in disguise. You need more time to consider an old relationship and if, in fact, you should turn back the clock and reunite with someone you still long for. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your unique, mysterious demeanor will attract a lot of attention. Make sure that the person you are pursuing is free and clear of a past relationship before making a move. Getting hooked on someone who is involved with someone else will not end well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): What you agree to and what

you want will differ. You have to be honest about your likes and dislikes if you want to end up with someone who thinks like you and enjoys the same things. Don’t let someone from your past confuse you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t make snap decisions when it comes to love. You have to do your due diligence even when you heart is telling you to move forward. Not everyone you meet will be straightforward regarding feelings and plans. Protect your heart and your possessions. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Stick close to home and spend

time with the person who makes you feel most comfortable. Venturing out and meeting new people isn’t likely to bring you in contact with anyone who can offer you what you need or want personally, romantically or emotionally. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Love and romance are highlighted. Don’t sit home waiting for someone to knock on your door. Get out and do the things you enjoy doing most, and you will connect with someone emotionally and physically and with regard to your plans and personal goals.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39

40 City november 21-27, 2012


November 21-27, 2012 - City Newspaper