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EVENTS: HOLIDAY BAZAAR, WARREN MILLER’S “FLOW STATE” 18 THEATER: “SISTER’S CHRISTMAS CATECHISM” @ GEVA 18 FILM: “SKYFALL,” POLISH FILM FESTIVAL 24 URBAN JOURNAL: THE NEXT FOUR YEARS

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 35

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OCUPANTHER

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

Vol 42 No 10

News. Music. Life.

We’d like the school district to stop trying new ideas on us.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Rochester wants more homeowners. NEWS, PAGE 4

Prez election boosts local pols. NEWS, PAGE 5

Love and advocacy for Lake Ontario. NEWS, PAGE 6

Lights, treats, presents: Holiday Guide 2012. INSIDE

FEATURE | BY DAYNA PAPALEO | PAGE 9 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Food trucks seek their space Though chuck wagons are by no means a new way of grubbing up, sometime in 2008 the modern breed of food trucks rolling around New York and Los Angeles began garnering oodles of attention thanks to inspired menus and a canny mastery of social networking that enabled them to attract ravenous throngs with a mere tweet. Then the media chimed in with reality-TV shows and breathless articles about innovative chefs creating their own opportunities outside the restaurant realm.

After the phenomenal success of this year’s two Food Truck Rodeos at the Rochester Public Market — the October installment boasted the participation of more than a dozen of these wheeled meal dealies — at this point it’s fair to say Rochester officially has a scene. The popularity of local food trucks is no longer in question. The major issue now, for both food-truck owners and City of Rochester officials, is defining locations where the trucks can do business.

Feedback BUY - SELL

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES 1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers Tues-Sat 11-6 PM, Thurs ‘til 8 PM

244-1999 • Theantiqueguy.com

We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Give students a voice

We are MAD, Making a Difference, a youth group of Rochester School District high school students. We are not lab rats. We’d like the school district to stop trying new ideas on us. We understand that there are needs for improvement but wish they were not thrown at us all at once. This year, when some schools were closed or reorganized, many of us were forced to change schools, take a different bus, learn new scheduling, and meet new faculty. Some of us were taken out of our comfort zone. After years of becoming familiar with the students and staff of our high schools, we had to start over and build new relationships. For future reference, we feel we should have a say before decisions to close or change our schools are finalized. Since these decisions affect us, we wish the district could take the time to ask how we feel. Here are some questions district officials should consider: What do students need? What are students interested in? How do students feel about our school’s neighborhood? How do students like the food? Do students feel safe? Do students have a voice when it comes to education? We hope the district tries to understand our perspective before making any future changes. REBECCA PEREZ, SHEARLY MADERA, BIANCA MARTINEZ, JUANITA VALAZQUEZ, ROCHESTER

Daydreaming

What I really want for Christmas is a three-month election season. ROSE O’KEEFE, ROCHESTER

The fights downtown

As much as I agree with sending students to schools within their neighborhoods, I don’t understand how it can happen when a number of students come from nomadic households (“Fights Return to Downtown,” News Blog). A student may live on Genesee Street at the  City

November 14-20, 2012

start of the school year but by the end of the school year he/she has had three different addresses in three different zip codes within the city. As for mass numbers of students downtown and the fights that take place because of it, maybe the district should go back to busing students back to their neighborhoods on school busses instead of using RTS. I also say that many students fight downtown because they believe they can get away with it. If the district would begin deploying school officials who know the students to the downtown area during these student transitions, the students will be less likely to fight because they can be identified. OWENS F. SHEPARD

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Fixing the US voting system

I agree with the strategy to change the US Constitution to defang rampant corporate abuse of power (“America for Sale,” News). But I would go further and bring the US voting process and technology into the 21st century. For the same reason that we have federal standards for our national highway and railway systems, our nation can and must nationalize its voting system. Like 32 other democracies in the world, the USA can “mandate” that its citizens exercise their democratic right to vote. Remember the no-smoking mandates and seatbelt mandates that we thought could never happen here? Until they did, and saved many lives. To eliminate waiting lines, the voting process must be re-engineered as an on-line application, like what the DMV and IRS provide to citizens today. Models of efficient on-line voting systems can be found in the Netherlands, Australia, and Canada. The net effect of a more efficient voting system will be to eliminate the need for exorbitant tax-dollar funding, volunteers, and voters’ time required to exercise our voting obligation. And it virtually guarantees that every citizen has an opportunity to vote; no more excuses. It also eliminates the lure of partisan politicians and vendors to “game” the system. Is this “mandate” too draconian for American sensibilities? Consider that the bi-annual Rube Goldberg system that hobbles US voters today is exponentially

more draconian. We can shed this albatross before we are forced to endure one more election debacle. JOHN JONGEN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Politics and transit

I had the opportunity to visit two upstate train stations this past year, one in Utica and the other in Syracuse (“Runaway Train Station?” News). The Utica station is a beautiful, old-school station reminiscent of Grand Central. It even has pillars saved from the Grand Central renovation. It’s located in the heart of downtown and is a cornerstone in the community and serves both bus and rail passengers. The Syracuse station is located at the Syracuse Regional Transportation Station, a brand new, modern intermodal facility. It is nestled next to the rail line and Route 81 near the regional market, baseball stadium, and Carousel Mall, which makes it very accessible to the community. There are ample parking and services, and it too serves both bus and rail passengers. Years of squabbling over Renaissance Square, a project that never made sense, held Rochester back for a long time when it comes to a bus terminal. Once Renaissance Square was rightfully tabled, the RTS Transit Center on Mortimer Street came into play, even when Louise Slaughter and Tom Richards were calling for a intermodal station a half-mile away that would serve both bus and rail passengers. How, as a community, did we let this happen? Partisan politics and lack of vision by some of our leaders and RGRTA seems to be the answer. We need to get beyond the politics and do what is right for the community. I hope it’s not to late for a Rochester Intermodal Station. While Mayor Richards is right in backing the intermodal station, he’s part of the problem when it comes to moving forward with MCC moving to State Street, where there is plenty of parking and space to grow, not to mention the boost it would give to the High Falls. I hope we can get beyond the politics and squabbling and drop the notion that MCC belongs in the Sibley Building. It’s time to move forward and not repeat the mistakes of Renaissance Square. MARTIN PETRELLA

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News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 14-20, 2012 Vol 42 No 10 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

urban journal | by mary anna towler

The next four years The 2012 election provided plenty of reasons to celebrate, Barack Obama’s re-election only one of them. A record number of women in the Senate. The first openly gay Senator. A House of Representatives with more Latinos, more Asian-Americans, three new openly gay members…. Also worth celebrating: the stunning dedication of voters, some of whom stood in line for six hours – until 1 o’clock in the morning – continuing to stand and wait even though the election’s outcome was clear. In areas hit by Hurricane Sandy, storm-traumatized people found their way to makeshift voting precincts and voted. By candlelight. Wonderful, wonderful stuff. But the election also left some very troublesome debris. Among the problems: the amount of money spent on campaigns. It’s a hoot that the efforts of Karl Rove, Sheldon Adelson, and the like bore so little fruit. But that’s in part because Democrats and their supporters spent plenty of money themselves. The money that went into campaign advertising was unconscionable, and there’s little reason to hope for change. Second: this was the ugliest campaign I can remember. We might dismiss the pronouncements of people like Donald Trump, but Mitt Romney’s lies weren’t coming from the fringe. Nor, locally, were the direct-mail pieces aimed at Democrat Ted O’Brien, painting a decent, honorable man as siding with people who sexually abuse women and children. But a third problem may be more serious, and will be harder to overcome: that is the deep, deep division in the country. The scene captured by television cameras at the Romney and Obama Election Night rallies in Boston and Chicago said it all. The Romney supporters were almost exclusively middle-aged and older. And white. The people cheering and crying in McCormick Center in Chicago were young, old, black, Hispanic, Asian, white…. This, of course, is how the vote broke. America is a multi-racial, multi-cultural nation – in some places. The red-blue voter map seems to get more startling with each new election. With a few exceptions, the blue states flank the shores of the Atlantic (north of the Mason-Dixon line) and Pacific Oceans. Except for the Midwestern cities, the vast expanse of the interior and southern United States is heavily red. And even in solidly blue states like New York, get very far out from the cities and you’re in red country. We are a nation at once diverse and segregated, a nation that both prides itself on

We are a nation at once diverse and segregated, a nation that both prides itself on its melting-potted nature and fears it.” its melting-potted nature and fears it. This is not new, nor is the outright hatred that some Americans feel for others. But it is a serious problem, and it will make it more difficult for the president and Congress to face the enormous challenges that are ahead. Wealth disparity, infrastructure decay, education, climate change, energy, health care: a divided nation can’t deal successfully with these. Shortly after midnight on Election Night, columnist Eugene Robinson, an African American, posted this on the Washington Post website: “The GOP and Mitt Romney ran a campaign designed to capture a huge share of a shrinking segment of the electorate: white men. Sorry to be so blunt, but that’s the demographic Republicans tried to capture, with their incessant talk of ‘taking the country back’ and their long-running attempt to portray Obama as somehow alien and threatening.” “Note to the GOP: It’s our country, too,” Robinson wrote. “And no, you can’t have it back. We all have to share.” There ought to be a way to reach all but the most extreme in this divided nation. We ought to be able to celebrate our diversity rather than fear it. But the divisions we saw in the 2012 election campaign, and the intractableness we’re seeing among House conservatives in these early post-election days, show us how tough it will be to move forward. If Barack Obama can pull most of us together, if he can use his immense oratorical skills to point the way to common ground, it could be an accomplishment that dwarfs anything else he does in eight years.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

[ news from the week past ]

Carpenter gets Water Authority job

The Monroe County Water Authority board appointed Pittsford Supervisor Bill Carpenter as deputy executive director, with a $137,000 annual salary. The Republican Carpenter will resign as supervisor, a position he’s held since 1994. Critics say Carpenter’s appointment is another example of patronage in Monroe County.

City to start land bank

City Council was expected to approve legislation Tuesday night to establish a land bank. The entities are meant to help governments address vacant properties. But to establish the land bank, the city has to file an application with the state, and that deadline is November 30. The application requires a copy of the local law establishing the land bank.

Windstream’s profits drop

Windstream Corporation, the company that purchased Perinton-based Paetec Holding Corporation in 2011, caught financial analysts’ attention when its stock value dropped. The drop was due to a weaker end-of-

 City

year forecast from Windstream CEO Jeff Gardner, who told the Wall Street Journal that the company’s profitability will be about 1 percent less than originally forecast. A new Windstream facility is supposed to open in the old Midtown site in downtown Rochester sometime next year.

News

Kodak deals with bondholders

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Homeowners wanted

Eastman Kodak has reached a $793 million deal with bondholders that could keep the company alive. According to the Wall Street Journal, Kodak needs to sell $500 million in patents to ensure the company gets the financing it needs to emerge from bankruptcy.

The plan is in its infancy, but City of Rochester officials may take a program designed to increase owner-occupied housing downtown and replicate it in the city’s neighborhoods. Which neighborhoods, when, and exactly how the program would work are still open questions.

Fire chief chosen

Rochester has a new fire chief. Salvatore Mitrano III replaces former chief John Caufield, who left earlier this year to take a position outside the city. Mitrano, who has been with the Rochester Fire Department since 1987, has been the city’s interim chief since March. His annual salary is $126,584. Mitrano takes over a department of 476 uniformed and 23 civilian personnel, with a $42 million annual operating budget.

November 14-20, 2012

A tax abatement helped with the conversion of the Capron Street Lofts in downtown Rochester. The city may try a similar program in the neighborhoods. Photo by MATT DETURCK

“There are no decisions, just ideas at this point,” says Bret Garwood, the city’s director of business and housing development. “We’re still just talking about it.” The Core Housing Owner Incentive Exemption offers propertytax exemptions for the creation of market-rate owner-occupied housing in the downtown area. The exemption applies to increases in property value. If you make improvements that increase the value of your home, the subsequent increase in your tax bill is phased in over a 10-year period. The CHOICE program also applies to units converted from other uses to owner occupancy. Garwood says CHOICE encourages developers to build more owneroccupied units, and makes the housing more affordable. Homeowners are typically more invested in their

properties and their communities than renters, officials say, and can help stabilize troubled neighborhoods. A logical place to replicate the CHOICE program may be in one or more of the city’s four Focused Investment neighborhoods, Garwood says: Beechwood, Dewey-Driving Park, Jefferson, or Marketview Heights. The city has singled out these areas for intense investment. All four areas have a high percentage of rentals, and the FIS plans for each include increasing owner occupancy. “I think it makes sense to do it where there are opportunities to create owner-occupancy units where they don’t exist now,” Garwood says. The CHOICE program helped the Capron Street Lofts conversion, he says, as well as the construction of North Plymouth Terrace at North Plymouth Avenue and West Main Street.

Maggie Brooks made tactical errors. She delayed talking about national issues — some would say she never did address them satisfactorily — choosing instead to run on her record as county executive. She seemed to think that her considerable star power combined with the public’s disgust with Congress would propel her to victory.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks. -- Montreall M. Wright, 35, Rochester. ROCHESTER TOTALS —

Rochester Police Department SOURCE:

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

2,150 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,072 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 9. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from October 31 to November 5: -- Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew G. Kantor, 22, Gillette, N.J. -- Staff Sgt. Dain T. Venne, 29, Port Henry, N.Y. -- Spc. Ryan P. Jayne, 22, Campbell, N.Y -- Spc. Brett E. Gornewicz, 27, Alden, N.Y. -- Pfc. Brandon L. Buttry, 19, Shenandoah, Iowa. —

POLITICS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Presidential election boosts local candidates Local political observers say they’re not surprised that incumbent Democrat Louise Slaughter beat Republican Maggie Brooks, the Monroe County executive, in their Congressional contest. But they are surprised, they say, by Slaughter’s margin of victory. According to unofficial results from the Monroe County Board of Elections, Slaughter bested Brooks by about 15 percentage points, 166,342 votes to 124,585 votes. The final poll in the race, released less than a week before the election, had Slaughter up by 10 points. It’s not a “trouncing,” as some media have reported. (For a real trouncing, see US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s victory over attorney Wendy Long.) But Slaughter’s victory was solid. Slaughter was certainly helped by the presidential election. The Obama-Romney contest brought out the city vote, which went heavily for Slaughter. Turnout for the City of Rochester was about 71 percent. To put that in perspective, in 2010, an “off” year, city turnout was approximately 43 percent. And Slaughter’s numbers in the 25th District race are nearly identical to the ObamaBiden ticket’s margin of victory over RomneyRyan in Monroe County. Beyond the numbers, though, Brooks made tactical errors. She delayed talking about national

issues — some would say she never did address them satisfactorily — choosing instead to run on her record as county executive. She seemed to think that her considerable star Louise Slaughter. power combined Photo by MATT DETURCK with the public’s disgust with Congress would propel her to victory. She may have underestimated voters’ affection for Slaughter, too. Slaughter’s campaign went early, hard, and heavy on the county’s scandals and its reputation for cronyism and patronage under Brooks. It’s tough to tell how much of an impact that had. The strategy has never worked for Dems in local races, but they’ve never had Slaughter’s money and political machine working for them, either. So, what’s next? Some people say the loss damaged Brooks’ viability as a future candidate. Not necessarily. She’s relatively young, still popular locally, a prolific fund-raiser, and now continues on page 6

CLOVER

PRESERVATION | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Dollar store is poor fit Although their opinion is not binding, Rochester Preservation Board members are unanimously opposed to replacing a historic former church at 660 West Main Street with a Dollar General. | Board members offered remarks on the proposal at a meeting last week, but did not take a vote. Their comments will be taken into consideration when the Zoning Board decides the church’s fate on November 29. | Owner Marvin Maye wants to tear down the vacant, 19th-century church and an adjoining house to build the Dollar General and two additional commercial spaces. The church is in the Neighbors United neighborhood in southwest Rochester, bordering the Susan B. Anthony Neighborhood and Bulls Head. | Some neighbors and neighborhood groups say Maye’s proposal doesn’t fit with the revitalization happening in that area. They want to find a new use for the church, such as for an indoor mall or west-side performance space. | Preservation Board members said last week that the scale and form of the church fit the character of the neighborhood, according to a city spokesperson, but Maye’s proposal does not.

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City 

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

League focuses on Lake Ontario The Rochester League of Women Voters has decided that its advocacy work will include protecting Lake Ontario and addressing issues affecting the lake. During a meeting last week, the group adopted a position drafted by the Lake Michigan League of Women Voters, an interstate organization of league chapters around Lake Michigan. The position spells out specific concerns applicable to the Great Lakes system as a whole. It calls for limiting the use of fragile shoreline areas, controlling the spread of invasive species through non-toxic measures, protecting water quality, and strengthening land-use management within the lake basins. The position also opposes inefficient and excessive water use, destruction of wetlands, toxic discharges into the air and water, and new or increased diversions of lake water outside of the basins. The Lake Michigan organization developed and adopted the position in the 1970’s and has updated it several times since. The Rochester league is applying it to Lake Ontario. “We can, through our committee work, begin to explore where we go with that,” says Georgia DeGregorio, president of the Rochester league. The Lake Michigan League of Women Voters has asked league chapters in Great Lakes states to support its position. Great Lakes issues are impacted by local, state, and federal policies and advocacy work is necessary at all levels of government. So the idea is to get leagues to support the position and engage on appropriate issues. “It’s just a way of encouraging advocacy and protecting and preserving the Great Lakes,” says Suzanne Dixon, director of natural resources for the Michigan state League of Women Voters and a board

member of the Lake Michigan League of Women Voters. Of particular importance is advocacy for federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding. Congress committed to providing money for ecological preservation projects and anti-pollution efforts in the Great Lakes, but after the first year started backing away from its promise. Lake Ontario has had its environmental success stories, and SUNY Brockport professor Joe Makarewicz likes to talk about those first when he discusses the Great Lakes ecosystem. For example, efforts to reduce phosphorous pollution have paid off, he says. And pesticides like DDT and mirex aren’t nearly as prevalent in Lake Ontario as they used to be. But the lake still has environmental problems, such as invasive species. Makarewicz laid out some of the lake’s issues for Rochester league members in a presentation last week. One of the most visible issues has been near-shore water pollution, particularly nutrient pollution which feeds problematic algae blooms, he says. Local, state, and federal agencies have been trying to identify and address sources of the pollution.

While some of Lake Ontario’s environmental problems have improved in recent years, it still has water-quality problems near the shore. PhotoS BY MATT DETURCK

And there’s an emerging issue that could also affect near-shore water quality. Because of the state’s booming yogurt industry, Governor Andrew Cuomo says he wants to make it easier for dairy farmers to increase the size of their herds. To do that, he says he wants to relax the threshold for farms that have to comply with state regulations for concentrated animal feeding operations, which are essentially farm operations with several hundred head of livestock. But CAFO regulations require farmers to develop plans for managing

manure, which can serve as a source of nutrient pollution in water bodies. Larger unregulated herds could result in increased nutrient pollution within the Genesee River watershed and the Lake Ontario basin, Makarewicz says. DeGregorio, of the Rochester League, says that local members expressed interest in exploring the CAFO issue further. They’re also interested in examining ballast water regulations for ocean-going ships entering Lake Ontario, she says.

The group targeted O’Brien with vitriolic and, in some cases, outright false ads. So was O’Brien’s victory a rejection of those tactics? Maybe. But like Slaughter, O’Brien was bolstered by the citywide turnout, more than tripling Hanna’s total, unofficially. And not having an incumbent in the race — former Republican Senator Jim Alesi chose not to run again — left the door wide open for O’Brien. Democrats also have an enrollment edge in the district.

Republican Joe Carbone. One probable factor: ballot lines. Aldersley had one to Carbone’s four, including the Working Families Party line, which usually goes to Democrats. The Aldersley outcome could have interesting implications. If the County Legislature delays its vote on bonding for MCC’s new downtown campus until Carbone takes office in January, it means Republicans would only need one Democratic vote to approve the borrowing. Rochester Mayor Tom Richards opposes the attempt to move MCC, and so far County Lej Dems have supported his position. Is there a Democrat willing to break ranks? And who would that be?

Local candidates continues from page 5

has the experience of a national campaign under her belt. We’ll see her name on a ballot again, and probably soon. She could, for example, run for State Senate in two years, knocking out Democrat Ted O’Brien. And that would give another Republican a year of incumbency in the county executive job. (Brooks has three years left before she’s termed out.) Speaking of which, where should we look for Brooks’ heir? We’re hearing buzz about Anthony Daniele, Republican majority leader in the County Legislature. And a couple of town supervisors seem to be interested. As for Slaughter? Who knows how long she’ll stay in Congress. But at 83, she shows  City

November 14-20, 2012

little sign of slowing down. Speculated future candidates for Slaughter’s seat include Lieutenant Governor Bob Duffy and state Assembly member Joe Morelle. And Brooks could make another run. The Sean Hanna-Ted O’Brien State Senate race was one ugly, expensive

mess. With control of the State Senate at stake, the race attracted money from several outside interest groups, including an anonymous group that ran ads against several Democratic state Senate candidates. (Control of the Senate still hadn’t been settled as of this writing.)

About the only local Democrat to have a

bad night was Monroe County Legislator Stephanie Aldersley who was defeated by

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This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Social workers discuss human rights

tacks and representatives of the Pakistani military and political organizations. The event is at the Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa Street.

Vargas meeting on school buildings

The Social Welfare Action Alliance Rochester Chapter hosts “Human Rights in Human Services,” a roundtable discussion at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, November 16. Fred Newdon, coordinator of community practice at Smith College’s School of Social Work, will talk about support for clients and preserving human dignity. The event is at Rochester Friends Meeting House, 84 Scio Street.

Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas is expected to talk about his draft master plan for updating city school buildings at his Coffee and Conversation meeting from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, November 14, at the district’s central office, 131 West Broad Street. The meeting is open to the public.

hosts a talk by Judy Bello, an activist who has been leading Upstate New York efforts to end drone attacks, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 18. She will discuss her meetings with victims of drone at-

Branch 120 of the Ukrainian National Women’s League of America will commemorate the estimated 10 million Ukrainians who died of famine under the former Soviet Union’s rule. The event

Remembering Drones discussion the Ukrainian genocide Rochester Against War

 City

November 14-20, 2012

is at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 18, at St. Mary The Protectress Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church, 3176 St. Paul Boulevard. William Drumright, assistant professor of history at Monroe Community College, will give a lecture about the famine following the service.

Creating a caring community

St. Monica Church hosts a “Call to Care” from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 17, to reflect on creating an environmentally sustainable, spiritually fulfilling, and socially just community. The event includes showing the film “Awakening the Dreamer, Changing the Dream,” and it will be held at 831 Genesee Street.

Wheels that deep fry,

KEEP ON TURNING The emerging food-truck scene tries to find its place in Rochester FEATURE BY DAYNA PAPALEO 1

PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

3

2

1 Lizzie Clapp, owner of Le Petit Poutine; 2 Food trucks like Hello Arepa and Marty’s Meats occasionally set up shop at the Object Maker’s Lot near the Public Market; 3 A breakfast arepa stuffed with black beans, egg, and goat cheese from Hello Arepa.

t wasn’t long after her army-green Le Petit Poutine truck hit the road in the spring of 2011, slinging the Canadian staple of hand-cut fries, savory gravy, and cheese curds, plus a scattering of thyme, that I approached Lizzie Clapp about doing a story on Rochester’s food-truck scene. But there was just one little hitch: Rochester didn’t actually have a food-truck scene at that point. Though chuck wagons are by no means a new way of grubbing up, sometime in 2008 the modern breed of food trucks rolling around New York and Los Angeles began garnering oodles of attention thanks to inspired menus and a canny mastery of social networking that enabled them to attract ravenous throngs with a mere tweet. Then the media chimed in with reality-TV shows and breathless articles about innovative chefs

creating their own opportunities outside the restaurant realm. Of course, longtime locals understand that it can take a little while for things to catch on in cautious Rochester, with trends typically saturating both coasts before seeping inland. But after the phenomenal success of this year’s two Food Truck Rodeos at the Rochester Public Market — the October installment boasted the participation of more than a dozen of these wheeled meal dealies — at this point it’s fair to say Rochester officially has a scene. “It was awesome,” Clapp says of the October 4 gathering, which drew hundreds of hungry Rochesterians. “It’s so helpful for us in the food-truck community.” The popularity of local food trucks is no longer in question. The major issue now, for both food-truck owners and City

of Rochester officials, is defining locations where the trucks can do business. You’ve probably noticed the ubiquitous hot-dog carts downtown; the City of Rochester has earmarked about 50 different spots for the carts, with around half of them in use, and typically just during the more temperate months. By contrast, there are only two spaces set aside for trucks in the downtown area; one is at East Avenue and Alexander Street, the other near Manhattan Square Park. This dearth of opportunity frustrates the food-truck owners who would love a chance to feed lunch to the estimated 55,000 people working in Center City. City officials say they’re interested in finding a solution that addresses zoning and safety issues, but the food-truck owners are eager to sell their wares downtown sooner rather than later. continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

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Since debuting their food truck Brick-N-

Motor at the October rodeo, Paul Vroman and Nathan Hurtt — who met on the line at Max of Eastman Place — have found resourceful ways of providing customers with fresh salads, soups, and hand-ground burgers. Whether it be a lunchtime pop-up at Eagle’s Landing Business Park in Henrietta or as part of an occasional mini-rodeo Saturday mornings at the Object Maker’s Lot on Railroad Street with fellow trucks Le Petit Poutine, Marty’s Meats, and Hello Arepa, they’ve found opportunities to operate. But, says Vroman, “I’d like to get downtown.” “We’re down in the suburbs, and we see the skyline of the city; we want to at least broaden the view and get more exposure downtown,” Vroman says. So what’s the hold-up? Why hasn’t the city done everything in its power to revamp an outdated system and use the popularity of the food-truck movement to bring a little taste of progress to an often static downtown? “Basically what it comes down to is the safety concern,” Vroman says, citing the City of Rochester’s requirement that trucks not block the sight line of moving traffic. That’s generally not an issue for food carts, which are not only smaller but, unlike trucks, able to set up on the sidewalk. City Clerk Dan Karin says that he has met with several food-truck operators about new vending spots, and that there is support for this growing business niche on City Council. But in addition to the public-safety issues, the city also has to make sure any new truck spots won’t detract from existing brick-and-mortar businesses, or impact residential areas. He says

he’s interested in working on a pilot program that he hopes to have going by the spring that would address the need for more downtown truck spaces. He also has an eye toward the promised public space in the still-evolving Midtown redevelopment process, which might offer some permanent spaces for food trucks. “I think there’s room to work within what’s already set up, and it’s really exciting,” says Le Petit Poutine’s Clapp. “But in order to get things done, we’ve got to supply the information, supply the demand. Really paint a picture for them, and just kind of make some compromises and let [city officials] see, over the evolution of how this is going to work, that it will.” Which brings us back to that gonzo October

Food Truck Rodeo, an experience that Arthur Rothfuss III of Hello Arepa likens to “learning to swim by being tossed in the deep end.” After discussing with his Venezuelanborn wife the notion of doing something in Rochester with a traditional Latin-American dish known as arepas, Rothfuss decided this past spring to get in the food-truck game. By the end of September Hello Arepa was serving what the side of the truck describes as “a grilled then baked corn-flour patty stuffed with tastiness,” with fillings that include barbecued tofu or black beans and feta. Besides the Railroad Street gig, Hello Arepa occasionally sets up at Roc Brewing Co. on Union Street, and Rothfuss is optimistic about working with the city. “They want us to be able to do business like everyone else,” he says. “It’s hard to change regulations, but I’m confident we’re going to work something out. We just want to make sure it doesn’t get swept aside.” Like any good entrepreneur, Clapp did her homework when she made the decision

last year to secure a curbside spot for Le Petit Poutine, eventually settling on the space outside of Lux Lounge on South Avenue, where she serves on select evenings (the South Wedge falls outside of the downtown business corridor, and it is subject to different zoning regulations). But she describes a veritable “Who’s On First?” routine upon trying to convey her wishes to the powersthat-be, eventually going so far as to e-mail the code-enforcement officer cell phone photos of the required measurements. “I didn’t hear from him for two weeks,” Clapp says. “I thought maybe I overstepped my bounds by being a little overbearing, but I really wanted this to happen.” “They have a lot of work to do,” says Clapp of city officials. “Maybe the budget isn’t as much as it should be for people in those positions. But in order for Rochester to be cooler, or improve in any way, it’s going to sometimes be more work. And I think from our end, as food-truck owners, the more of that research and help that we can give to them, the more they’re going to want to work with us.” The Rochester scene isn’t alone in its

growing pains. The Buffalo News recently reported on what it called “the Amherst food-truck controversy,” which jeopardized Buffalo’s Best Food Truck Contest, an outdoor event at the Boulevard Mall that doubled as a benefit for Buffalo City Mission. At issue was Amherst’s 1993 “peddling and soliciting” law requiring “a retail or wholesale business conducted from a temporary structure or tent, truck, van, or trailer” to pony up a $100 permit fee (per truck and per location) that would only be good for 90 days.

Food-truck owners essentially argued that the repeated permit fees were prohibitive, while town officials countered that they could not legally waive the fees, even for a fundraiser. The October 6 function went on after one of the mall’s tenants covered the $700 in fees, and the Town of Amherst is said to be updating and revising its peddling and soliciting law, with plans to create a new permit specifically tailored to food trucks. Those kinds of laws are usually meant to protect the businesses around where a mobile vendor sets up, and that is one of the concerns mentioned by City Clerk Dan Karin. But Vroman says that he doesn’t see a lot of pushback from the traditional Rochester restaurant community. “We know enough people who own or operate or work in brick-and-mortar establishments that are probably more excited about food trucks than anyone else in the city of Rochester,” he says. Besides, says Chowder UP’s Tim Gorie, any nearby restaurant would be able to offer amenities that trucks can’t, like ambience, tables, and restrooms. “If they’re not serving substandard food, they have nothing to worry about,” he says. Gorie, who has been cooking seafood in different jobs for the last 35 years, made plans to open Chowder UP after realizing that there were no chowder houses in Rochester. “I basically offer what I like,” he says of his steamed-and-sautéed seafood menu, which includes classic lobster rolls, crab sandwiches, fish tacos, and of course clam chowder. Gorie is encouraged by the ongoing dialogue between the city and the foodtruck owners, some of whom have recently begun meeting as a Food Truck Alliance. “We’re very cognizant of the fact that we

4 Poutine from Le Petit Poutine; the Canadian dish features fries, gravy, cheese curds, and thyme; 5 Arthur Rothfuss III of Hello Arepa; 6 Brick-N-Motor served at the Christkindl Market in Canandaigua in early November; 7 Marty O’Sullivan and Andre Linares of Marty’s Meats; 8 One of Brick-N-Motor’s signature “crack cookies,” featuring chocolate chips and corn flakes. 10 City November 14-20, 2012

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9 Paul Vroman of Brick-N-Motor; 10 Mushroom risotto from Brick-N-Motor; 11 Throngs of people showed up for the October Food Truck Rodeo at the Rochester Public Market; 12 A pork-belly sandwich from Marty’s Meats; 13 Le Petit Poutine’s Clapp is one of the area food-truck operators working with the city to find more spaces from which they can sell downtown. don’t want to be competing,” he says. “The trucks are a great draw.” And like Vroman, Gorie is very interested in offering his creations to downtown workers, whether on the street or as part of a pilot program. “In order to be a serious chef in a food truck,” says Gorie, “we need to be employed five days a week, year round.” Marty O’Sullivan of Marty’s Meats wants to be able to serve lunch in Center City as well. “We like being downtown; it’s such an eclectic, interesting crowd,” O’Sullivan says. “I don’t think the city is against food trucks; I think the city is willing to work with us. We are business owners, and I can’t see why the city wouldn’t want more businesses downtown.” Morgan Stanley’s loss is the food truck scene’s gain, as O’Sullivan left a career in finance upon noticing a lack of food trucks. (Fun fact: he also played hoops for the Rochester RazorSharks over the 2008-09 season.) “A lot of people probably thought I was insane,” O’Sullivan says, but he knew food, having cooked at Coppergrass Bistro under Max’s Ryan Jennings and dabbled in catering for family and friends. Naturally, O’Sullivan put his business acumen to work as well. After designing his truck, he says, “The first thing I did was find locations to do business. I read the rules, I read every town code.” And that strategy paid off in spades, with Marty’s Meats on the road nearly every day, doing breakfast or late night at RIT’s Park Point, or bringing lunch to the hungry workers at Tobey Village Office Park in Pittsford. It’s worth underscoring that the food being

churned out by many area food trucks goes

far beyond the hot dogs and street meat being offered by more traditional mobile vendors. O’Sullivan tailors his protein-centric menus to the particular clientele on a given day; brunch on Railroad Street features egg sandwiches and meats on a stick with sophisticated flavor combinations, while the aprés-midnight crowd has access to tacos, tater tots, and plates. Lunch brings out the salads and an impressive array of sandwiches, like the Thanksgiving, consisting of smoked turkey, house-made stuffing-flavored potato chips, and cranberry mayo. “I think that you can put the same quality of food out of a truck that you can get out of a fine-dining restaurant, minus the high overhead, the high cost that you have to pass on to the consumer,” says Vroman, who knows a thing or two about upscale eateries from his most recent job as executive chef at Max of Eastman Place. Vroman’s Brick-N-Motor, which Clapp describes as “a dream kitchen on wheels,” recently offered a wild mushroom risotto with pork belly, fennel salad, and maple gastrique for $8. Mobile food sure ain’t what it used to be. “I think that’s the hard part, is breaking the stereotype of the hot-dog vendor, and then what we’re doing,” says Brick-N-Motor partner Hurtt. “We respect what they’ve been doing for years now, and we’re not trying to take their territory. We’re just offering a different opportunity to get some food to enjoy the city outside, and that’s the beauty of this.” The intimacy of the food truck also offers the opportunity to subvert another cliché, that of the surly cook skulking around the back of the house. “I don’t think you ever really see a relationship between someone that’s making

Rochester-area

food trucks

This is a roster of some of the Rochester-area food trucks with internet presences, along with a few other local mobile-food vendors. Check their websites or follow them on Twitter to stay up-to-date on menus, locations, and service hours. Many are also available for private events and catering. Who did we miss? Let us know by commenting on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com Brick-N-Motor Serves a changing, seasonal menu, like a burger with aged cheddar, arugula, and balsamic onion jam; braised chicken tacos; wild mushroom risotto; and roasted beet salad. Facebook: Brick-N-Motor; Twitter: @ BrickNMotor; Website: bricknmotortruck.com. Cheesed and Confused Serves gourmet grilled-cheese sandwiches such as a bacon-gorgonzola melt; the Prime Time with shaved prime rib and havarti; and spinach, goat cheese, and ham. Facebook: Cheesed and Confused; Twitter: @cheesedandconfused; Website: cheesedandconfused.com. Chowder UP Serves lobster rolls, crab sandwiches, fish tacos, and clam chowder. Facebook: Chowder UP Seafood; Twitter: @chowderup; Website: chowderupseafood.blogspot.com. Hello Arepa Serves gluten-free corn flour patties of South American origin stuffed with fillings like scrambled eggs with tomatoes and onions, or ham, cheese, and Sriracha mayo. Vegan options available. Facebook: Hello Arepa; Twitter: @helloarepa; Website: helloarepa.com. J&S Fried Dough Serves funnel cakes, fried dough, fried

Oreos, fried Twinkies, etc. Facebook: J&S Fried Dough. Lynez’s Frozen Delights Serves Spanish and Italian ices, all dairyfree and in flavors like lemon, strawberry, pineapple, and mango. Facebook: Lynez’s Frozen Delights. Le Petit Poutine Serves poutine, eh? It’s handcut fries, gravy, cheese curds, and thyme. Vegetarian option available. Facebook: Le Petit Poutine, Twitter: @lepetitpoutine. Marty’s Meats Serves breakfast through late night, including steak, egg, and cheese breakfast sandwiches; coffee-rubbed BBQ pork belly on a stick; The Italian with roast beef, giardiniera, and provolone; and spicy s’mores. Facebook: Marty’s Meats; Twitter: @martysmeats; Website: martysmeats.com. Wraps On Wheels Serves wraps like the Cranberry Blue Chicken, with marinated chicken breast, candied walnuts, dried cranberries, blue cheese, and sun-dried basil vinaigrette; plus grilled burgers and hot dogs. Facebook: Wraps On Wheels; Twitter: @wrapsonwheels; Website: wrapsonwheels.com.

the food and the customer that close,” says Hurtt. “When you’re working in a kitchen you never get to see the customer.” For Rothfuss, the set-up combines the best of both worlds. “It’s really, really fun. I love arepas, and I love chatting with people,” he says.

Unlike many of her counterparts, Clapp specializes in just one thing: poutine. (Well, two things if you count her increasingly in-demand vegetarian version of the dish.) Poutine is a continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11

Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] The Lobby Presents…A Tribute to the Clash Friday, December 7. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Time and price TBD. 21+. 454-2966. bugjar.com.

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] The Used Saturday, January 26. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 6 p.m. $27.50-$30. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. [ CELTIC ] Celtic Women Wednesday, March 27. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 7:30 p.m. $41.50$101.50. 222-5000. rbtl.org.

Joe Bonamassa

Friday, November 16 Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 8 p.m. | $51.50-$81.50 | 222-5000, rbtl.org [ BLUES/ROCK ] Don’t let the last name fool you: Joe

Bonamassa is every bit an axe-slinging virtuoso like his British blues-rock contemporaries, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck. That’s heavyweight company, and Bonamassa is the one-in-a-million guitar prodigy everybody wanted to be when they were growing up. The Bonamassa story reads like a dream. The Utica native was in elementary school when he first opened for B.B. King on a club stage. And now at age 35, Bonamassa’s talent is like a gun in a knife fight. He has performed in major venues around the world, including a sold-out show at London’s Royal Albert Hall. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Toast to the Troops Wednesday, November 21 Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. | $10-$45 | Rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ ROCK ] For years I thought the Good Rats were from

Rochester, because the band played here so much. But turns out they hail from downstate. These Long Island barroom rock ‘n’ roll underdogs have rocked and rolled practically forever — since 1964, to be exact. Their hit “Tasty” was my favorite air-guitar-in-my-underpants tune. The Rats will be joined by Rochester troubadour Dave McGrath and the Led Zeppelin tribute The Sound Remains the Same for this patriotic pre-Thanksgiving show. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Jazz at Immanuel GABE CONDON & FRIENDS

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Eilen Jewell w/The Pickpockets. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $20-$25. Open Session w/Cathy & Pat. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Jeff Tyzik led the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra in the premiere of his original composition, “Images,” last weekend at Eastman Theatre. photo PROVIDED

Rockabilly Riot Saturday, November 17 Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way 7:30 p.m. | $6-$8 | abilenebarandlounge.com

The big picture [ REVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

[ ROCKABILLY ] First up is the honky-tonk husband/

wife combo of Kraszman & Fishwife, a June-andJohnny-esque duo that has monster guitarist Todd Krasz dialing back to sing some good ol’ Americana with his old lady. Krasz pulls off an exceptional vocal performance even though he suffers from acute vocal-chord limbosis, a rare condition where the vocal chords down to the legs resulting in an extremely low voice. The equally rocking Krypton 88 has returned to its less-countrified three-piece raunch and will rough up the joint before headliners, and one of the finest purveyors of traditional rockabilly, Toronto’s The Royal Crowns spin the place into the dirt. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Chillum Saturday, November 17 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $5-$7 | 454-2966, bugjar.com [ METAL ] The Flower City stoner-rock trio brags,

“We play your basement and do your drugs.” Grimm Belcomb (bass and yelling), Mark Metzger (guitar and yelling), and Mike McGee (drums and Satanic rituals) cut a demo EP in 2010 titled “Swinemetal.” The songs are super heavy, a little sloppy, and more than a little raw. But the band members’ modesty and sense of humor make up for their lack of polish. Total Overcomers and The Love Tunnels round out the bill. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

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Last Thursday’s concert by the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra with conductor Jeff Tyzik had all the right elements: a cohesive program, modern American composers, an amazing soloist, a world premiere work, and Tyzik at the podium with the RPO. Each one of the four featured compositions was by a contemporary American composer: Michael Daugherty (b. 1954), Leonard Bernstein (19181990), Aaron Copland (1900-1990), and Tyzik (b. 1951). There is a certain je ne sais quoi about great American orchestral works that reflect our nation’s huge landscapes, our smoke-swirled jazz influences, our own non-homogenized rhythms and ways of moving about. I want to jump right into some comments on the Tyzik composition, “Images: Musical Impressions of an Art Museum.” The work is a suite of seven pieces, each one inspired by a work of art at Rochester’s own Memorial Art Gallery. If I have a comment about “Images,” it is about the order of the pieces and the inclusion of one that seemed misplaced for the suite and the program. First, the sequence of the program insert showing the artwork should

have been in the same sequence as the performance. The art was being used to illustrate the impending orchestral performance; it shouldn’t have just been tossed on a page to advertise the art. Second, if you look at the art and you read through Tyzik’s extensive program notes, the piece “Harlem Street Scene” might not belong in the overall composition. It’s the one place in the “Images” work and, indeed, the entire program, where Tyzik used the word “fun.” It’s a fabulous little piece; a Dorsey-esque, get-you-in-the-aisles-and-dance, feel-good number. But the four pieces before it and the piece immediately after it were intense works about killing, horror, nightmares, and the living moving with an urn of ashes. Final word, and it’s on Tyzik as a conductor. He’s superb. Every bit of his 19 years working with the RPO came rushing through during Thursday night’s performance. Tyzik clearly knows what he wants to hear and how to shape the RPO to achieve that sound. The RPO clearly knows what to expect when Tyzik is at the podium, and the musicians look and sound comfortable and confident under his leadership.

[ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Buford & Smokin’ Section. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. [ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Tony Caramia. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Anthony Gianavola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. John Stowell Duo w/Bob Sneider. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 7 p.m. $7-$10. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

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Music

Saxophonist Charles Pillow has found success in his jazz arrangement of the classical piece “Pictures at an Exhibition.” “It just seemed to be perfect for jazz. I added a few chords here and there but mostly stayed true what the melody was,” he says. Photo PROVIDED

Tonal palette Charles Pillow w/Roberts Wesleyan Jazz Ensemble Thursday, November 15 Hale Auditorium, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 7:30 p.m. | Free | 594-6008, roberts.edu [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

The theme is so grand, it’s almost as well known as the first four notes of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. It arrives a long way into the piece, but just about everyone knows “The Great Gate of Kiev” from “Pictures at an Exhibition.” Still, you’ve probably never heard it the way it will be performed by the Roberts Wesleyan College Jazz Ensemble with guest saxophonist/ arranger Charles Pillow. Pillow has written a new big-band arrangement transforming Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky’s 1870’s piece into Miles Davis, 1970’s style jazz. “In his re-imagining of ‘Pictures at an Exhibition,’ Charles has used this rich, familiar material in a powerful and meaningful way,” says band director Russell Scarbrough, who will conduct the work. “The ensemble, which is a young group this year, will really be challenged and stretched by this this experience.” 14 City November 14-20, 2012

Pillow says it wasn’t too much of a stretch to turn this classic into jazz. “The opening theme is a pentatonic [five-note] scale, which is very much used in jazz and blues music,” says Pillow. “And the theme of ‘The Old Castle’ is in E-flat minor for alto saxophone, the same key as parts of ‘A Love Supreme’ was for tenor sax. And it’s a very similar melody.” The big-band arrangement Pillow has written (based on his 2004 small-group version) is the latest in a long history of transformations for this venerable composition. Ever since the 10-movement piano suite was written by Mussorgsky in 1874, “Pictures at an Exhibition” has been reinvented in myriad ways. In fact, the orchestra version most people know is not the original piece. While Mussorgsky’s composition remains a major vehicle for keyboard virtuosos, the most popular version of “Pictures” is an orchestral arrangement by French composer Maurice Ravel. (And Ravel’s is only one of many orchestral arrangements.) It does not end there. “Pictures” has had dozens of incarnations over the decades, including a hit album by British rockers Emerson, Lake & Palmer in the 1970’s. Pillow became enamored of the piece while attending Loyola University, where he

played the Ravel arrangement adapted for concert band. “I was just enthralled with the music,” says Pillow. Mussorgsky was inspired to write the work when he attended an exhibition of paintings by his friend Viktor Hartmann, an artist and architect who died in 1873 at the age of 39. The evocative titles of the piece’s movements refer to the images, many of which were based on Hartmann’s travels. Only a few of the original pictures survive. At some of Pillow’s performances of “Pictures” an artist creates images behind the band as it plays. At Roberts Wesleyan, the college’s art department will be projecting images during the performance. Pillow earned his master’s degree at the

Eastman School of Music, where he studied jazz with Ray Ricker and Bill Dobbins and worked on arranging with Rayburn Wright. Wright “was really a master arranger,” says Pillow, who now teaches at Eastman. A top New York session player, Pillow spends a great deal of time playing other people’s arrangements. He has appeared on a variety of albums by artists ranging from Van Morrison and Ray Charles to Amy Winehouse and Joss Stone. He usually doesn’t work directly with the artist.

“We normally work with the producer,” says Pillow, “but I recently did a session with Donald Fagen [of Steely Dan] and he was there directing everything.” Another recent project was Paul Simon’s latest album, “So Beautiful or So What.” “[Simon is] very demanding; he knows exactly what he wants,” says Pillow. “He would have us do different things almost like he wasn’t sure what he wanted. But then when he heard it he knew what he didn’t want. He’d say, ‘You play this down an octave, you play this up an octave, try it this way.’ Then they would orchestrate it right on the spot.” Pillow says Fagen and Simon have the luxury of a lot of time in the studio. That’s not the case when Pillow records original cast albums for Broadway shows, like the revivals of “Gypsy” and “Kiss Me, Kate.” “Cast albums are done in one day,” says Pillow, “one or two takes and you’re done.” A versatile musician, Pillow has also played in pit bands on Broadway. Before I knew his name, I remember marveling at the ability of one musician to pick up and play one reed instrument after another in the pit band when I saw “Sweet Smell of Success” on Broadway in 2002. Turns out it was Pillow. Of course he’s also in demand for straightahead jazz sessions with top artists like Ron Carter, Michael Brecker, and Maria Schneider. He especially liked working with guitarist John Scofield on an album titled “Quiet.” “It’s one of the coolest projects I’ve worked on,” says Pillow, “I like his quirky style. He played acoustic guitar with a small horn section behind him. He played so great and relaxed. The charts had a kind of Gil Evans influence.” Pillow was also thrilled to work with one of his idols, Joe Henderson, on a big-band project. “He’s one of the all-time saxophone greats. Just to be in the same room with him was great,” Pillow says. After the success of his “Pictures” album, Pillow came out with a jazz arrangement of Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.” Then he recorded “Van Gogh Letters,” an interpretive project in which he invented melodies based on the artist’s letters to his brother Theo. That’s not far from Mussorgsky’s method when he wrote “Pictures.” “I was fascinated by Mussorgsky’s notes about ‘Goldenberg and Schmuyle,’” says Pillow, referring to a movement of the work based on two of the few surviving pictures. “He described two people: one rich, one poor; two people, two melodies. I took the overall melody for the theme of the piece and used his other melody for a bass line so, in a way, I was de-orchestrating his original.” As for the future, “My next project might be a blowing session,” says Pillow, “something simpler than a gargantuan project.”

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 [ Reggae/Jam ] Friends of Poncho w/Bowla Cheats. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. [ Pop/Rock ] Black Tusk w/To The Deep, Oceans of Insects, and Night Terror. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$12. Theory Of A Deadman w/Adelitas Way, Charm City Devils. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $23-$25.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 [ Acoustic/Folk ] The Blind Owl Band w/Ruckus Juice Jug Stompers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. John Dady. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Singer-Songwriter Spotlight Series. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. [ Blues ] Gordon Munding. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. Uncle Ralph Blues. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique.” Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Arild Remmereit, conductor. Saet Byeol Kim, piano. 7:30 p.m. $15-$82. [ Jazz ] Duo Montagnard. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 12:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Be Glad & Dun. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 7 p.m. Free. Diana Chittester. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Fools. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free.

FUNK | Ocupanther

This outfit takes its name from the ocular panther, a strange mythological beast that can apparently enter one’s being through mere eye contact, “hypnotizing the mind and terrorizing the soul.” The Rochester-based quartet hopes that its intelligent and progressive take on funk does the same amount of wreckage between your ears. The group’s talented pair of guitarists, Mikey Pantano and Collin Jones, takes cues from old-school prog-rock as well as the modern improvisational jam scene, while bassist Jason Gilly and drummer Matthew Blauvelt constitute a formidable rhythm section that grounds some seriously smooth grooves. Put it all together and you’ve got an impressive musical animal with a predatory sonic approach. Ocupanther plays Thursday, November 15, 9 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $4-$6. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. Ocupanther. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $4-$6. Small Houses w/Bearfoot Brothers, Cammy Enaharo. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 [ Acoustic/Folk ] CuCu, enjoyyourshoes. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8:30 p.m. Free. Nick Humphreey. Artisan Coffee House, 2 Main St. 889-9730. 6:30 p.m. Free. Peg Dolan & Sharon McHargue. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 9 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. True Blue. Back Nine Grill, 3500 East Ave. 267-7031. 9 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Eric and the Blue Birds. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Joe Bonamassa. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 2225000. 8 p.m. $51.50 - $81.50 Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 8 p.m. $51.50-$81.50.

[ Country ] 1st Autumn Hoe Down. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 8 p.m. Call for info. Benefit for Adam Williams. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electrionc ] “Aquatexture” presented by the Quadratic Trio. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 8 p.m. $6. [ Jazz ] Big Bue House. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 8:30 p.m. Free. Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Electro Kings. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Friday Jazz at Immanuel: Gabe Condon. Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Ave. 4737664. 7 p.m. $10. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

[ Classical ] Cordancia. First Presbyterian Church of Pittsford, 25 Church St. 586-5688. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Williamson, NY. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Anonymous Willpower, Infrared Radiation Orchestra. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. [ Reggae/Jam ] Turkuaz & Spiritual Rez w/Fever. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 10 p.m. $10. Turnip Stampede. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Brass Taxi. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Clinton Curtis w/The Pat Maloney Syndrome. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$7. High Drags w/Cottage Jefferson, Brother Keep, and Burning Snella. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Into the Now. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info. Josh Simmonds Benefit Show. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $10. Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info. Powertrip. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Roarshark. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Skycoasters 33rd Annual Tailgate Turkey Bash. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 7:30 p.m. 21+. $15. warehouse w/Shades of Grey. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Wild Bill Pileggi. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Brian Coughlin’s Songwriters in the Round. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Burns Sisters w/Annie Wells. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. 16 City November 14-20, 2012

CLASSICAL | Cordancia

Kathleen Suher and Pia Liptak, artistic directors of Cordancia, had an idea in 2009 to create of a chamber-music ensemble that would focus on vibrant, eclectic classical music, and they have been scheduling interesting programs ever since. Suher is an oboist. Liptak, a violinist. On Friday night, with David Harman at the podium, Cordancia brings in organist Bruce Frank for a performance of classical works under the title “Vintage to Modern.” The concert includes some of the music Stravinsky used as his inspiration for his ballet “Pulcinella,” as well as an organ concerto by Handel. The performance takes place Friday, November 16, 7:30 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 21 Church St., Pittsford. $5-$10. Cordancia.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA Catch & Release. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Dave Chisholm Orchestra. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Frankie and Jewels’s Acoustically Speaking. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Great Chernesky, End of Process. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Call for info. Hurricane Sandy Fundraiser ft. Lil Anne and Hot Cayenne. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. 8 p.m. $12, additional collections of cash and goods taken. ilyAIMY w/Seth Horan. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $3-$6. Jim Lane. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Lovin’ Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Kinloch Nelson. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione New Blues Bland. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Industrial Blues Band. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

[ Classical ] Ad Hoc is So Sexy. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. 8 p.m. $5. RPO: Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique.” Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Arild Remmereit, conductor. Saet Byeol Kim, piano. 8 p.m. $15-$82. [ Country ] West of the Mark. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] 1 Year Anniversary ft. Mary Wojciechowski. Chakara Bistro & Bar, 7328 Pittsford Palmyra Rd. 223-8101. 6:30 p.m. Free. Cool Club Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. GRR Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. John Payton Project. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3. Madeline Forster. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. Call for info.

[ Pop/Rock ] Anchorage Nebraska w/exo band, Pink Elephant, Divinex, and The Setbacks. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. $4. Black Ice. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W. Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. Call for info. Chillum w/Total Overcomers, The Love Tunnels. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $5-$7. Greener Grass Band & Bangarang. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Guitar Expo. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 10 a.m. Free. Inneriot. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $5. Keaton w/The Andrew J. Reimers Country-Punk Extravaganza, The Emersons. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5. The Royal Crowns w/Krypton 88, Kraszman & Fishwife. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 7:30 p.m. $6-$8. Larcenist & Landmark. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Last Minute w/Right Turn Racer. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 3 p.m. $3-$5. Nod w/Dream Girls, Urknee, and Bjurton. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. (585) 2708106. 9 p.m. Call for info. Pat Buchanon’s Horse. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 2717050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Pulsate. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Sixx Pak. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free.

Pops on Pipes: Scott Foppiano. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 2:30 p.m. $15. [ Pop/Rock ] Cattle Decapitation. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7:30 p.m. $8.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19 [ Jazz ] Bob DiBaudo Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Bourbon Street Parade. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12.

DJ/Electronic | The Quadratic Trio

FOLK/ROCK | Greg Klyma

Have you ever heard an album that made you swear you were under the ocean when you shut your eyes and listened? If you’ve spun The Antlers’ recent release “Undersea,” or the Tears Run Rings masterwork “Distance,” then you know exactly what you’re in store for with The Quadratic Trio. This band takes that spacey music and raises it to the nth degree with “Aquatexture.” Using a quadraphonic sound system and synths, the performance is meant to not only create the mental image of being underwater, but maybe even trick you into feeling it. There will be all the aquatic noises you’d expect, and maybe a few you wouldn’t, which should serve well to keep you from “floating off” the narrative arc of the performance. If nothing else, this will go splendidly with the snowy weather undoubtedly on its way, and it should certainly be all kinds of relaxing.

Buffalo-based, blue-collar troubadour Greg Klyma grew up the son of a garbage man. This hard-nosed work ethic has informed an extensive catalog and a tireless touring schedule. As much a storyteller as he is songwriter, Klyma utilizes a slew of instruments (guitar, mandolin, harmonica, piano) to color his narrative approach. Sarah Craig, from Caffé Lena in Saratoga Springs, says his “stories blend seamlessly into songs, evoking a flavor of Mark Twain, Woody Guthrie, and David Sedaris.” His sound, influenced by the likes of Merle Haggard, Tom Petty, and Waylon Jennings, would be right at home at folk festivals and random campground jams. As his website boasts, he’s “a home-cooked meal and a Vaudeville show, in a fast-food, karaoke world.”

The Quadratic Trio performs Friday, November 16, with shows at 8 & 10 p.m. at MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. $6. Muccc.org. — BY SUZAN PERO

Greg Klyma performs as part of Songwriters in the Round Saturday, November 17, 8 p.m. at Tango Café, 389 Gregory St. $8. 271-4930. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Tempest. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. White Woods w/The September Campaign. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Peg Dolan. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free.

[ Blues ] Four-4-Time. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m.

[ Pop/Rock ] Dolfish w/Kitty Snowpants, Archimedes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Artisan Craft and Music Night w/The Pickpockets. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Current Swell. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. Call for info. StereoFidelics w/Poetry for Thieves, The Reactions. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Free (donations accepted). Finger Lakes Flute Circle. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 2 p.m. Call for info. Mix & Match Winds. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free.

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Theater — had the audience howling at the performance I attended. Again, much of the credit for that goes to Moore and the way she commands the audience, and her off-the-cuff comments. Even before the nativity section, she would go out into the audience to confront poorly behaved patrons. At one point she talked to a young woman who had been the May crown queen, and at the end rebuked her for talking while chomping on a piece of gum the whole time. One particularly noisy audience member got branded a troublemaker, and later was drafted into the nativity scene. And another made the cardinal sin of leaving his cell-phone ringer on during the play, and Sister confiscated it. (Good on her; maybe we need nuns patrolling every theater audience.) The way Moore dealt with all the distractions was honestly funnier than most of the show’s actual material. Colleen Moore in “Sister’s Christmas Catechism,” playing this holiday season on Geva’s Nextstage. PHOTO PROVIDED

O come, all ye faithful “Sister’s Christmas Catechism” Through December 9 Geva Theatre Nextstage, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Tickets start at $35 | 232-4382, gevatheatre.org [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Christmas items started infiltrating stores before Halloween. Holiday music is already on the radio. Thanksgiving is next week. I know, I know; it’s depraved. The holidays are upon us, and it’s safe to say that none of us is ready for the mad rush that accompanies the end of another year. But ready or not, here it comes, and Geva is perhaps a little ahead of the pack with one of its holiday offerings, the Nextstage comedy “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” It’s a small, cute show that is smart counterprogramming to the main-stage family spectacle “A Christmas Carol,” which begins in a few weeks. It’s also refreshing in the way that it deals with the tension between Christmas’s religious origins and its modern consumerist-dominated nature, and manages to have a bit of fun with Catholic dogma while still taking it seriously. “Christmas Catechism” comes from the same team that did “Late Night Catechism,” 18 City november 14-20, 2012

which had a popular run on the Nextstage last year. Reprising the one and only role in the show is Colleen Moore as Sister, an alternately wistful and brusque Catholic nun leading a catechism class (you’re the students), this one specifically focused on Christmas. Moore is so convincing in the role that I honestly thought she might have been a nun (apparently not, but she did come up through Catholic schools). Her low, affect-free voice underscores her nononsense presence, although she lights up whenever she talks about her own Christmas memories, mentions the baby Jesus, or one of her students gets an answer right. The writing in “Christmas Catechism”

frankly isn’t all that strong. The material is fine, but hardly laugh-out-loud funny. It’s Moore’s delivery that makes the show work, and especially the way she relates to the audience. Typically I cannot stand shows that require audience participation. “Catechism” practically requires that every person in the theater get involved with multiple question-and-answer sessions (the lucky winners get “quality prizes”), sing-alongs, and at least one pop quiz on spelling. The second half of the show involves nearly a dozen audience members being brought up on stage to participate in a living nativity scene, and the casting process — and costuming transformations

What is commendable about the play

itself is the way that it handles religion and comedy. Religion — just about any religion — is filled with so many ridiculous concepts and stories that it’s easy to get laughs by cynically poking fun. You get the feeling that the folks that wrote “Christmas Catechism” are believers, or at least people who genuinely respect those who have faith. Only one of the jokes in the show even came close to being insulting, and that was more inferred than expressed. (For the record, it was the story about how Joseph ended up with Mary, which involved a bunch of old guys touching their staffs until something white shot out of the end.) Whether you’re religious or not, you have to appreciate people’s views being treated with dignity, especially when it’s so easy to rip them down. A final note: make sure to get to the theater early. The Friday show I attended was supposed to start at 7 p.m., but the doors to the theater were closed minutes earlier. I had to wait, along with several other people, until the opening choir number was finished before I was allowed to enter, and Sister threw a little school-marm shade at the “latecomers.” (Sorry, we weren’t late; you were early.) Even more people came in after that and got even worse ribbing. So unless you want to get sassed at a Christmas show, make sure to take your seats a good 15 minutes before show time.

Art Exhibits [ Opening ] Dale Inglett. Nov. 15-Jan. 3. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Through Jan 3, gallery hours Mon, Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Nov 15 1-3 p.m. genesee.edu/gallery. “Imaginations: Space and Time, Drawings and Paintings by Debra Stewart.” Thu., Nov. 15, 1-3 p.m., Fri., Nov. 16, 4-6:30 p.m. and Nov. 17-Dec. 20. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Through Dec 20. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. Thu artist’s talk, Fri reception. 7851369. naegelbr@flcc.edu. University of Rochester Studio Art Faculty Exhibition. Nov. 15-Dec. 9. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. Sat., Nov. 17, 8-11 p.m. and Wednesdays-Sundays. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 10. Sat Nov 17 opening party $25. Continues Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. [ Continuing ] 1975 is Haunted! 4 Year Anniversary Show. WednesdaysSundays. 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Continues through Nov 17. Hours are Wed-Fri 12-8 p.m., Sat 12-7 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. Reception Oct 20, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. “60 from the 60s.” TuesdaysSundays. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. Through Jan. 7, 2013. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. “Altered States” by Betsy Phillips. Through Nov. 25. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through Nov 25. Hours Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Nov 2, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. “Anything Goes,” Exploratory Works by the Arena Art Group. Mondays-Saturdays. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Through November 17. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception Oct 5 6-10 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. Plastic, 650 South Ave. TueSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7 p.m. 563-6348. plasticforever.com. Art of REIGN: Fine art illustration by Trish Annese &

ART EVENT | Holiday Bazaar at RMSC

At the Women’s Council’s 42nd Annual Holiday Bazaar Arts and Crafts Sale, visitors will experience the largest shopping event the council has sponsored yet, featuring more than 200 fine artists and craftspeople. On Friday, November 16, 5-9 p.m.; Saturday, November 17, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Sunday, November 18, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) will host the fair, featuring ceramics, jewelry, glass, woodwork, photography, painting, printmaking, sculpture, fiber arts, and mixedmedia works. A used book sale and door prizes will also be offered as part of the event. In addition to fine arts and crafts, the bazaar will sell food and beverages in the Cunningham House studio, part of a Regency-style home constructed in 1880. This area of the museum is usually closed to the public. Admission to the Holiday Bazaar is $5 per day, or $7 for a twoday pass. Children 12 and under free. RMSC members receive half-price admission Friday night. For more information, call 271-4320 or visit rmsc.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Sharon Jeter. Through Nov. 24. Cat Clay, Suite 225, Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Through Nov 24. Hours by appt. only. Reception Nov 2, 5-9 p.m. catclay.com. “Art of the Book.” Through Dec. 9. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through Dec. 9. 428-8053. libraryweb.org. “Asina/Familiar.” Through Nov. 16. SPAS Gallery, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Nov. 16. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Oct 29, 5-7 p.m., panel 7 p.m. 475-2884. “Dansville Friends and Artists.” Through Nov. 18, 10 a.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Nov 18. Hours 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Brian O’Neill & David Dorsey. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Through Nov 24. Hours Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 27 5:30-7:30 p.m. 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. Celestial Songs: Sculpture by Tarrant Clements. TuesdaysSaturdays. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Through Dec 22. Tue-Fri noon-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m. 232-8120. “Clouds in My Coffee..” Through Nov. 24. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com.

“Dansville Friends and Artists.” Through Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Deborah Ronnen Fine Art Presents “Contemporary African American Printmakers.” Wednesdays-Sundays. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Through Dec 21. Sun 12-5 p.m., Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. 389-5073. “Dimensions” by Rick Hirsch/ Jane Shellenbarger. Through Nov. 30. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Through Nov 30. 594-6442. roberts.edu. The Exquisite Corpse. Through Nov. 29. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Continues through Nov. 29. Opening night 5-9 p.m. 3770132. outsidetheboxag.com. The Faces in Wood by Charles Jaffe. Through Dec. 31. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. Through end of Dec. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., ThuFri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230. melissa@genesee.coop. “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. Through Dec. 8. iGallery Kathy Clem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St., Suite 312. Continues Nov 2-Dev 8. Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m. igallerykathyclem.com. “The Heirloom,” Art by Mara Ahmed. Through Dec. 7. Little continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19

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FILM | Warren Miller’s “flow state”

As I write this Rochester has only received the softest dusting of snow for winter 2012-2013. But we know more is coming, so the showing of Warren Miller Entertainment’s new film “Flow State” seems particularly well-timed. On Tuesday, November 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) Warren Miller’s 63rd film will feature footage of skiing and snowboarding on some of the world’s most breathtaking peaks. The scenery includes mountains abroad in Japan, Norway, Austria, as well as domestically in Colorado, California, Alaska, and Utah. Along with picturesque landscapes of bright blue skies set against vast, white mountains, the film will highlight professional skiers such as Julian Carr, X Games Champion Colby James West, and Olympic gold medalist Ted Ligety, among others. Though many dread the winter months in Rochester, perhaps this film will inspire anticipation for the upcoming season and the unique beauties that accompany it. Tickets to the screening cost $20. For more information call 222-5000 or visit rbtl.org. —BY LILLIAN DICKERSON

Art Exhibits Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. Holiday Show and First Anniversary. Through Nov. 30. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. 654-2485. facebook.com/outsidetheboxag. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Through Jan 6. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Honeoye Falls-Lima Central School District Art Department members. Through Nov. 30. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Through Nov 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 244-9892. “Kaleidoscope.” Through March 2, 2013. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. Leave Your Dryer Lint Outdoors so a Squirrel Can Enjoy the Warm Bits of Sweaters You Love. Through Nov. 30. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Through Nov 30. Katharine Clemens senior solo exhibition. adifferentpathgallery.com. “Majestic Landscapes” Featuring M.S. Park, and new artists, Steven Walker, and David Jackson. TuesdaysSaturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Through Nov 27. 2921430. nanmillergallery.com. “Me Pix: Picturing Ourselves in video and photography.” Wednesdays-Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Through Nov 18. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Mosaic Show: Arena Art Group. Through Nov. 30.

I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Through Nov 30. zannebrummer@gmail.com. Nathan Lyons: Photographs 1957-2012. MondaysSaturdays. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through November 30. Hours Tue, Thu 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Wed, Fri, Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. “An Open Mind.” Through Nov. 30. Through November 30. Our House Gallery, Veterans Outreach Center Inc., 459 South Ave. pittyloverescue@ gmail.com. “Painting Tuscany.” Through Dec. 1. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Through December 1. Landscape paintings by Rebecca DeMarco, Denise Heishman, Jane O’Donnell, Sara O’Donnell, Betsy Taylor, and Rosalee Bedian. millartcenter.com. Paintings 2012: William F. Sellers. Mondays-Fridays. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Through Nov 30. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. “Partisan Artisans.” TuesdaysSaturdays. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Through Nov 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.–4 p.m. 288-7564. info@ rochestergreen.org. Patti Ambrogi and Own Butler Photographic Exhibition. Through Nov. 28. Gallery r, 100 college ave. Through Nov 28. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail. com. “Pieces of Me” New Work by Mary Moore. Through Nov. 30. Equal=Grounds, 750 South

Ave. Through November 30. gallery@equalgrounds.com. “Pitch Man” Hank Willis Thomas. Thursdays-Sundays. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. Through Dec 9. Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun 12-3 p.m. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. Rochester Art Club Fall Art Exhibition. Through Nov. 30. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. 585 278 7501. rochesterartclub.org. Sharon Stiller, Painter. Through Nov. 30. 2Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 271-6111. 2chicboutique.com. “Susan Ferrari Rowley: New Directions.” Through Nov. 17. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Through November 17. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display/Festival of Trees. Through Dec. 12. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Dec 12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Textures and Edges” Graduate Art Show of Jennifer Green. Through Nov. 18, 5-9 p.m. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 3895073. naz.edu/art/colacino-artgallery. “This Gentleman Bamboo” by Dennis Burns. MondaysSaturdays. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Through Nov 24. Hours are Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. “Three Meat Stew: A Photographic Medley.” Through Nov. 25. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Through Nov 25. Featuring Don Menges, George Wallace, and Gil Maker. adifferentpathgallery.com. “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Webster Art Club Fall Show. Through Nov. 29. Webster Library, 980 Ridge Rd. Through Nov 29. 872-7075.

Art Events [ Friday, November 16Sunday, November 18 ] 42nd Annual Holiday Bazaar Arts & Crafts Sale. Nov. 16-18. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-4320. rmsc.org. [ Sunday, November 18 ] A Conversation with G. Peter Jemison. Sun., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. With curator Ellen Taubman. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.

Comedy [ Thursday, November 15Saturday, November 17 ] Gemini. Nov. 15-17. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd.

Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ Friday, November 16 ] After Bedtime Episode 3. Fri., Nov. 16, 8 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. After Bedtime with Jimmy LeChase and friends is a late night talk show. thespacerochester.com. [ Saturday, November 17 ] 3rd Annual Night of Comedy/ Noche de Comedia. Sat., Nov. 17. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. Reception 6 p.m., show 8 p.m. Featuring Edgar Rivera, Angelo Lozada, and Mark Viera. 4286769. prfestival.com. A Benefit Show for MuCCC’s Benefit, Benefitting MuCCC. Sat., Nov. 17, 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Doors open at 7pm for reception and silent auctions/raffles, Cash bar (wine and beer). muccc.org. A November Improv Show. Sat., Nov. 17, 8 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. 607760-0422. brokencouch.com. Nuts and Bolts Comedy Improv Doubleheader. Sat., Nov. 17, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St. 334-8973. downstairscabaret.com.

Dance Events [ Thursday, November 15Saturday, November 17 ] DANSCORE. Nov. 15-17, 7:30 p.m. Nov 15-16 performances at Rose L. Strasser Studio in Hartwell Hall on the SUNY Brockport campus. Nov 17 performance at Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. 395-2787. brockport.edu/finearts. [ Saturday, November 17 ] Performance: Dance Buzz. Sat., Nov. 17, 4 p.m. Spurrier Dance Studio, University of Rochester, River Campus. 273-5150. Tango Dance Cafe Autumn Recital. Sat., Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com.

Kids Events [ Saturday, November 17 ] Cool Kids: History Houses Fest & Funshop. Sat., Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. 637-3984. generationcool.biz. Gift of Corn with Ronnie Reitter. Sat., Nov. 17, 2-3:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 812. Learn about the three sisters and then make a corn husk doll to take home. 428-8150. [ Sunday, November 18 ] Rochester Curling Club hosts open house for teens. Sun., Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 71 Deep Rock Rd. Four one-hour sessions will be held every hour, on the hour (10:00, 11:00,

SPECIAL EVENT | Toy Hall of Fame at Strong

Thursday, November 15, will be a big day for some of the toys residing at the National Museum of Play (1 Manhattan Square). At 10:30 a.m., the museum will host its annual Toy Hall of Fame induction ceremony for toys that have “achieved longevity and national significance in the world of play and imagination.” Current members of the Hall of Fame include the Slinky, LEGOs, hula hoops, various blocks and puzzles, and many more iconic toys. Toy finalists that have made it thus far in the competition are Clue, dominoes, Fisher-Price Corn Popper, Lite-Brite, little green army men, Magic 8 Ball, pogo stick, sidewalk chalk, Simon, “Star Wars” action figures, tea set, and Twister. With a list of such qualified contestants, the judges will no doubt have a tough time deliberating. May the best toy win! The induction ceremony is included in regular museum admission, $13 (ages 2 and under free). The Museum of Play is open Monday-Thursday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., FridaySaturday until 8 p.m., and Sunday noon-5 p.m. for more information call 263-2700 or visit museumofplay.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON 12:00 and 1:00). Wear loosefitting warm clothes and a clean pair of athletic shoes (sneakers are best) on the ice. 4145581. ceraven@gmail.com. rochestercurling.org.

Lectures [ Wed., November 14 ] 18 plus 19 = 20th Century Public Health: How Constitutional Amendments Drove America’s Healthcare System” with Judge Richard A. Dollinger. Wed., Nov. 14. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave. Social hour at 5:30 p.m., lecture 6:30 p.m. 241-1345. Neilly Lecture: Anne Stiles Discusses “Rewriting the Rest Cure in Frances Hodgson Burnett’s ‘The Secret Garden.’ Wed., Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. library.rochester.edu. Reclaiming Our Democracy. Wed., Nov. 14, 3:30 p.m. Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd. Move to Amend. Rochester will host a public forum on the impact of money on our democratic processes. 348-7264. “The Scandal of the Trial: HPV Vaccines, Knowledge/Value, and Experimental Subjectivity” with Kaushik Sunder Rajan. Wed., Nov. 14, 7 p.m. Warren Hunting Smith Library, Hobart and William Smith Colleges,

Pultney St. hws.edu/academics/ fisher_center. “Time Does Not Heal All Wounds” Keynote Conference. Wed., Nov. 14, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Holiday Inn Rochester Airport, 911 Brooks Ave. ACESConference.info. Why Amy Beach Matters with Liane Curtis. Wed., Nov. 14, 12 p.m. Central Library, Rundel Auditorium, 3rd fl., Central Library, 115 South Avenue. 428-8140. www3.libraryweb. org/CentralEvents.aspx. [ Thursday, November 15 ] “A Personal Journey in Researching the Holocaust: Chapter Two.” Thu., Nov. 15, 12:15 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2371. Building Our Media: a critical discussion series on independent media. Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Rochester.Indymedia.org. Energy: Getting to Net-Zero and why the Time is Now. Thu., Nov. 15, 7 p.m. Renewable Rochester, 780 Ridge Road, Webster. 671-1301. renewablerochester.com. The Immigrant and Refugee Way Home. Thu., Nov. 15, 7:15 p.m. Hoyt Auditorium, University of Rochester, 500 Joseph C. Wilson Blvd. rochester.edu.

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241-9670

At the 12 corners in Brighton

continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21

7 p.m. and Thu., Nov. 15, 3 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. 336-6060.

SPECIAL EVENT | MuCCC Benefit Show

The thing about community spaces for the arts is that there isn’t nearly enough funding to support them. The thing about buildings is that they require a lot of maintenance. The Multiuse Community Cultural Center has been a boon for indie and emerging theater groups, variety shows, and performances of all sorts, since it debuted in 2009 and now it needs your help raising funds for much-needed repairs and improvements. Show your love on Saturday, November 17, at 8 p.m., by attending “A Benefit Show for MuCCC’s Benefit, Benefitting MuCCC.” The event will showcase an ensemble cast of seven actors in a witty revue featuring original humorous shorts and theater classics with a twist, singing, dancing, and tributes to giants of the theatrical and literary worlds, including Shakespeare, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Dickens, and Alan Jay Lerner. MuCCC is located at 142 Atlantic Ave. Doors open at 7 p.m. for a reception, silent auctions, and raffles. Tickets are $10, $15 per couple in advance, of $15 each at the door. For more information, email info@muccc.org or visit muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Lectures Stage Whispers: Conversations with Theater Professionals. Thu., Nov. 15, 10 a.m. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Apollo Mark Weaver. 395-2787. brockport. edu/finearts. Wish You Were Here Photography Lecture: “World of Wonders” by Jimmy and Dena Katz. Thu., Nov. 15, 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. [ Friday, November 16 ] Community Dialogue Series: Raising a globally savvy child. Fri., Nov. 16, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145. thebaobab. org. Human Rights in Human Services Support for clients and workers. Fri., Nov. 16, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Friends Meeting House, 84 Scio St. Around-table discussion with Fred Newdom, ACSW, facilitator. swaa@swaarochester.org. swaarochester.org. MAG Centennial Lecture Series: Nobel Laureate Dr. Eric Kandel. Thu., Nov. 15, 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. [ Sunday, November 18 ] Awakening the Dreamer Symposium. Sun., Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East 22 City november 14-20,

Main St. 270-1683. events@ rochestergreen.org. “Morality, Mystery and… Lentils: From Sefer Ha-Aggadah” with Joyce Klein. Sun., Nov. 18, 7-9 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-0490. JewishRochester.org. Sunday Forum. Expressive Writing to Promote Healing and Wellness. Sun., Nov. 18, 9:45 a.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh St. 325-4000. [ Monday, November 19 ] “Holiness in the Marketplace: A Jewish Perspective on Business Ethics” with Joyce Klein. Mon., Nov. 19, 6-8 p.m. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd. RSVP by November 11th at JewishRochester.org. 4610490. JewishRochester.org. “Seeking Serenity” with Suzanne Feather, LMSW. Mon., Nov. 19, 7:15 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. mendedheartsrochester.org. [ Tuesday, November 20 ] Oliver Mead Tomlinson talk by Bill Poray. Tue., Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m. Fairport Historical Museum, 18 Perrin St. 223-3989. perintonhistoricalsociety.org.

Literary Events [ Wed., November 14 ] Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “The Postmistress” by Sarah Blake. Wed., Nov. 14, 2012

[ Friday, November 16 ] A “How’s It Going” mixer for NaNoWriMo participants. Fri., Nov. 16, 7-9 p.m. wab.org. Literary Reading. Fri., Nov. 16, 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Motherly Musings contributors. 6375494. Visiting Writer: Joseph Salvatore. Fri., Nov. 16, 7 p.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center Building, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. monroecc.edu. [ Saturday, November 17 ] Author Talk & Book Signing with Ilie Ruby. Sat., Nov. 17, 2 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Ilie Ruby, will discuss and sign her recently published novel, “The Salt God’s Daughter..” 4288375. libraryweb.org. Poetry & Pie Night. Sat., Nov. 17, 8 p.m. Poetry reading by Aricka Foreman. dpienight@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ PoetryPieNight. Saturday Author Salon featuring Mary Khazak Grant and “The Book Of Firsts.” Sat., Nov. 17, 2-3 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. liftbridgebooks.com. [ Sunday, November 18 ] Poetry Reading by Kathleen Wakefield and Bea Ganley. Sun., Nov. 18, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com.

Recreation [ Friday, November 16 ] Public Star Party: Jupiter. Fri., Nov. 16, 8-9:30 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road. Meet near Scout camping area on Hopkins Point Road. 703-9876. rochesterastronomy.org. [ Saturday, November 17 ] Volunteer Work Days. Sat., Nov. 17, 9-11 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive. Help care for Washington Grove. cityofrochester.gov/ washingtongrove. [ Sunday, November 18 ] 29th Annual Turkey Classic. Sun., Nov. 18. Southeast Family YMCA, 111 E Jefferson Rd. 8:15 a.m. 1-mile Family Fun Run, 9 a.m. 5-mile race. rochesterymca.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Durand Eastman Park. Sun., Nov. 18, 8 a.m. Meet in Lakeshore Blvd. parking lot between Zoo and Log Cabin Rds. 256-0485. rochesterbirding.com.

Special Events [ Wed., November 14 ] Film: “Not My Life.” Wed., Nov. 14, 7 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 258-0400. Hope Hour: RocHOPE’s Cocktails Against Cancer. Wed., Nov. 14, 5-7 p.m. Edibles,

704 University Ave. 224-4935. rochope@gmail.com. cancer. org/hopelodge. Marketer of the Year Winners’ Panel. Wed., Nov. 14, 7:30 a.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Ave. 703-4825. Public Citizen’s “Democracy in Motion” Tour. Wed., Nov. 14, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd. (585) 223-0770. citizen.org/democracy-inmotion-new-york. [ Wednesday, November 14-Monday, November 19 ] Rochester Polish Film Festival. Nov. 14-19. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 275-9898. [ Thursday, November 15 ] The 6th Annual Generation 2 Urban-Suburban Conference. Thu., Nov. 15, 9 a.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 2445970. g2isgenerationtwo.org. Artists & Artisans Series: Meet the Cheesemakers. Thu., Nov. 15, 6-7 p.m. Simply Crepes, 101 South Main Street. 3949090. simplycrepes.com/Events. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County 2012 Annual Meeting “One Great Idea . . . One Hundred Years Forward.” Thu., Nov. 15, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave. Free, register. 461-1000 x0. monroe@ cornell.edu. mycce.org/. National Toy Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Thu., Nov. 15, 10:30 a.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. Vajrasattva Empowerment with Ayang Rinpoche. Thu., Nov. 15, 6 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St. 261-7094. [ Friday, November 16 ] 19th Ward Annual Convention. Fri., Nov. 16, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Rochester Presbyterian Home, 256 Thurston Road. 19thward@19wca.org. 19wca.org. Film: “Happy.” Fri., Nov. 16, 24 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Milarepa Empowerment with Tibetan Master Ayang Rinpoche. Fri., Nov. 16, 6 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St. 261-7094. The Skycoasters PreThanksgiving Tailgate Party. Fri., Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 21+. 223-0999. skycoasters.com.

RECREATION | Curling Club Meeting

Curling is a sport in which players skillfully slide stones across a sheet of ice toward a target area that is segmented into four rings. This weekend the Rochester Curling Club is inviting area teens, ages 12-17, to try out the Olympic sport for themselves. An open house will be held at 71 Deep Rock Road (about a half mile west of the airport off Brooks Road) on Sunday, November 18, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Four one-hour sessions will be held, and will include 20 minutes each of off-ice instruction, on-ice instruction, and on-ice practice. The organizers recommend that participants wear loosefitting warm clothes and a clean pair of athletic shoes (sneakers are best). A release form must be signed by a parent or guardian for participation on the ice. The form is available for download at the club website rochestercurling. org, or may be filled out on the day of the event. The open house is free to attend. For more information, email ceraven@gmail.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Nov. 17, 10 a.m. Staybridge Suites Hotel, 1000 Genesee St. Western NY’s Premier Christian Singles Event. The Friday Night Single Mingle is November 16 and the Saturday Speaker Symposium is November 17. 888-492-9316. [ Saturday, November 17 ] Finger Lakes Cheese Trail Holiday Open House. Sat., Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 14 Farms throughout the Finger Lakes. flcheesetrail.com. “Please, talk with me” paranormal thriller. Sat., Nov. 17, 3 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Vajrayogini empowerment with Tibetan Master, Ayang Rinpoche. Sat., Nov. 17, 1 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St. 261-7094. Wheatland Historical Association Holiday Sale. Sat., Nov. 17, 9 a.m. Sage-Marlowe House, 69 Main St. 889-4574.

[ Friday, November 16Sunday, November 18 ] 19th Annual Dickens Christmas Festival. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Shops on West Ridge, 3200 W. Ridge Rd. Continues through Jan 1. 368-0670. shopsonwestridge.com.

[ Saturday, November 17Sunday, November 18 ] Holiday Train Display. Nov. 17-18. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave. Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun noon-4 p.m. 697-6604. ChapelOaks.net. National Toy Hall of Fame Celebration. Nov. 17-18. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Sat 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun 1–4 p.m. 263-2700. museumofplay.org.

[ Friday, November 16Saturday, November 17 ] Savvy Singles Extravaganza. Fri., Nov. 16, 7 p.m. and Sat.,

[ Sunday, November 18 ] Rochester Ukrainians Commemorate Victims of Holodomor, Soviet Manmade

Famine. Sun., Nov. 18, 3 p.m. St. Mary The Protectress Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church, 3176 St. Paul Blvd., Irondequoit. 342-6424. stmarysuoc.org. [ Sunday, November 18Monday, November 19 ] Tibetan Master, Ayang Rinpoche. Sun., Nov. 18, 9 a.m. & 2 p.m. and Mon., Nov. 19, 6 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St. 261-7094. [ Tuesday, November 20 ] Mineral Monthly Meeting. Tue., Nov. 20, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. RAS 288-5683. mineralvp@rasny.org. rasny. org/mineral. Tibetan Feast Offering Celebration. Tue., Nov. 20, 8 a.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St. 261-7094. Warren Miller. Tue., Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theater, 885 E. Main St. 2225000.

Theater The Apocalypse. Sun., Nov. 18, 7 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. The Bloody Noes and the Armageddon Players. djcardboard@gmail.com. muccc.org. “Cabaret.” Nov. 16-17, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. MCC Theatre, Building 4. monroecctickets.com. “Dearly Departed.” Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird

Rd. Through Nov 17. 3408655. penfieldplayers.org. Dinner Theatre: “The Love Star Love Potion.” FridaysSundays. Golden Ponds, 500 Long Pond Rd. Greece Paint Players. Through Nov 18. Fri-Sat 6:30 p.m., Sun Nov 4, 11 at 3 p.m. (Sun Nov 18 brunch at noon). 865-9742. goldenpondspartyhouse.com. “Generational Curses, A Dream Deferred, Not Denied.” Nov. 1617, 7 p.m. East High School, 1801 E Main St. 288-3130. yvdiva@hotmail.com. “Hermes.” Fridays-Sundays. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through November 18. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Playwright Bennett Fisher will attend Nov 16 staging of the play. 271-5523. breadandwatertheatre.org. Impact Theatre + Dinner. Fri., Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m. 1180 Canandaigua St. (Rte 21 Palmyra town hall), Palmyra. With singer Nick Costello and drama by Amanda Ladwig. 315597-3553. impactdrama.com. “It’s An Actor’s Life” TANYS Weekend Theatre Festival. Nov. 16-18. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Workshops, demos, performances. 345-6814. tanys.org. James Judd’s Funny Stories. Nov. 16-17. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8 p.m. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. Mixed Company: A Shakespeare Sampler. Nov. 16-17, 7 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. 398-0220. bestfootforwardkids.com. Monty Python’s “Spamalot.” Nov. 16-17, 7 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. The Neighborhood Acting Company. Wayne Central High School Performing Arts Center on Route 350 in Ontario, NY. 265-1468. neighborhoodactingcompany.org. Motherhood: The Musical. Nov. 15-18. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Ordinary Days.” FridaysSundays. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” Through Nov. 14. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 9. Wed Nov 14-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Nov 21 7 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Sound of Music.” Sat., Nov. 17, 2 p.m. Boundless Abilities Theater and Dance Company. Jefferson Rd School, 15 School Lane, Pittsford. 3980220 Fridays-Sundays. Fri Nov 16 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun Nov 17 2 p.m. Pittsford Mendon High School, 472 Mendon Rd., Pittsford. The Friday November 16 performance

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SPECIAL EVENT | Celebration of the Kahn Church

Though we’re not always aware of them, Rochester has some pretty special architectural gems. For example, I once spoke with an Italian exchange student who was delighted to see in person the First Unitarian Church (at 220 S. Winton Road), which he had seen in slides in an art-history course back home. The building was designed by internationally renowned architect Louis Kahn, who created the unique sanctuary space in 1962. It was described as one of “the most significant works of religious architecture of the century” in the New York Times by Paul Goldberger, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning architectural critic. Its exterior and ceiling are characterized by fascinating details that allow indirect natural light into the space. A celebration of the 50th anniversary of the building will take place at the church on Friday, November 16, at 6:30 p.m. The event will feature guest speaker and architect Terrance Goode, who will speak about Louis Kahn and the building, as well as commentary by Cynthia Howk of The Landmark Society. An exhibit on floor plans and materials relating to construction of the building will be on display in the church’s gallery. The event is free to attend. For more information, call 271-9070 or visit rochesterunitarian.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY will be ASL interpreted. pittsfordmusicals.org. The Sound of Music. Fri., Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 17, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Pittsford Mendon High School, 472 Mendon Rd. *The Friday November 16 performance will be ASL interpreted. pittsfordschools.org/. Traveling Cabaret: An Afternoon of Song, Dance, and Comedy. Sun., Nov. 18, 2 p.m. Chili Senior Center, 3235 Chili Ave. 889-6185. “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Sundays, 2 & 7 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Through Nov 18. 7 p.m. Sat Nov 17 only. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu.

Theater Audition “Romance.” Nov. 19-20, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Limelight Productions. Needed are seven men ages 20-70. 527-0884.

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[ Tuesday, November 20 ] Family Development Class: “Winning at Parenting.” Tue., Nov. 20, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

[ Wed., November 14 ] Family Development Class: “What Do You Want for Your Child?” Wed., Nov. 14, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

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[ Thursday, November 15 ] Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair

e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

Healing with breath and sound with the indigenous Australian didgeridoo Rev. Phil Shiva Jones, singer, songwriter, healer Nov. 25, 11 a.m. service and afternoon workshop. See our website Events page for details

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massage, and music. Thu., Nov. 15, 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Handicapped Accessible. 392-3601. rochesterunitarian.org. Demonstrating Effectiveness: Training to Help Nonprofits Attract Resources. Thu., Nov. 15, 9 a.m.-noon. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. 473-4000 x206. dsemple@artsrochester. org. artsrochester.org. [ Monday, November 19 ] Family Development Class: “You Make a Difference.” Mon., Nov. 19, 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

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Film Times Fri November 16-Tue November 20 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also FriSun 1, 4; BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 1, 4; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua ARGO: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 4; BREAKING DAWN: 7, 7:30, 9:30, 9:45; also Fri-Sun 1, 1:30, 4, 4:30; CLOUD ATLAS: 7:45; also Fri-Sun 1, 4:30; FLIGHT: 7, 9:35; also FriSun 1:15, 4; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 9:15; SINISTER: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 1, 3:05, 5:10; SKYFALL: 7, 8, 9:40; also Fri-Sun 1, 2, 4, 5; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. CINEMA PARADISO DIRECTOR’S CUT: 7; also Sat-Sun 3:15; ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW: Sat 11:30.

Fifty years on the Bondwagon [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Skyfall” (PG-13), directed by Sam Mendes Now playing

Apparently smashing all box office records for a James Bond flick, “Skyfall,” the latest addition to what essentially has become its own genre, follows most of the conventions the series has established while adding a few new devices and concepts. After 50 years of Bondage, audiences know pretty well just what to expect — fisticuffs and shootouts, spectacular chases in a variety of vehicles, the display of gimmicks and gadgets, exotic locations, an evil archvillain, and of course

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ALEX CROSS: 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:40; ARGO: 4:30, 7:15, 10:15; BREAKING DAWN: 11:20 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 12, 12:20, 12:40, 1, 1:20, 2:40, 3, 3:20, 3:40, 4, 4:20, 5, 6, 6:20, 6:40, 7, 7:20, 7:40, 8, 8:20, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20; FLIGHT: 12:05, 2:50, 3:25, 6:55, 9:15, 10:10; HOTEL continues on page 26

a couple of comely young women. “Skyfall,” however, also exhibits a contemporary interest in the debate over human intelligence and hightech espionage, which provides something like an intellectual subtext to the actions and characters. The picture opens with the usual introductory bang, this time in Turkey, with Bond (Daniel Craig) discovering a group of his colleagues murdered, which initiates his pursuit of the killer, who has stolen a computer record of NATO undercover agents. The extended sequence involves the familiar amazing camerawork, stunts, and some brilliant ingenuity — Bond not only rides a motorcycle over the rooftops of Istanbul but winds up on top of a train, where he uses a construction crane to scoop off the roof and catch his quarry. When his fellow agent Eve (Naomie Harris), aiming at the bad guy, accidentally nails 007, he falls off the train, off a lofty bridge, hundreds of feet into a fastmoving river, the sequence ends and in effect, the movie proper begins. The head of MI6, the irascible M

Daniel Craig as James Bond in “Skyfall.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY/MGM PICTURES

(Judi Dench), writes Bond’s obituary, inspiring the extended discussion of the value of people versus machinery in an age of computers, satellites, electronic surveillance, and global tracking systems. That argument reaches its climax when everything explodes as she testifies before a Parliamentary committee inquiring into the disastrous loss of the NATO agents. The archvillain this time around, a former British agent named Silva (Javier Barden), in fact manipulates computer technology so well that he hacks into any system at will, including the supposedly impervious machinery of the intelligence service. Unlike most Bond villains, he seems uninterested in the usual world dominations — these criminal masterminds harbor grand ambitions — but seeks revenge for M’s betrayal of him in the past. His motives reveal a most unpleasant side to M, who apparently traded him for some other agents, blithely consigning him to torture and death. When Silva captures Bond — another long story — he suggests a weird Oedipal subtext, hinting at a filial love for the old termagant, a terrible sadness over her betrayal, and further fueling his revenge, a consequent sibling rivalry for her dubious affections with Bond himself. That strange emotional component makes Silva a most unusual Bond villain, and Barden’s campy, juicy performance underlines his difference from that figure in the past. His apparently limitless assets, like an army of

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Poland springs [ pREVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

The 2012 Rochester Polish Film Festival Thursday, November 15-Monday, November 19 Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. rochester.edu/college/psc/CPCES

heavily armed assassins, a helicopter gunship, and his ability to escape any confinement, however, connect him with a host of his predecessors. Perhaps reflecting the deeper, darker emotional aspects of the story, much of the movie takes place beneath a variety of surfaces. Bond sinks in that Turkish river (the script never explains his resurrection), falls through the ice in a Scottish pond near the end, and in between finds himself in a number of subterranean locales — MI6 sets up shop in an old underground airraid bunker, he pursues Silva through ancient passages underneath London, a disused subway tunnel, and escapes an attack in a crude tunnel at his ancestral estate, appropriately named Skyfall. Daniel Craig once again demonstrates a pleasingly understated toughness in his impersonation of James Bond, with fewer of the juvenile double entendres and silly throwaway lines that apparently amuse so many viewers; he also wears the nifty suits and the obligatory tuxedo quite well. He sips at least one martini, though without the business of shaking rather than stirring (trust me, a real martini drinker would not want to bruise the booze). His rugged visage contrasts with the smooth good looks of, say, Roger Moore or Pierce Brosnan and his physical presence in general deserves comparison with the archetypal movie Bond, Sean Connery. Craig is an exemplary Bond and “Skyfall” one of the better films of this late, decadent stage of the form.

The Rochester Polish Film Festival, sponsored by the Skalny Center for Polish and Central European Studies at the University of Rochester, writes its 15th chapter this year, with eight features and four shorts that explore the myriad aspects of the Polish experience. Guest artists who will be on hand to present their work include veteran filmmaker Leszek Wosiewicz (“Totentanz: Scenes From The Warsaw Uprising”), writer-director Jan Komasa (the acclaimed ���Suicide Room” is his narrative feature debut), and co-producer Arkadiusz Wojnarowski (the animated documentary “Crulic: The Path to Beyond”). But first, a peek at a few of this year’s selections, all of which are in Polish with English subtitles. Visit the festival’s website for more details. Ki is an unmarried mother with a weaselly boyfriend who does more pouting than their adorably towheaded little boy, even going to far as to storm out right when Ki

Roma Gasiorowska in “My Name is Ki,” screening as part of the 2012 Rochester Polish Film Festival. PHOTO PROVIDED

needs to leave for work. We’re certain this loser is holding her back, and we’re psyched when she kicks him to the curb. But as “My Name Is Ki” continues, it becomes pretty clear that Ki’s problems are largely of her own making, through an unwillingness to take responsibility, a petulant sense of entitlement that taxes even her most generous friends, and an inflated opinion of her artistic self. (Not to mention a nasty, vengeful streak.) Director Leszek Dawid’s keenly observed drama watches as Ki learns about standing on her own without the assistance of a man, and he’s blessed with a brave and beautiful central performance by young Rebecca De Mornay lookalike Roma Gasiorowska as Ki. Gasiorowska is not afraid to paint the very human Ki in truthful strokes, and, as we all know, the truth often hurts. (Saturday, November 17, 3 p.m.) “Courage” seems to be something that

the macho Fred thinks he possesses; he collects antique firearms, races oncoming trains, and has a cowboy attitude toward the future of his internet company. Fred’s brother Jerzy is the tentative one, advising a more sensible path in business and objecting to Fred’s reckless ways. But it ain’t Fred who steps up when thugs harass a young woman the train, a move that leaves Jerzy on life support and Fred weaving a web of lies over the fact that he was unable to muster up the guts to help his brother. Fred’s shame takes the form of outright panic when it look as though everyone, from his family to his friends, will learn the truth about his inaction, and “Courage” unfolds as Fred comes to terms with inadequacies that he’d been burying underneath blustery bravado. The stoic Robert Wieckiewicz anchors the film as Fred, opting not for big, noisy epiphanies that ultimately ring false, but a gradual self-awareness of harsh realities. (Saturday, November 17, 6:30 p.m.)

Imagine the swoony holiday ensemble romance “Love Actually” transplanted from London to Warsaw and you’ve got Mitja Okorn’s predictable but lovely “Letters To Santa,” which takes place on Christmas Eve amongst a gaggle of attractive lonelyhearts. Chief among them is Mikolaj (the charming Maciej Stuhr), a radio DJ and widowed dad with a cute moppet of a son who spouts encouraging albeit questionable statistics like “Six out of five women agree to go on a date with a stranger.” That particular stranger is Doris (Roma Gasiorowska from “My Name Is Ki”), getting ready to spend the holiday alone when she’s pelted with one of Cupid’s snowballs. There’s also a childless couple, an unhappy family, a couple of neglected kids, a mean Santa, and — oh, you get it. It’s fluffy, it’s fun, and there’s never any doubt about the happily-ever-after, which is sometimes exactly what you need. (Sunday, November 18, 3 p.m.) Poland’s official Best Foreign Language Film submission for the upcoming Academy Awards is Waldemar Krzystek’s “80 Million,” a gripping, fact-based story set in 1980 Wroclaw, just before Communist military junta leader Wojciech Jaruzelski declared martial law in his showdown with Lech Walesa’s pro-democracy Solidarity movement. The film revolves around the daring efforts of four young activists to withdraw — and, just as importantly, stash for future use — 80 million zlotys in Solidarity funds before the account got frozen by the opposition. I’m not gonna lie; “80 Million” isn’t always easy to follow, and it takes a while to figure out who’s who, what they’re up to, and why. (A casual familiarity with these true-life events wouldn’t hurt.) Once you’re on board, however, it’s like a tense heist film, a cat-and-mouse game between the two sides, with a double agent or two thrown in for good measure. (Monday, November 19, 7 p.m.)

THE GENERAL

Thursday, Nov. 15, 8 p.m.

Using unusual objects and unconventional musical techniques, Alloy Orchestra injects new life into silent film. The three-man band — Terry Donahue, Roger Miller, and Ken Winokur — will accompany the screening of The General. It stars Buster Keaton as the hapless and unassuming hero of the Civil War. Hilarious, chaotic, and unpredictable at every turn. (Clyde Bruckman and Buster Keaton, US 1926, 75 min.)

MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO Friday, Nov. 16, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Alloy Orchestra Live!

One of the most endearing and internationally renowned films of all time, My Neighbor Totoro is a deceptively simple tale of two girls, Satsuki and Mei, who move with their father to the countryside to be nearer to their ailing mother. The girls soon befriend a family of Totoros, gentle but powerful creatures that live in the surrounding forests. Beneath the film’s playfulness and narrative simplicity lie depths of wisdom — as with much of Miyazaki’s work, at its core this film is about humankind’s relationship to the earth. (Tonari no Totoro, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1988, 86 min.)

Miyazaki

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25

TRANSYLVANIA: 11:45 a.m., 2:10; LINCOLN: 11:30 a.m., 2:45, 6:45, 8:05, 10:05; THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS: 1:05; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 10:40; SINISTER: 10:25; SKYFALL: 11:50 a.m., 12:30, 3:10, 3:50, 6:30, 7:10, 9:40, 10:30; TAKEN 2: 9:30; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:55, 10:35; 2D 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:25, 10.

continues from page 11

childhood favorite of hers from trips to her Canadian dad’s cottage near a little village where the comfort food is sold, Clapp says, from “broken-down buses, little shacks, all run by families.” It was her sister-in-law and former partner, whom Clapp credits with giving her the confidence to take the plunge into small business, that first planted the idea of replicating the poutine experience a little further south. “If I did it alone from the beginning, that whole start-up process — all the paperwork, figuring out where the truck’s coming from, and just putting the money up — I would have been too afraid,” she says. Clapp eventually bought her partners out. “The things that were working were starting to make money. Val and Seamus had a young family and couldn’t do that kind of schedule, and I got a taste of it and I loved it. And I didn’t want it to go away.” “I’m just getting the hang of this whole thing; ordering, keeping things in line,” Clapp says. “I think poutine’s done really well, but within doing well I’ve made improvements to the truck that make poutine easier and safer. That’s the next — can I say that? That’s the next truck. I want to do poutine with country gravy and an egg over easy. I want to do Le Grand Poutine.” With Rochester’s cold weather looming,

other food-truck owners are thinking about their futures, too. For Marty O’Sullivan, 2013 involves the branding of Marty’s Meats, bottling his sauces for retail, and maybe even launching another truck. Tim Gorie is securing high-profile gigs for Chowder

Dryden Theatre

A braised short-rib sandwich on focaccia bread, from Brick-N-Motor.

UP, though he acknowledges, “It’ll be a lean winter.” Many food trucks are available to cater private events. And all of them are waiting to see what the city’s next move might be. “Obviously there needs to be regulations,” says Vroman. “We don’t want to just be able to drive around the city and stop wherever we want to stop. But at the same time we don’t want to be given the spots that are so far away from everything where it’s not feasible for us.” Says Clapp, “The whole beauty and purpose of being on wheels is to go to underserved areas, to bring a little something special to a spot that might not be available otherwise; that’s the part about it that’s exciting and could be used as a really great tool for the city. But I think they’re just very caught up in all the details, which is their job — but let us help answer those questions. Let’s have a conversation about it, not a conflict.” This article contains additional reporting by Eric Rezsnyak.

271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 11/14-Wed 11/21. DOG DAY AFTERNOON: Wed 11/14 8; THE GENERAL: Thur 11/15 8; MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO: Fri 11/16 8; A TRIP TO THE MOON AND THE EXTRAORDINARY VOYAGE: Sat 11/17 8; PRINCESS TAM TAM: Sun 11/18 8; THE WIFE’S CRUSADE: Tue 11/20 8; BONNIE AND CLYDE: Wed 11/21 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor ARGO: 2:45, 9:35; BREAKING DAWN: 12, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2, 2:30, 3, 3:30, 4, 4:30, 5, 5:30, 6, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 7:50, 8:10, 8:30, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30, 11; FLIGHT: 12:50, 12:10, 4:05, 7:15, 10:25; LINCOLN: 12:15, 3:35, 6:55, 10:15; PITCH PERFECT: 12:20, 6:15; SKYFALL: 11:45 a.m., 12:45, 3:15, 4:10, 6:45, 7:20, 10:10, 10:40; TAKEN 2: 12:05; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 12:35, 4:15, 2D 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:05.

Geneseo Theatres

Butt Hutt BBQ & Grill Co. Serves baby-back ribs, pulled pork, chicken, beef brisket, and sides like BBQ beans and Cajun corn. Facebook: Butt Hutt BBQ; Website: ButtHuttBBQ.com. Fett Svin BBQ Serves traditional barbecue fare, plus things like Korean beef short ribs, smoked salmon cakes, the SLT (with scrapple, pickled tomato, romaine, and avocado mayo), and smoked heirloom squash with spiced honey butter. Facebook: Fett Svin BBQ; Twitter: @fettsvinbbq; Website: fettsvinbbq.com. Lettuce B. Frank Serves grilled corned beef reuben with fresh sauerkraut; vegan carrot slider with black beans and chick peas; soy hot dogs; Italian chicken sausage; and more. Facebook: Lettuce B. Frank; Twitter: @ lettucebfrank; Website: lettucebfrank.com. Paola’s Burrito Place Serves Mexican favorites from a scaledback version of the popular restaurant, including tacos, burritos, and enchiladas. Facebook: Paola’s Burrito Place.

26 City november 14-20, 2012

Roc City Sammich Serves Pittsburgh-style sandwiches: roast beef, pastrami, chicken, burger, or sausage topped with provolone, French fries, and cole slaw. Facebook: Roc City Sammich; Website: roccitysammich.com. Snow Daze Serves snow cones drizzled with syrups made from seasonal, local fruits like strawberry, Concord grape, and apricot. All-natural sodas, too. Facebook: Snow Daze; Twitter: @ roccitysnowdaze; Website: fingerlakessoda.com. Tuscan Wood Fired Pizza Catering Serves thin-crust pizzas, pastas, arancini, eggplant parm, portobello burger, Italian tuna melt, fried calamari, and more. Facebook: Tuscan Wood Fired Pizza Catering; Twitter: @tuscanwoodfired; Website: tuscanwoodfiredpizzacatering.com. The Wafel Cart Serves Belgian waffles with a choice of toppings, like the Amsterdam, covered in fudge, whipped cream, strawberries, bananas, Nutella, maple syrup, almonds, speculoos cookie spread, and sprinkles. Facebook: The Wafel Cart; Twitter: @ thewafelcart; Website: thewafelcart.com.

243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BREAKING DAWN: 7, 7:30, 9:30, 9:45; also Fri-Sun 1, 1:30, 4, 4:30; FLIGHT: 7, 9:35; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 4; SKYFALL: 7, 8, 9:40; also

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] DOG DAY AFTERNOON (1975): Al Pacino stars for Sidney Lumet in this fact-based drama about a man who robs a bank to pay for his lover’s sex change, only to watch as the heist devolves into a hostage situation and media circus. With John Cazale and Charles Durning. Dryden (Wed, Nov 14, 8 p.m.) THE GENERAL (1926): Cambridge, MA’s Alloy Orchestra, which performs using found objects and electronics along with traditional instruments, will be on hand to accompany this silent

Fri-Sun 1, 2, 4, 5; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Sun 12:30, 2:50; SMASHED: 6:40, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:10.

Greece Ridge 12

Pittsford Cinema

225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. ARGO: 1:10; BREAKING DAWN: 12, 12:30, 1, 1:15, 1:30, 3, 3:30, 4, 4:15, 4:30, 4:45, 5, 6:10, 6:30, 7, 7:15, 7:30, 7:45, 8, 9:10, 9:30, 9:50, 10:15, 10:30, 10:45; FLIGHT: 12:25, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45; LINCOLN: 12:05, 3:25, 6:45, 10:10; THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS: 12:20, 2:40; SKYFALL: 12:10, 12:50, 3:40, 4:10, 6:50, 7:20, 10, 10:35; TAKEN 2: 10:25; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 5:20, 10:20; 2D 12:15, 2:50, 7:50.

383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ARGO: 1:35, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50; BREAKING DAWN: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:40; FLIGHT: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:55; LINCOLN: 1:40, 4:50, 8; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 2:20, 7:30; PITCH PERFECT: 11:45 a.m., 4:45, 9;55; THE SESSIONS: 12:25, 2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:35; SKYFALL: 12:35, 2, 3:40, 5:05, 6:45, 8:10, 9:50; WRECK-IT RALPH: 1:30, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10.

Henrietta 18

Tinseltown USA / IMAX

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. ARGO: 4, 10; BREAKING DAWN: 11 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 12, 12:20, 1, 1:20, 1:40, 2, 2:40, 3, 3:20, 4:20, 5,5:20, 5:40, 6, 6:20, 7, 7:20, 7:40, 8, 8:40, 9:20, 10:20, 11, 11:20, 11:40, 12 a.m.; CLOUD ATLAS: 11:55 a.m.; FLIGHT: 12:05, 3:25, 6:40, 9:50; JAB TAK HAI JAAN: 12:30, 4:30, 8:15; LINCOLN: 11:10 a.m., 2:35, 6:05, 9:25, 10:05; THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS: 9, 11:55; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 2:20, 8:20; SKYFALL: 11:30 a.m., 12:10, 12:50, 1:30, 2:50, 3:30, 4:10, 4:50, 6:10, 6:50, 7:30, 8:10, 9:30, 10:10, 10:50, 11:30; SON OF SARDAAR: 3:40, 6:55, 10:15; TAKEN 2: 4:40, 10:40, 11:50; WRECKIT RALPH: 3D 12:40, 3:45, 6:30; 2D 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30.

The Little 258-04 240 East Ave.  ARGO: 6:50, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:15; Sun 2:40; LINCOLN: 6:30, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12, 3; THE SESSIONS: 7, 9:10; also SatBuster Keaton comedy about a Civil War-era engineer who crosses enemy lines to rescue his beloved train. Oh, and his girlfriend. Dryden (Thu, Nov 15, 8 p.m.) LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO (1988): This Hayao Miyazaki animated classic tells the story of two

247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ARGO: 12:45, 3:30, 6:50, 9:40; BREAKING DAWN: 11 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 12:10, 1, 1:35, 2:10, 2:45, 3:10, 4, 4:35, 5:10, 5:45, 6:10, 7, 7:35, 8:10, 8:45, 9:10, 10, 10:35, 11; CLOUD ATLAS: 11:10 a.m., 6:30; FLIGHT: 12:20, 3:50, 7:05, 10:10; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 11:55 a.m., 4:45, 9:35; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 11:05 a.m.; LINCOLN: 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 2:30, 7:15; PITCH PERFECT: 3:55, 9:25; THE SESSIONS: 12:05, 2:35, 5, 7:25, 9:55; SINISTER: 3, 10:15; SKYFALL: IMAX: 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:15; NONIMAX: 11:25 a.m., 1:30, 2:40, 4:50, 6:15, 8:05, 9:30; TAKEN 2: 12, 2:25, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 1:10, 6:40; 2D 11:15 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

young sisters who move to the country to be near their ailing mother, where they encounter the friendly but powerful creatures living in the forest nearby. Dryden (Fri, Nov 16, 8 p.m.) PRINCESS TAM TAM (1935): The James Card Memorial Lecture will feature Milestone Films co-founder Dennis Doros, who will introduce this “Pygmalion”-type story starring Josephine Baker as a Tunisian shepherdess introduced into Parisian high society. Dryden (Sun, Nov 18, 8 p.m.) THE SESSIONS (R): From writerdirector Ben Lewin comes this drama starring John Hawkes as a man in an iron lung who hires a professional sex surrogate

Daniel Day-Lewis in “Lincoln.” PHOTO COURTESY dreamworks PICTURES (Helen Hunt) to help him lose his virginity. Co-starring William H. Macy. Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown SMASHED (R): Mary Elizabeth Winstead (“Scott Pilgrim vs. The World”) and Aaron Paul (“Breaking Bad”) star in James Ponsoldt’s drama about how the dynamic between a harddrinking couple changes when the wife realizes she has to get sober. With Megan Mullally, Nick Offerman, and Oscar winner Octavia Spencer. Little A TRIP TO THE MOON/THE EXTRAORDINARY VOYAGE (1902/2011): Georges Méliès’ classic tale of a lunar voyage, fully restored to its original 1902 colors and featuring a new soundtrack by AIR, will be preceded by this documentary that chronicles the painstaking overhaul and hears filmmaking giants like Michel Gondry and Jean-Pierre Jeunet wax about Méliès’ continued significance to cinema. Dryden (Sat, Nov 17, 8 p.m.) THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (PG-13): Honestly, if you need a description, you’re not interested. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE WIFE’S CRUSADE (1926): This silent German drama takes on the subject of abortion through the intertwined tales of a crusading anti-abortion politician, his free-thinking wife, and a conflicted doctor. Dryden (Tue, Nov 20, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] ALEX CROSS (PG-13): This suspense thriller finds Tyler Perry picking up where Morgan Freeman left off, as novelist James Patterson’s psychologist/ detective takes on Matthew Fox’s sinewy, crazy-eyed bad guy. With Edward Burns, Giancarlo Esposito, and Cicely Tyson. Culver

ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henriett, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown CLOUD ATLAS (R): Assembling the creative forces of filmmakers Tom Tykwer (1998’s “Run Lola Run”) and siblings Lana and Andy Wachowski (the “Matrix” trilogy) gets you an ambitious adaptation of David Mitchell’s genre-spanning novel exploring the effects of individual actions throughout time. Starring Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, and Hugo Weaving. Canandaigua, Henrietta, Tinseltown FLIGHT (PG-13): Robert Zemeckis’s first live-action film since 2000’s “Cast Away” is a drama with Don Cheadle, John Goodman, and Denzel Washington as an airline pilot who saves a flight from crashing, only to have the ensuing investigation into the equipment malfunction reveal something troubling. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG13): Kevin James, Salma Hayek, and Henry Winkler lead the cast of this comedy about a biology teacher who tries to raise muchneeded funds for his cashstrapped school by becoming a successful MMA fighter. Tinseltown HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG): The first animated feature from “Samurai Jack” creator Genndy Tartakovsky showcases the voice talents of Adam Sandler as good ol’ Dracula, now a hotelier working to keep his daughter

(Selena Gomez) away from a charming backpacker (Andy Samberg). Culver, Tinseltown THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS (R): Wu-Tang’s versatile RZA makes his feature directing debut with this bloody wire-fu flick set in 19th-century China in which he stars, alongside Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu, as The Blacksmith, a weapons maker caught in the middle of feuding clans. Culver, Greece, Henrietta PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4 (R): “Catfish” directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman return for another stab at the surprisingly successful horror franchise, which looks to come full circle by revisiting the circumstances surrounding Katie and baby Hunter, gone missing after “PA2.” Canandaigua, Culver, Tinseltown THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER (PG-13): Writer-director Stephen Chbosky adapts his semiautobiographical coming-of-age novel about an introverted and troubled freshman who is befriended by a pair of seniors. With Logan Lerman, Ezra Miller, and Emma Watson. Henrietta, Pittsford PITCH PERFECT (PG-13): Anna Kendrick, Brittany Snow, and “Bridesmaids” scene-stealer Rebel Wilson lead the cast of this musical comedy about a loner who joins her college’s all-girl singing group and competes against their male rivals in a campus competition. Eastview, Pittsford, Tinseltown SINISTER (R): Ethan Hawke stars for director Scott Derrickson (“The Exorcism of Emily Rose”) in this thriller about a true-crime novelist who uses a mysterious box of Super 8 films to puzzle out how and why a family was murdered in his new home. Canandaigua, Culver, Tinseltown SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown TAKEN 2 (PG-13): Liam Neeson returns in this action flick as loving family man/not-all-thatretired spook Bryan Mills, this time in Istanbul when he and ex-wife Famke Janssen are taken captive by a father (go-to Eurobaddie Rade Serbedzija) looking to avenge his Albanian-kidnapper son’s death. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown

RESEARCH Subjects Needed For a mild to moderate plaque psoriasis trial. Potential subjects must be over 18 years old, in good general health and willing to attend four study visits. Eligible subjects will be compensated for time and travel.

IF INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING, PLEASE CONTACT: THE RESEARCH OFFICE at SKIN SEARCH, 100 WHITE SPRUCE BLVD., ROCHESTER, NY 14623

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Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

stop. West Rochester. Call 585328-2771. House has security.

Houses for Sale HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

Land for Sale

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent ART GALLERY AREA Writers & Books neighborhood. Bright, Large 1bdrm apartment, with study and high ceilings, laundry. Available now. $650/month+ utilities. 908-510-0269 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888. MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $440 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet surrounding. Utilities, Cable, off-street-parking included. On bus line, near bus

20 ACRES FREE Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN) 25,000 SQUARE FOOT BARN + 15 ACRES ONLY $89,900! Bring your horses- it’s ready to go! Level, open land with beautiful views! Additional 60 acres next door available at a discount! Call (888)701-7509. www.newyorklandandlakes.com ABANDONED FARM + 60 ACRES- $79,900! Beautiful trout stream, awesome valley views, quality hardwood timber, great hunting! Below market price! Call (888)905-8847. www.newyorklandandlakes.com

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Vacation Property BE SAFE: KINGMAN, Arizona; Start Fresh. NO Hurricanes,

Snow Storms, Earthquakes. Great year-round golf weather. Low cost of living. Call for information 800-448-6568 swrealtyaz@gmail.com

Retirement Property DELAWARE: For Sale Several NEW Ranch Homes! 55+Peaceful Country setting with all amenities included. Low 100’s, low taxes Call Today: 302-659-5800 www. bonayrehomes.com and www. lenapebuilders.net

Home Services

security, tons of TLC. Expenses paid as permitted. Legal/ confidential. Call Peggy & Sonu 1-888-962-5022 PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if adoption is your plan, choose from loving, pre-approvedm families. Call Joy: 866-922-3678. www. ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293.

MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Automotive

Ceilings & Drywall

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ♥ADOPT♥ A Home Filled with Laughter, LOVE, music, caring attorney, family happily awaits baby. Expenses paid Stacey ♥1-800-563-7964♥ ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future.  Expenses paid.  Private.  Legal.  Jenny 1-866-751-3377 ADOPTION - YOUR OPTION NY couple offers your newborn happiness, laughter, financial

1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE SS 396/350HP, original, $7400 OBO, email or call for details: dychyar8@msn.com / 607-2140053.

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $5 - $8 585-880-2903 $50 or offer BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903 BOOTS Size 6 1/2 Ladies or boys, lining inside, army green, good for horseback riding, also snow. 2 pair, rubber $7 each 585-880-2903 585-544-4155 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a second lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk,

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KdMovingandStorage.com 28 City november 14-20, 2012

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SEE PAGE 30 OF THIS WEEK’S ISSUE

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2012 WINNER OF DESIGN EXCELLENCE AND LANDMARK SOCIETY AWARDS STOP BY 312 STATE STREET OR CALL 454-5710

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com

gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private

MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds.

continues on page 30

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Ryan Smith

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THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Find your way home with East Irond., 38 Lodge Dr. Quaint Cape Cod! Move in Ready! New roof 2011. Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

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Colgate is Calling You

63 Colgate Street

Curb appeal abounds at 63 Colgate! This tree-lined street is a quiet dead end, but the traditional ease of access of the 19th Ward neighborhood is just moments away—close to both I-390 and downtown Rochester. The fresh, bright blue paint of this Arts & Crafts bungalow is cheery and inviting as you walk up to the large front porch. The leaded glass door opens into a foyer lined with the original ceramic tile floor. Immediately to your right the original wood floors of the living room gleam. The room is chock full of beautiful original details, including the front windows, leaded glass windows flanking the brick fireplace, and a built-in bookcase. The new gas fireplace is perfect for the impending winter nights! Original double, leaded glass doors open into the dining room. Incredible beams span the ceiling and original details adorn the walls. At some point during the home’s history the butler’s pantry off the dining room was converted to the quaintest of home offices—with space for dueling desks and a garden view into the backyard—while retaining the original leaded glass door. The dining room leads conveniently into the kitchen, where a sunlit addition off the back of the house improves storage capabilities with a full pantry wall and space for what could be a perfect breakfast nook. Out the sliding glass door, steps lead down into the fully fenced backyard, complete with a patio at the rear and lots of lawn.

Head through the hallway from the kitchen, and loop back to the foyer where the staircase leads up to three bedrooms and one full bath. Gorgeous hardwood floors, unpainted woodwork, and original wood doors continue on the second floor. The updated bath is modern with lots of storage but still retains its character with the original claw foot tub and hexagonal tile floor. In the hallway the original linen closet offers charming details and practical space for extra bedding and towels. There are two goodsized bedrooms, plus a master with double closets. One is the walk-in closet only of your dreams—until now! The 19th Ward neighborhood is the largest residential enclave of the city, popular for its diversity, convenient location and excellent housing stock. The 19th Ward Community Association is incredibly involved, working to foster a strong neighborhood spirit though various community activities, from neighborhood gardens to a neighborhood newsletter. Recreation options abound with close proximity to the Genesee River and Erie Canal trails and pathways. This 1,532 square foot house is large with charm but small on price, listed at $74,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R194578 or contact Danielle Riley with Nothnagle Realtors at 585-339-3965. by Anika Lindquist Anika is a Landmark Society volunteer.

and click on

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CITY rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29

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Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-2609958 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings. At 1-800-653-2276 or WWW. Woodfordbros.com NEW INVENTIONS and Product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on

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ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

30 City november 14-20, 2012

CITY Newspaper’s

MIND � BODY � SPIRIT THINK, MOVE, BREATHE, DANCE, HEAL, SEARCH, STRETCH, STENGHTHEN, RELAX [ See Page 23 of this week’s issue ] TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-428-5116 Today. Fee-based service. *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800-925-7945 SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Notices

Wanted to Buy

HEAT & EAT - you don’t have to choose! Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider

BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck. Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214-514-1040

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A , RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM

Lost?

Find your way home with

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

STUDENT EXCHANGE COORDINATOR: To recruit neighborhood volunteers & host families for international

students. Previous experience hosting/ working with exchange

continues on page 32

IS Business/Systems Analyst

BECOME A ENERGY PARTNER! New York is Deregulated. MAKE LOTS OF CASH SIGN UP NOW! powernow.igniteinc.biz electric@danepromotions.com 817-643-0135

Systems analysis for Finance and Procurement. Functional & technical exp with MasterSaf finance and tax functions and Softway import & export, Nota Fiscal and XRT Treasury.

DRIVER $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com

Resume to Eleanor Lathan, Carestream Health, Inc., 150 Verona Street, Rochester, NY 14608 attn: job #1122B.

All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing, Third Weds ~ 7 PM

Psychic Fair NOVEMBER 17TH

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11am–7pm • Free Admission

For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

ON PAGE 29

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23

Sunday Mass at St. Michael’s Church

Sunday, NOVEMBER 18, 4:00 P.M. Music for the Feast of Christ the King

L. L. Fleming: Ride On, King Jesus Edward Bairstow: Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence Paul Manz: E’en So, Lord Jesus, Quickly Come Free Parking at St. Michael’s Church

Corner of Clinton & Clifford

St. Michael’s Singers

Anne Laver Music Director/Organ Alicia Messenger, cantor rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 31 students preferred, strong organization and communication skills required. Email resume: asseusaeast@asse.com VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Consider taking part in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A preventive HIV vaccine can help STOP

the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 18-50, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are synthetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to

schedule an appointment, call (585) 756-2329 (756-2DAY).

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org HUNDREDS OF VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. A mandatory volunteer training is required for all new volunteers, which will be held on a date to be determined at the Camp Good Days’ Headquarters in Mendon, for those wishing to volunteer in the Rochester area. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo

Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays. org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www. campgooddays.org. ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547

WELDING/FABRICATION TEACHER Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS APPLY ON-LINE AT

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

SERVICES

Answer the call. Seasonal Drivers

Kelly Services® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. FedEx expects to have its busiest day in history on Monday, Dec.10, when it moves a projected 280 million shipments globally. For the overall holiday season between Thanksgiving and Christmas they expect an increase in personnel by approximately 20,000.

BE PART OF THIS RECORD BREAKING SEASON! Minimum six months experience driving like-sized commercial vehicle within last three years required. One year commercial driving experience strongly preferred. • 21 years or older • Customer service skills Inquire in person: Mon-Fri 10-am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY 14585 or email resume to: Tempupny@yahoo.com EOE 32 City november 14-20, 2012

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa. com (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa. com (AAN CAN)

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com NEW INVENTIONS and Product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-428-5116 Today. Fee-based service.

Actors Wanted ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-560-8672 for casting times /locations.

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is Zolala, LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on October 16, 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 656 Kayleigh Drive, Webster, NY 14580 [ LEGAL NOTICE VG CAPITAL GROUP LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Capital Group LLC was filed with SSNY on July 20, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 10N2 ASSOCIATES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 100 Cummings Center, Suite 333C, Beverly, MA 01915. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1665 PENFIELD ROAD LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 75 Langpath Rd., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 5, 2012. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC, PO Box 183, North Chili, New York 14514. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. Please direct all correspondence to the address below. [ NOTICE ] BROOKDALE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY

on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS FABRICATION, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS WEBSTER MACHINING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EAGLE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Goodhand Computing Solutions LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on September 27, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 30906, Rochester, NY 14603. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] hBARSCI LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 10, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York, 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

[ NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-10591 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Family First of NY Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Georgea A. Black, a/k/a Georgea Black, Nadine Black, as Executrix; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Nadine Black, Individually, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 12, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 305 Pearson Lane; Tax Account No. 059.07-1-21, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10044 of Deeds, page 501; lot size 80 x 150. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68768.0 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2012 Aaron Sperano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KALPIN’S AUTO CARE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Nicholas Kalpin 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613.

Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Lead Pipe Productions LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/16/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC at 23 Maricrest Drive., Rochester, NY 14616. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Legal Notice of Formation of LLC. Long Pond Road II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gerald F. Stack, Esq., Hiscock & Barclay, LLP, One Park Place, 300 South State Street, Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose: any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Peter Ferrari, 6 Dover Ct., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form of SAGER DRIVE PROPERTIES, LLC Art. of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 University Ave. Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Blue Wave Properties, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 19 Eaglesfield Wy, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

KING PROPERTIES NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/17/12. Office in Monroe

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license

has been applied for by OPA! ROCHESTER INCORPORATED dba OPA AUTHENTIC GREEK KOOZINA,1175 Jefferson Rd., Rochester NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant.

against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 21 Lawndale Terrace, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by DAMACA INC dba Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Road., Fairport NY 14450, County of Monroe, for a Sports Bar & Grill.

Notice of formation of COBBLER’S CORNER OF HENRIETTA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 663 Hinchey Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Brewski’s LLC dba Brewski’s Food & Drinks, 5019 W. Ridge Road, Spencerport, NY 14559, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CASUALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation Design Builders of Monroe County LLC. Articles of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 Universtiy Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Almar Affiliate Marketing, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 136 Princess Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Atimesa Studios LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Salil Athalye, 7 Brewster Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, also the registered agent.. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Brown Simmons LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10/18/2012. Office Location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DanLin Farms, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/01/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 355 St. Joseph St., Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to David C. Pettig & Associates, P.C., 65A Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JJ ZEBs, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/6/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 388 Mason Road, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of L&B Fabricators, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 10/31/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 W. Main St., STE 246, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name:WISEMEN ENTERPRISES LLC. Articles of Organization file with Secretary of State of New York on: 05/31/2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State of New York shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 67 Elwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is RT Fitz LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on July 6 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 580 Colebrook Drive Rochester, NY 14617 6. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 140 VINAL, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has be en designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 415 Murwood Lane,Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MDMS Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 194 Old English Dr., Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MFP 126 CAYUGA STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625.

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MODEST WANDERER & CO. LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/12. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 225 Dickinson Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: online retail. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN HOLT RD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evan & Fox, LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of One Way Enterprises I LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to One Way Enterprises, 8376 Merriman Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RAM NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Property Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities.

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33

Legal Ads > page 33 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Real Estate, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER APARTMENT MANAGEMENT, LLC.

Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROW HOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: J. Loftus, 69 Cascade Dr., Rochester,

NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Organization: The Little Speed Shop, LLC was filed with SSNY on December 27, 2010. Office: 500 Lee Rd. Building C Rochester, NY Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 500 Lee

Adult Services

Rd. Building C Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of AdvizeX Partners I, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 9/20/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 9724 Wolf Creek Dr., Irving, TX 750635032. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

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Notice of Qualification of Canal Front Capital Management, LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10 Little Acorn Cir., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC formed in DE on 11/14/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Canal Front Capital Management, LLC, 10 Little Acorn Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Business Filings Inc., 108 West 13th St.,Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of HCP SH ELP2 PROPERTIES, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE BERRY COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12.

34 City november 14-20, 2012

Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 11/16/11. Princ. office of LLC: 160 Inverness Dr. West, Ste. 400, Englewood, CO 80112. NYS fictitious name: BERRCO ADVERTISING, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Arts. of Org. filed with CO Dept. of State, 1700 Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Back of 1075, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is Back of 1075, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The street address of the limited liability company’s office is 1023 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Rochester Brainery LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to theLLC at 119 Sylvester Street, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC O’Neill Real Estate, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on July 12, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 849 Rush Scottsville Road, Rush, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served.

The post office address within or without this state to which the secretary of state shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him or her is Corporation Service Company, 80 State Street, Albany, New York, 12207. Corporation Service Company, 80 State Street, Albany, New York, 12207, is the registered agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Barbara and Michael Hanna Family, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Cognitive Innovations, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on September 26, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 219 Frankland Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 219 Frankland Road, Rochester, New York 14617. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMOKE SIGNALS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Smoke Signals Performance Products LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York

Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-3782 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Donald J. Payne; Janice H. Rose; Casa Associates, LLC; Susan Payne, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 15, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 21, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 18 Sheldon Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559, Tax Account No. 102.02-1-54, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10910 of Deeds, page 643; lot size 100 x 314. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $192,576.34 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2012 Deborah Field, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone:(585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF STRATEGIC CHANGE & INNOVATION, LLC ] Strategic Change & Innovation, LLC was filed with SSNY on 10/05/12.

Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 315 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ZYAIR PROPERTIES, LLC ] Zyair Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 09/14/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 133 Rosemary Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] STUDIO QI, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/25/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Thrombophilic Consultants LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/12. Office location, County of Monroe. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and mailed to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Av., Ste. 202 Brooklyn, NY, 11228 . Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] QUINZI PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/10/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Peter Quinzi 822 McKinley St. East Rochester, NY 14445 Any lawful activity.

Fun [ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

The Continuing Crisis

— Doctors Just Want to Have Fun: (1) Navy medical examiner Dr. Mark Shelly was notified of disciplinary action in July after admitting that he let his children handle a brain (and pose for photos with it) that he was transporting for autopsy to Portsmouth, Va. (2) A 15-year-old Swedish student, working at Malmo University Hospital on a “practical work-life” internship, was allowed by a doctor to make part of the incision for a cesarean section childbirth and to examine the patient vaginally. One alarmed cesarean patient alerted news media after reading about the orientation program in May and wondering if she had been a “hands-on” patient. — IRS agents, investigating tax-fraud suspect Rashia Wilson, 26, turned up “thousands” of identification numbers in a September home search in Tampa. Wilson had already laid down a challenge in May, when she wrote on Facebook: “I’m Rashia, the queen of IRS tax fraud. (I’m) a millionaire for the record. So if you think that indicting me will be easy, it won’t. I promise you. I won’t do no time, dumb (expletive unpublished).” The search also turned up a handgun, and since Wilson is a convicted felon (with 40 arrests), she was jailed, and denied bail in part because of the Facebook post. — Many visitors to San Francisco’s historic Castro neighborhood are shocked at the city’s culture of street nudism (virtually all by males). Only if the display is “lewd and lascivious” (with the purpose to arouse) is it illegal, but a September report in SF Weekly suggests that the nudity must be total -- that calling any attention at all to the genitals may suggest lewdness, such as by rings worn around the scrotum.

Bright Ideas

Way Too Many Apps: (1) The Swiss com-

pany Blacksocks offers an iPhone app that utilizes radio frequency identification chips inserted into socks so they can be automatically sorted. (2) The iPoo app, reported Wired magazine in November, “(l)ets you chat with your fellow defecators from the comfort of your own toilet.” (3) “In development” now, according to Harvard freshman Olenka Polak, is a “Code Red” app that creates an exchange network so that women and girls who find themselves unexpectedly spotting can locate an emergency source for a tampon or pad.

First-World Problems

America now has about 700 pet “aftercare” facilities, providing funeral services to the nation’s companion animals, according to a September NBC News report. Oakey’s, in Roanoke, Va., performs 800 to 900 pet cremations annually and provides about 20 customers a year with pet caskets, part of the estimated $53 billion America spends on pets (higher than the Gross National Products of more than 100 countries). The basic charge of Heartland Pet Cremation of St Louis is $275 for a private cremation, including a “basic” urn and memorial video slideshow. (For the more upscale, other facilities offer deluxe urns, taxidermy, freeze-drying pets and creating a synthetic diamond out of pet ashes.)

People Different From Us

Gareth Lloyd, 49, admitted that he is the one who made about 5,800 random phone calls (over a 90-day period -- averaging 64 a day!) to people just to listen to their reactions when he told them that his penis was stuck in a household object (usually jars or a vacuum cleaner). A Flintshire, Wales, court sentenced Lloyd only to probation (with restrictions on telephone use).

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 30 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Crank up the excitement in your life. Travel, explore new pastimes and let spontaneity lead to good times and new acquaintances who share your dreams, hopes and wishes for the future. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Serious-minded, loyal action and dedication to your beliefs and concerns will attract someone with a similar mindset who is willing to go the distance and share your vision.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your desire for change and excitement will make it difficult for you to stick to one partner unless that person shares your values, outlooks and diverse number of interests. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Let your intuition lead the way when it comes to finding the right partner. You will instinctively gravitate toward someone who is intense, passionate and into you.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll attract partners who challenge you. Back away at the first sign of domination, control or desire to change the way you are. Avoid being overly generous or compromising. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Experience will be key regarding an affair of the heart. Let past relationships help you weed out individuals who aren’t likely to give back as much as you offer.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your eclectic vision and interests will attract lots of attention from partners with varied backgrounds. Enjoy the experience and the knowledge you gain, but be wary of your differences. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Express your desires and talk about your future plans. You’ll be surprised how much interest you get from potential partners wanting to be a part of your life and your future.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Secrets will be prevalent. Ask questions and make suggestions that will allow you to see what makes the partners who interest you tick. Avoid exaggeration and evasiveness. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t base love on looks alone. Take your time and see if you enjoy interests as well as humor and life goals with whomever you meet before becoming intimate.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll have trouble deciphering the mixed messages you are getting from potential partners. Back away from anyone being secretive. Ulterior motives are present. PISCES (Feb. 19-March. 20): Money may influence a personal decision. Don’t choose someone based on what that person has accumulated. A commitment can be made, but only if you are truly in love.

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36 City november 14-20, 2012


November 14-20, 2012 - City Newspaper