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EVENTS: BILL COSBY, FIREHOUSE CHILI COOKOFF 18 FILM: “FLIGHT,” “WRECK-IT RALPH” 26 CHOW HOUND: OPA! AUTHENTIC GREEK KOOZINA,

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the violet lights

victor wooten

NOVEMBER 7-13, 2012 Free

sleigh bells

miz

declan ryan

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

john stowell

Vol 42 No 9

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

It hangs together because it has my name on it.” CLASSICAL, PAGE 18

Runaway train station? NEWS, PAGE 4

Downsizing won’t improve RCSD performance. NEWS, PAGE 5

Profile: Rob after addiction. NEWS, PAGE 6

MAG Centennial Sculpture Park update. ART, PAGE 22

2012 Restaurant & Bar Guide. INSIDE

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

America for sale This year’s presidential race was likely twice as expensive as the 2008 contest. And spending on federal elections – not just the presidential race, but the House and Senate contests, too — could’ve hit $6 billion, says Opensecrets.org, a website that tracks campaign fund-raising and spending. Money and politics is not a new marriage. But in modern politics, it’s not just the candidates and political parties raising and spending large sums of money; outside groups are spending more and more each election, too.

The Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United didn’t help. It gave corporations the ability to spend money to influence elections; they just can’t give directly to candidates. Across the country, chapters of the reform group Move to Amend are trying to get corporate money out of politics. The group is pushing for a constitutional amendment that would nullify Citizens United and a previous court decision that equates money with speech and allows for unlimited spending to influence elections.

GUEST COMMENTARY | by PATRICIA UTTARO

Libraries, e-books, and the freedom to read Public libraries are champions of books and defenders of your freedom to read. They provide a wide variety of reading materials and access for all. It’s an important role, because a free society depends on freedom to read to ensure universal access to information, new ideas, different opinions, learning through books, and knowledge. These activities are protected by the US Constitution. But the freedom to read through your public library could be in jeopardy. Several major publishers have refused to sell or license e-books to public libraries. Some make e-books available at very high prices or impose heavy restrictions on their use. Those obstacles severely limit library e-book selections – particularly the most popular books – and make it inconvenient for people to get e-books through their library. The projected growth of e-books over the next five years could transform that inconvenience into an encroachment on your freedom to read.

E-books are here to stay. A recent PricewaterhouseCoopers report projects that by the year 2016, e-books will make up 50 percent of the US trade-book market, and spending on printed books will be limited. A study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project found that 20 percent of adults had read an e-book over the past year. And libraries are already responding to the trend, with 76 percent offering e-books as part of their collections and 39 percent lending e-readers. It is possible that in the not-toodistant future, new books may only be published in digital format. When that happens, those with an e-book reader, a credit card, and disposable income will have the most freedom to read – creating a deeper-than-ever digital divide and, even worse, a significant knowledge divide. And that would be far more than an inconvenience.

Just as libraries have reinvented themselves over the years to adjust to dramatic changes in research needs, reading habits, and lending practices, traditional book publishers must reinvent their business models and their relationships with libraries to meet their bottom lines while continuing to support broad access. Librarians and library organizations across the country are drawing attention to the challenges of e-book access and trying to get publishers to change their practices. Right now, there are discussions and pilots underway between some publishers and some libraries to develop mutually acceptable models for e-book library lending. These discussions will be productive only if they lead to broad action to make e-books available to all libraries for use by the reading public with no strings attached. But libraries and librarians can’t resolve this important universal access

issue alone. They need readers, stakeholders, and policy makers to voice their concerns about the importance of preserving the freedom to read despite changes in what books look like today. The basic right to read hasn’t changed – only the vehicle for delivering books to anyone and everyone seeking information, opinions, knowledge, and the pure joy of sitting down with a good book. You can support this effort by reaching out to community stakeholders, local and state elected officials, and your members of Congress to make them aware of the e-book lending challenge and to get their support for preserving universal freedom to read and for encouraging committed collaboration between libraries and publishers. Because your freedom to read is worth fighting for. Uttaro is director of the Rochester Public Library, Monroe County Library System.

City’s coverage of the candidates

I look forward to reading your paper every week, because it is the only publication that does such a great job of covering local events and business, etc. I was extremely disappointed with your recent article concerning the Congressional race between Maggie Brooks and Louise Slaughter. I have never read anything so one-sided in my life. You may as well change the name of your paper to the Liberal Democrat Press. Maybe you need a refresher course on what journalism really is and what your responsibilities are in that regard. As a newspaper, you should be providing in-depth, thoughtprovoking information on the candidates. Instead, you spent three pages bashing Maggie  City

Brooks and little more than a page on how wonderful Louise Slaughter is. I am not disputing your assertions in the Maggie Brooks article, but are you seriously going to tell us that there is nothing negative in Louise Slaughter’s 26 years of governing? The only thing I detest more than the lies all the politicians spew is the unabashed bias in the media. You are supposed to provide us with unbiased reporting with all the facts and let us determine where we go from there. You should be ashamed of yourself. You have no right to call yourself a newspaper; all you are is an advertisement for whomever you support. I’ll continue to read the paper, because you do a great job covering the local restaurants and community, but I am definitely passing by on anything with perceived substantive value, because I can’t believe your coverage will be honest. JOSEPH SIRACUSE, ROCHESTER 

November 7-13, 2012

November 7-13, 2012 Vol 42 No 9 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler

Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

The editor’s response: We’re an alternative newsweekly, and in our 41 years we’ve never kept our liberal leanings a secret. We are committed to the journalistic standards of accuracy and fairness, but we are proudly opinionated. Our Brooks-Slaughter articles are part of our annual election endorsement package.

Congress must back diplomacy

I worry about another devastating and unneeded war. I hope whoever wins the presidency supports real, sustained diplomacy and that my members of Congress work toward this goal. As former US Ambassador to Israel Thomas Pickering recently wrote, “Patient, committed diplomacy is the only way to realize the long-term and durable objectives of an Iran without nuclear weapons and a region without war.” I was glad to hear both presidential candidates mention diplomacy with Iran during the debate this week,

but I’m concerned that some in Congress are already saying that the time for talking with Iran is over. Think about how much different our world would have been if our leaders had attacked China when it was developing a nuclear weapon. A lot of the same things that are being said about Iran now were being said about China then. War is not the answer to the conflict between the US and Iran. While in the debate I was glad to hear talk about peaceful resolution of the conflict between the US and Iran, I’m concerned that Congress could undermine diplomacy. I hope our senators will speak out on the Senate floor in support of diplomacy to prevent war and a nuclear-armed Iran and oppose any legislation that puts roadblocks in the way of diplomacy. AL GUNDLACH, ROCHESTER

Fracking complexity

New York has the nation’s worst, and most abusive,

compulsory-integration law, whereby people who do not want their land fracked can be forced to do so if enough people in their “unit” have signed leases (“Fracking’s Insurance Issues,” News). This compulsory-integration action amounts to a state-mandated violation of a mortgage holder’s mortgage terms, as well as violating homeowners’ insurance policy (turning a home property into a heavy industrial site, to name just one violation), subjecting policy holders to re-evaluation of their policies and higher premiums – or no premiums at all. As current law stands, if the fracking driller or any of its sub-contractors lack sufficient insurance to cover damages, accidents, personal injury, or death, the leaseholder is then liable to have the risk transferred to his insurance company. Nobody in his right mind would write a policy in such a situation. DWAIN WILDER

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Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

urban journal | by mary anna towler

New York, New York Each day brings more news of the pain lingering in the Greater New York area: more than 100 dead, countless homes and businesses destroyed, tens of thousands of people displaced. Scientists have been careful about linking the storm itself to global warming; an individual storm can’t be linked to longterm climate changes. But scientists haven’t hesitated to link Sandy’s horrific damage to global warming – and to warn that we’ll see more storms like this one in the future, and more damage, because of it. Too many political leaders aren’t facing up to the danger of global warming, cowed by pressure from fossilfuel business interests and an irrational fear of the fringe right. Meanwhile, we’ve delayed upgrading our infrastructure, from storm sewers to the power grid. And we have let development destroy wetlands that help protect low areas from storm surges. We’ve become a woefully antiintellectual nation, lagging behind in education in science, math, engineering, and technology, and literally sneering at science and scientists. On occasion, we wake up to obvious threats. Most of us recognize the danger of tobacco use, and we’ve accepted both regulations and taxes to limit it. Tobacco’s carnage has taken place one individual death at a time, the pain isolated and private; it shouldn’t be hard, then, to grasp the broader threat of global warming.

We may pretend to be a world leader, but we’re a woefully anti-intellectual one, literally sneering at science and scientists.”

And yet: In 2005, we saw death and destruction on a massive scale in the Gulf Coast, after years of ignoring both scientific evidence and warnings. We’ve had evidence and warnings about what could happen on the East Coast, too. But rather than uniting behind the scientists and pushing, at last, for action – rather than insisting that we lead the world in the effort to combat global warming – US political leaders have dawdled and argued, finding a pinhead to dance on, agreeing that change might have happened but questioning humans’ role in it. And so the pain of Sandy lingers in Manhattan and the Rockaways and Red Hook and Staten Island. And we wait for the next storm. This week’s print edition headed to press before polls closed on Tuesday, but we’ll have plenty of election coverage on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com. Join us there.

Bill Harter Our City publishing family lost an important member late last month with the death of our former circulation manager, Bill Harter. Bill was a lively, funny, influential, creative, fascinating, and adorable member of our staff from 1979 to 1991. A wiry, gray-haired, pony-tailed retired Postal Service worker, Bill learned the needs and quirks of our business quickly. He wrestled with postal regulations, made sure that our circulation grew, and made sure that our newsstand distribution was effective and efficient. He was endlessly patient, not only with our staff and customers but with successive groups of teenagers who, in that pre-computerized period, helped with circulation duties. And his non-work

interests were as zany and wonderful as he was: Old cars. Flying (not surprising for a former World War II fighter pilot). Roller coasters (the object of many trips). Downhill skiing (including a stint on the Ski Patrol). The Rolling Stones (leading to his winning – to great shouts from the staff here – a trip to a Stones concert in England, in a local radio contest). He was a devoted family man – and a devoted member of our City staff, keeping in touch long after he moved to Florida, e-mailing from there and stopping by to visit when he was back in town. Bill left a hole in our staff when he moved away from Rochester. And his death has left a great big hole in our hearts.

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City 

[ news from the week past ]

Fire chief announcement coming

Rochester Mayor Richards said last week that he expects to announce a replacement for former Fire Chief John Caufield shortly. Caufield left the department in the spring to become mid-Atlantic regional director of the National Fire Protection Association. He had been chief since 2007. Salvatore Mitrano, executive deputy chief of the Rochester Fire Department, has been serving as interim chief while the city searches for Caufield’s replacement.

RazorSharks owner buys Dome

Sev Hrynak, owner of the RazorSharks basketball team, is buying the Dome Arena from the Monroe County Fair and Recreation Association. The RazorSharks have played at the Blue Cross Arena at the Rochester Community War Memorial since 2005. But Hrynak could not reach an acceptable deal on a new lease for the space.

Kodak’s earnings drop

Eastman Kodak’s future looks even bleaker. The company says it lost

$222 million in the third quarter after sales of its digital cameras and film fell to new lows. The company’s revenue is down 17 percent from a year ago. The company also won court approval Monday “to stop providing health and welfare benefits to 56,000 U.S. retirees and dependents,” says the Democrat and Chronicle.

News

Tyzik in demand

Jeff Tyzik, the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra’s principal pops conductor, has been named the principal pops conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. He will conduct in Detroit three times this season.

High Falls Film Fest is back

The three-day High Falls Film Festival runs from Thursday, April 18, 2013, through Saturday, April 20, 2013. Venues include the Little Theatre, the Dryden Theatre at the George Eastman House, and the Cinema Theater. Schedule and ticket information will be announced in January. Myriad issues forced the cancellation of the 2012 festival, but the event has been retooled and returned to its original name and mission, celebrating women and film.

The much-maligned Central Avenue train station is due to be replaced by an intermodal station. Photo by MATT DETURCK

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Runaway train station? The New York State Department of Transportation has taken the intermodal station project off the City of Rochester’s hands, and city officials are wary. “Our concern is that we’ve invested a fair amount of time and effort in getting this design and this plan in place, and people are very attached to it,” says Mayor Tom Richards. The $27-million intermodal station for trains and buses will replace the aging Central Avenue train station, which was meant to be temporary when it was built in 1978. Conceptual designs harkening back to Rochester’s old Bragdon station have been released.

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November 7-13, 2012

Richards says there’s no telling what state officials will do with the project: they may start from scratch. Another concern is that the state will spend most of the money on improving the tracks, while giving the building short shrift. “Ultimately, they want to prepare the tracks for high-speed rail,” Richards says. “High-speed rail is a wonderful thing, but it’s a long time coming here. And we really don’t think we should shortchange the terminal for the tracks.” The bulk of the funding for the intermodal station is coming from the state, and the state has been

taking a more active role in projects in which it is significantly invested, Richards says. But the DOT needs to know that the city is watching, he says. “This is not a big project, so it’s kind of fragile in terms of what could actually happen,” Richards says. “But it may work out. And one of the ways to make sure it works out is by doing a little moaning and groaning in the beginning.” A state DOT representative said last week that the department is “knee deep in storm response” and couldn’t provide comment on this story.

Middle-class families aren’t leaving the city and its school system because of the buildings. They pursued options that are more likely to result in better outcomes for their children. And they will continue to do so unless the district drastically improves student achievement.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks. -- Ryan Adams, 26, Rochester SOURCE: Rochester Police Department ROCHESTER TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

2,145 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,071 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 2. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from October 23 to 31: -- Staff Sgt. Kashif M. Memon, 31, Houston, Texas -- Sgt. Clinton K. Ruiz, 22, Murrieta, California -- Cpl. Alex F. Domion, 21, Richfield Springs, New York —

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Downsizing won’t improve performance The Rochester school district’s population is shrinking. Students and their families are leaving in large numbers — opting for charter, private, or suburban schools instead of the district’s portfolio of mostly lowperforming schools. Superintendent Bolgen Vargas now has to convince school board members, parents, and the community that he knows how to right-size the district in a way that meets the city’s current and future needs. Vargas has presented school board members with a draft proposal that recommends closing five city schools to jettison unneeded space and save money. And he wants to spend about $625 million over the next 10 years modernizing some of the district’s schools. The plan is supposed to dovetail with the $325 million first phase of building modernization work that is already under way. Vargas says elementary schools 16, 22, 25, 36, and 37 are old, obsolete, and should be closed. Fitting them for technology and other modern classroom needs wouldn’t be worth the cost, he says. The task force charged with evaluating the condition of the schools also recommended modernizing about eight schools.

Bolgen Vargas. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

While most of the initial focus will undoubtedly be on the school closings, Vargas’s proposal raises a number of broader questions that deserve vetting. For starters, middle-class families aren’t leaving the city and its school system because of the buildings. They pursued options that are more likely to result in better outcomes for their children. And they will continue to do so unless the district drastically improves student achievement. The district and the city need to assure residents and taxpayers that spending $1 billion on buildings does more than shuffle students around. And that may involve re-evaluating the controversial school choice program.

League on the lake SUNY Brockport professor Joe Makarewicz will discuss the Great Lakes ecosystem at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 8, at Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Avenue. | Makarewicz’s presentation is part of a Rochester League of Women Voters event examining a position on Great Lakes protection developed by the League of Women Voters of Michigan. He’ll explain how the Michigan organization’s position will help Leagues in New York advocate for Lake Ontario. | The Michigan League has called for limiting use of fragile shoreline areas, preserving wild and pristine areas, guarding against inappropriate or excessive water use and destruction of wetlands, and non-toxic control and removal of invasive species. It’s trying to get all of the Great Lakes states to officially support its position. (The full position is available at http://www.lwvmi. org/positions.html.) | After the presentation, members of the Rochester chapter will discuss the League of Women Voters of Michigan’s position, says Georgia DeGregorio, president of the local chapter. The League of Women Voters of Michigan has asked New York’s state organization to support the position, and the state will likely take Rochester’s decision into consideration. | The Rochester League of Women Voters would also base future advocacy on the position, when relevant.

iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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LOOK FOR CITY NEWSPAPER’S PROFILE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Holiday GUIDE 2012

Rob after addiction

ONLINE & ON NEWSSTANDS

NOVEMBER 14TH, 2012

don’t miss out!

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

Rob (last name withheld), 24, is a recovering addict. Before seeking treatment, he overdosed on heroin. Photo by MATT DETURCK

With his stocky build and all-around good looks, Rob (last name withheld) could be the college kid next door. It’s easy to picture him passing a football, cramming for an exam in the library, or delivering pizza for some extra money. And those might have been snippets from Rob’s life if it hadn’t been interrupted by alcohol and drugs. But at 24, Rob’s a recovering addict. After spending several days in detox, he sought treatment in July 2011 at Unity Chemical Dependency outpatient clinic. Though the numbers vary, government data shows that between 17 million and 30 million Americans are alcoholics and more than 20 million regularly use illegal drugs. While addiction can take many forms — alcohol, drugs, tobacco, food, gambling — it is generally defined as a compulsive behavior where the drug of choice has become the controlling factor in a person’s life. If untreated, the disease can progress to problems ranging from health issues to incarceration. With some diseases, patients are passive recipients of treatment. But that’s not the case with alcoholism and drug addiction. Battling addiction often involves making a daily commitment to change, something the addict’s body and mind may vigorously challenge. Successful recovery is almost always hard won. Counselors often say addiction doesn’t

discriminate, and Rob is a good example. One of five boys, he grew up in a middle-class family in a small town west of Rochester. His childhood was as normal as could be, he says.  City

November 7-13, 2012

“No one introduced me to drugs,” he says. “It was just happenstance. I was hanging out with my friends and it was my own curiosity.” Rob was 17 and still in high school when he started drinking alcohol and smoking marijuana. By the time he began attending Monroe Community College, his drinking had increased and he was using acid and cocaine. “In my social group there were a lot of people smoking pot and drinking,” he says. “At first it was a lot of drinking, and [then] moving into hallucinogens, acid, and that. From there, I got into cocaine. I was keeping up with that for about a year or more. It was a lot of weekend binging, and sometimes it was on weekdays.” It wasn’t long before Rob began abusing prescription drugs — something Unity’s addiction therapists say they are seeing more of among younger addicts. “I started off with Vicodin and Percocet, the lower-end painkillers,” Rob says. “Then I got into OxyContin, and that was when I started to do it every day.” Two years ago, Rob began shooting heroin. Rob’s drug use began to impact his education. He was constantly switching his major: he started off in biotech, switched to mechanical engineering, and then to electrical engineering. For a while he pursued a career as a social worker. Rob also managed to pass a couple of calculus courses, but he eventually dropped out of MCC to work full time at a variety of jobs. His paychecks went to buying drugs, he says. Addicts often become highly skilled at deception, some experts say. Rob says

his parents and family members didn’t know about his addiction because he only revealed his problem in small pieces, never fully telling them the truth. “I kind of did it to throw them off my tracks,” he says. “I would say I was addicted to coke when I was really addicted to pills. I was addicted to pills when I was really doing heroin. I would kind of give them the lesser and say, ‘Well, I’m not doing that anymore.’ And it would be the thing that wouldn’t be obvious to find. I’m not doing coke, so you’re not going to find straws and coke baggies in my room.” But two events accelerated Rob’s downward slide: an arrest for shoplifting and, even worse, a heroin overdose. “It was basically a normal drug-getting day,” he says. “We went into the city and copped some dope and we started to shoot up. My friend asked me how it was and I said it was good. Then everything went black and I kind of woke up, and a paramedic was leaning over me.” Addiction is a lonely disease, Rob says, like

living in “a chaotic black hole.” You know you’re in trouble when even other addicts can’t stand to be around you, he says. The hardest part about recovery is getting started, Rob says. He says it’s like driving a stick-shift and never getting out of first gear. But Rob has come a long way, says Erin Corey, an addiction therapist with Unity. Rob has moved from sobriety — where he’s stopped using alcohol and drugs — to recovery, where he has begun the difficult work of exploring the causes of his addiction. “He has a lot of insight for someone so young,” Corey says. “Now I think he believes he can make changes in his life, and he’s already made a lot of changes.” Rob’s recovery has gone so well he now volunteers as a recovery peer at Unity. He helps Corey in group counseling, sometimes by sharing his own experiences with newly sober addicts. He’s also featured in a video on Unity’s website, and he’s back in school. He says his life is completely different now, but he recognizes that he will always be in recovery. “I will always be an alcoholic and addict,” he says. “Once I start I can’t stop.” And he says he’s learning to let go of the guilt and shame associated with his former life. “I just thought I was terminally unique, that my way was better, and it wasn’t,” he says. “Now I’m a work in progress. I’ll never be completely done, and it’s constant work. But it’s not a chore.”

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City 

America

FOR SALE

By one estimate, this year’s federal elections could cost as much as $6 billion. That’s a projection from the Center for Responsive Politics, the organization that runs the campaign finance tracking website Opensecrets.org. The number may be shocking, but it’s not spontaneous or arbitrary; it’s been decades in the making. And the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United opened up a new stream “We see the electoral process becoming more and more corrupted each cycle,” says Sam Fedele of Perinton, a member of the local Move to Amend chapter. “The evidence is the negative ads that you see.” Fedele and other Move to Amend members say the best and possibly only recourse is a constitutional amendment specifying that a corporation is not a person, but a legal entity without constitutional rights. The amendment would also say that money is not speech, and governments can limit and prohibit contributions and expenditures, and they can enact disclosure requirements. Weak, loophole-riddled campaign finance laws are also part of the money problem. They allow corporations and the wealthy to funnel money into organizations set up so they don’t have to disclose their donors. The result: unlimited spending without accountability. For example, Republican operative Karl Rove’s organizations, American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS, lead in independent expenditures for the 2012 elections, spending at least $157.6 million. But the groups didn’t  City

November 7-13, 2012

of political money by giving corporations the right to spend their cash to influence elections. Essentially, it extended the 1976 ruling in Buckley v. Valeo, which cast political spending as a form of speech. In Buckley v. Valeo, the court said individuals have the right to spend as much money as they want to influence elections, as long as they weren’t giving directly to candidates. In Citizens United, the court said corporations have that right, too.

disclose their donors, and by law they don’t have to since they are nonprofits and not political committees. Super PAC’s, unions, and other outside groups had put more than $1.1 billion into the 2012 federal races by the end of October. As of October 17, presidential candidates Barack Obama, a Democrat, and Republican Mitt Romney had raised a combined total of more than $1 billion and were nearing that mark in spending. The 2008 presidential election cost $1.7 billion, twice as much as the 2004 contest. The Congressional races haven’t come cheap, either. House candidates raised approximately $1 billion and spent approximately $891.9 million as of October 17, according to federal elections data posted on Opensecrets.org. Senate candidates raised $627.6 million and spent $540.6 million in that same timeframe. And those sums don’t include the half-billion dollars of outside spending reported in those races. Again, none of these are final figures, and there’s typically a lot of spending in the last weeks of a campaign.

Enter Move to Amend, a reform organization with chapters across the country. The organization’s members say that the growing influence of wealthy donors and corporate cash erodes democracy; elected representatives have to think about how their large donors would react to their votes.

Monroe County residents have had a firsthand look at the results of that spending, via two area House races. Rove’s Crossroads GPS spent $1.2 million to produce and air ads attacking incumbent Democrat Louise Slaughter in her race for the 25th Congressional District against Republican Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks. Outside ad spending isn’t necessarily about building an image or name-recognition. In many cases, outside groups are trying to reframe the domestic agenda, to get people and politicians to pay attention to the issues they think are important. And those issues and interests don’t necessarily align with the interests and desires of the general public. Often, they have to do with regulations. Corporations may want to overturn or water down environmental regulations that benefit the public, or banks may want to undo consumer protections that they see as impediments to larger profits. “Corporations do a lot of good things,” says Dave McLaughlin, a local Move to Amend member. “But multi-national corporations, their loyalty isn’t necessarily with the United States.”

POLITICS

BY JEREMY MOULE

Fedele says money and corporate spending in politics are often perceived as liberal issues. But there’s a strong conservative case for undoing Citizens United and Buckley v. Valeo, he says. For one, the founding fathers never intended for corporations’ influence to trump that of the greater public, he says. But money from wealthy donors and corporations is also an impediment to shrinking the size of government, Fedele says. For example, defense contractors are free to spend in support of candidates who would vote to maintain or increase military spending. “[You’re] never going to get small government because corporations see the government as a source of revenue,” Fedele says. Amending the Constitution is no easy

task. The US Senate’s website says that as of the end of 2010, 11,447 amendments had been proposed since the country was founded, and only 27 have been ratified. Among those that have failed or stalled: the Equal Rights Amendment and a measure that would give Washington, D.C., representation in Congress.

Taste it! Move to Amend’s proposed constitutional amendment Section 1 The rights protected by the Constitution of the United States are the rights of natural persons only. Artificial entities, such as corporations, limited liability companies, and other entities, established by the laws of any State, the United States, or any foreign state shall have no rights under this Constitution and are subject to regulation by the People, through Federal, State, or local law.

CHOCOLATE SEMINAR

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The privileges of artificial entities shall be determined by the People, through Federal, State, or local law, and shall not be construed to be inherent or inalienable.

Section 2 Federal, State and local government shall regulate, limit, or prohibit contributions and expenditures, including a candidate’s own contributions and expenditures, for the purpose of influencing in any way the election of any candidate for public office or any ballot measure. Federal, State and local government shall require that any permissible contributions and expenditures be publicly disclosed. Dave McLaughlin, a member of Move to Amend Rochester. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

The challenge is to make people understand and care about a complex subject, such as the influence of money on the political system. Once they do, they can educate and pressure their local elected officials, who can pressure higher office-holders and party officials further up the chain to build momentum for an amendment. Move to Amend Rochester says the first step is to educate the public, and the group is developing a program to discuss money in politics with civics-oriented classes at secondary schools and colleges. It’s also planning a seminar featuring speakers on different sides of the issue. Local elected officials would be invited and given a chance to comment. And at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 14, Move to Amend Rochester and Public Citizen, a national political reform and consumer advocacy group, will host a forum at the Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Road. The forum will focus on Citizens United, but also on how state legislation can promote fairer elections. Locally and nationally, Move to Amend

is trying to be creative with its education efforts. Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream co-founder Ben Cohen worked with the national network of Move to Amend for the Stampede to Amend tour. At the center of

The judiciary shall not construe the spending of money to influence elections to be speech under the First Amendment.

the effort are three stamps, which can be purchased Section 3 through movetoamend. Nothing contained in this amendment shall be org, that are used to stamp construed to abridge the freedom of the press. money with messages against corporate spending. Source: movetoamend.org/democracy-amendments For example, one of the stamps reads “Not to be used for bribing politicians.” it may be wiser to push for two separate (It is legal to stamp the bills, as long as they amendments, with the initial focus on aren’t rendered unusable or fraudulent.) clarifying that money is not speech. That initiative also includes a tour of the Amend-O-Matic, a truck-mounted machine (Some members of Congress have also introduced amendments to address for stamping bills. That tour did not come political spending.) through Rochester. If that amendment is ratified, federal, state, and local governments would be Move to Amend is not the only group able to pass new laws to limit campaign working to address issues around money in politics. Public Citizen and Common Cause spending and to require full disclosure of contributions and expenditures. are working at the state and national level Without change, the voice of the average to advance a constitutional amendment. In Common Cause’s case, that work is part of a person in the US political system will continue to diminish. Candidates are caught broader focus on campaign finance reform. in a cycle where they need to raise more and But there’s resistance from the wealthy more money to compete. And as the cost of interests and corporate leaders who are campaigning increases, candidates need more dumping money into elections through deep-pocketed supporters. outside spending. For that reason, undoing Citizens United may prove a heavy lift. While Move to Amend has proposed a single amendment to cover both Citizens United and Buckley v. Valeo, Fedele says rochestercitynewspaper.com

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

McMickle to give talk

Friends of Educational Excellence Partnerships presents “Everybody Needs Somebody Sometime,” a talk by the Rev. Marvin McMickle, president of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, November 13, 1100 Goodman Street South. Tickets: $25 in advance, $30 at the door. Call 455-7373.

Anti-violence workshops

The Alternative to Violence Project will hold workshops dedicated to reducing violence in homes, streets, and schools through a combination of lighthearted activities to reflective exercises. The workshops run from Friday, November 9, to Sunday, November 11. 10 City November 7-13, 2012

All meals are provided. Donations of $25 to $100 accepted. For a more detailed description of the workshops, schedule, and registration: www.avpusa. org or call 354-6844.

Book examines minority imprisonment

Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library presents a review of Michelle Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” at 12:12 p.m. on Tuesday, November 13. Activist Ream Kidane will be the reviewer, and the event is at the Central Library, 115 South Avenue.

Talk about Israeli settlements The First Unitarian Church presents a talk by Iyad Burnat, leader of the Popular Committee in Bil’in, Palestine at 7 p.m. on Saturday, November 10, at 220 Winton Road South.

US-Latin America discussion

The Rochester Committee on Latin America presents “The Election is Over: What Will it Mean for Latin America?” a discussion by Kristin Wylie, professor at SUNY Geneseo. The meeting is at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7, at Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street.

East High neighborhood meeting

The North Winton Village Association will hold a neighborhood meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7, at 1933 East Main Street. The meeting follows earlier meetings with the Rochester Police Department and the city school district regarding East High School. Neighbors have been concerned about drug sales, drug use, and student safety.

Dining Cornell Cooperative Extension, 249 Highland Avenue. And the South Wedge and Brighton Farmers’ Markets team up for the Long Season Winter Farmers’ Market (brightonfarmersmarket.org), happening every Sunday through December 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. in the Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Road.

Bowl games

Restaurants like Dogtown, Lento, and India House are scheduled to compete in the 9th Annual Firehouse Chili Cookoff, taking place 4:30-7:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 10. It only costs $25 for all the chili you can eat, a handmade ceramic bowl, and the full, warm feeling of helping out the Genesee Center for the Arts & Education. Visit geneseearts.org for tickets, or call 244-1730.

Edible dwellings

Moussaka (pictured left) and spanakopita (right) from Opa! Authentic Greek Koozina in Henrietta. PhotoS by MATT DETURCK

Greek peek [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

In this day and age, an online presence should be a priority for any business, especially a new restaurant hoping to persuade curious customers to spend their hard-earned money at an as-yet-unfamiliar place. Opa! Authentic Greek Koozina, which opened recently in Henrietta’s Frontier Commons, posted its impressive menu a few weeks before its projected debut, a shrewd move that had me daydreaming about juicy souvlaki, garlicky spreads, flaky spanakopita, and maybe a hearty helping of pastitsio. Oh, and some baklava, too. No, it’s not too difficult to find a decent gyro ’round these parts, but Opa! is only one of a couple spots whose menu skews pretty strictly Greek, and with a surprising number of seafood options beyond the typical fried squid. (Which reminds me: the Kalamari Yianni’s starter [$9], tossed with lemon, feta, and peperoncini = yum.) Appetizers include various preparations of shrimp, octopus, mussels, and smelts, and dinner brings out the grouper and salmon entrees ($19-$21). Non-carnivores are usually happy going Greek; there’s warm or cold dolmades ($7), oven-roasted gigante beans with tomatoes, carrots, and herbs ($7), and a half-dozen

spreads ($7 each), like the salty, spicy redpepper-and-feta-blend known as tyrokafteri, and melitzanosalata, made from smoky roasted eggplant. Roomy and tastefully decorated, with golds, ochres, and bright splashes of Aegean blue, Opa! honors the classics, like a crisp Greek salad ($8/$11; add some protein for several bucks more), the creamy tzatziki that balances the succulence of the meaty pitas ($8-$9), and comforting moussaka, a pillowy béchamel atop savory layers of eggplant, zucchini, potatoes, and ground beef sautéed with herbs and wine ($12/$14). Opa!’s wine and beer license is on its way; until then, it’s the smells and flavors that do the intoxicating. Opa! Authentic Greek Koozina is located at 1175 Jefferson Road. It is open MondayThursday 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday 11 a.m.-11 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Lunch prices range from $5 to $14, dinner prices up to $24. For more information, call 272-0001 or visit oparochester.com.

The sweet spot

The menu at State Street Bakery & Eatery, which recently set up shop downtown at the former site of the much-missed O’Bagelo’s, features the breakfast and lunch stuff you’d

likely be looking for: egg sandwiches, soups like white turkey chili and chicken tomato florentine, and hot sandwiches ranging from a turkey club to a roast pork with pickled daikon and sweet chili aïoli to a half-pound Angus burger. What you may not expect to find is a perfect madeleine, tender and lemony and with the proper bump. Or a chocolatecheese croissant the same size as your hand (well, my hand anyway). Or a buttery Milano-type cookie with rich dark chocolate tucked in the middle. But all those treats are there, and then some. I guess that’s why “Bakery” comes first. State Street Bakery & Eatery is located at 1165 State Street. It is open Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Food prices range from $3.25 to $7.95. For more information, call 319-4887, or visit its Facebook page.

Inside scoop

You’ve seen a snowflake or 20 by now, which means the farmers’ markets have moved their wares indoors, enabling us to shop fresh and local without exposing our purveyors’ extremities to possible frostbite. The Highland Park Winter Farmers’ Market (highlandwintermarket.com) goes down from 3-6 p.m. every Wednesday until May 8 in the auditorium of the Monroe County

It isn’t technically food news, because eating anything in the George Eastman House’s “Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display” would be punishable by... well, if not death, then it should be. So you’ll just have to use your eyes to appreciate these beautiful, clever, and occasionally mindblowing achievements in sugarcraft, with more than 70 cookie structures made by both professional and amateur bakers on display now through Wednesday, December 12. Visit eastmanhouse.org for more information, or call 271-3361

Opening

The people behind a popular west side Jamaican eatery have dropped some new roots across the river and called it Natural Vibes Jerk Hut II (663 Culver Road, 3604434), which serves up traditional island favorites from breakfast through dinner and beyond. Begin your day with dishes like callaloo ($8/$10) or ackee and saltfish ($10/$12), then participate in some real nose-to-tail eating with manish water ($4, the famous goat’s head soup), or some jerk chicken, curry goat, or cow foot ($9/$11).

Closing

The Italian restaurant Gusto has wrapped up operations at the corner of Alexander Street and Gardiner Park and joined forces with the neighboring Benedettos. Visit benedettosrochester.com to see what the new collaboration has planned. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11

Upcoming [ Dubstep ] Borgore Friday, November 30. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $20-$25. 9 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com.

Music

[ R&B ] WDKX Holiday Step Jam Saturday, December 8. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. $8.50. 1 p.m. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. [ Pop/Rock ] Passion Pit Monday, February 18. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $30-$35. 8 p.m. 232-3221. Rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

Sleigh Bells

Friday, November 9 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. | $20-$23 | waterstreetmusic.com [ ROCK ] Brooklyn duo Sleigh Bells might seem,

judging by name alone, like an early holiday diversion. But don’t be misled by the moniker. The pair pumps out a loud, raucous brand of noise pop/rock, awash in reverb and infectious riffs. The group’s 2010 debut “Treats” was a darling of year-end best-of lists, and while most recent effort “Reign of Terror” was released to favorable, albeit mixed, reviews, it offers the same primitive punch as its predecessor. There is no “might” at play here: this show WILL get loud. Hip-hop producer AraabMUZIK opens. This show was rescheduled from early October, with tickets from the original date still valid for the Friday show. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

Pietasters Saturday, November 10 Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 7 p.m. | $12-$15 | thepietasters.com [ SKA ] D.C. dancehall darlings The Pietasters are an

eight-man ska-sational onslaught that has been tasting pies and igniting dance floors full of piestompers since the early 90’s. The band’s brass-tastic, flipped-beat, rhythmdriven frenzy is back-breakingly beautiful and bombastic. Don’t try to fight the urge. “All Day” is the new album, and the band’s first of new material in five years. Keaton, Mrs. Skannotto, and Envious Disguise add gas to the fire. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Chip’s Challenge, Folkfaces, and the Dead Love Society. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Bobbie Henrie & The Goners. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info.

ZZ Top played the Main Street Armory on Friday, November 2. photo by FRANK DE BLASE

Black Tusk

Lake of fire bubblebath

Wednesday, November 14 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $8-$12 | bugjar.com

[ REVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

[ SWAMP METAL ] Swamp metal reminds me of zombie

films; it’s slow and terrifying and still manages to overcome you no matter how fast you run. The music is intense and deceptively fast within its slow grind. Enter Black Tusk from the swamps of Savannah, Georgia, a brutal threepiece band that is as much thrash metal as it is steeped in doom. Relentless and ominous, this band sets the bar for contemporary metal with a nod to its dark past. Run. To The Deep, Oceans of Insects, and Night Terror add more to the spectacle and awe. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Rochester Early Music Festival Friday, November 9 St. Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 7:30 p.m. | $5-$15 | 381-7149, wp.musicaspei.org [ CLASSICAL ] Musica Spei presents and performs as

part of the 12th Annual Rochester Early Music Festival. Musica Spei performs a cappella style from a vast repertoire of rarely performed, sacred choral masterworks of the Medieval and Renaissance periods. Also performing will be Pegasus Early Music, the Amadeus Chorale, Eastman Collegium Baroque Orchestra and Viol Consort, Baroquen Bones, Publick Musick, and organists Christopher Wilke and T. Woolard Harris. The concert is performed prism-style, as music flows from one piece to the next, and performers position themselves everywhere from the front of the church to its upper balcony and along the aisles. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Rochesterians love their synchronicity. And no, I’m not talking about the Ice Capades, I’m going on about ZZ Top, which delivered a primal killer-diller rock ’n’ roll display Friday night at The Main Street Armory for around 3,000 fans. The band strolled out onto a relatively sparse stage summa cum loud and immediately launched into three classics: the band’s version of Sam and Dave’s “Thank You,” “Waitin’ On The Bus,” and “Jesus Just Left Chicago.” (Speaking of Jesus, he had a couple of his loudmouthed minions out front beating their bibles and warning us about the lake of fire we would all be bathing in thanks to ZZ Top.) The trio took the chill out the damp night with rumbling hellfire and a swaggering, laidback back beat and that aforementioned synchronicity. Whether it was a casual leg-wiggle or a fuzzy guitar’s 360, the crowd went bananas when guitarist Billy Gibbons and bassist Dusty Hill pulled the old soft shoe a la Hope and Crosby. Gibbons’ guitar tone was thick and swampy as he sung in a lowdown growl so husky it could have been pulled by a dog sled. A little trivia for you tone hounds: Gibbons plays on .07 gauge strings, even

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though they sound big enough to be suspension-bridge cables. It seemed to me there were too many drums for the simple rhythm and swing the band churns out, even on thundering classics like “Heard it On The X.” The band dug generously into its lengthy catalogue, including its popular 80’s electronic-ified stuff like “Legs” and “Sharp-Dressed Man,” which frankly I dig the least. Thankfully, the Texas trio’s new album “La Futura” leans back into that comfy boogie we all like wallowing in, just like a big ol’ lake-of-fire bubblebath. Tommy Brunett opened the show and knocked out an immaculate infield homer with a brief set of honkified rock ’n’ tonk. The crowd was receptive and clearly drove the band into an immediate, full-set crescendo. Fellow wordsmith, saxophonist, and dark soul Charles Benoit brought his rocksteady pals in Some Ska Band to do just that at Tala Vera Saturday night. The joint was saturated and sardined to capacity as the band put its fingerprints on TwoTone and Studio One classics from the likes of Toots and the English Beat. The band is loose in its newness, but comfortable in its knowledge and obvious love of ska.

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[ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Irrera Brothers. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free [ Jazz ] Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6:30 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Atomic Swamis. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. For Today with Sleeping Giant w/Impending Doom, Texas In July, and Hundredth. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 7 p.m. $16-$18. continues on page 15

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Rochester singer-songwriter Declan Ryan says, “I guess I just want to write songs that I want to hear, that nobody’s written yet.” PHOTOS BY FRANK DE BLASE

Finding the balance Declan Ryan declandeclandeclan.bandcamp.com [ PROFILE ] By Frank De Blase

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It’s Declan Ryan’s lyrics that get you first. This Rochester singer-songwriter still searches for the appropriate genre in which to focus his insight, but his interim sound — his default strain, if you will — allows for his words to burn unfettered with a stark, undeniable hipster cool. The 23-year-old’s enigmatic lyricism and bare-bone guitar strike like Michelle Shocked’s “Texas Campfire Tapes,” or the early work of Ryan Adams (before Adams got buried in a pile his own prolific output). There are certainly more refined artists in our local music scene, but Ryan’s search and his invitation for everyone to spelunk along with him, makes for an engaging listen and a peek under music’s hood. Ryan seems to be throwing it all against the wall to see what sticks. He lends guitar to the swinging roots-rock un-band, The Public Market Band, has played with Gunnar Stahl, Club Sandwich, and recently came off an East Coast tour with Ahura Mazda. For Ryan, it’s the songwriter that comes first in the chow line before the singer. And it’s the words that are at the heart of it all. “Definitely the songwriter,” he says. “My voice is definitely my weak spot. I used to be a guitar teacher back in the day and always had more luck with that. But first and foremost are lyrics and a catchy tune.”

But at the same time, Ryan agrees it’s a combo collaboration of the two. “Sometimes, like in the case of artists like Leonard Cohen, where a lot of his songs were published as poems first. And a lot of people analyze Simon and Garfunkel that way as well. I think the two are definitely separate spheres, but the lyrics are integral to the music. The two really can’t be separated.” But do lyrics and music each pull their fair share? Singer-songwriter fans seem to be willing to give bad singing a pass as long as the lyrics hold up. Consider Bob Dylan, for example. “I’ve heard numerous accounts that he’s really a good singer,” Ryan says. “And that’s just a front he puts up… Or take somebody like Cohen, who doesn’t have a traditionally good voice. Or Tom Waits. The point at which you’re alright is when it stops interfering with the music. And that’s as far as you need to get. The way I see it; if you want to be a singer songwriter, if you want to be able to stand in a room with a guitar or piano and play a song, and have people get into it, there’s a certain baseline technical skill you need there. Anything above that is where you start developing your style.” As original melodies and hooks get harder

and harder to mine from what once upon a time seemed like a bottomless well, artists like Ryan have to forage for what remains. The lyrics give ownership, somewhat. “It’s just a different set of experiences,” Ryan says. “I mean, a lot of people have done what I’ve done. I guess I just want to

write songs that I want to hear that nobody’s written yet.” Though a fairly original artist, Ryan’s influences and intentions aren’t nearly as elusive as you might think. His references are reverential and unburied. His music is essentially anti-folk and his lyrics are Beat. Think Ferlinghetti with some fizz, Kaufman with a kick. For example, from his song “Then Don’t Hipst:”

“All my lover’s names are on highway signs So baby, blow a kiss to the state line And pray we don’t come back this way For quite some time. All these yellow lines and Jersey walls You see ’em once, you’ve seen ’em all.”

Ryan’s next step is to assemble an electric band to “explore and arrange these songs we’ve done acoustically and take it in more of a rock ’n’ roll direction,” he says. “I want to get some more people involved in it, but it seems that everybody that’s really talented is either crazy or busy.” He says that the songs and their components will weather the potential electric storm, that treacherous teeter-totter between plugged and un-plugged treatments. “Writing fairly simple songs with cowboy chords and not showing off, it’s pretty easy to go back and forth,” he says. “The way I see it, I want to make these pieces fit. It’s like a puzzle. I want them to fit in a way that it’s appealing to somebody that knows nothing about music and somebody that’s been through music school or is a 10-year veteran. I want to give them balance.”

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7

Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info. Open G. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. ROC_CHIP: The Future Band w/Cu-Cu, Sweat, and VJ PLZ. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Run For The Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 9 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after.

Six Feet Under w/Cattle Decapitation, Wretched, The Verbal Surgeon, and Mercia. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $15-$17.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Crossmolina. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Essence of Rhythm Salsa Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

JAZZ | VICTOR WOOTEN

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10

AMERICANA | MiZ

There is no shortage of dazzling slap-happy bassists on the scene today, but I have never seen one as wedded to the instrument as Victor Wooten. In every performance, he simply becomes one with the bass and there’s seemingly nothing he can’t do. Not since Jaco Pastorius has there been a bassist [ Blues ] who coaxes such a beautiful tone from his instrument. He may The Funky Blu Roots. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. be best known for his work with Béla Fleck and the Flecktones, 8:30 p.m. Call for info. but Wooten packs more than enough power on his own. Teagan Ward. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info.

[ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 s. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Copland, Bernstein—and Tyzik. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Kenneth Grant, clarinet. 7:30 p.m. $15-$82. [ Jazz ] Annie Wells. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 7:30 p.m. Free. The D’Jagoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] G Love & Special Sauce w/Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad (Acoustict). Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $22-$25. Sophistafunk w/The Moho Collective. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. [ Reggae/Jam ] Reggae Thursday Anniversary w/ Mr. Vegas. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $10 before 11 p.m.

Mike Mizwinski was given his first guitar when he was only 2 years old. At 9, his father took him to his first Grateful Dead concert. It was then that he knew what he wanted to do with his life. As a teenager, Mizwinski joined his first band and began writing his own music. In 2008, after moving back to home to northern Pennsylvania to work on a solo career, his visceral guitar style and intriguing vocal ability impressed fusion bassist Hansford Rowe. Rowe invited Mizwinski to join his band, the international touring act Gongzilla. The experience he gained Victor Wooten performs Tuesday, November 13, 8 p.m. playing with Rowe and company, as well as his work alongside at the German House, 315 Gregory St. $25.50-$30. other major acts such as Umphrey’s McGee and Particle, has ticketfly.com. — BY RON NETSKY informed his unique take on Americana. Since its foundation in 2012, MiZ has been intelligently blending folk, rock, bluegrass, [ Pop/Rock ] True Blue. Hatter’s Pub, 5 West and blues into an enigmatic American musical experience. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Ian Downey is Famous w/Trife Life, Peach Pit. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Rosie Flores w/Marti Brom. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $20-$25. Serge & Friends w/Drew Moore & Steve Melcher. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 6 p.m. Free. Teressa Wilcox Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 [ Acoustic/Folk ] CCE Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free. Grand Canyon Rescue Episode w/The Vassar Brothers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Jim Lane. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. Ken Waldman: Alaskan Fiddling Poet. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Big Blue House. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Blue Tomorrow. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Main St. 872-1505. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Community Organ Concert. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7 p.m. Free (donations accepted). Nazareth College Symphony Orchestra. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave., 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rochester Early Music Festival. St. Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 2419761. 7:30 p.m. $5-$15. Rochester Flute Association - Maria Piccinini, flute. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10-$20.

[ DJ/Electronic ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free.

MiZ performs Sunday, November 11, 8 p.m. at the Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $3-$5. 292-9940, lovincup.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Diverse Threads, Salad. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Double Standard w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Fat City. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. NiteFall. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free. Soul On Tap. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Chris Trapper. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8 p.m. $20. Dave McGrath. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 8 p.m. Free. Guitars in the Round: Petar Kodzas, Kinloch Nelson, Bob Sneider. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. $15. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info. Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. Small Potatoes. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free

[ Blues ] The Fakers. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Steve Grills and the Roadmasters. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3.

[ R&B ] Coupe De Villes. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ Classical ] Classical String Duo: Grace Crosby, Alex Trygstad. Monroe Branch Library, 809 Monroe Ave. 428-8202. 2 p.m. Call for info. Playing With Words- An Afternoon of Exploring and Singing Poetry. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 1 p.m. Free. RPO: Copland, Bernstein—and Tyzik. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Kenneth Grant, clarinet. 8 p.m. $15-$82

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Sleigh Bells & araabMUZIK. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $20-$23. [ Pop/Rock ] Doghouse w/Rob Gioia Experience. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Gary Trainer and The Sin Walkers w/Emily Mure, Frankie and Jewels’s. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4-$6. Household Pest. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. John Payton Project. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. 10:30 p.m. Free. Liquid Wrench. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info.

[ Country ] Closing Time. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 [ DJ/Electronic ] DeeDee’s Wild College Party. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $4$12 after. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Latin Fusion Guest DJ. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] The Bill Welch Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. GRR Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Hot Street Band. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. John Nyerges Band. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 8 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hedges Restaurant, 1290 Lake Rd. 265-3850. 7 p.m. Free. Wycliffe Gordon. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. $25-$38. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic/Open Stage. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 3 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Aces & Eights. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Dan & 9. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. Call for info. John Mary and The Valkyries. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $8-$10.

Victor Wooten (Bass clinic, demonstration). House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 1 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free Karaoke w/DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Karaoke with Tina P. Wintonaire, 628 Winton Road North. 7308350. 9 p.m. Free. ROCK | THE VIOLET LIGHTS

JAZZ | JOHN STOWELL

L.A. by way of Green Bay, Wisconsin, rock and raunch duo The Violet Lights pays so much homage to Britpop, you’d swear this band was from Blighty. There’s Mancunian guitar tremolo on some tracks, and Glasgowian choruses on others, giving debut EP “Sex & Sound” an across-thepond vibe. Joel Nass (vocals, guitar) and Amber Garvey (keyboard, vocals) make it tasty and leave audiences wanting for more. Lead single “Your Love/Not Enough” is pure bubblegum dance-punk that’s got me jumpin’ like Jack Flash. With Routine Involvements and Veluxe. DJ Professor follows the bands at midnight.

When Portland, Oregon, jazz guitarist John Stowell takes a solo, he aims high. Literally. Stowell’s guitar sits on his lap at a 45-degree angle, aimed at the stars. This may be unconventional, but it seems to allow the fingers on his left hand to zoom over the fret board with stunning dexterity. Stowell is a wonderfully melodic guitarist who has played with Milt Jackson, Art Farmer, Lionel Hampton, and many others. When he takes the stage at Bernunzio’s he’ll be playing a duo concert with Rochester’s world-class guitarist, Bob Sneider, whose style and guitar position are both straight ahead.

The Violet Lights perform Tuesday, November 13, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

John Stowell performs Wednesday, November 14, 7 p.m. at Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. $7-$10. 4736140, bernunzio.com. — BY RON NETSKY

Krypton 88. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. $4. Midnight Mob w/Polluted Moon. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Oblivion Fest w/Vanity Strikes. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 5 p.m. $7. Peatchy Nietzschy 20 Year Reunion. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $7. Richie Kay. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Small Town. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Stygian w/Lowkey, HorseFace. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. 21+. $5. Tryst. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11 [ Acoustic/Folk ] MiZ. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $3-$5. Wingin’ It. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Compline w/Candlelight Concert. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free (donations accepted). Pegasus: The English Cavaliers. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 2716513. 4 p.m. $10-$75.

16 City November 7-13, 2012

Rochester Celebrity Organ Recital Series- Ken Cowan. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 25 Westminster Rd. 2712240. 3 p.m. $5-$10. Russian Romance. St. Mary’s Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place. 232-7140. 2:30 p.m. $10. Veteran’s Day Concert: “Let Freedom Ring.” Athena Performing Arts Center, 800 Long Pond Rd. 7 p.m. Free. [ Country ] Benefit Line Dance for Greg Dugan w/Cold Cross Creek. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 1 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. Call for info. Free. Day Break. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ] Mary Mary. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 7 p.m. $42.50-$57.50. [ Pop/Rock ] House of Mercy Fundraiser w/ Brothers From Other Mothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 2 p.m. Call for info. Water Liars w/Dream Girls, Josh Netsky, and Ancillary Atoms. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Maria Gillard. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Gap Mangione New Blues Bland. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic with Dave McGrath. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Greyshot. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 7 p.m. Free. Hatewear Tour 2012 ft. Straight Line Stitch, Dead By Wednesday, and Defiler. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $8. The Setbacks w/Destroy Nate Allen, Dance the Hempen Jig,

Envious Disguise, and Mouth Full. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Don Christiano: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Air Force Band Of Liberty Bay State Winds Concert. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 594-6008. Call for info. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Victor Wooten. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 8 p.m. $25.50$30.

[ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] The Violet Lights w/Routine Involvements, and Veluxe. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Eilen Jewell w/The Pickpockets. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $20-$25. Open Session w/Cathy & Pat. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. Buford & Smokin’ Section. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. [ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Tony Caramia. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. [ Jazz ] Anthony Gianavola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free.

Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St. 243-9111. 7 p.m. [ Reggae/Jam ] Friends of Poncho w/Bowla Cheats. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. [ Pop/Rock ] Black Tusk w/To The Deep, Oceans of Insects, and Night Terror. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$12. Theory Of A Deadman w/Adelitas Way, Charm City Devils. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $23-$25.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17

Classical

Art Exhibits

The conductor as composer RPO: “Copland, Bernstein — and Tyzik” Thursday, November 8, 7:30 p.m. & Saturday, November 10, 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. $15-$82 | 454-2100, rpo.org [ PROFILE ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

You may have seen him wandering recently through the Memorial Art Gallery. Tallish. Glasses. Downstate accent. Both relaxed and hip at the same time. But you may not have realized that he was looking at art and hearing his own music. “I thought it was an interesting concept: that I would select certain pieces of art from the collection at the Memorial Art Gallery and write a musical depiction of them,” says Jeff Tyzik, composer and principal Pops conductor of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. In the same breath, Tyzik acknowledges, “It’s not the first time it’s ever been done in history — perhaps you’ve heard of Mussorgsky’s ‘Pictures at an Exhibition’?” Indeed, “Pictures at an Exhibition,” written in 1874 by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky, is not the only composition that comes to mind. Examples of art-inspired classical music range from Franz Liszt’s 1858 composition “Sposalizio,” from his piano works titled “Deuxième Année de Pèlerinage, Italie,” inspired by Raphael’s painting “The Marriage of the Virgin”; to Erik Satie’s 1923 composition of 20 short pieces for the piano titled “Sports et Divertissements,” with illustrations by Charles Martin. But, there is a stroke of originality in a composition inspired from works in the collection at Rochester’s own art museum. It’s exactly what we’ll hear this weekend when Tyzik conducts the RPO for his 40minute work, “Images: Musical Impressions of an Art Museum.” Tyzik was commissioned by Bob and Joanne

Gianniny to write the piece to commemorate the MAG’s 100th anniversary. Fifteen years ago, the Gianninys commissioned Tyzik to write a piece to celebrate the Genesee Country Village & Museum in Mumford. The RPO patrons did not put any conditions on the art that Tyzik could select as the inspirations for this composition. Wanting “to do something significant,” Tyzik wandered over to the Memorial Art Gallery and settled on seven works that became the seven sections of his composition. “I wandered the gallery with a totally open mind to see what interested me and what I thought 18 City november 7-13, 2012

might stimulate me musically,” says Tyzik. Tyzik’s selections surprised even himself. He says, “There are phenomenal pieces of art in the collection, but not every one of them spoke to me in a way that I thought I could depict my feelings in sound. It was very spontaneous. Certain pieces just spoke to me.” First to inspire Tyzik was a sculpture of gates by Albert Paley, “Convergence” (1987), which Tyzik described as “very celebratory, inviting, and brassy.” Another floor sculpture, this one a clock by Wendell Castle, inspired Tyzik when he learned it was based upon Castle’s impressions of the 1920 silent horror film “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.” “Each piece touched me in some way,” says Tyzik. “They inspired me to create a musical impression of these pieces.” Tyzik often works out of town to fulfill engagements as principal Pops conductor of the Seattle Symphony, Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, and the Florida Orchestra, and just last week he added the Detroit Symphony Orchestra to the list. That’s all in addition to various spots as a guest conductor from Boston to Dallas to Los Angeles and points in between. While he occasionally went back to the Memorial Art Gallery or referred to a photograph during the composing process, Tyzik says he really didn’t spend as much time in the gallery as he expected, because the impressions made upon him by the art were so striking. Looking at the list of the seven selected

works, it begged the question on how Tyzik’s composition could work as a cohesive whole. It would be difficult to imagine these seven works of art, alone, by themselves, in a single room of the gallery, and not be standing with one’s head tipped to one side, mystified to see the connection. Tyzik’s response was simple and true. “How does a symphony hang together? How does an opera hang together? It hangs together because it has my name on it,” says Tyzik. “All composers have their sound, their technique, their how they look at music — this creates some of the cohesion.” Even so, Tyzik admits that his new work, “Images,” is “a very eclectic piece.” Tyzik is grateful for the opportunity to conduct the premiere of his own composition, pointing out that as the composer he has a special insight into the piece. Tyzik says that former RPO conductor and music director Christopher Seaman was at the podium for the 2010 premier of Tyzik’s “Timpani Concerto” and says, “He did a wonderful job, but he didn’t have the insight into the piece like I have.” Tyzik says that when he has a chance to conduct his own compositions, it comes closer

RPO Principal Pops Conductor Jeff Tyzik is also an established composer. He debuts his new piece, based on artworks at the Memorial Art Gallery, this weekend. PHOTO PROVIDED

to what he intended. “I may get into rehearsal and make some changes, rebalance… I always like to have at least the first opportunity to do my pieces and then I can make any necessary adjustments,” says Tyzik. Indeed, Tyzik is fortunate as a composer to also be a conductor and a musician (he plays the cornet). And, as Tyzik sees it, “It’s very good for this orchestra to have me in a capacity other than just in the capacity as a guy who stands up in a Pops concert and waves his arms.” Over his lengthy and distinguished career, Tyzik has written more than 200 works for orchestra. He earned his undergraduate and masters degrees from Eastman School of Music, and has lived in the greater Rochester area for 43 years. But his travels as a conductor, guest conductor, composer, and jazz musician give him what he calls “a different perspective than a lot of people in the orchestra.” Tyzik says, “Rochester is not this one little bubble I live in. I look at it in a global sense of what kind of issues we are facing in the arts world and what experience I can bring back from other places when I see how others are dealing with their struggles.” Tyzik’s viewpoint inspires him to contribute to the RPO beyond the podium. “I’ve worked behind the scenes to contribute to the health of the orchestra financially and to contribute to its healthy relationship with the public,” says Tyzik. “I’ve put my heart and soul into this orchestra, doing everything I could think of to do to keep it financially sound and keep consensus between management, musicians, and the board, so we are rolling in the same direction as we face the difficulties we have faced.”

[ Opening ] Deborah Ronnen Fine Art Presents “Contemporary African American Printmakers.” Fri., Nov. 9, 5-10 p.m. and Wednesdays-Sundays. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Through Dec 21. Sun 12-5 p.m., Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. Gallery closed Nov 22-23. Reception Nov 9, 5-10 p.m. 389-5073. “Dimensions” by Rick Hirsch/ Jane Shellenbarger. Fri., Nov. 9, 5-7 p.m. and Nov. 10-30. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Through Nov 30. Reception Nov 9, 5-7 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. Holidays at the Gallery. Fri., Nov. 9, 6-8 p.m. and Nov. 10Jan. 6. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Through Jan 6. Reception Nov 9, 6-8 p.m. 3940030. prrgallery.com. “Kaleidoscope.” Fri., Nov. 9, 7-9 p.m. and Nov. 9-March 2. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. Leave Your Dryer Lint Outdoors so a Squirrel Can Enjoy the Warm Bits of Sweaters You Love. Fri., Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m. and Nov. 10-30. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Through Nov 30. Katharine Clemens senior solo exhibition. Reception Nov 9, 6-9 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Mosaic Show: Arena Art Group. Nov. 7-30 and Fri., Nov. 9, 79 p.m. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Through Nov 30. Reception Nov 9, 7-9 p.m. zannebrummer@gmail.com. “Three Meat Stew: A Photographic Medley.” Fri., Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m. and Nov. 1025. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Through Nov 25. Featuring Don Menges, George Wallace, and Gil Maker. Reception Nov 9, 6-9 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Perinton Nature-themed Fine Arts Show & Sale. Sat., Nov. 10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. One-day exhibit and sale by eleven local area bird, wildlife, and landscape fine artists. Various mediums including acrylic, oil painting, pyrography, photography, and glass art. Featuring award-winning Buffalo area wildlife painter Len Rusin. artatthearmory.com/perinton. [ Continuing ] 1975 is Haunted! 4 Year Anniversary Show. WednesdaysSundays. 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Continues through Nov 17. Hours are Wed-Fri 12-8 p.m., Sat 12-7 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. Reception Oct 20, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. “60 from the 60s.” TuesdaysSundays. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. Through Jan. 7, 2013. Mill Art

Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. “Altered States” by Betsy Phillips. Through Nov. 25. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through Nov 25. Hours Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Nov 2, 5-9 p.m. 4821976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Alumni Exhibition. Mondays, Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. genesee.edu/gallery. “Anything Goes,” Exploratory Works by the Arena Art Group. Mondays-Saturdays. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Through November 17. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception Oct 5 6-10 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. Plastic, 650 South Ave. TueSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7 p.m. 563-6348. plasticforever.com. Art of REIGN: Fine art illustration by Trish Annese & Sharon Jeter. Through Nov. 24. Cat Clay, Suite 225, Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Through Nov 24. Hours by appt. only. Reception Nov 2, 5-9 p.m. catclay.com. “Art of the Book.” Through Dec. 9. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through Dec. 9. 428-8053. libraryweb.org. “Asina/Familiar.” Through Nov. 16. SPAS Gallery, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Nov. 16. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Oct 29, 5-7 p.m., panel 7 p.m. 475-2884. Brian O’Neill & David Dorsey. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Through Nov 24. Hours Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 27 5:30-7:30 p.m. 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. Carla Bartow. Ongoing. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Opening Fri Oct 19, 7-10 p.m. carlasswanktank.blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. “Catching Dreams.” Through Jan. 13, 2013. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Featuring the work of Bonnie Evangelista, Becky Harris and Chris Horn. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. “Clouds in My Coffee..” Through Nov. 24. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com. “Dansville Friends and Artists.” Through Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. The Ecology of Food: Past, Present, Future. Through Dec. 5. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr. Through

ART | “Contemporary African American Printmakers”

Visitors to the “Contemporary African American Printmakers” exhibit at the Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery (4245 East Ave.) will gain something more than a pleasant afternoon of art viewing. Presented by Deborah Ronnen Fine Art, the exhibit focuses on 13 living, renowned African-American artists who regularly incorporate printmaking into their artwork. While visitors will see more than 30 works across a diverse range of print techniques, such as etching, lithography, wood block, screen print, gravure, and more, they will also gain knowledge of the printmaking process. As a backdrop to the artwork displayed, clips from “Art21—Art in the Twenty-First Century,” a Peabody Award-winning PBS series, will feature participating artists describing their work and process. Artist names that may stand out to those familiar with the field are Kara Walker, Martin Puryear, and Mickalene Thomas (artwork pictured). The exhibit is being held in conjunction with Rochester’s premiere of Garth Fagan’s new work, “Lighthouse/ Lightning Rod,” which features music by Wynton Marsalis. “Contemporary African American Printmakers” will represent the show’s set designer, Alison Saar, in four prints. Visitors can see the exhibit Friday, November 9, through Friday, December 21, with an opening reception this Friday 5-9 p.m. Gallery hours are Wednesdays and Thursdays noon-5 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays noon-8 p.m., and Sundays noon-5 p.m. Note that the gallery will be closed November 22-23. For more information call 389-5073 or visit naz.edu/art/arts-center-gallery. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON December 5. Reception Oct 3 5-7 p.m. Additional talks Wednesdays 2:30-3:30 p.m. geneseo.edu/galleries. “Edges of Books.” MondaysFridays, 1-5 p.m. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Dec 14. Reception Oct 4, 5-7:30 p.m. 475-3961. rit.edu. Exposed: Rochester’s Hidden Victims of Homelessness. Mondays-Fridays. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. 2715920. cityofrochester.gov. The Exquisite Corpse. Through Nov. 29. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Continues through Nov. 29. Opening night 5-9 p.m. 3770132. outsidetheboxag.com. The Faces in Wood by Charles Jaffe. Through Dec. 31 and Sat., Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m. Genesee Coop Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. Through end of Dec. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., ThuFri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Reception Nov 10 6-8 p.m. 461-2230. melissa@genesee.coop. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. TuesdaysSaturdays, 7 p.m. Primitive

Impressions, 4 Livingston County Campus. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. Through Dec. 8. iGallery Kathy Clem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St., Suite 312. Continues Nov 2-Dev 8. Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7-9 p.m. igallerykathyclem.com. “Framing Edo: Masterworks from Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views.” WednesdaysSundays. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. In Lockhart Gallery. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Honeoye Falls-Lima Central School District Art Department members. Through Nov. 30. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Through Nov 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Nov 2, 6-9 p.m. 244-9892. “Joy in the Atmosphere” by Richmond Futch. Through Dec. 31. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321

East Ave. Through Dec 31. Reception with live music and open painting Nov 2, 6-9 p.m. 729-9916. “Lost Birds: Sculptures by Todd McGrain.” Tuesdays-Sundays. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Oct 21: “Ideas in Things.” | Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Low Fidelity.” Through Dec. 9. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street. Through Dec. 9. Hours MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Reception Oct 25, 4-6 p.m. 395-2805. brockport. edu/finearts. “Me Pix: Picturing Ourselves in video and photography.” Wednesdays-Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Through Nov 18. Featuring Ann Oren, Daniel Cosentino, Jess Levey, Karen Y. Chan, and Stefan Petranek. Reception Oct 5 6-10 p.m. Artists’ talk Oct 7 1 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep. 30, 2013. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. Nathan Lyons: Photographs 1957-2012. MondaysSaturdays. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through November 30. Hours Tue, Thu 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Wed, Fri, Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. “An Open Mind.” Through Nov. 30. Through November 30. Our House Gallery, Veterans Outreach Center Inc., 459 South Ave. Month-long photography exhibit capturing the joy and beauty of what life is like for the thousands of responsible pet owners in our community who own and embrace pit bulls as valued and cherished family members. Reception Oct 26, 6-9 p.m. pittyloverescue@gmail.com. Opening of Longhouse Exhibit. Through Nov. 9. WilliamsInsalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Through Nov 9. Exhibit of Native American longhouses by Canandaigua third- and fourth-graders. Gallery hours Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 785-1623. Original Oil Paintings by American artist David Kerstetter. Mondays-Sundays. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Nov 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. “Painting Tuscany.” Through Dec. 1. Mill Art Center & continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19

COMEDY | Bill Cosby

KIDS | Children’s Book Fest

SPECIAL EVENT | Firehouse Chili Cookoff

Most famously known as the beloved, sharp-witted father on “The Cosby Show,” Bill Cosby has repeatedly proven his ability to win over the hearts of Americans across the nation. Not only has he made a name for himself as an actor and comedian, Cosby has also participated in a variety of concerts, recordings, and educational commercials. In terms of making strides for racial equality, the American icon broke barriers in television as the first African American to co-star in a dramatic series on the TV show “I Spy.” In an age where vulgarity frequently dominates the entertainment scene, Cosby has found a way to captivate audiences in a wholesome, yet, hilarious manner.

With daylight hours waning, pleasure reading seems more and more alluring as an evening activity after school or work. A great way to learn more about as-of-yet undiscovered books, authors, and illustrators is to bring the family to the Rochester Children’s Book Festival” On Saturday, November 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. authors, illustrators, and avid readers will gather at Monroe Community College (1000 E. Henrietta Road) to meet, discuss books, and attend workshops and presentations. Some workshop topics include how to write mysteries, fantasies, and poetry. The festival is presented by Lift Bridge Book Shop, in affiliation with Monroe Community College, 292-Baby, and Rundel Library Foundation, and is free (parking included) and open to the public. For more information, visit rochesterchildrensbookfestival.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON

Nothing whets my appetite for chili more than being trapped indoors on a cold, wet day. With the way the weather’s been raging in Rochester lately, the 9th Annual Firehouse Chili Cookoff can’t come soon enough. Hosted at the historic firehouse home of the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education at 713 Monroe Ave., the contest will take place Saturday, November 10, 4:30-7:30 p.m. with proceeds going toward programs GCAE provides for the community.

On Friday, November 9, at 8 p.m. Cosby will perform live at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.). Tickets range from $52 to $82. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 2225000 or visit rbtl.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON

Art Exhibits Gallery, 61 N Main St. Through December 1. Landscape paintings by Rebecca DeMarco, Denise Heishman, Jane O’Donnell, Sara O’Donnell, Betsy Taylor, and Rosalee Bedian. Reception October 19 6-8 p.m. millartcenter.com. Paintings 2012: William F. Seller. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Through Nov 30. Opening reception, Nov. 2 from 5-9 p.m. 473-4000. ArtsRochester.org. Paintings 2012: William F. Sellers. Mondays-Fridays. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Through Nov 30. Gallery closed Nov 7, 22, 23. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. “Partisan Artisans.” TuesdaysSaturdays. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Through Nov 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Reception Nov 6, 7-11 p.m. 288-7564. info@ rochestergreen.org. Patti Ambrogi and Own Butler Photographic Exhibition. Through Nov. 28. Gallery r, 100 college ave. Through Nov 28. 2563312. galleryr99@gmail.com. “Pieces of Me” New Work by Mary Moore. Through Nov. 30. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Through November 30. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. “Pitch Man” Hank Willis Thomas. Thursdays-Sundays. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. Through Dec 9. Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun 12-3 p.m. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. “Radical Departure” by Jose Olivieri Rivera. MondaysFridays, 7-9 p.m. Mercer

Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Continues through Nov 9. Hours are Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. monroecc. edu/go/mercer. Rochester Art Club Fall Art Exhibition. Through Nov. 30. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. 585 278 7501. rochesterartclub.org. Sharon Stiller, Painter. Through Nov. 30. 2Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 271-6111. 2chicboutique.com. “Susan Ferrari Rowley: New Directions.” Through Nov. 17. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Through November 17. Reception Oct 6 5-8 p.m. Artists’ Talk Oct 24 6:30-8:30 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. “This Gentleman Bamboo” by Dennis Burns. MondaysSaturdays. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Through Nov 24. Hours are Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 20, 12-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 10, 12-4 p.m. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Webster Art Club Fall Show. Through Nov. 29. Webster Library, 980 Ridge Rd. Through Nov 29. Awards Reception Nov 10, 2-4 p.m. 872-7075. [ Call for Artwork ] Let Them Eat Cake! Portraits of Pastries. Submit by Nov. 10. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Follow guidelines at shoefactoryarts. com/callforartists.html.

20 City november 7-13, 2012

Art Events [ Through November 16 ] CANstruction. Through Nov. 16. Bausch & Lomb Wintergarden. Guests are encouraged to bring a can of food for donation for Foodlink. [ Saturday November 10 ] Anderson Alley Artists Second Saturday Open House. Sat., Nov. 10, 12-4 p.m. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St. andersonalleyartists.com. Animal Art Expo. Sat., Nov. 10, 7-10 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. senecaparkzoo.org. Webster Art Club Fall Art Show Awards Reception. Sat., Nov. 10, 2-4 p.m. Webster Library, 980 Ridge Rd. 872-7075.

Comedy [ Friday, November 9 ] Billy Cosby. Fri., Nov. 9, 8 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 800-745-3000. tickmaster. com. [ Monday, November 12 ] Laughin’ Cup 2012 FINALS. Mon., Nov. 12, 8 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. The top 8-10 finishers from the preliminary rounds compete for the title of 2012 Laughin’ Cup Champion. 292-9940. lovincup.com.

Dance Events [ Friday November 9 ] Swing: A Night of Films, History, and Dancing. Fri., Nov. 9, 7 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY. The Lindy Hop is the original swing dance that originated in the 1920s and evolved alongside American Jazz music

throughout the century. Mike Thibault will be sharing the history of the dance through his collection of vintage and modern film clips of Lindy Hoppers during two 20minute film showings. 7-8pm: Beginner swing dance lesson 8-11pm: Social dancing with DJ Sam Copeland of Buffalo 9&10pm: 20-minute film presentations We’ll have freshpopped popcorn, movie candy, and other refreshments to enjoy during the films. We’ll pull up chairs, get inspired by the best of the best, then clear the floor for dancing!. 706-2621.

Kids Events [ Saturday, November 10 ] 2012 Rochester Children’s Book Festival. Sat., Nov. 10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. rochesterchildrensbookfestival. org. American Girl Fashion Show. Sat., Nov. 10, 10:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 11, 10:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Cathedral Hall at The Auditorium Center, 875 East Main St, 4th floor,. Fashion Show for girls, families and their favorite dolls. Enjoy tea party with refreshments and door prizes. 585-415-0550. twigsrgha.org. [ Saturday, November 10Sunday, November 11 ] Meet Dora and Diego at Animal Adventure Weekend. Nov. 10-11. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Sat 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun 1–4 p.m. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ Sunday, November 11 ] Buddy the T-Rex from Dinosaur Train. Sun., Nov. 11, 12-4 p.m.

A $25 ticket that includes all-you-can-eat chili, a drink, and a hand-made ceramic chili bowl that you get to take home with you. Patrons also get to vote on their favorite chili recipe, with contestants including local restaurants in several different categories. DogTown, Lento, Jines, Jeremiah’s Tavern, Mex, and India House are just some of the chili-makers competing for glory. In addition to tasty food and some friendly competition, the event will feature live music from Amanda Lee Peers of Driftwood Sailors. To those who love cows too much to eat them, never fear! Vegetarian and vegan options will be available. To purchase tickets, visit GeneseeArts.org, or call the Genesee Center office at 244-1730. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. rmsc.org. [ Monday, November 12 ] Magic and Mr. J. Mon., Nov. 12, 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. All ages are welcome. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ Tuesday, November 13 ] Gates Graphic Novel Group. Tue., Nov. 13, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Grades 7 to 12. 247-6446.

Lectures [ Wed., November 7 ] Among the Many Fires: Trials, Opportunities and Experiences of Native Americans in the Civil War. Wed., Nov. 7, 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Presented by GCC history instructor Dan Hamner. 5853430055. civilwaratgcc. wordpress.com. The Science of Global Warming and its Solutions with Beth Vanfossen. Wed., Nov. 7, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. 336-6060. Talking with Kids about the Real Stuff: Illness, Sexuality, God, Dying... Wed., Nov. 7, 811:30 a.m. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. 32nd Annual Janice Lynn Cohen Memorial Symposium. 2752187. crcds.edu/upcomingevents/?event_id=11.

[ Thursday, Novbember 8 ] 21st Annual Kristallnacht Program. Thu., Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Featuring author Tim Snyder, Ph.D. 292-3399. monroecc.edu/go/ holocaust. Building Our Media: a critical discussion series on independent media. Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Rochester.Indymedia.org. “Celtic Spirituality: Why the Irish Pray Differently.” Thu., Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. sjfc.edu. “The Election is Over: What Will it Mean for Latin America?” with Kristin Wylie. Wed., Nov. 7, 7 p.m. rocla.us. Religion and Technology in Shannon Lecture Series. Nov. 8. Thu., Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Ilia Delio, O.S.F., will present A Post-Human World? Technology and the Future of Humanity. 389-2728. naz.edu/news. Wish You Were Here Lecture with Douglas Holleley. Thu., Nov. 8, 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. [ Thursday, November 8Friday, November 9 ] 16th Helen Barrett Montgomery Conference. Nov. 8-9. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity

School, 1100 S. Goodman Street. 340-9651. Gdickersonhanks@crcds.edu. [ Friday, November 9 ] Community Dialogue: Parents and Education. Fri., Nov. 9, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. thebaobab.org. Community Dialogue Series: Parents and Education. Fri., Nov. 9, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Community Dialogue/Guest Speaker event: Parents as primary advocates for children’s education and after school programs. Teachers, parents, students and educational leaders will be invited to participate in this important conversation. Speaker/facilitator TBA. 563.2145. thebaobab. org Fri., Nov. 9, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Community Dialogue/Guest Speaker event: Parents as primary advocates for children’s education and after school programs. Teachers, parents, students and educational leaders will be invited to participate in this important conversation. Speaker/facilitator TBA. 563-2145. Religion and Technology in Shannon Lecture Series. Nov. 9. Fri., Nov. 9, 1:30 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Ilia Delio, O.S.F., will present Are We Wired for God?. 389-2728. naz. edu/news.

at noon or 2 p.m. tea lecture. susanbanthonyhouse.org. [ Tuesday, November 13 ] “50 Hidden Gems of Western NY” Presentation by Christopher Carosa. Tue., Nov. 13, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Jack’s Place at the Durand Eastman Golf Course, 1200 Kings Highway. 234-1884. “Everybody Needs Somebody Sometime” Reaching Out When the Ones in Need Are Our Children. Tue., Nov. 13, 7 p.m. With Rev. Dr. Marvin McMickle. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, 1100 Goodman Street South. 455-7373. “Halfway to Heaven and You:” How Popular Songs Sang Us

to the Suburbs. Tue., Nov. 13, 7 p.m. Greece Town Hall, one Vince Tofany Blvd. 225-7221. Opera Guild Lecture Series: “Verdi and the Orchestra.” Tue., Nov. 13, 7:30-9 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. iaccrochester.org. A Personal Journey in Reasearching the Holocaust: Chapter Two. Tue., Nov. 13, 12:15 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Nazareth’s celebration of International Education Week will come to a close with a lecture given by Nazareth College Center for International Education

Director Dr. George Eisen. 389-2371. Social Media and the Job Search. Tue., Nov. 13, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org.

Literary Events [ Thursday, November 8 ] The Greater Rochester Russell Set. Thu., Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. Phil Ebersole on Bertrand Russell’s Religion and Science. 415-5925. tmadigan@ rochester.rr.com. wab.org. Storytelling for Adults with Jay Stetzer. Thu., Nov. 8, 7 p.m.

Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ Saturday, November 10 ] Deep Fried Poetry Reading with Rosebud Ben-Oni and Rachel McKibbens. Sat., Nov. 10, 7 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Doors at 6:30pm,. attheyards@ gmail.com. attheyards.com. Playing with Words: An Afternoon Exploring and Singing Poetry. Sat., Nov. 10, 1-4:30 p.m. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. rochester.edu/eastman/calendar. esm.rochester.edu. Reading: Susan Gateley. Sat., Nov. 10, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78

W. Main St. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. [ Sunday, November 11 ] Steven Huff and Gerald Schwartz. Sun., Nov. 11, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ Monday, November 12 ] Ken Waldman, Alaska’s fiddling poet. Mon., Nov. 12, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590 x104. wab.org. [ Tuesday, November 13 ] Books Sandwiched In: “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.” Tue., continues on page 23

[ Saturday, November 10 ] Iyad Burnat, Head of the Popular Committee in Bil’in, Palestine. Sat., Nov. 10, 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 967-4946. rjmfrep@rochester.rr.com. rochesterunitarian.org. Learn about Local Tug Boats. Sat., Nov. 10, noon. Charlotte Genesee Lighthouse, 70 Lighthouse St. 621-6179. geneseelighthouse.org. Scholar in Residence. Fri., Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Congregation Beth Sholom, 1161 Monroe Ave. On Fri Nov 9 Clinical Psychologist, Dr. Lisa Aiken, will speak on ‘The Jewish View of Love and Intimacy” followed by a dessert reception. On Saturday Nov 10 her topic will be “Modesty and Self Esteem..” 473-1625. bethsholomrochester.com. [ Sunday, November 11 ] Arsenal of Freedom: Rochester’s Industry. Sun., Nov. 11, 2 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford. Rochester’s industry was completely transformed to produce the weapons and other supplies needed to win World War II, presented by Bob Marcotte. 249-5481. townofpittsford.org/library. [ Monday, November 12 ] Israel Speaker Series: Kenneth Stein. Mon., Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 461-0490. JewishRochester.org. Monday Lecture Series: “Hester Jeffrey: Lost and Found Again.” Mon., Nov. 12. Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, 17 Madison St. Luncheon lecture rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21

Art

One view of the Tom Otterness commission, “The Creation Myth,” now installed in the Memorial Art Gallery’s growing Centennial Sculpture Park. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Otterness sculpture complete; MAG sculpture park proceeds [ FEATURE ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Over the past few months striking progress has been made on the Memorial Art Gallery’s Centennial Sculpture Park, as well as the ArtWalk Extension project that has transformed the surrounding neighborhood. Sections of the forbidding iron fence that previously surrounded the gallery’s grounds have been removed, and the at-one-time boiling controversy over the large-scale sculptural installation by internationally renowned artist Tom Otterness has been reduced to barely a simmer. City spoke again with representatives for the MAG, with protestors, and this time with Otterness himself to learn more about the sculpture park and its place in the context of the Neighborhood of the Arts, as well as the greater Rochester community. The Centennial Sculpture Park is projected to be completed by October 2013, and will include more than 20 sculptures, new gardens, and a word-laden walkway through the museum’s campus. A year’s worth of celebrations kick off this month with the premiere of Rochester Philharmonic 22 City november 7-13, 2012

Orchestra Pops Conductor Jeff Tyzik’s original composition based on work in the MAG’s collection. Future programming will include major speakers, gala events, and unveilings and dedications of monumental works by Albert Paley and Wendell Castle. The transformation of the gallery’s campus along University and North Goodman is already so dramatic that the final product could not have been appreciated through the renderings. A canopy of trees towers over Otterness’s massive limestone statues and the new space feels like an open park, not a place owned by a private institution. The statues’ basic forms have been criticized by members of the community for a lack of character and sophistication, called a safe choice for the gallery, and compared to various toys meant for infants. I myself had doubts about Otterness’ aesthetic choices, but since experiencing the space myself and talking with the artist, I have a new appreciation for the playfulness he’s injected into the behemoth and minute figures. The Otterness commission, “Creation Myth,”

was installed concurrently with the ArtWalk Extension project that wrapped in early

October; that project included additional sculptural art, benches, bulletin boards, and revamped sidewalks along East Avenue, University Avenue, and North Goodman Street. “The area has become a science-art corridor,” says Grant Holcomb, director of the Memorial Art Gallery. “We feel very proud of our part in this larger art park of Neighborhood of the Arts.” Brooklyn-based artist Otterness traveled to Rochester to oversee and participate in the installation process. I spoke with the artist in late October, when he was doing some final walkthroughs to finish up on-site detail work on the sculptures, and finalizing the locations of the little bronze sculptures that accompany the big stone statues on the corner, and which act like a breadcrumb trail to the front doors of the gallery. Tiny by comparison, the bronzes cling to or perch upon the larger limestone sculptures, acting out the process of the sculpting or helping the sculptor with hatched chisel-mark details on the stone. The figures are made up of essential artistic forms — the cube, sphere, and cone, which are serendipitously echoed elsewhere along the now-completed ArtWalk Extension project — an aesthetic the artist adopted in 1978, when he was creating work using simplified forms inspired by Russian Constructivists and international sign imagery. Here, he puts some untraditional twists on the basic malefemale symbols, with bronzes of same-sex pairs engaged in a tender kiss (“It seemed good not to have it so heterocentric,” Otterness says) and others representing Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony penning their landmark publication, “The Revolution.” The installation is “sort of a reverse Pygmalion story,” says Otterness. “Instead of the guy carving the gal out of stone and kissing her and she comes to life, it’s the reverse. The gal is the sculptor and she’s trying to carve the right guy. This is the quarry scene,” Otterness says, referring to the amphitheater that now stands behind the main sculptures. “She’s been back here working, she’s given up on the other two guys back here. The one’s hands are backwards, the other one’s head has fallen off. They all have problems. The guy up front has his feet stuck together, but she keeps trying.” The work alludes to both people and their creative processes as being in continually unfinished states. For more than a year MAG has been

challenged by groups protesting the Otterness commission and MAG’s association with the artist. Their concerns stem from an art film Otterness made in 1977 in which he shot and killed a dog. Though most of the public discourse on the Centennial Sculpture Park

has focused on one controversial installation, the MAG staff doesn’t see the park as simply “an isolated commission, but a new presence, a new sense of space, a new gift to the community,” says Holcomb. Despite protests and petitions drawn up in opposition to the Otterness commission, Holcomb says that the gallery lost no more than two dozen members. In fact, it actually gained new members who wanted to show their support, and had 25,000 more people attend gallery events in the past year than the year before, according to Holcomb. The responses from those who wanted the MAG to rescind the Otterness commission have ranged from measured conversation to more extreme approaches. According to Holcomb, one person contacted Holcomb’s former employers, various staff members have been threatened, there have been angry, anonymous postings to voice mails, and Otterness’s life has been threatened. Holcomb calls the matter disturbing “in the sense that positions of vengeance and revenge and anonymous threats are just not a part of the world we’re used to,” he says. “We’ve learned a lot, and I can personally say that I found the experience, if disturbing at times, enlightening overall.” “I don’t think people’s minds will be changed overnight,” says Marjorie Searl, chief MAG curator, of the Otterness installation. “But no matter how people feel intellectually, I think it’s only fair for them to experience the space,” she says. Then she hopes that people can determine on a personal level if there is long-term value to this community “of having a space like this [which] helps to open them up to seeing Tom and his work in a larger sense, rather than focusing on one event, as repugnant as that event is to all of us.” Experiencing the space is not an option for

some protestors. “I won’t go down there, unless an organized protest comes to fruition,” says Dr. Michelle Brownstein, a veterinarian at Henrietta Animal Hospital. Brownstein is the originator of the Rochesterians Against Tom Otterness petition, which she says now has almost 4,000 signatures. Her feelings about the Otterness commission have not changed, though she expressed disappointment that the fire from the protestors “took such a nosedive and lost so much popularity” in the past year. Brownstein continues to believe that Otterness’s apology for the dog incident, which he made publicly in 2008, was insufficient, and sees the installation as “a tribute to a guy that abuses animals, that has abused animals in the past,” she says. Her long-term hope is that the sculptures are removed.

Literary Events

The MAG has pursued the possibility of some kind of tangible form of contrition being paid by Otterness, possibly to a local animaladvocacy group, but no resolution has been detailed at this point. One unfortunate side effect of the controversy

is that a public talk and formal unveiling of the work with the artist present is basically impossible. But despite the threats, Otterness says he wasn’t personally harassed during the installation process — in fact, one passing driver shouted out a commendation of the progress made by the artist and the installation team, he says. MAG has considered the possibility of the sculptures being vandalized, and the organization has taken the usual precautions to try to discourage it, including the use of video surveillance. Artist, MAG member, and NOTA resident of 22 years Paulette Davis doesn’t think it’s likely that the installation will be defaced, but says that if that happens, it would be a selfish act. “Don’t penalize the rest of us as city dwellers,” she says. Davis says she has already witnessed positive interactions between neighborhood residents and the “playful, engaging” new sculptures, which she believes invite a wider audience from the community on to MAG’s campus. Davis sees the protests as “almost a class issue,” and says that protestors shouldn’t discount the opinions of the people who welcome the installation. A Creative Workshop instructor for years, and a professed animal lover, Davis considers Otterness’s controversial past action to be abhorrent. But, she says, “in general, I don’t feel people should be held to one act of cruelty or even extreme stupidity” if the person has apologized and hasn’t repeated it. “Life is dynamic and life does not stay fixed in the past,” says MAG curator Searl. “We don’t bring to any other work of art the life history, typically, of the artist who created it, and if we did, we would certainly have a hard time with some of the works of art that are most valued in our culture.” “If we are consistent in the way we appreciate art,” Searl says, “over time, people are going to have to decide if the art has value standing on its own.” Progress on the Centennial Sculpture Park will continue with the completion of Jackie Ferrara’s “The Rochester Project” as the year ends, followed by installations of Paley’s and Castle’s sculptures in the summer of 2013. Watch for future updates and postings on MAG’s Centennial at rochesercitynewspaper.com.

Nov. 13, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com.

Museum Exhibit [ Through January 6 ] A T. rex Named Sue. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-4320. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ Thursday, November 8 ] A Walk on the Wild Side: Dishmill Creek Area. Thu., Nov. 8, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Will car pool from Parade Grounds lot. Brush and poison ivy on deer paths. 493-3625. [ Saturday, November 10 ] GVHC Hike. Sat., Nov. 10, 9 a.m. Springdale Farm lot, 696 Colby st, Ogden. Moderate 6+ mile hike, Northampton Park. 750-8937. gvhchikes.org. [ Sunday, November 11 ] Big Tree Tour Part III. Sun., Nov. 11, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Meet at Castile entrance gate, bring lunch. 493-3625. GVHC Hike. Sun., Nov. 11, 1 p.m. Ellison Park lot, 1008 Penfield Rd. Easy 3-4 mile hike Corbett’s Glen. 254-4047. gvhchikes.org. [ Monday, November 12 ] Second Annual Stars and Stripes VeteRun 5K. Mon., Nov. 12, 11 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road. veterun.webs.com. [ Wed., November 14 ] Old Growth Forest: Trestle Woods. Wed., Nov. 14, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Meet at Visitor Center for car pool, bring a lunch. 493-3625.

Special Events [ Wed., November 7 ] 29th Annual Arts Awards. Wed., Nov. 7, 11:15 a.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St. 473-4000 x205. artsrochester.org. Free Autumn Community Meal. Wed., Nov. 7, 5-6:30 p.m. Covenant United Methodist Church, 1124 Culver Road, corner Parsells Avenue. 6548115. Latino Cultural Symposium. Wed., Nov. 7, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Flaum Atrium, UR School of Medicine & Dentistry. urlpa@ rochester.edu. [ Thursday, November 8 ] Artists & Artisans Series: Meet the Cheesemakers. Thu., Nov. 8, 6-7 p.m. Simply Crêpes continues on page 24

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As unusual as the schedule of this club’s activities may seem, the run portion of meetings are not customary either. A Hash run includes a running trail unknown to members that is marked in advance, usually by flour, chalk, or even toilet paper, by one member of the group dubbed the “hare.” Members run through the woods, searching for trail markings, then conduct “down-downs” time afterward by sipping a cold beer. Once participants have attended several runs, they are designated a “hash name,” which typically has an embarrassing or filthy connotation. If this sounds like your kind of exercise, check out what The Hash is all about on Sundays throughout the winter. Runs begin at 2:09 p.m. and average three miles. Anyone over 21 is welcome, and visitors to H3’s website are assured that there are plenty of opportunities for walking breaks if you need a breather. For more information about this week’s run, call 234-1708 or visit rochesterhhh.com/2.html. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON

• Have not been hospitalized in the past 6 months for schizophrenia • Are willing to switch to the investigational medication for up to 1 year

For many of us, exercise can require some — or, let’s be honest, a great deal — of motivation. Flour City Hash House Harriers, also known as “HHH,” “H3,” or “The Hash,” seems to have the motivation factor down to a science. The local branch of this worldwide club describes itself as “a drinking club with a running problem.” Originally started in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 1938 as a running club comprised of British colonial officials and expatriates, HHH conducts group runs through local parks and wooded areas that culminate in a post-run celebration at a local pub or drinking venue.

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Special Events Canandaigua, 101 South Main Street, Canandaigua. 394-9090. [ Friday, November 9 ] Victor Wine & Food Fest. Fri., Nov. 9. Ravenwood Golf Club, 929 Lynaugh Rd. 742-6320. victorldc.org. [ Friday, November 9Sunday, November 11 ] Big Screen Adventure: Coral Reef Adventure. FridaysSundays. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 4 p.m., sat 2:30 & 4:30 p.m., Sun 1, 2, & 4 p.m., also Mon Oct 8 2:30 & 4:30 p.m. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ Saturday, November 10 ] 9th Annual Firehouse Chili Cookoff. Sat., Nov. 10, 4:307:30 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. American Girl Fashion Show. Sat., Nov. 10, 10:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 11, 10:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Cathedral Hall at The

Auditorium Center, 875 East Main St, 4th floor,. 585-4150550. twigsrgha.org End The Silence on Domestic Violence. Sat., Nov. 10, 6 p.m. New Life Fellowship Church, 330 Wellington Ave. 415-0550. Haudenosaunee Day. Sat., Nov. 10, 12-4 p.m. Eisenhart Auditorium, Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Avenue. rmsc.org. RTV Professional Beer Tasting Seminar. Sat., Nov. 10, 2-5 p.m. Camp Lima, 2375 Pond Rd. 582-1494. rgesell@ rochester.rr.com. Star Show: Curiosity on Mars. Saturdays, 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Also Mon Oct 8, 1 p.m. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Trade It in For Cobblestone Fundraiser. Sat., Nov. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd in Penfield. 348-9022. rocgold.com. [ Sunday, November 11 ] 2012 Rochester Collectible & Vintage Toy Show. Sun., Nov. 11, 10 a.m. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 334-4000. RochesterToyShow.com.

218th Anniversary Commemoration of Canandaigua Treaty. Sun., Nov. 11. 1:30 p.m. parade from Canandaigua Primary School, 96 W. Gibson St. to Ontario County Courthouse, 27 N. Main St. for 2 p.m. ceremony, followed by more events at Ontario County Historical Society, 55 N. Main St. 742-1690. Gothic Cathedral Tour. Sun., Nov. 11, 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 325-4041. sfxcrochester.org. Honor Flight Rochester. Sun., Nov. 11, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ Tuesday, November 13 ] One Take: Stories through the Lens: “Koch.” Tue., Nov. 13, 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org.

Sports [ Saturday, November 10 ] Roc City Roller Derby Presents: November Knockout. Sat., Nov. 10, 6 p.m. Dome Fair & Expo, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd. Watch the Rottenchesters, Midtown Maulers and the 5-H8-5s duke it out for the season title. Live music, arm wrestling with the Rochester B.R.A.W.L at the half and proceeds to benefit Harbor House. rocderby.com. Rochester Lancers Indoor Pro Soccer Match vs Chicago Soul FC. Sat., Nov. 10, 7 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. Kidfriendly events abound at all our games, including a pregame party band, interactive kids zone, face painting, balloon animals, and Lancer gear giveaways. 8725425. RochesterLancers.com.

Theater Beauty and The Beast Jr. Fri., Nov. 9, 7 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 10, 2 & 7 p.m. Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S. 242-5046. arts.bcsd.org. “Dearly Departed.” Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Through Nov 17. 3408655. penfieldplayers.org. Dinner Theatre: “The Love Star Love Potion.” FridaysSundays. Golden Ponds, 500 Long Pond Rd. Greece Paint Players. Through Nov 18. Fri-Sat 6:30 p.m., Sun Nov 4, 11 at 3 p.m. (Sun Nov 18 brunch at noon). 865-9742. goldenpondspartyhouse.com. “Freud’s Last Session.” Through Nov 11. Wed Nov 7-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m. 2324382. gevatheatre.org. The Gondoliers. FridaysSundays. RAPA, 727 E. Main St. Off-Monroe Players. Through Nov 11. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 232-5570. offmonroeplayers.org. “Hermes.” Fridays-Sundays. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through November 18. Fri-Sat 8

p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 271-5523. breadandwatertheatre.org. James Judd’s Funny Stories. Nov. 9-10. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Motherhood: The Musical. Nov. 8-11. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Motherhood: The Musical.” Thursdays-Sundays. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Previews Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Opening Sun 6 p.m., Ongoing schedule through Nov 18: Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “The Odd Couple.” FridaysSundays. Geneva Theatre Guild. Pat Collins Black Box Theater at the Geneva Community Center, 160 Carter Rd. Through November 11. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Nov 2 Gala Night 6 p.m.(tickets $25 includes show). gtglive.org. “Ordinary Days.” FridaysSundays. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. “Parade.” Nov. 7-11. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Wed-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 245-5833. geneseo/bbo. Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” Thursdays-Sundays. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Rochester Community Players. Through November 10. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 244-0960. muccc.org. “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” Nov. 7-14. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 9. Opening Wed Nov 7 7 p.m., performances Thu-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Nov 14 7 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Sound of Music.” Fridays-Sundays. Through Nov 17. Pittsford Musicals. Sat Nov 10 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun Nov 11 2 p.m., Fri Nov 16 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun Nov 17 2 p.m. Pittsford Mendon High School, 472 Mendon Rd., Pittsford. The Friday November 16 performance will be ASL interpreted. pittsfordmusicals.org. The Sound of Music. Sat., Nov. 10, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 11, 2 p.m. Pittsford Mendon High School, 472 Mendon Rd. *The Friday November 16 performance will be ASL interpreted. pittsfordschools.org/. Truth About Old School Theatrical Stage Play: Bridging the Gap Between the Younger Generation and the Older Generation. Sat., Nov. 10, 7 p.m. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4363977. aboutyouproduction@ yahoo.com.

SPECIAL EVENT | Anniversary of Canandaigua Treaty

Two-hundred and 18 years ago Colonel Timothy Pickering made history when he signed a peace treaty between the United States and the Six Nations Confederacy that established the Native American tribes’ sovereignty. To commemorate this day, on Sunday, November 11, members of the Six Nations will gather on the front lawn of the Ontario County courthouse for the annual re-dedication of the treaty. Events will begin at 1:30 p.m. with a parade from Canandaigua Primary School (96 W. Gibson St.) to Ontario County courthouse (27 N. Main St.). Along with the re-dedication, there will be a potluck dinner and a presentation by keynote speaker Jamie Jacobs, a cultural spokesperson from the Turtle Clan with extensive knowledge of the Haudenosaunee. Events are free and open to the public. For more information, call 742-1690 or visit ganondagan. org/TreatyCelebration.html. If the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois, community is something of particular interest to you, be sure to learn more about the culture at Haudenosaunee Day at the Rochester Museum & Science Center. On Saturday, November 10, noon-4 p.m. local Haudenosaunee artists will display traditional jewelry making and basket making, storytellers will tell folktales, RMSC educators will give tours of the museum’s world-renowned collection, and a local Seneca artist will conduct free classes on how to make cornhusk dolls. Cornhusk doll classes divided by age groups will begin at 10:30 a.m. and end at 3:15 p.m. To register, call 697-1942 ahead or the day of the class (provided there’s space). Cost included in regular museum admission, $11-$13. The RMSC is located at 657 East Ave. For more information visit rmsc.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON “What’s the Capitol of Bolivia?” Nov. 8-11. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. Working Class Theatre Company. Thu-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. workingclasstheatre.net. “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Nov. 10-11, 2 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Through Nov 18. 7 p.m. Sat Nov 17 only. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu.

Theater Audition [ Monday, November 12 ] “August, Osage County.” Mon., Nov. 12, 6 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. March 2013 performances. Roles for seven women ages 14-70 and six men ages 35-75. Reading script and information available. 461-2000 x235. rmeranto@ jccrochester.org.

Workshops [ Saturday, November 9 ] Medicare 101 Workshop. Fri., Nov. 9, 1-3 & 4-6 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 244-8400 x401.

[ Saturday, November 10 ] “The Road to Broadway with Tom Deckman.” Sat., Nov. 10, noon. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Ages 13 and up. Adults welcome. 4612000. [ Monday, November 12 ] Family Development Class: “The First Years Last Forever.” Mon., Nov. 12, 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. 325-3145 x131. [ Wed., November 14 ] Family Development Class: “What Do You Want for Your Child?” Wed., Nov. 14, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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Film Times Fri November 9Thur November 15 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

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Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport ARGO: 7; also Sat-Mon 1; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 9:15; also Fri-Mon 5:15; SatMon 3:15; SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also Fri-Mon 4; Sat-Mon 1; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Fri-Mon 5; also Sat-Mon 1, 3.

Flying high

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua ALEX CROSS: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Mon 5:10; also Sat-Mon 1:10, 3:10; ARGO: 7; also FriWed 9:20; also Fri-Mon 4, also Sat-Mon 1:15; CLOUD ATLAS: 7:45; also Fri-Mon 4:30; FUN SIZE: 7; also Sat-Mon 1, 3; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: SatMon 1, 2:45; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 7:15; also Fri-Wed 9:15; also Fri-Mon 5:15; also Sat-Mon 1:15, 3:15; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 9:15; also Fri-Mon 5:15; SINISTER: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Mon 5:10; also Sat-Mon 1, 3:05; SKYFALL: 7, 8, 9:40; also Fri-Mon 4, 5; also Sat-Mon 1, 2; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D+2D: 7, 9 (no 3D 9 showing on Thur 11/15); also Fri-Mon 5; also Sat-Mon 1, 3.

[ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Flight” (R), directed by Robert Zemeckis Now playing

In most of his movies Robert Zemeckis displays both a penchant for unusual special effects and an instinct for an easy emotional appeal. In “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” for example, he combined live action with animation; in “Forrest Gump” he integrated archival newsreel footage with his fiction; and in “Polar Express” he employed that trendy contemporary gimmick, motion capture. All of those movies earned a great deal of money, and “Forrest

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. HERE COMES THE BOOM: 7; also Sat-Sun 4:30; LOOPER: 8:45.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 11/7-Wed 11/14. IN COLD BLOOD: Wed 11/7 8; MARTY: Thur 11/8 8; NAUSICAA OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND: Fri 11/9 8, Sun 11/11 2; THE IMPOSTER: Sat continues on page 28

Gump,” God help us, achieved something like a Biblical status, providing a compendium of sentimental platitudes that comforted middlebrow audiences and inspired preachers and commencement speakers. Although a good deal tougher and certainly more adult in its approach, for the most part his new picture, “Flight,” reflects his continuing interest in emotionally charged situations, moral dilemmas, and a perhaps too glib resolution to all its problems. At the same time the film displays a commendable attention to specific detail, to the actual procedures of its subject, and features a terrific cast of actors. Perhaps recalling the remarkable feat of Captain Chesley Sullenberger in landing an airliner in the Hudson River a couple of years ago, the movie revolves around a similar event, an attempt to control and land an airplane that has lost all its mechanical functions, including both its engines. Denzel Washington plays the pilot, Whip Whitaker, a skilled professional who accomplishes an

Denzel Washington in “Flight.” PHOTO COURTESY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

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almost impossible task, but paradoxically finds himself on the verge of criminal charges that might send him to prison for the rest of his life. The picture opens with Whitaker awakening after a night of colossal dissipation in the company of one of the flight attendants who serves on his airplane. Despite nursing a major hangover that he treats with aspirin, coffee, cocaine, and vodka, Whip brilliantly pilots his flight from Orlando to Atlanta through a tremendous thunderstorm that bounces passengers and crew all over the craft, terrifying everyone aboard; once he conquers that challenge and reassures the passengers, he downs a triple screwdriver and promptly falls asleep. In the middle of his nap, his copilot wakes him to report a sudden loss of altitude; although the two of them battle the recalcitrant aircraft and try every trick in the book, one mechanical failure after another cripples the plane, robbing it of power and control. Heading for certain disaster, Whip accomplishes the seemingly impossible maneuver of rolling the craft over to level off the dive, then flips it again, making a successful crash landing but also losing five lives, including his bedmate of the previous night. In the hospital where he recovers, Whip learns that he is now a media sensation, a hero pilot who saved a hundred lives in a miraculous achievement; he also discovers that since toxicology tests revealed an extremely high level of alcohol in his blood, he may be charged with five counts of manslaughter.

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The game of life [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Wreck-It Ralph” (PG), directed by Rich Moore Now playing

“The Imposter” (NR), directed by Bart Layton Screens Saturday at the Dryden

After that revelation, the picture settles into the legal procedures on the part of his union and its lawyer, Hugh Lang (Don Cheadle) and a lengthy study of Whip’s alcoholism. Most of “Flight” in fact deals with addiction and its causes and consequences, partly through Whip’s relationship with Nicole (Kelly Reilly), a beautiful heroin addict who brings him to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and apparently manages to kick her own habit. It shows how his drinking has ruined his marriage, his relationship with his son, and threatens his career. It also includes an odd religious component, with a cancer patient in the hospital explaining an ironic theology of his disease, and his now crippled copilot affirming his belief that God intended him to be injured for a reason: neither man provides much comfort to Whip or the audience. The only special effects Zemeckis employs involve the interior of the airplane during the frightening storm and the even more frightening landing, an absolutely convincing sequence that should shake the confidence of the most intrepid traveler. Everything else in the picture, from the government’s investigation and the subsequent hearing to the resolute underplaying of the fine cast, especially Washington and Cheadle, matches that authenticity. The one actor not in any way constructed for underplaying, John Goodman delivers a bravura performance as Whip’s best friend, and he’s as good as everything else in “Flight.”.

By now, at least one generation of children will have grown up in a world where characters like Pac-Man, Mario, and Sonic the Hedgehog are just as iconic and beloved as Mickey Mouse was to their parents and grandparents. So in a way it’s rather fitting that Disney is the studio to bring a film about the secret lives of video-game characters to the big screen. Thankfully, they’ve done it with enough heart and wit to please both children and hardcore gamers alike. Like “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” and the “Toy Story” trilogy, which pulled back the curtain on cartoon characters and childhood playthings respectively, the computer-animated “Wreck-It Ralph” explores what life is like for the inhabitants of these games. It turns out that these characters have hopes and dreams just like anyone else, completely apart from what they’re told to do by a joystick. For the title character, Ralph (voiced by John C. Reilly, in an inspired casting

A still from “Wreck-It Ralph.” PHOTO COURTESY WALT DISNEY ANIMATION STUDIOS

decision), the destruction-prone heavy of the “Donkey Kong”-like game, that means longing for acceptance from his fellow game-dwellers, who treat Ralph like a villain even after the game is over. His job is to destroy buildings while Felix, the game’s hero, attempts to repair the damage. As a result, Ralph leads a lonely life and, after 30 years of playing the bad guy and being hated for it, wants his chance to be the hero. After crashing a 30th anniversary party being held in Felix’s honor, Ralph decides that if he somehow had a medal like the one Felix is awarded at the end of their game, he could be a hero, too. This leads Ralph to start “game jumping” in an attempt to visit other games, hoping to find someplace where he can at long last be the good guy. After his first attempt, in a first-person shooter game called “Hero’s Duty,” nearly gets him killed, Ralph escapes into a racing game called “Sugar Rush” (think “Mario Kart” set in Candyland). There he meets Vanellope von Schweetz (voiced by Sarah Silverman, perfectly straddling the line between loveable and obnoxious), an adorable little moppet with an unfortunate glitch in her code that makes her a potential danger to the other racers in her game, and thus banned from ever being allowed to compete. Striking up a friendship, the two find that they are kindred spirits, each outcasts with a desire for love and acceptance from a world that adamantly refuses to allow them a chance to do what would truly make them happy. Together, they just might have a chance to change their destinies. While the initial draw of “Wreck-It Ralph” is the chance to see dozens of classic video-game characters brought to life and sharing the same screen (getting the rights to all those characters, from Q*bert to a bunch of the “Street Fighter” cast, must have been a daunting

task), the heartfelt story and gorgeous animation make it a joy to watch. There are problems in the film’s occasionally inconsistent tone, and it sometimes leans a bit too heavily on puns, references, and throwaway gags rather than allowing the humor to come from the characters. (That makes sense considering director Rich Moore got his start on such gag-a-minute animated TV series as “The Simpsons” and “Futurama.”) A plot point involving Ralph accidentally allowing one of the enemies from “Hero’s Duty” into “Sugar Rush” isn’t completely necessary, and is clearly just an excuse for the animators to create a more eye-poppingly epic climatic battle sequence. But these are all minor complaints in a movie as inventive and just plain fun as this one. In 1994, 13-year-old Nicholas Barclay

disappeared without a trace while out playing basketball in his hometown of San Antonio, Texas. More than three years passed — just long enough for Nicholas’ family to abandon all hope of ever finding him alive — and then, in October of 1997, they received a phone call from the authorities in Linares, Spain, informing them that a young man claiming to be Nicholas had been found. The boy’s family accepted his reappearance as a miracle, ignoring the fact that the man claiming to be Nicholas had a French accent, was clearly in his 20s, and had different colored eyes and hair than the missing child. It’s not spoiling anything to say that the man was not, in fact, Nicholas Barclay. So why would this man impersonate a missing child? More importantly, why would that child’s family so readily accept his claims? Those questions form the basis for the gripping documentary “The Imposter.” Through reenactments and interviews, director Bart Layton examines this most unusual case in a confidently told tale that’s ultimately about the elusive nature of truth itself.

NAUSICAÄ OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND Friday, Nov. 9, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 11, 2 p.m.

Miyazaki’s debut film, set 1,000 years after a nuclear holocaust has gutted the globe, is widely considered his masterwork. After the death of her father and an attack from the hostile Tormekia, Princess Nausicaä must use her ability to communicate with the giant crustacean Ohmu to unite her people against the threat of annihilation. (Kaze no Tani no Naushika, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1984, 116 min.)

THE IMPOSTER

Saturday, Nov. 10, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Miyazaki

The twisting, turning tale begins with the disappearance of Nicholas Barclay, a 13-year-old Texas boy. Three and a half years later, the boy has been found in Spain, saying he survived a mind-boggling ordeal of kidnap and torture. His family is ecstatic to have him back, but ... how could the Barclays’ blond, blue-eyed son have returned with darker skin and eyes? How could his personality and accent have changed so profoundly? Why does the family not seem to notice? And if this person isn’t the missing child ... who is he, and what really happened to Nicholas? (Bart Layton, UK 2012, 99 min., Digital Presentation)

Rochester Premiere

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27

11/10 8; AN EVENING OF FILMS BY GEORGE MELIES: Tue 11/13 8; DOG DAY AFTERNOON: Wed 11/14 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor ARGO: 1:05, 4:25, 7:30, 10:20; CLOUD ATLAS: 11:55 a.m., 6:55; FLIGHT: 12:50, 4:05, 7:15, 10:25; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 12:45, 3:45; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 12:55, 4:15; THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS: 11:45 a.m., 2:35, 5, 7:25, 9:55; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 4, 10:10; PITCH PERFECT: 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:55, 10:35; SKYFALL: 12, 1, 1:30, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:20, 6:40, 7, 7:20, 7:50, 9:30, 10, 10:30, 10:50; TAKEN 2: 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 4:50, 7:35, 10:05; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8, 10:40; 2D 1:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall ARGO: 7; also Sat-Mon 1; CLOUD ATLAS: Fri-Wed 7:45; Thur 7; Fri-Mon 4:30; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: Sat-Mon 1, 2:45; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 7:15; also Fri-Wed 9:15; also Fri-Mon 5:15; also SatMon 1:15, 3:15; SKYFALL: 7, 8, 9:40; also Fri-Mon 4, 5; also Sat-Mon 1, 2; TAKEN

2: 9:10 (no showing Thur 11/15); also Fri-Mon 5:10; also Sat-Mon 3:10; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 7; also Fri-Wed 9; also Fri-Mon 5; also Sat-Mon 1, 3.

WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 4:10; also Fri-Sun 9:10; 2D 1:30, 6:40.

Film Previews

Tinseltown USA / IMAX

The Little

247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ALEX CROSS: 4:25, 9:55; ARGO: 12:45, 4, 7, 9:45; CLOUD ATLAS: 12:25, 4:15, 8; FLIGHT: 11:40 a.m., 1:30, 3:05, 4:40, 6:15, 7:50, 9:35; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 2:50, 7:40; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 3D 5:20, 10:10; 2D 12:30; THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS: 12, 2:30, 5, 7:25, 10; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 12:40, 2:55, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45; PITCH PERFECT: 1:30, 7:10; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 3D 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 9:50; 2D 12:10; SINISTER: 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 9:40; SKYFALL: IMAX 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:15; NON-IMAX: 11:25 a.m., 1:35, 2:40, 4:50, 6:15, 8:05, 9:30;TAKEN 2: 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 10:05; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 1:10, 3, 3:55, 6:40, 8:30, 9:25; 2D 11:15 a.m., 12:15, 2:05, 4:50, 5:45, 7:35, 10:15.

[ OPENING ] THE DETAILS (R): Tobey Maguire, Elizabeth Banks, and Laura Linney lead the cast of this pitch-black comedy about an unhappily married suburbanite whose raccoon problem leads him down a path of infidelity and murder. With Kerry Washington and Ray Liotta. Little AN EVENING OF FILMS BY GEORGES MÉLIÈS: This collection of short pieces by the French cinema pioneer spans the years 1901 to 1909 and includes titles like “The Troublesome Cheeses” and “Up-To-Date Surgery.” Dryden (Tue, Nov 6, 8 p.m.) Little THE IMPOSTER (2012): This documentary uses interviews and reenactments to explore the strange case of a young French con artist who somehow convinces a grieving Texas family that he’s their 16-year-old son who went missing for three years. Dryden (Sat, Nov 10, 8 p.m.) IN COLD BLOOD (1967): Robert Blake stars in Richard Brooks’ acclaimed adaptation of Truman Capote’s true-crime masterpiece about the hunt for and trial of two young men who murder a family during a botched robbery. Dryden (Wed, Nov 7, 8 p.m.) MARTY (1955): The Academy Awards for Best Picture, Director, Actor, and Screenplay went to

258-04 240 East Ave.  ARGO: 6:50, 9:20; also SatSun 12, 3:20; THE DETAILS: 6:30, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:40; KOCH: Tue 11/13 7; THE MASTER: 6:40 (no showing Tue 11/13), 9:30; also SatSun 12:10, 3:10; NOT MY LIFE: Wed 11/14 7, Thur 11/15 7; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 7, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 3:30; SEACHING FOR SUGARMAN: 7:10 (no showing Sat 11/10, Wed 11/14, Thur 11/15), 9:40; also Sat-Sun 1, 3.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ARGO: 1:40, 3:10, 4:30, 5:50, 7:20, 8:30; also Fri-Mon 12:30, Fri-Sun 10; CLOUD ATLAS: 12:50, 4:20, 7:50; FLIGHT: 1, 4, 7; also Fri-Sun 10; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 2:40, 5:05, 7:30; also Fri-Sun 9:55; FriMon 12:15; PITCH PERFECT: 2, 4:35, 7:10; also Fri-Sun 9:45; SKYFALL: 1:50, 3:40, 4:55, 6:45, 8; also Fri-Sun 9:50; also Fri-Mon 12:35;

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

28 City november 7-13, 2012

Apartments for Rent ART GALLERY AREA Writers & Books neighborhood. Bright, Large 1bdrm apartment, with study and high ceilings, laundry. Available

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

this drama about the unlikely romance between a lonely Bronx butcher (Ernest Borgnine) and a plain schoolteacher (Betsy Blair), both of whom had resigned themselves to singledom. Dryden (Thu, Nov 8, 8 p.m.) NAUSICAÄ OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND (1984): Japanese animation legend Hayao Miyazaki adapted his own manga for his debut feature, a postapocalyptic fantasy adventure about a princess struggling to prevent two warring nations from destroying themselves and their ailing planet. Dryden (Fri, Nov 9, 8 p.m., and Sun, Nov 11, 2 p.m.) SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Tinseltown [ CONTINUING ] ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Canandaigua, Tinseltown CLOUD ATLAS (R): Assembling the creative forces of filmmakers

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Tom Tykwer (1998’s “Run Lola Run”) and siblings Lana and Andy Wachowski (the “Matrix” trilogy) gets you an ambitious adaptation of David Mitchell’s genre-spanning novel exploring the effects of individual actions throughout time. Starring Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, and Hugo Weaving. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG): The first animated feature from “Samurai Jack” creator Genndy Tartakovsky showcases the voice talents of Adam Sandler as good ol’ Dracula, now a hotelier working to keep his daughter (Selena Gomez) away from a charming backpacker (Andy Samberg). Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Tinseltown PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4 (R): “Catfish” directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman return for another stab at the surprisingly successful horror franchise, which looks to come full circle by revisiting the circumstances surrounding Katie and baby Hunter, gone missing after “PA2.” Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Tinseltown WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown

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A house that truly feels like a home. Quality craftsmanship and charming architectural

knobs are found throughout the home. Off the dining room at the rear of the house is a good-

details. An attractive neighborhood with walkable local amenities and easy access to major thoroughfares. With these qualities, the property at 327 Rocket Street in the Homestead Heights neighborhood will be hard to pass up.

sized, functional eat-in kitchen that leads to the basement and a side entrance.

Most of the homes along Rocket St. represent a transition from the expansive porches and generous layouts of the earlier American Foursquares (proliferating on nearby cross streets) to a more compact home with a small stoop or no porch at all. 327 Rocket St., however, stands out with a classically inspired front stoop and a generous columned porch. Framed by low hedges and tucked to the side of the main entrance, the porch offers a perfect, secluded getaway in which to enjoy an evening drink or bask in a warm summer day. Stepping through the front door and the entrance vestibule (complete with a tiled floor, coat closet, a leaded glass window, and a leaded glass door), and into the living room, you will feel immediately at home in this comfortable and finely detailed home. The living room runs the width of the house and features a brick fireplace with a huge wooden mantle, built-in cabinets with leaded glass doors, small leaded glass windows, and a picture window that looks onto the front porch. Wood floors with a subtle inlay continue into the formal dining room. Wood doors with glass

The second floor has three bedrooms and a full bath. At the top of the stairs, an archway leads down a cozy hall with built-in linen cabinets to the full bath. This lovely little room is as charming as can be, with a tiled floor, a pedestal sink, a Moorish arch over the shower, and an archway that opens to a fabulous little alcove—with an arched window overlooking the front yard—that provides extra storage space. The master bedroom is another charmer with plenty of natural light provided by three windows, including a cozy window seat. His and hers closets flank the window seat. The other two bedrooms are a modest size with small closets. The unfinished attic offers ample storage space or flexible room to expand. Outside there is a detached single car garage and a small, low maintenance backyard. With 1,360 square feet, the charming and comfortable home at 327 Rocket St. is listed at $81,000. Visit rochestercityliving.com/property/ R194011 or see it in person at an open house on Sunday, November 11. Contact Deborah Renna-Hynes with Keller Williams Realty for more information, 585-899-0805. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner at The Landmark Society.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29

> page 29

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Automotive 1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE SS 396/350HP, original, $7400

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@rochestercitynews.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale

Groups Forming

vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. Liar Obama ruins U.S. economy, responsible for 8.3% unemployment rate, encourages class envy and racial division. Pits gay against straight. His record sucks. Worst president ever. Vote this American hating fraud out! 585-747-2699

Jam Section

Events TAX-FREE WEALTH SEMINAR by Equity Trust, Sponsored by Freedom First REIA, Ltd., 11/10 Rochester Airport Marriot. Bring a guest free. RSVP Susan: 585-2108583, susanh@ffreia.com www. ffreia.com

BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-2609958 fstone@rochester.rr.com EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk

Home and Garden Professionals

SNOW PLOWING

Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting

UNLIMITED SNOWPLOW CONTRACTS STARTING AT

Black Top Solutions

585-455-6651

$149

585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

ROCHESTERPAVEMENTS.COM

Affordable Home Improvements All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Fully insured

Call

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

SUN WORLD CONSTRUCTION INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs. Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

(585) 328-3832

Michael Mincher Serving Monroe County since 1977

ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet Garden Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

FALL/WINTER

CONTRACT SPECIALS Limited Contracts Available. • DISCOUNTED YARD CLEAN-UP W/SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT INCLUDED: starting at $350 • SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT: starting at $200 • SINGLE-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $45 • 2-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $75

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience

FREE (No-Obligation) ESTIMATES

FULLY INSURED LEAD CERTIFIED

ALL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE 802-6934

585-287-0692

www.AllPropertyMaintenanceNY.com

TRUSTED & RECOMMENDED FOR 25+ YEARS

Trusted quality service since 1994!

Master Elite workmanship at wholesale pricing.

Home Repair Specialist! • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small

Handicap Renovations 10% OFF

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

Any Stairlift or Ramp Installed*

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

*special excludes all previous work.

703-7738 AT TENTION

& MASONRY

FALL IS HERE!!! Clean your chimney for the upcoming burning season!

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

585-734-8444

Fully Insured

30 City november 7-13, 2012

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958

At 1-800-653-2276 or WWW. Woodfordbros.com *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/ DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800-925-7945 SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

Mind Body Spirit GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC Nicole Goodman Love Specialist, will provide happiness and peace of mind with your lover. Can solve allimpossible problems. Never fails. 1-866-524-6689

eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck. Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 19001988. Any School/Any State. www. yearbookusa.com or 214-5141040

Notices HEAT & EAT - you don’t have to choose! Find out if you may be

PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S.

FREE TRIAL

The Universe is Calling Healing with breath and sound with the indigenous Australian didgeridoo Rev. Phil Shiva Jones, singer, songwriter, healer Nov. 25, 11 a.m. service and afternoon workshop.

HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings.

See our website Events page for details

Sunday Mass at St. Michael’s Church

Unity

OPEN HOUSE Sat., Nov. 10th • 5:30pm-8:30pm

Cha Cha Fox Trot Salsa Swing Tango Waltz

Please see our website for ongoing groups and events.

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

1060 University Ave | 271-6840 Livehappyrochester.com

JOIN US FOR

FREE

Sunday, NOVEMBER 11, 4:00 P.M. Felix Mendelssohn: Happy and Blest Are They Arvo Pärt: The Beatitudes

Sunday Celebration 11 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children’s Program

All levels welcome, Beginner to Advanced! Our Certified & Registered Yoga Teachers, offer Hatha based yoga classes (more of a traditional style of yoga) Please see our website for schedule.

www.mollysyoga.com

220 Canal Park @ 1000 Turk Hill Rd Fairport, NY • 585-223-8270 Find us on facebook

Acupuncture Day November, 11th from 9am to 2pm! *for new patients only

302 N. Goodman St., Suite 403 in Village Gate 585.287.5183 • Find us on

Rochestercommunityacupuncture.com

FALL IN LOVE WITH DANCE!

Free Parking at St. Michael’s Church

Corner of Clinton & Clifford

Whether you want to dance for exercise, to socialize, to have fun or compete; let us design a personal plan to help you achieve your goals!

St. Michael’s Singers

ALL SKILL LEVELS WELCOME FOR SINGLES AND COUPLES!

Anne Laver Music Director/Organ Alicia Messenger, cantor

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIDE FOR SENIOR 20/hours week. Monday-Friday. Light housekeeping. Errands. Drive to appointments. Must have own car. Gas reimbursed. Resume and references required. 244-3587. AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial

aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

- Film - Fashionn Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com

BECOME A ENERGY PARTNER! New York is Deregulated. MAKE LOTS OF CASH SIGN UP NOW! powernow.igniteinc.biz electric@ danepromotions.com 817-6430135

Volunteers

DRIVER - $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime; Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF, 14/ ON-7/OFF Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV

salon bella vita

SEEKING HAIRSTYLIST & NAIL TECHNICIAN Established Salon located in the heart of the Village of Pittsford is looking for a hard-working, creative Stylist & Nail Technician. We are a professional, established, nononsense salon. Our credits include the News Channel 8 anchor staff. PLEASE CALL 585-820-9062 TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW.

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided.

For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

HUNDREDS OF VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. A mandatory volunteer training is required for all new volunteers, which will be held on a date to be determined at the Camp Good Days’ Headquarters in Mendon, for those wishing to volunteer in the Rochester area. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays.org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www.campgooddays.org. ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone

ATTENTION VETERANS! THE NAVY IS LOOKING FOR VETERANS. Those individuals who have served honorably in any branch of the Armed Forces, (i.e., the Navy, Army, Marines, Air Force or Coast Guard) and who want to continue their military career.

BENEFITS OF SERVICE INCLUDE: NO BOOT CAMP! A competitive salary Work only one weekend a month and two weeks per year College Stipend (MGIBSR for students) Advancement Exchange and Commissary privileges Life insurance TRICARE Reserve Select Retirement Opportunities for travel

QUALIFICATIONS FOR SERVICE INCLUDE: Must pass a MEPS physical May have to retake the ASVAB test Must be able to complete 20 years of service before age 60 If you, or someone you know, is a Veteran and would like the opportunity to serve in the United States Navy,

Call 1-800-242-3736 or email Jobs_pittsburgh@navy.mil America’s Navy: A Global Force For Good 32 City november 7-13, 2012

Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa. com (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa. com (AAN CAN)

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com

Actors Wanted ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-560-8672 for casting times /locations.

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is Zolala, LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on October 16, 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 656 Kayleigh Drive, Webster, NY 14580 [ LEGAL NOTICE BUCKINGHAM ASSET MANAGEMENT LLC ] Notice of Organization: Buckingham Asset Management LLC was filed with SSNY on September 17, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 259 Alexander St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE VG CAPITAL GROUP LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Capital Group LLC was filed with SSNY on July 20, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 10N2 ASSOCIATES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 100 Cummings Center, Suite 333C, Beverly, MA 01915. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1665 PENFIELD ROAD LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 75 Langpath Rd., Honeoye Falls,

NY 14472. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 5, 2012. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC, PO Box 183, North Chili, New York 14514. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. Please direct all correspondence to the address below. [ NOTICE ] 8LEADS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave. Ste. 202 Bklyn, NY 11228 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave. Ste. 202 Bklyn, NY 11228. [ NOTICE ] BLUE LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 75 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BRL SOLUTIONS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Brian R. Leavitt, 121 York Bay Trail, W. Henrietta, NY 14586. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BROOKDALE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS FABRICATION, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe

County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS WEBSTER MACHINING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] COLO BRANDS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, P.O. Box 2091, NY, NY 10009. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EAGLE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Elite Realty Investment Group, LLC filed an App. for Authority with the Dept. of State of NY on 9/11/2012. Jurisdiction: Utah and the date of its organization is: 5/2/2012. Office location in New York State: Monroe County . The Secretary of the State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served, the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: 480 Meigs St., Rochester NY 14607. Address maintained in its jurisdiction is: 10421 South Jordan Gateway, Ste 600, South Jordan UT 84095. The authorized officer in its jurisdiction of organization where a copy of its Certificate of Formation can be obtained is: Director, Dept of Commerce, 160 East 300 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84111. The purpose of the company is: real estate.

[ NOTICE ] Goodhand Computing Solutions LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on September 27, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 30906, Rochester, NY 14603. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] hBARSCI LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 10, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York, 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 201110591 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Family First of NY Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Georgea A. Black, a/k/a Georgea Black, Nadine Black, as Executrix; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Nadine Black, Individually, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 12, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 305 Pearson Lane; Tax Account No. 059.07-1-21, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10044 of Deeds, page 501; lot size 80 x 150. Said premises

are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68768.0 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2012 Aaron Sperano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KING PROPERTIES NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/17/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Lead Pipe Productions LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/16/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC at 23 Maricrest Drive., Rochester, NY 14616. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Legal Notice of Formation of LLC. Long Pond Road II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gerald F. Stack, Esq., Hiscock & Barclay, LLP, One Park Place, 300 South State Street, Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose: any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may

be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Peter Ferrari, 6 Dover Ct., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form of SAGER DRIVE PROPERTIES, LLC Art. of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 University Ave. Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Blue Wave Properties, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 19 Eaglesfield Wy, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of J. Lee Management, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 8/17/12. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, PO BOX 259 Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of RocOn Times, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/13/12. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC 366 University Ave, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Dwight Caesar dba Island’s Bar & Lounge, 1508 Dewey Ave. Rochester, NY 14615, County of Monroe, for a bar & restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by BRICK WOOD FIRED PIZZA & PASTA INC dba BRICK WOOD FIRED PIZZA& PASTA, 2833 Monroe Ave., Rochester NY 14618, County of Monroe, Town of Brighton for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Almar Affiliate Marketing, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 136 Princess Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Atimesa Studios LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Salil Athalye, 7 Brewster Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, also the registered agent.. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Brown Simmons LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10/18/2012. Office Location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 21 Lawndale Terrace, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Catalano & Associates Research LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon who process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 22 Morningside Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of COBBLER’S CORNER OF HENRIETTA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 663 Hinchey Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CASUALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/12. Office location:

Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DanLin Farms, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/01/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 355 St. Joseph St., Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to David C. Pettig & Associates, P.C., 65A Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JJ ZEBs, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/6/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 388 Mason Road, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name:WISEMEN ENTERPRISES LLC. Articles of Organization file with Secretary of State of New York on: 05/31/2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State of New York shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 67 Elwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is RT Fitz LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on July 6 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33

Legal Ads > page 33 as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 580 Colebrook Drive Rochester, NY 14617 6. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 140 VINAL, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has

be en designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 415 Murwood Lane,Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MDMS Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 194 Old English Dr., Rochester, NY 14616.

Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MFP 126 CAYUGA STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

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[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MODEST WANDERER & CO. LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/12. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 225 Dickinson Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: online retail. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN HOLT RD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evan & Fox, LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of One Way Enterprises I LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to One Way Enterprises, 8376 Merriman Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Pane Vino, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 175 N. Water St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Property Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Real Estate, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

34 City november 7-13, 2012

copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROW HOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: J. Loftus, 69 Cascade Dr., Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STEVE LADER PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1545 Mt. Read Blvd., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Steven Lader at the princ. office of the LLC, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Timberlane Apartments, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 700 Crossroads Bldg., 2 State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Organization: The Little Speed Shop, LLC was filed with SSNY on December 27, 2010. Office: 500 Lee Rd. Building C Rochester, NY Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 500 Lee Rd. Building C Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of AdvizeX Partners I, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 9/20/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and

shall mail process to the principal business address: 9724 Wolf Creek Dr., Irving, TX 75063-5032. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Canal Front Capital Management, LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10 Little Acorn Cir., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC formed in DE on 11/14/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Canal Front Capital Management, LLC, 10 Little Acorn Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Business Filings Inc., 108 West 13th St.,Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of HCP SH ELP2 PROPERTIES, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE BERRY COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 11/16/11. Princ. office of LLC: 160 Inverness Dr. West, Ste. 400, Englewood, CO 80112. NYS fictitious name: BERRCO ADVERTISING, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon

whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Arts. of Org. filed with CO Dept. of State, 1700 Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SONG MAKERS AND PUBLISHING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/20/12. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served,.. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 60176, Rochester, NY 14606. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff against RENEE M. FALZOLARE, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein and dated May 29, 2007, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction on the front steps of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 W. Main Street, Rochester, NY on the 15th day of November, 2012 at 10:00 AM premises situate in the Town on Greece, County of Monroe, State of New York, known and distinguished as Lot No. 121, as laid down on a map of Westwood Manor No. 6 addition a subdivision of the Conrad Baker Farm, Town of Greece, made by W. Fred Sullivan, surveyor and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 67 of Maps, at Page 36. Said Lot No. 121 is situate on the west side of Bakerdale Road and is of the dimensions as shown on said map. Said premises known as 268 BAKERDALE ROAD, ROCHESTER, NY Approximate amount of lien $ 85,746.49 plus interest & costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index Number 13884/06. THEODORE S. KANTOR, ESQ., Referee. Sweeney, Gallo, Reich & Bolz, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 95-25 Queens Blvd., 11th Floor Rego Park, NY 11374 [ NOTICE ] Zarpentine Farms R & K, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kimberly A. Francis, 1 Panarities Lane, Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Back of 1075, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is Back of 1075, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The street address of the limited liability company’s office is 1023 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Rochester Brainery LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to theLLC at 119 Sylvester Street, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC O’Neill Real Estate, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on July 12, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 849 Rush Scottsville Road, Rush, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the secretary of state shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him or her is Corporation

Legal Ads Service Company, 80 State Street, Albany, New York, 12207. Corporation Service Company, 80 State Street, Albany, New York, 12207, is the registered agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Barbara and Michael Hanna Family, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Cognitive Innovations, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on September 26, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 219 Frankland Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 219 Frankland Road, Rochester, New York 14617. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Notice of Formation of Frank A Guercio CPA, PLLC. Arts. of Org. were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on July 13, 2012. office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY

shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 1130 Crosspointe Lane Ste 4, Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMOKE SIGNALS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Smoke Signals Performance Products LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 20123782 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Donald J. Payne; Janice H. Rose; Casa Associates, LLC; Susan Payne, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 15, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 21, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 18 Sheldon Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559, Tax Account No. 102.02-1-54, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10910 of Deeds, page 643; lot size 100 x 314. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental

violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $192,576.34 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2012 Deborah Field, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone:(585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF STRATEGIC CHANGE & INNOVATION, LLC ] Strategic Change & Innovation, LLC was filed with SSNY on 10/05/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 315 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ZYAIR PROPERTIES, LLC ] Zyair Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 09/14/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 133 Rosemary Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ SUMMONS ] FAMILY COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE DOCKET NO. B-10398-12 In the Matter of the Commitment of Guardianship and Custody, Pursuant to Social Services Law 384-b, of DARYL TRAMER CHATMAN, a Child Under the Age of Eighteen Years Alleged to be Abandoned by MORESEE CHATMAN, Respondent. TO: Moresee Chatman, 160 Ravenwood Avenue, Rear, Rochester, NY 14619. A petition having been filed with this Court alleging that the above-named child in the care and custody of Monroe County Department of Human Services, Division of Social Services should be committed to the guardianship of Monroe County Department of Human Services. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear before this Court at

the Hall of Justice, Civic Center Plaza, Rochester, New York on December 17, 2012 at 9:30 am of said day to show cause why the Court should not enter an order committing the guardianship and custody of the child to the petitioning agency. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that if guardianship and custody of the child is committed to the petitioning agency, the child may be adopted with the consent of the Monroe County Department of Human Services, Division of Social Services and without further consent or notice to you. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that you have the right to be represented by an attorney, if the Court finds that you are unable to pay for an attorney, you have the right to have an attorney assigned by the Court. In the event of your default, the Court will hear and determine the petition as provided by Law. DATED: 09/12/12 BY ORDER OF THE COURT. Loreen Nash, Chief Clerk of Family Court Before: Judge Ruhlmann TO THE RESPONDENT: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to the Order of the Honorable Dandrea L. Ruhlmann, a Judge of the Family Court of the State of New York. A copy of this Order, along with the Petition has been filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Family Court, County of Monroe, at the Hall of Justice, City of Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to terminate your parental rights to the above-named child. Please note the date, time, and place a hearing will take place. Your failure to appear shall constitute a denial of your interest in the child, which denial may result, without further notice, in the transfer or commitment of the child’s care, custody, or guardianship, or in the child’s adoption in this or any subsequent proceeding in which care, custody, or guardianship or adoption may be at issue.

Fun

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36 City november 7-13, 2012


November 4-13, 2012 - City Newspaper