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‘Drug-free’ plan: pro and cons

On City Councilmember Adam McFadden’s proposal for drug-free zones in Rochester (News Blog):

I cannot fully express how bad an idea I think this is. And it’s illegal – not just on constitutional grounds, but I believe an illegal use of zoning codes. DAVE ATIAS

What a great idea! Adam McFadden is a visionary leader. FRED MULDOON

How about some real solutions, like ending the Drug War and a serious conversation on ending the school-to-prison-pipeline? DREW LANGDON

The last thing we need is another war on petty, street-level drug dealers. We know what that has reaped over the past four or five decades: jails and prisons filled with mainly black and Hispanic youth, many of whom are literally slinging drugs as a means of survival. In many cases they have little to no education, no job skills, and often, no hope – while the real culprits behind the multitrillion dollar, illegal drug industry continue to go free. It IS time for a war on drugs (a real one): on the big-shot, super-wealthy, mafia-types who ship drugs into the harbors and fly them onto the private airstrips of this corrupt nation, by the ton-loads. How is it that young children in our neighborhoods can tell you where the illegal drug spots are but the Rochester Police Department, Monroe County Sheriffs, New York State Police, FBI, CIA, ATF, Secret Service, Homeland Security, and other law enforcement agencies that we 2 CITY

OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

have probably never even heard of can’t seem to find the illegal drugs that flow through Rochester and other urban communities like water flows from High Falls? I would propose as an alternative that y’all (city and county leaders) help pull people together who are sick-and-tired-of-being-sickand-tired of our neighborhoods being flooded with illegal drugs and weapons, and develop a comprehensive plan by which we make a concerted demand that those listed above do more to solve the problem now – by going to the root, as opposed to continuing to fiddle around the edges. We need a movement. HOWARD EAGLE

Assessing the D&C

While I completely agree with the principles you articulated on what makes for good journalism, I completely disagree with your overall negative assessment of the newly launched and designed Democrat and Chronicle (“The New, ‘More,’ D&C,” Urban Journal). In a time when so many local newspapers are folding, shrinking, or eliminating any semblance of deep reporting, we should applaud the D&C for its expanded commitment to quality local investigative journalism, its expanded coverage of New York state politics, and the smart decision to focus on Rochester innovation and business. Its inclusion of USA Today is a logical move too, since due to the Internet, national news has become more a commodity. And while there is a downside to relying on a single publisher’s reporters, reading stories from Gannet’s journalists is far better than the D&C plugging in prepackaged national wire service stories, as many other local newspapers now must do to save on reporter salaries. Yes, some of the local stories highlighted on the front page seem minor and are given disproportionate attention. And the new editorial page design leaves something to be desired. But these are quibbles. The bottom line is that the D&C has survived the very treacherous transition to the

new digital media world – and did so while expanding its commitment to local, regional, and investigative reporting. And that’s a good thing for the community. ROBERT BERKMAN

I’m inclined to be more supportive of the D&C than you are in your column. I give them credit for experimenting with business model changes that keep the paper in print at all –going all electronic (as many peer newspapers have done) is a sorry capitulation. Perhaps your frustration is more appropriately aimed at the readers, not the publishers. There is no newspaper without readers. To your closing question – what do research scientists, etc., read – I think they are doing what I do: read the New York Times online and subscribe to The Economist, The Atlantic, etc., and skim the D&C for local coverage, including the investigative stuff (which I agree is important and often quite good). I generally don’t bother with USA Today when given free in hotels and I don’t read it now – but USA Today does offer more attractive coverage of nationalinternational news than the D&C has been providing. Maybe, just maybe, more of the readers who don’t seek out more robust coverage will be captured to read a bit more of this kind of news than they did under the old model. KENT GARDNER

More cheap eats

Some new suggestions here (Cheap Eats 2013). Thanks; but so many glaring omissions. Here are the first couple of dozen that come to mind, in alphabetical order. Arnett Café, Banzai, Bombay Chaat House, Breathe Yoga, Brooks Landing Diner, Dac Hoa, Deli Sandro’s, El Latino, The Gate House, Grill and Greens, Hot Rosita’s, Jitters, John’s Tex-Mex, The Lunch Box, Martusciello’s, Mise en Place, The Old Toad, Open Face, Orange Glory, Owl House, Palmer’s Market, Philly Steakout, Polska Chata, Starry Nites, Sugar Mama’s, Unkl Moe’s, Voula’s Greek Sweets. KEN MAHER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly October 23-29, 2013 Vol 43 No 7 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com On the cover: Green party mayoral candidate Alex White. Photo illustration by Matt DeTurck Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial interns: Trevor Lewis, Colin McCoy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photography intern: Larissa Coe Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

ROCHESTER GENERAL ELECTIONS 2013 COVERAGE CONTINUES ON PAGE 6

Still the best candidate for mayor: Tom Richards ENDORSEMENTS  BY CITY’S EDITORIAL STAFF

Officially, the campaign for Rochester mayor has narrowed to two candidates: City Council President Lovely Warren, who won the September Democratic primary, and Green Party candidate Alex White. Before the primary, we endorsed incumbent Tom Richards, but Warren won, handily, and she now has the backing of her party for the November 5 general election. Richards is still on the ballot on the Working Families and Independence Party lines, because the deadline has passed for removing his name. A week after his primary loss, however, he announced formally that he was ending his campaign, and he has not been seeking votes as a third-party candidate. We are still convinced that Richards is the far better candidate. He has kept the city financially stable through an exceptionally difficult economic period. He has encouraged new business and residential development. He has worked with employee groups to keep labor costs down and worked with unions and contractors to insure jobs for city residents on public projects. He is experienced, progressive, and pragmatic, and he is uniquely qualified to lead Rochester in this challenging time. For the general election, then, we’ve been faced with a difficult decision: do we endorse Richards, even though he is not campaigning for re-election; endorse someone we feel is not qualified for the job; or simply not endorse? The members of our editorial staff who determine our endorsements have been divided on that question. Some argued for no endorsement at all rather than endorse a candidate who isn’t running. But Richards is on the ballot, and that does give voters a choice. Since we believe strongly that Richards should serve another four years, we are endorsing him. On Alex White: Running for mayor for the second time, White is an energetic, interesting, often entertaining candidate. But he lacks the experience and knowledge that is essential for the mayor of a city Rochester’s size. And while some of his ideas sound appealing, they’re often naïve and based on the thinnest of research. A prime example: He would give the Rochester school district all the money it says it needs, and he says the city could finance the increase by not giving tax incentives to

Experienced, progressive, and pragmatic, Richards is uniquely qualified to lead Rochester in this challenging time.” developers. As much as this newspaper objects to tax incentives, the City of Rochester is in intense competition with its suburbs and with other regions for development. He says that redevelopment at the Midtown Plaza site would have happened without incentives. Where was White during those years when Midtown was emptying out and multiple attempts to lure development led nowhere? Tax incentives don’t last forever, and new development provides new taxes. And it frequently spurs other new development. White says that our inner-city deterioration and street-corner drug sales are the result of giving incentives to developers rather than investing in education and jobs. No, they’re not. They’re the result of sprawl and concentrated poverty, and without new development in the city, those problems will get worse. On Lovely Warren: As we said in our

endorsement of Richards in August, Warren certainly has strengths. She has been a strong advocate for Rochester’s poorest, most vulnerable residents, pushing for better housing, better schools, better neighborhoods, and more jobs. She has pushed for more minority hiring by the police and fire departments, and she personally helped recruit candidates. She has become an eloquent, charismatic public servant, and her primary win was impressive. It does not erase our concerns about her, however. Some of her initiatives will be expensive, and we think she’s naïve about how they can be paid for, given the city’s financial challenges. She wants city government actively involved in education, and her plans to help

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CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

King reschedules forums

State Education Commissioner John King has rescheduled community forums on the Common Core curriculum. King had cancelled the forums after his first presentation was met with strong resistance from teachers and parents. The forums will be held in cities around the state, including Rochester.

First charges in LDC probe

A grand jury investigation into Monroe County-affiliated local development corporations netted

News PUBLIC SAFETY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

South Wedge crime fighters

Resurrecting Richards

A day after the Independence Party of Monroe County called for city voters to cast their ballots for Mayor Tom Richards in the general election, the Democrat and Chronicle reported that two prominent city staffers are behind the effort. The D and C says that Gary Walker, the city’s communications director, and Molly Clifford, the city’s director of fire administration, colluded with Independence Party chair Steve Corryn in an attempt to get Richards back into the race. Richards lost the Democratic primary for mayor to City Council President Lovely Warren, but is still on the ballot on the Working Families and Independence lines. Richards hasn’t campaigned, though, and it’s unclear if he would serve even if he won in November.

Some residents of Rochester’s South Wedge are forming an anticrime group to address what they say is poor police response and follow-through, as well as a failure by the local media to report the truth about crime in their neighborhood.

South Wedge resident Wendy Painting cites the area of Alexander Street and South Avenue as a trouble spot. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE

“The people of the South Wedge are left with little recourse or remedy except to organize among ourselves, to track and monitor the frequency and location of violent assaults on our streets, take measures to protect ourselves and, finally, to devise measures that would help prevent their occurrence,” says an invitation to the group’s first meeting. The meeting is later this week. Statistics provided by the Rochester Police Department do not show a surge in what are called “part I crimes,” such as murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. The South Wedge has had three rapes so far this year, 23 robberies, three incidents of aggravated assault, and 20 burglaries. The RPD provided statistics covering a five-year period, and the 2013 year-to-date figures are in line

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with previous years, going back to 2008. The exception is burglaries; there were 60 in total last year. But one of the organizers of the South Wedge group says that there’s suspicion that the numbers are underreported. And the group seems to be responding to anecdotal reports of assaults and other confrontations. “Personally, I’m afraid to walk home alone at night,” says Wendy Painting, a group facilitator. “We want to know what we can do. I don’t know if the answer is to drop more cops on the street. I don’t know if the answer is to put more cameras on the street. I almost think it’s not. But information would go a long way.”

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After a long night of testimony on both sides, the city’s Planning Commission opted to table Morgan Management’s proposal to build a 99unit apartment building on University Avenue, in the East Avenue Preservation District. The application should resurface later this month. Supporters say that the project would inject life and vitality into the corridor, while detractors object to the size of the project. Critics also say that the building is inappropriate for a preservation district.

its first set of charges. Dan Lynch, president of Treadstone Development Corporation, a firm that contracts with two county-connected local development corporations, was arraigned on a charge of second-degree larceny and two charges of falsifying business records, says a press release from the Attorney General’s Office.

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Apartment plan tabled

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OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

As head of the RBA, Bob Duffy would be the face and the voice of Rochester’s business community. Duffy certainly knows the economic and financial topography here, so in that sense, he’s a good match for the RBA. But in the past, his attacks of indecisiveness and impulsivity have been counterproductive.

POLITICS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

The rumor that Bob Duffy will depart the Cuomo administration to head the Rochester Business Alliance when current RBA leader Sandra Parker retires is sprouting legs. Neither Duffy nor Cuomo has done anything to quash the speculation. Instead, Duffy’s refusal to discuss it has stoked the buzz into a near roar. (It’s unclear how Parker’s decision to delay her retirement affects things.) Duffy’s selection as lieutenant governor was likely meant to burnish Cuomo’s appeal upstate. But downstate drives Albany’s machinery and some say that the cognoscente didn’t know how to take this too-tall ex-cop with the nasal “a.” Rochesterians consoled themselves for the loss of Duffy with the knowledge that at least their former mayor would have the governor’s ear — whatever that meant. Duffy’s tenure as Cuomo’s right-hand man hasn’t been particularly remarkable — though it’s tough for a lieutenant governor to stand out. Duffy has been a traveling salesman for Cuomo’s budgets, and he chairs all 10 Regional Economic Development Councils, though the councils’ locally based representatives seem to do the heavy lifting there. Duffy hasn’t hurt Cuomo, either, though his intrusion into Rochester’s mayoral race was ill-conceived — a fact he later acknowledged.

(Duffy told the Democrat and Chronicle in January that Lovely Warren should stay out of the mayor’s race. Warren entered the race anyway and wound up winning the primary Bob Duffy. FILE PHOTO election. And Duffy got dinged for opening his mouth.) As head of the RBA, Duffy would undoubtedly do a lot of courting of investors — a task that he’s very familiar with and for which he is well-suited. He would also be the face and the voice of Rochester’s business community. Duffy certainly knows the economic and financial topography here, so in that sense, he’s a good match for the RBA. But in the past, his attacks of indecisiveness and impulsivity have been counterproductive. Duffy’s relationship with Warren is another question. He has been one of Warren’s strongest supporters, but it’s not clear if his ill-timed remarks about the mayor’s race damaged that bond. If Duffy does get the RBA job and he and Warren are able to mend fences, it could help settle the business community’s stomachs over a possible Warren administration.

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,288 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,105 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 21. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from October 6 to October 18: -- Staff Sgt. Patrick H. Quinn, 26, Quarryville, Pa. -- Sgt. Lyle D. Turnbull, 31, Norfolk, Va.

NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Duffy to return?

Cost of War

Housing help The City of Rochester formed a land bank to give officials some flexibility in addressing vacant, abandoned, and tax delinquent houses in its neighborhoods. But fulfilling that mission requires money. | Enter the state Attorney General’s Office, which is taking $20 million from New York’s share of a nationwide mortgage lender settlement and distributing it among the state’s eight land banks on a competitive basis. Officials with Rochester’s land bank have applied for a $3.3 million chunk of the money. | In the application, the officials say that $2.5 million would be used to purchase, rehab, and resell 50 houses. The land bank would acquire the properties and then turn them over to the HOME Rochester program. | HOME Rochester, which is administered by the Greater Rochester Housing Partnership, rehabs homes and sells them to first-time homebuyers at market value. The rehab costs often exceed the sale price. | Approximately $478,000 will be used to build six affordable, owner-occupied houses, according to the application. The rest of the money will cover staff costs, including a full-time employee with expertise in real estate, finance, or property management.

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CITY 5

ROCHESTER GENERAL

ELECTIONS 2013

Meet your

GREENS  BY JEREMY MOULE Truthfully, Democratic mayoral candidate Lovely Warren doesn’t have much to gain by debating her opponent, the Green Party’s Alex White. With the exception of a few elected officials at the county and state levels, the City of Rochester is a Democratic lock. By agreeing to debate, Warren would elevate White to an equal — a worthy competitor. (Warren has said that she won’t debate White.) But for the local Greens, the whole point of running is to be taken seriously, both by candidates and by voters. “It’s about sending a message to the people of Rochester that we’re legitimate, we’re here, and we’re here to work for you,” White says. And if the party can get at least one candidate elected this year, the Greens say, it’d send an even stronger message. The Green Party of Monroe County’s slate consists of White; City Council candidates David Atias, Drew Langdon, and Dorothy Paige running for three of five open seats; city school board candidate Lori Thomas running for one of three open seats; and Monroe County sheriff candidate Emily Good. Conventional wisdom casts third parties such as the Greens as agitators who exist on the political fringe and can’t really win elections; influencing the debate is the best that they can hope for. But local Greens vehemently reject that thinking. The Greens are running to win, Atias says. And when the candidates are competitive, he says, they force their opponents and the public to pay attention to issues that they may otherwise ignore. The Greens generally focus on topics such as protecting the environment and creating an economic structure that emphasizes communities and local enterprise over the wealthy and over large corporations. This year, local Greens have been particularly critical of the city’s approach to development, especially the tax incentives given to deeppocketed developers to build upscale housing. The Greens also say that they provide inter-party opposition and competition that’s otherwise absent in the City of Rochester. The Greens are running more people for office this year than the GOP, which has fielded few candidates in recent city elections. 6 CITY

OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

In recent local elections, the number of votes received by Green candidates vastly outperformed the party’s enrollment

(This year, Mia Hodgins is running for city school board on the Republican line.) “We are Rochester’s second party, perhaps disproportionate to our membership,” Langdon says. And while the sheriff’s race is countywide, Republican incumbent sheriff Patrick O’Flynn wouldn’t have a challenger if not for Emily Good.

2012 137th Assembly District election DAVID GANTT, DEMOCRAT 33,081 votes (71.5%) DREW LANGDON, GREEN 4,498 votes (9.7%) NEITHER 8,443 votes (18.2%)

It’s difficult to measure the influence that

the Greens have had on local elections. The media haven’t paid a lot of attention to their campaigns, and the candidates haven’t spent a lot of time courting media attention (although White has held press conferences on education, crime, and other issues). The Greens did get some coverage, however, when City Council was considering selling Midtown Tower to a partnership of Buckingham Properties and Morgan Management for $2. Green candidates protested by showing up at the City Council meeting and making their own offer for the property. (Council went ahead and approved the Buckingham-Morgan sale.) The stunt was part of the Greens’ broader campaign opposing tax breaks and loans for large residential developments. In addition to earning some news coverage, it put the campaigns of Lovely Warren and incumbent mayor Tom Richards in a position where they had to explain or defend the sale. Former Rochester mayor Bill Johnson, a Democrat, says that the Greens do give voters a choice in city elections and that they encourage discussion around issues. Johnson, White, and Richards waged a three-way mayoral race in 2011. During that campaign, White pushed the idea of a municipal power company. Richards didn’t support the idea, but at least the public got to hear the discussion, Johnson says. Johnson says that the Greens field thoughtful candidates who bring solid ideas to their races (though he’s clear that he’s not endorsing them). But Johnson also says that sometimes, the Greens rail against problems without addressing underlying issues. He says that while the Greens have attacked tax incentives for developers, he hasn’t heard specifics about how they’d address vacant properties. (The Greens have

Total votes cast: 46,253 Green Party registration: 179 talked about implementing homesteading programs and creating community gardens to address those issues.)

Some issues raised by the Green candidates

don’t seem to have gained traction with the other candidates in the races or with the public. For example, sheriff’s candidate Good is raising substantial issues related to mass incarceration. Good is a well-known local activist who’s been particularly vocal about police misconduct and accountability. Good entered the public eye after she was arrested while filming a Rochester police officer conducting a traffic stop; the charges were eventually dropped. She’s also been arrested at protests, which means that she’s spent some time — albeit minimal — in the county jail. What she saw was a dehumanizing booking and holding process, she says. For example, she says, one women’s holding cell is directly in front of a deputies’ workstation and has a transparent front. Some women are in jumpsuits and have to strip down to use the toilet’s cell, Good says. Good is also concerned about the medical care at the county’s jail facilities. And she questions why the county has maintained its jail health services contract with Correctional Medical Care. Earlier this year, the Albany Times Union published a lengthy article highlighting ongoing concerns from the state Commission of Corrections about forprofit jail health care companies, including Correctional Medical Care.

The Times Union obtained a state report about a 2009 inmate death at the county jail, which included a recommendation that the county terminate its contract with CMC. But the contract persists, according to CMC’s website. (O’Flynn’s campaign did not respond to requests for comment.) Good says that she also wants the sheriff’s office and the courts to make more use of restorative justice programs. And that she wants to replace the DARE programs in local schools with programs that teach conflict resolution skills. Good says that as sheriff she’d advocate for drug law reform at the state and federal levels. But Good’s campaign has been relatively low-profile. She’s made appearances at forums and events, and has talked to bus riders waiting at stops downtown. But she says that she doesn’t have a large number of volunteers or a significant campaign operation to work on her behalf. “The people who I do manage to talk to, I have really great conversations with the majority of the time,” she says. And Good’s campaign hasn’t had a perceptible influence on her opponent. O’Flynn has also kept a relatively low profile.

The Green Party has a numbers

problem. Countywide, its enrollment pales in comparison to the Democratic and Republican parties, and even the Conservative and Independence parties. continues on page 10

WHITE WANTS a Rochester `for us, by us´  BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN Alex White, the Green Party candidate for Rochester mayor, is fired up about Costco. But not in the way you think. Costco, a membership-only warehouse store, will be part of the CityGate development planned for the intersection of East Henrietta and Westfall roads. Costco received property tax abatements from the county’s industrial development agency worth $3.6 million for its new store. And that’s what has White riled up. That money could have been used to rebuild vacant houses in the city, he says, or to educate students in the Rochester school district. And the store will be redundant, he says, because the site is close to a Tops supermarket. “It will take business away from other places in the area,” White says. “It will be almost commercial-neutral to the general area. Are we really hurt by not developing that area? Is there really a burning need to put something down there? I don’t think there is.” White, who has run for mayor and City Council in recent years, owns the gaming store Boldo’s Armory on Monroe Avenue, and is a director of the Good Business Association of Rochester. He lives on South Clinton Avenue in Rochester South Wedge neighborhood. White is a longtime critic of the incentives given to developers by COMIDA and by city government. And he’s made it the main thrust of his mayoral campaign this year. White will face Democrat Lovely Warren in the general election on Tuesday, November 5. Incumbent Tom Richards has the Working Families and Independence lines, but is not actively campaigning. The argument for incentives is that few projects would get done without them, and that at least the municipality will get some tax money from the completed project. A vacant building doesn’t generate any tax revenue and has a deleterious effect on the surrounding area. But White says that private investment might step up if the city and COMIDA leveled the playing field. Smaller investors can’t compete with the big guys and their multimillion-dollar incentives, he says, so they don’t even try. “And I don’t buy the premise that if we don’t give the money, nothing will ever happen,” White says. “That’s absurd.”

But White’s critics point to projects like the Academy building, which has undergone a beautiful renovation with assistance including a $700,000 bridge loan from the City of Rochester. The building languished for years and was visibly deteriorating until the city found a way to make the financing work for a developer. Now the building has 21 market-rate apartments. By helping to finance housing projects,

the City of Rochester is picking winners and losers, White says. The population of the region is not growing, so every time a new house is built, he says, a vacancy is created somewhere else — most likely in a neighborhood that can ill afford it. “But more importantly, without this influx of new housing, we would have the possibility to fix up and fill the vacant houses in the neighborhoods, which is an incredibly important part of the problem because that’s driving down property values,” he says. And low property values make it difficult for people to get home-equity loans to maintain their property, White says. The city could, instead, invest its money to rebuild vacant houses using local labor, he says. And once the houses are fixed, the city could implement an urban homestead program, White says, which would build owner-occupancy in neighborhoods, create jobs, and boost property values. “This is an alternative way that we could use our money to actually create jobs and build wealth,” he says. Rochester did have an urban homesteading program at one time in which people bought vacant houses for $1 and were then given a set amount of time to make repairs. The new homeowners were on their own to find financing for the overhaul. The problem in many cases was that the cost of repairs was more than the houses were worth on the market once they were fixed up. Where Rochester’s program worked, say people who were involved in city government at the time, was in neighborhoods with decent property values like the 19th Ward and the South Wedge.

Lovely Warren, City Council president and the

Democratic candidate for mayor, has made education the keystone of her campaign. White,

Alex White is the Green Party’s candidate for mayor of Rochester.

by design, hasn’t had a lot to say about education or the Rochester school district during his run. “I’m running for mayor of Rochester,” he says. “I’m not running for school board. And the only way the mayor has any say over education other than the financing of education is if we go to mayoral control, which I am completely opposed to.” White does say that the way that Rochester provides its share of funding to the school district is backward. Instead of finding out how much the district needs from the city to properly educate students, White says, the city gives the district the base amount required by state law, and then the district figures out how much education it can afford with the money provided by the city, state, and other sources. “We need to find a way to pay for what the school district tells us they need,” he says. On policing, White has said several times that if elected, he would replace Police Chief James Sheppard. Sheppard is good on outreach, White says, but poor on management and supervision. He cites a few

PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

examples to make his case, including the rampant “fixing” of parking tickets uncovered by the Democrat and Chronicle last year. “I see officers behaving in a way that indicates they are poorly supervised,” White says. “It may be in the culture. It may be difficult to fix. But [Sheppard’s] not doing it.” White has also released a 10 p.m. plan to combat street-corner drug sales. Young people would be given jobs through the summer, and then paid to stay in school during the academic year, as long as they meet “acceptable standards for student attendance.” White says his vision is a Rochester that invests in itself and lifts itself up — the whole city, not just a privileged few. “I have a vision of a for-us-by-us Rochester, and that we are building the things we need, making the stuff we need here in Rochester to lift ourselves up,” he says. “I did not grow up in the lesser Rochester, but that doesn’t mean I can’t understand it. And I have gone to a great deal of effort to come up with solutions, rather than just talk about my experience growing up.”  rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

ROCHESTER GENERAL

ELECTIONS 2013

Greens take aim at tax incentives  BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN The Green Party of Monroe County is fielding three candidates for the five open seats on Rochester City Council. David Atias, Drew Langdon, and Dorothy Paige will face Council incumbents Carolee Conklin, Dana Miller, Jackie Ortiz, Matt Haag, and Loretta Scott (all Democrats) in the November 5 general election, as well as Working Families candidate Marlowe Washington. Washington also sought the endorsement of the Democratic Party, but lost to the incumbents in the September primary. The Green Party’s candidates have a common message: they want to stop government from giving tax breaks and other incentives to big-ticket developers. They say it’s unfair, and that the city could use those millions of dollars to begin addressing child poverty, the underperformance of the Rochester school district, vacant housing, and Rochester’s many additional persistent problems. Profiles of the Green Party’s Council candidates are below. Profiles of the five incumbents and Washington ran in the August 21 issue. Dorothy Paige

Dorothy Paige has worked extensively with the underprivileged in Rochester, so her concern for them comes from an authentic place. Paige, who was born in New York City, has spent much of her adult life working with the disadvantaged, particularly the homeless. She spent two years working in an overnight shelter in the South Wedge through AmeriCorps. Paige also worked with homeless women at the YMCA, homeless children at the Center for Youth, and for a federally funded job training program for senior citizens. Paige, who lives in the Dutchtown neighborhood in northeast Rochester, is currently unemployed and has spent two years looking for work. “My unemployment ran out, so I’m living on my savings,” she says. If the city or the county Industrial Development Agency is going to give incentives to developers, Paige says, they need to make sure that they get something equal out of the deal. 8 CITY

OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

(left to right) David Atias, Drew Langdon, and Dorothy Paige. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

“We just give away too much stuff,” she says. “It’s really unbalanced.” Another issue: vacant properties. City officials aren’t doing enough, Paige says, to rein in absentee landlords. The city should be able to take properties from negligent landlords, she says, and then work with nonprofits to rehab the houses to increase home ownership in troubled areas of the city. Paige also talks about the need for more job training programs for city residents, and for developers to provide job training and jobs for city residents in greater numbers. David Atias

David Atias is a local activist, longtime member of the Green Party, and has twice run for Rochester school board. A former teacher, he is currently the assistant director of advocacy for the Center for Disability Rights. City officials like to trumpet the investments they make in Rochester’s neighborhoods, Atias says, but much of that is for roads and other infrastructure. The city should invest in locally owned businesses, he says, which can serve as the nucleus for a neighborhood’s rebirth. Rochester needs jobs less than it does wealth creation, Atias says. The city’s many empty lots can be converted into for-

profit urban farms, he says, and attendant businesses will spring up to support and serve the farms. And the assets would stay in the community, Atias says. Atias also talks about exploring single payer health care coverage for city residents, and creating a municipal energy company as a way to attract business. City residents have been hearing only one party’s ideas — Democrats — for too long, Atias says, and it’s time to bring diversity to city governance. “There needs to be different kinds of dialogue,” he says. “Lots of people don’t believe in the direction we’re going.” Citing tensions between police and the African-American community, Atias says that Police Chief James Sheppard needs to be replaced. And he says that the city needs a fully independent review board to ensure police accountability. Drew Langdon

Drew Langdon works in sales and merchandising for Lord & Taylor in Eastview Mall, but says that’s just to pay the bills. His main occupation, he says, is activism. Langdon participated in statewide campaigns for marriage equality and the passage of the Gender Expression NonDiscrimination Act, and he’s a founder of

the Rochester Organization for Workplace Democracy. The latter promotes an alternate form of economics where the workers own the company, Langdon says. “No fat bonuses for failing CEO’s,” he says. Langdon formerly ran for State Assembly against powerhouse incumbent David Gantt, a Democrat. Langdon opposes the incentives awarded to developers who “only create minimal jobs.” He advocates for locally owned cooperatives to build wealth and create opportunities. “The big-business model is all about profit and enriching the few,” he says. Langdon says he pushed to convert the men’s clothing store Hickey Freeman into a cooperative before it was sold earlier this year. Langdon also says that the city needs a level of government that’s closer to the people than City Council. Council members’ territories are too vast, he says, and constituents have limited access to their representatives. Neighborhoods or quadrants could have their own councils, he says, that control everything from speed limits to zoning. Langdon also calls for citizens to have more influence into the city’s budgeting process. 

Many choices remain for school board  BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Lori Thomas. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Mia Hodgins. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE

There are three seats available on the Rochester school board this year, and incumbents Van White, Cynthia Elliott, and Jose Cruz are asking voters to return them to office. Our profiles of the candidates who ran in the September Democratic primary appeared in the August 21 issue. Though all three of the incumbents were able to fend off their primary challengers, some of the challengers are still in the race and will appear on the ballot in the November 5 general election. Candice Lucas is running on the Working Families Party line. And both Howard Eagle and Ronald Hall are running on the Freedom line. All are registered Democrats. Lori Thomas is a Green Party candidate and Republican Mia Hodgins will also be on the ballot. Their profiles are below.

Thomas says that her biggest concern with the district is the lack of accountability, particularly at the administrative level. “Failure fuels funding,” she says. “You don’t get money [in urban education] unless you fail.” The near total absence of parental engagement and oversight has allowed the oversight problem to become systemic and system-wide, Thomas says. She says that her first priorities as a board member would be to cut the number of cabinetlevel positions that the superintendent can hire, and to dissolve the administratorlevel union contract. Giving management cover through a union contract doesn’t make sense, she says. “Everyone talks about how teachers can’t be fired,” Thomas says. “No, no, no; administrators can’t be fired. They mess up and they just move them to a different school.” Thomas says that she is bothered when people say that 85 percent of the district’s budget goes to salaries, because that assumes that the money is going to pay teachers. But the district is top-heavy with highly paid administrators, she says. And she says that many never have meaningful contact with students, teachers, or parents — something she finds preposterous. “That’s why we have to change the system,” Thomas says. “We can’t reform it.”

Lori Thomas

Lori Thomas is a retired teacher in the city school district and a Green Party candidate for school board. She spends much of her time writing blogs about education and advocating for changes in local, state, and national education policies. Teaching is a second career for Thomas, who was born in Batavia, raised in Rochester, and graduated from James Madison High School. She earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees after working for the City of Rochester for 18 years as an environmental services operator. Thomas is an outspoken critic of the district and the school board. She regularly attends school board and community meetings armed with a battalion of questions and comments that often challenge central office administrators.

Mia Hodgins

Mia Hodgins is assistant director of alumni relations at Rochester Institute of Technology. This is her second run for school board, but this time she’s running as a Republican. continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

ROCHESTER GENERAL

ELECTIONS 2013

Meet your Greens continues from page 6

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The county’s approximately 1,100 registered Greens equal less than 1 percent of either registered Republicans or Democrats. Since the end of 2011, however, the party’s enrollment has been growing, marking an important shift after several years of declines. And in recent elections, Green candidates have performed at levels disproportionate to the party’s enrollment. White received 2,221 votes in the 2011 mayoral special election — approximately 9 percent of the 25,726 cast. And in a 2012 challenge against Democratic Assembly member David Gantt, Drew Langdon received 4,498 votes, or almost 10 percent of the 46,253 cast. The Greens say that they hope that running fuller slates, as they are doing this year, will convince more people to enroll as or to vote for Greens. And that’ll be crucial headed into the 2014 gubernatorial elections. The Green candidate has to receive a certain number of votes for the party to keep its official state recognition for the subsequent four years. That recognition makes it easier for the party to get its local and statewide candidates on the ballot. But to grow the Greens ranks, the party also has to do outreach, which is where campaign tactics come into play. And while the Greens say that they are frustrated by their exclusion from mediasponsored debates, they are encouraged that community groups are inviting their candidates to forums and meetings. “They want to hear our ideas,” Council candidate Atias says. “Will some of the folks who were there vote for us? I don’t know. I think so.” And former mayor Johnson also has some advice for the Greens on growing their party and influence. He says that they need to keep speaking out on issues after the elections are over.

In recent local elections, the number of votes received by Green candidates vastly outperformed the party’s enrollment

2011 mayoral special election TOM RICHARDS, DEMOCRAT 12,471 votes (48.5%) BILL JOHNSON, WORKING FAMILIES/INDEPENDENCE 10,732 votes (41.7%) ALEX WHITE, GREEN 2,221 votes (8.6%) NONE OF THE ABOVE 44 votes (<1%) Total votes cast: 25,726 Green Party registration: 302 The big-party candidates have many paths to reach voters, such as paid advertising and polished websites. They also harness substantial volunteer networks to knock on doors and to staff phone banks. But many outreach efforts require money, and in that, the Greens are lacking. Instead, this year’s slate is running campaigns that are, in a sense, more traditional. The candidates knock on doors and talk to anyone who will listen. They also go to community gathering places like the Public Market to engage potential voters. And they’ve embraced social media as a means to connect with voters and to spread their message. But they’re also trying their hands at an unconventional approach. Over the summer, the Greens began holding interactive Livestream events, where candidates had free-wheeling

conversations devoted to various issues. Viewers could join in the discussion. For example, Good and Langdon held a Livestream in August devoted to criminal justice and public safety issues. The candidates continue to hold Livestreams each Tuesday — an approach that gives them a direct connection to voters, sans filter. The Greens say that they want to win elections, but that they also have different ways of measuring success. Increasing the number of registered Greens is one measure, they say, and keeping their state recognition is another. In the longer term, building a party that is an active and meaningful participant in city elections would be an important milestone, they say. “A victory is going to look like people having better lives,” White says. “That’s what success in politics should be.” 

Choices remain for school board continues from page 9

Hodgins has a 10-point plan to improve student performance and raise the district’s graduation rate: increasing parental involvement, improving reading proficiency, and providing more arts, music, and sports to help feed students’ interests and keep them from dropping out. She says that she supports Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s efforts to give students more instruction time through expanded learning programs, and that she wants to help provide more training and development for teachers. 10 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

One of Hodgins’ biggest concerns is making the best use of the district’s resources, she says, and maximizing the district’s $780 million budget to the fullest extent. “Without drastic cuts in the budget, huge tax increases, or a dramatic increase in state aid, the way we manage funding of our schools is unsustainable,” she says. Grants, partnerships, sponsorships, and collaboration with other organizations offer innovative opportunities for developing new funding, she says.

Bright, young, and congenial, Hodgins clearly wants to help city students and her community. She says that she strongly believes in the value of community service. Even though the city is heavily Democratic, Hodgins says that her values are not confined to one party. And she says that she doesn’t believe that running on the Republican Party line will hurt her chances of winning a seat on the school board, though clearly there are limitations given the city’s current political landscape. 

Vote no on casinos

Endorsements continues from page 3

charter schools will undoubtedly undercut the efforts of the Rochester school district. As we said in our pre-primary article, Warren is eloquent when she talks about Rochester’s problems. She is less strong when it comes to having realistic ways to attack them. And most important, she does not have Richards’ deep management experience and his broader view of what Rochester needs. As Warren has noted repeatedly, Rochester is very much two communities:

one is “growing, prosperous, and has a bright future.” The other, “often invisible Rochester,” she says, “is characterized by high rates of unemployment, crime, poverty, and despair.” The residents of both of those communities – but particularly those of the poorest and most vulnerable – need and deserve the best mayor possible. We remain convinced that Tom Richards is that person.

Rochester City Council

and Working Families lines; and Howard Eagle and Ronald Hall on the Freedom line. As we did for the Democratic primary, we endorse Cruz, White, and Lucas. The school district’s challenges are enormous, and its options for improvement are limited, given the poverty in which most of its students live. That doesn’t mean teachers and administrators can’t improve; they can and must. But their effectiveness and morale are under almost constant siege as officials at the district, state, and federal level come up with one initiative, change, and demand after another. A high-quality school board is crucial, and the current one isn’t as strong as it should be. But the board isn’t the reason Rochester’s children aren’t doing better in school. Every one of the board’s seven members is intensely committed to those children and the schools that serve them. Jose Cruz and Van White have played valuable roles on the board and deserve to be re-elected. Cynthia Elliott is one of the community’s strongest advocates for Rochester children. And she has toned down the harshness and combativeness she was known for in her first years on the school board. But our endorsement for the third seat goes to Candice Lucas, who lost her primary bid but is continuing to campaign on the third-party lines. Lucas has served as president of the district’s parent council, advocating for increased parent engagement and working both with parents and guardians and with district personnel. That experience has given her valuable knowledge of the district, its finances and operations, and its challenges. Mia Hodgins and Ronald Hall are well intentioned but don’t have the strength and insight necessary for the board. Lori Thomas and Howard Eagle are knowledgeable and dedicated, but their combative style – for which neither apologizes – would cause serious problems on the school board.

Council’s five incumbents – Carolee Conklin, Matt Haag, Dana Miller, Jackie Ortiz, and Loretta Scott – won the September Democratic Party primary for their at-large seats. In the November 5 general election, they face Marlowe Washington on the Working Families line and three Green Party candidates: David Atias, Andrew Langdon, and Dorothy Paige. Ortiz and Haag also have the Working Families line, and all five of the incumbents are listed on the Independence line. No other third-party candidates or Republicans are running. Atias and Langdon are good candidates, and they have an important activist role to play pushing some of the Greens’ stronger positions. But both, like Paige, have a narrow, fairly simplistic view of government and its challenges, and Paige lacks the knowledge to serve in this important position. Washington has important ideas, including creating zones of distressed neighborhoods and singling them out for intense public-private investment. But he hasn’t made the case for unseating any of the incumbents. The five incumbents have broad experience, both on City Council and in their careers. They bring expertise in finance, technology, and public service, and they represent a broad urban constituency. With a new mayor likely taking office in January, their experience on Council will be invaluable.

Rochester school board Eight candidates are on the November 5 general election ballot for the three open school board seats. All three incumbents – Jose Cruz, Cynthia Elliott, and Van White – are running for another term on the Democratic Party line. Cruz and White are also running on the Independence and Working Families lines. The other four on the ballot: Green Party candidate Lori Thomas; Republican Mia Hodgins; Candice Lucas, on the Independence

ENDORSEMENTS  BY CITY’S EDITORIAL STAFF

Of the six proposals on the ballot in the November election, we are focusing on the most controversial: the measure permitting more casinos in the state. If voters approve the proposal, the state could get as many as seven new casinos. The first four would be in Upstate New York, but none would be in Rochester or elsewhere in western New York, where Indian tribes have exclusive rights to operate them. (Discussions continue about the possibility of an Indian-run casino in the Rochester area.) Promoters of the casino ballot measure – including the governor, state business leaders, and, of course, casino interests – have been lobbying hard for its passage. They promise at least 10,000 new jobs – and hundreds of millions of dollars for the state and for counties throughout the state (including Monroe), distributed from taxes on casino proceeds. And, the supporters say, the casinos will boost the state’s tourism economy by drawing out-of-state visitors and by appealing to New Yorkers who have previously gone elsewhere to gamble. If experience is a guide, new jobs will indeed be created. And the casinos will generate new tax revenue, which could lower local taxes and help pay for schools and local government services. So what’s not to like? A lot, frankly. First, we should take those job-creation and revenue figures with a big grain of salt. New York already has five Indian-operated casinos (with possibly more to come) and nine racinos: race tracks with electronic gambling. They’ll compete with the new gambling venues. Supporters of the casino ballot measure note that many New Yorkers now frequent out-of-state casinos. Why not have them spend those gambling dollars in New York State? And presumably, many of those folks will indeed start gambling closer to home. But at some point, unless there is an endless appetite for gambling, we’ll reach a saturation point. New casinos will draw business from existing ones, and job growth in a new one will cause job loss in older ones. As for New York’s casinos boosting tourism by attracting gamblers from other states: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Ohio already have casinos.

Some casino supporters think casinos will help nearby businesses. That’s a pipe dream. Casinos are one-stop entertainment, dining, and stay-over venues, designed to keep gamblers contained within their walls. They’re far more likely to suck business out of other restaurants, entertainment venues, and hotels – closing some of them and lowering local tax receipts. A third concern: the social costs resulting from the increased gambling and gambling addiction that casino expansion will bring. Nobody disputes that this will happen. And then, given the amount of money involved, there’s no end to the avenues for corruption. Gambling interests have already been spending money to influence public officials and New York voters. And as the New York Times noted earlier this month, the casino industry would almost certainly try to influence the officials who will decide where the casinos are located and who operates them – and to press for continued expansion. It did not lower the smell factor when the governor and state legislators revised the legislation calling for the casino expansion. Initially, it had barred casino developers from giving campaign donations to state officials. Suddenly, and quietly, that ban was taken out. The opportunity for corruption is enormous. And New York has no lack of history, talent, and inclination in that area. There are better ways to raise money for important government services than gambling, better ways to boost economic development, better business sectors to focus on: better industries for our vision of what New York can become. New Yorkers should vote no on the casino ballot proposal.

City will have election-night coverage of Rochesterarea races after 9 p.m. on Tuesday, November 5, at WWW.ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Casino debate

The Interfaith Alliance of Rochester and the League of Women Voters will sponsor “More Casinos in New York?” a debate on the pros and cons of approving additional casinos, including one for the Rochester area. Jim Bertolone, president of the Rochester AFL-CIO, will present the pros and David Blankenhorn with the Institute for American Values will present the cons. The event is at 7 p.m. on Monday, October 28, at 1050 East Avenue.

Police brutality forum

The United Christian Leadership Ministry of Western New York and the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance will present a public forum on police-community relations at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 24. Organizers have invited City 12 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

Council, Mayor Tom Richards, and District Attorney Sandra Doorley. The forum will be held at Faith Temple Apostolic Church, 141 Arnett Boulevard.

Meet Rochester school board candidates

The Greater Rochester Parent Leadership Training Institute and the League of Women Voters will host a public meeting to introduce voters to Rochester City school board candidates. The meeting is at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 23, at Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street.

Charrette for Lima

The Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design and the Rochester Regional Community Design Center will hold three day of workshops and discussions in the Village of Lima on, “Saving Our Small Towns and Villages.” The workshops will be held from Friday, October 25, through

Sunday, October 27, and will feature a panel discussion as well as a community charrette for the Village of Lima. The events are free, but registration is recommended since space may be limited. For a complete schedule of events, times, and locations: www.rrcdc. org or call 271-0520.

Prayer case examined

The Genesee Valley Chapter of the New York Civil Liberties Union, Rochester Lawyers Chapter of the Federalist Society, and the Monroe County Bar Association will present “Town of Greece v. Galloway: the Future of Legislative Prayer in America,” at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, October 29. The panel discussion will feature attorneys Heather Weaver from the ACLU and Brett Harvey from the Alliance Defending Freedom regarding the local prayer case that will be heard by the US Supreme Court next month. The event is at Nixon Peabody, 1300 Clinton Square.

Dining

Toasted maple-cinnamon Monks' Bread with Once Again Nut Butters' almond butter, and Mountain Rise classic granola. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Local flavor [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

The dwindling daylight reminds us that the 2013 harvest is drawing to a close, but that doesn’t mean locavores can’t still find homegrown vittles. Our region is teeming with talented and enterprising individuals who are committed to crafting good things for us to eat, often with ingredients that they too have scored in our big, shared backyard. This is the third installment in an occasional series that spotlights locally made edibles. Is there an area food company you’d like to put on our radar? Then do it! Add a comment to this article on rochestercitynewspaper.com, Tweet at us @roccitynews, or e-mail food@ rochester-citynews.com. The Abbey of the Genesee, a wee bit northeast of Geneseo in Piffard, New York, is home to about 30 Trappist monks who avoid the problem of idle hands by immersing them in dough. Since 1953 the abbey has been making Monks’ Bread, now available throughout much of Western New York in that very familiar packaging. Among the current varieties are stone-ground whole wheat, cinnamon-raisin, sunflower with rolled oats, and caraway rye, with seasonal holiday breads on deck. The monks’ baking repertoire has expanded to include cookies

and cakes, and ordering directly from the abbey allows you to personalize gift boxes with handcrafted products from other monasteries. Call 877-264-6785 to learn more, or visit monksbread.com. Totally employee-owned, Nunda, NY’s Once Again Nut Butter has been roasting and grinding since 1976, with fair-trade and sustainability models that go back much further than the recent wave of consciousness. Once Again produces a number of peanut butter (think old-fashioned, organic, crunchy, no-salt) along with variations on cashew, almond, sesame, and sunflowerseed butters, plus packaged roasted nuts and the Dawes Honey line. You can find Once Again at places like Abundance Coop and Lori’s Natural Foods, or online at onceagainnutbutter.com. Geulah’s “Claim to Flame” Spicy Tomato Spread is the creation of Geulah von Perlstein, owner of Geulah’s Café and Deli at the Jewish Community Center. A versatile and all-natural condiment co-starring garlic, cumin, and crushed red pepper, the spread takes advantage of the tomato’s inherent umami to enliven whatever it’s used on or in, be it chili or a rice cake. Look for Geulah’s “Claim to Flame” Spicy Tomato Spread at shops like Parkleigh, Lipman’s Kosher

Market, and Lombardi’s Gourmet Imports, or just pop by Geulah’s Café. Check geulahs. com for more info. If you visited an area farmers’ market over the summer, you may have encountered Jennifer Brake slinging herb-and-spice mixtures under the banner of VonBrake Spices, a family business devoted to handblended rubs and seasonings. VonBrake spice blends include cajun, jerk, thai, and garam masala, along with prosciutto and pastrami rubs, plus the intriguing espresso blend and a poblano mole that did wonders for my Dr. Pepper barbecue sauce. VonBrake provides recipe ideas as well; follow the company on Facebook to see where it’ll pop up next, or visit vonbrakespices.com. South Bristol’s Arbor Hill Winery has a lot on its proverbial plate, and most of it is grape-related. There are, of course, a number of wines, but Arbor Hill has been offering a line of gourmet foods since 1980, such as jams and preserves, flavored vinegars, finishing sauces, and Healthy Purple grape-pie filling, plus addictive grape gummy bears and licorice twists. Look for Arbor Hill products at shops like Red Bird Market and Aman’s Farm Market, or visit thegrapery.com to order online. Glenn and Marcia Litwiller’s Mountain Rise Organics is a farm in the hills of Naples,

NY, that makes herb blends, herbal soaps, and Mountain Rise Granola, a hearty combination of whole grains and other goodness, like cocoa in the Chunky Cocoa version, or raisins, cinnamon, and ginger in the Spice of Life blend. A few of the granolas in the Mountain Rise line are vegan, and all are baked and packaged in Mountain Rise’s nut- and peanut-free bakery. Get your granola on at places like Abundance Co-op and Wegmans in Canandaigua and head to mountainrise.com for more details. You’re told that when life hands you lemons, you make lemonade. But this is Western New York, and when you’re confronted with a pile of grape guts, you make grape seed oil. Romulus, NY’s Seneca BioEnergy cold-presses the byproducts from a couple dozen wineries to make Finger Lakes Grape Seed Oil, a light-bodied oil that’s excellent as both an ingredient (it contains the “good” kind of cholesterol) and a cooking fat thanks to its relatively high smoke point. You can find Finger Lakes Grape Seed Oil at retailers like Casa Larga Vineyards and Pittsford Wegmans; visit fingerlakesgrapeseedoil.com to learn more. “Do you dukkah?” the flyer salaciously wondered at Allens Hill Farm’s booth at the Brighton Farmers’ Market. From the Arabic word meaning “to pound” (which really doesn’t help to make it any less dirtysounding), dukkah is actually a nut-andspice concoction of Egyptian origin that’s traditionally used as a topping or mix-in. The Bloomfield, NY, farm sells a few varieties of dukkah, along with baking mixes, granolas, sea salts, and owner John Loveland’s applecider molasses. Look for Allens Hill Farm products at shops like Red Bird Market, or visit allenshillfarm.com to order online. Confession time! At last month’s gutbusting Festival of Food, there was one vendor I visited twice, and that was Happy Earth Tea, the thoughtful infusions of owner/operator Niraj Lama helping to both warm and soothe on a long, brisk night of indulgence. Lama — a native of Darjeeling, India, if you’re looking for bonafides — offers organic, single-origin black and green teas, as well as various herbal blends and chais. The Happy Earth Tea website provides gorgeous photos and tempting descriptions of flavor profiles, along with instructions for brewing. Experience Happy Earth Tea at restaurants like Red Fern, or pick up some for home enjoyment at Happy Earth Tea’s Etsy shop and at happyearthtea.com. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Upcoming [ JAZZ ]

Music

XRIJF Club Pass Friday, October 25. Various locations. $174. rochesterjazz.com  [ R&B ]

WDKX Holiday Step Jam ft. The New Boyz Saturday,

December 7. Blue Cross Arena. One War Memorial Square. 1 p.m. $18.50. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com [ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: Gala Holiday Pops Friday, December 20-Sunday, December 22. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. $10-$92. Various. 454-2100. rpo.org

Rochester Chamber Orchestra

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 HOCHSTEIN PERFORMANCE HALL, 50 NORTH PLYMOUTH AVE. 3 P.M. | $10-$30 | ROCHESTERCHAMBERORCHESTRA.ORG, 734-6163 [ CLASSICAL ] At its concert on October 27, the Rochester

Chamber Orchestra will celebrate the start of its 50th season. Headline composers for the concert include Mozart and Haydn, including Haydn’s “Cello Concerto in C,” featuring cellist Cicely Parnas (pictured). The concert will also include works by Chevalier de Saint-George, Lucile Grétry, and Francois-Joseph Gossec. The Rochester Chamber Orchestra is led by music director and conductor David Fetler. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Daniel Carter & The Moon MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 BOP SHOP RECORDS, 1460 MONROE AVE. 8 P.M. | $10 | BOPSHOP.COM , 271-3354 [ JAZZ ] When Daniel Carter plays free jazz, the freedom

extends to his choice of instrument. Carter is adept at saxophone, clarinet, flute, trumpet, and keyboard, playing all of them with furious energy. He’ll be joined by The Moon: former Rochesterian and wildly experimental guitarist Adam Caine, and powerhouse drummer Federico Ughi. — BY RON NETSKY

EIGHTH ANNUAL

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EVENING OF WINE AND JAZZ!

PRESENTED BY GREECE COMMUNITY BROADCASTING INC.

Thursday, Nov. 7th • Tickets: $25 On sale October 7th Held at the Waterside Room of Pier 45 at the Port of Rochester Featuring wine and beer tasting, chocolate sampling, great

gourmet food, live jazz by Jive Street Five, a silent auction and more.

ROCHESTER’S NEW COMEDY CLUB! $20 • NO Drink Minimum

DUSTIN DIAMOND “SCREECH” From “Saved by the Bell!”

SPECIAL EVENT

FRI-SAT OCT. 25 & 26 MC: Bill Moran from WCMF

More info at JAZZ901.ORG 14 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

JokeFactoryComedyClub.com RESERVATIONS GOING FAST Reserve Your Seats! EVERY WED • IMPROV NIGHT • 8pm

FOR RESERVATIONS

Call 328-6000

Plenty of Free Parking

At The Holiday Inn Airport

$15 • NO Drink Minimum

JIM FLORENTINE From VH1’s “That Metal Show” and Comedy Central’s “Crank Yankers!”

SPECIAL EVENT

FRI-SAT NOV. 1 & 2

MC: Bill Moran from WCMF

911 Brooks Avenue

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Jeff Riales and Bruce Diamond. Sticky Lips BBQ

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Mandolin Orange Album Release Party. Abilene

Weekend SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 THE BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | BUGJAR.COM [ POP/ROCK ] San Francisco-based band Weekend

delivers a wash of ambient, 80s New Wave influenced post-punk with a relevant, contemporary edge. The songs on its recently released album “Jinx” present a sound that is clearly influenced by New Wave acts such as Joy Division and The Smiths, complete with the pop sensibility of both bands and many others within the genre. Like its shoegaze and new wave predecessors, Weekend takes a raw, punk rock sound and places a soft filter over the surface.The end product winds up, creating a wall-of-sound, each part coming together to create a haunting, hazy tribute to the bands that came before. — BY LEAH CREARY

Judah SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 MIRACLE DELIVERANCE CHURCH, 69 WHITNEY ST 4 P.M. | $5-$18 | 354-5440 [ GOSPEL ] Turns out Rochester has its own gospel super group: Judah. The group is celebrating its fourth anniversary and its new CD release with a blockbuster gospel music event this Saturday. The lineup also includes comedian Les Long as the MC, Jason Monroe and the Elim Christian Fellowship Choir, Chosen Generation, Shawn Brown and Da Boyz from St. Louis, The Gospel Believers from Grand Rapids, and Hiz AhNoint’d from South Carolina. — BY DAVID RAYMOND

Sweet Tea Project performed at Richmond’s on Tuesday, October 15. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Adios to Audio?

[ BLUES ]

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Ed Roland’s Sweet Tea Project rolled into town Tuesday, October 15, not to steep, not to brew, not to percolate, but to rock the joint like a diesel-powered Dixie-fied deep fryer. The man’s music is instantly recognizable, thanks to seven No. 1 hits with his band, Collective Soul — and so is his voice. What’s new and not something you would necessarily pin on Roland is the instrumentation behind Sweet Tea Project’s sound. It’s pure Americana; not too honky, not too tonky, with just the right amount of dirt, dust, and twang. You can thank the exquisite application of lap steel and the banjo, an instrument which admittedly isn’t often known for its exquisite application. The band filled the newly revamped Richmond’s to the walls on Tuesday. It was hot and sticky, sweet and sweaty as the steam heat from the eager bodies shoehorned in to dig the scene, mingled with that of the fry cook cranking out those hot wings. The band plowed through material off its debut “Devils ’n’ Darlins” with a Man in Black detour and a Collective Soul encore. The five-piece band seemed right at

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. Call for info $7-$10. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Tom Quigley. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

The Nighthawks. Dinosaur

home playing authentic barroom rock ’n’ roll in an actual beer joint, with the crowd piled in almost nose to nose with the band. We’ll be talking about this one for a while. Is it adios to Audio Influx? With the exit of key members Chris “Hollywood” English and MDot Coop, you’ve got to wonder. But everyone in the band’s camp says no. A new drummer has already been rehearsing with the remaining players. Now I’m not saying the band should hang it up, but those are some big shoes to fill. Anyhow, it was a farewell gig of sorts at a packed Dinosaur Friday night, where the band jammed its hip-hop-soul for the kids. The band was incredibly tight with a soulful vocal tag team attack over its thick groove ’n’ grind. Slid over to Richmond’s once again for North Carolina hard-rockers Blanco Diablo. This band is loud with a borderline ferocity that threatened to blow the lid off the joint. Digging this band in this size joint was like watching a Panzer park in a phone booth. I’d seen the trio once before and it seems like it has moved in a slightly more metal direction, at least in its guitar attack. Ain’t nothin’ wrong with that.

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Brighton Symphony Orchestra Fall Concert. 7:30 p.m. Cherry Ridge Auditorium, 900 Cherry Ridge Rd. Webster. Call for info. Live from Hochstein: Ad Hoc. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. hochstein.org. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night.

Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Raye Black. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. continues on page 17

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 EASTMAN SCHOOL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, NEIL VARON, CONDUCTOR Music of Grieg, Mozart, and Schumann Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free

Eastman Theatre Box Office:

585-454-2100

facebook.com/ConcertsAtEastman

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 EASTMAN JAZZ ENSEMBLE AND NEW JAZZ ENSEMBLE, BILL DOBBINS AND DAVE RIVELLO, DIRECTORS, BILL HOLMAN, GUEST COMPOSER AND DIRECTOR Music of Bill Holman Kilbourn Hall, 8 pm, Free

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 REPERTORY SINGERS AND WOMEN’S CHORUS, PHILIP SILVEY AND RENATA DWORAK, CONDUCTORS Music of Hangen, Paulus, Ramsey, and Mozart Kilbourn Hall, 8 pm Free ROCHESTER CELEBRITY ORGAN RECITAL SERIES: DIANE MEREDITH BELCHER Asbury First Methodist Church, 8 pm Tickets $12 general admission, $5 students available, at the door

MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 GUEST RECITAL – GAUDETE BRASS Hatch Recital Hall, 8 pm Tickets $10 general admission available at the door, free to U/R Id Holders TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29 EASTMAN PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE, MICHAEL BURRITT, DIRECTOR Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 FACULTY ARTIST SERIES – CLAY JENKINS, JAZZ TRUMPET WITH GENE BERTONCINI, GUITAR AND IKE STURM, BASS Performing music from their new album Joy Hatch Recital Hall, 8 pm Tickets $10 general admission available at the door, free to U/R Id Holders

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 EASTMAN WIND ENSEMBLE AND MUSICA NOVA, BRAD LUBMAN, CONDUCTOR; CHIEN-KWAN LIN, SAXOPHONE; MICHAEL BURRITT, PERCUSSION Music of Boulez, Adams, Stravinsky and Birtwistle Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

Music BUY - SELL

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES 1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 PM

244-1999 • Theantiqueguy.com

Shui Asian Fusion

$5.00 OFF Your Meal! $30 Purchase or more

Expires November 10, 2013 236 University Ave | 546.6525 Open 7 days a week 5 Star Restaurant on

MoChester started as a singer/songwriter project between two Webster-based brothers. Now it’s a four-piece pop/rock outfit that blends in strains of jazz and reggae. PHOTO PROVIDED

Mo’ betta pop

Find us on

MoChester Bar & Lounge

SPECIAL SHOWS

FRI. OCT 25: HAPPY HOUR BENEFIT FOR THE AWESOME MARIAH ROSE

“KRASZMAN & FISHWIFE”

9:30: MInNESOTA ROOTS-ROCKER

MARY CUTRUFELLO

SAT. OCT 26: 7PM (upstairs lounge)

NICK YOUNG CD RELEASE PARTY!

9:30: (DOWNSTAIRS)

ROCKABILLY

HALLOWEEN BASH!

FEAT. BOBBY HENRIE & THE GONERS COSTUME CONTEST – CRAZY DRINK SPECIALS SPECIAL MONDAY SHOW, OCT. 28: 8PM: ROCKABILLY DANCE PARTY!

THE LUSTRE KINGS! WED. OCT 30:

“THE MIGHTY HIGH & DRY RAMBLE” WITH SPECIAL GUEST “OVERHAND SAM” COME IN COSTUME! 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY•232-3230

www.abilenebarandlounge.com 16 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

W/BALLYHOO!, PASSAFIRE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $10-$15 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM MOCHESTER.COM [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

The hearts and influences of its members are visible on its collective sleeve. Clearly a pop vehicle, MoChester jams effortlessly outside the safety of pop’s sugar walls with apparent, and perhaps some not-so-apparent, roots. There’s reggae, there’s jazz, even some darker leanings toward the blues. But the band’s gentle song-based aesthetic gives it a unique edge in a scene that doesn’t necessarily acknowledge or embrace unique. MoChester is pop, but more than pop, too. Singer-guitarist Brandon Sheffer calls it “Pop with a reggae twist,” he says. “It started out less reggae, more pop… a little jazzy at times, maybe a little more acoustic driven.” Flashforward to today and you’ve got a MoChester with its 3-year-old line-up — Sheffer, his brother John Sheffer on guitar and keyboards,

drummer Alex Melville, and Ben Overmyer on bass — a rock band of substance and subtlety, of tangibility and mystery. The Sheffer boys had been playing music together since their early teens, growing up in Webster. “John and I started MoChester when I was 13 or 14,” Brandon says. “It started out singer/ songwriter. I just played acoustic guitar for years.” It wasn’t until 2005, while recording some demos, that the man went electric. Melville and Overmyer played together in Livid, which morphed into Small Time Criminals, which used to share the bill every now and then with MoChester. The collision of these two sets of talent ramped up the MoChester sound, cranking up the intensity up a bit. John blames Melville. “I think when Alex joined us,” he says, “he put a heavier modern-rock element, kind of an edge, to it.” With the release of this year’s “Lost and Found” — the band’s follow-up to its 2011 debut “Stop and Go” — MoChester proves it is growing more into its music and how it approaches the added spice of genres outside mainstream pop and rock. For example, MoChester’s members

love reggae. They use it as a bridge, a detour, a dance-floor lure. But when does the influence become no longer a dash or twist, but the dominant strain? Brandon takes a stab. “I think if the whole song has upstrokes, it’s a reggae song,” he says. But generally, based on the band’s output to date, reggae is just one of the many grooves and slants the band takes. It’s a juxtaposition that drives home the myriad surrounding sounds. “Like when the chorus is a little more rockdriven before it busts back into a reggae verse,” says John. And Brandon points out his left-ofpop-center leanings as well. “I use jazz chords a bit as opposed to the standard bar chord,” he says. “Something with a little flavor — G7 instead of G M — something a little prettier. I think a misconception is that we’re overall pop, that we’re looking for a sound that appeals to everyone. I think our goal in songwriting is to please ourselves first, and if other people enjoy it, that’s a bonus.” John says, “There have been times in practice where we’ve written a song that we’re excited about. And we want to save it for a big show or something, and the minute we get to the first show after writing it, it’s like, ‘We gotta play it.’”

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester.com. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Ballyhoo! w/Passafire, MoChester. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $10-$15.

S.S. Web w/Fox 45, Black Bandit & The Stickups. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. TR3 w/Legit. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 9 p.m. $15.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Frankie & Jewels. Avenue Pub, 522 Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Old Timey Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

Tamra Cherubin presents Victory Over Fear ft. Judah Sealy, Phylicia Rae, Jaylynn Little. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $5-$7. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washinton Square Lunchtime Concerts. firts

univeralist church, 150 s. clinton ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Appalachian Spring. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92.

University of Notre Dame Glee Club. St. Louis Church, 60 South Main St. Pittsford. stlouischurch. org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$35. [ POP/ROCK ]

Consider the Source. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9 p.m. $5-$10. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. JJ Lang. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern. com. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Rochester Indie Fest: Night I: College Battle of the Bands. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Rochester Indie Festival. Various locations and shows. See website for full schedule. flourcityshows. com/indie-fest.

POP/ROCK | GROUPLOVE

If you prefer a lesson in environmental responsibility to go along with your music, perhaps the Campus Consciousness Tour may be up your alley. Visiting college campuses across the nation, the CCT’s aim is to combine popular music with social consciousness in educating students about the environment; in both message and touring practices alike, the hope is building towards a more sustainable future. Helping deliver that message in the 2013 iteration is LA based alternative pop-rockers Grouplove, alongside NYC electronic duo The Knocks. Grouplove, for the uninitiated, dabble in electronic tinged rock with more than a dash of pop, resulting in what is pretty much the exactly formula needed for gracing an iPod commercial, which its track “Tongue Tied” actually did. The band is touring in support of its sophomore record, “Spreading Rumours,” released earlier this month. The Campus Consciousness Tour featuring Grouplove, The Knocks and Saints of Valory, takes place Tuesday, October 29, 7 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St., $25-$35, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVE LABARGE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. Brockport. 637-2383. 58main.com. 8 p.m. Free. Joe Baia. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Mary Cutrufello w/Kraszman & Fishwife. Abilene Bar

& Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. $8-$12. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Demons: Margaret Leenhouts, violin. Nazareth College Wilmot

Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. go.naz.edu/musicevents. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ivan Parker w/Final Harvest. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 888222-1048. 7:30 p.m. $16-$22. The Nazareth Brass Trio. First Presbyterian Church, First Presbyterian Church, 97 E. Genesee St. Skaneateles. 315685-5048. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10.

Rochester Celebrity Organ Recital Series: Diane Meredith Belcher. Asbury

First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. 8 p.m. Call for info. RPO at SUNY Brockport. The College at Brockport, 350 New Campus Dr., Brockport. 7:30 p.m. $8.50-$16. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

PRESENTS......

HALLOW-paloooooza October cto ober 26th 6pm obe er 26t 6th @ 6pm Music By:

ily ly Extended Family a Big Leg Emma dha a Conehead Buddha The niche

and more TOTAL TAP TAKEOVER

Admission : 14 in advance $ 18 at the door $16 at the door w / costume $

includes :

Commemorative beer Glass Com Beer flight costume prizes $ 100 cash

& honorary prizes

www.lovincup.com • 300 park point drive

UR Brass Choir: Dead Man’s Party. University of Rochester

Strong Auditorium, River Campus. 8 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

Big Dog Country 103.5 Halloween Bash ft. Goodness.

Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

8 Days A Week. McGraw’s

Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

DJ/ELECTRONIC | NEUROCEPTOR

FOLK | MARY CUTRUFELLO

FOLK | NICK YOUNG

Genesis P-Orridge of the proto-industrial group Psychic TV once made the controversial statement that “all music is innately psychedelic.” Whether you agree with him or not, it can certainly be said that some types of music are just more focused on consciousness expansion than others. Rochester’s Neuroceptor creates unabashedly psychedelic music utilizing both electronic tools, as well as more traditional “organic” instruments. Favoring dubby downtempo grooves and various ethnic influences, Neuroceptor paints explosively colorful, lavishly textured soundscapes reminiscent of popular EDM acts like Shpongle. Harmony Flo also bring its brand of dub-psy trance to the bill.

Minnesota based singer-songwriter Mary Cutrufello has spent over 20 years in the music business. This Yale-educated country crooner’s forceful approach to Americana has garnered her respect throughout the genre and landed her spots playing with a list of legendary longhorns such as Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Billy Joe Shaver. She’s been on the Tonight Show and toured with The Allman Brothers, Susan Tudeschi, and Gov’t Mule. Although she is considered a honky-tonk wonder woman of sorts, it is her ability to rock that sets her apart. Cutrufello has said that “rock and roll is where I’m from, and as much as I love country, I have to give that part of me its voice too.” Well, thank God for that, because the resulting dialogue is rather divine.

Nick Young grew up during the grunge era but cites a connection with alternative country bands like Uncle Tupelo as creating a foundation for his interest in picking up the guitar. Young’s father introduced him to the group and that set the wheels in motion for a self-described shy kid to front a power-pop/alt-country outfit (Burning Daylight) and eventually throw his hat into the acoustic singer-songwriter ring. Now as a solo performer, Young has toured the lower forty eight with pal Chris Trapper (formerly of The Push Stars) and released a twang-infused debut album “Truth Is.” Young will make a hometown tour stop at Abilene with a CD release party for his latest “South Lima.” Brian Ayers opens.

Mary Cutrufello performs Friday, October 25, 9:30 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, $8-$12, abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Nick Young performs on Saturday October 26, 7:00 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, $10, abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Tony Padilla. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. 11 p.m. Free.

Full Throttle. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 6710816. flahertys.com. Call for info.

[ CLASSICAL ]

50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Rochester Indie Festival. Various locations and shows. See website for full schedule. flourcityshows.com/indie-fest. Spectra. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free. Tommy Brunnett. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info.

  Neuroceptor performs Friday, October 25, 10:30 p.m., at Dubland Undergound, 315 Alexander St., $5-$10. — BY JIM KEMPKES

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 80s Halloween Bash ft. Hall Pass. Nola’s Restaurant &

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Free. Barn Dogs. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. Battle of the Bands. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Brass Taxi. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. The Closer. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 6:30 p.m. $10-$15. Comedown, Headtrip. California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Halloween Bash. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. Happy Hour with Jeff Cosco. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 5 p.m. Call for info. Nod, The Years, and Guest. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9:30 p.m. $3. River Lynch. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Rochester Indie Fest: Dadstache Records Showcase, Rochester Chip. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Rochester Indie Fest, Night II: Pet Sounds: A Tribute to The Beach Boys. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $3-$5. Rochester Indie Festival. Various locations and shows. See website for full schedule. flourcityshows. com/indie-fest. Shine. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

Smooth Talkers w/Acoustic Brew. Johnny’s Irish Pub,

1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub.com. 5 p.m. Free. The LPs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Chris Young CD Release Show.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 7 p.m. $10. Jumbo Shrimp. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.

18 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

Halloween Spooktacular.

Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 585-389-2700. go.naz.edu/ music-events. 7:30 p.m. Free, Donation to benifit Pittsford Food Cupboard accepted.

Honeoye Falls Community Concert Band Fall Concert. HF-L

District Auditorium, 619 Quaker Meeting House Rd. Honeoye Falls. hfccb.org. 7 p.m. Free. Judah CD Release. Miracle Deliverance Faith Center, 69 Whitney St. 426-6812 ‎. 4 p.m. $5-$15. RPO: Appalachian Spring. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ COUNTRY ]

Halloween Party ft. Double Cross. Nashvilles, 4853 W

Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ] Download. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Ernie Capone. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Halloween Bash Day 2 ft. Intox. Montage Music Hall,

Halloween Bash ft. Bobby Henrie and The Goners. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8.

Halloween Party ft. Anger Management. Richmond’s

Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 2708570. richmondstavern.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Halloween Show. California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 6211480. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Harmonica Lewinski Halloween Party/Album Release. Skylark

Lounge, 40 South Union St. (585) 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 10 p.m. $4.

Hollowpalooza ft. Big Leg Emma, Conehead Buddha, Extended Family. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 6 p.m. $14-$18. Lake Effect. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Ultimate Halloween Party w/ The Skycoasters. Pelican’s

Nest, 566 River St. 6635910. pelicansnestrestaurant. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Virgil Cain. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Rochester Indie Fest: Night III: Album Release Show w/ Weekend, FOWLS. Bug Jar, 219

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Rochester Indie Fest: U of R Night. Boulder Coffee Co.,

Celtic Music Sundays: Book & Mike. Temple Bar and Grille,

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$12.

100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free.

109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Fandango at the Tango. Tango

Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Seamus Kennedy. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. $10. Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Natalie B Band. Smokin’ Joe’s

Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ] Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Eastman at St. Michael’s. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 325-4041. sfxcrochester.org. 2:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Il Giardino d’Amore. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave.,. 389-2700. go.naz. edu/music-events. 3 p.m. music of the Polish and Italian Baroque. Free. Musicale: Lilac Piano Trio. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/ museum admission.

Polonia Nell’ Europa Antica: Baroque Music by II Giardino D’Amore. Nazareth College, 4245

East Ave. 3 p.m. Free.

Rochester Chamber Orchestra.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 3 p.m. $10-$30. [ POP/ROCK ]

p.m. Village Gate. $20.

Rochester Indie Fest Night IV: Double Album Release Show ft. Steve Layman, M.D. Woods, Broken Field Runner, and Declan Ryan & Close Calls. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Rochester Indie Festival. Various locations and shows. See website for full schedule. flourcityshows. com/indie-fest.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave Patten. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ] Gaudete Brass. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m. [ JAZZ ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.

Andy Calabrese Trio ft. Chet Catallo. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Daniel Carter & The Moon. The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. bopshop.com. 8 p.m. $10. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside

Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

Theater The woman who came to dinner “Me and Jezebel” THROUGH NOVEMBER 2 BLACKFRIARS THEATRE, 795 E. MAIN ST. $28.50-$36.50 454-1260, BFTIX.COM [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

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“Darling, there are no other stars.” That line is ascribed to Bette Davis in “Me and Jezebel,” the opening production in Blackfriars Theatre’s 64th season. The show tells the allegedly true story of what happened when Davis — the legendary movie star who won two Academy Awards for Best Actress, received 10 Oscar nominations, and who was the first woman to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute — came to a fan’s house for dinner. That fan was Elizabeth Fuller, an author who eventually turned the story of Davis’s visit into a novel, which was adapted into a one-person play, which turned into a two-person show that successfully mixes comedy and drama. The production at Blackfriars is a charming piece that should be of interest to anyone with an interest in Old Hollywood, or who perhaps has a house guest who simply will not leave. The story is set in the early 1980’s, prior to Davis filming the pilot of Aaron Spelling’s “Hotel” but after the debut of Kim Carnes’ chart-topping pop song in her honor, “Bette Davis Eyes.” Fuller eagerly tells the story of what happened when she accidentally became acquainted with her childhood cinematic idol and had her over for dinner, which somehow led to Davis staying for a night or two. Which then became three or four. Which somehow turned into two weeks, and then subsequently zipped past that deadline. As the movie star and her host become closer, the two share their lives. Davis wrestles with the publication of her daughter’s “Mommie Dearest”-style tell-all while Fuller navigates an increasingly exasperated husband and relives memories of her late grandmother. She also takes more than a few pages out of Bette Davis’s diva playbook. The play nicely balances the serious emotional notes with some very funny lines, most of them stemming from Davis ragging on various celebrity contemporaries or dishing the dirt on her past projects. Humphrey Bogart and Paul Newman get

called out a few times, but Davis’s arch-nemesis, Joan Crawford, gets the most frequent licks from Davis’s acid tongue. If you’re not familiar with the stars or the movies in question most of the jokes won’t land, but when they do they’re hilarious. And it’s interesting to get a fading A-lister’s take on the nature of American celebrity. (“Once they stop asking for your autograph you’re finished,” Davis says in the play; Miley Cyrus just gave an interview to Rolling Stone that eerily echoed that sentiment.) Many stagings of “Me and Jezebel” feature men

Aggy Dune (Tom Smalley) and Kasha Davis (Ed Popil) in “Me and Jezebel,” now on stage at Blackfriars Theatre. PHOTO BY DAN HOWELL

in drag in at least the Bette Davis role. This makes sense, because Davis was essentially a drag queen trapped in a woman’s body — larger than life, in your face, and ready to let you have it. For the Blackfriars production, director John Haldoupis cast two of Rochester’s top female illusionists, Ed Popil (a seasoned veteran of local stages, both as a man and in his female alter ego Kasha Davis) and Tom Smalley (better known as local drag diva Aggy Dune). The two of them perform frequently in the Big Wigs show at various venues, and their chemistry and comfort with each other shines through consistently. Popil has the larger role as Fuller. He also has to take on several secondary roles, ranging from a 4-year-old child to a wizened Irish grandmother, which he communicates effectively through mannerisms and voice (no costume changes). Popil has a natural warmth about him, and Kasha’s “celebrity housewife” vibe works well in this show. He also looked absolutely stunning in the performance I attended, especially in the va-va-voom dress sported in the second act. Popil tripped over lines on occasion, but immediately got back on track. Smalley has the flashier role as Bette Davis, and he does the screen siren proud. There are times when the light hits Smalley just right and he very much approximates Davis herself (no make-up, wig, or costumer designers are listed in the program, but they

are terrific across the board). Smalley does an exaggerated take on Davis’s mannered speaking so that it comes across over the top, but still instantly recognizable as Bette Davis. And he is so funny. His Davis is bitchy, dismissive, arrogant — yet still quite vulnerable at times — and Smalley is fully committed to the role all the way through to the final bows. The program bio suggests that Smalley is interested in doing more local acting work. Let’s hope we see him on the stage again soon. The direction by Haldoupis keeps the show moving quickly from one area of the set to another. The show includes numerous audio and lighting cues, all of which were flawlessly executed. I went into the show already familiar with Bette Davis from “All About Eve” and “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” and afterwards found myself desperate to see more of this unconventional, gutsy woman’s work. I was especially interested in seeing her Oscar-winning turn in 1938’s “Jezebel.” I was chagrined to discover that only two of her films are available on instant streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime (one is “Of Human Bondage,” which gets a great reference in “Me and Jezebel”). I wonder what Ms. Davis would have to say about that….

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] AsIs Gallery, Sage Art Center, Wilson Blvd. “Addition and Subtraction: Intro to 3D with John Archer.” Through Nov 5. Reception Oct 24, noon-1 p.m. sageartcenter.com/asis-gallery/. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “#imhereyourethere: New Paintings by Jim DeLucia.” Through Nov 23. Reception Oct 26, 5-8 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr. “Pulled Resources: Custom, An Alfred University Foundation Project.” Through Dec 7. Tue-Thu 12:303:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 3-5 p.m. 2455813. hawkins@geneseo.edu. geneseo.edu/galleries. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Camera Rochester Holiday Show.” Through Jan 5. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Reception Nov 8, 5-7 p.m. 546-8400. cotton@EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. episcopalseniorlife.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “The History of Space Photography” and “AstroVisions.” Through Jan 12. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. 3rd Annual “Just a Little Freakshow.”. Circus Sideshow inspired Art, music by DJ Skooba, circus costume party. 18+. thegrassrootsgallery@gmail. com. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Work by Carlie Trosclair. Through Nov 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester.edu/hartnett. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. “Life in Remote Places: A Fragile Balance” by Kris Dreessen. Through Nov 23. Photo exhibit explores the balance of families living in the Amazon and Nicaragua. Tue-Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Closed Tuesdays after November 12. Apartment One Gallery at Livingston Arts Center, Reception Oct 24, 5-7 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Lockhart Gallery at SUNY Geneseo, 28 Main St. “Black: A Graphic Signifier.” Through Dec 7. Tue-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., FriSat 1-5 p.m. Reception Oct 25, 5-7 p.m. 245-5813. hawkins@ geneseo.edu. geneseo.edu/ galleries. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Being,” Sculptures and Drawings by Olivia Kim. Through Nov 25. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 26, noon-5 p.m., with FuturPointe Dance performance at 1 p.m. 624-4760. ockheesgallery.com. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Rochester Indie Fest: “The Art of Music” and “Boos and Brews.” Featured local artists Mike Turzanski, Chris Day, Adam Madia, and more. Check out posters and artwork of local music and shows that have happened here in Rochester, and buy some rare, limited edition posters courtesy of HTB Press. In addition, Roc Brewing will be hosting “Boos and Brews”, debuting a trio of pumpkin-based beers throughout the weekend –

ART | “BEING” BY OLIVIA KIM

In her studio in the Hungerford Building, Olivia Kim creates masterful figurative sculptures of cast glass and metals, stone, clay, or plaster, capturing the balance and grace of the human form in motion, and creating human portraits of desire or the dawn with deeply detailed, expressive countenances. Kim’s pursuit of art studies has taken her from Rochester’s School of the Arts, to Alfred University, to the Florence Academy of Art in Florence, Italy. Sculptures and drawings from Kim’s new body of work, “Being,” will be featured at Ock Hee’s Gallery (2 Lehigh St., Honeoye Falls) on Saturday, October 26, with a meet-the-artist reception taking place noon-5 p.m. And as a bonus, perfectpairing to the artwork, the reception will feature a special dance performance by FuturPointe at 1 p.m. Olivia Kim’s work will remain on view through November 25. Gallery hours are Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., and admission is free. For more information, call 624-4730, or email ockhee@frontiernet.net. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY a pumpkin-spiced Belgian Ale, a Smoked Pumpkin libation, and a pumpkin-seed Stout. Costume / Dance party on Saturday night. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail. com. flourcityshows.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Mush Hole Remembered: R. G. Miller. Through Dec 8. Reception Oct 24, 4-6 p.m. 395-2787. brockport.edu/finearts. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Volo Calvariam: 1975’s Five Year Anniversary.” Through Nov 2. 1975ish.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. “Woman of Steel” featuring the work of Mary Taylor. Through Oct 28. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Oct 11, 5-8 p.m. 4734000 x206. artsrochester.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Picture This” A Collection of Mix Media Paintings in a Collage Form. Through Oct 31. Local Artist: Andrew Hakes, Debbie Ingerick, Joshua Lopez, and Richmond Futch Jr. 7299916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab.org.; George K. Arthur Photographic exhibit. thebaobab.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Rays of Sunshine: A Look at Down Syndrome.” Through Oct 25. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “End of Summer.” Through Nov 30. Work by

Gretchen Schulz, D. Brent Walton and Gary Combs. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.org. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Home Grown.” The Lobby’s 2 year anniversary with a group show. lobbydigital.com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible.” Through Dec 13. MonFri 9 a.m.-noon. 475-3961. rit. edu.; Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible, exhibition opening. Through Dec 13. 4753961. skgtwc@rit.edu. library.rit. edu/cary. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Social Reportage: Raw.” Through Nov 2. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Photographic essays touching on poverty, homelessness, and social issues in an urban setting. By Arlene Hodge and students. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. 325-3145 x144. mharochester.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “Unconventional Clay Forms.” Through Oct 26. Richard Harvey, Sharon Allen, Cheryl Hungerford, Sharon Jeter, Nancy Valley. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-4 p.m. 6375494. differentpathgallery.com. continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Art Exhibits Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. History in the Making VIII. Through Nov 3. Ceramic traditions, contemporary objects. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “A Collection of Thoughts and Dreams” by Christine Sisak and Diane Tank. Through Dec 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. 82nd Print Club of Rochester Exhibition. Through Oct 27. Wed-Sun. 256-3312. galleryr99@ gmail.com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. “Solos, Duetts, and Concertos,” paintings and sculpture by Daviid Chamberlain. Through Oct 29. davidchamberlainstudios.com.; The Tomte Series. Through Dec 12. Swedish-American acrylic paintings reflecting bold contemporary Scandinavian colors and Swedish traditions by Nils R. Caspersson. 3386617. jgeisel@frontier.com. thegeiselgallery.com. Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd., Batavia. “Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War” from The National Library of Medicine.. Through Oct 26 in the Alfred C. O’Connell Library. 343-0055. genesee.edu. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Simply Myanmar. Through Oct 27. Works by Chris Kogut, Dick Bennet, Hope DellaStua, Bob Pierce, and Terri Sipone. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “In the Mood.” Through Oct 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Work by Malcolm Liepke and Jurgen Gorg. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Studio 34 Faculty

RECREATION | FALL SKY RIDES

Take advantage of the beautiful fall weather before the snow starts to appear and head to Bristol Mountain (5662 New York 64, Canandaigua) for the last weekend of Fall Sky Rides. Obviously you can’t ski yet — well you could, it just won’t go that well for you — but you can take a ski-lift ride to the base of the mountain and get an eyeful of the fall scenery. With the unpredictability of Rochester winters, this could be one of the last chances to observe the area’s beautiful fall foliage. If the weather is clear you might be lucky enough to get a glimpse of Canandaigua Lake. Rides cost $6-$10 per person, and children 2 and younger ride for free. Sky rides run noon-4 p.m. Visit bristolmountain.com or call 374-6000 for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS Exhibit and Works in Progress. Through Oct 28. 319-5279. joebeanroasters.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Rock, Fabric, Scissors.” Through Dec 9. Featuring Nancy Valle, Jilll Gussow, and Lynne Feldman. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 25, 6-8 p.m. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. “Landscape: Subject and Stimuli.” 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Maplewood Family YMCA, 25 Driving Park Avenue. Irondequoit

Art Club. Through Oct 31. Hours: weekdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. irondequoitartclub.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Oct 24, Creative Workshop: “Living Memory Alumni Show: Part 2.” Through Dec 13, Lockhart Gallery: “Connoisseurs Around the Corner: Gifts of Art from MAG’s Founding Family.” Through Dec 29, Grand Gallery: “Memory Theatre.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Ken Martin:

Sculpture. Through Nov 8. MonThu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.4 p.m. Gallery talk Oct 11, noon. Reception Oct 11, 7-9 p.m. 2923121. monroe.edu/go/mercer/. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Paintings of Local Buildings” by Mitchell J. Lurye. Through Nov 9. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Live in Joy With Color” by Charlotte Barnard. A display of heartfelt creations in watercolor, polymer and yarn. Through Oct 27. 546-8400. cotton@episcopalseniorlife.org. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “In Process: Emerging Artists in Metalsmithing and Jewelry.” Through Oct 25. Sun and Tue-Thu, noon-5 p.m., FriSat, noon-8 p.m. 389-5073. artscenter.naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Residuum.” Through Oct 25. Wed-Sun, noon5 p.m. A collaboration between photographer Ann Lovett and artist/educator Mary Hafeli. 3895073. artscenter.naz.edu. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: closed Tue. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Wildroot Group 35th Anniversary Exhibition. Through Nov 8. Reception Oct 25, 6-8 p.m. 732-7197. nholowka@ rochester.rr.com. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Elements of Expression: Words & Images.” Through Nov 15. Tue-Thu noon-7 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-3 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Frame of Reference” Group Show. Through Nov 2. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com.

Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Stormymade: Garden of Earthly Delights by Margaret Storms. recordarchive.com. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. “In Retrospective: Selected Works from the Wallace Library Art Collection, 1972-2009.” Through Nov 9. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.4:30 p.m., Mon-Thu 7-9 p.m., Sat 1-4:30 p.m., Sun 2-4:30 p.m. 475-2646. rit.edu. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. “signals_ now_” Through Nov 10. signals_ now_ is a collaboration between RoCo and Signal Culture, a new experimental media art organization based in New York State. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. $1. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Kathleen Sherin: “Defying Gravity.” Through Nov 1. An exhibition of prints containing drypoint, collagraphic carborundum printing and monoprint techniques. genesee. edu/campuslife/arts/gallery/. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Travel Stories: 19th Century--Present. Through Dec 27. 275-4477. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists.. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “Two Sides of a Story: Illustations by Shawnee Hill.” Laverly Library, lower level gallery, St. John Fisher College. Through Nov 25. coroflot.com/shawneehill. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Sunrise to Moonset” by Valerie Berner. Through Nov 2. Open daily and nightly. 2712630. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet. com.

University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Memories, Observations, Experiences, Obsessions,” Toby Thompson Memorial Exhibit.. Through Dec 14. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Oct 11, 6-7:30 p.m. 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. University of Rochester, River Campus. Chester Carlson and 75 years of Xerography. Through Jan 1. Carlson Science and Engineering Library. 275-4461. mengel@library.rochester.edu. rochester.edu. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. ImageArt: “I do?!” and “Wish You Were Queer” Postcard Show.. Through Oct 26. 442-8676. imageout.org/imageart. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. “Fifty Years” Photographs by Winston Vargas. Through Nov 1. Thu-Sat noon-3 p.m. 315-331-4593. waynearts.wordpress.com. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. The First Annual Art Student Association Show. Through Nov 1. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. brockport.edu/finearts. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Artists’ Breakfast Group 25th Anniversary Exhibit. Through Nov 12. 978-2551. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “The Seneca Family Sculpture: History and Process.” Through Nov 11. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon5 p.m. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Art Events [ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] Learn the Art of Woodcutting with Artist Heather Swenson. 1-3:30 p.m. Central Library, 115 South Ave. $8, register 428-8138. www3.libraryweb.org/form. aspx?ekfrm=483724. Sign Language Museum Tour. Every other Saturday, 11 a.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave.

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Included in museum admission $5-$12, free to members. 2713361 x238. hgray@geh.org. eastmanhouse.org. [ MON., OCTOBER 28 ] Canstruction Rochester. Oct. 28Nov. 9, 7 a.m. Bausch & Lomb Wintergarden, 1 Bausch & Lomb Place Through Nov 9. This year’s theme is “Canstruction Goes Hollywood” and will feature movies, television, celebrities, glitz and glamor. Open for viewing weekdays from 7 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Admission is free, but a canned food donation is appreciated. All donations from this design-build competition is donated to Foodlink Free. 8800205. apolochock@buckprop. com. canstructionrochester.com.

Comedy [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Battle for the Belt. 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue Flower City Improv $5, 2 for 1 with any student ID (585( 3286000. flowercityimprov@gmail.com. jokefactorycomedyclub.com/. [ THU., OCTOBER 24 ] Jim Norton. Oct. 24-26. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] Dustin Diamond “Screech” of Saved By The Bell. Oct. 25-26, 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue $20, register 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com.

Nov 3. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 4 p.m $13-$16 935-7173. mjtstages.com. Halloween Movie: Paranorman. 4 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Teen Fright Fest Halloween Party. 6-8 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 12-18 Free, register. 359-7092.

SPECIAL EVENT | BUCCANEER’S BALL

If you’ve been waiting for the right time to release your inner pirate, then you’ll want to go on this grand advent-ARRRR!. The Buccaneer’s Ball takes place Saturday, October 26, at the Hilton DoubleTree Inn (1111 Jefferson Road) 6-11 p.m. Enjoy casino-style gambling, munch on hors d’oeuvres, dig into dinner dishes and desserts, partake in an auction, and get swept away by the Caribbean sounds of the Alfred St. John’s Trinidad & Tobago Steel Drum Band. Make sure to put on the best pirate gear you have—bandanas, puffy shirts, cutlasses, and shoulder parrots should get you started on the right path — and compete in the pirate costume contest. Tickets are $65 per person or $115 per couple, with all proceeds benefitting the Pirate Toy Fund. You must be 21 or older to attend. Your ticket gets you $500 of Buccaneer’s Bucks (gambling money) and one free drink. Visit piratetoyfund.org or call 271-5519 for tickets and more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

[ SUN., OCTOBER 27 ] Seamus Kennedy, Irish Comedian and Singer. 7-10 p.m. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St East Rochester $10. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com.

Fine Arts, 2575 E. Henrietta Rd. In the essence of Soul Train. Line dancing, karaoke, hors d’oeuvres, BYOB $5 249-0354. franceshare@yahoo.com.

Kids Events

crafts, games, and activities Free, register. 336-6062. aholland@ libraryweb.org. Tween Tech Lab: Digital Light Painting. 4:15-5 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 359-7092.

Dance Events

[ THU., OCTOBER 24 ] Monster Mash V. 2.0. 6:30 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd Wear your costume, and enjoy a variety of

[ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] “Dr. Dolittle, a musical.” Oct. 25-Nov. 3. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Through

[ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] A Soooooulful Old School Dance Party. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Gallery One

[ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] Annual Fall Family Festival. 10 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Cool Kids: Fencing Fun with EnGarde’ Batavia. 11 a.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road . Batavia Free 6373984. coolkids@rochester.rr.com. Fall Family Fun. The Garden Factory, 2126 Buffalo Rd Through Oct 27. Animals, rides, games, crafts, more 247-6236. gardenfactoryny.com. Meet Bunnicula at Literature Live. Oct. 26-27. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Included in admission: $13, free to kids under 2 2632700. museumofplay.org. Park Avenue Family Monster Stomp. noon. The Generosity Store, 39 South Goodman St. Free Trick-or-treating for children in costume on Park Avenue at participating retailers (Look for orange balloons!). Games, activities and raffles for 50 cent donation to benefit Golisano Children’s Hospital and Holy Childhood. Saturday October 26th, noon-4pm Free 585-4426779. judy@thegenerositystore. org. thegenerositystore.org. Play, Eat & Trick-or-Treat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road . Batavia Featuring bounce houses, crafts, refreshments and huge basket raffle $3, adults free 515-343-0055 x6286. vcbello@genesee.edu. Spooky Science Weekend. Oct. 26-27, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center,

657 East Ave. Blazing jack-olanterns, face painting, and pumpkin chucking are all part of a special pre-Halloween weekend at the RMSC. Become messy with glowing slime and other fun hands-on experiments. Get up close with some of the RMSC’s creepy crawly animal friends like tarantulas and snakes. Get wowed by 11-foot lightning bolts in our Electricity Theater and launch pumpkins with a trebuchet in the Museum’s backyard (weather permitting). Costumes encouraged. Face painting takes place from 1–3 p.m. each day Included in admission: $11-$13 697-1942. rmsc.org. ZooBoo. 10 a.m.-4 p.m Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $6$8. senecaparkzoo.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 27 ] Birds. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Join Paul and Megan from Birds Unlimited to learn interesting facts about parrots and how to care for them. Meet some of their exotic birds Included in admission: $11-$13 rmsc.org. BRATS Halloween Party for Kids. 2-4 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Preschool to grade 3 Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Family Fun Craft. 1:30-4 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 29 ] Hallow-teen Psych Night VI. 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Grades 6-12 Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., OCTOBER 30 ] Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: “Dragons.” Oct. 30-Nov. 3, 7 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square Wed Oct. 30, 7 p.m.-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m., Sun 1 & 5 p.m $15-$95 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com.

Lectures [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] 20 Minutes and a Beer. 5:30 p.m. Back Nine Grill, 3500 East Ave. Featuring T.C. Pellett, Public Relations Manager Brand Cool talking about “Decency Disrupts: How Sustainability Marketing Is Changing Brands” $3-$5. 2677031. rafconnect.org. Fashion Student Seminar speaker Project Runway Season 9 winner Anya Ayoung-Chee. 2 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road . Batavia Free, register 345-6830. Living with Alzheimer’s, Early Stage, Part 1. 6:30-8 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Milestone of Rochester MultiReligions Interfaith Journey. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Free. interfaith@naz.edu. Women and War: the Lineage of Women. 7 p.m. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave. By donation 463-3266. kmiller@admin.rochester.edu. gandhiinstitute.org. [ THU., OCTOBER 24 ] Adoption and Adaptation Native American Lecture Series. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. 10/24: “Adopting “In”: Preserving Iroquois Traditional Community” 11/21: “Adopting “Out”: Researching and Reclaiming Identity” $5-$15 742-1690. ganondagan.org/events.html. “Birds of a Feather: The distinctive species of Kenyan birds” with James Makau Nzioka of Wilderness Zones Safaris. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5, RSVP 5632145. thebaobab.org. “Envisioning Emancipation” with authors Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer. 6 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Eastman House continues on page 26

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Halloween 2013 falls on a Thursday, which means we’ve got a solid 10 days of costumerelated shenanigans. Below find a list of area haunted houses, costume parties, horrorfilm screenings, masquerades, and trick-or-treating options. Did we miss something? Tell us about it by commenting on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com, Tweeting @roccitynews, or e-mailing themail@rochester-citynews.com.

Theatre, School of the Arts, 45 Prince St. $5-$9. 242-7682. sotarochester.org.

Saturday, October 26 [ FILM ] “The Conjuring”

Thursday, October 24 [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare Manor Haunted house featuring over a quarter mile of scary attractions. Continues through November 2. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Southtown Plaza, 3333 W. Henrietta Road. $16-$25. 4559781. nightmaremanor.com. [ HAYRIDE ] Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester Take a 35-minute wagon ride through 40 haunted acres of De Fisher Fruit Farms. Thrills and terrors abound. Continues through October 27. 7-9:30 p.m. 3329 Eddy Road, Williamson. $15-$22. 423-2991. hauntedhayridesrochester.com. [ PARTY ] One’s Halloween Weekend Extravaganza Halloween party with drink specials and costume contests. Music by DJs Napalm and Steve lo. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. One Nightclub and Ultra Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. $5 after 11 p.m. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Dinner and Ghost Stories at the Reunion Inn Dine in a haunted house and listen to creepy tales about the ghosts of Rochester’s past. 7-9 p.m. Reunion Inn, 4565 Culver Road. $10. 3239899, sites.google.com/site/ rochestercandlelight-ghostwalks. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Night of the Living Wedge Halloween Pub Crawl Pub crawl through the South Wedge area. Costume contests, raffles, coupon giveaways, drink specials, and munchies. Starts at Colony Bar & Grill, 503 South Ave. southwedge.com. [ THEATER ] Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours Take a nighttime stroll through the streets of the Genesee Country Village and be treated to seven spooky theatrical vignettes. Continues through October 26. 7-9 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. $14-$16. 294-8218, gcv.org.

Friday, October 25 [ FILM ] Little Horror Fest 35mm double-feature of “Friday the 13th” parts 1 and 2. 10 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $8-$12. 258-0400. thelittle.org.

[ GHOST WALK ] Landmark

Society’s Ghost Walk Nighttime lantern tour where ghosts of Rochester’s past are brought to life. Not recommended for children under 8. Continues October 26. 6:30-9 p.m. Tours start at The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Ave. $12-$20. 546-7029 x11. landmarksociety.org. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ]

Cobblestone Art Center’s Haunted House Spooky haunted house created by the students and staff of Cobblestone Art Center. Continues through October 30. 6-9 p.m. 1622 Route 332 Farmington. $5-$10. 398-0220. cobblestoneartscenter.com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Dark Matter Haunted House Haunted house complete with plenty of scares and a zombie shooting gallery and tarot card reading stand. Continues October 26. 7-10 p.m. Henrietta Family Moose Center, 5375 W. Henrietta Road. $6-$8. 4519996. hauntedvoid.com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ]

Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7-10:30 p.m. 423-2991. hauntedhayridesrochester. com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare Manor See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 455-9781. nightmaremanor.com. [ HAYRIDE ] VerHulst Haunted Hayride Haunted hayride through VerHulst farm. Start at dusk and last approximately 40 minutes. Not suitable for children under 7. Continues through Sunday, October 27. 7-10:30 p.m. 5161 W. Ridge Road, Spencerport. $17. 352-8484. verhulsthalloweenhayride.com. [ MUSIC ] UR Brass Choir’s 5th Annual Spooktacular Allbrass renditions of popular music, video interludes, and lighting effects. 8 p.m. Strong Auditorium, University of Rochester, 500 Joseph C. Wilson Blvd. Free. rochester. edu/calendar. [ PARTY ] Monster Ball Costumes, drinks specials, and themed drinks. Music by Alice Cooper cover band Welcome to

24 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

My Nightmare. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. RIT Inn & Conference Center, 5257 W. Henrietta Road. $15. 359-1800. rochesterbuzz.com. [ PARTY ] One’s Halloween Weekend Extravaganza See Thursday, October 24, listing. Music by DJs Zio and Gueedo. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. One Nightclub and Ultra lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. $5 after 11 p.m. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Ghosts of Mt. Hope Ghost Walk Walk along Mt. Hope cemetery and listen to chilling tales of Rochester’s ghostly past. Tours at 7:30, 9, 10:30 p.m. Intersection of Mt. Hope Ave. & Reservoir Ave. $5-$10. 5428687. sites.google.com/site/ rochestercandlelightghostwalks [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Haunted Halloween Trains Get on board the “Phantom Express” and listen to haunted stories by author Mason Winfield. Train goes by several of the region’s allegedly haunted sites. Continues October 26. 5:30 p.m. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave, Medina. $35-$52. 798-6106. railroadmuseum.net. [ THEATER ] “An Evening of Thrills and Chills” A series of gothic inspired one-act plays, including a reading of Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven”. Continues through October 27. 7:30 p.m. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N. Goodman St. $16-$20. 861-4816. blacksheeptheatre.org. [ THEATER ] Fall Mansion Mysteries Help solve a murder mystery in this live “whodunit” performance at the lavish Sonnenberg Mansion. Continues October 26. 7-9 p.m. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St., Canandaigua. $20-$24. 3944922. sonnenberg.org. [ THEATER ] Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours See Thursday, October 24, listing. 6-9:30 p.m. Genesee Country Village, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. 294-8218. gcv.org. [ THEATER ] “The Twilight Zone” Students of School of the Arts perform several theatrical adaptations based on the TV series. Continues through November 3. 7 p.m. Black Box

Shows at 6:30, 9 & 11 p.m. Hoyt Auditorium, University of Rochester, 500 Wilson Blvd. $2-$3. rochester.edu/calendar. [ FILM ] “The Raven” Roger Corman’s version of Edgar Allen Poe’s thriller. 8 p.m. Dryden Theatre, Eastman House 900 East Ave. dryden. eastmanhouse.org. [ GHOST WALK ] Landmark Society’s Ghost Walk See Friday, October 25, listing. 6:30-9 p.m. landmarksociety.org. [ GHOST WALK ] Sprits of Sea Breeze Ghost Walk Walk along Lake Ontario and listening to ghost stories of the Reunion Inn and Rochester’s past. 7:30, 9 p.m. 4565 Culver Road, Irondequoit. $5-$10. 542-8687. sites.google.com/ site/rochestercandlelightghostwalks. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ]

Cobblestone Art Center’s Haunted House See Friday, October 25, listing. noon-9 p.m. cobblestoneartscenter.com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Dark Matter Haunted House See Friday, October 25, listing. 7-10 p.m. hauntedvoid.com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7-10:30 p.m. hauntedhayridesrochester. com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare Manor See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. nightmaremanor.com. [ HAYRIDE ] Verhulst Haunted Hayride See Friday, October 25, listing. 7-10:30 p.m. verhulsthalloweenhayride.com. [ KIDS ] Monster Stomp Pick up Monster Stomp bag at more than a dozen Park Ave merchants and then go trickor-treating at participating merchants. Noon-4 p.m. parkavenue.org. [ KIDS ] Trick or Treat @ RIT Trick or treat around RIT campus. 5-8 p.m. 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Free. events.rit. edu. [ PARTY ] Halloween Bash with Me & The Boyz Halloween costume contest, drink specials and music by Me & The Boyz. Free Buffalo Bills tickets will be awarded for winner of best costume. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Shooter’s Sports Bar and Grill,

1226 Fairport Road, Fairport. 385-9777. shootersny.com [ PARTY ] Hollowpalooza Halloween bash with live music by Big Leg Emma and Conehead Buddha. There will also be art on display, draft beer by Three Heads Brewing, and a $100 costume contest. 6 p.m.-2 a.m. Lovin Cup Bistro and Brews, 300 Park Pointe Drive. $16-$18. 292-9940. lovincup.com. [ PARTY ] Hoppy Halloween Party Come in a costume and receive a free sampling card. Winner of the costume contest receives a Beer for a Year Card $150 value card. 6-9 p.m. CB Craft Brewers, 300 Village Square Blvd., Honeoye Falls. cbcraftbrewers.com. [ PARTY ] Huge-ah Halloween Bash Costume contest, prizes, drink specials, plus live music by Bobby Henrie and the Goners. 9:30 p.m. Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $5-$8. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. [ PARTY ] Marshall Street Halloween Party Halloween party with decorations, costumes, prize giveaways, food specials and $2.50 beers. 8 p.m. Marshall Street Bar and Grill, 81 Marshall St. 325-2191. marshallstreetbarandgrill.com. [ PARTY ] Nashville’s Halloween Party Costume contest, drink specials, live music by Double Cross. Second party on 10/31. Nashville’s, 4853 W. Henrietta Road. nashvillesny.com. [ PARTY ] One’s Halloween Weekend Extravaganza Music by DJs Richie Salvaggio and Kalifornia. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. One Nightclub and Ultra lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. $5 after 11 p.m. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. [ PARTY ] Pelican’s Nest Halloween Party Halloween party featuring costumes, over $2000 worth of prize giveaways, free pizza and wings, and music by Skycoasters. 7:30 p.m. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. facebook.com/ PelicansNest. [ PARTY ] Teagan & The Tweeds Adult Halloween Party Live music! 10 p.m. Dinosaur BBQ, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. [ PARTY ] Frighty Boolicious Halloween Party Costume parties for individuals and groups, drink specials, drag shows at 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. Tilt, 444 Central Ave. 10 p.m. $5 21+, $15 18-20. Facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. [ PARTY ] Lux Halloween Party Gory games and prizes, killer

costume contest, drink specials. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 9 p.m. lux666.com. [ PARTY ] Writers & Books 5th Annual Masquerade H.P. Lovecraft-themed masquerade Halloween party. Food, drinks, costume contest, raffle, games, 3D projections. 8-11 p.m. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. $10-$12. wab.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] English Country Dance Masquerade Ball Brontë-themed masquerade and dance. Dance review 4-5 p.m., potluck at 5:15 p.m., dancing 6:30-9 p.m. Costumes and masks are encouraged. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Road. $25. 328-3041. rochestercontra.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Halloween Spooktacular Choral and orchestral music, as well as a dramatic adaptation of Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart.” 7:30 p.m. Wilmot Recital Hall, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Free, food donations accepted. 389-2093. naz.edu. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Halloween Variety Show Snacks, dancing, costumes, all that good Halloween-y type stuff. Hosted by Maurice Fibb and featuring special guests The BLOODY NOES and Payton Marovich. 8-11 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. $3-$. 678-6870. thesquirrel.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Haunted Halloween Trains See Friday, October 25, listing. 5:30 p.m. railroadmuseum.net. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Literature Live: Meet Bunnicula Just in time for Halloween come and meet the vampire bunny Bunnicula at the Museum of Play. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Drive. Regular museum admission. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Mendon Zombie Run An apocalyptic 5k foot race in which you must run for your life from a hoard of virulent zombies. Check in 9 a.m., race at 11 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Stewart Lodge, 95 Douglas Road, Honeoye Falls. $20-$55. beastmodeevents. com/ZombieRun. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Murder Mystery at the E.B. Morgan House Stay overnight, dine and play your part in solving an interactive murder mystery. Pretty much a real-life game of Clue. Check in at 3 p.m. $380/ couple. 391 Main St., Aurora.

CITY

315-364-8888. fingerlakes.org/ things-to-do/events. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Psychic Fair Psychic readings for $1/minute (20-minute minimum), door prizes, refreshments, sales and raffles. Noon-5 p.m. Psychic’s Thyme, 1460 Lyell Ave. Free admission. 473-4230. psychicsthyme.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Pumpkins in the Park 5k & Kids Race Perfect opportunity to show off your Halloween costume while getting some exercise. Race registration at 7:30 a.m., 5K at 9 a.m., kids race a 9:45 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, off Culver Road. 428-6770. yellowjacketracting.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Rochester Parkour Halloween Gorilla Gauntlet Run through a Halloweenthemed, ninja warrior-style obstacle course. Costumes are encouraged. 1:30 p.m. Rochester Parkour, 121 Lincoln Ave. $10 to run, free to watch. 204-7537. rochesterparkour.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Zoo Boo Come in costume, trick or treat around Seneca Park Zoo, interact with life performers and costumed characters. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues October 27. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. $8 plus zoo admission. 336-7200. senecaparkzoo.org. [ THEATER ] “An Evening of Thrills and Chills” See Friday, October 25, listing. 7:30 p.m. blacksheeptheatre.org [ THEATER ] Fall Mansion Mysteries See Friday, October 25, listing. 7-9 p.m. sonnenberg.org. [ THEATER ] Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours See Thursday, October 24, listing. 6-9:30 p.m. gcv.org.

Sunday, October 27 [ FILM ] “The Phantom of

the Opera” Screening of the 1925 silent original version accompanied by live organ music. Rochester Theater Organ Society. 2:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $10-$15. 2342294. rtosonline.com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Cobblestone Art Center’s Haunted House See Friday, October 25, listing. Noon-5 p.m. cobblestoneartscenter.com. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare Manor See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7:30-9:30 p.m. nightmaremanor.com. [ HAYRIDE ] Velhurst Haunted Hayride See Friday, October 25, listing. 7-9:30 p.m. verhulsthalloweenhayride.com. [ KIDS ] Al Sigl Walkabout Indoor costume walk about with treats, face painting, costume contest, and music. Breakfast and registration

at 8:30 a.m. walk begins a 9 a.m. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Road, Victor. alsigl.org. [ PARTY ] Hell’s Angels Halloween Party Starts at 1 p.m. Dinosaur BBQ, 99 Court St. $15. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Literature Live: Meet Bunnicula See Saturday, October 26, listing. 1-4 p.m. museumofplay.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Psychic Fair See Saturday, October 26, listing. Noon5 p.m. psychicsthyme.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Trick or Treating in the Village Take the little ones for an afternoon of trick or treating in the Genesee Country Village. Additional activities include face painting, scavenger hunt, and Halloween arts and crafts. Noon-4 p.m. 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 538-6822. gcv.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Zoo Boo See Saturday, October 26, listing. senecaparkzoo.org. [ THEATER ] “An Evening of Thrills and Chills” See Friday, October 25, listing. 2 p.m. blacksheeptheatre.org.

Monday, October 28 [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Cobblestone Art Center’s Haunted House See Friday, October 25, listing. 6-9 p.m. cobblestoneartscenter.com.

Tuesday, October 29 [ FILM ] “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”

The 1920 silent version of the horror classic. 8 p.m. Dryden Theatre, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $8. dryden. eastmanhouse.org. [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Cobblestone Art Center’s Haunted House See Friday, October 25, listing. 6-9 p.m. cobblestoneartscenter.com. [ MUSIC ] Punk Rock Halloween Celebrate Halloween with some punk-rock music. Artists include The Independents, The Results, and No Time To Lose. 8 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $10-$12. 454-2966. bugjar.com.

Wednesday, October 30 [ FILM ] “Frankenstein” & “The Bride of Frankenstein” Doublefeature of two classic horror movies plus live girls, beer, wine, costume contests and a raffle. 8 p.m., 9:30 p.m. Cinema Theater, 957 S. Clinton Ave. $10. 271-1785. cinemarochester.com [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Cobblestone Art Center’s Haunted House See Friday, October 25, listing. 6-9 p.m. cobblestoneartscenter.com.

[ PARTY ] Fall for Chocolate Adult

Halloween Party Halloween party with chocolate sampling and wine tasting. Costumes encouraged. 6-9 p.m. Affaire De Chocolat, 1769 Penfield Road, Penfield. 387-9111. affairedechocolat.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] “Twilight Zone” Comes to Rochester Anne Serling, daughter of “Twilight Zone” creator Rod Serling, gives a talk about her father, his influence, his show, and her new book. Book signing to follow the talk. Noon at Penfield Public Library; 7 p.m. at Pittsford Barnes & Noble. Free. 264-1497. peterlovenheim.com.

Thursday, October 31 [ FILM ] “The House of Usher”

Roger Corman’s version of Edgar Allen Poe’s thriller. 8 p.m. Dryden Theatre, Eastman House 900 East Ave. dryden.eastmanhouse.org. [ FILM ] “The Shining” 10 p.m. Ingle Auditorium, RIT campus, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. events. rit.edu [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare Manor See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7:30-10:30 p.m. nightmaremanor.com. [ KIDS ] Toddler Trick or Treat Bring the little ones for some indoor trick accompanied by live storybook characters. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Drive. Included in museum admission. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ MUSIC ] Rhythm Dogs Halloween Celebrate Halloween with Rhythm Dogs’ funky soul and blues fusion music. 9 p.m. Dinosaur BBQ, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. [ PARTY ] Halloween Par-tay! Costume contest, prizes, drink specials, and music by bluegrass/ folk powerhouse Hey Mavis. 8:30 p.m. Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $5-$8. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. [ PARTY ] Halloween Party @ Tapas Costume contest, drinks and live music by DJ Flex. 9 p.m. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. [ PARTY ] Halloween Party with Sons of Synergy Halloween party with giveaways, drink specials, and music by acoustic duo Sons of Synergy. 8-11 p.m. Shooter’s Sports Bar and Grill, 1226 Fairport Road, Fairport. 3859777. shootersny.com. [ PARTY ] Mex’s Halloween Costume Party Halloween costume contest, 2-for-1 appetizers, drink specials. 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Mex, 295 Alexander St. 262-3060. mexrestaurant.com.

[ PARTY ] Nashville’s Halloween

Party x2 Costume contests for sexiest, “most redneck,” scariest, most unique; drink specials; 18+. Nashville’s, 4853 W. Henrietta Road. nashvillesny.com. [ PARTY ] One’s Halloween Party Halloween Party featuring costume contest and drink specials. Music by DJs Napalm and Steve Lo. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. One Nightclub and Ultra lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. $5 after 11 p.m. 5461010. oneclublife.com. [ PARTY ] Roots Collider Sexy Robot Halloween Costume Party Robot Halloween costumes strongly encouraged. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. $7 at door. $10+ for under 21. 232-7550. facebook.com/ dublandunderground. [ PARTY ] 98PXY Annual Erotic Exotic Ball Costume contests for best erotic and best exotic, drink specials, drag shows. Tilt, 444 Central Ave. 10 p.m. $5 21+, $15 18-20. Facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] River Campus Libraries Scare Fair Halloween treats, decorations, costume contest, and tours of Rush Rhees Library Tower. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, 500 Wilson Blvd. Free. 275-5804. rochester.edu/ calendar.

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Friday, November 1 [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare Manor See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7:30-11 p.m. nightmaremanor.com. [ MUSIC ] Trash Wave Halloween Bash Halloween-themed concert featuring local punk rock group the UV Rays. 8 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. 454-2966. bugjar.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Rocky Horror Halloween Film screening of the cult classic, goodie bags, costumes. Continues November 2. 8:30 p.m. RIT Campus, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. $5. events.rit.edu.

Saturday, November 2 [ HAUNTED HOUSE ] Nightmare

Manor See Thursday, October 24, listing. 7:30-11 p.m. nightmaremanor.com. [ PARTY ] Mex’s Dia de los Muertes Party Costume contest and drink specials including $20 margarita pitchers. 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Mex, 295 Alexander St. 262-3060. mexrestaurant.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Rocky Horror Halloween See Friday, November 1, listing. 8:30 p.m. events.rit.edu.

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Literary Events

LECTURE | NATIVE AMERICAN LECTURE SERIES

As empires, and other human activities, cause different groups of people to clash or brush against one another, individuals caught up in the cultural shifts have dealt differently with the changes. In North America, many Native groups strive to maintain an identity separate from but coexistent with the decedents of colonizers and new immigrants alike. Friends of Ganondagan has teamed up with Nazareth College to present a fall lecture series that focuses on the identity politics surrounding “Adoption and Adaptation.” The lectures will explore instances in which nonNatives have been adopted into Native cultures, and in which Natives have been adopted into non-Native culture. Two lectures in this series remain, and each will take place at 7 p.m. at Nazareth College’s Shults Center (4245 East Ave.). On Thursday, October 24, the subject will be “Adopting ‘In’: Preserving Iroquois Traditional Community,” featuring speakers G. Peter Jemison (pictured), Ganondagan site manager and eighth-generation descendent of Mary Jemison; and Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner, executive director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation. Using the historical examples of Mary Jemison and Matilda Joslyn Gage, these speakers will delve explore variations of adopting “in,” part of an ancient Native tradition that preceded European arrival. On Thursday, November 21, speakers Ronnie Reitter, Ganondagan site interpreter and former foster child; and Jack T. Ericson, Native genealogy expert, will discuss “Adopting ‘Out’: Researching and Reclaiming Identity.” Reitter will share her personal story about finding family, and Ericson will address resources and strategies for searching out one’s roots. Individual lecture prices are $15; $10/Friends of Ganondagan members; $5/students with ID. Tickets will be available beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the event. For more information, visit ganondagan.org/events.html or call 742-1690. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Lectures curator Allison Nordstrom moderates Free. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Great Decisions: Myanmar and Southeast Asia. 12-1:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Jim Keady talk on Labor Rights. 7:30 p.m. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr . Penfield Free. penfield.edu/news. cfm?story=127620. Roz Steiner Art Gallery Artist Lecture Series. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Kathleen Sherin. Free genesee.edu/ campuslife/arts/gallery/. [ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] “i do?!” Panel Discussion. 6 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop,

31 Prince Street Marriage Equality and Art’s Engagement with Social and Political Movements. Featuring Douglas Crimp, Jonathon Katz, Scott McCarney, Anne Tischer, Bess Watts Free. 442-8676. imageout.org/imageart. [ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] Visiting Artist: Bill Finger. 2 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave Included in admission: $5-$12, free to members. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. [ MON., OCTOBER 28 ] The History of Halloween with Paul Tantillo. 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 3597092. [ TUE., OCTOBER 29 ] Harvesting Justice Symposium. Oct. 29. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Symposium 3:30 p.m., dinner 6:30 p.m $50,

26 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

[ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] An Autumn Reading with Kathryn Bonnez. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free 473-2590. kathrynbonnez@ gmail.com. wab.org. Read with Seymour: “Wolf Hall” by Hilary Mantel. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Reading and Discussion: “A Lone Star in the Green Mountains” by Kathryn Bonnez. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free 473-2590. kathrynbonnez@ gmail.com. wab.org. [ THU., OCTOBER 24 ] Books Sandwiched In: “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn. 12:10-1 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Reviewed by Tom Voelkl, retired Brighton Chief of Police 784-5300. brightonlibrary. org. Poems for Lunch. noon. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Each week, local poet and teacher, Kitty Jospé will offer a selection of poems and guide the discussion Free. 428-8375. carol.moldt@ libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org. Visiting Writer mary Ruefle: A Reading. 7 p.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center Building, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Free. monroecc. edu. [ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] First Annual Empore State Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Gallery One Fine Arts, 2575 E. Henrietta Rd. Hosted by Prufrock of Ottawa, NY. Featuring poets representing Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, Albany and Suffren, NY $10$15 953-0741. luhihgsmith@ hotmail.com. empirestateslam. eventsbrite.com. Literary Reading: Patti Lavell “Confessions of Catholic School Dropout.” 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St Brockport Dress up in your favorite costume, but there might be door prizes for anyone who dons a nun’s habit, Catholic school uniform, or priest vestments Free. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. New Book Presentation: “The Great Rescue” by Stephanie Dikey. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. October Reading With Patti Lavelle. 5 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St Brockport “Confessions of a Catholic School Dropout” author Patti Lavelle shares selections from her popular book and her upcoming novel “Fat Chance” Free 3959833. chrissygreenny@gmail. com. differentpathgallery.com/. Saturday Author Salon: “Shakespeare’s Amazing Traveling Adventure” by Niki Barrie. 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ MON., OCTOBER 28 ] The Irish Vampire Conference. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave A

one-day multidisciplinary event exploring the life and influence of the Irish novelist, Bram Stoker, and his immortal 1897 work, Dracula. The event will include a variety of presentations on the origin of the novel and its connection to Irish culture and politics Free. sjfc.edu. [ TUE., OCTOBER 29 ] Books Sandwiched In. 12:1212:52 p.m Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. “Frankenstein’s Cat” by Emily Anthes. Reviewed by Louis DiVincenti. Free. 4288350. rebecca.fuss.libraryweb. org. libraryweb.org. Entering the Twilight Zone with Anne Serling. 6:30 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue Free. thelittle.org. Literary Talks: The Plutzik Reading Series. 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Oct 12: Louise Gluck, Oct 29: Aleksandar Hemon, Nov 14: Sally Keith Free. 275-9255. rochester.edu/college/eng/ plutzik. Poetry Reading: Chuck Martin. 7 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. Twilight Comes to Rochester: Anne Serling, author of the just-published memoir, “As I Knew Him: My Dad, Rod Serling.” 4 p.m. Temple Sinai, 363 Penfield Road. Free. 3816890. lovenheim@gmail.com.

Recreation [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Things that Go Bump. 4-5:30 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $6-$8 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. [ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] Halloween Phantom Express Trains. 5:30 p.m. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. First Class: $52 / Coach: $35. 798-6106. office@ railroadmuseum.net. Landmark Society’s Ghost Walk 20th Anniversary Tour. Oct. 25-26, 6:30 p.m. The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue $12-$20. 546-7029 x11. landmarksociety.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] Focus on Trees. 9:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3, $10 per family. 271-1880. rmsc.org. GVHC Event. 9:30 a.m. Webster Park, Holt Rd. at Lake Rd. East lake Rd. Easy/moderate 5-6 mile hike Free. 227-3180. gvhchikes. org. Make a Difference against Hunger 5K walk/run. 9 a.m. The College at Brockport, 350 New Campus Dr., Brockport. Registration 7:30 a.m. Benefits Brockport Ecumenical Food Shelf $15-$25, register 9448150. brockportfoodshelf. org/5kRunWalk/. Rochester Birding Trip: Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge. 11 a.m. Meet at Brockport Park-and-Ride off Rte 31. Bring a snack for lunch and beverages 503-2534. rochesterbirding.com. Vampiring Orienteering Event.. 7 p.m. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. $8 per entry/team, register roc.us.orienteering.org. Walk to End Alzheimer’s. 10 a.m. Village Park, Main St.,

Geneseo. Registration at 9 a.m Raise funds. 760-5400. [ SUN., OCTOBER 27 ] GVHC Event. 8 a.m. Kreag Road Park, Bushnell’s Basin. Strenuous/hilly 7 mile hike, Crescent Trail Free. 469-0327. gvhchikes.org 9:30 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Strenuous/hilly 7 mile hike Free. 475-0923. gvhchikes.org. GVHC Hike. 9:30 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Strenuous/hilly 7 mile hike. Meet at Stewart Lodge lot 475-0923. gvhchikes.org. Halloween Madness. 1-4 p.m. Clover Lanes, 2750 Monroe Ave. $10-$12, register. 2441484. info@cloverlanes.com. cloverlanes.com/specialevents. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 29 ] Pacesetters Walk. 6:30 p.m. Meet in parking ot of Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd. South 249-9507. huggersskiclub.org.

Special Events [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Candidate Night. 6:30 p.m. Bible Baptist Temple, 706 South Ave Free, RSVP 458-9315. lnrcmc. org. City School Board Candidate Forum. 6:30-8 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street This forum is sponsored by the Greater Rochester Parent Leadership Training Institute in partnership with The League of Women Voters 325-4000. greaterrochesterplti@gmail.com. greaterrochesterplti.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. L.L.Bean “Wintervention.” 11 a.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Free. llbean.com. [ THU., OCTOBER 24 ] Cultural Harmony Week. Oct. 24Nov. 2. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Events designed to address a wide variety of community and diversity issues, including race, religion, gender, ethnicity and non-Western culture. This year’s theme, “Constructing & Reaffirming “I”dentity,” will explore how individuals of diverse backgrounds are constructing their identity geneseo.edu. Fall Open House. 2:30-5:30 p.m. Rivers Run, 50 Fairwood Dr Free. 292-5440. riversrunliving. com. Grand Opening and Wine Tasting. 5-7 p.m. Char’s South Ave Wine and Liquor, 1409 South Ave. 285-2884. charwinenliquore@ gmail.com. Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours. Through Oct. 26. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford All tours run 6-9:30 p.m., except October 24, which runs 7-9 p.m $14-$16. 294-8218. gcv.org. [ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] Dado Fashion Show. 8 p.m. BayTowne Plaza, 1900 Empire Blvd., Webster. To benefit the Wilmot Cancer Center. Doors at 6

p.m $25-$150 271-7890. dado. boutique@gmail.com. Dark Circus Ball, Grand Opening. 7 p.m. Nu Movement, 716 University Ave. An evening packed with music, art, and entertainment $20. 704-2889. numvmnt.com. Fall Mansion Mysteries at Sonnenberg: “The Masquerade.” 7 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St . Canandaigua $20$24 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Haunted History Ghost Walks and the Haunted Jail. Oct. 2526. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Haunted Jail 6-9 p.m. $5 per person. Haunted History Ghost Walks take off from in front of the Wayne County Courthouse Saturday at 7 p.m. $5-$10, 90 minute walking tour of Lyons 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. Haunted House. Through Oct. 30. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Through Oct 30. Sat-Sun noon, Fri Oct 25 at 6 p.m., Mon-Wed Oct 2830 at 6 p.m. A devilishly good time to benefit Cobblestone Arts Center for persons with disabilities $10 ages 13+, $5 ages 12 & under. 398-0220. cobblestoneartscenter@gmail. com. cobblestoneartscenter.com. Haunted House Fundraiser Come if you Dare. Through Oct. 30. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Opening day Oct 12, 12-9 p.m. Week nights 6-9 p.m., Sat 12-9 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m $5-$10 398-0220. cobblestoneartscenter.com. Haunted Reading House. 6-9 p.m. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S $10 for each 10 minute reading/ activity haunted 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. Hitchcock Double Feature: “Psycho” and “Rear Window.” Oct. 25-27. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St . Geneva Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10 315-7815483. boxoffice@thesmith.org. thesmith.org. Horror Fest. Oct. 25. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. “Friday the 13th” at 8 p.m. and “Friday the 13th Part 2” at 10 p.m $8 each or $12 for both thelittle.org. Midnite Madness. 6:30 p.m. Costume Parade starts at 6:30 p.m. at Main & Mkt Sts., Brockport. Free balloons & treats. 7-9 p.m. free Halloween fun downstairs at Lift Bridge Book Shop provided by the College at Brockport Arts for Children Program. Saturday 2 p.m. at Lift Bridge: Activities with Star Wars Characters liftbridgebooks.com. New York on Tap. 7 p.m. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St $40, register 3947070. nywcc.com. Public Star Party: Free public observing through telescopes. 8-9:30 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Near Scout camping area on Hopkins Point Road. Join us for views of star clusters, galaxies, and gaseous nebulae. Held only if skies are at least partially clear Free. 703-9876. rochesterastronomy.org. Spellbound Chocolate Tasting. 5-8 p.m. Hedonist Artisan Chocolates, 674 South Ave Free 461-2815. hedonistchocolates.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] Batavia Cemetery Tour. 7-9 p.m. Harvester Ave., Batavia $10

hauntedhistorytrail.com/bataviacemetery-tour.html. Buccaneer’s Ball. 6 p.m. Double Tree Hotel, 1111 Jefferson Road $65. 271-5519. facebook.com/ PirateToyFund. East Side Winter Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Indoors at 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield eastside. activities@rochester.rr.com. Geneseo Kiwanis Antique Show. Oct. 26-27, 10 a.m. NYS Armory Geneseo, 34 Avon Rd. $5. 5551212. geneseokiwanis.org. Halloween at the Bayside. 9 p.m. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd Webster Costume contest with prizes 323-1224. baysidepubwebster.com. Halloween Bash. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685

W. Henrietta Rd. Cash prizes for best costume ($150) and sexiest costume ($50) 334-8970. mckenziesirishpub.com. Halloween Party. 6-9 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 This family-friendly party will have food, fun, and prizes for the best homemade costumes $10, discount for families 210-0075. rocmaker. eventbrite.com 9 p.m. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. Costume contest 256-1000. 140alex.com. Halloween Variety Show. 8 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Time for chills and thrills! And snacks, dancing, costumes, all that good Halloween-y type stuff. Join your host, Maurice Fibb,

Along with The BLOODY NOES, Payton Marovich & PAXTOR, and some other special guests for this fun filled evening $3-$5 suggested donation flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. Haunted History Ghost Walk. 7 p.m. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St. Meet in front of the Wayne County Courthouse $5-$10, free to kids under 7 315-946-4943. masonwinfield.com. Historic Houseparts 16th Annual Tent Sale. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Historic Houseparts, 528-560 South Ave historichouseparts.com. Huge-AH Halloween Bash. 9:30 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way Costume contest, great prizes, stupid drink specials. Live

music $5-$8 cover 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. Jazz90.1 Third Annual Autumn Breakfast. 9 a.m.-noon. Greece Olympia High School large cafeteria, 1139 Maiden Lane, Greece $7, children 5 and under free 966-2660. jazz901.org. Psychic Fair. Oct. 26-27, 12-5 p.m. City Gate Plaza, 1460 Lyell Ave Free admission. 473-4230. psychicsthyme.com. Rochester Gem, Mineral, Jewelry and Fossil Show. Oct. 26-27, 10 a.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $3-$6, under age 12 free. 232-3221. show@rochesterlapidary.org. rochesterlapidary.org/show. Screening: “Letters to Jackie.” Oct. 26. Little Theatre, 240 East

Ave. Tue 1 p.m., Sat 7 p.m 2580400. thelittle.org. The Spectral Carnival. 10 a.m.2 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Two year anniversary. Carnival-inspired food, games, music, dancing and spectacles. Costumes encouraged $10 attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com. Writers & Books 5th Annual Masquerade Party inspired by HP Lovecraft. 8 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Raffle prizes from local cultural organizations, shops & other Rochester businesses $10-$12 473-2590. wab.org. Yiddish Tog: A Celebration of Yiddish Tradition and Culture. Oct. 26-27. JCC Rochester,

1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 7 p.m. screening “A Serious Man,” Sun 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Bagels and Schmooze,” 2 p.m. “From Klezmer to Broadway” with singer Naomi Miller ($14-$16) 4612000. jccrochester.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 27 ] Andrea and Marilynne’s Excellent Scavenger Adventure for Beaders. Oct. 27-28. Bead Breakout, 2314 Monroe Ave. & Studio 34 Creative Arts Center, 34 Elton St. Sun noon-4 p.m., Mon 2-9 p.m. 271-2340, info@ beadbreakout.com or 737-5858, studio34artists@aol.com. Fire Relief Benefit for the Sulli Family. 2-8 p.m. Village Gate, 274 N. Goodman St. Music, raffles, continues on page 28

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Theater

THEATER | FESTIVAL OF NEW THEATRE

If you’re interested in theater, playwriting, or both, you’ll want to check out the 2013 Festival of New Theatre starting this week at Geva Theatre Center (75 Woodbury Blvd.). The festival gives patrons the unique opportunity to get a glimpse into the future of American theater, as playwrights will be doing concert-style readings of plays they are currently working on. The audience’s response to the readings will give the playwrights the critical feedback they need before their plays go further into production.

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The first new play on the schedule is “True Home” by Rochester native Cass Morgan; the reading will take place Wednesday, October 23, at 7 p.m. Next up will be “A Conversation with Nora Cole,” as she gives the inside scoop on the creative process behind her upcoming untitled play about her ancestors. The event will be held Friday, October 25, at 7 p.m. This will be followed by “Theatre in Progress: Excerpts of New Plays” Monday, October 28, at 8 p.m. This examines new ideas being explored by playwrights Greg Kotis (“All Your Questions Answered”), John Cariani (“Last Gas”), Deborah Zoe Laufer (“Informed Consent”), Eric Coble (“Stranded on Earth”), and Mat Smart (“Tinker to Evers to Chance”). Then on Tuesday, October 29, at 7 p.m., Rochester author Bill Capossere will present his new play, “Galileo’s.” Admission to all Festival of New Theatre shows is free, but reservations are required. The festival runs through Sunday, November 3. To find out about the rest of the shows check out gevatheatre.org or call 232-4382 for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Special Events dinner, refreshments, 50/50, fun $20 donation gofundme. com/4GD6B4. Haunted Garden Stroll. 6-10 p.m. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St. Canandaigua $5, free to kids under 5 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Hispanic/Latino Heritage Family Day. 12-5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Hands-on activities, storytelling, guided tours, music and dance performances, more $5 suggested donation. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus: 3rd Annual SpaGAYtti Dinner. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave $6-$12 271-1050. thergmc.org. Screening of 1925 film “The Phantom of the Opera” with Live Organ Accompaniment. 2:30 p.m. $10-$15, children 12 and under free 234-2295. rtosonline.org. Tracking Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. 11 a.m.-5 p.m New 28 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Departures every 30 minutes $8-$10. 5331113. nymtmuseum.org. Trick-or-Treating in the Village. noon. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Infants and adults with trickor-treaters are free $3-$5. 538-6822. gcv.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 29 ] Conversations on Race. 6-8 p.m. Oct 29: Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd., Webster. Nov 12: Sully Branch Library, 530 Webster Ave., Rochester. Nov 14: Central Library 115 South Ave Nov 20: Fairport Public Library, 1 Fairport Village Landing, Fairport 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Red Cross Hometown Heroes Breakfast. 7:30-9 a.m. RIT Inn & Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd. 359-1800. redcross.org/ rochesterhometownheroes. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com.

“The 39 Steps.” Through Nov. 17. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Nov 17. Previews Wed Oct 23-24, 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 p.m. (open-captioned), Sat 8 p.m., Performances: Sun 2 & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Oct 30, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. The Calamari Sisters: “A Bun in the Oven.” Through Nov. 10. RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St Through Nov 10. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $25-$45 3253366. rapatheatre.or. “Check, Please.” Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Oct 27. NTID’s Lab Theatre, room 1510 of the Lyndon B. Johnson Building. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m Free, limited seating info@ players.rit.edu. rit.edu/sg/players. “Driving Miss Daisy.” Delavan Theatre on the New York Chiropractic College Campus, 2360 New York 89, Seneca Falls. Through Nov 2. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun Oct 27, 2 p.m $10-$12 315-568-9364. senecacommunityplayers.org. “An Evening of Thrills and Chills.” Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313. Through Oct 27. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $16-$20 blacksheeptheatre.org. Festival of New Theatre 2013. Through Nov. 3. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd True Home by Cass Morgan, Wednesday, October 23, 7 p.m. A Conversation with Nora Cole, Friday, October 25, 7 p.m. Theatre in Progress: Excerpts of New Plays, Monday, October 28. 8 p.m. Regional Writer: Galileo’s by Bill Capossere, Tuesday, October 29, 7 p.m. Love/Sick by John Cariani, Wednesday, October 30, 7 p.m. Rochester “Bake-Off”: New Play Excerpts, Wednesday, October 30, 9 p.m. Young Writers Showcase: New Plays in Performance, Saturday, November 2, 2:30 p.m., and Sunday, November 3, 2:30 p.m Free, register. 232- 4382. gevatheatre.org. “Good Rockin’ Live, a Salute to Sun Records.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $23-$33 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “In the Mood,” A 1940s Big Band, Swing Dance Musical Revue. Wed., Oct. 30, 3 & 7:30 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $30-$70. 800745-3000. dawn@artbeatshows. org. ticketmaster.com. “Julius Caesar.” Through Nov. 9. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Through Nov 6. Fri Oct 25Thu 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Oct 31-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Wed Nov 6-Sat 7:30 p.m $9-$19 261-6461. rochestercommunityplayers.org. Marc Salem’s Mind over Rochester. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m $25 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Me and Jezebel.” Through Nov. 2. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Nov 2. Thu Oct 24, 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Fri Nov 1-Sat 8 p.m $28.50-$36.50. 4541260. bftix.org.

“One October Midnight.” Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. Oct. 25-26, 8 p.m. and Thu., Oct. 31, 8 p.m. $9-$10 315-2536669. auburnpublictheater.org. Repertorio Español’s “En el Tiempo de las Mariposas.” Wed., Oct. 30, 7:30 p.m. Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle., Geneseo $8-$10 245-5247. mcewen@geneseo.edu. tinyURL. com/RepertorioAtGeneseo2013. “Strange Brew with a Side of Murder.” Sweden Senior Center, 133 State St. BUM Players of Brockport $10 or two for $19 637-5656. “The Twilight Zone.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Through Nov 3. Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m $5-$7 242-7682 x1551. sotarochester.org. UR Performing 12. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus. Oct. 25-26, 8 p.m. Free. rochester.edu/college/eng/ theatre/productions.php. “Urinetown, The Musical.” Nazareth College Arts Center Callahan Theater, 4245 East Ave. Through Oct 27. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$20 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. “Walter Cronkite Is Dead.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Theatre Rocs. Hourglass Play Readings Series. Free, donations accepted 520-2940. hourglassplays@gmail.com. hourglassplays.org.

Theater Audition [ ONGOING ] “Love in the Style of Will.” Through Jan. 31, 2014. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Actors and directors wanted for Valentine’s show featuring romantic scenes from Shakespeare justin.rielly@ gmail.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 27 ] Auditions for “Bare: A Pop Opera.” 7 p.m. RAPA, 727 E. Main St Seeking high school students (ages 14+) through college students for this production. Prepare one 32-measure cut from a musical theater song in the style of “Bare” No dance audition 851-1997. raparocs@ gmail.com.

Workshops [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] After the Fire Class: Coffee & Chocolate. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Family Development Class: “Winning at Parenting.” 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Homemade Baby Food: Fun, Healthy, and Easy. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Succulent Gardens: Terrarium Workshop. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ THU., OCTOBER 24 ] Communication. 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd.

Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias come with more than just memory loss. Free. 800-2723900. lfernandez@alz.org. alz. org/rochesterny. Living with Alzheimer’s, Early Stage, Part 2. 6:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Free. 800-272-3900. lfernandez@alz.org 6:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free 800-272-3900. lfernandez@alz.org. alz.org/ rochesterny. Nexus Nights. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Nutrition, Simplified. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. SPINE: The Backbone of Your Career. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Urban Spaces: Hip-Hop Identities in a Transnational Context conference. Oct. 24-25. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Contact Anne Marie LaFave at alafave2@ mail.naz.edu to reserve a seat. For general information about the conference, please contact Dr. Rachel Bailey Jones at rjones3@ naz.edu readme.readmedia. com/HIP-HOP-STUDY-DAYSat-NAZARETH-COLLEGEOctober-24-25/7402299. [ FRI., OCTOBER 25 ] Making Beer at Home. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Middle Eastern Drum Workshop with Murat Tekbilek. 4-5:15 p.m. Spurrier Dance Studio, University of Rochester, River Campus Free, register. 2735150. rochester.edu/college/ dance/events. Saving Our Small Towns and Villages Rural Design Workshop. Oct. 25-27. Friday October 25, at Elim Gospel Church, 1679 Dalton Rd., Lima: 1-5:45 p.m. Observe presentations/Workshop. Checkin begins at 12:30 p.m., 7-9:15 p.m. Keynote speaker, panel and audience Q&A. Check-in begins at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, October 26, at Elim Gospel Church: 9 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Lima Village Charrette (RSVP/reservations required). Registration begins at 8 a.m. Sunday, October 27, at Lima Town/Village Hall, 2nd Floor, 7329 E Main St. Lima: 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m. Final charrette presentations (RSVP appreciated). Check-in begins at 1 p.m everstraete@rrcdc.org. rcdc.org/CIRDWorkshop.html. [ SAT., OCTOBER 26 ] Institute for Creative Music: Connecting the Beat, Voice, and Instrument. Music learning workshop for all ages and styles.. 4-11 p.m. Vineyard Community Space, 836 South Clinton Ave 342-8429. info@ monroeparkvineyard.org. flourcityshows.com.

Learn the Art of Woodcutting with Local Artist Heather Swenson. 1-3:30 p.m. Central Library, 115 South Ave. $8, register 4288150. www3.libraryweb.org/form. aspx?ekfrm=483724. Open-Hearth Cooking. 9 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Ages 16 to adult $79$90. 538-6822. gcv.org 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $79, register. 2948215. gcv.org. Photo Weekend in Rochester. Oct. 26-27. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Two days of photo education and inspiration with Rocky Mountain School of Photography instructors Tim Cooper and Eileen Rafferty. Lectures, courses and a group critique. Geared toward beginner to intermediate photographers $99-$139. 800-394-7677. rmsp@rmsp. com. monroecc.edu. [ MON., OCTOBER 28 ] Culinary Class: Soup, Soup, Soup with Bridgette Pendleton. 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $69, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. Family Development Class: “Don’t Make Me Say It Again!” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Write a Novel in 30 Days. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., OCTOBER 29 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Family Development Class: “Active Parenting Now (Part 3 of 6).” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents for children ages 5-12 Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Home Brewing Techniques Class. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Discuss and practice in-depth techniques for pour-over and full-immersion coffee brewing methods $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com/classes. Moving Past Birth and Breastfeeding. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Writing Workshop: NaNoWriMo. 7-9 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Adults and young adults welcome. nanowrimo.com. Register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

50TH ANNIVERSARY

Rochester Chamber Orchestra

DAVID FETLER, Conductor

Sunday, October 27 at 3PM Hochstein Performance Hall 50 N. Plymouth Ave HAYDN - Cello Concerto in C Cicely Parnas, Cello SAINT-GEORGES - African Heritage Symphony No. 1 LUCILLE GRETRY - Composed Opera at age 14 Overture and Arias Michaela Anthony, Soprano GOSSEC - Sinfonia in C MOZART - Overture to Lucio Silla

GETLISTED get your event listed for free

TICKETS Adults $30, Seniors $20, Students $10

e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

Available at Wegmans or Purchase online at www.rochesterchamberorchestra.org order by phone (585) 734-6163 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Bullying and bloody revenge “Carrie”

(R), DIRECTED BY KIMBERLY PEIRCE NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Back in 1998 Gus Van Sant directed a remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s classic horror flick “Psycho,” which simply duplicated the original almost shot-for-shot, without adding to or changing or reinterpreting the material. Kimberly Peirce accomplishes much the same result in her new picture, “Carrie,” a remake of Brian De Palma’s 1976 film; like Van Sant she pretty much copies the first movie without any significant changes

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 32

in plot, characters, or theme. Why both directors should choose such a route remains a mystery, known perhaps only to Hollywood insiders. Based on Stephen King’s cleverly constructed breakthrough novel, “Carrie” represented a kind of breakthrough for De Palma as well. His relatively straightforward adaptation collected a number of positive reviews and performed well at the box office, especially with the teenage audience that embraces horror, and in effect launched two successful careers. King must now be one of the most productive and not incidentally one of the richest novelists in the world, while De Palma has created a string of brilliant Hitchcockian thrillers. Aside from a weird and grisly prologue and a slightly different epilogue, Peirce’s “Carrie” closely follows the original. The action proper opens with Carrie White (Chloë Grace Moretz), a shy loner and a misfit, cowering timidly, isolated from everyone else in her high-school gym class. In the showers she experiences her first menstrual period and, knowing nothing about her body or anything

Chloë Grace Moretz as the title character in “Carrie.” PHOTO COURTESY MGM PICTURES

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involving sexuality, panics and screams, which provokes the scorn of her cruel classmates, who mock her and pelt her with sanitary napkins. The humiliation more or less accidentally initiates the first inklings of Carrie’s special gift of telekinesis, which takes her a while to understand and master. Carrie’s home life explains her difference from her classmates and her consequent loneliness; her mother, Margaret (Julianne Moore), is a religious fanatic who prevents her daughter from participating in anything like the normal life of a high-school kid. She constantly quotes (actually misquotes) the Bible, dwelling on evil and punishment, and when she thinks her daughter has sinned, locks her in a closet to pray for forgiveness. When Sue (Gabriella Wilde), one of Carrie’s classmates who regrets her participation in the taunting, persuades her boyfriend Tommy (Ansel Elgort) to invite Carrie to the prom, the cruelty of her classmates brings on a terrible climax. Her chief tormentor, Chris (Portia Doubleday), suspended for her attack on Carrie, along with a crew of louts, hatches a scheme of bloody revenge. Carrie’s telekinetic powers inspire her to respond out of anger and despair with her own act of ultimately apocalyptic vengeance. Although the movie follows its model closely, perhaps because of familiarity with the original, it lacks the edge, the emotional impact, and of course the shock of De Palma’s work. Although no

The transparent trap “The Fifth Estate” (R), DIRECTED BY BILL CONDON NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

longer than its predecessor, it seems to drag slowly toward its entirely predictable climax, then provides a most perfunctory commentary on the action. The whole work suggests that its makers really didn’t care too much about their picture and had no interest in trying anything novel or original. The exaggeration of the performances contrasts with the lackluster repetition of just about everything else. Prettier than Sissy Spacek, Hollywood’s greatest waif, who played the original Carrie, Chloë Grace Moretz pretends too obviously to be the plain shrinking violet, and when she blossoms at the prom she glows as Spacek did not. Julianne Moore, looking uncharacteristically unattractive and behaving hysterically most of the time, grows very tiresome very early in the movie. The rest of Carrie’s classmates look far too old to be in high school, some of them appear to be pushing 30, a just a bit aged for the senior prom. Remakes grow out of a long tradition in the film industry and despite conventional wisdom, don’t always fail to match up to or even improve on their originals. Some in fact achieve their own excellence — “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” for example, or, much earlier, “The Thief of Bagdad.” Those pictures actually reinterpret the material from the past and make something new, different, and entirely satisfying out of a proven success, no mean achievement. In her remake, Kimberly Peirce, on the other hand, only repeats the past, a most unrewarding endeavor.

For nearly the entire year leading up to the release of “The Fifth Estate,” WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has actively campaigned against the film, which depicts the creation of his controversial online organization. He’s done everything he can to ensure the film’s failure; supposedly he even met with Benedict Cumberbatch early on to implore him not to accept the lead role in the film. WikiLeaks, with its mission of fighting against government corruption by forcing transparency through the release of classified documents, and the impact it had (and is still having) on the landscape of modern journalism, is a subject ripe for exploration. That the film opened this weekend with the lowest debut of any wide release so far this year may be related to the factual inaccuracies that so angered Assange, but more likely has to do with the ways it squanders an interesting subject to emerge as a timely, but ultimately bloodless biopic. Beginning in the early days of WikiLeaks and culminating with the Iraq War Logs and then the release of hundreds

A scene from “The Fifth Estate.” PHOTO

of thousands of U.S. State Department diplomatic cables, the film uses computer hacker and technology activist Daniel Domscheit-Berg (author of the book of one of two books screenwriter Josh Singer credits as source material) as the audience conduit into Assange’s world. At first a devoted acolyte of Assange’s mission of governmental transparency, Berg (sensitively played by Daniel Brühl, “Rush”) effectively puts his life on hold to assist Assange in making WikiLeaks into the powerful political force it eventually became. While the site becomes a phenomenon, the differing ideologies between the two men over how exactly the site will divulge the information it receives creates an irreparable rift between the colleagues. The conflict boils down to Assange maintaining that any documents they release should be done so without any editing on their part, while Berg argues that any information that could trace back to the anonymous individuals who provided the documents should be redacted for their protection. Setting aside any debate about how closely the film hues to the facts (these arguments get dredged up any time a film sets out to tell any sort of real-life story), it fails to properly dramatize why these events matter. It attempts to do so, occasionally checking in with Laura Linney and Stanley Tucci as State Department officials dealing with the fallout of the cable leaks, but their scenes are so haphazardly presented that they barely register. Singer’s script also seems undecided on its feelings about Assange himself, spending the first half of the film championing his cause, then demonizing him in the second. The script fails to offer up any real insight into the man and his motivations. I won’t even get into the way it dismisses whistleblower Chelsea Manning (then known as Bradley Manning) as a soldier

whose role in the leaks was revealed as a result of online “bragging,” a harmful bit of misrepresentation of the actual circumstances. Director Bill Condon has previously shown great skill in translating complicated individuals to the big screen, in biopics “Gods and Monsters” and “Kinsey,” but here seems at a loss for how to add urgency to a subject that is not inherently cinematic — there’s only so many ways to make actors hunched over laptops exciting. He resorts to relying on flashy motion graphics and a propulsive techno score (courtesy of composer Carter Burwell) as a source of excitement. Condon repeatedly uses metaphorical representation of WikiLeaks’ online network, depicted as an endless expanse of desks and monitors, so the actors can wander around in a more visually interesting environment, but it comes across as gimmicky and more than a little silly. Another method, mercifully discarded early on in the film, involves projecting the typed words onto the actors; a tactic that’s straight out of early 90’s techno-thrillers like “Hackers” and “The Net.” Benedict Cumberbatch is quite good as the enigmatic Assange, even managing to overcome the fact that in his white wig he looks exactly like Tilda Swinton, but his performance isn’t enough to overcome the script’s deficiencies. Brühl also does what he can with his character, but as the audience surrogate he’s somewhat of a blank slate, leaving the film without a compelling lead to care about. “The Fifth Estate” ends on a rather odd note, with Cumberbatch, in character as Assange, discussing his displeasure with the film and advising the audience to seek out the truth for themselves. It’s hard to argue with his statement, and those who are interested in the story of WikiLeaks, and Assange himself, will likely be better off doing exactly that.

COURTESY DREAMWORKS PICTURES

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935): The scientist attempts to build his creation a mate, but that doesn’t go too well either. Cinema THE COUNSELOR (R): Ridley Scott directs a script by Cormac McCarthy in this tale of a respected lawyer whose one-time involvement with drug trafficking gets him in over his head. Starring Michael Fassbender, Cameron Diaz, Javier Bardem, Penélope Cruz, and Brad Pitt. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE (1920): John Barrymore stars in the story of a scientist who develops a deep connection with the darker side of his personality. Dryden (Tue, Oct 29, 8 p.m.) ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW (NR): This surreal fantasy about the dark underbelly of family-friendly entertainment was filmed secretly at the Disney theme parks. Little FRANKENSTEIN (1931): A scientist attempts to create a living creature by reanimating dead tissue. He succeeds, but it turns out not to be such a great idea. Cinema FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980): A lonely sports enthusiast attempts to get a group of self-involved camp counselors to join him for a game of hockey, with little success. Little (Fri, Oct 25, 8 p.m.)

FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 2 (1981): But he keeps trying anyway. Little (Fri, Oct 25, 10 p.m.) JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R): The Jackass gang is back for this hidden camera road trip movie, starring Johnny Knoxville as a very unconventional grandfather. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown LE CORSAIRE (NR): The Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow presents the epic ballet about one dashing pirate, a kidnapped maiden, and a dramatic shipwreck. Little (Sun, Oct 27, 12 p.m.; Tue, Oct 29, 6:30 p.m.) THE RAVEN (1963): Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, and Boris Karloff star as battling sorcerers in Roger Corman’s film, based loosely on the poem by Edgar Allen Poe. Dryden (Sat, Oct 26, 8 p.m.) THE ST. VALENTINE’S DAY MASSACRE (1967): Roger Corman directs the story of the most notorious event in gangland history. Starring Jason Robards and George Segal. Dryden (Thu, Oct 24, 8 p.m.) THE SWIMMER (1968): Burt Lancaster stars in this adaptation of John Cheever’s surreal short story about a man who decides to travel home by swimming through his neighbors pools. Dryden (Wed, Oct 23, 8 p.m.) WADJDA (NR): The first film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia tells the story of a young girl determined to raise enough money to buy a

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

bicycle, even as society tells her it’s wrong. Little, Pittsford THE WAITING ROOM (2012): Director Peter Nicks’ observational documentary examining the inner-workings of Oakland’s Highland Hospital. Dryden (Fri, Oct 25, 8 p.m.; Sun, Oct 27, 2 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] BAGGAGE CLAIM (PG-13): Paula Patton plays a flight attendant who takes advantage of her job to fly across the country revisiting her exes and hunt for a date in time for her sister’s wedding. With Djimon Hounsou, Taye Diggs, Derek Luke, Adam Brody, and Tia Mowry. Culver, Greece BLUE JASMINE (PG-13): In Woody Allen’s latest, Cate Blanchett stars as a NY socialite who returns to San Francisco to reconnect with her sister after going through a life crisis. With Alec Baldwin, Peter Sarsgaard, and Louie C.K. Little CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13): Paul Greengrass directs the true story of Richard Phillips, the captain of a cargo ship attacked by Somali pirates in 2009. Starring Tom Hanks and Catherine Keener. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown CARRIE (R): See review on page 30. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture

book, this time involving an island of food/animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown DON JON (R): Joseph GordonLevitt makes his big screen debut as writer/director with this comedy about a ladies man who finds that real-life ladies have difficulty competing with the ones in his pornos. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, and Tony Danza. Cinema, Tinseltown ENOUGH SAID (PG-13): Julia Louis Dreyfus plays a divorced woman who begins dating a new man (James Gandolfini), only to discover that he’s her new friend’s ex-husband in this romantic-comedy from Nicole Holofcener. With Catherine Keener and Toni Collette. Canandaigua, Little, Pittsford ESCAPE PLAN (R): Wrongfully imprisoned in a futuristic, highsecurity jail, Sylvester Stallone must team up with fellow inmate Arnold Schwarzenegger to break out. So it’s pretty much a documentary. With Jim Caviezel and Vincent D’Onofrio. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE FIFTH ESTATE (R): See review on page 31. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown

GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown I’M IN LOVE WITH A CHURCH GIRL (PG): When a man with a criminal past falls for a woman who’s committed to her faith, they each much choose between the life they know and the love they’ve found. Starring Ja Rule, Adrienne Bailon (“The Cheetah Girls”), Stephen Baldwin, and Michael Madsen. Henrietta INEQUALITY FOR ALL (NR): This documentary examines the everwidening economic gap in our country and what it means for our future. Little INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG-13): Fresh off the success of “The Conjuring,” director James Wan returns to the saga of the haunted Lambert family. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, and Barbara Hershey. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (PG13): Forest Whitaker stars in this true story, about a butler who served eight American presidents over the course of three decades. Also starring Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, Alan Rickman, Jane Fonda, Robin Williams, and John Cusack. Cinema, Culver MACHETE KILLS (R): The sequel to Robert Rodriguez’s grindhouse homage about the

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585-259-5474 Phone wschmack@gmail.com

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

32 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

adventures of Mexican vigilante, Machete. Starring Danny Trejo, Michelle Rodriguez, Sofía Vergara, Charlie Sheen, and Lady Gaga. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown PRISONERS (R): An all-star cast heads up this thriller about a group of parents who take matters into their own hands after their daughters are kidnapped. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, Maria Bello, and Paul Dano. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown ROMEO & JULIET (PG-13): Never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo, here played by Hailee Steinfeld and Douglas Booth in an adaptation by Julian Fellowes (Downton Abbey). Pittsford RUSH (R): Ron Howard’s film about the true story of the 1970s rivalry between Formula One racers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Brühl, and Olivia Wilde. Culver, Eastview, Pittsford WE’RE THE MILLERS (R): A small-time pot dealer hires strangers to pose as his family in order to not arouse suspicion while making his way across the Mexican border with a shipment. Starring Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, and Ed Helms. Canandaigua, Cinema

Rochester City For Sale Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

156 Grafton 3 bedroom 417 Hayward 4 bedroom

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

149 Oneida 3 bedroom

Search. Buy. Sell.

430 Hague 4-5 bedroom 144 Berlin 2/2 multi

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com.

Land for Sale WATERFRONT LOTS - Virginia’s Eastern Shore WAS $325K. Now From $55,000- Community Pool/ Center, Large Lots, Bay & Ocean Access. Great Fishing & Kayaking, Spec Home. www.oldemillpointe. com 757-824-0808

Vacation Property BIG HUNTING LODGE: House, 8 acres, hunt adjoining 500 acre Deer Creek Forest. Bass ponds, brooks, fruit woods. Was $129,900, now $99,900. www. LandFirstNY.com Call 888-6832626 ORLANDO LAKEFRONT CONDOS! Last new FL lakefront condos available for below replacement cost! (formerly bank owned)3BR, 2BA only $199,900, was $365,000. Close to theme parks and all major attractions. Don’t miss out! Beat the snow-bird rush. Call now 1-877-333-0272, x 136

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-7348444

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

Adoption

The Emporium

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

24” GAS RESTAURANT RANGE Southbend Model #S24E. Excellent condition. $1000. or B.O. 315-331-6999

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 ULTRA CLASSIC EXCELLENT CONDITION 15,000 miles asking $10,000 716-440-0880

Events **** GUN SHOW - Jones Hall**** 354 Liecester St. Caledonia, NY 85 Tables! Saturday October 26th 9:00am-4:00pm & Sunday October 27th 9:00am3:00pm Next Show 11/09/ & 11/10 Springville Vol. Fire Hall. nfgshows.com

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

PAINT: BENJAMIN MOORE 2 gallons interior, Ivory Porcelain #239 Eggshell finish, Location Charlotte 585-663-6983 $30 all WOODEN HANGERS FOR COATS: 12 wood hangers for coats. 12 wood, 2 plastic 1 for hanging pants. All $15 585-880-2903

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $15. 585-880-2903 CANVASS CHAIR Fold up $5 585-383-0405 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EVEN FLO Aura strooler & combo car seat $40 B/O 585-225-5526 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

continues on page 34

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

THE

HomeWork

M ILLS AND A NNEX AT H IGH F ALLS

HEAT INCLUDED • TOWNHOUSES AND FLATS

2012 WINNER OF DESIGN EXCELLENCE

History and Charm Abound in Swillburg

342 Field Street

The small 20-block Swillburg Neighborhood in Rochester’s southeast quadrant has a compelling history. The area was once home to trails used by Native Americans. In the early 1800s the path of the old Erie Canal was the southern boundary of the neighborhood where lock 66 was constructed. And when the canal bed was replaced by the city’s trolley and subway lines, Swillburg became an important stop on the line. German and Irish immigrants settled in the neighborhood at the turn of the 20th century and built homes—most of which are still here, like the American Foursquare at 342 Field Street. Located on a picturesque lot that overlooks neighboring Pinnacle Hill, the red-tinted cast concrete front porch of this 1910 home welcomes you. And inside, you notice the original details of this period home— hardwood floors, wide floor and window moldings, and a Craftsman staircase. From the sunny foyer an archway opens to the spacious living room where freshly painted walls in a lovely shade of cream and crisp white trim coordinate well with the oak hardwood floors. The same décor and hardwood floors continue in the elegant dining room. The bay window with stained glass panes and an elegant chandelier make it a pleasant place in which to dine. The updated kitchen is stunning. And it’s all new--tile flooring, cabinets, and countertops. But its crown jewels are the new stainless

steel appliances. Ample pantry space completes the renovated space. Upstairs you find more oak floors in the three bedrooms—all have closets. The fourth smaller bedroom could work nicely as an office or nursery. An updated bath with new fixtures retains its original medicine cabinet. A stairway off the upstairs hall leads to the full attic, and the full basement below contains the home’s mechanics as well as the laundry and additional storage space. Outside, the fully-fenced backyard adds privacy and a great entertaining space. A driveway to the right of the home leads to plenty of off-street parking. Modern shops and restaurants on South Clinton Avenue surround this period home. The Cinema Theatre and the Highland Park Diner, two of Rochester’s venerable institutions, are located here. Park Avenue, Highland Park, and Cobbs Hill Park are within walking or biking distance. The active Swillburg Neighborhood Association organizes events such as the annual Swillfest and the holiday decorating contest. 342 Field Street is in the Rochester City School District, and several houses of worship are nearby. The 1,406 square foot home is listed at $124,900 with taxes of $4,577. Call Sharon Skivington of REMAX/Plus at 269-8901 for a tour. by Bonnie DeHollander Bonnie is a Landmark Society volunteer.

STOP BY 312 STATE STREET OR CALL 454-5710

www.themillsathighfalls.com

MON-FRI: 9AM-5PM SATURDAY: 9AM-1PM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

> page 33 GRACO DOUBLE STROLLER $40 B/O 585-225-5526 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585-490-5870 LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-360-2895 USED TV FOR SALE —Sharp 13” Color with remote. 14 years young with remote. $20 cash and carry. Message phone Mary 585/413-0827

Garage and Yard Sales

assortment household items, wooden tables. 11 Devonwood Lane, Pittsford (off Calkins Road)

GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., 10/25 & 10/26, 9am-3pm. Large assortment Women’s Plus-Size clothing (1x-3x), all pristine condition, (Macy’s, Nordstrom, Grace, Philosphy) some still with tags, casual, work to dressy dresses, pants & jeans, tops, sweater cardigans, blazers, & winter coats… ALL MUST GO! First comers get best selection!!! Huge

Groups Forming ATTENTION FLASH SOCCER FANS! The Western NY Flash Mob is gathering to prepare for the 2014 season. Join us! For more info find us on Facebook or contact us wnyflashfans@ gmail.com

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts

VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585-3284121 Experienced please.

able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (AprilNovember) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480 NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Home and Garden Professionals

Once Over

ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

CERTIFIED HOME & ROOF INSPECTOR Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs Commercial & Residential 10 year labor warranty on all workmanship

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

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Call: 458-ROOF

(7663)

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding Fully insured • Accepting All Major Credit Cards

Call

414-3692

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ALL WASHED UP

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585-734-8444 We’re TOPS In Roofing Service Free Estimates! • Re-Roof and Complete Tear-off • Insurance Claims • Storm Damage • Installation & Repairs Since 1968

637-3348

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

Trusted quality service since 1994!

ROOF LEAKS? Home Repair Specialist! • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Flat Roofing • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

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ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

34 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Miscellaneous ARE YOU BORED OR LONELY, looking to start a new relationship or maybe just meet a new friend, then you should try Livewire. It’s fun, it’s FREE, it’s Livewire. No gimmicks, no subscription fees just a fun way to meet new people. Call now. (585)333-3003 DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting MakeA-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today! HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $4897.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827

Mind Body Spirit CHANGE YOUR LIFE WITH HYPNOTHERAPY! A gentle way to uncover your potential and get rid of those old fears and limitations. Let Graceful Solutions help you! Grace LaDelfa, CCH, RM, LMT Certified Clinical Hypnosis 2349 Monroe Ave. Rochester, NY 14618 585-764-4325 EARN BIG $$’s while losing weight! We challenge you to lose up to 50 pounds and get paid for it! Special limited offer. Call Now! 1-800-973-3271 (AAN CAN)

Tutoring TUTORING Trouble with Spanish, Physics, Chemistry, Russian? Help available. Easy to understand. 585-458-7693. Call 10am-8pm

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

APPLY CALL: 315-257-9104 or send resume to; athompson@roofally.com

$8,000 COMPENSATION Women 21- 31. EGG DONORS NEEDED. 100% Confidential/ Private. Help Turn Couples Into Families with Physicians on The BEST DOCTOR’S List. 1-877-9-DONATE; 1-877-9366283; www.longislandivf.com

DRIVERS- HOME WEEKLY & BIWEEKLY EARN $900-$1200/ WK. Class A CDL & 6 Mos. Exp Reg. No Canada, HAZMAT or NYC! SMITH TRANSPORT 877-705-9261

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093 CORREIA’S GENERAL CONTRACTING Sales & Project Manager. Average first year $55$60K. Recession proof industry. No experience necessary / Will train. Top rep in 2012 made over $200K TO

HELP WANTED!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.processbrochures.com (AAN CAN)

Assistant Professor of Mental Health Counseling to teach graduate courses in Mental Health Counseling including the Social and Cultural Diversity courses required under Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Responsible to deliver lectures, maintain office hours, maintain active research program, serve on academic and administrative committees and participate in campus and community events. SJFC requires

candidates with a PhD in Counseling Education with demonstrated ability to teach graduate level courses in Mental Health Counseling, including the Social and Cultural Diversity courses required under CACREP and experience with and/or knowledge of culturally diverse populations. Qualified candidates interested in applying must submit applications on-line to: https://jobs.sjfc.edu/. Posting #0600546.

continues on page 36

SATTELLITE DISH INSTALLERS Subcontractor position - trucks and tools required - Excellent Pay- Call 888-313-8504 or 706-733-0988 To see if you quality ST. JOHN FISHER College in Rochester, NY is looking for

Start Your Career With ConServe!

Debt Counselor & Bilingual Debt Counselor Openings

Uncapped Bonus • Competitive Wages Unbeatable Benefits • Flexible Scheduling • Growth Potential

200 Cross Keys Office Park, Fairport 14450 For more information and to apply:

www.conserve-arm.com Click the “ConServe Careers” tab

ConServe is an EOE & Drug-Free Workplace ce

SERVICES

YOU DELIVER THE PACKAGES. WE DELIVER THE FUNDS. Seasonal Drivers Needed! Who doesn’t love working in a dynamic environment while earning extra money? We’ve got both waiting for you in one great opportunity with an industry-leading company. Kelly Services® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. You could be hired immediately if you meet these requirements:

Altec has TECHNICIAN OPENINGS to repair mobile hydraulic aerial equipment at customer sites. Work from home with company service vehicle. Exp required in same or related field (ex. aerials, tractors, cranes, dozers, GSE). Stable company with 80+ years of success. Apply at www.altec.com or send resume to hrrecruiter@altec.com or call 205-307-2083.

• 21 years or older • Strong customer service skills • Minimum of six months commercial driving experience within the last three years • One year commercial driving experience preferred though CDL not required As a Kelly® employee, you’ll receive weekly electronic pay, a service bonus plan, benefit options, and more. If you’ve got the drive, we want to hear from you. Don’t miss out. Inquire in Person: Mon-Fri 9am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY resumes: tempupny@yahoo.com An Equal Opportunity Employer rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ]

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 35

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 BOOK LOVERS needed to sort and price donated books for resale at Downtown Library bookstore. Proceeds benefit library programs. Training provided. 585-428-8322 or Kate.Antoniades@libraryweb.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children.

Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help TrapNeuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM is looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers for :Meal delivery.

Clerical work and answering phones, scheduling volunteers to deliver routes. For more information visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 787-8326. SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 SECOND YEAR MCC DENTAL STUDENT eeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE in exchange for your time! Contact Tina B. 585-902-8009 or emailtinahygiene@gmail.com

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-Time. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS- begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN)

18-20 RENTAL, LLC, a domestic LLC, currently known as 18-20 J2, LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisovski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] APA NEW YORK LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/23/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8509 Mass Pointe Trl. N., Jacksonville, FL 32244, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] BERKELEY ASSOCIATES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/24/02. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC PO Box 10282 Rochester, NY 14610 Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Community Forensic Interventions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/4/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at P.O. Box 391, Penfield, NY 14526. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Custom Built Wine Cellars, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 50 Woodgreen Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-9970 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christopher M. Vanhall, a/k/a Christopher Vanhall; Karon Lewis; NY Financial Services, LLC; Arrow Financial Services, LLC; Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein,

36 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on October 30, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 94 Clearview Avenue, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 009.673-8.1 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9345 of Deeds, page 287. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,256.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: September 2013 Vincent E. Merante, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2013-1707 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEWYORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. David J. Dibble, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of David J. Dibble, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributes and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; Melissa Dibble; LR Credit 22, LLC; Louis Rivera, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 3, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises

directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 202 Whittier Road, Rochester, NY 14624; Tax Account No. 117.04-1-46 described in Deed recorded in Liber 4575 of Deeds, page 238; .64 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $82,307.02 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2013 Charles Genese, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KD Granite and Cabinets, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/26/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 76 Louise St., Rochester, NY 14606. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Blueprint Educational Consulting Services, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on November 5, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 62 Notre Dame Drive. Rochester, NY 14623. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MLA CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 524 Hamlin Parma Townline

Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Genesee Energy Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 7/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Babcock Farms Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Valley Energy Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 7/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Babcock Farms Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name: POST THIS IS ROCHESTER LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/3/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O POST THIS IS ROCHESTER LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of City View Equestrian, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 4310 Union St, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of NORTHGATE CAR WASH LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 07/09/2013.County: Monroe.SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 50 Dobson Rd. Rochester NY 14616,Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number 3153987, for Beer, Wine & Liquor has been applied for the undersigned to sell Liquor at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control at 390 Elmridge Center Dr., Rochester, NY 14626 for on-premise consumption. Chinatown Restaurant of Greece Inc.

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Form. of SEVEN EXPRESS LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 08/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 132 Country Manor Way, Apt 19, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of COLEMAN ASSOCIATES INTERNATIONAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Analusis LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 176 Montpelier Cir, Rochester NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KJN Health & Fitness LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) Nov. 21, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 60 Almay Road, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AFFORDABLEFURNITUREROCHESTER LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) May 9th, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Legal Zoom, 101 N. Bland Blvd., 11th Floor, Glendale, CA 911203. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Bad Boyz LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of C & D Fitness, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1942 West Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Course Gems, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o the LLC, Damon Morey LLP, Attn: William F. Savino, Esq., 200 Delaware Ave., Ste. 1200, Buffalo, NY 14202. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CSB Solutions LLC Articles of Organization filed Secretary of State (SSNY) 7/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon who process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 35 Wenham Lane Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DKNS Express LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 08/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 53 Karlan Dr., Rochester, NY,14617. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dutton and Company Real Estate Services, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 Capron St, 5C, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EAST MOUNTAIN SUNRISE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 25 Farm Field Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

SSNY shall mail process served to: 537 Averill Ave. APT 1, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Integrated Sonics, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/11/13 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process 50 Park Circle Rd, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of FSI 1908 West Ridge Road LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI Boonville LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI Buell Road LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI Sandy Creek Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greece Ridge Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Grizzly Construction LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) 9/23/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of J Mazur Consulting LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 08/30/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 7 Turning Leaf Dr, Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Liberty Recovery Associates LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/28/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 30051, Rochester, NY 14603. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity.

York 14559. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LZ Vending LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/10/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Treetop Drive, Fairport, NY, 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MT. HOPE OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Nearpass Acupuncture,

PLLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 9/25/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 800 Ayrault Rd., STE 220, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NORTH AMERICAN REALTY TRUST LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PENNANT OUTDOOR LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.

of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 79 Madison Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Scott Edward Aufenanger at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/02/2013. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 95 Belmont St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its principal office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PITTSFORD OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of formation of SPS FIRE AND SECURITY ROCHESTER, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/24/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 362 COURTLY CIRCLE ROCHESTER, NY 14615. Purpose: LIMIT LIABILITY

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of S&J Carthage Properties LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary

Notice of Formation of Tap Semiotic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State

cont. on page 38

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION 1. PUBLICATION TITLE: City Newspaper. 2. PUBLICATION NO.: 022-138. 3. FILING DATE: October 4, 2013. 4. ISSUE FREQUENCY: Weekly 5. NUMBER OF ISSUES PUBLISHED ANNUALLY: 52. 6. ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: $35 Regular; $30 Senior; $45 Out of State. 7. MAILING ADDRESS OF KNOWN OFFICE OF PUBLICATION: 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607. 8. MAILING ADDRESS OF HEADQUARTERS OR GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICE OF PUBLISHER: 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607. 9. FULL NAMES AND COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESSES OF PUBLISHER, EDITOR, and MANAGING EDITOR: PUBLISHER: William and Ma ry Anna Towler, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607; EDITOR: Mary Anna Towler, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607. 10. OWNER: W.M.T. Publications, Inc, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607. STOCKHOLDERS OWNING OR HOLDING 1% OR MORE OF THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF STOCK: Edward Curtis 1570 East Ave. Rochester NY 14610; Paul Goldberg 80 St. Paul St., #4B, Rochester NY 14604; Mary Anna Towler 160 Westminster Rd. Rochester NY 14607; Bill Towler 160 Westminster Rd. Rochester NY 14607; Joe Watson 54 Nunda Blvd. Rochester NY 14610; Donald & Barbara Corbett, Jr. 864 E. Bluff Dr. Penn Yan NY 14527; Albert Craig III 30 Howland Ave. Rochester NY 14620; Cheryl Reeves 58 Matthew Dr. Fairport NY 14450; Nathan Robfogel 2 Beekman Pl. #14A New York NY 10022-8058; Cinda Johnson 3756 Wonderland Hill Ave. Boulder CO 80304; Sandra Lloyd 91 South Main St. Pittsford NY 14534. 13. KNOWN BONDHOLDERS, MORTGAGEES, AND OTHER SECURITY HOLDERS OWNING OR HOLDING 1% OR MORE OF TOTAL AMOUNT OF BONDS, MORTGAGES, OR OTHER SECURITIES: None.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: J. GILLESPIE CARPENTRY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on September 18, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 64 Pannell Road, Fairport,New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: FLORAL EXPRESSIONS BY JENNI, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 243 Ogden-Parma Town Line Road, Spencerport, New

13. Publication Title

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

City Newspaper

15.

a.

9/18/13

Extent and Nature of Circulation

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

38,173

38,000

10

14

34

31

44

45

38

38

33,895

34,377

Total Free Distribution (Sum of 15d. and 15e.)

33,933

34,415

Total Distribution (Sum of 15c. and 15f)

33,977

34,453

4,196

3,547

38,173

38,000

.1295

.1306

Total Number of Copies (Net press run) (1)

Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions Stated on Form 3541. (Include advertiser's proof and exchange copies)

Paid In-County Subscriptions Stated on Form 3541 b. Paid and/or (2) (Include advertiser's proof and exchange copies) Requested Circulation (3) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Non-USPS Paid Distribution (4) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation [Sum of 15b. (1), (2),(3),and (4)] d. Free Distribution by Mail (Samples, compliment ary, and other free)

(1) Outside-County as Stated on Form 3541 (2) In-County as Stated on Form 3541 (3) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS

e. Free Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means) f. g. h. i.

Copies not Distributed To tal (Sum of 15g. and h.)

j. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (15c. divided by 15g. times 100) 16. Publication of Statement of Ownership

10/23/13

Publication required. Will be printed in the _________________________ issue of this publication.

Publication not required.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37

Legal Ads > page 37 on 7/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 186 Raeburn Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Adam Rains at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lost Borough Brewing LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 Capri Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YP & YL ROCHESTER 2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ACC OP (Park Point) LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY,

NY 10011, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of COLE TAYLOR MORTGAGE, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/20/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of EPM Equipment, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/20/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc. (CSI), 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: c/o CSI, 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of GALLAGHER VOLUNTARY

BENEFITS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/30/13. Princ. office of LLC: 295 Woodcliff Dr., Ste. 101, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Insurance brokerage. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of My Doggie, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 9/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Utah on 9/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the principal office address of LLC: 33 Arthur St., Rochester, NY 14621. Arts. of Org. filed with Utah Div. of Corps., P.O. Box 146705, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114 . Purpose: real estate investments. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Phelan Construction, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MA on 7/7/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA and

Adult Services

principal business address: 323 Washington St., Suite 1, Westwood, MA 02090. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of SWITCH IT COMMUNICATIONS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 05/08/09. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Woods Cove III, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/1/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] SB JOHNSON PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 7/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Davy Dr., Ste. 200, Rochester, NY 14624. General Purpose [ NOTICE ] SHJJ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 8/26/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3484 Monroe Av, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Six GC LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/5/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS

38 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013

is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at c/o Sherm Levey, 145 Culver Rd. Ste. 100, Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Stringers, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/19/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 80 Topspin Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff against SUSAN M. PAPROCKI A/K/A SUSAN PAPROCKI, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on June 18, 2013. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, N.Y. on the 20th day of November, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Said premises known as 12 Katsura Court, Penfield, N.Y. 14526. Tax account number: SBL # : 139.12-1-68. Approximate amount of lien $ 130,408.44 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 139-11. James Valenti, Esq., Referee. McCabe, Weisberg, & Conway Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street - Suite 210 New Rochelle, New York 10801 (914) 636-8900 [ NOTICE ] XLNQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 05/31/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 85 Friel Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] ZBJQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 6/13/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at PO BOX 676 Henrietta NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity

location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 1694 PENFIELD RD PENFIELD NY 14625 . Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] 2014 Titan Holdings LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on July 8, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 1880 Manitou Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. The purpose of the Company is Real Estate Management [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Lock 32 Brewing Company, LLC. Art of Org. files with Sec’y. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC 10 Scheon Place, Pittsford, NY 14534. Pupose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Victor Asset Acquisition, LLC filed Application for Authority with the New York Department of State on August 29, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 230 Crosskeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Camman Acres, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on August 27, 2013. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 9593 Ridge Road, Brockport, New York 14420. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

ZJ HEALTHY FOOT CARE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 9/16/2013. Office

The name of the LLC is Blue Sky Media Solutions LLC. The Articles of

Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on September 9, 2013. The LLC’s office is located in Monroe County, New York State. Process may be serviced on the NY Secretary of State. A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 919 S. Winton Rd, Suite 314, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is manager-managed. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business.

this action. Judgment amount: $91,921.96 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2013 Kelly M. Ciccone, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

[ NOTICE OF SALE ]

EH LEHIGH CORNER PROPERTIES, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on August 20, 2013 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 3115 EAST HENRIETTA ROAD, HENRIETTA, NY 14467. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law.

Storage Mobility of Rochester, LLC hereby publishes notice, as required by New York SelfStorage Facilities Act (NY Stat. 182) of a public sale of the property listed below to satisfy a landlords lien. All sales are for cash to the highest bidder and are considered final. Storage Mobility of Rochester, LLC reserves the right to reject any bids. The sale will be held at 105 McLaughlin Rd Rochester NY 14615 on: Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 11:00 AM. Customer Name Container ID Clark, Paul13A94Coleman, Christopher L 6A94Giambrone, Vince8010B94 Contents include but not limited to: Household items, books, exercise equipment, stereo equipment and more.

[ NOTICE OF SALE ]

[ NOTICE OF SALE ]

Index No. 2013-5772 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. David M. Brodie; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 3, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 20, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Perinton, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 38 Raymond Road, Penfield, NY 14525; Tax Account No. 139.14-2-8 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10539 of Deeds, page 126; lot size 70 x 204. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in

SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR WELLS FARGO HOME EQUITY ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES 2006- 2 TRUST, HOME EQUITY ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-2, Plaintiff, against RODAR M. MANGALINO, JR; SOPHEA MANN; SORPHON MANN, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/17/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City Of Rochester, State of New York on 11/22/2013 at 09:00AM, premises known as 25 SCARLET PINE CIRCLE, Brockport, NY 14420 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL No. 054.01-3-13. Approximate amount of judgment $120,372.30 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 2012-13750. Ronald S. Goldman, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: October 16, 2013 1066161

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD A 61-year-old Texas man admitted to a hospital not long ago appearing to be falling-down-drunk, even though denying having had even a single drink, was discovered to be unintentionally manufacturing beer in his stomach. With “auto-brewery syndrome,” stomach-based yeast automatically ferments all starches (even vegetables or grains) passing through, converting them into ethanol. Normally, natural stomach bacteria control the yeast, but if, for example, antibiotics had inadvertently eliminated the bacteria, the yeast would prevail. The case was reported in a recent International Journal of Clinical Medicine.

Government in Action

— Update: As several additional states debate permitting marijuana use by a doctor’s prescription, Irvin Rosenfeld presented his own experience in August to a packed house at Kentucky’s state capitol. Rosenfeld suffers from painful bone tumors (diagnosed, with a poor prognosis, in 1963) and began smoking dope in the federal government’s Compassionate Investigational Drug program in 1982 -- since then consuming 130,000 government-supplied joints (12 per day, carefully measured), which he said absolutely had prolonged his life. “I didn’t ask for my bone disease,” he said. “All I asked for is the best medicine possible.” — While Congress struggled recently to pass a budget or an increase to the national debt limit, one program made it through rather easily, according to a September New York Times report: farm subsidies for inactive “farmers.” The subsidies were renewed, based on a

2008 law, virtually assuring that more than 18,000 in-name-only farmers (who received $24 million last year) will not be cut off. Included, according to a 2012 Government Accountability Office report, were recipients at 2,300 “farms” that had not grown a single crop in five years (including 622 without a crop in 10 years). — “Close Enough for Government Work”: The security contractor USIS, which does $2.45 billion worth of background checks for the National Security Agency and other departments (and had cleared file-leaker Edward Snowden and the Washington Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis), gets paid only for completed files. However, full background checks often require months of work, and at some point, reported The New York Times in September, when USIS needed cash, it would “flush” stillopen files, treating them as completed, and submit them for payment -- as happened with the files of Snowden and Alexis. In both cases, reported the Times, subsequent, crucial information failed to make it into the flushed files.

Undignified Deaths

(1) A 68-year-old hiker with a broken ankle was killed in Mansfield, Australia, in August following his “successful” lift from the bush by an Ambulance Victoria helicopter. Moments after he was raised, airborne, about 30 yards off the ground, he fell to his death. (2) A 52-year-old man was killed in an explosion in Rowan County, Ky., in July when he lit a cigarette while hooked up to an oxygen supply. The man had already survived three explosions under the same circumstances.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 35 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Emotions will be topped up, and excitement will mount this week due to an encounter you have with someone unique. Don’t show signs of possessiveness or you may send the wrong message. If you are fun to be with, that special someone will want to be with you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Not everyone will be open with you when it comes to personal involvement, commitment or current romantic situation. Don’t let anyone sweep you off your feet or talk you into intimacy without knowing the potential for your relationship growing into something long-term.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll attract lovers but also find it difficult to settle for just one partner. Don’t lead anyone on. As long as you are honest, you will have no regrets. Give whoever interests you the option to play the game of love with you or to take a pass. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take part in activities and events with the intent of being a social butterfly. Go out and have a good time and meet interesting people. One of the friendships you develop will have the potential to turn in a very special and rewarding union.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll be like a kid in a candy store when it comes to love. Your charm will dazzle whoever you meet, guaranteeing plenty of partners. Action may be excellent, but be wary of someone coming on too strong. Don’t make a promise you don’t intend to keep. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Looking for what someone has to offer or trying to impress someone with what you have will end in disaster. Let whoever interests you come to you for the right reason. Building a relationship must be based on common interests, chemistry and similar life goals.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A long-distance romance is likely to sprout if you travel or sign up for an online dating service. Before you decide it’s too much work, give love a chance. It may open doors to all sorts of unique possibilities that can change your life in a positive manner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Keep your money in a safe place, and refrain from giving anyone the impression you are looking for a commitment. Approach love with a sense of freedom and fun. Take time to get to know how much you enjoy being with someone before you let possessiveness take over.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You may be obliged to make some sort of promise if you have moved too quickly when it comes to being intimate with someone you just met. Before you travel down that path, make it clear that your playful action does not mean you are making a commitment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Secret affairs are apparent. Before you decide to pursue someone, ask questions that confirm availability. Avoid being put in a vulnerable position that can end up costing you emotionally, financially or physically. Do your best to protect your assets, your reputation and your heart.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll be tempted to mix business with pleasure; however, before you do, consider how it can alter your life, direction and financial security. Take it slow and listen carefully to what’s actually being offered. You may want to take a pass. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your emotions will play games with you. What you think you are heading into and what you end up with are not going to resemble one another. A reality check will be required if you want to avoid a situation that is based on ulterior motives and lies.

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40 CITY OCTOBER 23-29, 2013


October 23-29, 2013 - City Newspaper