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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

EVENTS: FOURTH OF JULY EVENTS, MOVIES IN THE PARK

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FILM: “WHITE HOUSE DOWN,” “THE HEAT”

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CHOW HOUND: ROSIE’S HOT BUNS, JUST JUICE 4 LIFE

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URBAN JOURNAL: RIGHTS AND THE SUPREME COURT

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Vol 42 No 43

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

It’s dynamic, energetic, muscular, and has lots of bass.” CLASSICAL, PAGE 18

Josh Fox on “Gasland Part II.” INTERVIEW, PAGE 6

Brighton eyeing big purchase? DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 5

Chess kids. EDUCATION, PAGE 4

Gender bending at the Eastman House. ART, PAGE 22

FEATURE | BY KATHY LALUK | PAGE 10 | PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

Disc jockeys: Ultimate Frisbee in Rochester Ultimate Frisbee — typically just called “Ultimate” — is a fast-paced, football-like sport that substitutes flying discs for that pigskin missile. There is no shortage of Ultimate players in the Rochester area. The Greater Rochester Area Disc Association estimates that there are as many as 4,000 regular players of the sport locally. From casual, less-organized match-ups among friends (and strangers) on nice days in Ellison and other area parks, to organized league play on weekends throughout the spring and summer, to Rochester’s first

professional team, the local Ultimate scene is thriving. The game has evolved from its low-key beginnings on college campuses. It’s still got the same laid-back vibe, but it’s no longer just for frat boys or hippies looking for a break from football practice and hacky-sack. “Anyone can play,” says Tanya Beiswenger of Greater Rochester Area Disc Association’s Spring Fling league. “Literally, anyone.” (Pictured: Eric "Ginger" Dixon of the Rochester Dragons professional Ultimate team.)

Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit those selections. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Pro-choice push doomed good bill

It is with more sadness than joy that I congratulate the New York State Senate for defeating the Women’s Equality Act, the very name of which explains my unhappiness. The bill contained nine extremely important and long-overdue corrections to New York State law that would have brought many critical improvements to women’s equality in our state. Due to the machinations of politicians who receive major campaign funding and other support from prochoice organizations and individuals both in-state and out, the Women’s Equality Act was saddled with a self-destructive component expanding abortion access well beyond what voters can accept. Understanding the abortion polls quite well, these politicians cobbled an expansion of abortion access into an otherwise fine bill that most New Yorkers would support. Even the state Conservative Party supported the non-abortion components of the bill. Unfortunately, rather than pass into law the WEA’s necessary elements, pro-choice lawmakers in Albany killed the whole bill by refusing to remove its only divisive element. By failing to deliver acceptable legislation for women, the governor and legislative leaders have made it clear that they are willing to support disenfranchising women in order to appease their special-interest donors. It is my hope that a new 2 CITY

JULY 3-9, 2013

Women’s Equality Act can come forward early in the next session without the unpopular expansion of abortion that defeated it this time. KEN MAHER

Sexual assaults and the military

Your editorial, like so many on the topic, is devoid of any context – which quite frankly, given your gender, is not a surprise (“Good. Old. Boys,” Urban Journal). After reading it, one would think that the military was populated by roving brigands of rapists terrorizing women at all turns. I am quite sure that there is some forcible rape in which a credible threat of either physical or social coercion is a key ingredient. Other cases, such as the recent one at the Naval Academy, involve alcohol. In that recent case, a young woman attended a party, drank herself unconscious and was allegedly raped by three young men. I will grant you that drinking yourself unconscious is neither an explicit or implicit consent to sexual activity but what was the young lady thinking? As a man with four daughters, I have always stressed to them that you have to be responsible for yourself. This is a multifaceted problem that is not going to be solved by punishing the actions of young men and excusing the behavior of young women. None of their behaviors is what one would expect of a future officer. Once again, forcible rape is another matter and needs to be dealt with forthwith. AL GREGORIO

Visiting hours

On our report on the Rochester Historical Society’s financial troubles (News): I would love

to check out the collection, but the museum is only open 1950’s banking hours geared toward the elderly or retired. I am neither. MR. ROCHESTER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly July 3-9, 2013 Vol 42 No 43 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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Rights and the Supremes Last week was a historic, and deeply troubling, week, with the Supreme Court issuing some of the most important rulings it has made in recent years. On the court’s final day, there was a lot to celebrate, with the fall of the Defense of Marriage Act and a decision that, in effect, legalizes samesex marriage in California. But while in those rulings the court affirmed a basic right, in a decision earlier in the week it slapped other Americans in the face. And in another, it seemed to merely postpone the day when many Americans will have to fight for an important right. The rulings on marriage equality give federal benefits to same-sex married couples in states where those marriages are permitted, and they let California join (again) the list of those states. But for samesex couples in most states, the rulings do nothing. Those Americans are still secondclass citizens. That said, it is no small thing – in both practical and symbolic terms – that DOMA has died. Same-sex couples deserve the benefits that other married couples have. And it was unconscionable for this country to have a federal law designed to hurt and discriminate against a specific group of citizens. (Conservatives in Congress aren’t giving up, though; they’re talking about a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage throughout the country.) Dampening the celebration over the marriage-equality rulings: In Fisher v. the University of Texas, the court sent back to a lower court the issue of whether UT can consider applicants’ race when it decides which students it will admit. UT had argued that a diverse student body serves an educational purpose. The court agreed that it does but said the university should be required to prove that it can’t achieve diversity any way other than by considering the race of its applicants. As Mychal Denzel Smith wrote in The Nation: “While the goal of diversity has been the easiest way to sell affirmative action to the public, that isn’t the purpose. The original intent behind affirmative action was to afford the descendants of America’s slave population and those who had suffered under Jim Crow – black people – the educational and employment opportunities denied to them by racist laws.” That need still exists, and while affirmative action is only one of the ways to address it, it’s an important one. More troubling still is the court’s decision – and its reasoning – on the Voting Rights Act. In ruling that select cities and states no longer have to get permission from the Justice Department to change their voting laws, the justices turned a blind eye to the growing attack on voters’ rights.

The Supremes’ DOMA ruling is worth celebrating. But in terms of equality for all Americans, the court pulls us backward. According to a report issued last month by the Brennan Center for Justice, 82 different bills to restrict voting were introduced this year in 31 states; seven states had passed restrictive bills, and 50 more bills were pending when the report was written. Supervision under the Voting Rights Act needs to be expanded, not eliminated. The Supreme Court has made that all but impossible, though, at least for the foreseeable future. John Nichols of The Nation notes the need for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing the right to vote. But constitutional amendments are neither easy nor fast, and a lot of damage can be done while we wait for that change. On Sunday, the New York Times called on Congress to pass a law “declaring a universal right to vote that could not be infringed by any level of government.” That’s a long shot, too, given Republicans’ addiction to states’ rights. We’ll celebrate the steps toward marriage equality during the Gay Pride events in Rochester this month. But we need to keep in mind that while those are important steps, they are very, very small. And the big story this past week was the stark reminder that in terms of real equality for all Americans, we still have a long way to go. And that for the moment, the Supreme Court wants to pull us backward, not forward.

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CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

MCH hires

Former Albany County Nursing Home administrator Gene Larrabee will be the new executive health director at Monroe Community Hospital. And Colleen Rose has been hired as the hospital’s deputy director. Rose comes to MCH from the Fairport Baptist Home, where she worked as director of strategic initiatives. The appointments must be approved by the Monroe County Legislature.

State touts Eastman Business Park

New York’s economic development agency awarded $7.2 million in incentives to assist Recycled Energy Development’s purchase of Eastman Business Park’s utilities system. And last week, state and local officials visited the park to talk about an agreement between the state and Kodak. The company and other park tenants will be absolved of environmental liabilities, and Kodak will place $49 million into an environmental trust fund for monitoring and cleanup work.

Land bank funding

Over the next two years, New York’s land banks will

have access to up to $20 million in funding from the attorney general’s office. The state has eight land banks, including Rochester’s. The funding is meant to help revitalize neighborhoods hit hard by the housing crisis.

News

Dems propose registry

Democrats in the Monroe County Legislature say they’ll introduce legislation to establish a registry of people convicted of animal abuse. The registry would be maintained by the Humane Society of Greater Rochester. There would be exceptions, but generally any person or business selling more than nine animals a year would have to check the registry before making a sale.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Chess kids You might wonder how, in the ever-expanding empire of video games, an ancient board game can still attract players. But a group of ninth graders at Wilson Commencement Academy in the Rochester school district say there’s nothing like the cerebral matches in chess. The six-student Rochester team recently came in sixth in the U.S. Chess Federation 2013 SuperNationals. The tournament, which drew more than 5,300 students from all over the country, is the ultimate in scholastic chess competition.

Audit critical of repair program

A City of Rochester audit of its Emergency Assistance Repair Program revealed some flaws with the program, which is intended to help low-income property owners with basic repairs. Though there were no laws broken or jobs left incomplete, most of the problems cited involved poor supervision. The city funneled about $2 million into the program in 2009 in an effort to improve neighborhoods.

Six young men at Wilson Commencement Academy make up a competitive chess team. They’ve been playing together since kindergarten and have won state and national tournaments. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Most members of the Rochester team, which consists of Peter Carter, Theodore Chapman, Sam Cherin, Webster Kehoe, Connor Wagner, and Patrick Phillips, began playing together when they were kindergarten students at Genesee Community Charter School. A couple of the boys had learned the rules before entering school. While at GCCS, the students had a morning period where they could chose an activity, and the team grew from there. “You have to know how to strategize,” says Peter Carter. “Every move has to be thought out and you have to think of every countermove from your opponent.”

Numerous studies have shown that chess encourages cognitive development by sharpening memory and reasoning. Rochester has a thriving chess community, says Michael Kehoe, Webster’s father. Not only have their teachers and parents supported the students, he says, but there are coaches and master-level champion players in the Rochester area. Enthusiasts of the 5,000 year old game will find local tournaments under way on most Saturdays, Mondays, and Wednesdays, Kehoe says. Many of them are held at the Rochester Chess Center, 221 Norris Drive.

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Cost of War “Incorporating this parcel into Buckland Park would be an outstanding opportunity to preserve a green habitat for wildlife and create a passive recreation area for town residents.” BRIGHTON’S SUSTAINABILITY OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE IN A LETTER TO SUPERVISOR BILL MOEHLE

The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Jahmia Singleton, 31, Rochester -- Reggie Johnson, 27, Rochester

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

Rochester Police Department, media reports

SOURCE:

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DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Imminent domain Faith Temple Church in Brighton. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

A once fought-over piece of land next to Buckland Park in Brighton may end up in the town’s hands, after all. Brighton officials tried unsuccessfully to buy the land between Westfall and South Winton roads several years ago to add to the then-nascent park. The property was instead purchased by Faith Temple Church with plans to build a new sanctuary, school building, senior housing, and ball fields. Brighton initiated eminent domain proceedings on the property and the whole thing went to court. The two sides settled, with the church selling part of the land to the town and planning to move ahead with its project. But Faith Temple recently put the 70 acres it still owns up for sale. The single parcel includes the remainder of the once-disputed property, combined with other land held by the church. The process of developing the land was taking too long, says Kim Edlin, a pastor at Faith Temple, so church leaders decided to look for an existing building to renovate, instead. But before

that can happen, Edlin says, the church needs to sell the Westfall Road property. “We’re a church,” she says. “We don’t have endless resources.” Several parties have expressed interest in the land, Edlin says, but no offers have yet been received. The sale creates an opening for Brighton to pursue the property. And the town’s Sustainability Oversight Committee says officials should look into purchasing and preserving the land. “Incorporating this parcel into Buckland Park would be an outstanding opportunity to preserve a green habitat for wildlife and create a passive recreation area for town residents,” the committee said in a letter to Brighton Supervisor Bill Moehle. The site is one of the few undeveloped properties left in Brighton. Moehle says that real estate discussions are sensitive and that he can’t say whether the town may try to buy the property. “It’s a very important parcel of land,” he says.

Surveys frustrate teachers Students, teachers, principals, and parents in the Rochester school district recently participated in comprehensive districtwide surveys. The questions were tailored to each group’s relationship to the district. For example, students were asked about their teachers’ instruction, responsiveness, and classroom demeanor. | The New York State Education Department required the surveys as part of the teacher evaluation legislation enacted last year for priority school districts — those where the majority of schools are failing. | Teachers found the surveys frustrating, says Adam Urbanski, president of the Rochester Teachers Association. | “They ate up so much valuable time,” he says. And some teachers found some of the questions intrusive, he says, and not always age-appropriate. | But Anita Murphy, deputy superintendent of the RCSD, says the surveys were designed to gauge perceptions of students and parents for planning purposes. And the cumulative results will be used to help identify problems and guide in the development of solutions, Murphy says. | “We worked very specifically to not make it punitive,” she says. “We want to use the data to make the schools better.”

2,246 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,098 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to July 1. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from June 18 to 28: -- Spc. Javier Sanchez Jr., 28, Greenfield, Calif. -- Sgt. Corey E. Garver, 26, Topsham, Maine -- Sgt. Justin R. Rogers, 25, Barton, N.Y. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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CITY 5

INTERVIEW | BY MATTHEW SCHNIPER

Contami-Nation: Josh Fox returns to fracking fracas Of all things flammable in the wide world, tap water shouldn’t be one of them. At least that’s the consensus — call it crazy — among environmentalists and fracking foes, for whom the phenomena, supposedly brought on by nearby hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas extraction, has grown into quite a powerful symbol. Fitting, as fire has conveyed the angry heart and distempered emotion of many movements in modern history, from bra-burning and flag-burning to self-immolation. It’s clear from speaking with Josh Fox, the amped-up face-man for the anti-fracking movement, that he views Americans’ battle against big industry, not to mention their own elected leaders, as nothing short of a fight to the (slow) death. Our health versus their wealth. Fox, 40, earned some celebrity with the 2010 film Gasland, which was nominated for a Best Documentary Oscar, as well as for four Emmy Awards (winning one for its directing). Opposition upped Fox’s profile soon after: An independent film team used Kickstarter to produce the pro-fracking FrackNation. And special interests that support fossil fuel development, groups like the Independent Petroleum Association of America, backed the documentary TruthLand in an effort to discredit Fox’s “fearumentary.” It’s a strange David-and-Goliath conflict, pitting billionaires and multinational corporations versus the relatively lowly founder and artistic director of New York-based International WOW Company, a theater and film collaborative dedicated to illuminating “global social and political crises.” But frack with a Columbia University grad who’s written, directed and/or produced more than 30 stage works and who cut his cinematic teeth with 2008’s Memorial Day, an exposé of Abu Ghraib atrocities, and growing national resistance is what you get. Fox gave an interview to the Colorado Springs Independent in advance of the July 8 release of Gasland Part II on HBO. The following is an edited version of that conversation. SCHNIPER: What did you most want to do with Gasland II?

Fox: Well, I was compelled to make the follow-up film because, frankly, we saw just an enormous movement happening. Now, I’m not crediting the film with that. The movement has happened because there is this largest domestic drilling campaign in history happening, and people are angry and upset and protesting that. But what we found was there was another layer of contamination due to fracking 6 CITY

JULY 3-9, 2013

we wanted to investigate. And that’s the contamination of democracy. It is incredible to see the Democratic establishment — [Colorado] Governor Hickenlooper, President Obama, [former Pennsylvania Governor Ed] Rendell, everyone except [New York Governor Andrew] Cuomo right now, frankly — literally in the gas tank. And to be betraying the health concerns of their own constituents in favor of toeing an oil and gas development line, when every indicator says we have to move away from this and move toward renewable energy… There’s vigorous development of renewable energy. It is totally viable for us to replace this fuel and to replace all fossil fuels with renewable energy. We need strong leadership who’s not on the take from oil and gas to represent the people. So what we wanted to do is say, “Oh my God, look at what happened in the media. Look at what happened in the streets. It’s unprecedented, amazing what’s happened in the face of the fracking threat. Why hasn’t the government responded?” Since the film premiered at Tribeca Film Festival in April, what’s the response and blowback been?

More of the same. I mean, the industry got caught hiring psyops officers. People who’d just come from Iraq and Afghanistan who were trained in psyops, psychological operations, and they were employing those techniques against landowners fighting the industry in Pennsylvania. They got caught doing that. They were tape-recorded at their own teleconference describing landowners fighting for their basic human rights in Pennsylvania as “insurgents.” This industry has pursued a line of disinformation, of deceit. Now, it’s not surprising. Understand that my first glimpse of the oil and gas industry was them coming to me [as a member of a family that owned property in Pennsylvania] and saying, “Oh, it’s not going to be such a big deal, we’ll hardly even drill, just sign at the bottom line, it’s free money.”

A homeowner tries to light his tap water on fire in a scene from the first Gasland film. PHOTO COURTESY DOGWOLF

When their first note is deception, how do you expect the next note to be something truthful? What they’re doing here is doubling down on denial and it’s following the strategy of Big Tobacco. Big Tobacco had a problem they couldn’t solve. There was no way to make a healthy cigarette. The gas industry has been studying well leakage, water contamination, all of these problems for decades. And they’ve come to the conclusion in their own scientific reporting, and we show this in Gasland II, that there is no way to make a leak-proof well. And in fact, their leakage rates are alarming and astounding. Five percent of all wells leak immediately upon installation, and their cement casings fail. And 50 percent of them leak over a 30year period. It’s the industry’s own science. So in the same way that the tobacco industry had these memos in their drawers that said, “Oh, we knew all along that nicotine’s addictive and that tobacco’s harmful,” the gas industry has their own research. And some of that stuff has been published, even. It’s not even hidden. Some of it is hidden and we uncover a lot of that material in the new film. What do you say to people who insist that there is no credible evidence of the dangers of fracking? What’s your best, most irrefutable data, your strongest argument, your best proof on your side?

This is not even a question of proof. You look out there — and I’ve been to 25 states and all over the world investigating this issue — the contamination is clear from all the reporting. The New York Times, Pulitzer Prize-winning ProPublica, there are thousands of pages written on the contamination. Anyone who’s

saying it doesn’t exist is living on a slightly different planet. But the best evidence of why these things are happening comes from the gas industry itself, their own reports, which are featured in Gasland II. We know it is happening, and the first film is evidence of that. All the reporting is evidence of that. And a lot of this has to do with PR. Who can win the PR war. All I’m trying to say is, “Look at this reporting. Look at what’s actually being wrought on these people.” And it’s not a small number of people. Finding contamination cases making the first Gasland was not difficult at all. The EPA released its first progress report in December 2012 on its two-year study of potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water, with a final draft promised by 2014. What do you think of that report so far?

I haven’t seen the progress report. The EPA would be in conflict with their own findings on several occasions if they were to come out and give fracking a clean bill of health. One of the first interviews I did was with Weston Wilson — we know him as Weston Wilson the Whistleblower — in Region 8 offices at EPA. He blew the whistle on a 2004 report by EPA which said, “Yes, we’re injecting toxic material into the ground but it is no risk.” He said it was an Orwellian world. Unfortunately, what we’ve seen and you’ll see demonstrated in Gasland II, is that EPA is subject to the same political pressures as any of our state agencies are. And that the industry has an incredible grip on our regulatory agencies. In Pennsylvania, [in] the public accountability initiative report called

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Once they start exporting natural gas, we’re going to be subject to the same international pricing pressures we are with oil. And those multinationals who are not Americans, they’re multinationals with investors from China and all over the world, those are the guys who are now going to be controlling how much you have to pay for your energy.

Josh Fox. PHOTO COURTESY DOGWOLF

“Fracking and the Revolving Door in Pennsylvania,” they examine all the people who are supposed to be regulating on behalf of the citizens, and they said it’s had a corrupting effect and that the industry has captured the regulatory agencies that are supposed to represent the citizens. It does not mince words. And we’re seeing the same situation over and over again. What do you think about the way President Obama has handled the fracking issue?

The Obama administration has clearly embraced natural gas. There were natural gas talking points in the State of the Union address. I don’t think they did that with good science, with an eye toward the brilliant reporting that’s happened. I don’t think they did that with the idea of good government in mind. And one of the things that we’d like to do is reach out to President Obama and say, “Your base is not with you on your position on natural gas. You need to do what we elected you to do.” I was campaigning door to door in the Pennsylvania primary in Wayne County, PA, knocking on doors for President Obama in April 2008. And many of my colleagues obviously preferred him to the opposition in the last election. But he needs to go ahead and represent the people who elected him. This issue is not going away. When we talk about frack Colorado, frack Pennsylvania, frack California, frack New York, what we’re talking about is tying ourselves into another 30 to 50 years of dependency on the same old oil companies that are doing the fracking. This is Royal Dutch Shell, this is Exxon. These are the guys who have been playing with our purse strings.

I was reading one review and this person said, “Although the film is about fracking, its deeper subject is America in the early 21st century. What used to happen in the far away Third World or indigenous regions is now going on in the US. Call it karma ... seducing the populace with promises of ‘energy independence,’ a government that once vaunted democracy as its prime export, now disenfranchises citizens.” Can you elaborate?

OK, the fossil fuel industry has always considered a certain element of the population expendable. Those expendable people have been in Nigeria, in West Virginia, on the Western Slope of Colorado. Those are the people who are allowed by them and by a lot of governments to be poisoned and destroyed. When you look at the map of shale plates all over America, the area of people being considered expendable by the fossil fuel industry has expanded to a lot of new places. You’re seeing those people who are not used to being treated that way. You could call it exploitation models deployed in the developing world, you could call it an exploitation model deployed in West Virginia, but that’s their M.O. That’s the way they treat people. Like, “How did our gas get under their mountains?” And let’s move them aside. And what you’re seeing is an equal and opposite reaction, like a Newtonian political equation. It’s a stand-and-be-counted moment. For the president, for all the other elected officials who are involved in this debate, I urge them, please — we are here to work with you. We want you to work with the people, and not with the fossil-fuel industries that had their way with so many at such great expense. These are human rights issues. These are issues of democracy, and that’s what the new film speaks to. Matthew Schniper is an arts editor at the Colorado Springs Independent. He also frequently writes about film and sustainability topics.

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CITY 7

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3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

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First Friday

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Citywide Gallery Night

July 5 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

Gallery r Alumni Invitational / New Work

Writers & Books Read, White and Blue Book Sale

Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Open Studios

J U LY H I G H L I G H T S :

Image City Photography Gallery Spiritual Moments Main Street Artists' Gallery & Studio Teddy Bears on Parade Nu Movement ART by DAY Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) 6x6x2013 The Gallery@Equal=Grounds Canis Lupus The Shoe Factory Art Co-op Shoe Factory House Artists Visual Studies Workshop Gallery ChemoToxic, I Am That and Other Stories

8 CITY

JULY 3-9, 2013

• 6x6x2013: Get Your Small Art! at RoCo • Open Studios at HUA • Spiritual Moments by Jim Hartsen at Image City • Teddy Bears on Parade at Main St Artists' Gallery

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Marriage equality celebration

The Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Simon Cyrene will hold a special ceremony to celebrate the US Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act. The event is at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, July 3, at 17 Fitzhugh Street.

Rally against government surveillance

Civil liberties activists will hold a rally, “Rochester Restore the Fourth,” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 4. The goal of the rally is to increase public awareness about warrantless mass surveillance and the need to restore the power of the Fourth Amendment. The rally will be held in Washington Square Park.

• Canus Lupus at The Gallery @ Equal=Grounds • ART by DAY at Nu Movement • ChemoToxic, I Am That and Other Stories at VSW • Shoe Factory House Artists at the Shoe Factory • Read, White & Blue Book Sale at Writers & Books • Alumni Invitational / New Work at Gallery r

CITY NEWS BLOG

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND

Dining to feed ribs, brisket, pulled pork, and those crucial sides to barbecue lovers. There’s also an impressive schedule of live music from local blues practitioners like Joe Beard and Steve Grills. Tickets are $5 after 3 p.m. (lunchtime admission is free) and can be found at places like The Bop Shop, online at rochesterevents. com, or by calling 888-512-SHOW.

Summertime brews

Now that you’ve recovered from Real Beer Week, it’s probably time to get your hops levels back up. Check out Rohrbach Brewing Company’s July 9 food-and-beer pairing; the theme is Summer Pig Roast, and the menu includes steamed clams, grilled corn, salt potatoes, and spit-roasted suckling pig, plus beer accompaniment. Advance tickets are $35; visit rohrbachs.com for more details, or call 594-9800.

Reds, whites, and cruise Left to right: pork hot bun with house-cured onions, Asian-style slaw, toasted ancho and BBQ sauce; Indian-style flatbread with pork and house-cured veggies; warm chicken corn pocket with silky green sauce, melted sweet onions, and house-cured onions. All from Rosie's Hot Buns. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Go slow [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Syracuse native Caleb Piron had been practicing law in Manhattan for a little while before he made the choice to move his legal career to the back burner. “It was just an itch I had to scratch,” the self-described “food nerd” says of his decision to trade pocket squares for side towels and dive into the food-service industry. “Ooh, how’d that conversation go?” I totally had to pry, secretly hoping for tales of a shrieking holiday bloodbath upon Piron breaking the news to his family. He gave this question careful consideration: “I think they’re probably still a little confused.” Piron initially thought food truck, but the NYC costs were prohibitive. So he joined his brothers in Rochester, found a space in an eclectic neighborhood, and got to work. Fast-forward to Rosie’s Hot Buns, Piron’s new Monroe Avenue eatery that serves what he calls “slow food fast.” The concept is deceptively simple: three different breads filled with a choice of proteins, sauces, and toppings. Everything is made in-house, from the yeast-risen doughs to the pickled vegetables to the pistachio butter that anchors Rosie’s outrageously lush signature cookie. The beef, pork, and chicken are prepared sous vide, a method that tenderizes the meats over a long, leisurely cooking time while preserving all the taste.

The bread used in the Hot Bun has an airy focaccia feel but the flavor profile is Asian, the vegetarian option a fried tofu that’s crisp on the outside, creamy on the inside, and dressed with a savory ginger-sesame sauce. The Corn Pocket gives off a Latin-American vibe thanks to the black beans and salsa verde, while the Spice Roll is a baked-then-griddled flatbread filled with Indian flavors, the yummy cheese-andpeas version nearly making me forget that I’m a hardcore carnivore. Each will run you $4. The last several weeks have been a crash course in Restaurants 101 for Piron as he and manager Christian Stark worked out the kinks and tried to get Rosie’s Hot Buns as streamlined as possible. (Rosie, incidentally, is Piron’s bulldog; she does not work any shifts.) Plans for delivery, cold-brew coffee, wine and beer service, and housemade ice-cream sandwiches are afoot, as are set daily specials like fish tacos, Piron’s take on fried chicken, and a “very cheesy” dish irresistibly named Mac & Sleaze. Rosie’s Hot Buns is located at 642 Monroe Ave. It is open Monday-Wednesday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. and Thursday-Saturday 11 a.m.-midnight. Prices range from $2 to $10. For more information, call 2705597 or visit rosieshotbuns.com.

In the raw

Local devotees of raw food and its health benefits probably already know about Damaris Pinedo and her juices, which now

Presented by Corn Hill Navigation and Pittsford Wines, the Sam Patch wine-tasting cruises are back for a fifth year, providing aspiring oenophiles with the opportunity to learn about wines as the lovely Erie Canal provides a changing backdrop. The 90-minute cruises, which travel from Schoen Place to Bushnell’s Basin, occur on various Wednesday and Friday evenings and cover topics ranging from the wines of South America to celebrity-owned vineyards. Advance tickets are $26 per person; get more details at samandmary.org or call 662-5748.

have a permanent home at 713 Park Ave. The certified holistic health coach recently celebrated the grand opening of Just Juice 4 Life, a charming juice bar that crafts fresh, seasonal blends of fruits and vegetables, along with smoothies and other raw-food nibbles both vegan and gluten-free. Pinedo freezes some of her creations, too; not long ago I enjoyed a refreshing mix of pineapple, parsley, and cucumber that was a far cry from the popsicles of my youth. Just Juice 4 Life, which still maintains its Sunday outpost at the Brighton Market, also offers workshops as well as various juice cleansing programs; call 2708202 or visit foodsthatfeed.com to learn more.

Thai Lao Restaurant has shut its doors at 309 University Avenue after just over a year in business. Sully’s Brickyard Pub, at one time tucked away on the South Avenue extension downtown, is now closed. Monty’s Korner, which sat where East Avenue meets Alexander Street, is no more.

Farm aid

Opening

On ‘cue

Street in the former Grotto space, serving Mexican food and housing what it bills as Rochester’s first beer wall. Call 546-6150 to learn more, or visit tequilalocorochester.com. During Jazz Fest the Toronto-based Yogen Früz chain debuted its downtown Rochester location on Gibbs Street, making it convenient for anyone to pop into Eastman Place for their frozen-yogurt fix. Do some advance work at yogenfruz.com.

Erin Bullock’s Mud Creek Farm is hosting a farm-to-table dinner benefit to raise funds for the CSA farm and its converted electric tractor. The dinner, which includes a silent auction and tour of the Victor farm, takes place on Wednesday, July 10, with cocktail hour beginning at 5 p.m. Tickets start at $100; make reservations by calling 315-212-2916. For more details visit mudcreekfarm.com.

The annual Big Rib BBQ & Blues Fest goes down Thursday, July 11-Sunday, July 14, with pitmasters from around the country converging on the Highland Park Festival Site

Closings

Tequila Loco is now open at 7 Lawrence

Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

DISC JOCKEYS ULTIMATE FRISBEE IN ROCHESTER [ FEATURE ] BY KATHY LALUK

“UUUUUUP!!!” Players’ voices echo in a cacophony of varying pitches and intensities. My eyes dart away from my mark and go immediately to the sky. A small white disc cuts through the clear blue sky toward the end zone — a good 25 feet ahead of me and my mark. She sprints toward the end zone, I chase after her. Why the hell did I pick the fastest player to mark? Running at full speed, we simultaneously leap for the disc, our outstretched fingers mere centimeters apart. WHOOSH! The other player snatches the disc out of the air, scoring a point. I’m left standing red in the face, out of breath, and slightly embarrassed that I missed it. “Good bid!” I hear players from both teams shout to me from the sideline, as I stand totally in awe not only of how good the other players are at my first Ultimate Frisbee game, but also at the sportsmanship in this competitive, football-like game. There is no shortage of Ultimate players in the Rochester area. From casual, lessorganized match-ups among friends (and strangers) on nice days in Ellison and other area parks, to organized league play on weekends throughout the spring and summer, to Rochester’s first professional team, the local Ultimate scene is thriving — and growing. The game has evolved from its low-key beginnings on college campuses. It’s still got the same laid-back vibe, but it’s no longer just for frat boys or hippies looking for a break from football practice and 10 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Rochester Dragons Final 2013 Home Game VS. NEW YORK EMPIRE | SATURDAY, JULY 6, 7 P.M. WEBSTER SCHROEDER HIGH SCHOOL, 875 RIDGE ROAD, WEBSTER $7 | ROCHESTERDRAGONS.COM

hacky-sack. During my first game, I stood shoulder-to-shoulder with men and women twice my age, as well as a young man barely out of high school. “Anyone can play,” says Tanya Beiswenger, captain for the team called Dirt in the Greater Rochester Area Disc Association’s Spring Fling league. “Literally, anyone.”  

Humble beginnings

Ultimate Frisbee (or simply “Ultimate,” since the term Frisbee is trademarked) has been around for years, but has seen a surge in popularity over the last few decades. Many credit a group of high-school students with inventing the sport at Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey, in the late 1960’s. The sport quickly gained popularity on college campuses; the first-ever official Ultimate game on a college campus was between Rutgers and Princeton in 1972. The first College Nationals, made up exclusively of collegiate teams, took place in 1984, with Stanford taking the title. As the sport picked up momentum, the first players’ associations formed in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, giving more structure

to the then-loosely organized activity. While the laid-back pick-up tradition is still very much ingrained in the fabric of the sport itself, things have grown more competitive, as more traditional athletes get their hands on a disc and catch “Ultimate fever,” as some players call it. In 1979, the Ultimate Players Association (now USA Ultimate) was formed, and since then has been a driving force in growing the sport and organizing tournaments across the country. The Fitness Industry Association lists Ultimate as among the fastest-growing team sports in the country. In 2008 (the most recent year for data), there were an estimated 4.9 million ultimate players in the United States. Sean Donnellan, a player for the Rochester Dragons Ultimate team and board member for the Greater Rochester Area Disc Association, says that there are as many as 4,000 regular Ultimate players In the Greater Rochester area. “It’s hard to put an exact number on it, since many people play pickup games,” Donnellan says. A pick-up game is more casual than league or professional play. “We’re very accepting,” says Sarah Burns, an Ultimate player and wife

of Dragons captain T.J. Burns. “Just show up and bring your dark shirt and your light shirt and someone will bring a Frisbee and you’re all set to get hooked.”  

Game play

To say that Ultimate is fast-paced is an understatement. Just watching a game can be dizzying to the inexperienced viewer, but in a good way. Ultimate combines the non-stop movement and athletic endurance required by soccer with the passing and strategic skills of basketball. Just substitute a swirling piece of airborne plastic for the traditional ball. Although only seven team members are on the field at a time, teams typically have at least 12 to 15 players on the roster because of the constant running. “You need to be able to sub in and let people rest pretty frequently,” says local player Dooley Maring. Play starts with the pull, where one team throws the disc from one end of the field to the other. The other team, waiting on the opposite side of the field, can either catch the disc or let it drop, then pick it up and play it. Once in possession of the disc, a player isn’t locked in — he or she can pivot on one foot. This is especially helpful when trying to find an open teammate to whom you can pass. Sometimes they’re ahead of you, but sometimes, you need to pass backwards to a teammate just to keep the play moving. (As in basketball, players are not allowed to travel with the disc. They are only allowed a

Left: Elizabeth Way warms up prior to a game of Ultimate at Ellison Park organized by the Greater Rochester Area Disc Association. PHOTO BY MATT BURKHARTT Center: GRADA estimates that up to 4,000 people play Ultimate locally. PHOTO BY KATHY LALUK Right: Jon Bain, a member of the Rochester Dragons, Rochester's professional Ultimate team. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

few steps to stop themselves once they catch the disc.) If a pass is incomplete, intercepted, or caught out of bounds, the opposing team immediately gains possession and tries to move the disc in the other direction. Once a player has the disc, it becomes a hot potato. He or she has 10 seconds to get rid of it, or it’s considered a “stall.” Defensive players (often called the “markers”) are allowed and encouraged to count aloud. If the player doesn’t throw the disc by the “T” of 10, possession switches teams. Because of this, play move quickly. Your team can be on offense one second and back on defense the next, then back to offense just a few seconds later. “If we drop it, there’s no debating it: it’s a turnover, so all of a sudden we’re on defense,” says Dooley Maring. “Then if they make a play and it gets knocked down or whatever, it’s our disc and we’re back on offense.” If a team successfully gets the disc into the end zone, it gets a point and the teams switch sides. The team that scored then gets the next pull. Play continues until a predetermined condition is reached (a certain score or a time limit). This varies depending on the league and level of skill/competitiveness. Although Ultimate resembles many traditional sports in terms of play, team make-up, and objective, it differs greatly with what’s called “spirit of the game.” There are no referees, no umpires, no officials calling penalties, etc. (except in professional cases; more on that in a bit). It’s up to the players

themselves to act sportsmanlike and respect the rules. Sometimes that leads to players calling fouls on themselves. Other times, it can lead to disagreements. With no one in black and white to make the final call, the teams are obligated to talk it out civilly until they can reach an agreement or compromise. “It’s what makes Ultimate different from any other game,” says Lynne Boucher, a local Ultimate player and coach. “It makes it a really different playing environment than just about any other sport out there.” That spirit is fiercely upheld by GRADA. The organization, founded in 1999, prides itself on recruiting and encouraging new players and expanding the sport in the Rochester area. It boasts about 1,000 regular members who play in recreational, intermediate, advanced, and women’s leagues, as well as puts on regular tournaments throughout the spring, summer, and fall. Ultimate is pretty much a year-round sport. Even though Rochester winters aren’t exactly conducive to playing sports outdoors, some teams adapt and play in indoor leagues to feed their Ultimate habit. Members of GRADA even organize an outdoor tournament in the wintertime to feed their habit. It’s called WART, short for “What Are we Thinking?” Despite its growing popularity, Ultimate isn’t a sport that’s on everyone’s radar. “You see all these amazing plays on ESPN from other sports, and as Ultimate players, we look at it and go, ‘That happens in Ultimate every

week,’” Beiswenger says. “But people who have experienced Ultimate can’t wait to pass it on to someone else.” Beiswenger, like many other Ultimate players, got her start through an impromptu invite to play in college. “I played other sports in college, and one of my friends invited me to play in a pick-up game once and it was love at first play,” Beiswenger says. “I’ve been playing ever since.” Boucher, who says she’s been playing Ultimate since about six knee surgeries ago, has been coaching Ultimate teams for the last five years. The Brighton High School team (there are about 20 local high-school ultimate teams) that she coaches won the local championships and placed third at the state level. She also coaches at Nazareth College, where she helped inspire some budding professional players get hooked on the sport, including current Dragons player and GRADA President Joe Becker. Becker started playing pick-up games at Nazareth while in grad school. “I just got hooked,” he says. “Now, all of my friends are Ultimate players. I spend four or five days a week committed to something Ultimaterelated,” Becker says. “We were talking the other day and were like, ‘What if we never played Ultimate, what would our lives be like?’ We’d have a completely different circle of friends, a completely different lifestyle because it’s easy to find all sorts of people willing to play.”

Going to the pros

With more and more people are getting hooked on the sport, a second national league was formed in 2012, the American Ultimate Disc League. In its inaugural season, there were just eight teams, including the Buffalo Hunters — which is now the Rochester Dragons. Just a year after it became the first Ultimate team to play in the AUDL in Upstate New York, the team moved to Rochester and renamed itself. Several of the original Buffalo Hunters team now play as Rochester Dragons. Becker says he considered trying out when the team was based in Buffalo, but he didn’t want to drive an hour and a half away to play a home game. “When I heard the team was coming to Rochester, I was pumped and was like, ‘I have to try out,’” Becker says. Twenty-three players were eventually picked, and the Dragons are just wrapping up a successful first season. Home games are played at Webster Schroeder High School to more than 100 spectators per game. Numbers aside, the fans’ enthusiasm is infectious. By the second quarter, I was shouting “Up!” and cheering along with everyone in the stands. The team plays under AUDL rules, which have been adapted slightly from the original rules of the game to ensure competitive and professional play. The most significant continues on page 28

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ JAZZ ]

Nancy Kelly Sunday, July 28. Lovin’ Cup. 300 Park Point Dr. $10. 7 p.m. 292-9940. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Zedd Wednesday, September 11. Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $25-$30. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ POP/ROCK ]

Frightened Rabbit Saturday, October 19. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $16-$20. 9 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

Baauer and R.L. Grime WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 PEARL NIGHT CLUB, 349 EAST AVE. 8 P.M. | $18, 18+ | 325-5660

[ ELECTRONIC/HIP-HOP ] Straight outta Brooklyn, Baauer is going to drop the bass on you when he drops the beat. With a mix of hip-hop and dub as well as some of the most interesting samples I’ve heard in some time, his music has definitely got that booty-shaking mix. R.L. Grime (pictured) might have some of that slower Southern feel, and he is fresher on the scene, but his airy mixes are no less entrancing. Ryan Hemsworth will be down from Canada to show us how it’s done with the drum loops. — BY SUZAN PERO

Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin SATURDAY, JULY 6 ROCHESTER ZEN CENTER, 7 ARNOLD PARK 6:30 P.M. | FREE | RZC.ORG [ WORLD ] Shakuhachi is a Japanese flute that has been

used by Zen Buddhist monks in the practice of suizen (blowing meditation) for centuries. It is said that a single note can bring one to a state of enlightenment. The sound of shakuhachi is ancient but not obscure. Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin is one of a few grand masters of the traditional shakuhachi outside of Japan. Seldin has been nominated for both an Oscar and a Grammy, and has performed at venues including Carnegie Hall and Metropolitan Museum of Art.

— BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

12 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Music

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Even Steven. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. The Maria Gillard Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. The Squirrel Hillbillies. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Kid Rock

Shemekia Copeland performed Friday, June 28, at the East & Chestnut Stage as part of the 2013 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

FRIDAY, JULY 5 DARIEN LAKE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 6:45 P.M. | $29 | LIVENATION.COM [ ROCK ] Among all the concerts I’ve ever attended, it was

a Kid Rock show that inspired me to play a bit of hooky. What aroused my wayward spirit was crushing tunes and the ridiculousness of Kid Rock and Twisted Brown Trucker, a half-band, half-circus spectacle from Detroit. Kid Rock is blessed with a knack for self-promotion and a penchant for gimmicks, despite ditching those poledancers from back in the day. You betcha that there is still a place for a large American flag or a giant middle finger to be unfurled sometime during a number. But Kid Rock has mostly morphed into grown-up rock.

—BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

The Ghost Peppers

Wrapping up the Jazz Fest Friday night I saw a re-tooled and reinvigorated Shemekia Copeland on the Chestnut Street Stage at the Jazz Festival. The weight this beautiful lady has lost has simply been shifted over to the sound of her band. Man, these cats played heavy — twin slide guitars and a bottom end heavier than a Puerto Rican Toyota low-rider. Copeland’s music leans a little on the funky side, and she strikes me as a soul-shouter at heart. But mixed together it’s a hell of a bluesy kick in the gut. She was magnificent. (FD) Youn Sun Nah & Ulf Wakenius it would

[ FUNK ] In-the-know foodies will tell you that the ghost pepper is, simply put, the hottest frickin’ thing you could ever think of putting in your mouth. How hot is a ghost pepper? It’s so hot that scientists in India have actually considered weaponizing the hybrid chili. Seriously. So, if you’re going to name your band after this particular condiment, you better bring some spice to the table. The Ghost Peppers do just that. This Rochester five-piece folds together elements of classic R&B and soul, gritty blues, and good ol’ N’awlins funk. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

have to be “otherworldly,” because they made sounds I hadn’t heard before in this one. Nah came out alone to begin the duo’s first set Friday at the Lutheran Church. With only a thumb piano, she proceeded to sing “My Favorite Things.” If John Coltrane reduced the song’s verse down to two chords in his famous modal rendition, Nah reduced it further, down to one chord — and somehow made it work. She could do this because she had one of the most remarkable voices I’ve ever heard.

DOES SEX HURT?

She was capable of everything from operatic high notes to Björk-like punk histrionics. When she sang she used her hands and arms in an evocative upper-body ballet that accented everything she sang. And her uniqueness went beyond her voice. At one point she soloed on kazoo, but somehow converted it to a muted trumpet. While Nah was reinventing the human voice, Wakenius was doing the same thing with a simple, six-string acoustic guitar. He played percussive rhythms and lightningfast leads and kept a bass going — all of this at the same time. The whole set was a high point, but I especially liked their rendition of Trent Reznor’s strangely beautiful song, “Hurt.” The church was as full as I have ever seen it and very few people left before the end of the concert. (RN) Visit the Music Blog at rochestercitynewspaper.com for reviews of dozens of shows from the 2013 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival.

Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Anthony Gianovola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Maria Gillard Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Summer@Eastman:Bob Sneider Combo. Kilbourn Hall,

26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10. continues on page 14

BUY - SELL

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES 1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 PM

Answer: CITY is on FACEBOOK.

Call Linda Leoni at 585-275-3160 or email linda_leoni@urmc.rochester.edu.

Summer@Eastman: Guitar Faculty Recital - Petar Kodzas & Friends. Eastman East Wing

Solve the pictogram:

Are you between 18 and 50 years of age and have pain with intercourse and tampon insertion? The University of Rochester is conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled research study sponsored by the National Institute of Health to determine the effectiveness of Gabapentin compared to placebo in reducing intercourse pain. Participants will receive Gabapentin one half of the time and placebo (inactive treatment) one half of the time, study-related care at no cost, and $50 per visit, or a total of $300 if all six visits are completed.

Sands Drive. 758-5300. 8 p.m. $15-$50.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE & RON NETSKY

If I had to pick just one word to describe

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 CLUB AT WATER STREET, 204 N. WATER ST. 9:30 P.M. | $5-$10 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM

[ CLASSICAL ]

Celebrate America with the RPO. CMAC, 3355 Marvin

244-1999 • Theantiqueguy.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Music

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s

Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

Giving the drummer his due

[ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. ,. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 9050222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-4544830. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 585-2883930. 9 p.m. Free.

JD McPherson SATURDAY, JULY 6 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 9:30 P.M. | SOLD OUT | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM JDMCPHERSON.COM [ PROFILE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

For 29 of the 35 years that drummer Jason Smay has spent on the globe, his snappy beats have gotten asses out of seats and started them shaking. An amazingly solid, in-the-pocket performer, he’s kept time with an array of classic rock ’n’ rollers. Smay has done time — and kept it — in groups like Steve Grills and the Roadmasters, The Frantic Flattops (with yours truly), The Lustre Kings, The Hi-Risers, and Los Straitjackets. His current gig is with the rhythm-and-blues rocker from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, JD McPherson. With the release of “Signs and Signifiers,” McPherson has exploded on the scene, turning heads with his incendiary shows, showing up in music rags all over the map, being named by NPR as an “Artist You Should Know,” and appearing on “Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” “The Late Show with David Letterman,” and “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.” At the heart of this chaos is its rock ‘n’ roll beat. And at the heart of the beat is Smay, the Rochester drummer who just wanted to play the saxophone. “My dad played drums in the 1960’s,” Smay says. “But just for fun. My parents couldn’t afford a saxophone. So, in about the third grade, I started banging away on my dad’s drums. He used to always tell me, ‘If you want to play rock ’n’ roll that’s fine, but you should play jazz first to get some background. If you want to be anybody, you’ve got to start out on jazz first.” His parents arranged for lessons from teachers who covered the ins and outs of a musician’s life, along with the paradiddles and fills. “My parents always found guys that were working musicians,” says Smay. “As opposed to guys who were just teachers with no life experience.” Smay began hitting open-mic nights and sitting in with more seasoned cats, some more than twice his age. “I always seemed 14 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Rochester drummer Jason Smay (second from left) has played with the Hi-Risers and Los Straitjackets, and now beats the kit for up-and-coming national rhythm-and-blues star JD McPherson (second from right). PROVIDED PHOTO

to hook up with older guys because of my taste in music,” he says. “I played with Steve Grills when I was like 20. Before that, I was playing with Janet Beaman, who has since passed away.” But Smay’s road to the road began with local trio The Hi-Risers. Smay had to light the fuse and get the band on the road once he joined. “It was more a sense of, why not?” he says. “Greg [Townson] had toured a bunch. And I was like, ‘I’ve got this connection in Chicago, I’ve got this connection in New York.’ And I guess I didn’t take no for an answer. I pushed and pushed and pushed, and you know, who doesn’t want to do that stuff?...I played with those guys for about 10 years and in that time I had joined Los Straitjackets.” Head Straitjacket Eddie Angel had first caught wind of Smay’s tenacious trap-set prowess when The Lustre Kings (with Smay on drums) backed him up on one of his “Guitar Party” tours. Angel also took the Hi-Risers, who were also on Angel’s Spinout Record label, on a threeweek Christmas tour. So when a spot on the throne opened up, Smay got the call, packed his drums, and donned a Luchador mask. For roughly four years Smay was in both bands, and even got Hi-Riser guitarist Townson a slot in Los Straitjackets when the band’s second guitarist was diagnosed with cancer. But Smay was forced to choose when he joined McPherson and the tour demands doubled. “It went from 100 nights a year to 200 nights a year,” he says. “I used to have more time on my hands to sit and enjoy music. But it’s getting harder and harder.” But he’s happy where he’s at, and at the success he’s enjoying. “I think it’s one of those things where it’s a quality product and it stands out,” he says

of McPherson’s music. “But there’s also that X-factor of the right place at the right time. I really love rhythm and blues — Chicago-style rhythm and blues — it’s my first love and this is in that vein. But the lyrics are a little more modern, so it’s not dated.” McPherson and his band have hit some enviable working-musician milestones, like recording at the legendary Sun Studios in Memphis, and appearing on national TV. On that last score, Smay had to fend for his drums as well as beat on them. David Letterman wanted Smay’s drums — bad. “He collects vintage drums,” Smay says. “He was standing at my drums tapping them before we went on. ‘So, tell me about these drums.’ And I’m like, ‘They’re just old Radio Kings,’ and he’s like, ‘OK, OK, good. What year are they from?’ And I’m like, ‘They’re mid-40’s.’ And he’s like, ‘How much you want for them?’ ‘Aw, man, I can’t sell them. They’re my drums, I need ’em.’ He had his assistant there with a checkbook. ‘No, no. Seriously, how much you want for them?’” The band is recording its second album — the first with Smay — in September at bass player Jimmy Sutton’s Hi-Style Studios. and plans to continue circling the globe. Smay comes home often to his wife and three sons (ages 11, 7, and 4) and to wrench on his late 70’s Monte Carlo or old Shovel Head. Smay says he’s going to stick this one out. You’ve got to wonder what band could call to make him jump ship. “I don’t know, man,” he says. “All the groups I like are no longer together.”

Medicine Wednesdays w/ Thunder Body. Abilene Bar

& Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ POP/ROCK ]

Allegro. Ontario Beach Park,

4799 Lake Ave. 7 p.m. Free.

Bobby Henrie & The Gonerrs.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Dave Matthews Band. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 599-4641. 7 p.m. $40.50-$75. Joe Brucato & Friends. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 4 p.m. Call for info. Push. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. Rhythm Dogs. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Ten Ugly Bands Contest ft. Last Minute, Wilxy & Crump. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. Free.

Volahn w/Arizmenda, Bilirubin, Chillum, and Obsessor. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$10.

THURSDAY, JULY 4 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. 2 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Genesee Johnny. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Arshak Andriasov. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Irondequoit Concert Band. ,. 8 p.m. Irondequoit Town Hall, 1280 Titus Ave. Call for info.

RPO Independence Day Concert.

,. 9 p.m. Main Street Bridge, Downtown. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

DeeDee’s Wild College Party Summer Session Independence Day Party.

Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. ,. 7 p.m. Call for info.

July 4th Party ft. Richie Salvaggio, Jameson Alexander, DJ Steve Lo, and Mike DjGweedo Ferrante. ONE Nightclub

and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. ,. Call for info. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s

Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

5 Alarm Open Jam. The

Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 5853193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. ,. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co., 739

Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 585288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ] The Buddhahood. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 585319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

SINGER-SONGWRITER | CAMMY ENAHARO

Local songstress Cammy Enaharo’s tunes are truly a breath of fresh air. The songwriter recently released her first EP, and is currently a common presence on the Rochester scene. Enaharo’s instrument of choice is her baritone ukulele, which pairs perfectly with her hypnotic, contralto voice. Thanks to her sultry chops, comparisons to the legendary Lauryn Hill and the late Amy Winehouse are both imminent and appropriate. Enaharo’s style of music fits in nicely with the recent female singer-songwriter trend, joining musicians such as Ingrid Michaelson, Brandi Carlile, and Sara Bareilles in a movement toward confessional, vulnerable songwriting. Cammy Enaharo performs on Tuesday, July 9, 8 p.m. at Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. Abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY LEAH CREARY Hall Pass. Pelican’s Nest, 566

River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info.

Kate Reece’s Great Big ‘Merican Birthday Bash ft. Fowls, MD Woods, Sexy Teenagers, Declan Ryan, and Jenna Giuliani. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. $3-$5.

Party in the Park: Dawes w/Doug Paisley, Violet Mary. Riverside

Festival Site, 148 Exchange Blvd. 5:30 p.m. $2-$5. Skycoasters. Perinton Park, 99 O’Connor Rd. 12:30 p.m. Call for info ,. 8 p.m. Town of Brighton. Call for info. Time Line. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 2 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, JULY 5 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Barry’s Crossing. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 8:30 p.m. Free. Dave North. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

Hartwig. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Jony James Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Play Ball! RPO at Frontier Field.

Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 8:30 p.m. Free w/game admission.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] On the House Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. ,. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. continues on page 16

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[ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band.

Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free.

1 mile East of Lollypop Farm

Macedon, NY • 585-223-1222 OPEN JULY 4TH • 8:30AM-5PM JULY 5, 6, 7 • 8:30AM-6PM

WaysideGardenCenter.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

FRIDAY, JULY 5 DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 9 p.m. Free.

The Dubstep Nite Light Paint Party. Main Street Armory, 900

E. Main St. 232-3221. 8 p.m. $30-$60.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585-6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free.

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140

Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. ,. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Amanda Montone Duo.

Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Cousin Vinny. Manetti’s Restaurant, 726 South Main Street. 394-3460. 6 p.m. Free.

Happy Hour: Hannah Walpole.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. Free. The Russell Fielder Trio. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Jeff Campbell Combo. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes.

The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585-6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free.

[ R&B ]

All White Affair ft. Jagged Edge, DJ Big Rig, DJ Backspin.

Diplomat Party House, 1956 Lyell Ave. 647-1566. 9 p.m. $50-$65. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Absolutes w/White Woods, Anchorage Nebraska, and John Valenti. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8.

Back In The Day w/Heavenly Chill Billies. Nola’s Restaurant &

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Big Mean Sound Machine. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. Call for info. The Fools. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 7 p.m. Call for info. Independence Fest Day 1. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Kid Rock. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 599-4641. 6:45 p.m. $24.

Moonlight Stroll Concert: Naked Grey. Sonnenberg Gardens and

Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St. 394-4922. 8 p.m. $4-$9. Orient Express Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. 924-3232. Call for info. That Party Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Thoroughbred. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 585-3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, JULY 6 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. The Pint And Goblet Tavern, 300 Village Square. 6244386. 6 p.m. Free.

Latino Night ft. Tony Vega, Next Level. Frontier Field, 1

Morrie Silver Way. 6:05 p.m. $7-$11 presale.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Sweet T and Johnny B. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert Solo. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free.

The Pickpockets w/Kneptune, Barry Brothers Band, and The End of America. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Won by One. Northside Church of Christ, 634 Hudson Ave. 2663140. 5 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band.

[ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic Night. Mooseberry

Café, 2555 Baird Rd. 585-3489022. 6 p.m. Call for info.

16 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. The King Bees. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

SINGER-SONGWRITER | JOHN VALENTI

JAZZ | PAUL HOFMANN

Songwriter John Valenti has a vintage charm that is rarely seen in our local scene. Similar to artists like St. Vincent and My Brightest Diamond, Valenti mixes an obvious love for standards with lo-fi, atmospheric production. His gift for melody, combined with sweeping strings and a simple, but catchy chord structure recalls the music of early rock-and-roll greats. Valenti himself writes that the world inside his mind “consists of a syrupy mixture of 60’s bubblegum pop, Cole Porter music, and black-and-white melodrama.” All of those influences are made apparent both through his live show, and throughout his EP, “Passive Aggressives Anonymous.”

Paul Hofmann’s annual summer concert will pay tribute to Dave Brubeck. He’ll be playing some of Brubeck’s best-known tunes like “Blue Rondo A La Turk,” “It’s A Raggy Waltz,” and “In Your Own Sweet Way,” and some less familiar works. Hofmann will be supported by some of Rochester’s finest players, including Howard Potter on vibraharp; Tom Phillips, piano; Doug Stone, tenor saxophone; Jeff Campbell, bass; and Mike Melito, drums. Paul Hofmann performs Wednesday, July 10, 7:30 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. $10. 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu. — BY RON NETSKY

John Valenti performs with The Absolutes, White Woods, and Anchorage Nebraska on Friday, July 5, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. Bugjar.com. — BY LEAH CREARY

Vans Warped Tour. Darien Lake

Nightfall. The Beale New Orleans

Vinyl Orange Ottoman, Genesee Johnny. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Grille and Bar-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Ronnie Nyogetsu Reishin Seldin. Rochester Zen Center, 7 Arnold Park. 473-9180. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat

Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-4544830. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 585-754-4645. 10 p.m. $5. Upscale Saturdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. first Saturday of every month. 21+. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Marco Amadio. Bayside Pub,

279 Lake Rd. 585-323-1224. Call for info.

The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Call for info.

PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 5994641. 11 a.m. $23.50-$37.50.

[ R&B ] BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Mainstream Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. 924-3232. Call for info. Mitty & The Followers. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Alysia Groth Band w/Paul Strowe. Schooner’s Riverside

Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 2 p.m. Call for info Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 2 p.m. Call for info. Bangarang. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

The Chairs & Men Behaving Badly. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill,

52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Gigantour 2013 ft. Megadeth, Device, Newsted, Black Label Society, Death Division, and HELLYEAH. CMAC, 3355 Marvin

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Seth Martino and Billy Eberts Acoustic Duo. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 4 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Young Artists in Concert - A Celebration of Winners. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jaded Heart w/Steve Piper. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Independence Fest Day 2 ft. Heene Boyz, Forgive the Forgotton. Montage Music Hall, Kung Fu Grip w/Mochester, Ruby Shooz. Nola’s Restaurant &

St. 585-454-4830. 10 p.m. Call for info.

50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 4 p.m. $5-$10.

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 6 p.m. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ]

The GoCats. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. 585-323-1224. Call for info.

Green Party Rock for Rochester: Routine Involvements, House Majority, and Wixley & Crump.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

Punk Roc Hip Hop Woodstock (In the Roc). ,. 6 p.m. Manhattan

Square Park, 353 Court St. Free.

The Skycoasters Summer Beach Party. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River

St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info. Todd Bradley. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-3231020. 4 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, JULY 8 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

[ COUNTRY ]

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Sands Drive. 758-5300. 4:30 p.m. $25-$45.

Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. Call for info. Free.

Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

SUNDAY, JULY 7 The Galileo Band. Sticky Lips

[ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel &

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

Manic Monday Retro Dance: DJ MaryKate. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Calligraphy. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. The Seth Uptown Duo. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Summer Jazz Studies Faculty Concert: Bill Tiberio Band. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

TUESDAY, JULY 9 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Cammy Enaharo. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9 p.m. Free. Hannah & Maggie. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd. 585-624-1390. 7 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG.

[ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Brighton Symphony Orchestra: Summer Concert. ,. 6:30 p.m.

Buckland Park. 1341 Westfall Rd. Call for info.

Summer@Eastman - Summer Sing: Mendelssohn “Elijah”. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $5. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. ,. Call for info. Free.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 585-454-4830. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 2883930. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. 340-8663. 7 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Roc City Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Amy Montrois Trio. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Peace Be Still w/Cottage Jefferson, Keeler, and Black Racer. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

METAL | MEGADETH

Rumi’s

If you didn’t know better, you might think that Dave Mustaine got dealt a lame hand when he was fired from Metallica in 1983. In reality, his band Megadeth has been one of the most durable and influential thrash metal outfits of all time, having sold more 50 million records worldwide, while garnering consistent critical acclaim. (And, by the way, the band has never recorded a Bob Seger song. Just saying.) The group’s latest album, “Super Collider,” its 14th studio effort, is filled with the trademark technicality and devastating guitar solos that have defined Mustaine and company’s sound for almost 30 years. Black Label Society, Device, Hellyeah, Newsted, and Death Division also perform as “Gigantour” stops at CMAC. Megadeth performs Saturday, July 6, 4:30 p.m. at CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $32.45-$54.90. cmacevents.com. — DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

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Jazz Studies Faculty Concert: Paul Hofmann, piano. Kilbourn

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 7 p.m. Free. Jumbo Shrimp. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-3231020. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Maria Gillard Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Soulfish. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 7:15 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s

[ BLUES ]

The Ghost Peppers, The Greener Grass Band •. ,. 9:30

p.m. $5-$10.

Natalie B Band. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

SENSEational MusicArt Night w/SoulSword. ,. 7:15 p.m.

Pieters Family Life Center. 1025 Commons Way. $5. RPO. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Summer

Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10. Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

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Classical Summer road trip with the RPO [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

According to Ward Stare, the only place you’ll want to be on July 19 is at the Eastman Theatre, where he’ll lead the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra in “three of the greatest works by three of the greatest composers.” Stare, a 30-year-old Rochester native, speaks of Beethoven, Mozart, and Wagner the way that some speak of summer vacations in national parks or Disneyland. He uses words like “dynamic,” “energetic,” “muscular,” and “jampacked,” and he promises that this concert will be an opportunity for us to hear the RPO “in all its glory in just the first piece.” The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra gives nearly 200 concerts per year, reaching 250,000 audience members. But if you think the RPO concert season coincides neatly with the school year, you are making the same mistake I once made when I was only looking at the traditional classical concerts performed on Thursday and Saturday nights at the Eastman Theatre. So this summer, forget about that gas-guzzling camper that only results in complaints from the kids, and get out to multiple venues where you can find RPO performances from Mozart to Main Street, complete with fireworks and baseball. Your family summer vacation with the RPO starts with a bang on Wednesday, July 3, at 8 p.m. at the CMAC Performing Arts Center in Canandaigua, for favorites like “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” “America the Beautiful,” and the “1812 Overture.” It was actually Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky who composed that last iconic favorite, which Americans have co-opted into a celebration of our own Independence Day. While there won’t be cannon fire, there will be fireworks. Michael Butterman conducts, and the orchestra will be joined by the Rochester Oratorio Society and guest narrator Paul Burgett. For RPO free concerts that are closer to home, you have only to travel to the Main Street Bridge of downtown Rochester for a free concert on Thursday, July 4. Butterman will also conduct this concert, and it will also be followed by fireworks. Another variation on this concert theme of the RPO, classics, and fireworks takes place Friday, July 5. It all begins with a Red Wings game against the Pawtucket Red Sox, followed by the RPO concert, followed by fireworks. The RPO is out-and-about and free again on July 10, at Ontario Beach Park with guest conductor Matthew Kraemer. The summer season will conclude with a Pops 18 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

concert featuring Broadway star Matthew Morrison, a lead on TV’s “Glee.” While the extensive performance schedule for the RPO events from July 3 through July 20 may surprise you, Stare isn’t surprised — he’s been attending RPO concerts with his family since he was about 8 years old. “The RPO had a huge part in shaping my early musical development,” says Stare. “It’s the first really great orchestra that I ever heard growing up.” Stare, who got hooked on Beethoven when he was about 5 years old, says he always wanted to be a conductor, even while developing his talents as a trombonist. He attended Pittsford Mendon High School and participated in the Rochester Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. At 18, Stare was appointed principal trombonist by the Lyric Opera of Chicago. He played a 26-week season with them while pursuing his conducting dreams by studying in Europe and at Aspen’s American Academy of Conducting. Stare made his conducting debut in 2007 with the Cleveland Orchestra. Whether it’s his youth or his own experiences, Stare is a big fan of parents bringing children to orchestra concerts. He says that the concert on July 19 is a great opportunity for just this, whether it’s the first time for an orchestra outing as a family or a routine activity. When asked for a script that parents could use to get their kids to eagerly come along to the RPO, Stare had no problems diving right into a description of the Wagner piece that will be on the program, “Overture to The Flying Dutchman.” Stare says the piece was featured in a “Pirates of the Caribbean” movie — a helpful pitch that should cut against any perception children might have that classical means music to put them to sleep. The story of “The Flying Dutchman” was inspired by Wagner’s escape from Riga to London, Stare says. “He was behind with his creditors and they seized his passport. Wagner bribed the ship’s captain to let him sneak out, but the weather at sea was so bad that the trip that should have taken five days took two weeks, and they were nearly lost at sea as they had to go all the way up and around Norway. Wagner based the opera on those themes and imagery. It’s dynamic, energetic, muscular, and has lots of bass,” says Stare, adding, “And that’s just the first 12 minutes of the concert!” Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony received no

less an enthusiastic description from Stare, and it, too, featured prominently in a movie, “The

Rochester native Ward Stare will conduct the RPO on July 19 as part of the orchestra’s summer season. PHOTO BY SUZY GORMAN

King’s Speech.” “Anyone who remembers the final scene where the king finally delivers his speech can come out to hear it live in its original context of the full symphony,” says Stare. Stare describes the symphony as “classic Beethoven,” containing elements of “struggle, journey, and a celebration of life.” Going back to how you message for kids, Stare points out that the final movement, in particular, is a rousing climax that gives the orchestra “a real work-out.” The third work on the program is the Mozart clarinet concerto, featuring RPO’s own Kenny Grant. Stare and Grant have a relationship going back to Stare’s days playing with the Rochester Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. Stare sums up his pitch for the Rochester community to turn out for the concert by paraphrasing jazz legend Duke Ellington. “He said it something like this: there’s good music and bad music. That’s true for classical, pop, any kind of music. I’m a big fan of the RPO and of conducting. I just want people to be excited about it because it’s worth being excited about.”

2013 RPO Summer Season Celebrate America with the RPO Wednesday, July 3. CMAC, Canandaigua. 8 p.m. $15-$50. Independence Day Concert Thursday, July 4. Main Street Bridge, Rochester. 9 p.m. Free. Play Ball! Friday, July 5. Frontier Field. Approx. 8:30 p.m. Included w/admission to Red Wings game. An Evening with the Symphony Saturday, July 6. Arrowhead Park, Inlet. 7:30 p.m. $10-$110. Wegmans’ Concerts by the Shore Wednesday, July 10. Ontario Beach Park. 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple B’rith Kodesh Concert Thursday, July 11. Temple B’rith Kodesh. 7:30 p.m. Summer Spectacular with Fireworks Friday, July 12. SUNY Geneseo. 8:30 p.m. $5-$12. 90th Anniversary Celebration Saturday, July 13. Riverside Convention Center; Jeff Tyzik, conducts. 6 p.m. $200. Eastman Summer Conducting Institute Thursday, July 18. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. 8 p.m. $5-$15. Summer Classics Special Concert: Ward Stare Conducts Mozart and Beethoven Friday, July 19. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. 8 p.m. $50-$72. Summer Pops Special Concert: Matthew Morrison Saturday, July 20. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. 8 p.m. $24-$85. For more information call 454-2100 or visit rpo.org.

ART | FESTIVAL OF SOUND & LIGHT

I often wish I had been present to witness phenomenal artistic events in the past. For example, beginning in 1915, renowned Rochester architect Claude Bragdon dramatically transformed his architectural work throughout New York State by designing theatrical events and settings, which he called Festivals of Light and Song. The events took place at night and transformed previously familiar parks and spaces into wonderlands of music and lights. One event in New York City drew a crowd of more than 60,000 viewers.  On Friday, July 5, at 9:30 p.m., Writers and Books (740 University Ave.) will stage a rebirth of the Festivals of Light and Song, using images projected via 3D video mapping onto the façade of its Bragdon-designed building. This initial event in what is intended to be a “Festivals of Sound & Light” series will be a tribute to Bragdon, incorporating his images, words, and a selection of music he used in his own festival events a century ago. The event is free and open to the public. Bring lawn chairs. Prior to the light show, check out the Read, White & Blue Book Sale at Writers & Books, held 6-9 p.m. With the exception of consignment books from local authors, all paperbacks will be $1 and all hardcover books will be $3. Admission is free! For more information, call 473-2590 or visit wab.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Gallery r, 100 College Ave. “Alumni Invitational / New Work.” Through July 20. Featuring the work of RIT alumni Belinda Bryce, Bradley Butler, Elizabeth Coyne, Vincent Massaro, Jose-Enrique Portas. Reception July 5, 6-9 p.m. 585256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. Gallery Salon & Spa, 780 University Ave. Art Opening: Nicole Scanlon. galleryhair.com/events. Nu Movement, 716 University Ave. “Art by Day” by Bruce Day.. 7042889. lessonsattheloft.com. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Jen Vaccarella Art Show.. Through Aug 12. Reception July 8, 6-9 p.m. 360-2920. owlhouserochester. com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “The Finger Lakes: Above & Below” by Gloria Betlem.. Through Aug 16. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in the Welcome Center. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-noon. Reception Jul 10, 7 p.m. 385-7322. gloriabetlem.com. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Flower Child from the Flower City: Artworks by Kristina Kaiser. Through Jul 11. Reception Jul 5, 7-10 p.m. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com. [ CONTINUING ] Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. Reception May 3, 6 p.m. 585-3195999. acanthuscafe.com.

Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “Reflections” by The Silver Lake Art Group. Through July 26. artswyco.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Images of Faith” Mix Media Paintings by Richmond Futch Jr.. Through Jul 31. Reception Jun 7, 6-9 p.m. Live Music and Open Painting (Bring own supplies). 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Francesca Lalanne Jeune: “Morphogenesis.” Through July 31. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby’s Summer Showcase Art Opening. Through Jul 31. Featuring Rachel Dow, Peter Lazarski, Adam Maida, Topher Martin, Thievin’ Stephen, Mike Turzanski, Yews, Jason Vector, etc. Reception Jun 7 8 p.m. Benefit for Thievin’ Stephen hospital bill, live music plus live painting by Thievin’ Stephen at 8 p.m. $3 or suggested donation. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Gramma’s Cameras II,” Photography by Lori Horton Ball. Through Aug 31. Mon 9 a.m.9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.5:30 p.m. Reception Jun 21, 7-9 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. First Annual Highland Park Neighborhood Art Show. Through end of July. Opening Night Event: Friday June 14, 7-9 p.m. Portrait Nights: Wednesday June 19, 6-8 p.m. (July Portrait Night

Date TBA). 585-244-6787. highlandparkrochester.org. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. Reception Apr 12 4:30-7:30 p.m. 585-637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Colored Pencil Perspectives.” Through Aug 4. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Members of the Rochester Area Pencil Club. Reception Wed Jun 26, 4-6 p.m. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Canis lupus familiaris II by Gerry Szymanski. Through Jul 27. Reception Jun 7, 7-9 p.m. 585242-7840. gallery@equalgrounds. com. equalgrounds.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibition party Jun 14, 7:15-9:30 p.m., $18. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “Spiritual Moments” by Jim Hartsen. Through July 7. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Friday, June 14, 5-8:30 p.m. and Friday, July 5, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Petals Upon Petals,” Featuring Flawless Contemporary Realism by David Kerstetter.. Through Jul 31. Also featured are Roberto Salas and Ning Lee. MonFri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Sharon Stiller. Through Jul 19. thelittle.org. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Apartment One Gallery: “Simple Gifts: The Artwork of Sharon Leary and Anne Clements”. Through Aug 10. 585 243-6785. livingstonarts. org.; New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.” Through October 5. 585 243-6785. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m. 2329030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Mortal: A Portfolio of Woodcuts by Kiki Smith. Through Aug 25. Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. 3253145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. Reception Thu June 13, 7-9 p.m. 624-7740. millartcenter. com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org.; Expressions of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Reception Dec 6. Continues TFN Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785.; The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and

painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Buddhist & Asian Art.” Through Aug 24. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 6x6x2013. Through Jul 14. In gallery previews May 29-31, 1-10 p.m. Reception & artwork sale Jun 1, 6-10 p.m. ($5 admission, $20 per artwork). 461-2000. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Innovators and Legends: Generations in Textiles and Fiber. Through Aug 11. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. and Second Saturday, May 11, 12-4 p.m. Additional gallery hours are on Wednesdays from 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts. com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. “At the Pump” and “American Playgrounds” by David Freund. Through Jul 27. Reception Jun 7, 6-9 p.m. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Hex Signs & Barn Stars” by Beth Brown. Through Aug 3. 2712630. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. Reception Mar 13 7 p.m. 585-473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. College Clay Collective. Through July 20. National juried exhibition featuring the best in college ceramics. 2715183. geneseearts.org. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” by Willie Osterman. Receptions and fundraiser for Pluta Cancer Treamtment Center May 3, 7-9 p.m. 9:30 p.m. music by Brian Murphy. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Art of the Railroad & Large Scale Model Trains. Through July 12. Model trains by Robert Thon and drawings by Sam Ferrara. Reception June 14, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 315-331-4593. waynearts. wordpress.com.

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Call for Artwork [ WED., JULY 3 ] Call for Art! Ongoing. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St. The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. Please include the following in your email: - 3 to 5 jpeg images of current work Artist statement - CV/Resume Kindly indicate whether you are continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

274 Goodman St. N. $5. 7979086. VIP@improvVIP.com. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] Improv Comedy Battle. 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 7979086. VIP@improvVIP.com. Polite Company: Summer Camp. July 6, 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10-$12. muccc. org.

COMEDY | POLITE COMPANY: SUMMER CAMP

[ SUN., JULY 7 ] The 2013 Funniest Person in Rochester Contest Round 1. July 7, 6 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. $7. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

I don’t know about your recollections of summer camp, dear readers, but mine are a mash-up of shyly watching my preteen crush being heroically outdoorsy, wanting to spend more time doing sporty things but being stuck with prissy, lip-glossy girls, getting a mother of a sunburn, being forced to attend boring, crappy-crafting workshops, and a “raid” in which some of the boys put worms and such in the girls’ sleeping bags. So you could say there is plenty of awkward-comedy material to mine from the topic. 

[ MON., JULY 8 ] Banzai Comedy Night. 7:30 p.m. Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar, 682 South Ave. Sign up at 7:30 p.m. Show starts at 8. Hosted by Uncle Trent 473-0345. banzairochester. com.

Join Polite Company Comedy Improv and Sketch Comedy for the first day of summer camp at Lake PolitiComahati – better known as MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) -- on Saturday, July 6. What shenanigans will the troupe get into, regarding the great outdoors and singing around the campfire? Find out on Saturday at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, or $12 at the door. For more information, visit muccc.org or pcimprov.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Dance Events

Call for Artwork submitting available work or work that is representative (315) 5210832. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call for Artists. ongoing. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Catholic Family Center’s Call for Bowls. Through Aug. 1. Inviting artists of all kinds to donate handmade bowls for Empty Bowls of Rochester 2013, to be held Oct 16 at McQuaid Jesuit High School. Drop off Jun 1-Aug 1 at Catholic Family Center, 87 N. Clinton Ave 262-7172. cmarshall@cfcrochester.org. ImageArt: “I do?!” Through July 10. Deadline August 10. Submit works that respond to or address the issues surrounding marriage equality. All artists working in any media are welcome to submit imageout.org.imageart. New York Filmmakers Quarterly. ongoing. Films must have been produced within NYS in the past 2 years. No fee. No honorarium. Max length 30 minutes. To be screened at Little Theatre last Wednesdays and Saturdays in January, April, July, and October. Send DVD screener + cover letter with 1 sentence bio and one sentence film description to Karen vanMeenan, Programmer, New York Filmmakers Quarterly, Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., Rochester NY 14604. Notification by email within 8 weeks of receipt emergingfilmmakers@yahoo. com.

Art Events [ FRI., JULY 5 ] “Fashion in The Dark: A Concept.” July 5, 9 p.m. Pandaman Toys, 209 Monroe Ave. Immerse 20 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

yourself in the stages of a fashion collection with an ideal setting of projected video and music spun by some of Rochester’s best DJs. Local fashion designer Katrina Elliott will be showing muslin “rough draft” samples of a science fiction inspired runway collection $5 suggested donation 797-7060. contact@katrinaelliott. com. pandamantoys.com. First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org. Hungerford First Friday Open Studios/Galleries. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m thehungerford.com. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] Sign Language Museum Tour. Every other Saturday, 11 a.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Included in museum admission $5-$12, free to members. 271-3361 x238. hgray@geh.org. eastmanhouse. org. [ SUN., JULY 7 ] Punk Rock Hip Hop Woodstock. July 7, 6-9 p.m. Manhattan Square Park. Music and Arts festival: listen, dance, share, perform, play, paint Free. facebook.com/events/572683949450139/?fref=ts.

Comedy [ FRI., JULY 5 ] Etch-A-Sketch Comedy L.O.L Comedy Weekend Explosion. July 5-6, 8 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. $10. 250-0715. thecomedyclub.us. Guns n’ Syrup Comedy Showcase. July 5, 8 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main Street $5. 585-209-0734. thespacetheatergallery.com/. Improv Comedy Battles. 9:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy,

[ TUE., JULY 9 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Free. laughriotcomedy.com.

[ WED., JULY 3 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:45-11pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing. Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. $4 (or free if it’s your first time!). 585271-4930. lindyjam.com. [ THU., JULY 4 ] Contra Dance. 8-11 p.m. Covenant United Methodist Church, Culver Rd Contra dancing, live music & called dances. $7-$8, under 17 free with adult. cdrochester.org. Dance Lab East. 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects 99 cents. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. [ FRI., JULY 5 ] Friday Night Salsa Party. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. Introductory Lesson @9 p.m., open dancing with DJ Freddy C 10 p.m.-1 a.m $5 admission. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] Fandango at the Tango. 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 2714930. tangocafedance.com. Saturday Night Club Dance. 8 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. Introductory Lesson @ 8 p.m. Open Dancing with guest DJ Gina Jamieson Lesson + Dance: $10 Dance Only: $5. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. West African Drumming and Dance Classes with Fana Bongoura. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Saturdays at Baobab, Sundays at DancEncounters, 215 Tremont St $10-$15 per session. 503-6793372. kerfala.bangoura@gmail. com. mounafanyi.org. [ SUN., JULY 7 ] English Country Dancing. 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd English Country Dancing, live

music, called dances. $7-$8, under 17 free with adult. 2442468. fbcrochester.net. [ MON., JULY 8 ] Cardio Charleston: Fitness + Swing Dance Class. 6 p.m Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY For both guys and girls—finally, a swing dance class that is focused on fitness. Join us once a week for an hour of dancing minus the starting, stopping, rotating, and waiting around. In this class we will use fundamental solo jazz and charleston steps to get a fun and energetic workout. If you’ve never done solo jazz, this is a fantastic way to get started! We will cover all the basics and add new variations and styling every week. All levels of dancers are welcome. Drop-in price is $7/class. Preregister for $25 for 5 weeks at www.groovejuiceswing.com. $25 prereg for 5 weeks or $7 per class at the door. 845-706-2621.

Festivals [ SAT., JULY 6 ] B3 Festival. July 6, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Inspire Moore Winery, 197 N. Main St., Naples. Vendors, face painting for kids, music 3745970. nundawao@frontiernet.net. Sterling Renaissance Festival. Sundays Sterling, NY 800-8794446. sterlingfestival.com.

Kids Events [ WED., JULY 3 ] Babytime Storytime. Through Aug. 6, 10-10:30 a.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Newborns-18 months with caregiver 359-7092. Dig into Storytime! 10 a.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. All ages with a caregiver Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Drop-in Storytime. 10 a.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org 10-10:30 a.m Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd All ages Free. 359-7092. Storytime with Mike. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 9:30 & 10:30 a.m Free. 2274020. bn.com. Tales from Beatrix Potter. ongoing, 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St 3749032. bvtnaples.org. [ THU., JULY 4 ] Story Time. Mondays, 10:3011 a.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Ages 2-5 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ FRI., JULY 5 ] Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: Catskill Puppet Theater. July 5, 7 p.m. Cool Kids, Sagawa Park, 100 Main St. Free 637-3984. coolkids@rochester.rr.com. generationcool.biz. Family Fridays: Around the World in 80 Days. July 5, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11-$13. rmsc.org. Friday Make and Take Craft. 1-5 p.m Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Storytelling with Mike. 10:30 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Free. 227-4020. bn.com.

FILM | MONROE COUNTY MOVIES IN THE PARKS

Monroe County’s free “Movies in the Parks” series will screen eight films at Ontario Beach Park and the Highland Park Bowl again this summer. The season kicks off on Tuesday, July 9, with classic thriller “Jaws” at Ontario Beach Park and will be followed by “The Amazing Spider-Man,” “Skyfall,” and “The Hunger Games” on subsequent Tuesdays through July 30. Movies will also be screened at Highland Park Bowl every Thursday evening from July 11 to August 1, including “The Lorax,” “Ghostbusters,” “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted,” and “Les Misérables.” Pre-show fun starts at 8:30 p.m., and movies begin at dark. Bring blankets or lawn chairs, and get a scoop at Abbott’s while you’re there. For more information on the series, visit monroecounty.gov or call 753-7275. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Toddler Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Ages 1-4. Free. 637-2260. patkutz@liftbridgebooks.com. liftbridgebooks.com. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] GGH Kids. 10:30 a.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd Suggested ages 4-12, everyone welcome Free. 377-1982. grossmans.com. Pete the Cat Visits the Library. July 6, 2-3 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 359-7092. libraryweb.org. [ MON., JULY 8 ] Free Glenn Hagan Basketball Skills Clinic. July 8-26. July 8 through July 12: Flint Street Community Center, 271 Flint St. July15 through July 19: Carter Street Community Center, 500 Carter St. July 22 through July 26: Thomas Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. Each day will have two sessions. Youth ages 9 to 12 are welcome to participate from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Youth ages 13 to 18 are welcome to participate from 1 to 4 p.m. Meals, trophies and prizes will be provided. Lunch is served to both age groups from noon to 1 p.m. Youth may participate only at one site Register. 428-9865. Maximizing Middle School for College Prep (Students Entering Grades 6-8). Every 4 days, 10 a.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Identify opportunities to enhance academic rigor and distinction in middle school. Identify your learning style and key study skills to ensure your success in every course. You’ll create an individual roadmap to graduation including academic and activity planning, career exploration, and personal development $395. 233-9502. Move Like a Dinosaur with Rochester Museum and Science Center. July 8, 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library,

2300 Elmwood Ave. Ages 5-8 Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. PJ Storytime. 6:45-7:15 p.m Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free. 359-7092. Read to Annie the Shih-Tzu. July 8, 1 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Summer Chamber Music Workshop for Young Musicians. July 8-12. A chamber music workshop for young performers to learn from the musicians of Gibbs & Main culminating in a concert on Friday, July 12 with performances by students quartsemble.com. [ TUE., JULY 9 ] Dig into Summer Movies. 2 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jul 2: “A Bug’s Life,” Jul 9: “The Borrowers,” Jul 16: “James and the Giant Peach,” Jul 23 “Holes,” Jul 30: “Treasure Buddies.”. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Junior Friends of the Gates Public Library. second Tuesday of every month, 4-5:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 9-16. Junior Friends are a group of volunteers who meet yearround and help the library with activities such as book sales, parties, bulletin board displays and more exciting things. We also get involved with community service activities. Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of each month Free. 247-6446. Teen Tuesdays. 2:45-4:15 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Almost every Tuesday afternoon throughout the school year. Grades 9-12 340-8720 x4020. [ WED., JULY 10 ] Acting Basics Class for Kids (Ages 10-13). July 10, 6 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com.

[ WED., JULY 3 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 7/3: Chris Shelton 7/10: Karen Beck 7/17: Colleen Powderly 7/24: Sheila Evans 7/31: Michael Ketchek. Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ FRI., JULY 5 ] First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. first Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University

TWEET AT US AND LIVE FOREVER*

[ MON., JULY 8 ] Christopher Seaman Book Signing. July 8, 5 p.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave 5 p.m. signing, 5:30 p.m. Seaman will speak about his book, 6-7:30 p.m. Wine and hors d’oeuvres reception; book purchase and signing. (Please note that ticket purchase is for talk and reception only; books will be available for purchase.). $50, register. 454-2100. rpo. org/p_1690.

Museum Exhibit

Monthly Open Mike. second Monday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., JULY 9 ] Genesee Reading Series: Larry Berger and Marie Starr. July 9, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Hosted by Wanda Schubmehl $3-$6. wab.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Wayne Writers Guild. July 9, 7:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Participants meet to read and discuss their pieces of writing Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

[ WED., JULY 3 ] “Bringing Down the Attic.” Through Aug. 3. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Explore the hidden collection at the museum Free. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. PGA Championship History Exhibit. Through Sep. 2. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through September 2. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] Boardwalk Arcade. July 6-Sep. 8. The Strong National Museum

of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Opening Weekend Celebration July 6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and July 7, 1-4 p.m $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay. org.

Recreation [ WED., JULY 3 ] Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. continues on page 23

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[ TUE., JULY 9 ] ‘Growing Up In A Frank Lloyd Wright House’ by Kim Bixler. July 9, 7-8 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins

Literary Events

Ave Rochester’s longest running open mic welcomes poets, performers, and writers of all kinds. wab.org. Read, White & Blue Book Sale. July 5, 6-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free admission. wab.org.

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Rd Free, register. 359-7092. libraryweb.org. Tuesday Travelogue: China. July 9, noon. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

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Catfish Charlie’s Hot Diggety Dog Show with Barrel of Fun Productions. July 10, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Get “hooked” on Charlie and his puppet partners Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: The Odd Life of Timothy Green.. July 10, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org.

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Art of a young man adorned in a speedo and glistening from a swim, and the abashed giggle of the black maid busy cleaning the bathroom. Contrast portraits of firstworld countries’ male and female soldiers in decorous dress, or intense close-ups of helmeted faces, with Gilles Varon’s shot of an unarmored, youthful body from Biafra, loaded down with ammunition and burdens of the invisible sort, a man-child confronting the camera warily from beneath bandoliers of bullets.

Images from “The Gender Show,” currently on view at George Eastman House. Left: An image from Debbie Grossman’s “My Pie Town” series. Right: Anne Noggle’s portrait of Lois Hollingsworth Zilner, a woman Air Force Service Pilot from WWII. PHOTOS COURTESY GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE

The gender spectrum, in silver tones and Kodachrome “The Gender Show” THROUGH OCTOBER 13 GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE, 900 EAST AVE. 271-3361, EASTMANHOUSE.ORG TUESDAY-SATURDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M., SUNDAY 11 A.M.-5 P.M. | $5-$12 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Though the exhibit on gender currently showing at George Eastman House does not seek to lecture its viewers about contemporary socio-politics, its scope and range of representations provide ample opportunity for cultural and self-reflection. The first show presented by the Eastman House team under its new director, Bruce Barnes, “The Gender Show” explores the ways in which gender has been represented in photography over more than 170 years, from daguerreotypes to massive color prints, in a thick, juicy crosscut of the wide world. It should be enjoyed leisurely, with friends or alone, and given the proper time to digest fully. The museum’s galleries hold more than 130 images with plenty of representations of men and women in what we still know as traditional gender roles, as portraying the role of their dichotomous opposite, or in various manifestations of the androgynous spectrum. Images allude to the extended effects of our physical sexual traits: the 22 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

specific pleasures and burdens they each designate, and their effects on our culture and relations with one another. From the steady gazes of these historic mirrors arise subtly nagging questions. What if we felt no awkwardness toward the androgyny of children? From birth we begin to be strictly marked by selfconscious kin with colors and themes. Soon, more specific physical aspects are shaped, as seen in Victor Keppler’s 1943 “First Hair Cut,” which presents one bewildered little angel newly shorn of his babyish curls, with a tearful mother and a proud barber. Early challenges to these definitions are found in Elias Goldensky’s 1920 “Head And Shoulders Study,” in which we find the young adult “beautiful boy” type, appreciated since antiquity. Women are depicted again and again as objects of desire, or in stations of domestic usefulness, and men as romantic pursuers and in the utilitarian and leadership roles. The exhibit includes a few exceptions, such as Lewis W. Hine’s 1935 series about the progressive Ethical Culture Schools that taught wood-shop classes to girls and cooking to boys. But in general, the subjects in these photos are often caught training the next generation to be the same. In Frank S. Scherschel’s 1940 work “Mother and Daughter,” a dolled-up wife transforms her

toddler’s hair into a pretty coif. In Susan Meiselas’ “Before the Show, Tunbridge, Vermont,” from her 1974 series “Carnival Strippers,” a boy is initiated into male voyeurism by a group of leering men. Though the child gives little away in terms of specific emotional expression, he is undoubtedly rapt. What we consider to be the paragons of femininity are built on so much artifice. Study the faces of the subjects. Recognize the self-conscious acting, the downright discontent among some of them. Not even Marilyn Monroe fit the mold she was helping to reinforce. The star’s prescribed fog dulled the aching hollowness of what her life had become for a short while, and different versions of her fantasy continue to be envied and emulated. Nickolas Murray’s 1952 shot of the starlet is all perfectly defined pout, bedroom eyes, and blooming figure displayed for consumption. In a captivating set of images by Chuck Samuels, the artist unflinchingly takes on the male gaze with his own flesh through a series of self-portraits based on iconic nude portraits of women by Avedon, Weston, Bellocq, and Man Ray. The ever-present disparity between upperclass and squalor rears its disturbing head, too. Some women are saved from domestic drudgery by their station in life, while others are condemned to it. Barbara Norfleet’s “Private House, New Providence Island, Bahamas,” captures the carefree demeanor

Anomalies are bright bolts in a dim routine of uneasy conformity that doesn’t even recognize itself. How you react to such daring tells a lot about how you’ll live your life — though such a jolting encounter doesn’t necessarily reflect your own path, it may be such a signal that inspires your own liberation, whatever that looks like. Definitions are flipped in Kalup Linzy’s 2006 video “Lollypop,” a brilliant, playful update on the theme of frustrated seduction and flirtatious dismissal, in which two men (Linzy and a friend) sit bare-chested, lip-synching a risqué 1930’s song. In the Entrance Gallery, Janine Antoni’s formal portrait triptych, “Mom and Dad,” depicts her parents in drag as each other or as themselves, three times as a couple in various combinations of gender. In so many of the works, the subtleties of gender expression seem to be more about navigating various power dynamics than anything else. But one series stands apart in its depiction of utter cooperation. Debbie Grossman’s series “My Pie Town” is a re-envisionment of Russell Lee’s body of photographs, created in 1940 for the United States Farm Security Administration, which focused on the depressed Pie Town, New Mexico, and its struggling inhabitants engaged in activities of work and rest. Here, the power between individuals seems balanced. As in many other images in the show, the ghost of strife/hard living haunts the subjects, and the sense of harmonious living almost certainly lingers from the desperate lack of nonsense present in the original subjects. Using Photoshop, Grossman seamlessly replaced any male faces and attributes in the images with more feminine features to create a township entirely populated by women and girls. The series offers an opportunity not only to conceive of the capacity of women to meet any task demanded of them if the need is present and the will serves, but also to picture how natural it is to love and struggle and play together, regardless of what combination of features our bodies possess.

[ TUE., JULY 9 ] Butterfly Walk Mendon Area Mystery Tour. July 9, 10 a.m.noon. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road Meet at the Visitors’ Center/Wild Wings parking lot on Pond Road, just off Clover St. (Rt. 65). After we check out the Butterfly Garden, we will carpool to other nearby areas for some good butterfly spots. Bring lunch, if you would like to stay longer 425-2380. rochesterbutterflyclub.org.

Special Events SPECIAL EVENT | WINE CRUISE ON SAM PATCH

I can hardly think of a more relaxing activity than sipping delicious vino while gently cruising on a waterway. The season of wine cruises aboard the historically named Sam Patch kicked off last week, and will stretch into the summer and early fall, showcasing delicious wines and the stretch of the lovely Erie Canal between Pittsford and Bushnell’s Basin. The next event takes place Wednesday, July 10, when Pittsford Wines will celebrate five years of wine cruises with Corn Hill Navigation, featuring red and white wines from around the world and samples of food products from the portfolio of Dan Biviano from Casa Imports, as well as light snacks from Via Girasole Gourmet. Wine cruises also take place on July 19 and 26, August 2, 7, and 16, September 11 and 20, and October 4. Wednesday cruises depart from Schoen Place in the Village of Pittsford at 6 p.m. and return about 7:30 p.m. Friday cruises depart 6:30 p.m. and return at 8 p.m. Tickets are $26 per person and must be purchased in advance, and passengers must be 21 or older. For more information, call 662-5748 or visit samandmary.org or pittsfordwine.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Recreation Roc Cirque presents Whirly Wendsday. 7 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Join the fun at Rochester’s premier spin toy meet up. Hooping, poi, juggling, fire performances, and much more. Live DJ’s are playing during the session to help you stay moving. Extra hoops and poi are available free. (585) 683-5734. Wildflower Walk. July 3, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park $8 parking fee. 493-3625. [ THU., JULY 4 ] GVHC Event. July 4, 8 a.m. Pittsford Plaza by Barnes and Noble. Easy/moderate 5 mile hike free. 475-0923. gvhchikes.org. Twilight Tours. 7 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] GVHC Event. July 6, 11:45 a.m. Powder Mills Park, 154 Park Rd. Woolston Rd. Lot. Moderate/hilly 5-7 mile hike Free. 323-1911. gvhchikes.org. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant.The tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk through the south section covering approximately 1–1 ½ miles on paved roads and even terrain. Learn about 19th and 20th century Rochesterians including Rufus Sibley co-founder of Sibley, Lindsay, and Curr

department store, Frank Gannett, founder of the Democrat and Chronicle, James Vick founder of Vicks Nursery, and others $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Scenic Guided Paddle. July 6, 9-11 a.m. Personal flotation devices must be worn. You must provide your own canoe/kayak or arrange for a rental. Meet at the Ellison Park south entrance off Blossom Road; follow the “Hike” signs to canoe/kayak launch location Free, register. 340-8655. [ SUN., JULY 7 ] GVHC Event. July 7, 2 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road Moderate 4 mile hike, Devil’s Bathtub area Free. 2544047. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Except May 12 see Special Events. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. This tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk of approximately one mile on paved roads and uneven terrain. Subjects covered include local history, famous people (including Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass), horticulture, geology, architecture, symbolism, and more $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh. org. [ MON., JULY 8 ] E. Philip Saunders Golf Touranament. July 8. Bristol Harbour Golf Club. Registration 11 a.m., lunch 11:30 a.m., shotgun start 1 p.m Register. 546-8280. compeerrochester.org.

[ WED., JULY 3 ] 100 Days of Entertainment in the Park. Through Sep. 2. Commons Park, Lakeshore Dr. To celebrate the Canandaigua Centennial, the Canandaigua BID presents ‘100 Days of Entertainment in the Park.’ Most entertainment will be at Commons Park, larger groups will perform at the Kershaw Gazebo. Bring your chair and enjoy entertainment every day, for 100 days, in Canandaigua Free. 396-0300. Better Breathers Club. first Wednesday of every month, 2-3:30 p.m. The Northfield, 4560 Nine Mile Point Rd., Fairport. 377-5350. yourcaremedicalsupply.com. Dentzel Carousel. Through Oct. 14. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave The Carousel’s 2013 Operating Schedule is, as follows: Memorial Day Weekend – Open Friday, May 24 through Monday, May 27 Post-Memorial Day until June 21 – Open Weekends (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) June 21 through Labor Day – Open Daily (7-Days per Week) Post-Labor Day through Columbus Day – Open Weekends (Saturday and Sunday) Columbus Day – Open Monday, October 14 (Last Day of 2013 Season) The Carousel’s 2013 Hours of Operation are: Noon to 9:00 p.m. The Carousel’s 2013 Price Schedule is, as follows: Single Ride -- $1.00 Punch Card (12 rides for the cost of 10) -- $10.00 **Valid Any Time** Wrist Band (Ride All Day) -- $5.00. cityofrochester.gov. Friday Happy Hour! Fridays, 5-7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2-for-1 on wines by-the-glass and beers by-the-bottle!. 585-262-2336. veritaswinebar.com. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Knit Clique: Knitting/Crocheting Drop-in. 12-2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Summer Shows at Seneca Park Zoo. Through Sep. 2. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Observe an alligator feeding. Watch an otter and keeper interact. Talk with staff after a Stage Show. There will be seven live shows daily, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m Included in zoo admission: $8-$11 senecaparkzoo.org. Scottsville Midweek Farmers’ Market. 4-7 p.m Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main Street in Scottsville 8893981. kmemccall@aol.com. Sodus Bay Lighthouse Museum July Fourth Extravaganza. July 3-4. Wed 10 a.m. Red, White, and Blue Kiddie Parade. Children in costume march from the Sodus Point Fire Hall, 8364 Bay Street,

to the Pavilion of the Sodus Bay Lighthouse Museum, 7606 North Ontario Street. Fireworks after dark. Thur Breakfast on the Bluff 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Registration for the Lighthouse 5-K Run begins at 7:30 a.m., with the race beginning at 9 a.m. Art & Craft Show from 88 a.m.-5 p.m. Concert 2-4 p.m sodusbaylighthouse.org. Turning Points. 3:30-5 p.m. An information Center for families whose lives have been touched by Incarceration. Join us to share information, resources, and support Free. 328-0856. turningpoints4families@frontier. com. “The Wonderful World of Black Holes” Starshow.. Through Aug. 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Ages 6 to adult. Mon-Sun 11 a.m. or 1 p.m., varies (check site for specific times) also First Sunday of each month at 1 p.m $6-$7, members free. rmsc.org. [ THU., JULY 4 ] City of Rochester Independence Day Celebration. July 4, 7:30 p.m. Downtown Rochester. Music, fireworks Free. 428-5990. cityofrochester.gov/july4. Coming Out & Being Out Support Group. 6:30 p.m. The Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley, 875 E Main St. Suite 500 We don’t just come out once - If only life was that easy! This group is for teens who want support around coming out and being out to parents, in school, at church and in other areas of life. (13-18 yrs old). Free. 244-8640. gayalliance.org. Gender Identity Support Group. 6:30 p.m. The Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley, 875 E Main St. Suite 500 Gender Identity Support Group 6:30pm - 7:30pm This group is for transgender, gender queer, & gender nonconforming teens or teens who are questioning and exploring their gender identity. (13-18 yrs old). Free. 244-8640. gayalliance.org. Genesee Country Village & Museum July 4th. July 4, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. $10.50-$16.50. 2948218. gcv.org. Lincoln Tours. Saturdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. Old Fashion Fourth of July. July 4, 10:15 a.m. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St Parade, concerts, refreshments, cake walk 637-3645. morganmanninghouse.org. Open House. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Free. 210-0075. rocmaker. eventbrite.com. Rochester Restore the Fourth Amendment Rally. July 4, 10 a.m. Washington Square Park, S. Clinton Avenue at Washington Square A nationwide movement to restore the 4th Amendment and the right to privacy. We will meet at Washington Square Park and march to the Federal Building and back to the park for demonstrations, food, and speeches. Join us to restore the Fourth!. Free. 857-1222. Rochester Restore the Fourth Rally to Protect Privacy. July 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Meet at Washington Square Park, march to the Federal Building for speeches and activism workshops. RestoretheFourth. net facebook.com/ RochesterRestoreTheFourth.

THEATER | “LEGALLY BLONDE: THE MUSICAL”

When sweet, carefree, and strikingly blonde sorority president Elle Woods’ boyfriend dumps her to search for someone more serious, the unsinkable Elle decides to follow him to Harvard Law School and win him back. Along the way, Elle must contend with her ex-boyfriend’s new flame, who seeks to sabotage Elle’s romantic and educational efforts, as well as a shark of a law professor. The 2001 hit movie “Legally Blonde,” starring Reese Witherspoon, has been transformed into a highenergy song and dance extravaganza that is currently being staged at The Merry-Go-Round Playhouse (6877 East Lake Road, Auburn) as part of the Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival. Later this month it will also be staged by the JCC SummerStage program (see jccrochester.org for details). The Finger Lakes production kicked off last week, but continues through July 17. Show times this week are Wednesday, July 3, at 2 p.m.; Thursday at 7:30 p.m.; Friday at 2 & 8 p.m.; Saturday at 8 p.m.; Monday at 2 p.m.; TuesdayWednesday, July 10, at 2 & 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $22-$50 and are available for purchase by calling 315-255‑1785 or by visiting fingerlakesmtf.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org. Town of Brighton Independence Day Celebration. July 4, 8 a.m.10 p.m. Brighton Chamber of Commerce 5k race, starting at the Brighton Twelve Corners Middle School (2643 Elmwood Ave.) at 8 a.m. Music, food, rides, and activities starting at 2:30 p.m. at Meridian Centre Park (700 Meridian Center Blvd.). Fireworks at 9:45 p.m townofbrighton.org. Your 4th Of You Lie ”Independence” Day Observation. July 4-5. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. Two-day program featuring blood-relative of Frederick Douglass, psychologist, Pan-Africanist, orator, educator, political scientist and author of “Psycho-Academic Holocaust: The Special Education & ADHD Wars Against Black Boys,” Dr. Umar Johnson (Ifatunde). July 4 3 p.m. pre-screening lecture, book signing. 4 p.m. Rochester premiere of Ta-Seti Studio’s “The Psycho-Ancestral Breakdown of the Master Teachers’ Vol. I” followed by talk back. July 5, 1 p.m. book signing, review of Frederick Douglass’ July 5th Oration, followed later by a lecture $20 admission. 4976139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799. [ FRI., JULY 5 ] 16mm America: From Reel to Shining Reel. July 5, 8 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Grill fires up at 8 p.m., films at dusk: Star Spangled Banner (1970), Blue Jeans (1970), Casey at the Bat (1967),

Our National Anthem (1956), Who Is An American? with Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids (1984) $2 suggested donation. 4428676. vsw.org. Big Screen Adventure: Coral Reef Adventure. Sundays. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 4 p.m., sat 2:30 & 4:30 p.m., Sun 1, 2, & 4 p.m., also Mon Oct 8 2:30 & 4:30 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. First Festival of Sound and Light. July 5, 9:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave A tribute to Claude Bragdon, involving projections of his images, words, and a selection of music he used in his own Festival events a century ago Free. wab.org. James Madison High School Family Reunion. July 5, 6 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St If you have ever attended or graduated from James Madison High School, then you should be at this event. It’s a reunion of all classes, meet & greet, pool party and a semiformal dinner at the convention center. $55. 436-3924. JamesMa disonHighSchoolFamilyReunionEFBevent.Eventbrite.com. Moonlight Stroll Concert Series. 8-10 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St Jul 5: Naked Grey. Jul 12: Tullamore Celtic Band with Young School of Irish Dance. Jul 19: Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra. Jul 26: The MusicaMakers Big Band. Aug 2: Neville Francis & The Riddim Posse. Aug 9: Italian Night with Gap Mangione ($12-$15) $4-$9 (only $1 on July 5, $12-$15 on Aug 9.). 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Special Events

com. westsidemarketrochester. com.

Rochester Amateur Radio Association: “Show &Tell Night”. July 5, 7 p.m. Henrietta Fire Hall, 3129 East Henrietta Road Free. 210-8910. kc2pcd@rochester. rr.com.

[ WED., JULY 10 ] Caregiver Support Meeting. second Wednesday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. This group is specifically a support group for those caring for someone with memory loss. The group offers social interaction, educational discussions and a supportive environment. This is not a therapy group. Meetings are held the second Wednesday of the month at Quail Summit, 5102 Parrish St. Extension, Canandaigua Free. 396-1010. Farm to Table Dinner. July 10, 5-8:30 p.m. Mud Creek Farm, Victor. A benefit to support the farm and electric tractor. Cocktail hour, farm tour, silent auction, dinner $100, register. 315-2122916. mudcreekfundraiser@ gmail.com.

[ SAT., JULY 6 ] 90s and Radiohead Laser Shows. July 6-27. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 90s Laser at 8 p.m., followed by Radiohead Laser at 9:30 p.m One show $6-$7, both $9-$11. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket.com. Latino Night @ Frontier Field. July 6, 6:05 p.m. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way Red Wings vs. Red Sox game 6:05 p.m., meet Tony Vega at 7 p.m $7-$11 presale prfestival.com. “Shrimp and Chardonnay” Tasting. July 6, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. Keuka Spring Chardonnay wines paired with shrimp appetizers. Keuka Spring Vineyards, 243 State Route 54, East Lake Road, just outside of Penn Yan. $15, register. 315-536-3147. KeukaSpringWinery.com. [ SUN., JULY 7 ] Affinity Orchard Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m Affinity Orchard Place, at English & Fetzner Roads, Greece Free. affinityorchardplace.com. Basic Old-School Dungeons and Dragons Gaming Group. first Sunday of every month. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St All ages and skill-levels welcome Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks. com. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S This year on June 30 the market will temporarily move to the parking lot at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Avenue (across the street and slightly west of Brighton Town Hall) 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. July 7. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.-2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket. [ MON., JULY 8 ] Songwriter’s Circle. July 8, 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Hosted by John Wilder Free. wab.org. [ TUE., JULY 9 ] “Movies in the Parks” series. Ontario Beach Park Tue Jul 9: “Jaws,” Jul 16: “The Amazing Spider-Man,” Jul 23 “Skyfall,” Jul 30: “The Hunger Games.” Highland Park Bowl Thu Jul 11: “The Lorax,” Jul 18: “Ghostbusters,” Jul 25: “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted,” Aug 1: “Les Misérables.” Pre-show fun starts at 8:30 p.m., and movies begin at dark. Bring blankets or lawn chairs Free. 753-7275. monroecounty.gov. “One Take: Stories Through the Lens” Series: “One Track Heart: The Story of Krishna Das.” July 9, 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $10. thelittle.org. Rohrbach’s Food & Beer Pairing. second Tuesday of every month, 6 p.m. Rohrbach’s Brewpub, 3859 Buffalo Rd $30, register. 24 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

SPECIAL EVENT | INDEPENDENCE DAY EVENTS

The following Independence Day celebrations will be held in and around Rochester on Thursday, July 4. For more events, visit our online calendar at rochetsercitynewspaper.com. City of Rochester: Downtown Rochester. Free festivities start at 7:30 p.m. with a jazz performance by the Jimmie Highsmith Experience featuring vocalist Fatima on the Main Street Bridge, followed by Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra 9-10:20 p.m with a performance of patriotic favorites. Fireworks choreographed to RPO renditions launch at 10 p.m. Attendees may bring chairs or blankets for viewing of the fireworks show and concerts. Pets are not permitted. The Party in the Park concert features Doug Paisley, Violet Mary, and Americana soul band, Dawes, at the Riverside Festival Site on the corner of Court and Exchange Streets, 5-10 p.m., $2 admission, children under age 12 free, seating for an additional $3. Attendees may not bring their own chairs. For more information, visit cityofrochester.gov/july4 or call 311 (outside the City of Rochester call 428-5990). Town of Brighton: Brighton Chamber of Commerce 5k race, starting at the Brighton Twelve Corners Middle School (2643 Elmwood Ave.) at 8 a.m. The rest of the day features music, food, rides, and activities starting at 2:30 p.m., all of which will take place at Meridian Centre Park (700 Meridian Center Blvd.). Fireworks at 9:45 p.m. townofbrighton.org. Genesee Country Village & Museum: Activities run 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and include shooting of the anvil, a grand parade, patriotic concerts, a pie-eating contest, egg toss, sack races, pea-shooter contest, town ball match, children’s muster, and the swearing in of new American citizens on the steps of the Town Hall (11 a.m.). Admission is $16.50 for adults, $10.50 for ages 4-16, $13.50 for students and seniors, and free to children 3 & under. 410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. 294-8218, gcv.org.  Restore the Fourth Rally: Combat warrantless mass surveillance and fight for your Fourth Amendment rights. Gather at 10 a.m. at Washington Square Park and march to the Federal Building, hear speeches, and participate in activism workshops. Learn more at RestoretheFourth.net and facebook.com/RochesterRestoreTheFourth. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 594-9800. rohrbachs.com/ Rohrbachs-Brewpub.html. “A Royal Flush ‘Food as Medicine’ weekly support group. 4:15 p.m. Lightheart Institute, 21 Prince St. Weekly support group to heal the GI tract, eliminate IqG delayed food allergens and help you lose weight $47 per session. 288-6160. info@lightheart.com. lightheart.com. Tilling the Soil: Tuesday Summer Movie. July 9, 6:15 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jul 9: “Field of Dreams,” Jul 16: Bridges of Madison County,” Jul 30: “The

Secret Garden.”. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50 Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@gmail.

Theater “Boom.” Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St Through Jul 7. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Wed Jul 3 2 p.m., Thu 2 & 8 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$33 374-6318. bvtnaples.org. The Great American Trailer Park Musical. Through July 14. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. Through Jul 14. Wed Jul 3 & 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Jul 10 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $22-$50. 315-255-1785. fingerlakesmtf. com. Justin Rielly’s “Come Talk to Me” Staged Reading. Jul 9, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Pay what you will. 866-8114111. muccc.org. “Legally Blonde: The Musical.” Through July 17. Merry-GoRound Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Through July 17. Wed Jul 3 2 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 2 & 8 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Mon 2 p.m., Tue-Wed Jul 10 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Mon 2 p.m., Tue-Wed Jul 17 2 & 7:30 p.m $22-$50 315255-1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. The PiTCH. Jun 13-Aug 17. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. July 4-6: Pump ‘n Go July 11-13: Legends and Lore July 18-20: The Take July 25-27: Ten: The Story of Grace and Joe Aug 1-3: The Coincidentals Aug 8-10: Beautiful Dreamer: The Stephen Foster Musical Aug 15-17: Love on Ice. $20. 315‑255‑1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Wed 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Twelfth Night.” Through July 20, 8 p.m. Highland Park Bowl, 1200 South Ave. July 5-7, 9-10, 12-14, 1617, 19-20 at 8 p.m Free, donations accepted. 234-7840. rochestercommunityplayers.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., JULY 3 ] The Gregory Kunde Chorale is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info line: 3777568. gregorykundechorale.org.

“Metal Quest: Planet Metal.” Through Sep. 20. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave “Planet Metal” is a fun, thought-provoking play about three metal-loving aliens who visit Earth and become rock stars. We still need a few actors, no experience or audition required. Just contact me somehow and you’re probably in! No spoken lines, about five practices. Nothing difficult. Free 298-0983. metalquest1@gmail.com.

Workshops [ WED., JULY 3 ] Irish Traditional Flute Styles for Beginners and Fans Class. July 3, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Morning Alignment Yoga. Mondays, Fridays, 7:15 a.m. Nu Movement, 716 University Ave. Strength and Flexibility, Freedom and Expansion, Knowledge and Inspiration…… Yoga is power and everything is action. Inspired by the Anusara System of Yoga and trained by Vishali Varga, Nicole’s classes look to the inner Divine while focusing on proper body alignment. Visit www. facebook.com/NicoledeViereYoga for Community Conversations and detailed Class Information! Classes EVERY Mon./Wed./Fri. from 7:15-8:15am located in the Flatiron building/University Ave. $14 Drop In, Class Passes Available 585-329-3028. NicoledeViereYoga.com. Open Weekly Group Meditation. 5:30 p.m. The TRU Center, 6 South Main St. This meditation group meets weekly on Wednesdays at 5:30-6:30pm. Join us for renewal, deep relaxation and decompression in the ways you need most. Clear out what does not serve you and be filled with new energy and possibilities. This themes vary week-by-week and include guidance in areas such as totems, angels, guides, singing bowls, oils, drums, visualization and more. Preregister to tru@trubynicole.com 24 hours in advance $12. 3810190. tru@trubynicole.com. trubynicole.com. [ THU., JULY 4 ] JSY at the Market. Saturdays, 1 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Foodlink’s nutritionist offers free cooking demonstrations on ways to prepare fresh fruits and vegetables purchased at the Rochester Public Market using SNAP benefits. “Just Say Yes” to Fruits and Vegetables is a state-funded initiative to help individuals make healthier choices with their SNAP dollars Free. 328-3380. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. Yoga. Mondays. Eastside Wellness Center, 625 Ayrault Rd. Monday Vinyasa Flow 4:30 p.m., Restorative 6 p.m. Thursday Vinyasa Flow 5:30 p.m $14 dropin, $60 5 classes, register. cindy@ relaxreleaserestore.com. [ SAT., JULY 6 ] Grown by Nature with Organic Rick. 8:30 a.m. Grossmans

Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd Free. 3771982. grossmans.com. Live Organic, Love Organic, Think Organic. 8:30 a.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd Free. 377-1982. grossmans.com. [ MON., JULY 8 ] Event Planning 101 Class. July 8, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Geva Comedy Improv: Summer Improv Bootcamp. 6:30-8:30 p.m Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Geva Comedy Improv announces a 7-week instructional course on improvisation for ages 16 and up. There is no prior experience necessary and classes will be taught according to experience and skill level. Special showcase performance to be held on Sunday August 25th $175, register. 232-1366 x3052. tryan@gevatheatre.org. gevacomedyimprov.org. Guided Group Meditation: Part 2: Discovering the Magic Within. 10 a.m The TRU Center, 6 South Main St. In this 1.5 hr. workshop, Part 2, you will reach a little deeper in connecting with parts of yourself that need growth or healing. Pre-register by June 28 via tru@trubynicole. com $88. 381-0190. tru@ trubynicole.com. trubynicole. com. Managing And Reducing Stress Through Meditation and Movement Class. July 8, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Summer Improv Bootcamp. 6:30 p.m Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Geva Comedy Improv announces a 7 week instructional course on improvisation for ages 16 and up. There is no prior experience necessary and classes will be taught according to experience and skill level. Course tuition is $175.00 for the full 7 weeks. For more information or to register, contact Tim Ryan at tryan@ gevatheatre.org or by calling 232-1366 ext. 3052 $175, register. 232-1366 x3052. gevacomedyimprov.org. [ TUE., JULY 9 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. The African World History class provides an ongoing experience of the contributions and achievements Africans and African-Americans have made throughout history. The class uses the historical experiences of African peoples to highlight the cultural values we share. Stay tuned and check the Baobab website for further details $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. “The Essence of the Heart Sutra.”. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m.

Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Cold Process Soap Making Workshop. July 9. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Visit site for details smugtownmushrooms.com. Health Insurance Open House for Rochester’s Uninsured. 2-5 p.m. Threshold at the Community Place, 135 Parsells Ave Fidelis Care representatives will be on-site at Threshold at the Community Place, 145 Parsells Avenue, Rochester, every Tuesday from 2 – 5 PM to answer questions about health insurance options, and to help eligible residents apply to enroll in Fidelis Care programs. Current Fidelis Care members may also receive assistance completing their annual recertification at these events 1-888-343-3547. fideliscare.org. Introduction To Ear Training Class. July 9, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Introduction to Reading Hebrew Class. July 9, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Rochester Thyroid Cancer Support Group. second Tuesday of every month, 6 p.m Rochester Thyca Support Group, 255 Alexander St. The Rochester Support Group for Thyroid Cancer, meets on the second Tuesday of every month at the Gilda’s Club. The group is a patient led support group for the newly diagnosed, and those currently surviving, thyroid cancer Free. 276-4633. rochester-ny@thyca.org. WedgeThirst 4 Art Vinyl Painting. July 9, 6-8 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. [ WED., JULY 10 ] Abundance Theory. July 10, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Participants study how to practice positive thinking. They learn how to develop life habits that encourage success. These habits include setting goals and learning to manifest. Come and see the possibilities Free. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Small Business Council Coot Camp #5: Lessons Learned: Recovering From A Real Disaster. July 10, 7:45 a.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. Presented By: Peter Bruu and Michael Montagliano, IV4 $25, SBC members free. 271-1111. rochestersbc.com/. Weight Loss: What You Really Need to Know Class. July 10, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery. com.

AJI ZONING & LAND USE ADVISORY 50 Public Market | 208-2336 AWAKEN: Qi gong, yoga, tai chi, fine art 8 Public Market | 261-5659 BOULDER COFFEE CO. 1 Public Market | 232-5282 CARLSON METRO CENTER YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880 CITY NEWSPAPER 250 N. Goodman St | 244-3329 THE CITY OF ROCHESTER Market Office | 428-6907

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard Street | 546-1221

MARKET DISTRICT

B U S I N E S S A S S O C I AT I O N

JUAN & MARIA’S EMPANADA STOP www.juanandmarias.com | 325-6650 “HOME OF THE HIGHLY ADDICTIVE SPANISH FOODS”

FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTOR

DEEP DISCOUNT STORAGE 265 Hayward Avenue | 325-5000

WHAT YOU NEED IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC MARKET marketfriends@rochester.rr.com | 325-5058

THE GOURMET WAFFLER Catering 461-0633

20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

1115 E. Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday Every Month CAFE 50 Public Market | 325-5280 Purveyors of Fine Coffee and Tea OBJECTMAKER 153 Railroad Street | 244-4933

97 Railroad Street | 546-8020 Tours • Tastings • Private Parties www.rohrbachs.com TIM WILKES PHOTOGRAPHY 9 Public Market | 423-1966

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 29

The president in peril again [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“White House Down” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY ROLAND EMMERICH NOW PLAYING

The appearance of “White House Down,” a thriller about a terrorist attack on the White House only a short time after “Olympus Has Fallen,” a thriller about a terrorist attack on the White House, should inspire more commentary than the obvious remarks about coincidence. The movies, after all, are the creation of the American film industry, that nest of leftist Hollywood “elitists” who enliven the erotic dreams of conservative crazies and inspire those crybabies

to produce their fine Republican whine. Two such similar pictures so close together suggest that once again popular film reflects some sinister undercurrents in the culture, the perfectly plausible notion that a good portion of the audience really wants to see their president in peril. (“Air Force One,” “Independence Day,” “Olympus Has Fallen,” and this film, by the way, all feature obvious surrogates for Democratic presidents — think about it.) In the case of “White House Down” the president also happens to be an African American, James Sawyer (Jamie Foxx), who has just set forth a plan to withdraw all American forces from the Middle East and convene a meeting of all the region’s leaders to establish a permanent peace. The inescapable similarities to Barack Obama underline the film’s connection to current events; the various motivations of the attackers, especially the hatred they all voice, follow quite closely the opinions uttered every day by politicians, pundits, and commentators.

Channing Tatum in “White House Down.” PHOTO COURTESY COLUMBIA PICTURES

The plot develops in several directions, focusing on a handful or people connected in one way or another to the White House and the presidency. John Cale (Channing Tatum), a plainclothes Capitol policeman hoping to join the Secret Service, visits the place for an interview, and brings his daughter Emily (Joey King), a history buff and a fan of the president, for a tour. He doesn’t get the job, but as their tour begins, a large, heavily armed gang of gunmen explode a bomb, shoot scores of guards and agents, take the tourists hostage, and demand $400 million and the usual airplane exit. Instead of simply storming the place, as in “Olympus Has Fallen,” this group enters surreptitiously and more or less peacefully, through possessing all the necessary access codes, obtained from the head of the Secret Service (James Woods), of all people, who harbors his own reasons for treachery. The gang includes a number of representatives of lunatic groups — white supremacists, ex-mercenaries, hardened special-operations soldiers, probably a Tea Party member or two, for all we know — all of them bearing some kind of grudge against the government. As it turns out, the whole complicated assault actually constitutes an attempt at a coup d’état inspired by devotion to the aims and profits of the military-industrial complex. In addition to its slam-bang, nonstop, and extremely violent action, the movie provides NEW!

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Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 716-885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206” or go to www.bcrc.us/studies.php 26 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

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Police women “The Heat” (R), DIRECTED BY PAUL FEIG NOW PLAYING

moments of humor and some convincing human touches. Little Emily Cale serves as one of its heroes, taking videos of the gang with her phone and sending them out over the Internet, which helps identify the gunmen. Unsurprisingly, contemporary electronic technology dominates much of the methods of the attackers, including control of the White House security devices, the firing of a missile to shoot down the vice president’s plane, and of course, access to the launch codes that will initiate a nuclear strike on the Middle East. Channing Tatum, a fast-rising star, seems likely to succeed the mighty Arnold and the lesser Bruce as the muscular action hero of the day. He possesses a convincing physical presence and performs credibly as the anguished, helpless father of a young girl in terrible danger. His hand-to-hand fights with the leader of the terrorists (Jason Clarke) take up far too much screen time, but show him as virtually indestructible no matter what weapon his adversary uses against him. “White House Down” sustains its plot and employs its excellent cast with skill and conviction. The sets, the effects, the manipulation of contemporary reality with utter authenticity all demonstrate the slickness and competence of Hollywood filmmaking at its best. When those Hollywood leftist elites attempt to take down the president of the United States, they do a terrific job.

The buddy-cop genre has always been an almost exclusively male club. The plots of these films typically follow a strict formula revolving around two law-enforcement types whose personalities clash upon first meeting, but who must find a way to work together to bring down a big bad, violating the civil rights of every suspect they encounter along the way, before ultimately forging a powerful friendship with one another. That it’s taken this long for someone to make a buddy-cop movie with female leads is mind boggling, and telling about the sorry state of Hollywood and its relationship with women, even in this day and age. Taking its inspiration from films like “48 Hrs.” and the “Lethal Weapon” series, “The Heat” mostly sticks to the tropes of the genre. But it works, largely thanks to the chemistry between its talented and likeable lead actresses. Starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy, the film calls upon both actresses to play characters well within their respective wheelhouses. Bullock (in her first starring role since winning the

Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock in “The Heat.” PHOTO COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

Oscar for “The Blind Side” almost four years ago) is special agent Sarah Ashburn, an uptight, workaholic FBI agent who is extremely good at her job, but disliked within her department because of her massive ego and condescending attitude toward others. After learning that Sarah’s got a shot at a possible promotion, her supervisor sends Sarah to Boston to lead an investigation into a massive drug ring, as a way to prove herself and show that she can work well with her fellow lawenforcement agents. McCarthy portrays Shannon Mullins, a spectacularly vulgar, loudmouthed detective with the Boston police department. Naturally, after getting into an altercation the second they meet one another, the two women learn that they’re to be partners and are forced to find common ground if they have any hope of bringing down the nefarious kingpin. I’d love to see McCarthy attempt to break out of the box she’s built for herself a bit more in the future, but it’s impossible to deny that she’s great at what she does. She has the ability to remain a hugely likeable presence, even if the character she’s portraying is a complete asshole. A staple of the buddy-cop genre typically revolves around how the partners grow and learn from one another, so I appreciated the fact that the script allows Mullins to be herself the entire way through, no growth required. Bullock is mainly tasked with playing the straight woman to McCarthy’s whirling dervish of chaos, but doesn’t allow herself to be completely upstaged and earns plenty of laughs herself (“That is a misrepresentation of my vagina.”). Director Paul Feig’s offbeat casting choices fill out the supporting characters with talented comedians, including “MadTV” alum Michael McDonald as a ruthless drug-ring enforcer, and Kaitlin Olson (“It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”), inexplicably sporting a ridiculous Russian accent. The scenes

WILLIE NELSON’S 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION Thursday, July 4, 7 p.m. Where cinema is an event. 6 nights a week.

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Mesmerizing and tranquil, this seldom-screened film of the three-day concert that drew 25,000 people documents the sun-soaked, beer-drenched, smoky affair with candor. Deemed a “national treasure” by the Library of Congress, the film features footage of greats such as Leon Russell, Waylon Jennings, and Doug Kershaw, among others. (Yabo Yablonsky, US 1979, 100 min., 35mm)

PHOTO BY PHOTOFEST

[ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

involving Mullins’ cartoonishly belligerent Southie family are hilarious, though Jane Curtin is wasted as Mullins’ mother. I wish that scripter Katie Dippold (previously a staff writer on the TV show “Parks and Recreation”) had come up with a more compelling, less by-thenumbers plot to contain these characters. But honestly, the plot doesn’t usually matter in these films. What’s important is the chemistry between its leads and the ways they find to make their unique skill sets work in tandem. McCarthy and Bullock have a funny, awkward rapport. And while “The Heat” would have been even more groundbreaking had it been a true action-comedy starring two women (the film is, despite its surprisingly high body count, basically a workplace comedy), Dippold and Feig (“Bridesmaids”) are clearly more comfortable allowing the comedy to be front-and-center. Dippold adds in some scenes where Ashburn and Mullins have to deal with the misogynistic attitudes of their fellow officers, but mostly the film sticks to the well-worn formula of the genre. What’s great about “The Heat” is the way in which it makes it clear that these are two women who are incredibly good at their jobs and don’t care what the men around them think. As directed by Feig, the films tends to stumble its way through its boilerplate action scenes. The director’s forte is obviously his relationship with his actors; he’s able to get strong performances from everyone he works with, but his movies tend to be shapeless, oddly paced, and devoid of any sort of noticeable style (unless you argue that those attributes are a style in and of themselves). I like Feig’s films, but I can’t help wondering what this one would have been if a director with a background in action had taken a crack at it. Maybe for the sequel.

JAZZ ON A SUMMER’S DAY Tuesday, July 9, 8 p.m. Jazz comes out of dark clubs and into the sun in this compelling documentary on the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. The film captures the thriving spirit of this truly American art form through extended performances by Thelonious Monk, Sonny Stitt, Dinah Washington, Louis Armstrong, and more. Members admitted free. (Aram Avakian and Bert Stern, US 1959, 85 min., 35mm)

Film Info: 271-4090 | 900 East Avenue | Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. | WIFI Hot Spot rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

DISC JOCKEYS continues from page 11

MOONLIGHT STROLL MUSIC SERIES FRIDAY NIGHTS 8-10PM The Gardens are aglow again! Cash Wine Bar available

PERFORMANCES BY: JULY 5 - Naked Grey (rock) JULY 12 - Tullamore Celtic Band & the Young School of Irish Dance

JULY 19 - Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra

JULY 26 - The Music Makers Big Band AUG. 2 - Neville Francis and the Riddim Posse (reggae)

$9 Adults •$7 Members •$4 Youth 6-17 Kids under 5 are FREE

151 Charlotte St. Canandaigua 394-4922 •www.sonnenberg.org This organization is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts administered locally by the Finger Lakes Community Arts Grant.

28 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Top left: Candace Yeh passes the disc while being guarded by an opposing teammate. PHOTO BY MATT BURKHARTT Top right: The crowd cheers at a Rochester Dragons game at Webster Schroeder High School. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON Bottom: Members of the Rochester Dragons professional Ultimate team watch intently from the sidelines. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

change is the addition of referees, who make the calls on the field (however, the “spirit of the game” is still very much alive, and players can appeal decisions). Instead of playing to a predetermined score, AUDL games are timed, with four quarters of 12 minutes each and a 15-minute half time. If the score is tied, a five-minute overtime period will be played. If the score remains tied after overtime, a second overtime will be played in which the first team to score wins. Other notable changes include a drop in the stall count from 10 seconds to seven, a five-yard penalty for traveling when catching the disc, and a turnover for

traveling when throwing the disc. There are also other rules that result in five-, 10-, or 20-yard penalties, depending on the severity of the infraction. “When I started, I did not take it seriously,” says Dragons player Skylar Brunner. “I thought, ‘Oh, this is kind of cool.’ Now, it’s my life.” It shows. The Dragons players sprint up and down the field — back and forth — hundreds of times per game, leaping like gazelles and diving like Olympic champions, reaching, grasping for every last catch. And even at heights of 4 feet in the air or sliding on their bellies, their fingertips somehow nearly always wrap around the edges of the

plastic disc that’s cutting through the air at astonishing speeds. All that skill is a result of weekly practices and constant playing. Becker says that between team practices, Dragons games, and pick-up games, he plays Ultimate pretty much every day of the week, an ethic echoed by pretty much all of his teammates. “In December, it’s more like six days a week,” he jokes. (I think.) “This isn’t just a sport, it’s a lifestyle,” Becker says. One that so many in Rochester seem to have embraced. “I’ve met the best friends of my life this way. I’m always itching to get out on that field. And I wouldn’t trade that for anything.”

Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE ATTACK (R): An IsraeliPalestinian goes on a dangerous mission to find out the truth when the police inform him that his wife is the perpetrator behind a deadly suicide bombing. Little, Pittsford AUGUSTINE (NR): This drama follows the relationship between a renowned 19th century neurologist and the maid who becomes his star patient. Little DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG): A former supervillain is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to spy on a dangerous new super criminal in this animated sequel. With the voice talents of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Russell Brand, and Ken Jeong. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (1982): Steven Spielberg’s classic sci-fi family film about the friendship between a young boy and a friendly alien. Vintage (Tue, Jul 9, 9 p.m.) THE GIANT CLAW (1957): A giant alien bird terrorizes Earth in this 50s monster movie, and the monster has to be seen to be believed. Seriously, just Google it. Dryden (Fri, Jul 5, 8 p.m.) THE GOONIES (1985): Hey you guys! Catch this 80s classic, about a group of kids on an adventure to find buried treasure and save their

town, on the big screen. Vintage (Tue, Jul 9, 11 p.m.) JAZZ ON A SUMMER’S DAY (1959): A great concert documentary about the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. Featuring performances from Thelonious Monk, Dinah Washington, Louie Armstrong, and more. Dryden (Tue, Jul 9, 8 p.m.) KEVIN HART: LET ME EXPLAIN (R): Documentary following the popular stand-up comedian on his 2012 concert tour. Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE KINGS OF SUMMER (PG-13: Coming-of-age story about three boys who decide to escape their parents by building a house in the woods and living off the land. Little LOOTERA (NR): The daughter of a wealthy landowner falls in love with a mysterious stranger in this Bollywood film, inspired by O. Henry’s “The Last Leaf.” Henrietta THE LONE RANGER (PG-13): The fictional cowboy hero gets the summer blockbuster treatment, from director Gore Verbinski (“Pirates of the Caribbean”). Starring Armie Hammer, Johnny Depp, and Helena Bonham Carter. Hi-yo Silver! Away! Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster ONE TRACK HEART: THE STORY OF KRISHNA DAS (NR): This documentary examines one man’s path from a promising rock and roll career to becoming a worldrenowned spiritual teacher. Little (Tue, Jul 9, 7 p.m.)

SAFETY LAST! (1923): Harold Lloyd stars in this silent comedy. about a young man out to find success in the big city. The film features Lloyd’s now iconic climb up the face of a clock tower. Dryden (Sat, Jul 6, 8 p.m.; Sun, Jul 10, 2 p.m.) WILLIE NELSON’S 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION (1979): This concert film documents Willie Nelson’s 2nd annual 4th of July picnic, which drew a crowd of over 25,000 people. Dryden (Thu, Jul 4, 7 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 42 (PG-13): Brian Helgeland writes and directs this biopic about Jackie Robinson as he’s signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers under team GM Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford). Also starring Chadwick Boseman, Christopher Meloni, and Alan Tudyk. Movies 10 AFTER EARTH (PG-13): Will and Jaden Smith play a father and son who struggle for survival after crash landing on Earth, 1000 years after humanity has abandoned the planet. Movies 10 COPPERHEAD (PG-13): A family in Upstate New York faces the devastating effects of the Civil War. Starring Billy Campbell. Pittsford THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine

Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Movies 10 EPIC (PG): A young girl gets caught in the middle of a battle between the forces good and evil over the fate of the natural world in the animated adventure film. With the voices of Beyoncé Knowles, Colin Farrell, Josh Hutcherson, Amanda Seyfried, and Aziz Ansari. Canandaigua, Movies 10 FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG-13): The sixth installment of the streetracing action film series. Expect fast (and potentially furious) cars, which may or may not explode in epic fashion. Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez, Luke Evans, and Tyrese Gibson. Cinema, Culver Ridge THE HANGOVER PART III (R): The Wolfpack returns in the final film of the blockbuster comedy franchise. Starring Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, and Zach Galifianakis. Movies 10 THE HEAT (R): See review on page 27. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE INTERNSHIP (PG-13): Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn reteam in this comedy about two out of work salesmen competing to land an internship at Google. Canandaigua, Cinema, Movies 10, Vintage JURASSIC PARK 3D (PG-13): Steven Spielberg’s beloved adventure tale, about a dinosaur theme park that goes terribly wrong, returns to the big screen

and gets the snazzy 3D treatment. Clever girl. Movies 10 MAN OF STEEL (PG-13): Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Zack Snyder and Christopher Nolan’s angsty new reboot of the Superman franchise! Starring Henry Cavill, Kevin Costner, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Diane Lane, and Russell Crowe. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G): This prequel to Pixar’s “Monsters, Inc.” shows us the origins of Mike and Sulley’s friendship, which dates all the way back in their college days. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (PG-13): Joss Whedon takes a break from superheroes with a low-budget adaptation of Shakespeare’s play, starring all your Whedonverse favorites. Pittsford NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13): A team of illusionists use their talents to perpetrate a series of heists targeting corrupt business leaders. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, and Isla Fisher. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown PAIN & GAIN (R): Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson star as bodybuilders who get caught up in a kidnapping plot that goes bad in Michael Bay’s latest action extravaganza, inspired by true events. Also starring

Tony Shalhoub, Ed Harris, Rob Corddry, Anthony Mackie, and Rebel Wilson. Movies 10 THE PURGE (R): In the year 2022, the government hopes to keep the crime rate at an all-time low by instituting a policy where all crime is legal for 12 hours. Starring Ethan Hawke and Lena Headey. Movies 10 THIS IS THE END (R): Seth Rogen, James Franco, Jonah Hill, and a host of other mainstays of the Judd Apatow repertory company play themselves in this comedyhorror-adventure about the end of the world. With Jay Baruchel, Craig Robinson, and Danny McBride. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster WHAT MAISIE KNEW (R): A young girl is caught in the middle of her parents’ bitter custody battle. Based on the Henry James novel, starring Julianne Moore, Alexander Skarsgård, and Steve Coogan. Little WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG-13): See full review on page 26. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster WORLD WAR Z (PG-13): Brad Pitt tries to stop the zombie outbreak that threatens to destroy the world in this apocalyptic action thriller. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

> page 29 UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Open or closed adoption. YOU choose the family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. Call 24/7. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Automotive 1999 SAAB 9.5 good condition, green. Automatic. Runs good, needs transmission filter. Hepa filter brand new. $900 OBO, 5857647587.

2002 CADILLAC DTS 130,000 gentle miles. Onyx Blue with clean beige leather Driven to Church for the most part. Meticulous care given, ( i.e. weekly wash, premium gas+ frequent oil and lube) $3,995.00, 585-861-7114 ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FREE OIL CHANGE Chevy, Buick, & GMC under 100K miles, Rochester and surrounding towns, moultonshop5@gmail.com

For Sale 13” TV, CONVERTER BOX antennna $47 585-752-1000 2 DIGITAL T.V. CONVERTER BOXES. 26” Magnovox T.V. set.

All in perfect working order. All for $39 585-654-9480 2 GAL. KEROSINE In 3 GAL container. $10 585-490-5870 3 1/2 T Hydraulic car jack $49 585-490-5870 ALUMINUM FOLDING CHAIRS (2) $15. 585-490-5870 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $20 585-880-2903 COFFEE TABLE 18”w x 30”l x 16”h Dark Walnut. $16 585-4905870

DARK WALNUT TABLE 18”w x 33” L x 27” h with 1 drawer $45 585-490-5870

conflagratards from smokin your stash Gardall Fire Safe 10x10x13 $45 585-749-6968

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GLASS TABLES Oval glass top coffee table $50, 2 round, glass end tables $25 each or $100 for all plus 2 table lamps. Please call 585-325-7979

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30 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-8802903 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585-490-5870 KODAK ICE MAKER Brand new in box. Will hold 1 bag of ice or ice and food or drinks. 585-383-0405 MAGNAVOX digital to analog converter $28 585-490-5870 NORDIC TRACK SPORT EXCERSIZER Simulator, X-country skiing, adjustable resistance & elevation. Excellent condition. Charlotte 585-6636983 $50 PALM TREE 5’ tall $15 585490-5870 PALM TREE 6’ tall $17 585490-5870 PELLET STOVE Englander Model #55-SHP-10 plus chimney kit $1300 new. Use 1 season . Buy this stove, save our planet. Asking $875 or B/O 585-749-6968 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 SUITCASE roll around, large 585325-7979 VARIOUS Shovel, rakes, brooms, heavy duty $3 ea, duffle bags $3 ea, Hand tools $2, Ramps (car) heavy duty $35, work shoe & boots $1, wire cage for rabbit $25 585-752-1000 WEDDING: Card box, ring pillow basket, toast glasses, 2 candle holders. Excellent, must see $50 585-392-5127 WHIRLPOOL GAS DRYER. Very Good Condition. 3 years old. $50 Call 585-527-8024 WOOD GARDEN FIGURES, 2 girls, 1 dog, stands in ground. All three $10 585-880-2903

Computer Services COMPUTER PROBLEMS? Call Turnquist Computer Services for expert in-home help. Setup, troubleshooting, maintenance, repairs. Hours convenient for you. Competitive, low rates. Call 512-8827 today.

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HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube.com/user/ Chaztize7

continues on page 32

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Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

A Browncroft Beauty, Ready to Become Home 219 Browncroft Boulevard In 1914, when Charles Brown subdivided 300 acres of his nursery to create the Browncroft neighborhood, he envisioned a completely planned tract that would become a Rochester showplace. Much detail was paid to the aesthetics of the neighborhood: elaborate flowering trees and greenery created a parklike atmosphere while restrictive covenants determined the style of homes to be built. And all these years later, the Browncroft neighborhood is still one of the most idyllic enclaves in the city! On Browncroft Boulevard, canopied by Sycamores and London Planetrees, sits 11 mostly stucco and brick-clad homes developed by Cusimano, a builder who developed beautiful architecture throughout the city in the early 20th century. Much detail was paid to the work, demonstrated wonderfully in this Tudor Revival style residence, complete with sweeping angled gables, broad banks of windows, flower boxes and a corner entry. The curved brick walkway leads to a semienclosed portico, allowing a well-preserved wooden arched door to set the tone for this historic home. The interior retains all of the original pocket and leaded glass doors. The home’s leaded glass windows have been maintained throughout the years, allowing for seamless functionality for generations to come. Walking through a large pocket door, one enters the living room, which boasts oak flooring bordered with dark inlays and intricate plaster-cast crown moldings, shipped by way of Italy thanks to Cusimano! The living room also features a woodburning fireplace flanked by bookshelves and decorative leaded glass windows.

Entertainers will rejoice with the size of the dining room. The beautiful glass chandelier appears to be original to the home and the built-in cabinet affords no shortage for glassware displays. Through a swinging door is the cook’s workshop, the kitchen. For a house of this era, the footprint is unusually spacious and features an adjoining breakfast room. The staircase leads to a second level with three large bedrooms featuring oak floors, plenty of storage and diamond-paned leaded glass windows. The full bath has been sensitively remodeled. Not included in the square footage is a finished portion of the attic. The outdoor space is wonderfully utilized. The brick patio in the fenced yard lends itself perfectly to summer barbeques and family gatherings. Those unfamiliar with the Browncroft neighborhood will delight in the amenities found within walking distance. The Winton Branch library is a block away, so too is the bustling Winfield Grille and Wintonaire, staples in the neighborhood. To the east is Ellison Park, 447 acres of natural woodlands, walking trails and playgrounds. This unique property is being offered at $209,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R219919 or contact Wendy Helbig, Keller Williams Realty at 585-758-8358. by Jason Roberts Jason is The Landmark Society House & Garden Tour Chairperson and the majordomo of The Good Home Steward, now found at facebook.com/GoodHomeSteward.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 31 HAMMOND AURORA ORGAN Nice sounding Hammond Spinet organ w/ Leslie speaker built-in. Solid state. Includes bench $500 Hurry! 585-455-5739 LOOKING FOR MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS. please no freelancers apply. Available evenings, equipment & transportation Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 SEEKING GUITARIST Who likes early Beatles and Who, Jefferson Airplane, Springsteen, Ramones, B-52s and X. I play bass, write, and sing backup. Want to jam without pressure, see where things go. mooskamovers@aol.com SEEKING VOCALIST that can learn many songs quickly. Many styles of music, lead & background. Please no one who requires too much attantion. Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” christine@rochester-citynews. com HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-9593419

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment 20013 - 2014 VACANCIES: Physics (9-12), Biology (9-12), Biology/

Physics (9-12), Earth Science (912), Mathematics (8-12), Physical Science (5-8), Special Education General Curriculum (K-4), Special Education Early Childhood – Prince

Industrial Sewing Position East Side manufacturer seeks qualified Industrial Sewer. Minimum of 3 years experience required. Automotive/marine experienced desired- will be working with vinyl, leather, and carpet. Must be self- directed, able to work from English language patterns, and be proficient with measuring devices. Ability to operate high and low speed industrial sewing machines. Attention to detail required. Must be able to maintain minimum re-cuts while achieving daily requirements. Must have excellent attendance and a willingness to be cross trained in other departments. Excellent starting pay/benefits.

Resumes with wage requirement to: P.O. BOX 344 Newark, NY 14513

Edward County Public Schools, Farmville, VA –434-315-2100. www.pecps.k12.va.us Closing Date: Until filled. EOE

New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093

FOREMAN to lead utility field crews. Outdoor physical work, many positions, paid training, $17/hr. plus weekly performance bonuses after promotion, living allowance when traveling, company truck and benefits. Must have strong leadership skills, good driving history, and be able to travel in New York and NE States. Email resume to Recruiter 4@ osmose.com or apply online at www.OsmoseUtilities.com EOE M/F/D/V

DRIVERS HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile!

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@lifespan-roch.org.

NOW HIRING MBE/DBE/WBE Subcontractors/Suppliers

One of the leading General Contractors in Western NY is soliciting bids for an upcoming construction project in Rochester. New York State Certified MBE, DBE, and WBE subcontractors are requested for all scopes of work for the construction of this project set to break ground in July of 2013, with an estimated completion in Fall of 2014.

Please send information, or a Vendor Qualification Form to: TAYLOR – The Builders 2580 Baird Road, Penfield, NY 14526, fax to 585-248-5630, or email to RochesterGC@Yahoo.com. No phone calls will be accepted! “An Equal Opportunity Employer”

32 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 5467220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help TrapNeuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org HOPE HALL Recruiting volunteers to call sponsors and assist with events. Please contact: Michele KaiderKorol, Development Associate at Hope Hall, (585) 426-5824 x111. LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-Time. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

Not. of Form. of SENECA WINTERBERGERS LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/9/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 30 Gravel Hill Lane, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Ruffles Boutique LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 17, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 35 Brunswick Street, Apt. 2, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 26 SAGINAW DRIVE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 6/20/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 26 Saginaw Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 4699 LAKE AVENUE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/13/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4699 Lake Ave., Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business locaton. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] A & D REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/28/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 22 Whitestone Lane Rochester Lane Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] CRC RESOURCES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 140 Metro Park, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DGMAS, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 18, 2013 with an effective date of

formation of June 18, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Doan EZ Auto Rental LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on June 17, 2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

NEW MARKET VENTURES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/12/09. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 38 Kimbark RD Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Chris Rimlinger 38 Kimbark RD Rochester, NY 14610.

[ NOTICE ] E.C.O. ENTERPRISE, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 235 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] GASLIGHT PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KD BENEFITS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. Of Org., filed with the SSNY on 5/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 311 Brooksboro Drive, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KimSanity, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 12, 2013. The name was changed to KimSulting, LLC. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Sanfilippo Circle, Rochester, New York 14625. Purpose: any lawful activity.

LEGAL NOTICE FORMATION of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the LLC is RealGem Properties, LLC. 2. Articles of Org. were filed with Department of State of NY on June 7, 2013. 3.County of office: Monroe. 4. The Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: c/o Teaposy, Inc., 1900 Clinton Avenue, S., Unit 18111, Rochester, New York 14618.

[ NOTICE ] Not. of form of KCP Solutions of Upstate New York, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 5/24/13 County: Monroe SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 2 Clebourne Dr. Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of A Muse Ink, LLC. Art. Of Org. with the Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 4/18/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 620 Park Avenue, Suite 161, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of A&M Reporting, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/30/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 376 Westside Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of DL CHURCH WEBSITES, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. PO Box 71, W Henrietta,

NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. Of Form. Of GQR Consulting LLC, Art. Of Org. Filed with SSNY 4/17/13. County: Monroe SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 194 Saint Regis Drive South, Rochester, NY 14618, Purpose: Any lawful Activities.

Notice of Formation of 1372 EDGEMERE DRIVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by PLUM HOUSE SUSHI INC dba PLUM HOUSE SUSHI ,686-688 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by RENYI, INC dba SHANGHAI RESTAURANT, 2920 W. Henrietta RD., Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. Name of foreign LLC is Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/30/13. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Formed: 5/29/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business: 150 Verona Street, Rochester, NY 14608. The address of the office required to be maintained in Delaware is its registered agent: Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 1679 S. Dupont Hwy, Suite 100, Dover DE, 19901. The name and address of the authorized officer in Delaware where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State, State of Delaware, Division of Corporations, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BIRCHGROVE REAL ESTATE LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 00-00-00. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 10068, Rochester,

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 151 Park, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/29/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 151 Park Ave., Rear Bldg, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 212 BREWING COMPANY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 455 POST AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 124 Stockton Ln, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 4700 East Lake Road, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 128 Lynx Ct., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 880 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bansbach

Zoghlin P.C., 31 Erie Canal Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name: OpenTee, LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/20/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 117 Heather Dr, Rochester, 14625. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ADAM SOLUTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aidan Samuel, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AVANT GARDE AMENITIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Don Trooien, 212 Brewing Company, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Bernard Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3 Box Car Dr., North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CASTLE PARK, LLC.

cont. on page 34 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

Legal Ads > page 33 Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 58 Whitestone Ln., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Howard R. Crane, c/o Relin Goldstein & Crane LLP, 28 E. Main St., Ste. 1800, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Direct EDU, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 5/13/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 772 Shorecliff Drive Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HearShield, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 90 Sycamore Ridge, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Manning Marine, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 290 Woodcliff Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process

against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Marino Law Group, PLLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 S. Washington St., Ste. 220, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: to practice the profession of Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MRECC Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 45 Bauers Cove, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NB4 PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Rd., Ste 5, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Personalized Visual Learning LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of

State on 05/08/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 36 Cobb Terrace, Rochester, NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PINK SALON, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Galwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Primetime Ventures, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 290 Woodcliff Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of REN LIQUORS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place,

Adult Services

Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Skyroc Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SNOWBIRD PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/11/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Chad R. Hayden, Esq., 1634 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Solid State Concrete Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SOUTH HICKORY PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STRATEGIC ALLIANCE NETWORK LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TAMARAC ORGANIZATIONAL SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location:

34 CITY JULY 3-9, 2013

Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 4 Kingsbury Ct., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Julie LaFave at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Universal LEC LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corp. System, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of USA Choice Realty, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YL PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Midfirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Traycie L. Calhoun, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/7/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at Monroe County Office Bldg., at W. Main Street, State of New York on 07/17/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 127 Perinton Street, Rochester, NY 14615- 3141. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 090.30, BLOCK: 1, LOT: 41. Approximate amount of judgment $90,975.12 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 13297/2010. Kristine Demo Vazquez, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson

Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: May 9, 2013 1037221 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 07/10/2013 [ NOTICE ] Portable Basement, LLC has filled Arts. of Org. with the Secretary of State on 4/12/2013. Office location: Monroe County. United States Corporation Agents, INC. is designated as the agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. USCA, INC. shall mail process to: 7014 13th Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Manufacturing. [ NOTICE ] VISION BUICK GMC LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Daniel E. Edwards, 800 Panorama Trail S, Rochester, NY 14625. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] VISION TWO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 421 Sundance Trail, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Front Runner Media LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 1/ 25/07. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 7014 13th Ave. Suite 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SUPERIOR CARE AGENCY LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) , 05/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 207 Tremont Street, Suite 112, Rochester, New York, 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Developub LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 07/30/12. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to United States Corporation Agents Inc, 7014 13th Ave Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The purpose of the

Company is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Wrightstone, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 29, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1 Park Avenue, Brockport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1 Park Avenue, Brockport, New York 14420. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION SOVEREIGN VORTEX SYSTEMS LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 05/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to SOVEREIGN VORTEX SYSTEMS LLC, C/O JOHN COTTON, 620 PARK AVE., ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-13004SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Robert M. Schmidt; Leslie Avila, a/k/a Leslie Avila-Schmidt People of the State of New York, Probation; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance; Marlene Cruz; Carey Shillea; Carole Coleman Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 21, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 12, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 177 Arbutus Street, Rochester, NY 14609; Tax Account No. 092.771-58 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9016 of Deeds, page 10. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record

and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $36,641.42 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Victoria Lagoe, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-13009 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Cora N. Mack a/k/a Cora N. Prescott; GE Money Bank; ) Capital One Bank USA NA; CACH LLC Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 29, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 10, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 87 Cindy Lane, Rochester, NY 14626; Tax Account No. 059.034-66 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10225 of Deeds, page 612. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $95,706.17 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Loren H. Kroll, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-2591 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. David E. Haasis; Beate A. Haasis, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 23, 2013 and entered herein, I, the

Legal Ads undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 10, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 27 Rodessa Road, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 075.344-4 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6888 of Deeds, page 310. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $58,961.43 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: May 2013 Matthew Nafus, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-9142 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Ronney F. Morris, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Ronney F. Morris, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; ESL Federal Credit Union; United States of America; People of the State of New York. Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 31, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate

in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 626 Lawrence Road, Brockport, NY 14420; Tax Account No. 030.041-4 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10644 of Deeds, page 558. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $58,142.93 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Christopher Calabrese, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-9970 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs Christopher M. Vanhall, a/k/a Christopher Vanhall; Karon Lewis; NY Financial Services, LLC; Arrow Financial Services, LLC; Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 31, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 94 Clearview Avenue, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 009.673-8.1 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9345 of Deeds, page 287. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,256.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional

allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Vincent E. Merante, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE } Index No. 2012-10756 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. William M. DuBois; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 29, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 12, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 142 Gates Greece Townline Road, Rochester, NY 14606; Tax Account No. 084.043-32 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10600 of Deeds, page 282. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $75,000.95 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 James Grosso, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-9837 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JUAN R. IZQUIERDO; LYDIA RAMOS, if living, or if she be dead, her husband, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-ininterest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through LYDIA RAMOS, by purchase, inheritance, lien

or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective husbands, or widowers of hers, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF AEGIS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-5; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the amended complaint in the aboveentitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this supplemental summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the amended complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: June 10, 2013 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing supplemental summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated June 14, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose certain tax liens (the “Tax Lien”) covering the property known as 27 Chapin Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account No. 091.76-1-51 (the “Premises”). The relief sought is the sale of the Premises at public auction in satisfaction of the Tax Lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $4,463.47, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorney’s fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Premises. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 238-2000

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