Issuu on Google+

STEVE GADD

PUDDLE OF MUDD

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013 Free

GUNPOETS

DAVE RIVELLO ENSEMBLE

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

EVENTS: SCULPTURE PARK FAMILY DAY, HEP KIDS

20

FILM: “WORLD WAR Z,” “MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING”

26

RESTAURANT REVIEW: BROWN HOUND BISTRO

11

URBAN JOURNAL: CUOMO’S BIG GAMBLE

3

CROSSWORD

35

THE BYGONE FEW

Vol 42 No 42

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

The question is, “Where do we start?” not “Whose fault is it?” NEWS, PAGE 6

The Empire Zone strikes back. DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 4

Rochester Casino’s long odds. GAMING, PAGE 5

UR goes down Alice’s rabbit hole. ART, PAGE 22

MuCCC gets absurd. THEATER, PAGE 20

LGBT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

After marriage: the future of gay rights For many in the LGBT community, the Supreme Court’s decisions on California’s Proposition 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act have been painfully slow in coming. The cases embody an issue that has been at the forefront of the gay rights movement for more than a decade. But if you think that marriage equality is the Rochester LGBT community’s highest priority, you might be mistaken. It all depends on whom you ask.

Some community leaders say the fight for marriage equality has eclipsed other important issues in the LGBT community. For starters: is the struggle over? Will organizations like the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley remain relevant? And when will the movement address issues facing the LGBT community of color and the transgender community? (Pictured: Rochester LGBT activists Anne Tischer, left, and Bess Watts.)

DOES SEX HURT? Are you between 18 and 50 years of age and have pain with intercourse and tampon insertion? The University of Rochester is conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled research study sponsored by the National Institute of Health to determine the effectiveness of Gabapentin compared to placebo in reducing intercourse pain. Participants will receive Gabapentin one half of the time and placebo (inactive treatment) one half of the time, study-related care at no cost, and $50 per visit, or a total of $300 if all six visits are completed.

Call Linda Leoni at 585-275-3160 or email linda_leoni@urmc.rochester.edu.

Even more than sushi!

$5 Off your $25 Purchase (One Coupon per Table) exp. 8/20/2013 Valid at Genesee location ONLY

910 Genesee St. | 585.271.0979

Rumi’s M E DITE R RAN EAN G R I LL

STARTING THIS WEEK Come in for our Chicken Shawarma and try our Maryland Crab Cakes!

Taking Reservations!

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit those selections. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

a comedian such as Bill Maher as offering some sort of wisdom (“Bill Maher’s Funny Fury”). He claims to simply “inform,” but his slander of those who hold opposing points of view as “really … racially motivated” reveals his ignorance. Name-calling is a retreat from reason, a lazy refuge from having to argue, an abandonment of the respect for others that binds the social contact.

Fracking is ‘lunacy’

FRANK HOWARD

I read Victor Poleshuck’s stunning suggestion that fracking would be good for US foreign policy (“Fracking and Foreign Affairs,” Feedback). What is so difficult to understand about the fact that poisoned water and exposure to radium and radon kill people? It beats me that someone would gloss over this in favor of improved foreign policy. Perhaps it’s the difficulty of getting your mind around the magnitude of water involved. If all 200,000 wells proposed for New York are fracked just once at 5 million gallons per well, that comes to 1 trillion gallons of poisoned water. That is more water than is contained in nine of the 11 Finger Lakes combined. Two hundred billion to 400 billion gallons of that water returns to the surface radioactive. This lethal liquid must be shipped or stored somewhere and kept away from people, animals, wildlife, and whatever clean drinking water remains, with no accidents or spills. It is ludicrous to pretend that this can be done. People will be hurt and killed. Large areas of land will be unlivable, and our drinking water, the bedrock of life, will be ruined. What I struggle to get my mind around is why we are even considering such lunacy except for the enrichment of a few powerful investors. Fracking is insane. It’s work that would make a terrorist proud. JOHN KASTNER

2735 Monroe Ave. | Rochester, NY

585.242.7864 Mon-Thu: 11-9pm • Fri: 11-10pm Sat: 10-10pm • Sun: 10-9pm

RUMISGRILLCAFE.COM 2 CITY

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

Maher’s ‘lazy refuge’

It is a sad statement of our civilization’s state that we uphold

Crosswalk dangers

Recently a new crosswalk was painted on East Main Street between the YMCA and a city parking garage. I parked in that garage and was in the crosswalk as cars coming from the west approached me. They didn’t look like they were going to stop; however, I stood my ground rather than run back to the sidewalk, since a state law says they are supposed to stop. The lady driving in my lane almost came to a full stop but then went around me by going into the parking lane. As she passed me, I yelled to her that she was supposed to stop. She looked at me as if I was from Mars. After she passed me I started to continue across the street, and at that moment a car in the inside lane heading east ran into me and then continued down the street. Some employees of the YMCA witnessed the accident and called both an ambulance and the police. When the policeman arrived I mentioned that I would like to see one of those signs placed on the crosswalk, saying it’s a state law that you’re supposed to stop. He suggested I make a big stink in regards to the sign and commented that no one stops for people in crosswalks. What’s the use of having a crosswalk if people still have to wait for all the cars to pass before crossing a street? It was probably safer to let people cross the street without the crosswalk than to give a false sense of security with the crosswalk. I realize that in Rochester, much of our Police

Department’s efforts are spent preventing crime and solving crimes. We seem to rely heavily on red-light cameras to enforce traffic violations. But it’s about time to put forth some effort enforcing the state law regarding crosswalks. CHARLIE PETERSON

Why students don’t graduate

Why is the graduation rate so low? (Rochester’s Grad Rate Dips,” News Blog) In part because kids enter ninth grade incapable of doing work even at a sixth-grade level. Social promotion is a major reason for these numbers. In the school I’m working at this year, not a single seventh- or eighth-grader was held back. This includes one student of mine who earned a 0 percent for one marking period and less than 5 percent for at least two others. (He wasn’t the only one.) The high schools that are receiving the eighth graders from my school are receiving a cohort where 7 percent of them were reading at grade level last year. Far more than half of those students simply cannot graduate in four years due to the Regents requirements. My school is not the only one committing this. High schools can only do so much against the rushing tide of failed students headed their way every year. There’s only so much students can advance over and above the one year’s worth they are expected to advance (especially when they start out six or seven years behind their suburban cohort). These numbers skew the blame game away from the designers of this failed policy (administration) and the failed family and social systems endemic in the impoverished regions of the city and onto the backs of the highschool teachers who are trying their damnedest to create silk purses out of sows’ ears. Until students are promoted based on achievement and not birthday, the graduation rate will not improve. Period. YUGOBOY

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly June 26 - July 2, 2013 Vol 42 No 42 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Cuomo’s big gamble to create new jobs We’re a long way from getting a casino in Rochester, but the idea keeps raising its head –currently by the governor himself. So I keep poking around, collecting studies on the impact of casinos on their communities. And my conclusion, based on what I keep finding, is that any municipality thinking about embracing a casino ought to be very, very careful. And very, very skeptical. Governor Cuomo sings a common refrain as he justifies his enthusiasm for casinos: they’re an economic development tool. They create jobs. And yes, they do create jobs – in the casinos. Nearby, though, based on what I’ve read, the story isn’t necessarily as good. Casino operators like to keep their customers captive, so they offer more than gambling. Large casinos often include a hotel and restaurants. And they often offer low hotel rates and deep discounts on food, making it hard for nearby businesses to compete. For casinos operated by Indian tribes – the only kind, under state law, that could be opened in Rochester – the competition would be even tougher. Those casinos are tax exempt. A 2004 study by Rochester’s Center for Governmental Research – done for the Wilmorite development company when it was interested in creating a casino in Rochester – found that there could be some positive economic benefits, in job creation and in revenue for the city. But CGR qualified its findings carefully. For instance, it predicted that “the social cost burden” – social costs associated with an increase in gambling – could be as high as $10 million annually. CGR also noted that Rochester would be entering the casino business late, behind a fair number of existing operations in western New York and Canada. That would make it harder to attract people outside the Rochester area. And while a local casino might attract Rochesterians who had been going to Turning Stone, Buffalo, or Niagara Falls, the CGR report said, it might also take customers from other local entertainment venues. And, the CGR report said, if the casino included restaurants and retail offerings, “existing downtown food, drink, and retail establishments are likely to suffer a loss of business, with a cascading impact on property values and property taxation.” And if the casino included a hotel? That “would very likely increase vacancy rates among existing facilities,” CGR said, “and reduce hotel and motel tax receipts.” More recently, in a 2011 study of the possible effects of Indian-run casinos,

Casinos do create jobs – in the casinos. Nearby, though, at competing hotels and restaurants, the story isn’t necessarily as good.” Niagara University associate professor Steve Siegel predicted that if the Seneca Gaming Corporation created the casino it wanted in Buffalo, the result for the city would be a net job loss. Based on a study of SGC’s financial figures, Siegel concluded that “if a full-service casino is constructed anywhere within the City of Buffalo, the impact on the lodging, food, and beverage and entertainment industries will be devastating.” It’s disconcerting that the governor is so enamored with casinos as an economic development tool for New York State. I know, I know: when New Yorkers go to other states to gamble, we lose money to those states – money from taxes, money from food and beverage sales, money from hotel stays and payroll. Cuomo wants to bring that gambling and that money back home, and create some jobs in the process. I get that argument. But honest to goodness, with the number of casinos that’ll be opening in this state, we’ll be spreading the gambling benefits pretty thin. And we’ll add some social costs that the other states are paying now. And New York State gets plenty of benefits from out-of-state residents who come here as tourists and convention goers. Besides, isn’t it kinda sad that as we scrape around to try to replace Buffalo’s steel industry and Rochester’s Kodak jobs, a state that was once proud to be known as the Empire State is reduced to dreaming of casinos as an economic engine?

THREE GAMES $5 • 5-8PM • MON-FRI A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD BAR!

L&MES LAN

JUNE BEER SPECIALS

GREAT LAKES ALCHEMY HOUR IPA HEAVY SEAS BIG DIPA TROEGS NUGGET NECTAR SOUTHERN TIER INNER LOOP

L&M Lanes Gift Cards Now Available!

Any denomination - Great gift idea!

SPRING LEAGUES FORMING NOW!

873 Mercha Merchants Rd. • 288-1210 www.LMlanes.com www.L Find us on

PROUDLY PRESENTS

June 27, 29 • 7:30pm June 30 • 2:00pm School of the Arts • 45 Prince Street Rochester Adults: Students/Seniors/TANYS:

$15 in advance $10 in advance

$20 at the door $15 at the door

www.everyonestheatre.com Music and Lyrics by Dolly Parton. Book by Patricia Resnick. Based on the 20th Century Fox Picture. Originally produced on Broadway by Robert Greenblatt, April 2009. 9 TO 5, THE MUSICAL is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 http://www.mtishows.com/

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Grad rate slips

Graduation rates in the Rochester school district fell from 45.5 percent in 2011 to 43.4 percent in 2012 for students who entered ninth grade in 2008 and graduated in June 2012. The rate is slightly higher for students who graduated in August. Rochester’s grad rate is the lowest of New York’s Big Five school districts. The statewide grad rate remained at 74 percent.

URMC purchasing Lakeside

After closing suddenly in April, Lakeside Hospital in Brockport is being acquired by the University of Rochester Medical Center. Plans call for re-opening urgent care followed by emergency care. Lakeside faced about $25 million in losses and had already let go of much of its staff before URMC’s announcement.

Ethics proposal advances

The Monroe County Legislature’s Agenda/ Charter Committee passed Democratic legislation to change a provision of county ethics law. The proposal prohibits county employees and officers from accepting gifts from anyone with an interest in county business.

The full Legislature must vote on the proposal.

News

Eastman agreement

The state and Kodak reached agreement regarding future operation of Eastman Business Park. Kodak will establish a $49 million environmental trust fund for cleanup work at the park and in the Genesee River. The fund will also protect future park tenants from environmental liabilities, says a release from Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office. The broader agreement also includes a commitment from Kodak to keep key corporate operations at the park, and it advances plans to sell the park’s utilities to a subsidiary of Recycled Energy Development.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

The Empire Zone strikes back

The Medley Centre project in Irondequoit isn’t held in high esteem by the public. Neither were the state’s Empire Zones — businesses in these designated areas were entitled to tax incentives. Even state officials agreed the zones were so flawed the whole system had to be junked.

Castañeda out in Brockport

Brockport Mayor Maria “Connie” Castañeda was soundly defeated in her re-election bid by Margay Blackman, a current village trustee and retired professor of anthropology at SUNY Brockport. Castañeda has been a divisive figure in Brockport politics. Also winning election were Blackman’s running mates, Valerie Ciciotti and Carol Hannan. They will serve four-year terms on the village board.

The company that owns Medley Centre has received more than $3 million in property tax credits since the mall became an Empire Zone in 2004. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

But combined, Medley and the zone program make for one glorious display of New York’s often ironic economic development system. Medley Centre was designated an Empire Zone in 2004 when it was purchased by Bersin Properties LLC. It remained an Empire Zone when developer Scott Congel bought the mall and its parent company — Bersin — a few years later. From 2004 to 2011, Bersin Properties LLC received $3.3 million in property tax credits, which it used to reduce its state tax bill. The company received credits of $493,427 for 2011, $322,813 for 2010, and $616,966 for 2009, according to state records. Bersin Properties will keep getting the credit through 2017, though the amounts will get progressively smaller after 2013, says Laura Magee,

a regional spokesperson for Empire State Development, the state’s economic development arm. The credits are determined by a formula written into state tax law. The credits have been large enough to offset Bersin Properties’ obligations under a local payment-inlieu-of-taxes agreement. Basically, Medley’s developer, Congel, is making regular, annual payments under the PILOT agreement and then, in a way, getting reimbursed via state tax credits. In an e-mail, Magee wrote that the state let the Empire Zone expire in 2010 “because there were inefficiencies, a lack of accountability, and it did not yield as much private investment and job creation as it should have.”

NEW!

CITY CITY NEWSPAPER

on

pinterest.com/roccitynews DINING · NEWS · ART · CULTURE

4 CITY

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

The Seneca Nation’s casinos are on tax-exempt sovereign land ceded by local governments. In return, the governments, as well as the state, get a cut of gross gambling revenues. “You’re in the business of gambling,” says Rochester Mayor Tom Richards.

GAMING | BY JEREMY MOULE

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Casino’s long odds

RCSD redux

The Seneca Nation of Indians now has exclusive casino rights in much of New York’s western end, including Rochester. But that doesn’t mean a Seneca-run casino will open here anytime soon. Or ever. The Seneca Nation was granted exclusive rights as part of the resolution of a longstanding dispute with the state over gaming revenues. That means any fullfledged casino in Rochester would be owned and operated by the Senecas. And Seneca officials have had exploratory talks with city and county officials in the past, says Mayor Tom Richards. Richards says he’s not opposed to a casino, but he’s cautious and doesn’t see it as an economic panacea for Rochester. He says that a site would have to be selected carefully and that he doesn’t support putting a casino downtown. Opening a Seneca casino in Rochester would be a complicated decision involving issues ranging from money to community character, Richards says. And it’d also involve negotiating contracts between the Seneca Nation and the city, Monroe County, and New York State. The Seneca Nation owns its existing Western New York casinos, which are all on tax-exempt sovereign land ceded by local governments. In return for giving up the land,

FILE PHOTO

the local governments, as well as the state, get a cut of gross gambling revenues. “You’re in the business with them,” Richards says. “You’re in the business of gambling.” City Council President Lovely Warren, who is challenging Richards in this year’s mayoral primary, says she would want to know how city residents would benefit from a proposed casino, as well as how many permanent jobs would be created, what the city’s cut would be, the location, and how the casino would look. “At this point in time, I’m not leaning one way or another,” Warren says. Richards and Warren say there are casino models that offer gaming without amenities like hotels or entertainment. Those models encourage visitors to patronize other businesses and attractions, they say, and may be a better option for Rochester.

In his effort to save city schools, Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas is turning to three former high-level district administrators: Ray Giamartino, Ralph Spezio, and Suzanne Johnston. | Giamartino will serve as chief of school transformation, where his primary task will be to move some of the lowest performing schools in the state to schools in good standing. He was formerly a school chief with the district, overseeing 20 schools in the northeast area of the city. He left the RCSD in 2010 to become superintendent of the East Rochester school district. | Spezio will become executive principal of School 17 when the school reopens in the fall. He returns to the district after leading School 17 from 1990 to 2002. | Johnston will serve as an outside educational expert for Joseph P. Wilson Commencement Academy. She will work as a mentor to the school’s new principal, Uma Mehta, to raise Wilson’s academic performance. | All three hires have a long history with the district. Giamartino has considerable experience in literacy development, while Johnston led Wilson Magnet during some of its best performing years. Spezio helped raise awareness about lead poisoning’s impact on city students.

Clams:

LIVE LOBSTERS STARTING AT

5

$ .99

DAVE’S LOCKER CLAMS CASINO $3.99/pkg 3 pkg/$10 LOBSTER TAILS (Cold Water) 3/$20 Compare!

/LB.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,243 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,098 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to June 24. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from June 10 to June 18: -- Lance Cpl. Jared W. Brown, 20, Youngstown, Fla. -- Sgt. Justin R. Johnson, 25, Hobe Sound, Fla, -- Spc. Ember M. Alt, 21, Beech Island, S.C. -- Spc. Robert W. Ellis, 21, Kennewick, Wash. -- Spc. William R. Moody, 30, Burleson, Texas iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

We give you choices, and we will NOT be Undersold! Wild Littlenecks Top Necks Cherrystones Maine Steamers Mahogany’s Oysters Mussels

THE LOBSTER TRAP LIVE LOBSTERS!

PROPANE REFILLS

871 Fairport Rd. (corner of Marsh) East Rochester 586-9980 • TheLobsterTrap.com • Open 7 Days 9-6 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5

INTERVIEW | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Ruth Scott and the rising tide Ruth Holland Scott remembers sixth grade as a broken string of recesses. Scott’s teacher at her small, segregated school in Albion, Michigan, often slept through class, Scott says — waking only when students pestered her. “The guys would take these long polls that you used to raise and lower the windows and lift the wig off her head,” Scott says. “And she would wake up and say, ‘recess!’ So we had a series of recesses all day long.” To compensate for the underwhelming environment, Scott and a friend began schooling each other. They gave assignments, exams, and held the other accountable for her performance. Scott says her sixth-grade experience is proof that everyone, regardless of background, can succeed with the right attitude and support. It’s a message she says she has tried to embody and share as a community leader in Rochester. Scott is former head of the 19th Ward Community Association and was the first black woman to serve on Rochester City Council. She became Council president in 1986 and eventually ran for mayor, but lost in a five-candidate primary race to Bill Johnson. A teacher by profession, Scott has held many positions in the Rochester school district. She set up the reading lab at the former Wilson Junior High, was dean of women at the old Madison High School, and has served the district in advisory and troubleshooting roles. Scott has also completed a memoir, “The Circles God Draws,” which she says is about “searching for and finding purpose in life despite the boxes people may try to force you to enter.” Given her background and her history, Scott is able to offer unique insights on education and politics in Rochester. She and her husband, Bill, moved to the city in 1969 — a transformative and vital time in Rochester politics. The city had active Democratic, Republican, Liberal, and Conservative parties, Scott says, though the GOP, on the whole, was much more progressive than many party members tend to be now. And the local Democratic Party was being reinvented from the inside by its Kennedy-inspired younger members, who organized, gained power in the committees, and eventually took over leadership of the party. “There was just lots of activity going on,” Scott says. “It’s interesting that we came just at that time.” In a recent conservation, Scott talked about politics, the state of Rochester’s schools, and investment in downtown versus investment in the city’s neighborhoods. The following is an edited version of that discussion. 6 CITY

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

CITY: What was it like to be the first black woman on City Council?

Scott: I don’t see myself in those terms. I didn’t carry around with me that constant, “Oh, here I am. I’m the first this, I’m the first that.” I was more conscious of, “OK, how can this community work together to be a broader community, a better community, a more inclusive community?” One person said to me when I won, “You know, you’re in a wonderful position. You can stand in the doorway to City Hall and block anybody you don’t want to come in.” A lot of people have that feeling about being in powerful positions. And I said, “That’s not the way I view it. My job is opening doors to anybody who wants to come in.” Many people say that metro schools may be the only way to break up the concentrated poverty in the city and to ensure that everyone has a chance at a quality education. But almost no one believes we’ll ever get metro schools because the community’s so divided.

I do think that the [school district’s] urbansuburban program has some potential to break it up. But I think more than anything else, job opportunities will break up the poverty. People have to have some place to work; they have to have skills. And I think the community college will be a great partner in helping people get skills who may not be getting them from their school district. I don’t know what’s going to happen with the school district. I wouldn’t be surprised if at some point it might be divided. In Michigan, there are a number of small cities where the districts were not able financially to improve the schools enough and people were fleeing. I see the same thing happening in Rochester. The [Albion] school board voted to dissolve the high school and has made an agreement with a nearly town, Marshall, to take the children from the district. I used to suggest when I was on City Council that there be shared use of buildings. A lot of buildings on the

Ruth Holland Scott was the first black woman to serve on Rochester City Council. She also ran for mayor. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

outskirts of Rochester were next to towns, and my thought was that the beginning steps of collaboration would be to share those buildings. If [suburban] districts were overcrowded and just needed one or two classes, why rent space in a for-profit place? Rent space in one of [the RCSD’s] buildings that had extra room. Then they would begin to see that city kids are not so bad, and the city district is not so bad. But that was never seriously considered by anybody but me. Whenever City publishes anything about the role poverty plays in the schools, people scream, “But it’s the parents’ fault!”

I think we can all play the blame game. There are certainly some families who are not taking care of their children. Some don’t have the wherewithal to take care of their children. If you have to work three part-time jobs that are not paying you anything and not paying for health benefits, you don’t have time to take care of children. So I think that’s a big excuse. And I think everybody adopts it when it comes down to some crisis. We have always had poor kids in this country, and we’ve had poor kids who’ve done some extraordinary things. Why?

Because somebody decided to adopt them, to encourage them, and to give them the skills they need. I do think we’ve locked ourselves into a non-sequitur kind of place where we can’t figure out how to get out of it. Some people say it’s poverty. Some people say it’s the parents. Some people say it’s the schools themselves. And other people don’t have an opinion; they just think people deserve what they get. The question is, “Where do we start?” not “Whose fault is it?” I think we start in communities. We go back to neighborhood schools, because I think it’s much easier for a neighborhood to wrap itself around [a school]. When you have schools that are adopted by the neighborhood, people have a vested interest and they get along better. People say they want to help schools, but helping them is not going in and taking over. First place, we’ve got to start with the board, and we’ve got to straighten some things out with the administration of the schools. We’ve got to find a way to make partnerships with the teachers. And then of course we have this dumb testing thing that’s taken hold in the nation and gone crazy. It has nothing to do with learning. And they don’t even know if

the tests are valid or reliable. So somehow that thing has to be broken. And we should be providing enrichment. How many kids get to go to an auditorium and listen to music? Or see a program on science demonstrations? In the city, not too many. How do you expect them to be interested when they see nothing related to the real world? If the religious institutions would shake themselves out of their segregational places and reach across the aisles to each other and partner with the school district and the parents in the city, a lot of good things could happen and progress could be made. We’re divided in so many ways: the schools, the neighborhoods, city versus county. When did we lose that sense of community?

If I were to pinpoint something, I think [it was] once people felt like the possibility of having quality, integrated schools was lost. I think that’s part of when it began to slip away from us in Rochester. And it’s not like the schools were perfect. One of the reasons why Wilson is where it is today is because the 19th Ward Community Association insisted that Wilson be improved. We wrote a grant to provide counseling and sort of like pre-diversion of youth so they wouldn’t be entrenched in the public safety system. We wanted to show other agencies how to deal with these kids — what kind of programming to do. And we did that very successfully. We have a competitive primary race going on between Richards and City Council President Lovely Warren. A big part of Warren’s platform is to build up the neighborhoods, but Richards says the city already invests much more in the neighborhoods than it does in downtown.

That is where the answer is going to be — the answer to a lot of problems in the city. It’s going to have to grow from the neighborhoods. Nothing ever grows from the center out. Ask [Richards] when he’s adding up what he spends, is he including the tax abatements he gives to corporations? Is he including the job-creation agreements that are never, ever lived up to? And is he considering the fact that the neighborhoods are much larger? It’s not an apples-to-apples comparison. What rising tide ever lifted all boats? If your boat has a hole in it or you don’t have a boat, you drown.

WEEKLY SPECIALS • $1 Oyster Tuesdays • • No Corkage Fee Wednesdays • • $5 Custom Craft

Cocktails on Thursdays • WEEKDAY HAPPY HOUR 4-6pm 274 N. Goodman St., Rochester

www.lentorestaurant.com ww l 271-3470 3470 • 271

TWEET AT US AND LIVE FOREVER*

* NO PROMISES

twitter.com /roccitynews

White Swans Asia Caffé

BUBBLE TEA - Made with real fresh fruit! FINE ASIAN CUISINE

SERVING

DIM SUM

All Day, Every Day 798 S. Clinton Ave. 585-319-3249 Sun–Thurs: 10am - 9:30pm, Fri & Sat: 10am – 10:30pm rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

FEW GROUPS INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE LGBT COMMUNITY ARE AS TARGETED

AFTER MARRIAGE LGBT

BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

For many in the LGBT community, the Supreme Court’s decisions on the federal Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Proposition 8 have been painfully slow in coming. The cases, Prop 8’s ban of same-sex marriage in the Golden State and DOMA’s denial of federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples embody an issue that has been at the forefront of the gay rights movement for more than a decade. It was always expected that the fight for marriage rights would end up before the Supreme Court, activists say. But if you think marriage equality is the Rochester LGBT community’s highest priority, you might be mistaken. It all depends on whom you ask. As momentous as the Supreme Court’s decisions are, some community leaders say that the fight for marriage equality has also exposed problems in the gay rights movement, and that it’s time for reexamination. And regardless of the court’s decisions on Prop 8 and DOMA, there are questions in the LGBT community about the future of the movement. For starters: is the struggle over? Has the movement focused too much on one issue — marriage? How will organizations like the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley stay relevant? Where does the gay rights

8 CITY

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

movement go from here? What about the needs of the LGBT community of color and the transgender community? “I’m relying on the history of other movements,” says Scott Fearing, acting executive director of the GAGV. “If you look at the civil rights, women’s rights, and disability rights movements, there are victories and setbacks even to this day.” Fearing says he’s cautious about believing the LBGT community finally has a seat at the table. “Through the 1990’s, there was a sort of flat plateau in women’s rights,” he says. “Now people are saying, ‘Hey, wait a minute, there are still a lot of problems.’ We’re seeing that some of the bias and discrimination remains.” The same is true of the gay rights movement, he says. The HIV-AIDS epidemic helped unite the LGBT community 30 years ago, and in recent years, marriage equality has been a galvanizing issue. But that doesn’t mean the movement is over, Fearing says. “As an agency, we spent the last 40 years showing people how to survive,” he says. “Now we need to show them how to thrive.” For the LGBT community, there’s power in staying connected, Fearing says. And part of the GAGV’s job is to show people why advocacy is still important. “Yeah, if you live in many US cities, we’re more accepted,” he says. “But once you get out into rural areas of New York

THE FUTURE OF GAY RIGHTS

and other parts of the country into what I would call the broader American culture, we’re still outsiders.” GAGV staff often does outreach to schools, businesses, and community groups. Fearing says he tells his staff that many of the people they meet fall into one of three political categories. The far right opposes anything to do with the LGBT community and gay rights, he says, while the far left is much more supportive. But the largest group, about 60 percent of the country, is in the political middle, Fearing says. “I think that Middle America has heard us and they’re becoming more accepting, and that’s who we need to keep on speaking to,” he says. “We need to move people from that middle column to the far left. And many of us have been working very hard at this for years. But we do represent change, and America doesn’t always do well with social change.” A realtor’s “for sale” sign hangs outside

Open Arms Metropolitan Community Church, a small white building on Marshall Road in the Town of Chili. A flower garden in front of the church is giving way to a burst of weeds. The church is relocating to downtown Rochester. Open Arms is known for its diversity and large LGBT congregation, which has at times worried interim pastor, the Rev.

Tom Decker. Open Arms’ rainbow flag was removed by vandals, Decker says, and they’ve had a bomb threat. Education has to be a bigger priority for the gay rights movement, he says. “Yes, the focus has been on marriage equality,” Decker says. “But it’s not really about marriage. It’s about basic human rights. It’s about dignity. This is all about education. Giving people rights doesn’t take away the rights of others.” Educating the broader American public is important, he says, but LGBT activists and community leaders can’t ignore educating the LGBT community, either. “Our teens are coming out at a younger age and they’re more open,” Decker says. “And they need to see our LGBT lives represented in curriculums in schools.” The GAGV’s Fearing agrees. Younger generations in the LGBT community are losing touch with the gay rights movement’s historical context, he says. Many young people don’t know about Stonewall. They haven’t heard of Harvey Milk, the first openly gay politician elected in California, or Matthew Shepard, a young gay man who was savagely beaten and killed outside Laramie, Wyoming. Shepard’s death drew attention to hate crimes in the US. “They don’t know the enormous role he played in a major shift in American attitudes,” Fearing says. “It was an awakening for America.”

FOR VIOLENCE AND OPPRESSION AS TRANSGENDER PEOPLE OF COLOR. WHAT DOES MARRIAGE EQUALITY DO FOR THEM?

—BRUCE SMAIL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF MOCHA CENTER

(far left) Bruce Smail, executive director of MOCHA, says the LGBT community of color has issues that aren’t being addressed. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON (left) The Rev. Tom Decker, interim pastor for Open Arms Metropolitan Community Church, says the gay rights movement needs to put greater emphasis on education both internally and externally. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN (above) Married couple Anne Tischer (left) and Bess Watts are Rochester-area LGBT activists. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

To begin addressing this issue, this year’s Pride Festival will feature “Forging Alliances: Rochester’s LGBT Story,” a multimedia historical retrospective that examines the gay rights movement in Rochester. The exhibit will be housed in the former Canopies restaurant in Manhattan Square Park after the Pride parade on Saturday, July 20. Perhaps the biggest concern about the marriage

equality struggle is how it has overshadowed the LGBT community’s diversity, some activists say. The LGBT community has matured since the gay rights movement began in the early 1970’s; and now consists of a wider range of people and interests. The thousand or so rights and privileges afforded to opposite-sex married couples that backers of same-sex marriage frequently hold up as evidence of inequality simply don’t resonate with everyone in the community. “While the gay marriage movement has, of course, been widely important and effective and involved people from myriad walks of life, aspects of it, at times, ignored certain people in favor of others,” writes Richard Lawson for theatlanticwire.com. “The public face of the cause has largely been the same: white and at least middle class, which is a problem. The racial and economic disparities in the gay community are similar to those in larger America, but they also come with their own particular sets of issues, particularly youth homelessness and the spread of HIV-AIDS.”

Among for many LGBT people of color, marriage is not high on the list of priorities, says Bruce Smail, executive director of MOCHA Center. The agency, which has offices in Rochester, Buffalo, and New York City, was formerly the Men of Color Health Awareness Project. “We haven’t had a political stance on it [marriage equality],” Smail says. “I don’t think it has a direct impact on organizations like MOCHA.” For LGBT people of color, issues like housing and employment discrimination, access to affordable health care, and education are far more important, he says. While people may think these problems have been greatly reduced, Smail says, for LGBT people of color, they remain stubborn barriers. California’s Prop 8 might not have passed if LGBT activists had paid more attention to communities beyond West Hollywood and San Francisco, he says. “It raised questions in the LGBT community of color,” Smail says. “Whose civil rights are most important? Those bridges into other communities weren’t built. They didn’t have a strong coalition to combat the opposition. I don’t think they [opponents of Prop 8] saw this coming.” The almost singular focus on same-sex marriage has largely ignored issues related to race, class, and violence, Smail says. “Discrimination is multi-layered, including discrimination inside the LGBT

community,” he says. “In discussions around oppression, every individual, because of their status, is either privileged or they are targeted.” Few groups inside and outside the LGBT community are as targeted for violence and oppression as transgender people of color, Smail says — and what does marriage equality do for them? Anne Tischer and Bess Watts can’t walk

more than a few steps into Equal Grounds, a café on South Avenue with a large LGBT clientele, without being stopped by friends and neighbors. The women call themselves “professional lesbians,” a reference to their long history of activism. Even though they are widely recognized in Rochester’s LGBT community for their staunch support of marriage equality — they had a symbolic marriage ceremony in Washington Square Park in 2004 as an act of civil disobedience — they agree with Smail. Over the years, the Pride parade has essentially passed by certain people in the LGBT community, they say. But in the post-SCOTUS era, they say, the movement isn’t going to end. Instead, the LGBT community and activists are going to have to reassert themselves regarding basic needs, they say. “We’re going to go into a period of very hard activism,” Tischer says. “We’ve got to push back on discriminatory practices in housing and employment.”

And they say that even though there is less discrimination against some people in the community, acceptance is somewhat regional and could quickly dissolve. The challenge, they say, is to cultivate a new, younger guard of LGBT activists. “Trying to get people out to attend rallies and collect petitions is like pulling teeth,” Tischer says. “Most LGBT people are unaware of their lack of basic rights until they’re in a crisis.” And they say the hardest fight is still to come. Many LGBT activists want to continue with a strategy of addressing discriminatory practices, like bans on samesex marriage, in a piecemeal manner. For instance: should the community pursue the Employment Non-Discrimination Act? But critics of EDNA and piecemeal approaches say that some version of the EDNA bill has been making the rounds in Congress since the 1990’s and has never gained any traction. Since an addendum to the 1964 Civil Rights Act is almost impossible, would pursuing an all-encompassing LGBT rights bill be a better approach? Some activists say that would spark a national debate about LGBT rights, and would go a long way toward ending the treatment of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender Americans as second-class citizens. “That’s going to be the big fight,” Tischer says.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG. Visit us at the XRIJF, where we will be broadcasting live each day on Jazz (Gibbs) Street!

SUMMER PARTY SUPPLIES Genesis EP

One Touch Gold Grill

Smokey Mountain

The Performer

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION Weber’s Smoke Cookbook

The “Q” 100 & 200

3-Piece Stainless Steel Tool Set

We carry a large selection of Grilling Accessories, Barbecue Sauces & Wood Chips.

MILEAGE MASTER “The Grillmaster’s Mecca” LP Gas • Parts • Service

M-F 9-5 pm, Sat 9-4, Closed Thurs. July 4

2488 Browncroft Blvd. • 586-1870

Rochester’s Only

Dealer

We have a great selection of wood chips... hickory, mesquite, apple, cherry, pecan, and Jack Daniels.

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Film about changing gender

The Lifetree Café will show a documentary film about a man who identifies as a woman and begins the process of changing gender. The film will be shown at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 1, and offers insight into the issues surrounding gender identity, such as the impact on family, work, schools, and faith. The film will be shown at 1301 Vintage Lane in Greece.

Talk on race

Moving Beyond Racism will hold a discussion on “Beyond the Whiteness of White” by Jane Lazarre at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 1. Lazarre’s book is a memoir of a white mother raising black sons, and learning what being white means in the context of 10 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

those relationships. The meeting will be held at Barnes and Noble in the Pittsford Plaza, and it’s not necessary to have read the book in advance.

Waterfront revitalization meeting

The City of Rochester will hold a public information meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 26, regarding the Rochester Local Waterfront Revitalization Program. The LWRP is being prepared in cooperation with the New York State Department of State, and the meeting will provide an update on plans for Lake Ontario, the Genesee River, and the Erie Canal. The meeting will be held in City Council chambers at City Hall, 30 Church Street.

Film on the Seneca Nation

The University of Rochester will show the film “Bury My Heart with

Tonawanda,” which tells the story of a boy with Down syndrome who is rejected by his family, but accepted by the Tonawanda Seneca Nation. The film explores the Seneca culture, beliefs and myths, and Native American history. The film will be shown at 7 p.m., on Thursday, June 27, at the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Avenue.

Dining A few words about chicken. The menu’s

Left to right: red snapper with yellow lentils, garlic scape, and sprouts; yellowfin tuna with risotto, rose-petal-apple conserve, and microgreens; the dining room at Brown Hound Bistro in South Bristol. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Putting a finger on the Finger Lakes Brown Hound Bistro 6469 STATE ROUTE 64, SOUTH BRISTOL 374-9771, BROWNHOUNDBISTRO.COM DINNER DAILY 4:30-9 P.M.; BRUNCH SUNDAY 8 A.M.-2 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY LAURA REBECCA KENYON

Summer is in full swing, which is a good excuse to get out of the city. Head south on Route 64, down toward Canandaigua Lake, through Bloomfield, past Bristol Mountain Ski Resort (marvel at the green summer slopes), and stop before you reach Monica’s Pies and downtown Naples. Near the “Y” where Route 64 meets Route 21, sits the Brown Hound Bistro. If you haven’t yet dined there, you’re in for a treat. Simply put, it is one of the best restaurants in the region. Availing itself of locally grown produce and meats, Brown Hound takes its cues from the season and consistently turns out delicious food. In some restaurants, that might lead to an air of superiority or pretentiousness — not here. The staff is friendly, knowledgeable, and there to make you happy and comfortable. The interior of the space is warm: Tuscan yellow walls, natural woods, braided rugs, paintings from local artists on the wall. The restroom, tucked under the stairs leading up to the

kitchen, is an homage to the restaurant’s namesake, owner Trish Asher’s departed hound, Henry. Don’t let the occasional pompous patron scare you off. (Guy who groused that his favorite out-of-state microbrew wasn’t on the menu: understand where you are and order the local beer.) If you do, you’ll remove the possibility of having a meal with tastes, scents, and colors so memorable that dishes might bubble into your thoughts at unexpected times. For instance, driving on 490 last week, I found myself longing for a slice or floral-scented apple, deep rose in color, light rose in flavor, gently sweet and slightly firm to the teeth that I’d enjoyed at Brown Hound two weeks earlier. The rose petal-apple conserve in question is

paired with a customer favorite: pan-seared yellowfin tuna with a scoop of risotto and a scattering of micro greens ($30). Like the majority of dishes on the menu, it’s both familiar and unexpected. Each meal’s star attraction is a well-prepared and satisfying rendition of a classic dish. But it’s in the sides where you’ll find the surprises: lovely shocks of color, texture, and flavor that, together, make eating at the Brown Hound both reliable and delightful. Take the spring house salad ($7). It’s not a plate where you’d expect novelty. In

some restaurants, it’s thoughtless: iceberg lettuce, shaved carrots, limp tomatoes, and maybe some corrugated cardboard posing as croutons. Here, however, the house salad plays with sweet (apple, maple) and sharp notes (red onion, shallots, vinegar), making you eager for the next bite. The lively and fresh greens are sourced just miles down the road from Ambrosia Acres Family Farm. And then there’s the scattering of diced and candied bacon. Food writing is oversaturated with declarations of love for bacon, but when it’s good, it’s very, very good. And when its smokiness is enhanced with a touch of sweetness and a bite of pepper, it’s wonderful. Similarly, the artisan cheese plate ($11) features a mild chevre, muscular blue, and sharp cheddar cheeses — solidly appetizing choices for a Finger Lakes restaurant. Baguette crostinis, crunchy and flavored with olive oil, are eager to be piled with the cheese and — more importantly — the house-made onion marmalade. The marmalade has the texture of chutney: onion slices stand firm against the jam-like background. Cooked for a long time to develop a deep caramelization, the onions are sweetened with brown sugar and perked with ginger and (apple cider?) vinegar. Brown Hound is looking into to bottling the marmalade for sale; home cooks — myself included — will be lucky if it happens.

chicken breast ($24), locally sourced from Sweet Grass Farm, is plump and juicy, but it’s still a chicken breast. What interests is its pairing: carrot sambal. Unlike South African or Asian carrot sambals, this is pureed smooth but retains a sambal’s spicy, warm heat. It’s the star of the entree, elevating the entire dish in the way a bold necklace can enliven a simple black shift dress. A few more words about chicken: the chicken Moroccan ($38) is a shared plate, with two robust thighs and drums, a heap of couscous studded with dried fruits, and romesco sauce. The chicken’s skin is a deep tawny and crisp, almost as if fried, and the meat is succulent. Here, again, the sides shine: fat, sweet dates recall the dish’s namesake, while the romesco sauce reflects the piquancy of red peppers. Lest I’ve made you think that there’s only poultry on the menu, pay attention to the Incredible Wellington ($32), a fillet of beef topped with Lively Run Cayuga bleu cheese and wrapped in puff pastry, served with bordelaise sauce, mashed potatoes, and mushroom duxelles; and the spring risotto ($21), showcasing seasonal vegetables and parmesan cheese. If you go for brunch, make an effort to sit out on the wrap-around porch, shaded by a brick-red-and-white-striped awning. (Don’t worry if it’s chilly; the bistro has fleece blankets on hand to keep you warm.) Among my favorites are the French onion soup ($5), a hearty crock that gets the balance of salty and savory with crunchy and cheesy just right; the Sweet Grass lamb burrito ($11), featuring grass-fed lamb topped with tomato, red onion, and Lively Run feta; or the French Hill Toast ($7), made with homemade cinnamon-swirl bread and served with local Sugarbush Hollow maple syrup. (Go early if you want to order that last dish; I’ve often found that the restaurant runs out of cinnamon bread if I get there after 11:30 a.m.) And last, but not least, if pastry chef Emmy Wilk’s toffee blondie sundae ($6) is available, order it. A blondie is a soft and chewy bar cookie flavored with vanilla and brown sugar. The blondie here is studded with toffee and the sundae is drizzled with salted caramel sauce for a sweet, salty, buttery, chewy treat. Even if you have to eat dessert after breakfast — even if you ate the Omega pancakes ($5 for a short stack) made with buttermilk, Birkett Mills’ buckwheat, ground flaxseed, and blueberries — who cares? It’s worth it.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] John Mayer Tuesday, August 13. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $36-$75. 7:30 p.m. 5994641. darienlake.com

Music

[ COUNTRY ] Jason Aldean Saturday, August 17. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $30-$59.75. 5 p.m. 5994641. darienlake.com [ POP/ROCK ] John Sebastian Saturday, December 7. Café Veritas, First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. $25-$50. 7:30 p.m. cafeveritas.org 

Dave Rivello Ensemble MONDAY, JULY 1 KILBOURN HALL, 26 GIBBS ST. 7:30 P.M. | $10 | 274-1100, ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU

[ JAZZ ] When Dave Rivello put together his band in 1993 he had compositions and arrangements that simply needed to be heard. Twenty years later, the Dave Rivello Ensemble is Rochester’s premier big band. Trumpeter Mike Kaupa has been on board from the first rehearsal. Bass clarinetist Dean Keller has been a member for 12 years. Others — many of them Eastman School of Music students — have come and gone over the years, but the ensemble always sounds great. That’s because Rivello makes sure he has a rich instrumental palette when he paints with notes. — BY RON NETSKY

Matt4star THURSDAY, JUNE 27 DUB LAND UNDERGROUND, 315 ALEXANDER ST. 10 P.M. | $5, 21+ | 232-7550 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] RIPROC is back and is as awesome

as ever this Thursday, pumping out the jamming beats with local act Matt4star. While Matt4star took a break from the scene for a while, since he got back in the groove it has been non-stop and doesn’t seem to be winding down any time soon. With a steady mix of rock, drum and bass, and r’n’b flavored beats, Matt4star keeps it hopping. — BY SUZAN PERO

CITY’s 13 20

jazz GUIDE

ONLINE AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS, BIOS, SCHEDULES 12 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2. 2013

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. The Rabbit Room,

61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Final Music Week at Spot Coffee ft. Tin Can Set. SPoT

Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Free.

Food Truck Rodeo ft. Out of the Blue. Public Market.

5 p.m. Free.

Jack & the Bear THURSDAY, JUNE 27 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 11 P.M. | FREE | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ FOLK/ROCK ] In the present musical climate, if a

band’s sound seems to defy categorization, it is almost inevitably given the “indie folk” label. Jack & the Bear has just as much trouble classifying its own sound, but if the members were pressed (and they have been) they would say (and have said on their Facebook page) that it might be something like “Randy Newman sword fighting Captain Hook on top of the eye of Sauron.” With other influences including Tom Waits, Conan O’ Brien, and Mark Hamill, a live performance by the Monroe, Michigan, band promises to be a highly literate, hyperactive voyage to a sonic galaxy far, far away. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Lap Giraffe FRIDAY, JUNE 28 SPOT COFFEE, 200 EAST AVE. 5 P.M. | FREE | 613-4600, SPOTCOFFEE.COM [ JAZZ ] Coming from me, the term “smooth jazz” is typically like name-calling. Smooth means all the edges have been sanded away and the sugar doubled. But in the case of Rochester’s Lap Giraffe (an animal in the same phylum as the jackalope, unicorn, and the Easter Bunny, I believe), the band explores interesting melodies and grooves with smooth panache. The edge is still there, and the floor isn’t too sticky when they’re done. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Terell Stafford performed Saturday, June 22, at Montage as part of the 2013 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Notes from the Jazz Fest [ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE AND RON NETSKY

Willie Nelson strolled out on to the Kodak Hall stage Saturday night at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival and didn’t stroll off until every motherf***er who has said to me, “Willie Nelson isn’t jazz,” walked away convinced that he is. This was just an amazing show front to back, with Willie and his minimal band — bass, snare drum, harmonica, piano — digging into his hits, other people’s hits, and some new, soon-to-be hits like “You Don’t Think I’m Funny Anymore” or “Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die.” But back to the jazz analogy. Like Ray Charles, Nelson sets his own time signatures that flow pretty much as he feels them, when he feels them. According to his bassist, my old pal Kevin Smith, it’s a heads-up game playing with Willie as he lyrically and melodically interprets the songs as the mood hits him. There probably is no other artist that has sung more versions of his own songs than Nelson. And his guitar playing? It is elegant, poignant, blissful, heartfelt — a quiver of six-string arrows through the heart. Let’s see: it’s interpretive, innovative,

CITY

evolving, and exquisite. Yup. That’s jazz. Told ya. — FD

Kanack Stock. The Kanack School of Music, 2077-2079 South Clinton Ave. 6:30 p.m. $10. Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Steve Piper. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Saturday night I found myself at the Montage watching Terell Stafford, and had the following realization: trumpet is the most confrontational of instruments. While the piano usually faces the side of the stage and the saxophone is sending notes upward or to the ground, the trumpet is in your face. There’s no sliding back and forth like the trombone. The trumpet says, “I’m talkin’ to you!” When Stafford is on the other side of that trumpet, the urgency is palpable. Whether he’s playing a fiery up-tempo tune or wrapping his horn around a midtempo ballad like “Candy,” Stafford is in command. He is no less a brilliant player when he switches to flugelhorn. The other three members of Stafford’s quartet were musicians who had studied with him at Temple University in Philadelphia, where he is coordinator of the jazz studies program. They were young but all three were capable of swinging hard and soloing with imagination. — RN

Bands on Broadway. Inn on Broadway/Tournedos Steakhouse, 26 Broadway. 232-359. 5 & 10 p.m. Free. Teagan Ward and Lou. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-323-1020. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Summer at Eastman: Matthew Ardizzone, guitar. Eastman

East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. noon. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

90s Dance Party ft. DJ NaNa, DJ Red. Vertex Night Club, 169

N. Chestnut St. 585-232-5498. 9 p.m. $3.

The Bare if You Dare Affair ft. Nick Kage. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info.

Gigi’s Rock’N Roll Birthday Bash ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-4544830. Call for info. continues on page 15

Y L I DA

s ’ Y T I C

NEW EVERY DAY AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

CONCERT REVIEWS, PHOTOS, FESTIVAL INFO rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Music Different drummer Steve Gadd W/BOB JAMES AND DAVID SANBORN PART OF THE 2013 XEROX ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL THURSDAY, JUNE 27 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. SOLD OUT | ROCHESTERJAZZ.COM [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

CLOSED FOR

REMODELING J U LY 1 S T- 8 T H

COME VISIT OUR

NEW BAR

on

J U LY 9 T H !

See our website for more info

BEST OF ROCHESTER WINNER 6 YEARS IN A ROW 2007-2012

302 N. Goodman St. Village Gate, Rochester 256.5980 14 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2. 2013

Most drummers would acknowledge that Steve Gadd is among the most dynamic percussionists in the world. The rest just call him Steve God. But when he talks, Gadd is no cymbal crasher; he’s disarmingly soft-spoken. The man whose brilliant solo adds the exclamation point to Steely Dan’s “Aja,” whose fife-and-drum-corps lines on Paul Simon’s “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” are more familiar than the song’s melody, the man who is drummer of choice for the world’s top pop musicians, is as modest as can be. “I consider myself very lucky to play with the people I have played with,” says Gadd, whose career is marked by starling versatility. From Quincy Jones’ “Stuff Like That,” to Rickie Lee Jones’ “Chuck E’s In Love”; from Chick Corea’s “Nite Sprite” to Van McCoy’s “The Hustle,” Gadd has done it all. “I just try to find something to play that’s going to make the music feel really comfortable and understandable,” says Gadd. “If you can create a good foundation people can build high buildings on top of it. I try and make it groove. I like all different kinds of music so there are lots of different pockets to go for. I let the music dictate which one.” Gadd spends a lot of time on the road touring with Clapton, Simon, James Taylor, and others. At the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival he will be featured with pianist Bob James and saxophonist David Sanborn. The two artists are known for their work on the smoother side of jazz, but “Quartette Humaine,” their latest album, featuring Gadd, is a straight-ahead affair. The group will be touring through October. “I love those guys, not only as musicians but as my friends, people that I’ve worked with on and off for

Rochester-raised drummer Steve Gadd has played with many music legends over his long career, including Eric Clapton and Paul Simon. His current project, “Quartette Humaine,” is with jazz greats David Sanborn and Bob James. PHOTO COURTESY XEROX ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

many years” says Gadd. “I respect them musically so I’m 100 percent on board.” America’s most in-demand drummer was

nurtured by the Rochester music scene of the 1950’s and 1960’s. “I had a great time growing up in Rochester,” says Gadd. “There was a lot of different kinds of music happening. There were great teachers at the Eastman School, I was in drum corps, and there were a whole bunch of jazz clubs that brought in out-of-town bands. My grandparents, my uncle, and my parents took me to hear different bands.” During his formative years, Gadd sat in with local jazz legends Joe Romano, Larry Covelli, and Sal Nistico. He remembers playing with Warren Greenlea, “a great

alto saxophonist who used to play at the Pythodd all the time.” He met multi-reed player Gerry Niewood and started playing gigs with him when they were in high school. Later, they both took part in Chuck Mangione’s “Friends & Love” concert with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra in 1970. Gadd remained in the area until a few years ago when he moved to Paradise Valley, Arizona. But even living in paradise he misses Rochester. “I miss all my friends,” says Gadd. “Rochester will always have a special place in my heart. Family and a lot of great memories — I couldn’t have grown up in a better place.” continues on page 19

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 [ JAZZ ]

Anthony Gianovola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kyle Vock Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion w/The Russell Fielder Trio. Little

Theatre, 240 East Ave. 5:30 p.m. Free. The Russell Fielder Trio. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s

Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Medicine Wednesdays w/ Thunder Body. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. Noble Vibes w/Bowla Cheats. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. [ POP/ROCK ]

Abilene Late-Night Sessions. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. June 29, 11:15 p.m. See website for full schedule. Free. Brass Taxi. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Drew and Humble Soul. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 8 p.m. $2. Joe Brucato. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 4 p.m. Call for info. Jucifer Twenty Years Slaying Ears Tour w/Velvet Elvis, Burndwiller. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9:15 p.m. $8-$12. Our Friends Band. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free.

The Sharrows, Fire Wheel, WYATT, and Cammy Enaharo. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Ten Ugly Bands Contest: Right Turn Racer, Pseudo Youth. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. Free.

THURSDAY, JUNE 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Frankie & Jewels. 1872 Café, 431 W. Main St. 585-730-7687. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. The Pickpockets. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5.

INDIE/HIP-HOP | THE GUNPOETS

In a New York town known mostly for its collection of colleges and canyons, there is a rapidly rising band that’s changing the musical landscape on its way up. Ithaca’s The Gunpoets is a seven-piece hip-hop set that is redefining the underground rap sound. The group mixes elements of pop, rock, funk, and soul, with the intelligent lyricism reminiscent of hip-hop’s golden age. The band has shared stages, as well as its alternative approach to rap, with such internationally known acts as Arrested Development and Talib Kweli. The Gunpoets perform Friday, June 28, 8:30 p.m. at The Club at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $10$15. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR Trindad & Tabogo Steel Drum Band. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 7 p.m. Free.

Windsor Folk Family.

Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Bands on Broadway. Inn on Broadway/Tournedos Steakhouse, 26 Broadway. 232359. 5 & 10 p.m. Free. Cold Sweat. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. Free. Genesee Johnny. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. 585-2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward w/The Backsliders. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. The Dynamic’s. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Hochstein at High Falls: Mambo Kings. Granite Mills

Park, 82 Browns Race. 12:10 p.m. Free. Katie Ernst Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Park Avenue Band. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

5Head, Patrick Jaouen, Beet Juice. Tala Vera, 155 State St.

546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Abilene Late-Night Sessions.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-2323230. June 29, 11:15 p.m. See website for full schedule. Free.

Blake Schwarzenbach’s 2013 Mobile Disco Decathlon w/Forgetter, Blake Schwarzenbach w/Light Feelings. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10.

Five Alarm Open Jam.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 585-319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Mike & Sergei. Silk O’Loughlin’s, 5980 St. Paul Blvd. 585-266-7047. 7 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 8 p.m. $2.

Party in the Park: Puddle of Mudd w/Officer Friendly, Melia. Riverside Festival Site,

148 Exchange Blvd. 5 p.m. $2-$5. Thoroughbred. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 7 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 16

RCTV15 Fifth Annual Black Music Celebration. Rochester

Community TV (RCTV15), 21 Gorham Street. 325-1238. 7 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

AUDIO

SOUND

SOLUTIONS

STEREO

FOR LESS

BUY - SELL

AREA’S FASTEST REPAIR

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES

Receivers • CD Players • Speakers Turntables • Tuners • Phono Cartridges Repair & Service • Vintage Records Equipment and lots more!

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers

442-0890

Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 PM •

402 W. Commercial St. East Rochester

244-1999 Theantiqueguy.com

AUDIOSOUNDSOLUTIONS.NET

THURSDAY, JUNE 27 Velvet Elvis. Skylark Lounge,

40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, JUNE 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dan Fisk. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info.

Oision MacDiarmada and Seamus Begley w/Ciaran’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146

W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. $10. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

est.

1927

GARDENING CLASSES

Wed. July 10th 5:30-7:30 pm Gardens for butterflies & hummingbirds

LARGE SELECTION OF

HARDY TREES & SHRUBS

Over 3 acres of fresh hardy nursery stock, from the common to the hard to find

ANNUALS • PERENNIALS • FERTILIZER • SEED BAGGED MULCH STONE • BULK MULCH • LARGE SELECTION OF FINE POTTERY

Delivery & Planting Services Available LOCATED NEAR ELLISON PARK • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

485 LANDING ROAD NORTH • 482-5372 WWW.CLOVERNURSERY.COM

Bands on Broadway. Inn on Broadway/Tournedos Steakhouse, 26 Broadway. 232-359. 6 & 11 p.m. Free. The Chairs. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Dan Schmitt. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. 585-216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Teressa Wilcox Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free. Three’s A Crowd. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Furioso. Vino Lounge, 7 W

Main St. 872-9463. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Final Music Week at Spot Coffee ft. ft. Lap Giraffe, DJ Jeremy Bittle, Ghettotronics. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 5 p.m. Free.

Rochester Experimental Music Festival. Visual Studies

Workshop, 31 Prince Street. (585) 442-8676. -29, 8 p.m. $5. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Coupe De Villes. Finger Lakes

Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. 924-3232. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Pizza and Beer Volume 2 ft. The Gunpoets, Blackened Blues, Kids with a Z, Malicious Intent, and Homiside. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8:30 p.m. $10-$15.

[ POP/ROCK ] 49 Days. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Abilene Late-Night Sessions. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. June 29, 11:15 p.m. See website for full schedule. Free. 16 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2. 2013

ROCK | THE BYGONE FEW

Local band The Bygone Few has everything you’d want to hear from a rock band. The band really doesn’t stray from a stoner-rock feel, sticking with traditional instrumentation — featuring vocals, guitar, drums, and bass. Any rock purists out there will appreciate how Bygone puts its own spin on a genre of music that has obviously made an impact on the members’ musical development. Complete with a heavy bass section, a rough-around-the-edges frontwoman, and a laid-back, chugging tempo, Bygone pays its dues to the music it loves, and more. The Bygone Few performs with Wisdom Kids, Low Flying Planes, and The Tabs on Tuesday, July 2, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $5-$7. Bugjar.com. — BY LEAH CREARY Benny Beyond w/Mdot Coop, Tugboat, Archeologist, and Precious Kindred. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $5-$7. Cole Michaels. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-6970235. 7 p.m. Call for info. Dog House. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free.

Goodbye Ronnie Pre-CD Release Show. Tala Vera, 155

State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. GRR Band w/Josh Netsky. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 5:30 p.m. Free. Grrr!. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Household Pest. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 9 p.m. $2. Plan B w/Revolver. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info. Start Making Sense. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 11 p.m. Free. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Chairs. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info Warehouse Band. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free.

Final Music Week at Spot Coffee ft. Folkfaces, Our Friends Band. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585613-4600. 5 p.m. Free.

Galtee Mountain Boys w/Unholy Alliance. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 2 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. 585-323-1224. Call for info. The Squirrel Hillbillies. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. 585-271-2630. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

The Balkun Brothers Band.

Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Bands on Broadway. Inn on Broadway/Tournedos Steakhouse, 26 Broadway. 232-359. 6 & 11 p.m. Free. Deborah Magone. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 8 p.m. $2. Gap Mangione. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. The Imaginary Band. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free.

Jazz Fest Week 2 schedule

[ COUNTRY ]

For reviews of dozens of Jazz Fest shows, features on free acts and where to eat, and more, visit rochestercitynewspaper. com or rochesterjazz.com.

10 p.m.: Aaron Goldberg Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Gretchen Parlato Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass)

Wednesday, June 26

Thursday, June 27

The Zac Brown Tribute Band.

Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Boats N Goats ft. JP Shaggy, DJ Kaliforina.10 a.m.

Irondequoit Bay. $15-$20.

Rochester Party Finder w/DJ Delight. California Brew Haus,

402 W. Ridge Rd. 585-6211480. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Annie Wells w/Michalea Davis. Little Theatre, 240 East

Ave. 5:30 p.m. Free.

HEP Kids Jazz Celebration.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 10 a.m. $2-$10. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Midnight City. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free.

Rochester Experimental Music Festival. Visual Studies

Workshop, 31 Prince Street. (585) 442-8676. 8 p.m. $5. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

The Fools. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. 924-3232. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Abilene Late-Night Sessions.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-2323230. 11:15 p.m. See website for full schedule. Free.

Battle For Billy Taylor Benefit ft. Billy Taylor, Taken By Surprise, Windshield Bugs, Free the Python, BML, and Steel Kingdom. Pineapple

Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 6 p.m. 21+. $10.

Big Eyed Phish w/Patrick Jaouen. Nola’s Restaurant &

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info. Harmonica Lewinsky. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. Call for info. Jessi Lynn. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 585-544-3500. noon. Free. continues on page 18

Noon: Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes Central Library (FREE) 4:30 & 5:15 p.m.: High School Jazz Bands Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:30 p.m.: Lee Fields & The Expressions Harro East Ballroom ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 5:45 p.m.: Harold Danko Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Goldings-Stewart-Bernstein Montage ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Gretchen Parlato Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Roberto Occhipinti Group Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Brockport Community Big Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ESM-XRIJF Jazz Scholarships Alumni Combo Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6:15 p.m.: Aaron Goldberg Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Trio Globo with Howard Levy Xerox Auditorium ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Soweto Kinch Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Rocky Lawrence plays Robert Johnson Little Theatre ($20$25, or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Jimmie Highsmith Jr. Experience RG&E-Lidestri Stage (FREE) 7:15 p.m.: Lee Fields & The Expressions Harro East Ballroom ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:30 p.m.: Djabe Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:30 p.m.: Jacob Karlzon 3 Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20$25, or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Curley Taylor & Zydeco Trouble Abilene ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Harold Danko Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8 p.m.: Roger Hodgson Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre ($70-$125) 8:30 p.m.: Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Soweto Kinch Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Jimmie Highsmith Jr. Experience RG&E-Lidestri Spirit Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Trio Globo with Howard Levy Xerox Auditorium ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:15 p.m.: Rocky Lawrence plays Robert Johnson Little Theatre ($20$25, or Club Pass) 9:30 p.m.: Djabe Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:30 p.m.: Jacob Karlzon 3 Lutheran Church of The Reformation ($20$25, or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: Curley Taylor & Zydeco Trouble Abilene ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Roberto Occhipinti Group Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Goldings-Stewart-Bernstein Montage ($20-$25, or Club Pass)

Noon: Herb Smith Central Library (FREE) 1 p.m.: Student Jazz Workshops Eastman School of Music (Room 120) 4:30 & 5:15 p.m.: High School Jazz Bands Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:30 p.m.: Dirty Dozen Brass Band Harro East Ballroom ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 5:45 p.m.: Howard Levy Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Brad Turner Quintet Montage ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Ravi Coltrane Quartet Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Culture Clash with Carl Atkins Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ECMS Saxology Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Greater Rochester Jazz Orchestra Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: Carmen Souza Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Scottish National Jazz Orchestra Xerox Auditorium ($20$25, or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Zoe Rahman Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Gem City RG&E-Lidestri Spirit Stage (FREE) 7 p.m.: Rudresh Mahanthappa’s GAMAK Little Theatre ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:15 p.m.: Dirty Dozen Brass Band Harro East Ballroom ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:30 p.m.: Soul Stew Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:30 p.m.: Jacob Karlzon & Viktoria Tolstoy Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Howard Levy Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Garland Jeffreys Band Abilene ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8 p.m.: Bob James & David Sanborn w/Steve Gadd Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre ($40-$85) 8:30 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Zoe Rahman Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Gem City RG&E-Lidestri Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Scottish National Jazz Orchestra Xerox Auditorium ($20$25, or Club Pass) 9:15 p.m.: Rudresh Mahanthappa’s GAMAK Little Theatre ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:30 p.m.: Jacob Karlzon & Viktoria Tolstoy Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:30 p.m.: Soul Stew Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:45 p.m.: Garland Jeffreys Band Abilene (FREE) 10 p.m.: Ravi Coltrane Quartet Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Carmen Souza Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass)

10 p.m.: Brad Turner Quintet Montage ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Culture Clash with Carl Atkins Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass)

Friday, June 28

Noon: Karl Stabnau Central Library (FREE) 1 p.m.: Student Jazz Workshops Eastman School of Music (Room 120) 3:45, 4:30 & 5:15 p.m.: High School Jazz Bands Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:45 p.m.: Cyrus Chestnut Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ESM Jazz Honors Unit 3 Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Rochester Metro Jazz Orchestra Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Giacomo Gates & Friends Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Gregory Porter Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Montage ($20$25, or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: Hilario Duran Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Carmen Souza Xerox Auditorium ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Phronesis Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Shemekia Copeland East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage (FREE) 7 p.m.: Ben Taylor Little Theatre ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:30 p.m.: Youn Sun Nah & Ulf Wakenius Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:30 p.m.: Frampton’s Guitar Circus Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre ($70-$125) 7:30 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:45 p.m.: Gas House Gorillas Abilene ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Cyrus Chestnut Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8:30 p.m.: Dirty Dozen Brass Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Phronesis Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Carmen Souza Xerox Auditorium ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: The James Hunter Six East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage (FREE) 9:15 p.m.: Ben Taylor Little Theatre ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:30 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap Jazz Street Stage ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:30 p.m.: Youn Sun Nah & Ulf Wakenius Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: Gas House Gorillas Abilene ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Dirty Dozen Brass Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Hilario Duran Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Montage ($20$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Giacomo Gates & Friends

Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Gregory Porter Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass)

Saturday, June 29

1 p.m.: Student Jazz Workshops Eastman School of Music (Room 120) 3:45, 4:30 & 5:15 p.m.: High School Jazz Bands Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:45 p.m.: Marianne Trudel Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ESM Jazz Honors Unit 4 Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Greece Jazz Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Mario Romano Quintet Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Kurt Elling Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Tim Berne SnakeOil Montage ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: Five Play Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Tyson Naylor Trio Xerox Auditorium ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Gwilym Simcock Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Thunder Body East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage (FREE) 7 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap East Ave. & Alexander St. Stage (FREE) 7 p.m.: Amy Lynn & The Gunshow Little Theatre ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:30 p.m.: Torben Waldorff’s Wah Wah Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:30 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:45 p.m.: Marianne Trudel Hatch Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Blaggards Abilene ($20$25, or Club Pass) 8:30 p.m.: Al Chez & The Brothers of Funk Big Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Gwilym Simcock Christ Church ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Monty Alexander’s HarlemKingston Express East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue East Ave. & Alexander St. Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Tyson Naylor Trio Xerox Auditorium ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:15 p.m.: Amy Lynn & The Gunshow Little Theatre ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:30 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:30 p.m.: Torben Waldorff’s Wah Wah Lutheran Church Of The Reformation ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: Blaggards Abilene ($20$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Al Chez & The Brothers of Funk Big Band Unity Health Care Big Tent ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Mario Romano Quintet Rochester Club ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Tim Berne SnakeOil Montage ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Kurt Elling Kilbourn Hall ($20-$25, or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Five Play Max of Eastman Place ($20-$25, or Club Pass)

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

HIV+ Research Volunteers Needed for HIV Study • Must be 18-55 years old and have documented HIV and taking ATRIPLA • Must be substance-free • 35 day study commitment • One 4 overnight and one 2 overnight stay in our unit • 6 clinic visits • Get paid up to $2900 for entire study • Get free health and laboratory evaluations

Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 716-885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206” or go to www.bcrc.us/studies.php

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 Joywave w/KOPPS, Midnight Faces, and B.C. Likes You!. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$21. The Low Down. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free.

Old Time Machine, Upward Groove, People Can Be More Awesome. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Quasars in The Mist. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Rock Dolls w/Night Stalkers. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 483-9570. 1 p.m. Call for info. Slow Riders. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. Swamp Moose. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Free.

SUNDAY, JUNE 30 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 7 p.m. Free. Dave McGrath. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-3231020. 6 p.m. Call for info. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Friends Unplugged. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 483-9570. 3 p.m. Call for info. O’ Sister, Brother. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-6970235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

FREE TRIAL OPEN HOUSE Sat., July 13th • 5:30pm-8:30pm

Cha Cha Fox Trot Salsa Swing Tango Waltz 1060 University Ave | 271-6840 Livehappyrochester.com

Dancing for G.R.A.S.P.! Greece Residents Assisting Stray Pets

JUNE 30TH from 1PM-3:30PM Come enjoy; Dance lessons & Demonstrations.

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

18 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2. 2013

Raffle tickets will be available for purchase. Pre-purchased ticket for the event are $8.00 each or $10.00 at the door. Proceeds to benefit G.R.A.S.P.

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

[ BLUES ]

Peter Novelli Band. Smokin’

Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Hochstein Alumni Orchestra.

Perinton Presbyterian Church, 6511 Pittsford Palmyra Rd. 2231203. 3 p.m. Free. Music for a Summer Evening. Trinity Reformed Church, 909 Landing Rd North. 381-5330. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations welcomed.

The Singin’ For Jesus Gospel Concert. Cathedral Hall at The

Auditorium Center, 875 East Main St, 4th floor. 209-0688. 4 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Joe Santora Trio. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 4 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hooligan’s Eastside

Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. 671-7180. 2 p.m. Free.

ROCK | PUDDLE OF MUDD

Kansas City’s Puddle of Mudd is the quintessential example of hard rock after the grunge backlash at what was called “modern rock” in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. In fact, there’s a little nod to the Pacific Northwest Mecca in the band’s 2002 single “She Hates Me” — I love that song. It was with songs like this, and huge single “Blurry,” that Puddle of Mudd dominated the 2002 Billboard Music Awards with five nominations and four wins. Melia and Officer Friendly (look out for a reunion show soon) warm the stage. Puddle of Mudd performs Thursday, June 27, 5-10 p.m. as part of Party in the Park, Riverside Festival Site, Court & Exchange. $2-$5. cityofrochester.gov/PIP. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. Nola’s Restaurant

& Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 4 p.m. Call for info.

Inneriot (Logan’s Birthday Show) w/Silverfish, There I Say Is Lightning, and The Lone Tree in the Woods that Killed us All. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Joe Baia. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. 6 p.m. Call for info. Me & The Boyz. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, JULY 1 [ CLASSICAL ]

Summer@Eastman: Matthew Ardizzone, guitar. Eastman

East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Manic Monday Retro Dance: DJ Cub, C, Darren. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Summer@Eastman: Dave Rivello Jazz Ensemble.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10. [ POP/ROCK ]

Lightning Swords of Death. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $10.

TUESDAY, JULY 2 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Summer@Eastman: Nicholas Goluses, guitar & Juliana Athayde, violin. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

Summer@Eastman: Summer Sing: Beethoven - Mass in C.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10. [ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. The Titus

Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. 7 p.m. Call for info.

The Bygone Few w/Wisdom Kids, Low Flying Planes, and The Tabs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Different drummer continues from page 14

You might think a drummer with Gadd’s reputation would call his own shots, but that’s not the case when he’s in the studio. “I definitely listen to what they want,” says Gadd. “I go in and first of all listen to the music, and then try to come up with something that I feel works for it. Good artists and producers give you a certain amount of time to sort of see where you want to go with it. Then it’s a group process, making decisions about what works and what doesn’t work. It’s different in every session; there is no set way.” Though he is best known for enhancing the work of others, over the years Gadd has released albums as a leader under names like Steve Gadd Band and The Gadd Gang. The most recent is a collaboration with Edie Brickell. Even though Brickell writes all of the songs, she pays respect to him in the band’s name, The Gaddabouts. “That was her decision,” says Gadd. “I produced it, but it’s a definite band. There’s a lot of joy, a lot of mutual admiration and respect.” With thousands of recordings and concerts under his belt, Gadd refuses to pick favorites. “I try to make my favorite whatever I’m working on at the time,” he says. But he does admit to some euphoric moments playing live with the 1970’s fusion band Stuff, and on other occasions. “There were a lot of great moments between Stuff and the audience sharing the groove,” says Gadd. “Paul Simon’s put some great shows together that were unbelievably enjoyable to be a part of. The energy between the audience and what’s happening on stage is incredible.” “And James Taylor and Eric Clapton — just to be involved with audiences that big with that much energy is pretty spectacular. The recordings with Chick [Corea], with his writing and playing, were really special,” Gadd says. Given his long career, I wondered if Gadd had ever thought about what it might mean, philosophically, to have been a part of so much great music. “When you can make something feel good and share it with people, and you’re feeling really good yourself, and the audience seems to be feeling the same kind of intensity and same kind of joy, that’s like sharing something positive, something joyous and something loving,” he says. “If these kinds of words can be applied to just how you live your life, not playing music, then it becomes philosophical. I’m not thinking philosophically, but that’s what I go for.”

AJI ZONING & LAND USE ADVISORY 50 Public Market | 208-2336 AWAKEN: Qi gong, yoga, tai chi, fine art 8 Public Market | 261-5659 BOULDER COFFEE CO. 1 Public Market | 232-5282 CARLSON METRO CENTER YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880 CITY NEWSPAPER 250 N. Goodman St | 244-3329 THE CITY OF ROCHESTER Market Office | 428-6907

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard Street | 546-1221

MARKET DISTRICT

B US I NE S S A S S OC I AT I O N

JUAN & MARIA’S EMPANADA STOP www.juanandmarias.com | 325-6650 “HOME OF THE HIGHLY ADDICTIVE SPANISH FOODS”

FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTOR

DEEP DISCOUNT STORAGE 265 Hayward Avenue | 325-5000

WHAT YOU NEED IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC MARKET marketfriends@rochester.rr.com | 325-5058

THE GOURMET WAFFLER Catering 461-0633

20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

1115 E. Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday Every Month CAFE 50 Public Market | 325-5280 Purveyors of Fine Coffee and Tea OBJECTMAKER 153 Railroad Street | 244-4933

97 Railroad Street | 546-8020 Tours • Tastings • Private Parties www.rohrbachs.com TIM WILKES PHOTOGRAPHY 9 Public Market | 423-1966

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

Theater

Art Exhibits

The cast of “The Bald Soprano,” one of two one-acts currently at MuCCC. PHOTO BY ANNETTE DRAGON

Stop making sense “The Lesson” & “The Bald Soprano” BY JOHN W. BOREK PRESENTS THROUGH JUNE 29 MUCCC, 142 ATLANTIC AVE. $10-$20 | 234-1254, MUCCC.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Thank goodness for MuCCC. The Neighborhood of the Arts-based theater has been around almost five years and continues to stage the kinds of works that most local theater groups wouldn’t dream of touching. Take, for instance, “The Bald Soprano” and “The Lesson,” the Eugene Ionesco double-bill currently being staged at MuCCC by John W. Borek Presents. Ionesco — a Romanian playwright considered by some to be the father of absurdist theater — is not exactly a community-theater staple. His esoteric works are challenging for cast, crew, and the audience alike. At the performance I attended, a patron approached director Michael Arve after the first play ended and asked, “But what did it have to do with a bald soprano?” Absurdist theater is an acquired taste, and it requires the audience to put aside preconceived notions of what theater is or should be. The pieces by definition are inherently nonsensical. In the case of the plays currently on stage at MuCCC, however, you might find that there is a method to the madness if you can let go and simply accept the works for what they are. The evening begins with “The Bald Soprano,” Ionesco’s first play. The piece features two couples, the Smiths and the 20 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

Martins, who are dressed identically. Each husband and wife pairing discusses various banal subjects — what they ate for dinner, community gossip, how the couple may or may not have met — often stating facts that are blatantly contradicted in the next sentence. Sometimes the characters don’t seem to be actually communicating with one another at all. Eventually incidental characters The Maid and The Fire Chief enter the picture, but there’s no real plot. The defining note to the piece is that all the dialogue is spoken in a crisp, refined English accent and in a very…measured…pace and tone. The program explains that Ionesco was inspired by English grammar books and the one-dimensional “characters” featured in them, and despite the seemingly senseless nature of the play you can see deeper meaning informing the proceedings. The second play, “The Lesson,” is more direct in its messages, though still plenty absurd. An ambitious young pupil shows up for a private lesson with a wizened professor. The dynamic starts off pleasantly enough, with the teacher initially impressed by the student’s answers. But the facade quickly falls apart as the student demonstrates an inability to reason and relies almost totally on fact regurgitation. Meanwhile, the professor loses his own grip on reality, becoming angrier and angrier as he spouts off increasingly bizarre lectures. Both plays raise interesting questions about Big Things, including language, education, civilization, and the general pointlessness of it all. And even if the bulk of the dialogue seems random on a cursory level, there’s some keen insight there.

Take, for instance, the professor’s language lecture in “The Lesson.” He makes the point that people speaking entirely different languages are wrong when they think that they’re saying the same thing when they say something like, “I live in the capital.” He has a point: a Spanish citizen who says “I live in the capital” is talking about an entirely different place than a French citizen who says “I live in the capital.” Similarly, we use multiple different words to refer to numbers (figures, units, etc.) and yet they all supposedly mean the same thing. Why the different terms? Shut up and think what you’re told to think, kid. “The Bald Soprano” also speaks to the inherent fallacies of society, and how ludicrous it is when you think about it. We act the way we act because we are trained to do so. Language is a false construct. Manners are manufactured. We are taught these things, but to what purpose? What would happen if we all just stopped playing by the rules? Both pieces are well-rehearsed and performed.

The entire cast is game for the wild ride set out before them, and given that they are in many cases trading lines that have nothing to do with one another, it’s an especially impressive endeavor. Toward the end of “The Bald Soprano” the main four actors — Meredith Powell, David Byrne, Gregory Nunn, and Karen Craft — engage in a rapid fire, round-robin-style exchange that borders on free association. The timing at the performance I saw was flawless, including the moments when all four actors had to shout in unison. In “The Lesson,” Roger Gans has to deliver some incredibly long nonsense passages and somehow keep track of it all, and sell a mental collapse to the audience, as well. Meanwhile, MJ Savastano as the student has to say the same line over and over again — “I have a toothache” — but make it sound different and more insistent each time. But are the plays worth seeing? That depends on your threshold for experimental theater. I found the set-ups amusing, and some of Ionesco’s word play is quite witty. But there came a point in both plays where the novelty of the concepts wore off and the repetitious nature of the dialogue wore very thin; it almost felt like the playwright was trying to push viewers out of the play. The endings recaptured my attention, however. Director Michael Arve says one of the things that draws him to absurdist theater is that it allows the audience to “laugh at the tragic.” Both shows provided some giggles even as they dealt with some pretty grim subject matter, either implicitly or explicitly. If that sounds appealing, you might give the shows a shot — you’re unlikely to see many things like it anywhere else in the region. Just don’t go in expecting to see a hairless person hitting high notes, or for anything to truly make sense.

[ OPENING ] International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Petals Upon Petals,” Featuring Flawless Contemporary Realism by David Kerstetter.. Through Jul 31. Also featured are Roberto Salas and Ning Lee. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Buddhist & Asian Art.” Through Aug 24. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Black and Blue: New Works by Ryan Bubnis and Lucas Irwin.” Through Jun 29. 1975ish.com. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. MasterPrint Gallery Artist Showcase. Through Jun 28. Featuring the work of Avignon, Banwar, Carpenter, and Lindgren. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000. artsrochester.org. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “Reflections” by The Silver Lake Art Group. Through July 26. artswyco.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Images of Faith” Mix Media Paintings by Richmond Futch Jr.. Through Jul 31. 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Francesca Lalanne Jeune: “Morphogenesis.” Through July 31. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 2753571. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby’s Summer Showcase Art Opening. Through Jul 31. Featuring Rachel Dow, Peter Lazarski, Adam Maida, Topher Martin, Thievin’ Stephen, Mike Turzanski, Yews, Jason Vector, etc. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Gramma’s Cameras II,” Photography by Lori Horton Ball. Through Aug 31. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. First Annual Highland Park Neighborhood Art Show. Through end of July. 2446787. highlandparkrochester.org. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. 637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Colored Pencil Perspectives.” Through Aug 4. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Members of the Rochester Area Pencil Club. Reception Wed Jun 26, 4-6 p.m. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Canis lupus familiaris II by Gerry Szymanski. Through Jul 27. 2427840. gallery@equalgrounds. com. equalgrounds.com. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. The Price of Freedom is Death: Black

ART | BUDDHIST AND ASIAN ART

Through widely regarded as a religion, Buddhism is actually a practice meant to properly value the self and others through maintaining balance in all aspects of inner and outer existence. Given the strife that results from how out of balance our lifestyles are, it’s worth taking a closer look at some of the wisdom offered by its teachers throughout the ages. On Saturday, June 29, Ock Hee’s Gallery (2 Lehigh St., Honeoye Falls) will present a new exhibit, “Buddhist and Asian Art,” featuring items such as a late 1600’s Buddhist painting (pictured) and a white porcelain vase featuring characters that represent the concept of a “cleansed mind.” A reception will be held Saturday, July 13, 11 a.m.-noon, featuring a talk by Ock Hee titled “Compassion for the Living and Dead,” based on Ock Hee’s personal studies of Kwan Yin and Ji Zo Bodhisattvas. The exhibit will continue through August 24, with public viewing hours MondaySaturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call 624-4730 or email ockhee@frontiernet.net. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Arts Aesthetic Art Show.. Through June 29. 497-6139. facebook. com/pages/Frederick-DouglassResource-Center/341993564799. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano.. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd. Art Alive!. 377-1982. grossmans.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. “Snaps,” Retrospective Images from the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. Through Jun 30. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat noon-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “Spiritual Moments” by Jim Hartsen. Through July 7. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Friday, July 5, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “All Dressed Up,” by Marcella Gillenwater and Malcolm Liepke. Through Jun 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 2641440. internationalartacquisitions. com. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Apartment One Gallery: “Simple Gifts: The Artwork of Sharon Leary and Anne Clements”. Through Aug 10. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org.; New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.” Through October 5. 585 243-6785.

Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Mortal: A Portfolio of Woodcuts by Kiki Smith. Through Aug 25. Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. 3253145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 6x6x2013. Through Jul 14. $1 admission, $20 per artwork. 461-2000. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Innovators and

Legends: Generations in Textiles and Fiber. Through Aug 11. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Wednesdays from 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts. com. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 Main St. BREAK!. Through Jun 29. Break is a free art event by local artist The Lady Sylyea. 270-1854. facebook.com/ theladysylyea. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. “At the Pump” and “American Playgrounds” by David Freund. Through Jul 27. 461-4447. spectrumgalleryroc. com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “Parallel Universe and Figurations” Through June 28. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Art Gallery in the Joseph S. Skalny Welcome Center. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-noon. 385-7322. camering@sjfc.edu. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Hex Signs & Barn Stars” by Beth Brown. Through Aug 3. 2712630. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. College Clay Collective. Through July 20. National juried exhibition featuring the best in college ceramics. 2715183. geneseearts.org. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Shared Visions” by Jim and Gail Thomas. Through Jun 28. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri or by appointment. 770-1923. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” by Willie Osterman. 442-8676. vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Art of the Railroad & Large Scale Model Trains. Through July 12. Model trains by Robert Thon and drawings by Sam Ferrara. 315331-4593. waynearts.wordpress. com.

Art Events [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] Mayday! Underground Crafts + Art. June 29, 10 a.m. White Office Building, 256 Alexander St. Come join us for a day of handmade awesomeness! Find a range of items perfect for unique, one of a kind gifts, while supporting local artists. You’ll find bath products, original art, fiber arts, jewelry, pottery, textiles, and plush. The first 20 shoppers will receive a free swag bag and there will be surprises all day for shoppers Free admission. maydayunderground. wordpress.com. [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] Sculpture Park Family Day. June 30, 12-5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Family art activities, music and dance, guided tours, storytelling $5 suggested donation. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.

Comedy [ THU., JUNE 27 ] Joe DeRosa. June 27-29. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu

7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., JUNE 28 ] 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar Present: InZANEity. June 28, 8 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. Hosted by Jimmy LeChase, featuring Zach Swan, Brennan Banta, Nate Gobias Clark. Headlined by Zane Golia (home from LA) $5. 585-454-7140. facebook. com/3GuysWalkIntoABar. Improv Comedy Battles. Fri 9:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] The 2013 Funniest Person in Rochester Contest Round 1. June 30, 6 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. $7. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] Dancing for G.R.A.S.P. June 30, 1-3:30 p.m. Fred Astaire Dance Studios, 3450 Winton Place. Dance lessons and demos to benefit Greece Residents Assisting Stray Pets $8-$10. 2921240. fadsrochester.com.

Festivals [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] Celtic Faire. June 29, 10 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Celebration of Celtic heritage, featuring the rousing music, food and dance of Scotland and Ireland $10:50-$16.50. 5386822. gcv.org. Town of Penfield Annual Independence Day Celebration. June 29. All-star parade 10 a.m. Events at Harris Whalen Park include fun for the whole family beginning at 5 p.m. Kids can enjoy a bounce house, and vendors will offer many different food options. Music, 5:30 p.m., fireworks at 10 p.m. There will be no rain date in the event of inclement weather penfield.org.

Kids Events [ WED., JUNE 26 ] Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Monsters, Inc. June 26, 2:30-4 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. [ FRI., JUNE 28 ] Cool Kids: Me, The Super Hero!. June 28, 7-8 p.m. Cool Kids, Sagawa Park, 100 Main St. Free. 637-3984. coolkids@rochester. rr.com. generationcool.biz. Express Your Inner Artist: Draw a Duck Program. June 28, 10-11:30 a.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East Register. 315568-5987 x229. Tasha_Daniels@ fws.gov. Free Teen Improv class. June 28, 7 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. Teen Improv class (ages 11-16) $5. 797-9086. VIP@improvVIP.com. Summer Camp Show Performances: “101 Dalmations.” June 28-29. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 p.m $5. 935-7173. mjtstages.com.

FESTIVAL | CELTIC FAIRE

My heart soars when I hear the joyful, lilting sounds of tin whistles and fiddle-based jigs and reels. And though I can’t dance worth a damn, when I see Irish steppers do their thing, I experience a sensation akin to phantom limbs that want to join in. This weekend, Genesee Country Village and Museum (1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford) will showcase the culture of Scotland and Ireland at its first Celtic Faire on Saturday, June 29. Lovers of all things Celtic will enjoy Irish dance presented by the McMahon School of Irish Dance and MGOS Academy of Irish Dance, and traditional music of Scotland and Ireland performed by the Rochester Scottish Pipes and Drums and the Niagara Regional Police Pipe Band. The fair will also include performances of small pipes in a “Ceilidh Connection,” a variety of Celtic-focused activities in the Historic Village, and specialty vendors. The grounds are open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., with performances beginning at 11 a.m. Admission rates are $10.50-$16.50, and free to ages 3 and under and members. For more information, call 538-6822 or visit gcv.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] HEP Kids Music & Fun for Families. June 29, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. Free. 454-4596. hochstein.org. Opening of Newly Renovated and Expanded Wegmans Super Kids Market Exhibit. June 29, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] Little Buddies Film Series Presents “My Dog Skip”. June 30, 11 a.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $5. thelittle.org.

Lectures [ WED., JUNE 26 ] Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Chocolate with MVP Health Educator Cheryl Minchella—Wednesday. June 26, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. Health Information Technology Symposium. June 26, 8 a.m.4 p.m. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr $35-$75, register. 594-6209. brownpapertickets.com/ event/390337. [ THU., JUNE 27 ] Conference on Self-Determination Theory. June 27-30. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Register. sdtconference.org. Que Bella Sicilia: The Beauty of Sicily. June 27, 7-8:30 p.m.

Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 3597092. Wish You Were Here Photography Lecture. June 27, 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Mark Klett $3-$6. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org June 27, 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Mark Klett $3-$6. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. [ FRI., JUNE 28 ] Architecture for Lunch Tours. 12:10-12:30 p.m June 28: Eastman/Grove Place (meet in front of Eastman Place, corner of Gibbs and East Main) landmarksociety.org. [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] Altered Book Art Class. June 29, 1 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Panel Discussion: The Black Aesthetic: The Search for Self in the 21st Century. June 29, 6 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. Special guest Abiodun Oyewole of the Last Poets will join The Rochester Black Arts Council. Walking in the steps of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960’s, the council will discuss self determination and empowerment in the city of Rochester $10. 497-6139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799.

Literary Events [ WED., JUNE 26 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. May continues on page 23

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Art then photographed them in sets she created. Included in the exhibit is a print of her portrait of Alice shielding herself from the tormenting deck of cards, paired with the actual White Rabbit doll she created. This case also holds examples of advertisements that used the iconic stories to sell various products, from insurance to beer. Guinness adverts from the 1950’s incorporated the beer in Wonderland scenes and verses: “Whenever I lose my patience,” said the Queen, “I have a Guinness.” On the surface Victorian England was

A 1959 Guinness advert from the “Alice” exhibit at University of Rochester’s Rush Rhees Library. PHOTO BY J. ADAM FENSTER/UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER

Strange little girls “Alice IN the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books, 1865-2012” THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15 UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER RARE BOOKS & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, RUSH RHEES LIBRARY, RIVER CAMPUS 275-4461, LIB.ROCHESTER.EDU MONDAY-FRIDAY 9 A.M.-5 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

The day after I went to see “Alice IN the Looking Glass,” an exhibit of wonderful illustrations and books currently at the University of Rochester, I was walking to a meeting downtown when I noticed a white rabbit stenciled low on a wall. My attention was piqued, and I instantly began eyeing the vicinity for what the artist may or may not have wanted to point out. Or, for a trail of rabbits to follow. Such is the enduring legacy of author Lewis Carroll, who couldn’t have guessed that the fantastical story he created in 1864 as a gift for a young friend would still make such an impact almost 150 years later. Visitors to the exhibit learn that the co-curator and collector, Jeanne Harper, is a member of rich and active Lewis Carroll societies of North America and Great Britain, both academic and 22 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

enthusiastic. For this fascinating show, Harper and her co-curator, Leah Hamilton, share insight into Carroll’s life and how Alice and her adventures were interpreted over the past century and a half. This is presented through Harper’s collection of illustrated international volumes of Carroll’s iconic works, as well as related artworks by various artists. In the entryway of the Rush Rhees Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections department, posted information paints the picture of Carroll as a Victorian-age Renaissance man (mathematician, logician, writer, photographer, and teacher). His actual name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, and he wrote and illustrated “Alice’s Adventures Underground” for young Alice Liddell. The story so captivated all who read it that after many requests, Dodgson published it as “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” in late 1885, under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. The book and its sequel, “Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There,” have enthralled readers of all ages, have never been out of print, have been translated to more than 100 languages, and have been illustrated by many notable artists throughout the years. Elements from the stories are also ubiquitous in other art and in pop culture. The directive to follow the white rabbit kicks off Neo’s trip down a code-constructed rabbit hole in the 1990’s film “The Matrix.” Glasgow-based indie rock band Franz Ferdinand has a song called “The

Lobster Quadrille.” And the exhibit itself offers the printed lyrics of Jefferson Airplane’s allusionfilled song, “White Rabbit.” When visitors enter the narrow corridor into the department, they find themselves flanked on one side by low cases providing the history of the first editions of Alice’s adventures from gift to publication to the subsequent stories and other volumes of “nonsense” tales and poetry by Carroll. On the other side of the passage, tall cases show off the diversity of imagery created by artists from around the world who envisioned Alice and the most iconic scenes quite differently. Reproduction prints of illustrations by artists from Australia, Germany, England, France, Italy, and elsewhere depict the vanishing, cryptic Cheshire Cat, the chaotic tea party, Alice’s expanded body spilling out of openings of the White Rabbit’s house, the meeting with the riddlesome, hookahpuffing Caterpillar, miniature Alice swimming in a sea of her own regretted tears, and the everenraged Queen of Hearts. In Vienna-born, Germany- and Hollandbased artist Lisbeth Zwergler’s orderly tea party, the characters stare into separate space and barely interact at all, while Thorsten Tenberken’s acrylics and chalk rendition reveal a red-haired Alice amid delicious, dreadful darkness. Canandaigua-based artist Nancy Wiley made the Wonderland characters into dolls,

an orderly pressure-cooker of a buttonedup, repressed culture. But curiosity and bewilderment were never unfamiliar to anyone, and have always resonated among many readers. In the midst of children’s literature that featured fairies and elves, or provided moralizing tales, the heroine of the Alice stories was “curious and independent: a spunky little girl who asks questions and challenges authority,” says Harper in the provided information. Harper’s looking-glass collection offers a reflection of changes in art, design, and society over the 20th century. Here, the various Alices range from the very young and innocent poppet in illustrations by British artist Mabel Lucie Atwell, who J.M. Barrie personally asked to illustrate his “Peter Pan,” to the mixed-media, dream-and-delirium depictions created by Salvador Dalí, to the gonzo freak-out imagery by Ralph Steadman. In 1907, the original wide-release Alice illustrator John Tenniel’s copyright expired, enabling Arthur Rackham, among others, to legally produce his own dreamy versions of the imagery. In the 1920’s, Willy Pogany’s young flapper Alice sported short-cropped hair, pouty lips, and fine-drawn brows amid Art Deco elements. A section on international editions holds Alices from Poland, Hungary, Brazil, Ukraine, Portugal, and Finland. An Arabic translation printed in Cairo features Alice with kohl-lined eyes, and images from “Alitji in the Dreamtime,” an Aboriginal version of the tale illustrated by Byronn S. Sewall, include the White Rabbit transformed into a very anxious kangaroo. Small subdivisions focus on artists’ books or small and fine-press editions, such as the 2000 Paris-published work by Spanish painter Julio Pomar, with a rather Cubistlooking panoramic pullout page. Carroll’s confounding poem “Jabberwocky” gets its own tiny section, offering some of the most terrifying and intriguing artworks. Here, interpretations ranges from the reptilian birdbeast of beloved British illustrator Graeme Base, to the allegorical adult-world monster of Stéphane Jorisch’s socio-political depiction.

[ THU., JUNE 27 ] Annie & Joe’s Eclectic Book Club: “The Watch” by Joydeep RoyBhattacharya. June 27, 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks. com. [ FRI., JUNE 28 ] Last Friday Story Slam: Coming Out (not limited to ‘of the closet’). June 28, 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free. wab.org. [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] Book Reading: Nikki Friedlander. June 29, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com.

[ THU., JUNE 27 ] Twilight Tours. 7 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] GVHC Event. June 29, 7 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Meet at 390 exit 11 (park and ride lot), strenuous/hilly 14 mile hike Free. 750-8937. gvhchikes.org.

Old Goat Run. June 29, 9 a.m. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 New York 444 Register. 7421690. trirunningandwalking.com. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] M4E the Race 4 Music 5K. June 30, 9 a.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. We are here to make sure that the arts stay in our schools and give every child the opportunity for that to happen. All the proceeds go towards our Summer Arts Camp which costs

nothing to the children $15-$20. 209-9111. music4everyone.org/ race4music.html. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Except May 12 see Special Events. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ TUE., JULY 2 ] Pacesetters Walk. July 2, 6:20 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Free. 249-9507.

Special Events [ WED., JUNE 26 ] Exploring the Sea. June 26, 12:30

p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Come enjoy our journey through the sea, under the sea and above. Great music from Anything Goes, The Beach Boys, Blondie, and more! 3890220. cobblestonesrtscenter.com. Food Truck Rodeo. June 26, 5-9 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Free admission. cityofrochester.gov. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Happy Hour and Launch of The Rochester Blogger Network Cocktails & Cuisine on the Patio. June 26, 6-7:30 p.m. Napa Wood Fired Grill, 573 South Clinton Ave. Bloggers, writers and those

[ TUE., JULY 2 ] R-SPEC meeting. first Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. r-spec.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JUNE 26 ] “Bringing Down the Attic.” Through Aug. 3. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Explore the hidden collection at the museum Free. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. PGA Championship History Exhibit. Through Sep. 2. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through September 2. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ TUE., JULY 2 ] New Electricity Theater Featuring Musical Tesla Coils. July 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. From July 2 through August 31, the show schedule is: Monday– Saturday each hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday each hour from noon to 4 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ WED., JUNE 26 ] Butterfly Walk. June 26, 10 a.m.noon. Black Creek Park, North Chili. Meet outside Byrne Dairy, just south of Exit 4 from I-490 west, at the southeast corner of the intersection of Union St. (Rt. 259) and Chili Ave. (Rt. 33A). Bring a lunch if you would like to stay longer 385-4725. rochesterbutterflyclub.org.

continues on page 24

OPEN

[ SUN., JUNE 30 ] Poetry Reading: Barbara Braverman and Janet Nemetz. June 30, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ MON., JULY 1 ] Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. July 1, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Pittsford Plaza July selection: “Beyond the Whiteness of White” by Jane Lazarre. Everyone is welcome whether or not you have read the book. Join us for a safe, stimulating discussion Free. 288-8644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com.

interested in blogging are invited to a pre-party 5:30-6 p.m. All are welcome 6 p.m.+ $5, RSVP. 232-8558. bloggernetwork@ rochesteralist.com. Rochester Blogger/Writer Networking Event. June 26, 6 p.m. Napa Wood Fired Grill, 573 South Clinton Ave. Mingle with fellow bloggers and writers, share ideas, and find out about the best in Rochester from the people who write about it. Bloggers, writers and those interested in blogging are invited to a preparty 5:30-6 $5 at door, RSVP. 746-2576. bloggernetwork@ rochesteralist.com. Rochester Business Networking Event. June 26, 7:30-9 a.m.

7 DAYS

A WEEK

AT OUR

RESTAURANT & BAR 37 Charlotte Street • 546-8885 • CaptainsAttic.com Find us on

SELECTIONS AVAILABLE

ANY TIME, ANY DAY!

$2 DRAFTS

IN THE

EAST

END!

for updates & specials!

FOOD, DRINKS & E NTERTAINMENT ALL WEEK LONG!

BEER AND COCKTAILS

NEW LOCATION

MON-FRI

11am-2am

SAT-SUN

Live

11am-2am

ENTERTAINMENT

MON-FRI 4-6PM FREE Buffet & Drink Specials

WED-SUN Visit our website for a full events calendar!

ST. E. MAIN

ST .

29: James Rowe June 5: Deborah Cornaire June 12: Rigel Klingman June 19: Joe St. Martin. Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com.

Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Fri noon, Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org

CH

AR

LO

SC IO

Literary Events

EA

ST

TT

E

ST .

AV E

.

$2 BOTTLES

$2 WELL DRINKS

AP PL E $4 MA RTINIS

BUY ONE STARTER/APPETIZER OR SANDWICH, GET THE SECOND ONE WITH THIS COUPON

FREE!

Plenty of nearby parking!

Second item must be of equal or lesser value. One coupon per party. Offer good with coupon only through July 6, 2013.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

ART | CENTENNIAL SCULPTURE PARK FAMILY DAY

KIDS | HEP KIDS JAZZ CELEBRATION

EXHIBIT | TESLA COILS & ELECTRICITY THEATER

If you’ve been watching the ever-changing campus surrounding the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.), you will have noticed the addition of monumental sculpture and shifts toward more lush landscaping. On Sunday, June 30, noon-5 p.m., all ages are invited to take part in a family day held to celebrate the gallery’s growing Centennial Sculpture Park.

The Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival is mainly geared toward adult audiences, but Hochstein School of Music & Dance (50 N. Plymouth Ave.) will present a day of fun and music for families with children ages 2-12 on Saturday, June 29. HEP KIDS provides the opportunity to explore jazz music, learn about instruments, create musical crafts, and take in presentations by community partners.

New additions to the campus include Jackie Ferrara’s “Path of Colors,” “Creation Myth” by Tom Otterness, and “Unicorn Family” by Wendell Castle (pictured). Still to come is a new, 25-foot-tall Albert Paley sculpture, “Soliloquy,” which is projected to be installed this year. Visitors can learn more about the changes to the grounds and enjoy family art activities, music and dance, guided tours, and storytelling. Admission is a suggested donation is $5. For more information, call 2768900 or visit mag.rochester.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

The event includes four half-hour jazz concerts in Hochstein’s Performance Hall featuring Mambo Kings’ Dick DeLaney, guitarist Craig Snyder, bassist Alfred Stone, vocalist Lisa Salvaggio-Clark, drummer/composer Aaron Staebell, among others. Each musician will play different jazz styles and encourage audience interaction. Also featured will be creative movement sessions, a jazz instrument petting zoo, arts & crafts, and more.

I’ve always been fascinated by man’s ability to harness the wild flame of electricity. As a child I would press my ear up against the walls to hear the buzz and hum of what I described as a house or building’s “blood.” Later, I developed a healthy obsession with the used-and-abused Serbian genius Nikola Tesla, and am impatiently awaiting the opening of the Tesla Science Center, which will be housed in his old laboratory, Wardenclyffe, in Shoreham, New York. For now, I’m ecstatic about the new Electricity Theater, a permanent exhibit at Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) featuring “singing” Tesla Coils, which opens this week.

Special Events Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail Register. rochestertipclub-june2013.eventbrite.com. Scottsville Midweek Farmers’ Market. 4-7 p.m Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main Street in Scottsville 8893981. kmemccall@aol.com. [ THU., JUNE 27 ] Attic Treasures and More. June 27-29. Faith United Methodist Church, 174 Pinnacle Rd Thu 9am-6 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (bag sale) 3341180. faithumcny,orf. Digital Rochester Media Marketplace. June 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St 451-0050. nicole@breaktheicemedia.com. “Dog Days of Summer: A Community Event to Raise Pet & Animal Awareness.” June 27, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd 377-1982. grossmans. com. Film: “Bury My Heart with Tonawanda.” June 27, 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Free. 742-1690. ganondagan.org. Muslim Journeys Movies: “Prince Among Slaves.” June 27, 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. “Small Business Summit and Networking Event.” June 27, 7:30-9 a.m. Rochester Institute of Technology’s stateof-the-art Golisano Institute of Sustainability on the RIT campus in Henrietta Free to businessowners. 746-2807. chwiecko@nysenate.gov. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org.

Summer Tasting. June 27, 6:308 p.m. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 21+. Sponsored by Colonial Liquors. Enjoy a splash of summer cocktails and wines on the outdoor patio (weather permitting) Register. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. [ FRI., JUNE 28 ] Film: “110 MorningSide:A Tribute To Abiodun.” June 28, 6:30 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. Nicholle La Vann brings the Black Aesthetic alive through her works of documenting the legacy of Poet Abiodun Oyewole member of the Last Poets for one night only $10. 497-6139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799. “Forward Home: The Power of the Caribbean Diaspora.” June 28, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Register. thebaobab.org. [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] 100th Year Celebration and Pot Luck Dinner. June 29, 3-8 p.m. Burroughs Audubon Nature Club ‘s Sanctuary, 301 Railroad Mlls Rd., Victor. Includes a presentation by John James Audubon (aka Mark Carra), a guided hike, butterfly display, mineral display, water watch event, and refreshments. Bring your table setting and a dish to pass, and stay for dinner. Dessert will be a 100th anniversary cake 249-9489. 27th Annual Ray Edmunds Memorial R/C Air Show and Fun Fly. June 29-30. Remote Control Flying Field, Northampton Park, Spencerport Road (Rte 31), Sweden and Ogden. Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-3 p.m Free admission. rccr1957.com. The Big Flea: A Village Fair. June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St. Flea market, carnival games,

24 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

The event takes place 10 a.m.-2 p.m., and costs $2 per child, $5 per adult, and $10 max per family. For more information, call 454-4596 or visit hochstein.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY folk music, raffles and prizes, more Free. 585-248-6275. friendsofpittsfordvillage.com. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket.com. Electronic Recycling Event to Benefit Needy in Rochester. Last Saturday of every month, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Electronics can be dropped off behind Annunciation Church, 1754 Norton Street (use Clark Avenue entrance), on the last Saturday of each month, and Thursday mornings by appointment. Donations can include any household electronics such as computers and related equipment, VCRs, DVD players, digital converter boxes, receivers, radios, video game consoles, and other devices. Items containing refrigerant will not be accepted. The donations will be recycled, with proceeds used by the non-profit St. Vincent de Paul Society of Rochester to support its mission of serving individuals and families in need and by St Francis Xavier Cabrini Parish to support its outreach programs pschaad@ rochester.rr.com. 338-2330. Landlord Expo 2013. June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. RIT Gordon Field House, One Lomb Memorial Drive Free admission, free workshops (585) 475 - 4121. thehousingcouncil.org. Party in the Garden. June 29, 6:30-9 p.m. This first-of-its kind fundraiser by our chapter will be at the beautiful home and gardens of Tom and Martha Lightfoot on 8387 Bay Street, Sodus Point. Our emcee will be John DiPasquale, News 8 Now (WROC-TV) meteorologist

Purchase tickets online. 2710805. msupstateny.org. [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] Affinity Orchard Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m Affinity Orchard Place, at English & Fetzner Roads, Greece Free. affinityorchardplace.com. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S This year on June 30 the market will temporarily move to the parking lot at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Avenue (across the street and slightly west of Brighton Town Hall) 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. June 30. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.-2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket. Hit a home run with Baseball Day Train Rides. June 30, 11 a.m. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd $8-$10 820-2341. rgvrrm.org. The Self-Esteem Runway Show. June 30, 6 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St $15, register. 315-253-6669. angela@ auburnpublictheater.org. auburnpublictheater.org.

On Tuesday, July 2, head to RMSC’s third floor to learn about lightning, conductors, insulators, and storm safety. Visitors will experience bursts of lightning accompanied by musical tones: the Electricity Theater features twin solid-state, tunable Tesla coils built by ArcAttack, a performance art group featured in Season 5 of “America’s Got Talent.” The coils can play music, whether it’s the Super Mario theme song, a Lady Gaga hit, or “Dueling Banjos.” Electricity Theater shows will take place July 2 through August 31, Monday-Saturday each hour on the hour from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., and Sunday each hour from noon to 4 p.m. Admission to Electricity Theater included in regular museum admission: $11-$13, and free to RMSC members and children under age 3. For group reservations and rates, call 697-1942. The exhibit is recommended for ages 9 and older, as the show is relatively loud. Earplugs are available. For more information, call 271-4320 or visit rmsc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50 Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@gmail. com. westsidemarketrochester. com. [ WED., JULY 3 ] Friday Happy Hour! Fridays, 5-7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2-for-1 on wines bythe-glass and beers by-the-bottle!. 585-262-2336. veritaswinebar. com.

[ MON., JULY 1 ] Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. first Monday of every month, 8-9 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Prizes: $20 / $10 / $5 bar tabs for the first, second, and third place teams. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar. com.

Sports

[ TUE., JULY 2 ] Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109

Theater

[ SAT., JUNE 29 ] Gladius Fights V. June 29. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. Doors 6 p.m., show 7 p.m $35 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

“9 to 5 The Musical.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Everyone’s

Theatre Company. Through Jun 30. Sat June 22 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu & Sat June 27 & 29 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$20. 242-7682. everyonestheatre. com. Big Pants & Botox. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Wed Jun 26-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m Tickets start at $38. 2324382. gevatheatre.org. “Boom.” Through July 7. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St Through Jul 7. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Wed Jul 3 2 p.m. $12-$33 374-6318. bvtnaples. org. An Evening of Ionesco: “The Bald Soprano” and “The Lesson.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through Jun 29. Thur-Sun. Evening performances at 7:30 p.m. and the Sunday June 23 matinee is at 2 p.m $10-$20 234-1254. muccc.org. The Great American Trailer Park Musical. Through July 14. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St Through Jul 14. TWed Jun 26 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Jul 3 & 7:30 p.m. $22-$50 315-255-1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. “Legally Blonde: The Musical.” Through July 17. Merry-Go-

Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Through July 17. Wed Jun 26-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue 2 & 7:30 p.m., Wed Jul 3 2 p.m. $22-$50 315-255-1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. “My Name is Mudd.” Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through June 29. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $6-$12. 271-5523. breadandwatertheatre.org. The PiTCH. Jun 13-Aug 17. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. June 27-29: Matchmaker, Matchmaker: I’m Willing to Settle. $20. 315‑255‑1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. “Slow Parade,” an evening of short plays by Louie Podlaski. Jun 30, 7 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $6 suggested donation 866811-4111. muccc.org. “The Wiz.” Eisenhart Auditorium, Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Avenue Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 p.m $10-30 ofccreations.com Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. A fundraiser for Rochester’s Facing Race, Embracing Equity initiative. Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 p.m $10-$30, register. ofccreations.com.

Workshops [ WED., JUNE 26 ] Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.”June 26, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Visual Thinking and Three Dimensional Drawing. June 26, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 585-730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ THU., JUNE 27 ] 3D Printing Demo & Meetup. June 27, 7-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Free, register. 210-0075. rocmaker.eventbrite.com. JSY at the Market. Saturdays, 1 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Foodlink’s nutritionist offers free cooking demos on ways to prepare fresh fruits and vegetables purchased at the Market using SNAP benefits. “Just Say Yes” to Fruits and Vegetables. Free. 328-3380. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. [ SAT., JUNE 29 ] Beginning Soap Class. June 29, 1-4 p.m. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd. $68, RSVP. 585-3489022. mooseberrysoap.com. Garedening to Attract Wildlife. June 29, 1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd Free. 3771982. grossmans.com. Grown by Nature with Organic Rick. 8:30 a.m Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd 6/8 Mulching, 6/15 Watering, 6/22 Composting, 6/29 Natural Pest Control Free. 377-1982. grossmans.com. Natural Dyes. June 29, 1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd Free. 377-1982. grossmans.com.

We’re seeking one outstanding sales professional to help us grow more!

FILM | “BURY MY HEART WITH TONAWANDA”

Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, CITY Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 FRIE

NDLY

COMMUN

ICATIVE ORGANI

One of the enduring problems in capitalist culture is the unwillingness to deeply feel our mutual responsibility toward one another. We don’t have to put a name or a system of doing things differently to enact the simple truth that caring for and empowering others is good for individuals and the community alike. This week, catch the premiere of a locally produced film that explores the Native American cultural perspective on disabilities and acceptance. Friends of Ganondagan will present “Bury My Heart with Tonawanda” on Thursday, June 27, at 7 p.m. at the Memorial Art Gallery Auditorium (500 University Ave.). The film tells the fictional story of John Harrison, a developmentally disabled boy rejected by his family and shunned by 19th century society, who is then accepted and nurtured to adulthood by the Tonawanda Seneca Nation. “Bury My Heart with Tonawanda” was written, edited, and produced by Adrian Esposito, a local filmmaker with Asperger’s Syndrome, directed by Gary Sundown (a member of the Seneca Nation), and stars many individuals, including elders, from the Tonawanda Indian Nation. The film seeks to “educate about Seneca culture, beliefs and myths, but also reveals the positive effects of love and respect while challenging the stereotypes often applied both to Native Americans and people with disabilities.” Esposito was inspired by a Seneca story that explains why corn-husk dolls are faceless: to remind the people of the equal value of one another, despite specific beauty, ability, or circumstance.

ZED

OR EMAIL: bmatthews @rochester-citynews.com OR CALL: 585-244-3329 ext. 27

In the Strath allan in the heart of the Neighborhood of the Arts

OUR PATIO IS OPEN Enjoy dinner, dessert, or your favorite cocktail on our outdoor patio! Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner Private Parties | Sunday Brunch 11-3 550 EAST AVE | ROCHESTER

charsteakandlounge.com FOR RESERVATIONS

241.7100

Admission to the event is free (donations to Friends of Ganondagan are welcome), and tapas and wine are available for purchase beginning at 5 p.m. For more information, call 742-1690 or visit ganondagan.org/events.html. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Synthesizers and You Class. June 29, 3 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ SUN., JUNE 30 ] How to Grow, Harvest and Play with your Herbs. June 30, 3 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery. com. [ TUE., JULY 2 ] African World History Class. 7:309 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab. center@yahoo.com. thebaobab. org. Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. “The Essence of the Heart Sutra.”. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m.

Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Eating for Energy Class. July 2, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Japanese Cooking at Home: Yakitori Class. July 2, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ WED., JULY 3 ] Irish Traditional Flute Styles for Beginners and Fans Class. July 3, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

All zombies, all the time [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“World War Z” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY MARC FORSTER NOW PLAYING

The current proliferation of zombie books, movies, and television shows suggests that we now dwell in the time of the living dead, a horrible but not entirely surprising prospect. Born in the 1930’s, the most creative decade in cinema history, the genre reflected some particular realities of its era — the fact of race, the plight of labor, the existence of a class system. Dormant for decades, the zombie film was resurrected by George Romero in his landmark

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 28

“Night of the Living Dead” in 1968, and it’s been lurching through theaters ever since.’ One of the major distinctions in the treatment of its subjects, oddly, involves the relatively simple business of locomotion — there are two kinds of zombies, those that move slowly and those that move rapidly. Romero’s zombies, like their predecessors, stagger awkwardly and laboriously after their prey — live humans — with the deliberate, frightening inevitability of nightmare creatures. Romero also introduced cannibalism into the form, another unpleasant invention that continues in the present day. The latest traveler to the land of the living dead, “World War Z,” based on a popular novel by Max Brooks, employs the fast-moving variety of the monsters, which in part explains their power and menace. Speed in fact defines the whole movie, in the movement of its plot and the kind of menace its zombies represent. After a perfunctory prologue showing television news clips of beached whales, poisoned fish, outbreaks of rabies,

Brad Pitt in danger in “World War Z.” PHOTO COURTESY OF PARAMOUNT PICTURES

and so on, accompanied by puzzled commentary from announcers, the main action of “World War Z” begins like so many horror or science-fiction films, with the sort of bland domestic bliss that exists only in the movies and always disintegrates into terror. In a suburb of Philadelphia, Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) cooks breakfast for his two daughters and packs them and his wife, Karin (Mireille Enos), into their car for the commute to school and work. They get stuck in an immense traffic jam, which suddenly explodes into chaos, with an attack by what appears to be thousands of people, who crash through windshields and bite drivers and passengers; the victims almost immediately twitch and convulse, turning into zombies themselves. The rapidity and panic of that situation summarize just about everything that will follow. Lane manages to escape the attack, but finds himself in the middle of the horror when his former boss at the United Nations, where he had served as an investigator in some dangerous places, summons him to assist in the struggle against the incomprehensible menace. The zombies apparently carry some kind of disease that kills the living, then rapidly reanimates them as gaunt, twitching, raging monsters who gnaw on human flesh. The plague that infects humans and its carriers moves so rapidly that most of the major cities of the world succumb entirely, governments collapse, and nobody seems safe. Lane’s family finds temporary refuge on an

We‛re Open All Summer! All your favorite confections

Truffles • Brags • Creams • Licorice Molded Chocolates • Sugar Free

Patio Doors and Windows to fit your Lifestyle WINDOWS

And of course we have our famous Fresh Roasted Nuts & Snack Mixes as well as Gift Tins, Trays & Baskets for any Occasion

Monday-Friday 10-6, Saturday 10-5 1520 Monroe Ave. • 244-9510 www.thenuthouseonline.com 26 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

Andersen® The most trusted name in windows and doors

Call our experts for a consultation Local Delivery Nationwide Shipping

120 Stonewood Ave. (just off Lake Ave) | 585.663.0430 1230 Lehigh Station Rd. Henrietta | 585.334.5500

www.mflumber.com

Find us on

Bard college [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Much Ado About Nothing” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY JOSS WHEDON NOW PLAYING

aircraft carrier in the Atlantic, while he pursues both the cause of the infestation and its solution. His quest takes him to some odd destinations — South Korea, Jerusalem, and Wales — while along the way thousands of people die and most of his contingent of soldiers lose the battle against the zombies. The picture alternates oddly between scientific discussion on how to counter the attacks and wildly violent sequences enhanced by the usual computer generated images. In Jerusalem, for example, where the Israelis build a wall to keep the zombies out, a philosophical scientist (Ludi Boeken) speaks sadly and wisely of how the history of his people led to that response. At the same time, a remarkable special effect shows hordes of thousands of zombies swarming up that wall like ants after sugar, as if they were somehow poured upward, perhaps the most stunning and meaningful image in the film. According to most reports, the producers of the picture intend to make a series, and Brad Pitt’s voiceover at the end promises a sequel; the movie however somehow falls short of its apparent intentions. The nonstop action and straightforward plot work well enough, but the repetitive nature of the various encounters and the strange embodiment of the conception weaken the film’s potential. Its very existence, though, underlines the zombification of the culture, suggesting that the zombies are here and they have won.

Most directors faced with a brief hiatus between principal photography and postproduction for a gargantuan comic-book blockbuster like “The Avengers” would probably be content to kick up their heels for a bit, take a well-deserved vacation, and maybe, if they’re feeling exceptionally ambitious, start poking around for the next project they’ll start working on sometime in the semi-distant future. But most directors are not Joss Whedon. Thank god. Instead of resting on his laurels, Whedon spent his downtime in the Marvel movie-verse rounding up his stable of actor friends and enlisting them to star in a micro-budgeted adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing,” filmed over the course of 12 days in his own Santa Monica home. Of course, “The Avengers” turned out to be a huge worldwide success, both commercially and critically, eventually going on to become one of the highest-grossing movies of all time. And according to Whedon, it was due in large part to the

Amy Acker in “Much Ado About Nothing.” PHOTO COURTESY BELLWETHER PICTURES

creative recharge he got from shooting this labor of love. Aside from shifting the action of the 16th century play to the modern day, Whedon sticks closely to the original work (including dialect), which follows the intertwining plights of two pairs of would-be lovers: the adversarial Beatrice (Amy Acker, “The Cabin in the Woods”) and Benedick (Alexis Denisof, “Angel”), engaged in a “merry war” against one another; and Claudio (Fran Kranz, also of “The Cabin in the Woods”) and Hero (Jillian Morgese, an extra in “The Avengers”), a young couple head-over-heels in love in the way that only young couples in Shakespearean plays can be. This being Shakespeare, the plot revolves around various cases of deception, mistaken identity, and professions of love that bring the couples together and/or tear them apart. Of course, this being one of the Bard’s comedies, there’s never a question that everything will be tied up in a happy ending and, likely, a wedding or two. Starring a group of performers that span across the entire Whedonverse (as fans have affectionately dubbed the writerdirector’s body of work), all clearly having a ball, the film has an infectious “Let’s put on a show!” charm. It’s a delight to watch, and the proceedings are only enhanced if you have a familiarity with and fondness for this particular group of actors. I admit that I found myself momentarily distracted several times, as a new character popped up on screen and I mentally tried to place from which Whedon project I recognized the performer. Certain members of the cast clearly know their way around a Shakespearean turn of phrase better than others. Amy Acker delivers a superb performance as the sharp-tongued Beatrice. With any luck, it’s a performance that will get her noticed by more A-list directors and earn her the juicy roles that she richly deserves. Alexis Denisof’s capable work suffers in

comparison; he excels at playing the lovestruck fool, but is slightly less successful during his more dramatic moments. Fran Kranz acquits himself quite well as Claudio, demonstrating his remarkable range (and showing off the fact that he’s secretly got a smokin’ body to boot), in a role far removed from his stoner character in “Cabin.” At the screening I attended there was a palpable sense of joy from the moment Nathan Fillion came on screen, portraying the comedic role of the bumbling constable, Dogberry. I’m happy to report that his considerable charms are in no way hampered by Elizabethan dialect. Reed Diamond is another cast standout as the meddlesome Don Pedro. Sticking with the original dialect is an interesting choice for Whedon, a writer known for his dialogue. But he’s clearly aware that attempting to improve on Shakespeare’s words is typically a recipe for disaster. The direction is workmanlike and mostly a no-frills affair, but it’s all the better to showcase the performances. Oddly, the editing felt choppy at times, and the repeated fade to white as a transition between scenes came across as a little cheesy. The cinematography doesn’t quite pop in the way that the best blackand-white photography does, but as one of my viewing companions noted, the de-saturated style was likely an easy way to get around not having to worry about the color palette of Whedon’s home as the production design of the film was being decided. But these are superfluous. nitpicky problems. What matters is that Whedon has succeeded in making a smart, lively, funny, and sexy interpretation, and perhaps most importantly, he makes the play accessible in a way that’s rare to find in adaptations of Shakespeare. If nothing else, Whedon’s built-in fanbase has the potential to bring an entirely new audience to the playwright’s work, and that in itself is something worth celebrating.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Bring this coupon into our store before July 6, 2013 and receive

15% OFF your next wine purchase. *Sale items excluded*

TASTINGS Fridays & Saturdays from 4-7pm

pinnacle wine & liquor

New name, but still Jim Yaeger’s Fine Wines and Spirits, in the former White House Liquor location!

1720 1 720 0M Monroe A Ave • 271-4931 7

READ CITY ONLINE EVERY WEEK AT www.issuu.com/roccitynews

your neighborhood grocer

BUTCHER SALE JUNE 28–JULY 4!!!

$9.99 /lb choice boneless strip steaks firecracker split-broilers for $2.69 /lb (while supplies last, we reserve the right to limit quantities.)

as always, we will have 6 VARIETIES of

artisanal sausages Please call ahead

for large orders Mon-Sat 9am-8pm, Sun 9am-6pm

OPEN JULY 4 til 3PM

We fill Growlers! 2294 MONROE AVE. BRIGHTON 271-8270 | FIND US ON 28 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] AMERICAN GRAFFITI (1973): A group of high school grads spend one last night together before they go their separate ways, and off to college. Starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, and Harrison Ford. Vintage (Tue, Jul 2, 9 p.m.) COPPERHEAD (PG-13): A family in Upstate New York faces the devastating effects of the Civil War. Starring Billy Campbell. Pittsford GALAXY QUEST (1999): The cast of a cult sci-fi TV show have to play their roles in real life when a group of aliens recruit them to help save their race, in this satire of “Star Trek” and its fans. Starring TIm Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman, and Sam Rockwell. Dryden (Wed, Jun 26, 8 p.m.) GREASE (1978): You’re the one that I want. Oo-oo-oo. Vintage (Tue, Jul 2, 11 p.m.) THE HEAT (R): A by-the-book FBI agent teams up with a coarse Boston cop to bring down a drug lord in this buddy comedy from director Paul Feig (“Bridesmaids”). Starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster MY DOG SKIP (2000): A coming-of-age tale about a young boy and his dog, Skip, growing up in 1940s Mississippi. Based on the memoir by Willie Morris. Starring Frankie Muniz, Diane Lane, and Kevin Bacon. Little (Sun, Jun 30, 11 a.m.) RAANJHANAA (NR): A young man pursues his childhood crush despite religious and class conflicts in their families. Henrietta RISKY BUSINESS (1986): A straight-arrow high school student allows himself to cut loose when his parents go out of town, and things get out of hand. Starring Tom Cruise and Rebecca De Mornay. Dryden (Sat, Jun 29, 8 p.m.; Sun, Jun 30, 2 p.m.) THIS MUST BE THE PLACE (2011): Sean Penn stars as a former rock star on a journey across America to fulfill the wishes of his estranged, and recently deceased, father. Dryden (Fri, Jun 28, 8 p.m.) WHAT MAISIE KNEW (R): A young girl is caught in the middle of her parents’ bitter custody battle. Based on the Henry James novel, starring Julianne Moore, Alexander Skarsgård, and Steve Coogan. Little WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG-13): The White House is under terrorist attack, and it’s up to the president (Jamie Foxx) and a wannabe Secret Service agent (Channing Tatum) to save the day. Also with Maggie Gyllenhaal. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge,

Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster ZERO EFFECT (1998): An eccentric private eye and his associate are hired to solve a case of blackmail against a wealthy business tycoon in this mystery based loosely on the Sherlock Holmes story, “A scandal in Bohemia.” Starring Bill Pullman and Ben Stiller. Dryden (Thu, Jun 27, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 42 (PG-13): Brian Helgeland writes and directs this biopic about Jackie Robinson as he’s signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers under team GM Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford). Also starring Chadwick Boseman, Christopher Meloni, and Alan Tudyk. Movies 10 BEFORE MIDNIGHT (R): Rom-com sequel to “Before Sunrise” and “Before Sunset,” picking up the story of Jesse and Celine. Starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy. Pittsford THE BLING RING (R):Sofia Coppola directs this drama, based a true story, about a group of fame-obsessed teens who rob the homes of celebrities. Starring Emma Watson. Pittsford THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated

family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Movies 10 THE EAST (PG-13): A former FBI agent infiltrates an anarchist group that seeks revenge against corporations who engage in criminal activity. With Ellen Page, Alexander Skarsgård, and Patricia Clarkson. Pittsford EPIC (PG): A young girl gets caught in the middle of a battle between the forces good and evil over the fate of the natural world in the animated adventure film. With the voices of Beyoncé Knowles, Colin Farrell, Josh Hutcherson, Amanda Seyfried, and Aziz Ansari. Canandaigua, Movies 10 EVIL DEAD (R): Sam Raimi produced this remake of his 1981 classic horror film, about five friends who stumble across a Book of the Dead while vacationing in a cabin in the woods. Hijinks ensue. Movies 10 FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG13): The sixth installment of the street-racing action film series. Expect fast (and potentially furious) cars, which may or may not explode in epic fashion. Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez, Luke

Evans, and Tyrese Gibson. Culver Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE GREAT GATSBY (PG-13): F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic Jazz Age novel gets the Baz Luhrmann treatment in this glitzy adaptation. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, Tobey Maguire, Joel Edgerton, and Isla Fisher. Cinema THE INTERNSHIP (PG-13): Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn reteam in this comedy about two out of work salesmen competing to land an internship at Google. Canandaigua, Eastview, Henrietta, Vintage, Webster IRON MAN 3 (PG-13): Shane Black (“Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”) takes over directing duties while Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark in the third installment of the superhero franchise. Also starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley, and Guy Pearce. Cinema, Tinseltown, Vintage JURASSIC PARK (PG-13): Steven Spielberg’s beloved adventure tale, about a dinosaur theme park that goes terribly wrong, returns to the big screen and gets the snazzy 3D treatment. Clever girl. Movies 10 (3D, 2D) LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED (R): A woman, recently separated from her husband, meets a handsome widower while

traveling to Italy for her daughter’ s wedding. Starring Pierce Brosnan. Cinema MAN OF STEEL (PG-13): Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Zack Snyder and Christopher Nolan’s angsty new reboot of the Superman franchise! Starring Henry Cavill, Kevin Costner, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Diane Lane, and Russell Crowe. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G): This prequel to Pixar’s “Monsters, Inc.” shows us the origins of Mike and Sulley’s friendship, which dates all the way back in their college days. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (PG-13): Joss Whedon takes a break from superheroes with a low-budget adaptation of Shakespeare’s play, starring all your Whedonverse favorites. Pittsford NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13): A team of illusionists use their talents to perpetrate a series of heists targeting corrupt business leaders. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, and Isla Fisher. Canandaigua, Culver

Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster OBLIVION (PG-13): In a future where humanity has abandoned Earth, one man sent to harvest its resources begins to question the true purpose of his mission. Starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman. Movies 10 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R): Terrorists overtake the a White House in this action thriller starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Ashley Judd, and Melissa Leo. Movies 10 OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG):Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Movies 10 PEEPLES (PG-13): Average Joe Craig Robinson crashes his rich girlfriend’s family reunion in order to ask for her hand in marriage in this comedy from producer Tyler Perry. Also starring Kerry Washington and David Alan Grier. Movies 10 THE PURGE (R): In the year 2022, the government hopes to keep the crime rate at an all-time low by instituting a policy where all crime is legal for 12 hours. Starring Ethan Hawke and Lena Headey.

Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown SCARY MOVIE 5 (R): The latest in the long-running series of film spoofs parodies everything from “Paranormal Activity” to “Black Swan,” with a cast that includes Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan, Heather Locklear, Snoop Dogg, and Mike Tyson. Movies 10 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13): Kirk, Spock and crew return in J.J. Abrams’ sequel to his massively successful reboot of the Star Trek franchise. Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown THIS IS THE END (R): Seth Rogen, James Franco, Jonah Hill, and a host of other mainstays of the Judd Apatow repertory company play themselves in this comedyhorror-adventure about the end of the world. With Jay Baruchel, Craig Robinson, and Danny McBride. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster WORLD WAR Z (PG-13): Brad Pitt tries to stop the zombie outbreak that threatens to destroy the world in this apocalyptic action thriller. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

continues on page 30 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Home and Garden Professionals Build Your New Garage or Addition

Trusted quality service since 1994!

Fast, with Custom Built Panelized Structures! • Attached/Detached Garages

Let us tear down and rebuild your new garage!

ROOF LEAKS? Home Repair Specialist!

Packages available for any size garage!

Innovative Panelized Systems www.ipsgarages.com • Henrietta, NY • (585) 624-7780

• General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

We’re TOPS In Roofing Service Free Estimates! • Re-Roof and Complete Tear-off • Insurance Claims • Storm Damage • Installation & Repairs Since 1968

637-3348

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST

ALL WASHED UP

WINDOW CLEANING • Window Cleaning • Power Washing • Gutter Cleaning

820-6431

For Sale 13” TV, CONVERTER BOX antennna $47 585-752-1000 2 DIGITAL T.V. CONVERTER BOXES. 26” Magnovox T.V. set. All in perfect working order. All for $39 585-654-9480 3 1/2 T Hydraulic car jack $49 585-490-5870 ALUMINUM FOLDING CHAIRS (2) $15. 585-490-5870

703-7738

BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $20 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

& MASONRY

DRIVEWAY GATES 8’ sections. All welded parts complete $49 per each 585-752-1000

SUMMER IS HERE!!! • Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt

GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. $12 bold, also Daisy Pinwheel $3 585880-2903 585-544-4155 GLASS TABLES Oval glass top coffee table $50, 2 round, glass end tables $25 each or $100 for all plus 2 table lamps. Please call 585-3257979 HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-8802903 MAGNAVOX digital to analog converter $28 585-490-5870 NORDIC TRACK SPORT EXCERSIZER Simulator, X-country skiing, adjustable resistance & elevation. Excellent condition. Charlotte 585-6636983 $50 PALM TREE 5’ tall $15 585490-5870 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 VARIOUS Shovel, rakes, brooms, heavy duty $3 ea, duffle bags $3 ea, Hand tools $2, Ramps (car) heavy duty $35, work shoe & boots $1,

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.”

Fully Insured

585-734-8444

Once Over

- DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs Commercial & Residential 10 year labor warranty on all workmanship

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

> page 29 insured. No credit/ income requirements. NMLS#3740 Free 26 pg. catalog. 1-855884-3300 ALL ISLAND MORTGAGE

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

Do it right the first time

Call: 458-ROOF

(7663)

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet Garden Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

Affordable

Home Improvements All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Fully insured

Call

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job! 30 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads wire cage for rabbit $25 585752-1000 WEDDING: Card box, ring pillow basket, toast glasses, 2 candle holders. Excellent, must see $50 585-392-5127 WHIRLPOOL GAS DRYER. Very Good Condition. 3 years old. $50 Call 585-527-8024 WOOD GARDEN FIGURES, 2 girls, 1 dog, stands in ground. All three $10 585-880-2903

Jam Section BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-4735089

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 HAMMOND AURORA ORGAN Nice sounding Hammond Spinet organ w/ Leslie speaker built-in. Solid state. Includes bench $500 Hurry! 585-455-5739 LOOKING FOR MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS. please no freelancers apply. Available evenings, equipment & transportation Contact Bobby 585-328-4121

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

backup. Want to jam without pressure, see where things go. mooskamovers@aol.com SEEKING KEYBOARDISTS & SAX player available evenings. Wanting one unit to work with. Contact Bobby 58/5-328-4121 SEEKING VOCALIST that can learn many songs quickly. Many styles of music, lead & background. Please no one who requires too much attantion. Bobby 585-328-4121

SEEKING GUITARIST Who likes early Beatles and Who, Jefferson Airplane, Springsteen, Ramones, B-52s and X. I play bass, write, and sing

continues on page 33

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Free summer meals for children 18 and under. Call 211 or (585) 295-5624 or 295-5626 to find a Monroe County site. LAWNY® NOEP Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York & NYSOTDA.

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

KdMovingandStorage.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Greece; 158 Merrick St, $94,900. This home boasts refinished hardwoods, woodburing fireplace, an archway to the dining room, and a closed in porch with a brick floor. Many Upgrades! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724

A Charlotte Special

45 Holcomb Street

When a house has been truly cared for and loved by its owners, it shows. And, really, what’s not to love about 45 Holcomb Street? The current owners have spent the past eleven years carefully restoring the historic details that give the home its character while also updating features that make it a livable abode for the 21st century. It’s a perfect balance of old and new. The unassuming exterior of this 1910s Craftsman style bungalow belies its spacious and impressive interior. Inside, you will find hardwood floors, high ceilings, spectacular varnished woodwork, original light fixtures, and restored multi-paned wood windows that lend each room warmth and character. The deep front porch features a beaded board ceiling and runs the width of the house, offering space for summer lounging and outdoor dinner parties. Stepping through the front door into the living room, you are struck by the woodwork and the proliferation of windows that allow natural light to pour in from all sides. These windows and the layout of the large, airy rooms give the interior an open feel that makes it seem larger than its 1650 square feet. Beautiful multi-paned wood casement windows line the living room, along with a fireplace and built-in shelving. A colonnade separates the living and dining room, creating a dramatic transition. An expansive bay window fills the dining room with light, highlighting the coffered ceiling, picture rail, and other woodwork.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Like the rest of the house, the spacious kitchen is a harmonious blend of old and new. It

boasts original wood cabinetry and hardware, a restored wooden countertop in the pantry, new stainless steel appliances, gorgeous new soapstone countertops, and a new peninsula. Off the dining room are the master bedroom and a seriously spacious, full bathroom updated with hexagonal floor tiles and white subway tile on the walls. A second bedroom, which could also function as an office, den, or playroom, features a large bay window with a window seat. Upstairs is a third bedroom, a half bath, and unfinished storage space tucked under the eaves. The property includes a wide and attractive city lot with loads of well-tended gardens, including lilacs, a redbud, flowering crabapples, heirloom roses, Rose of Sharon, and a small vegetable plot. The family friendly, walkable neighborhood has something for everyone—a diner at the end of the block, Turning Point Park and the Genesee Riverway Trail, a playground at nearby School 42, the Charlotte Library, and Lake Ontario just up the street. With a great neighborhood and landscaping on the outside and tons of character on the inside, this Charlotte bungalow is a truly special home. The property is listed at $94,900 with Rome Celli of RE/MAX Realty, 756-7425. Visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R224657 to see it for yourself. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner at The Landmark Society.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators

Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help

SINGLE ALTERNATIVE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

is seeking one bright, outgoing, creative

SALES PROFESSIONAL for long-term relationship!

Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

INTERESTED? EMAIL BETSY MATTHEWS:

bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 2876377 or email jpowers@lifespanroch.org.

Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com!

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854.

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project.

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities PACKAGED CANDY AND NUT Distributors or anyone looking to own their own business Call 800-231-2018 or visit: www. marlowcandy.net (Celebrating 43 Years in the business)

HOPE HALL Recruiting volunteers to call sponsors and assist with events. Please contact: Michele Kaider-Korol, Development Associate at Hope Hall, (585) 426-5824 x111. LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org

START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

Career Training EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS!

NOW HIRING MBE/DBE/WBE Subcontractors/Suppliers

One of the leading General Contractors in Western NY is soliciting bids for an upcoming construction project in Rochester.

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

Industrial Sewing Position East Side manufacturer seeks qualified Industrial Sewer. Minimum of 3 years experience required.

New York State Certified MBE, DBE, and WBE subcontractors are requested for all scopes of work for the construction of this project set to break ground in July of 2013, with an estimated completion in Fall of 2014.

Automotive/marine experienced desired- will be working with vinyl, leather, and carpet.

Please send information, or a Vendor Qualification Form to:

Attention to detail required. Must be able to maintain minimum re-cuts while achieving daily requirements.

TAYLOR – The Builders 2580 Baird Road, Penfield, NY 14526, fax to 585-248-5630, or email to RochesterGC@Yahoo.com. No phone calls will be accepted!

Must have excellent attendance and a willingness to be cross trained in other departments.

“An Equal Opportunity Employer”

32 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

CITY

Call Christine at

Must be self- directed, able to work from English language patterns, and be proficient with measuring devices. Ability to operate high and low speed industrial sewing machines.

Excellent starting pay/benefits.

Resumes with wage requirement to: P.O. BOX 344 Newark, NY 14513

Legal Ads

> page 31 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 & 585-512-6044 PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS or product in alternative papers

BOOK SALE! July 4th, 5th, 6th & 7th

10 am - 4 pm Livonia, NY

across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” christine@rochester-citynews. com HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Lost and Found LEFT @ BROWNCROFT Garage Sale Saturday May 4, glass lilac plate , box of decorative gels, toy purse 585-654-8253

Wanted to Buy CASH BUYER, 1970 and Before, Comic Books, Toys, Sports, entire collections wanted. I travel to you and Buy EVERYTHING YOU have! Call Brian TODAY: 1-800-617-3551

Next to Ember Grill

60,000 ON SALE!

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of SENECA WINTERBERGERS LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/9/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 30 Gravel Hill Lane, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

DGMAS, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 18, 2013 with an effective date of formation of June 18, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

KimSanity, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 12, 2013. The name was changed to KimSulting, LLC. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Sanfilippo Circle, Rochester, New York 14625. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Ruffles Boutique LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 17, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 35 Brunswick Street, Apt. 2, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 4699 LAKE AVENUE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/13/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4699 Lake Ave., Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business locaton. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] A & D REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/28/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 22 Whitestone Lane Rochester Lane Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Lost?

Find your way home with SEE OUR

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 31

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23

Artisan Cabinetworks, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 15 Nevele Creek, Town of Penfield in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 15 Nevele Creek, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

[ NOTICE ] Doan EZ Auto Rental LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on June 17, 2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] E.C.O. ENTERPRISE, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 235 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] GASLIGHT PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] HAVENTEN, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3000 Marcus Ave., Ste. 1W5, Lake Success, NY 11042. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

CRC RESOURCES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 140 Metro Park, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

KD BENEFITS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. Of Org., filed with the SSNY on 5/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 311 Brooksboro Drive, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE FORMATION of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the LLC is RealGem Properties, LLC. 2. Articles of Org. were filed with Department of State of NY on June 7, 2013. 3.County of office: Monroe. 4. The Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: c/o Teaposy, Inc., 1900 Clinton Avenue, S., Unit 18111, Rochester, New York 14618. [ NOTICE ] MOSES MAN LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/7/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 41 French Rd Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NEW MARKET VENTURES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/12/09. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 38 Kimbark RD Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Chris Rimlinger 38 Kimbark RD Rochester, NY 14610. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of A Muse Ink, LLC. Art. Of Org. with the Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 4/18/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 620 Park Avenue, Suite 161, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of A&M Reporting, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/30/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 376 Westside Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of DL CHURCH WEBSITES, LLC,

Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. PO Box 71, W Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Finish Line Investors LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 39 Vassar St Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ]

upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 10068, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1372 EDGEMERE DRIVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Not. Of Form. Of GQR Consulting LLC, Art. Of Org. Filed with SSNY 4/17/13. County: Monroe SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 194 Saint Regis Drive South, Rochester, NY 14618, Purpose: Any lawful Activities.

Notice of formation of 151 Park, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/29/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 151 Park Ave., Rear Bldg, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by PLUM HOUSE SUSHI INC dba PLUM HOUSE SUSHI ,686-688 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

Notice of Formation of 212 BREWING COMPANY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. Name of foreign LLC is Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/30/13. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Formed: 5/29/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business: 150 Verona Street, Rochester, NY 14608. The address of the office required to be maintained in Delaware is its registered agent: Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 1679 S. Dupont Hwy, Suite 100, Dover DE, 19901. The name and address of the authorized officer in Delaware where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State, State of Delaware, Division of Corporations, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BIRCHGROVE REAL ESTATE LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 00-00-00. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 455 POST AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 124 Stockton Ln, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 4700 East Lake Road, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 128 Lynx Ct., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 65 ARTHUR ST., LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/15/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

Legal Ads > page 33 may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 95 Seneca Ave., Rochester NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 880 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bansbach Zoghlin P.C., 31 Erie Canal Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name: OpenTee, LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/20/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 117 Heather Dr, Rochester, 14625. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ADAM SOLUTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aidan Samuel, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on

5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AVANT GARDE AMENITIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Don Trooien, 212 Brewing Company, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Buckingham Net Leased Properties Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 259 Alexander St., Rochester, NY 14607, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CASTLE PARK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 58 Whitestone Ln., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Howard R. Crane, c/o Relin Goldstein & Crane LLP, 28 E. Main St., Ste. 1800, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Direct EDU, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 5/13/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 772 Shorecliff Drive Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JTS Buffalo, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Manning Marine, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 290 Woodcliff Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Marino Law Group, PLLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 S. Washington

Adult Services

St., Ste. 220, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: to practice the profession of Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Morsch 1, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 43 Pearwood Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MRECC Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 45 Bauers Cove, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NB4 PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Rd., Ste 5, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Personalized Visual Learning LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 05/08/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 36 Cobb Terrace, Rochester, NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PINK SALON, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Galwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Primark Interactive, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 4/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Primark Interactive, LLC, 1 East Main Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

34 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Primetime Ventures, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 290 Woodcliff Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of REN LIQUORS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Skyroc Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Solid State Concrete Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STRATEGIC ALLIANCE NETWORK LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TAMARAC ORGANIZATIONAL SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 4 Kingsbury Ct., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to

the LLC, Attn: Julie LaFave at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YL PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Midfirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Traycie L. Calhoun, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/7/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at Monroe County Office Bldg., at W. Main Street, State of New York on 07/17/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 127 Perinton Street, Rochester, NY 14615- 3141. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 090.30, BLOCK: 1, LOT: 41. Approximate amount of judgment $90,975.12 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 13297/2010. Kristine Demo Vazquez, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: May 9, 2013 1037221 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 07/10/2013 [ NOTICE ] Portable Basement, LLC has filled Arts. of Org. with the Secretary of State on 4/12/2013. Office location: Monroe County. United States Corporation Agents, INC. is designated as the agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. USCA, INC. shall mail process to: 7014 13th Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Manufacturing. [ NOTICE ] TENPIN ASSOCIATES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3000 Marcus Ave., Ste. 1W5, Lake Success, NY 11042. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] VISION BUICK GMC LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is

designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Daniel E. Edwards, 800 Panorama Trail S, Rochester, NY 14625. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] VISION TWO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 421 Sundance Trail, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WHOZ NEXT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/12/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 104 Troup ST Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Front Runner Media LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 1/ 25/07. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 7014 13th Ave. Suite 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SUPERIOR CARE AGENCY LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) , 05/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 207 Tremont Street, Suite 112, Rochester, New York, 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] ALYESKA LLC, a domestic Liability Company (LLC), filed Articles of Organization with SSNY on 04/09/2013. Office: Monroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process in any action or proceeding may be served, and the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process is: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Developub LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 07/30/12. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to United States Corporation

Agents Inc, 7014 13th Ave Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advanced Rakestraw Cabinetry, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 215 Whittier Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 215 Whittier Road, Rochester, New York 14624. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] CDE Partners LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 7, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Wrightstone, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 29, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1 Park Avenue, Brockport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1 Park Avenue, Brockport, New York 14420. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION SOVEREIGN VORTEX SYSTEMS LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 05/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to SOVEREIGN VORTEX SYSTEMS LLC, C/O JOHN COTTON, 620 PARK AVE., ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Legal Ads [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-13004SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Robert M. Schmidt; Leslie Avila, a/k/a Leslie Avila-Schmidt People of the State of New York, Probation; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance; Marlene Cruz; Carey Shillea; Carole Coleman Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 21, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 12, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 177 Arbutus Street, Rochester, NY 14609; Tax Account No. 092.77-1-58 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9016 of Deeds, page 10. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $36,641.42 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Victoria Lagoe, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-13009 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Cora N. Mack a/k/a Cora N. Prescott; GE Money Bank; ) Capital One Bank USA NA; CACH LLC Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 29, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 10, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as

follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 87 Cindy Lane, Rochester, NY 14626; Tax Account No. 059.034-66 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10225 of Deeds, page 612. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $95,706.17 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Loren H. Kroll, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-2591 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. David E. Haasis; Beate A. Haasis, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 23, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 10, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 27 Rodessa Road, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 075.344-4 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6888 of Deeds, page 310. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $58,961.43 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED:

May 2013 Matthew Nafus, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-10756 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. William M. DuBois; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 29, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 12, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 142 Gates Greece Townline Road, Rochester, NY 14606; Tax Account No. 084.043-32 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10600 of Deeds, page 282. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $75,000.95 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 James Grosso, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-9837 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JUAN R. IZQUIERDO; LYDIA RAMOS, if living, or if she be dead, her husband, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-ininterest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through LYDIA RAMOS, by purchase, inheritance, lien

or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective husbands, or widowers of hers, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF AEGIS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-5; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the amended complaint in the aboveentitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this supplemental summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the amended complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: June 10, 2013 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing supplemental summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated June 14, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose certain tax liens (the “Tax Lien”) covering the property known as 27 Chapin Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account No. 091.76-1-51 (the “Premises”). The relief sought is the sale of the Premises at public auction in satisfaction of the Tax Lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $4,463.47, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorney’s fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Premises. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 2382000

Fun

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 30 ]

CHECK OUT OUR TV RECAPS AT OUR

ENTERTAINMENT BLOG!

True Blood • RuPaul's Drag Race Game of Thrones • and more!

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/BLOGS/ENTERTAINMENTBLOG

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

Fresh Summer Color! Our greenhouses are Fully Stocked AZALEAS $9.95

Reg. $14.95

Shining Sensation Weigelia 50% OFF #3 POT NOW

$19.97

ROSES…in Full Flower! Choose from David Austin, Floral Carpet, Knockouts, Drifts and More!

SPECIAL! Buy 3 or more, get 25%

OFF

BULK LANDSCAPE SUPPLIES

Mulches- 5 types, Decorative Stone- 8 types Screened Topsoil, Composts, Gravel, Sand, Playground Chips Pick-up or Delivery, Fast and Friendly Service

Great Summer Color

HYDRANGEAS Over 200 selections

WE ARE PASSIONATE FOR OUR PERENNIALS! Our New Expanded Display Area has over 600 selections available.

Friendly, qualified personnel to assist you. Check with us for both the common and the unusual.

Buy 3 or more at

25% OFF

PERENNIAL OF THE WEEK

ORIENTAL & ASIATIC LILIES 25% OFF

Find us on the web! WaysideGardenCenter.com complete inventory, price specials and more are all online.

124 Pittsford-Palmyra Road, Rt. 31 1 mile East of Lollypop Farm

Macedon, NY • 585-223-1222

M-F 8:30AM-8PM, SAT & SUN 8:30AM-8PM

WaysideGardenCenter.com 36 CITY JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2013


June 26 - July 2, 2013 - City Newspaper