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EVENTS: THEATREROCS SHOWCASE, ART OF THE MIX 21 FILM: “ON THE ROAD,” “EVIL DEAD” 28 CHOW HOUND: PENFIELD POUR HOUSE 11 URBAN JOURNAL: MISSING MARCH MADNESS

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 39 CITY NEWSPAPER’S BEST BUSKER CONTEST 31

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AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

The irony is dramatic, but also obvious.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 22

College Town: It’s about the windows. DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 4

Pittsford YMCA project sparks traffic worries. NEWS, PAGE 9

Look for marina work after Labor Day. NEWS, PAGE 9

Digest Rochester Contemporary’s “Eat It.” ART REVIEW, PAGE 20

COVER STORY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 6 | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MARK CHAMBERLIN & MATT DETURCK

Latino Rochester: pride and power City Commissioner Carlos Carballada represents one end of the spectrum of the Rochester area’s rich Hispanic-Latino community: immigrants and their first-generation children, many of whom have attained nearly every measure of success. They’ve become CEO’s, doctors, engineers, attorneys, and politicians — often leaving the city to join the middle class in the suburbs. But a large portion of Rochester’s Latino community still struggles in poverty, often filling low-paying jobs in construction, agriculture, and food service.

Rochester’s second-largest-and-growing minority group has made enormous strides, but some Latinos say the community needs a new crop of leaders who will fight for much-needed improvements, especially in the area of education. But the community is clearly an important factor in the city’s diversity and economic success. The challenge for many Latinos is to move further into mainstream America while retaining their vibrant cultural legacy. Pictured: Melisza Campos, Jackie Ortiz, and Jose Cruz.

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APRIL 10-16, 2013

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Austerity or jobs?

The national mythology about the economy given by the mainstream media can be summarized as a discussion whose terms are “austerity” and ... “austerity.” Not “versus full employment” or “jobs” but how much austerity, when, and for whom. We all need to share in the sacrifice... Riiight! The media choose to forget that during the 30’s Depression Franklin Roosevelt saved capitalists from themselves, in part by applying the Keynesian economics of deficit spending to overcome unemployment. When driven to sufficient levels by World War II, it worked as it was supposed to work. (The part we forgot recently was to pay back the deficits during the boom times. That, of course, would require responsible governance.) Thus the government became the employer of last resort and repaired some crumbling infrastructure. It was goodbye and good riddance to the regressive, extremely counterproductive economics of Hoover and Coolidge. Don’t you wish! Doing its part to ignore history and regress fatally we have, for example, the March 3 Democrat and Chronicle editorial suggesting a truly regressive Simpson-Bowles like “compromise,” i.e. givebacks on Social Security and the federal Med programs (which “reasonable” Democrats need to learn to accept). How is austerity working out for those who have already been force-fed this prescription in the Euro Zone? More jobs or fewer? Increasing debt ratio or decreasing? The news is consistently bad, predictable, and well known. But this is not part of our polite conversation in the media. Why not?

The actual but unmentioned issue is whether to get all austere, or confront unemployment. Which problem is most urgently pressing right now? The “gotta reduce deficits now” argument is dishonest on its face, since by the only significant measure, deficits are going down as a percent of GDP in the US, but will, as in the Euro Zone, become larger as a percent of GDP when we copy the Euro austerity mania. So even though Paul Krugman columns are printed in the New York Times, where is the discussion of his Keynesian economic ideas versus austerity? I want the austerity mongers to have a discussion with Nobel and other economists like Krugman, Joseph Stiglitz, and Richard Eskow, to name several of the widely ignored. Enough echo chamber already. How about an honest conversation and debate? But of course I am dreaming. Conservative scolds have already drowned Keynesian economics in the bathtub by never acknowledging its existence or successful history. As far as I can tell, neither do liberal politicians who are fighting to “save” Social Security. If this is as big a trump card as I believe it is, why not? MIKE CONNELLY, ROCHESTER

The Greens and development

On a Green Party supporter’s comment on city development and the campaign for mayor: “This development would have happened due to market demands regardless”? This is the essence of the Green Party fantasy. What market conditions are you citing? The worst economy since the Great Depression? Declining population and further concentration of poverty? The Green Party loves to compare the tax impact of actual development to the possible tax impact of magical fantasy projects that don’t exist (rather than to the non-revenue producing decay that they replace) without factoring in any of the other benefits of these projects. If Apple moved its corporate headquarters to downtown Rochester, built an architectural wonder on an abandoned

parking lot, but was given tax breaks to do so, (Green mayoral candidate) Alex White would be decrying the move. You don’t compare the deal to a perfect non-existent one; you compare it to the abandoned parking lot. White seems almost completely unaware of the almost generations of divestment from the city. Pretending that private equity is fighting to spend money on urban development and that tax incentives are needless give-aways is frighteningly divorced from reality. It’s cheap, and it attempts to turn complex economics into bumper sticker politics. GOODGOV

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

‘Whipping Man’s’ a must-see

Thank you, Geva, for yet another winning show. With its well-crafted script, powerful performances, and engaging story, Geva’s newest is “The Whipping Man.” We are season subscribers, but I have to admit I wasn’t sure, given the title, if this would be too violent a story for me. Despite its intensity, however, the play did not show violence as much as help the viewer imagine the resulting pain that damaged these men’s lives. The stormy, crumbling scenery was like a fourth character in setting the haunted mood. The twists in the story, from comic to tragic, left the audience gasping at times. I walked away feeling like I had learned something and can’t stop thinking about it. That’s the sign of a great production. With all the talk about race in Rochester lately, “The Whipping Man” is absolutely a must-see. CATHY ANDERSON, IRONDEQUOIT

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly April 10-16, 2013 Vol 42 No 31 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Missing March Madness In our house, March used to be a great month, the NCAA basketball championship a happy break after slogging through the worst of winter. And as alumni of a Southeastern Conference school, both of us raised in a state where University of Tennessee loyalty bordered on fanaticism, there was a special attraction: even if our men’s basketball team didn’t get past the early rounds, our women’s team always did. Always. And even when Tennessee men didn’t do well, we let March Madness take over our evenings as winter turned to spring. But last year, after reading Taylor Branch’s “The Shame of College Sports” in the Atlantic, I stopped watching NCAA games. And the work of people like the Times’ Joe Nocera and NPR’s Frank Deford has deepened my concern. At too many American colleges and universities, aided and abetted by the NCAA, sports has become something ugly. Winning and money have overshadowed what sports and college should be about. You know about the really big scandal involving Penn State, Jerry Sandusky, and Joe Paterno. This year, as March Madness headed toward the final rounds, Rutgers fired basketball coach Mike Rice after a videotape became public showing Rice shoving players, throwing basketballs at them, and yelling homophobic slurs. Rutgers’ athletic director says when he saw the videotape four months ago, he wanted to fire Rice, but others in the university wanted him kept on and “rehabilitated.” So he was. Rice, whose salary was $700,000, was fined $50,000, but because he finished the season at Rutgers, he earned a $100,000 bonus. Nocera, Deford, and others have reported the numerous small scandals – and the illogical rules, power, and vindictiveness of the NCAA. (Among Nocera’s examples: A University of Connecticut player who was suspended from the team because the NCAA objected to an “improper benefit” that his mother had received. The benefit? A friend had bought an airline ticket for her so she could accompany her son to the schools he was considering attending.) Then there’s the advantage the schools and the NCAA take of “student-athletes”: The players don’t get paid. But the NCAA does. The schools and the coaches do (and some assistant coaches make more than $1 million a year). The NCAA’s take from March Madness in 2011, Branch writes: $771 million: “threequarters of a billion dollars built on the backs of amateurs – on unpaid labor.”

Everybody makes money but the students. And the biggest scandal is the damage done to the system of higher education.

That’s just the start: the NCAA sells DVD’s of past games – years and years afterwards. It sells video games, T-shirts. The athletes whose images are featured get nothing. But the biggest scandal is the damage this is doing to the system of higher education. Journalists reporting on all this tell of promising young athletes being admitted to universities when they are all but illiterate, of “student-athletes” being eased into meaningless courses, of grades being changed to protect their eligibility. Coaches’ pay often dwarfs that of faculty members. Academic programs face cutbacks while sports programs and facilities thrive. And too many schools seem more interested in being known for how their football or basketball team fares than for the quality of education they provide, the research their faculty and students do, the contributions to medicine, literature, science, and economics their alumni make. And there may be no starker example of how sports has corrupted higher education than the University of Kentucky, where basketball coach John Calipari recruits players with the open acknowledgement that they have no intention of finishing college. To keep talented athletes from dropping out of high school, NBA rules bar them from joining the NBA until they’re 19. Calipari recruits them to spend their 18th year helping Kentucky win games. Last year all five starting basketball players left school for the NBA. Three were freshmen. Two were sophomores. What, then, is the purpose of a university? What’s the purpose of college athletics? And, by the way: whatever happened to that quaint old phrase, “It’s not whether you win or lose, it’s how you play the game”?

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

High Falls visitor center closing The Center at High Falls, the museum-gift store-gallery for visitors to the area, will close in June, according to city officials. The center, which was reporting financial losses, may have fallen victim to a change in occupancy and commercial use for many of the buildings in the area. The city once imagined High Falls as a tourist and entertainment draw, but the area became more of an office-apartment location instead.

I-Square construction starts

Developers Mike and Wendy Nolan broke ground on I-Square, a seven-building, mixeduse development in the Town of Irondequoit. Crews are doing utility work at the site this week, says a post on the I-Square website. The project is proceeding after disagreements between the Nolans and the town over a tax incentive agreement, which have since been resolved.

August groundbreaking for train station House Representative Louise Slaughter said

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APRIL 10-16, 2013

that construction on a new intermodal station for trains and buses will begin in August. The station will replace the current one, which was built in 1970 and was supposed to be temporary. Construction should be completed by 2016.

News

Politicians behaving badly

Two separate bribery cases set the state capital on edge. Senator Malcolm Smith, a Democrat, was arrested and charged for allegedly paying several New York City Republican leaders to support his mayoral candidacy; those leaders were also arrested and charged. Democratic Assembly member Eric Stevenson was also arrested and charged for allegedly accepting money to introduce specific legislation. The New York Post reported that Governor Andrew Cuomo and his aides planned to use the scandals to oust Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver from his leadership position, and that Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle was their favorite to replace him. But Cuomo said it’s up to the legislative bodies to select their leaders and he wouldn’t interfere.

How it may look at the intersection of Mount Hope Avenue and the newly created Celebration Drive when the College Town project is completed (more images at rochestercitynewspaper.com). PROVIDED IMAGE

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

College Town’s window problem When Marcia Barry, the City of Rochester’s director of planning and zoning, meets with College Town developers this week, they’ll talk windows. Last month, the city’s zoning board gave College Town, a 16-acre mixed-use development planned for the west side of Mount Hope Avenue between Elmwood Avenue and Crittenden Boulevard, leeway on some zoning requirements. The condition is that developers add “transparency” to the street fronts of the project’s planned grocery store and its hotel.

The hotel would be located on Elmwood, and the grocery would front the newly created Celebration Drive. Celebration would bisect Mount Hope between Elmwood and Crittenden Boulevard. Barry has to give final approval to the project’s site plan and says she’ll work with developers to see if more windows can be added to the first story of the grocery store and hotel. Or if windows aren’t feasible, she says she’ll press them on alternatives like showcases or display space. Prior to last month’s zoning board meeting, College Town’s developers submitted a plan that included

street-level blacked-out windows for the grocery and the hotel. Barry recommended rejecting the plan, so developers revised it to include more windows, she says. Developers added windows to the hotel facade in what would be a conference area, and they added display areas in front of the kitchen space. They also added windows in front of the grocery store, though Barry says there is still room for improvement. Barry says she expects revised designs to be submitted to the city after she talks to developers.

“When you’re talking about making the kind of investment we’ve made in these FIS neighborhoods, you have to help people sustain it. You can’t do the improvement and walk away and think that things in the neighborhood are going to change.” [ LOVELY WARREN ]

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,198 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,081 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to April 8. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from March 29 to April 3:

NEIGHBORHOODS | CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

ENERGY | BY JEREMY MOULE

Improving neighborhoods

Power play

Rochester Mayor Tom Richards wants to keep the city’s Focused Investment program operating in the same four neighborhoods for at least two more years, saying the program needs more time to work. The city started Focused Investment about four years ago, singling out four challenged neighborhoods for intense investment of time and resources: Marketview Heights in the northeast, Beechwood in the southeast, DeweyDriving Park in the northwest, and Jefferson Avenue in the southwest. Federal grant money and other resources have been used to rehab homes, for demolition, and many other efforts. The goal was to see marked improvement in the selected neighborhoods within three to five years. But Richards now says that, despite many gains, it will take longer than expected for the city to realize its objectives. Richards called for the extension following the release of a progress report on the FIS program, put together by the city’s Department of Business and Housing Development. The report says that although the overall health of the neighborhoods seems to be improving, “the distressed nature of these neighborhoods makes it difficult to achieve results quickly.” Through FIS, the report says: rehabs had been completed or are under way at 137 residential and 18 commercial properties,

and a total of 44 vacant structures have been or are going to be demolished. But the neighborhoods continue to suffer from lower property assessments, higher Lovely Warren. crime rates, higher FILE PHOTO rental rates, and higher vacancy rates. City Council President Lovely Warren, who is running for mayor this year, says she supports FIS, but a critical component is missing. The program doesn’t include individualized support for people living in the FIS neighborhoods, such as connecting them to needed services. “We were supposed to do more,” Warren says. “When you’re talking about making the kind of investment we’ve made in these FIS neighborhoods, you have to help people sustain it. You can’t do the improvement and walk away and think that things in the neighborhood are going to change.” City spokesperson Gary Walker says City Council has approved a pilot community building program for Beechwood, and that programs are planned for the other three neighborhoods, as well.

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The powers that be want to close a nuclear plant that provides electricity to downstate, but upstate ratepayers shouldn’t be on the hook for that decision, State Senator Ted O’Brien says. | Federal licenses for Indian Point Energy Center’s two operating reactors expire soon: one at the end of September, the other in 2015. And some state officials, including Governor Andrew Cuomo, do not want them relicensed, which means they’d shut down. | The plant is owned by Entergy, which wants the reactors to be relicensed. | O’Brien’s objections deal with a contingency plan prepared by Consolidated Edison and the New York Power Authority, which buy electricity from the Indian Point plant. | The plan, which the utility providers submitted to the state Public Service Commission, would require upstate ratepayers to cover $200 million of the costs associated with replacing Indian Point’s generating capacity. O’Brien says that Indian Point provided power solely for downstate users, and he’s written the PSC to express opposition to the contingency plan. | Republican State Senator George Maziarz and Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle, a Democrat, also oppose the plan. | Con Ed and NYPA estimate the cost of replacing Indian Point’s output at $811 million.

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CITY 5

LATINO ROCHESTER: PRIDE AND POWER

COVER STORY | TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Don’t be too hard on yourself if you don’t remember, but the City of Rochester has already had its first Latino mayor. City Commissioner Carlos Carballada filled the office for a blink-and-you-missed-it period of time in 2011, when everyone was arguing over the legal process to replace former Mayor Bob Duffy. (Duffy won election as lieutenant governor and eventually a special election was set to select his replacement). Carballada says he’s proud of his Spanish and Peruvian heritage, but that he didn’t give the milestone a thought until a reporter brought it up. Though Carballada grew up in a household with deep ethnic roots, assimilation into a largely Anglo-American society was what his mother wanted most for her two sons. She pushed them to speak proper English. “She would say, ‘Work hard today and tomorrow will take care of itself,’” Carballada says. “It’s still the best advice I’ve ever received.” Carballada represents one end of the spectrum of the Rochester area’s rich Hispanic-Latino community: immigrants and their first-generation children who 6 CITY

APRIL 10-16, 2013

have attained nearly every measure of success. They’ve become CEO’s, doctors, engineers, attorneys, politicians, and teachers — often leaving the city to join the middle class in the suburbs. But a large portion of Rochester’s Latino community still struggles in poverty: living in crime-ridden neighborhoods, and filling low-paying laborious jobs in agriculture, construction, food service, and housekeeping. For many Latinos, the move to the continental US mirrors the path taken by earlier European immigrants: a journey from humble beginnings in chaotic homelands. And even though some Latinos say Rochester’s second-largest minority group has made enormous strides, others say the community needs new leaders who will inspire and drive much-needed change. Either way, Rochester’s Latino community is clearly a significant factor in the city’s diversity and economic success. But the community’s struggle to move further into mainstream America while retaining its unique cultural identity presents a challenge for young and old. Rochester’s Latino community is obviously not as large as some cities in the Northeast or

PHOTOS | MARK CHAMBERLIN

Southwest, but its growth reflects a national trend occurring in many urban areas. According to the US Census, the number of Monroe County residents identifying as Latino or Hispanic in 2000 was 39,065 or 5.3 percent of the population. The community not only grew to 54,005 in 2010, but it increased to 7.3 of Monroe County’s total population. Most Rochester-area Latinos, nearly 35,000, live in the city. And the majority, nearly 28,000 according to the 2010 Census, is Puerto Rican. Some arrived on the US

Poverty seems to create more poverty. And ironically, it’s expensive to be poor. - Saul Maneiro

mainland in the late 1800’s, but the migration began in earnest in the 1940’s and continued through the 1990’s, according to Julio Saenz, author of “Images of America-Rochester’s Latino Community.” Rochester school board member Jose Cruz’s family left the island in the 1950’s when he was 18 months old. Before moving the family to Buffalo and then to Rochester, Cruz’s father found work on a Florida farm operated by food giant Campbell. “My story is pretty typical of many, many [Puerto Rican] families who came here at that time,” Cruz says. “We were able to create this hybrid culture where kids like me grew up in two worlds. We’d be having a regular day in school, and then go home and have rice and beans. And never the two shall meet.” Puerto Ricans, who were American citizens by then, were hindered by many of the same challenges faced by other immigrant communities, Cruz says, and self-reliance was akin to survival. “We looked different from everyone else, we ate different foods, and we had different customs,” he says. “[And] there weren’t as many agencies to help people like there are today. There weren’t many

Latino doctors or lawyers, so you really had to develop this matrix of people who could provide these services.” The interdependence within the community grew out of necessity, Cruz says. He says his family was fortunate because his father learned to speak English. “My father had this knack, he was actually very proficient in English,” Cruz says. “So people like business owners and farmers would ask him to help with translation.” The Spanish language is something Latinos have in common regardless of where they are from, Cruz says: language acts as a unique bond. “It’s important to remember that ‘Latino’ is a very broad brush,” he says. “We come from many places and we’re not the same. But one of the things that really helps our communities — whether it’s Puerto Rican, Dominican, Cuban, or one of the Latin American countries — is that we’re all bound by the same language. So you could go to any one particular house, it doesn’t matter where we’ve come from, and we’re able to communicate with each other almost 100 percent of the time.”

“It’s important to remember that ‘Latino’ is a very broad brush.” - Jose Cruz

Rochester City Council member and businesswoman Jacklyn Ortiz was born in

the continental US, but her mother was born in Puerto Rico, and her grandmother was Mexican. She says that the Latino community in Rochester has had several periods of growth, and that the community today is definitely in transition. “At this moment, we’re on the rise again,” Ortiz says. “And it’s not just from a population standpoint; it’s happening from a cultural awareness standpoint, too.” Ortiz says the wider public is much more familiar with Latino foods, customs, music, and artists than it used to be. Rochester school board member Melisza Campos says her mother was the only member of her family who graduated from college. But more first- and second- generation Latinos are earning college degrees, running businesses successfully, and assuming positions of higher responsibility today. “I think our community is progressing economically and politically,” Campos says. Many Latinos organized support for former Mayor Duffy’s election, she says, and the community can become a game-changer when it’s engaged. “I think we have to harness this opportunity we have and make it even more powerful,” she says. “And we can do that by raising our voices where there is an issue.” One extremely sensitive local and national issue for many Latinos is immigration. Immigration reform became a highly contentious political issue during the 2012 presidential election, with Democrats supporting a path to citizenship for the approximately 12

Opposite page: The Reverend Laurence Tracy. Above, from left: Jackie Ortiz, Melisza Campos, and Jose Cruz. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

million noncitizens living in the US. The majority are believed to be Latinos, many living here discretely for decades. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said during the campaign that people who are here illegally should voluntarily deport themselves. Romney later conceded that the comment probably alienated many Latino voters. “I think honestly it’s horrendous,” Ortiz says. “How many people in this country can say that they or their families, or however you want to describe it, were here from the beginning? Rarely can anyone say that.” Ortiz and many Latinos say it’s a matter of fairness. Ortiz says she has trouble understanding why millions of Europeans were allowed to come to the US years ago, and when Mexicans and other Latinos come here for the same reasons — searching for a better life — they’re treated differently. “What is the difference?” she asks. “Who are politicians to say, ‘Sorry, the doors are now closed. I got mine. My family is here.’ I don’t care how long you’ve been here and how many generations [of your family] are here, you have no right to say that it was OK for my descendants and family to come here, but yours can’t.”

Former Monroe County Legislator Saul Maneiro, whose family came to Rochester from Puerto Rico by way of Brooklyn, likes to say he’s a “New Yorican.” And he says he’s especially proud that a lot of Puerto Ricans are at the forefront of immigration reform efforts. Maneiro says he’s concerned that earlier groups of people who came to the US seem to have forgotten what that experience was like. “They were once in that position where people distrusted them and there was fear and xenophobia,” he says. “You know there was a certain point when pizza and bagels went from being ethnic cuisine to being on every other corner.” Equally concerning to many Rochester Latinos

is the community’s ongoing struggle against poverty. While it’s true that many Latinos have achieved success in almost every area of the private sector, politics, and academia, some city officials say the Latino community is the Rochester area’s poorest. In a 1989 report, 37 percent of Monroe County’s Latino community lived at or below the poverty line, compared to 32 percent of the AfricanAmerican community, and 7 percent of whites. And according to a 2011 US Census American Community Survey, the situation is still grim. The median family income for

Latinos living in Rochester at that time was about $27,000. More than 1,300 Latinos under age 18 had no health insurance. And more than 5,000 between ages 18 and 64 were not covered. Poverty seems to create more poverty, Maneiro says. And ironically, it’s expensive to be poor, he says. “The cost of things tends to multiply when you’re poor,” he says. “If a person has bad credit, everything becomes more expensive to them. When you have a person with bad credit coupled with low income, their resources are extremely strained.” A major contributing factor to the Latino community’s challenges with poverty, says school board member Campos, is lack of education. When immediate family members have a college education, it changes the trajectory for the next generation, she says. Campos recalls a conversation she had with a group of young Latinas in a city school fifth grade. “I asked them what their goals were,” she says. “They all had the same goals as you would expect from girls that age: going to college, having a great career, getting married, and having a family. When I asked what gets in their way, one young Latina stood up and said, ‘I can’t even do my homework because I’m too busy watching my brother and sister.’” The mother worked nights, so the young girl had to do the cooking, cleaning, and laundry. The young girl is resilient, Campos says, but the distraction from her homework and the lack of educational support at home for all three children put them at risk for a life of poverty. And many parents take their children out of school to return to Puerto Rico to visit family for a week or more, Campos says, not realizing how far it can put their children behind academically. While the graduation rate for students in city schools hovers around 50 percent, it’s even lower for African American and Latino males. A major problem waiting for these students is continues on page 8 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

CITY Newspaper

proudly inducts the NEWEST MEMBER of the

ROCHESTER THEATER HALL OF FAME At the TheatreROCS! Showcase 2013

"IT'S A MAD, MAD WORLD"

Saturday, April 13, 8 p.m.

LATINO ROCHESTER continues from page 7

the transformation under way in the US economy, says city schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas. (Vargas came to the US from the Dominican Republic when he was in his teens.) There was a time when a young person with a limited education could get a decent job, Vargas says, but today even most entry level positions require some math and computer skills. Education is more than just a pathway to a better job, Vargas says: it is essential. Ask a group of Rochester Latinos to name

some of the community’s most important leaders, and many familiar names come

Just because you have people who have been elected into office or have achieved success, doesn’t mean you have charismatic leaders. You have people in political jobs.” He credits the work of Latinos like retired city commissioner Julio Vasquez for building community awareness and engagement around a wide range of issues from employment to education. “We had pickets and marches, and we brought about needed change,” he says. Those efforts resulted in the introduction of bilingual education into the city school district’s curriculum and the creation of the Ibero-American Action

Hispanic-Latino

(reception at 7 p.m.) JCC Hart Theater, 1200 Edgewood Ave.

34,456 / 16.4%

Mexican

1,168 / 0.6%

Puerto Rican

27,734 / 13.2%

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8 CITY

CITY

APRIL 10-16, 2013

Rochester’s Hispanic-Latino population Total city population: 210,565 Source: 2010 US Census

up. But the Rev. Laurence Tracy is among the community’s most highly regarded figures. For about 50 years, the Roman Catholic priest has worked and lived in what he calls the city’s east-side barrio. The walls of Tracy’s small apartment off North Clinton Avenue near Upper Falls Boulevard are covered with small plaques in both Spanish and English recognizing his community involvement. Tracy says he’s deeply concerned about the city school district’s low graduation rates. He has worked with multiple generations of Latinos who have struggled with poverty, often from cradle to grave. And he attributes some of the problem to a lack of new leadership in the Latino community. “In the 1960’s and 1970’s, we had some charismatic people,” he says. “We don’t have that kind of leadership today.

Cuban

1,616 / 0.8%

Other Hispanic-Latino 3,938 / 1.9%

League. The human service agency remains at the heart of the community. He says the difficulty for many activists and community leaders is that upward mobility sometimes leads to a disconnect from the community. And he includes his own work in the criticism. “What’s hard is not being clinical and detached,” he says. “I challenge myself to be personal and compassionate to a lot of people who are in pain and suffering. You’ve got to remain involved with advocacy. You deal with tragedy by dealing with the structural causes of that tragedy.”

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Pittsford Y proposal comes down to cars The high volume of traffic at Pittsford’s Clover Street-Jefferson Road intersection is a sensitive issue for nearby residents. The intersection, which brings together two heavily traveled state roads, was last in the public eye several years ago when the state Department of Transportation expanded the intersection to address its above-average rate of collisions. DOT representatives say that at least anecdotally, conditions have improved. But the intersection and its heavy traffic volumes are getting attention once again, this time in the context of a proposed YMCA building. The YMCA of Greater Rochester wants to build a 90,000 square foot to 130,000 square foot facility on the northwest corner of the Jefferson-Clover intersection. The facility would be the new home for the Southeast YMCA, which is currently located on East Jefferson Road just outside of the Village of Pittsford. The property is zoned to allow up to 180,000 square feet of office space, but YMCA representatives are asking the Town of Pittsford to add an allowed use. YMCA officials declined comment on this story. “We will refrain from providing any comment regarding this matter until the Pittsford Town Board acts on our application and our board of directors has an opportunity to review it and make a decision,” wrote Jennifer Lesinski, the organization’s vice president for marketing and mission advancement, in an e-mail last week. The Town Board has delayed its vote on the Y’s request. Board members wanted time to

consider public comments, says Pittsford Supervisor Sandra Zutes, and to examine the project’s potential impact on traffic. The Southeast YMCA draws users from Pittsford and the surrounding communities. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN While the site is located entirely within the town, Village of Pittsford While the town has focused on the CloverCorby raises another concern about the officials are also concerned about the YMCA project; he says it seems to fall into Jefferson intersection, Village of Pittsford project’s traffic implications. the trend of “big-boxing everything.” He officials worry that Y-related traffic could add The Southeast YMCA draws users from says he wonders whether it may make more to rush-hour congestion at the Jefferson RoadPittsford and the neighboring communities of South Main Street intersection. sense for an organization like the YMCA, Perinton and Brighton. A larger Y could draw “It will certainly cause more backups during which is providing neighborhood services, people from a broader area, says Village of to build smaller, regional facilities that are the rush hour, at least based on the information Pittsford Mayor Bob Corby, and that could closer to the users. that I know as of today,” Mayor Corby says. bring more traffic through the village. The traffic jams at the intersection have In recent years, the YMCA of Greater been difficult for state and village officials Rochester built larger facilities in Penfield and At least 15,000 vehicles pass through the to address, he says. And expanding the Gates. And the larger facilities tend to draw Clover-Jefferson intersection daily. And intersection is out of the question since it from a broader area than the smaller ones, SRF Associates, the firm the town hired would mean demolishing houses that are part which are often more neighborhood-focused. to analyze the Y proposal’s potential traffic of a national historic district, Corby says. In October, Y officials told the impact, says that the facility would add The village studied traffic patterns at the Pittsford Town Board that they can’t traffic during morning and evening rush expand the current Southeast YMCA intersection when the state Department hours. And that could mean delays. For location because it’s landlocked, according of Transportation proposed the Jeffersonexample, the study says the added traffic to minutes from that meeting. They Clover expansion, Corby says, and the would probably cause increased delays at the town’s consultant has told village officials said that the Southeast YMCA is the northbound left-turn lane on Clover Street. organization’s smallest facility in the he’ll do his own examination in association But the analysis also says that the Y Rochester area and that the new location with this new project. Village officials are would likely have less of an impact on would better meet residents’ future needs. waiting to see that data and, depending traffic than if the property was used for on what it reveals, could pursue their own an office park. study, Corby says.

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Port work should begin this fall City of Rochester officials learned the hard way that Rochesterians don’t care to go to the lake in the off-season. Pier 45, the city-subsidized restaurant at the terminal building, had to stop operating in the winter because of steep financial losses. So what makes officials believe that they can transform the port from a summer spot to a year-round destination, as they plan to do with a massive project that includes a marina, public promenade, housing, and possibly stores, offices, and restaurants? Mark Gregor, who is managing the port redevelopment for the city, says

getting Rochesterians to think of the port area as something more than a fairweather friend will always be a challenge. He says the key will be in the services and amenities the port offers. “If we start to see development proposals that include year-round uses from a retail and commercial standpoint, that’s kind of what we’re looking for,” Gregor says. The 30-acre project is a mix of public and private investment. The city expects to start work on its share, a $30 million marina plan that could eventually include 157 slips, sometime after Labor

Day this year. The marina would be built in two phases and include, in the first phase, 30 slips for “transient” boaters — people who need a slip on a temporary basis. Visitors to the port area will probably see some activity this summer, Gregor says, but nothing that will disrupt use of the lake or the beach. RG&E will be doing work in the area, he says, and the city may start removing some fencing, light poles, and other features. The other part of the project is three areas of private, mixed-use development. Gregor says there would be between 280

to 430 housing units when the site is fully developed over a period of several years. “We think we’re probably creating a market that really doesn’t exist too much on Lake Ontario,” Gregor says. “And that’s new market-rate housing associated with a marina or very close to Lake Ontario.” The goal, he says, is to create a destination for the boating community, as well as providing a new housing and living option for people who are attracted to city living but want a more resort, smaller-town setting.

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CITY 9

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N o t t h e s a m e o l d Ro c h e s t e r S e l e c t i o n

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

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RIT hosts LGBT conference

RIT will host the annual “Northeast Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Conference” from Friday, April 12, through Sunday, April 14. The conference features workshops, films, panel discussions, and speakers including Zach Wahls, an LGBT and marriage equality activist. Registration and costs: www.nelgbt.com or call (585) 475-6355.

Local transit planning meeting

The Genesee Transportation Council will hold a planning meeting at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 11, at the Ontario County Municipal Building, 20 Ontario Street in Canandaigua.

Lectures highlights historical activism

Temple B’rith Kodesh will present “Jewish Access to Higher Education in the 20th Century,” a lecture by NYU Professor Harold Wechsler at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 11. Wechsler will talk about how Jewish defense groups lobbied for anti-discrimination legislation after World War II. The event will be held at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Avenue.

City meeting on skate park

The City of Rochester will hold the second Roc City Park design meeting at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 11, at School 12, 999 South Avenue. Residents will get an update on the design process for the future skate park and have a chance to offer further input.

UR diversity conference

The University of Rochester will present its 2013 Diversity Conference “Our Differences, Our Strength,” from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Friday, April 12. The theme of the conference is how diversity can strengthen the academic community. The keynote address will be given by Lani Guinier, the first tenured AfricanAmerican woman professor at Harvard. Information: www.rochester.edu/ diversity/annualconference/2013.

Labor workshop

Labor Lyceum will present the workshop, “Building Worker Power Through Community Organizing,” from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 13. Organizers will discuss building grassroots worker groups from a wide range of occupations. The event will be held at NYSUT Hall, 30 Union Street.

Dining

A "Brats & Tots" sandwich (left photo) and a look at the 31 beers on tap (right) at the Penfield Pour House. PHOTOS BY MIKE HANLON

Tip jar [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Until cloning becomes more affordable, I can’t be everywhere at once. That’s why I rely upon a stealthy network of well-placed informants for food intel, along with intriguing tidbits submitted by hungry readers like you. But reporting on the recent avalanche of new restaurants has left little room for me to empty the ol’ tip jar here at Chow Hound HQ, so this week, let’s stuff your face with facts. First, though, a quick snack at the Penfield Pour House, which opened February 28 at 1665 Penfield Road, settling into the building that formerly housed J.G. Crummers. All the televisions give the Pour House a sportsbar feel, but on a recent visit the place was also packed with families happily chowing down at that intersection where bar food meets comfort food. Think housemade pizza logs, peel-and-eat shrimp, and pot roast, along with salads, sandwiches, pasta, and a few daily specials. There are big burgers, too, and as someone who loves bacon but not its inevitable flavor domination, I totally appreciated the Pour House’s signature burger, topped with a subtle but delicious grilled bacon and cabbage hash. Call 264-1665 for

more info, or do some advance work at the Pour House’s Facebook page. Palmer Food Services, Rochester’s oldest family-owned-and-operated business, is once again celebrating our dining scene with its Savor Local Restaurants promotion, going down this year April 18-28. What this means is that dozens and dozens (and dozens) of eateries will offer special deals over those 11 days, including places like Bad Apples Bistro, Nathan’s Soup & Salad, Six50 Black Oven Cooking, Castaways at the Lake, and the Marshall Street Bar & Grill. The list of participating restaurants truly is massive; check it out at savorlocalrestaurants.com. Park Avenue’s Café CiBon detours from its usual Italian flavors to throw a “Springtime in Paris” wine dinner on Monday, April 15, featuring Chef Ashley Swan Abramson’s take on classic French dishes like vichyssoise, escargot, spring lamb stew, and crème brûlée. The $75 price includes four courses plus dessert, along with wine pairings. Call 4612960 to make reservations, and take a gander at the full menu on CiBon’s Facebook page. The word on the street is that the wildly popular Food Truck Rodeo will return to

the Rochester Public Market on Wednesday, May 29, 5-8 p.m., with installments planned through August on the last Wednesday of each summer month. There will be live music and a fleet of mobile food vendors, and if past rodeos are any indication, everyone you’ve ever met will likely be in attendance. Get more details at the Public Market website, cityofrochester.gov/marketevents. Westside pizza mecca Fiamma, 1308 Buffalo Road, has expanded its hours to include weekend brunch and lunch, as well as dinner service on Sundays. Call 270-4683 for more information, or visit fiammarochester.com. Nirupama and Rahul Laroia’s Amaya Bar & Grill, 1900 S. Clinton Ave., is spicing things up with new menu items courtesy of Manhattanbased chef/consultant Tuhin Dutta, who brings to the table a knowledge of the incredible diversity of flavors found on the Indian subcontinent. The debuting dishes include Poppy Ka Seekh, a vegetarian kebab with a poppy-seed crust, and braised lamb shanks done Awadhi style; check out amayabarandgrill.com to learn more, or call 241-3223. The Rochester Winos are hosting a light wine-and-food pairing at Banzai

Sushi & Cocktail Bar, 682 South Ave., on Wednesday, April 24. Tickets are $30; pick ‘em up at rochesterwinos.com. Looks like now might be the time for a move to East Rochester: Good Smoke BBQ, 326 W. Commercial St., East Rochester, is now doing weekend delivery within a three-mile radius of the restaurant. Newly expanded menu, too; visit goodsmokebbq. com or call 203-1576. Wanna learn something new? Highlights of the spring schedule for classes at the Culinary Center at Vella include both artisan cheese and sausage making, as well as Mexican-style food with John and Jeana Roth from John’s Tex-Mex. Call 421-9362 or visit vellaculinarycenter.com to see what else Vella has in store. Oh, and make sure to check out the lineup at the new Rochester Brainery in Village Gate on Goodman Street; upcoming classes include “Get Hip with the Dip” on Monday, April 29, and “Brewing Methods: Tea” on Tuesday, April 30. Rochester Brainery is also teaming up with Lento for Third Wednesdays, featuring culinary instruction followed by a meal; the theme for April 17 is pasta. Visit rochesterbrainery. com for more info, or call 730-7034. Just in time for Finger Lakes road-trip season, Il Posto Bistro & Wine Bar, from the former owners of Bacco’s on Park Ave., is now open at 137 S. Main St. in Canandaigua. The Italian-influenced menu encompasses a variety of starters, salads, pizza, and pasta dishes, plus unexpected entrées like lamb tagine. Call 905-0535 or visit Il Posto’s Facebook page for more details. Located at 3177 Latta Road, Soho Yogurt Café is the newest addition to this city’s growing roster of self-serve froyo spots. Besides an array of frozen treats and toppings, Soho also serves coffee drinks, tea, and baked goods, with gluten-free options available. To learn more, visit sohoyogurtcafe.com or call 225-0786. There have been a flurry of restaurant closings in the past couple weeks: Eros Restaurant & Bar, 37 Charlotte St.; Baked & Carved, inside Salinger’s at 107 East Ave.; Thai Time Cuisine, which opened this past November at 2171 W Henrietta Road; and LaRosa’s Italian Kitchen + Bar, 800 Pittsford-Victor Road, which closed along with the Brookwood Inn.

Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

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Jessye Norman

SUNDAY, APRIL 14 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. 5 P.M. | $25-$125 | 454-2100, ABCINFO.ORG [ CLASSICAL ] The incomparable Jessye Norman will

perform a benefit concert at the Eastman Theatre for Action for a Better Community, Inc. this Sunday. Joining her for the program, called “The African American Cultural Legacy,” will be special guests Garth Fagan Dance and pianist Mark Markham. Action for a Better Community is an agency that promotes and provides opportunities for low-income individuals and families to become self-sufficient. Norman has performed leading roles in operas the world over, in basically every concert hall you have ever heard of. She has won five Grammy Awards. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

AudioInFlux THURSDAY, APRIL 11 STICKY LIPS BBQ JUKE JOINT, 830 JEFFERSON ROAD 9 P.M. | $8-$10 | 292-5544, STICKYLIPSBBQ.COM [ JAZZ FUSION ] Despite beginning as a studio project

in the fall of 2007, AudioInFlux has since evolved into an exhaustive — and exhausting — live concert experience. This Rochester quintet is one of the most aptly tagged troupes around. Its performances are nothing if not lessons in musical mutability, bringing jazz, funk, soul, hip-hop, and reggae together into a dance-tastic frenzy. The group originally made its name as a four piece, with occasional help from a formidable horn section, before adding MC Marcus Mdotcoop, the last brick in an impressive funk fortress.

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WEDSDAY, APRIL 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jeff Slutsky. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. John McConnell. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Session w/Cathy & Lynn. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Tempest. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10-$15.

Deerhoof

[ CLASSICAL ] JACK Quartet. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10-$20.

The Meat Puppets performed at The Club @ Water Street on Saturday, April 6.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 9 P.M. | $15 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM

PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ ALTERNATIVE ] San Francisco’s Deerhoof has been at it since the mid-90’s, crafting its unique noise-pop over the course of multiple albums and singles, with numerous compilations and one-off tracks littered throughout. The foursome remains democratic, shifting attention equally amongst its parts. Despite the equality in the ranks, what most often stands out is the vocal stylings of lead singer Satomi Matsuzaki. With her lilting, child-like delivery of lyrics and wordless choruses both nonsensical and charmingly coy, you may forget something far more mature is unfolding. — BY DAVE LABARGE

Pegasus Early Music SUNDAY, APRIL 14 MEMORIAL ART GALLERY, 500 UNIVERSITY AVE. 4 P.M. | $10-$25 | 703-3990, PEGASUSEARLYMUSIC.ORG [ CLASSICAL ] Pegasus Early Music features passionate

musicians who often perform on period instruments. So imagine my surprise when this season was unveiled, including the upcoming concert of Zappa, Zappa, and Zelenka. The first “Zappa” is 18th century Italian composer Francesco Zappa. The “Zelenka” is Jan Dismas Zelenka, an 18th century Czech composer. But the second “Zappa” turns out to be Rochester composer Richard Scott, with new chamber works for baroque instruments based on the music of the American rock legend Frank Zappa. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Live from Hochstein: The Nance Family. Hochstein

Suit of many colors

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free.

[ REVIEW ] BY BY FRANK DE BLASE

In an attempt to see Methanol’s extension project, The Atomic Swamis, I stumbled upon Buffalo bar-room heavyweights The Heavenly Chillbillies instead. I landed at Sticky Lips Juke Joint on Friday as the band was plowing through Dave Alvin’s tribute to Hank I in “Long White Cadillac.” So naturally I warmed to these guys in a hurry as I slammed back a couple of chocolate milks. The band hit heavy on the blues without overdoing it, and stuck close to blues-heavy rock with a spicy dash of the South like a punch in the mouth. Next I hustled over to Lovin’ Cup to catch This Life wind down its set, which was reminiscent of neon-free alternative bands like The Modern Lovers. Bogs Visionary Orchestra came out next and played like a four-man carnival full of ironic lyrical and musical quirks. The bearded Bogs led the parade on guitar and slide banjo (you heard me, slide banjo) in a suit that featured as many colors as his musical palette. He copped the stance of Zappa (or was it Beefheart?) playing the part of a barker pitching the ballyhoo on the midway.

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Margaret Explosion. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke.

Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

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It was Tin Pan Alley on Easter Sunday. It was country-ish twang on account of the rhythmic 2/4, it was klezmer-esque on account of its accelerated percussion and groove, and it was just straight-up out of sight. I hung out and hung on every word. GZA couldn’t be bothered to show up for his Water Street show Saturday night, and the rumor is he played a whopping 10 minutes the night before. But there was zero pretense on the club side as The Meat Puppets played a fat and sonically soaring set that frequently detoured into monstrous guitar melees, especially on the excellent and extended free-fall free-for-all on “Lake of Fire” and the set-closing “Backwater.” Making the Water Street scene a little late caused me to miss the mellow indie shot-in-the-arm from The World Takes, a cool new band from Philadelphia that features DJ Bonebrake of the seminal L.A. punk band, and one of my all-time faves, X. Bonebrake was floating about and stopped to chat as I made a serious effort to not sound like a squealing bobby soxer. What a great night, what a cool dude.

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Local hard-rock trio The Ginger Faye Bakers performs this weekend at Monty's Krown. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

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While driving to Petco the other day, I shoved the Ginger Faye Bakers’ boss disc, “Feast,” into my dashboard, cranked the volume, and did a double take. I could’ve sworn I heard the ghost of Ron Asheton haunt the speakers amidst this Rochester band’s heavy jam. The Ginger Faye Bakers rock harder than a lot of bands that consider themselves heavy in the first place, aligning itself with breakthrough and exploratory artists like Pavement, Wilco, and The Flaming Lips. So maybe heavy isn’t the right word. Let’s swap it out and say intense. The band — Nate Baker, guitar/vocals; Tim Sadue, bass; and Billy Martin, drums — has been burning with melodic intensity since 2009. Both Baker and Sadue grew up outside Watertown, a “cultural and economical armpit,” according to Baker. “There’s nothing going on. People there fuck and fight and drink and that’s about it,” Baker says. Amidst all the fornicating, fisticuffs, and fluid intake, the boys found

themselves surrounded by musicians. “It seemed that all the friends we had played in bands,” Baker says. “Which, for a small town, is kind of weird.” After college, Baker and Sadue both landed in Rochester. Baker initially lent guitar work to the indie-leaning group Cavalcade, “but it really wasn’t my thing,” he says. It was around this time in 2009 that he and Sadue began playing and writing, creating what would be The Ginger Faye Bakers. Drums — or more specifically, drummers — were a bit of an issue. What is it with drummers? “One dude was a student and he was gone at the end of May,” Baker says. “Another was a lost soul and he just decided to move to Alaska.” Finally, along came Martin. “Billy’s the best drummer we’ve played with,” Baker says. “In terms of the band’s sound, it’s gelled more, the songs have become more focused. The feeling before was just a grab bag of songs. Before I’d write whatever, and we’d do it. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn’t.” The Bakers’ live shows are a constant and

consistent cataclysm of tones and beats that give a heavyweight punch on flyweight legs. This is where Baker cuts loose. The studio, however, is it a bit daunting for the group — especially when it comes to singing. “It was pretty intimidating for me, because I’m a little self-conscious at times,”

says Baker. “You’ve got to be in the right place to do it. It’s easier to sit in my basement for three days when no one’s around. Say, ‘Let’s do this,’ and wail it out, scream it out, instead of people looking at you. ‘Let’s do it again, that wasn’t quite right.’ It’s a weird dichotomy. I think it’s because of the pressures. ‘OK, this is it. This is what everyone’s going to hear, documented for the rest of our lives. It’s going to last forever.’” Forever didn’t take long in the studio, though. The band had done its homework and banged out “Feast” over the course of a weekend at More Sound Studio in Syracuse. “We did the whole record in two days,” says Baker. “Everything was rehearsed and had been demoed, so it wasn’t that much of a stretch. We tracked it all — bass, guitar, drums — live. Prior to that everything we’d done was in my basement. It was the first time I’d been in a real studio.” Though it took relatively no time to produce, it took a while before Baker could comfortably sit down and enjoy it. “Upon reflection, I love it,” he says. “I spent a whole three weeks before I listened to it again.” It’s definitely good enough for forever — or at least for the next generation. “I’d like to have my daughter pull it out and take it to show and tell,” says Baker. “And maybe she’ll turn on some other kids. ‘Wow, your dad’s in a band? Wow, you have a record. What’s that?’”

CLASSICAL | SOUND EXCHANGE

FOLK/ROCK | SOUNDRABBIT

BROADWAY/CLASSICAL | LOTTE LENYA COMPETITION

Sound ExChange is a group based out of the Eastman School of Music that explores alternative ways of presenting tunes to audiences by re-imagining the traditional concert experience. This program is designed to transform ARTISANworks into an interactive concert hall. You can take Sound ExChange out of the theater, but don’t expect to take the theater out of Sound ExChange. Creating your own music through a family-dinner-style arrangement of music by color, and original compositions set to sign language, are among the presentations scheduled to take place in the venue’s immersive galleries.

Shortly after the group’s formation in 2007, SoundRabbit was awarded “Best Pop/Rock Release by a New Band” by the Mile High Music Store in Denver for its debut album, “This Room Becomes a Crowd.” The buzz continued to grow around the Boulder band and its fusion of folk, jazz, rock, and world music as it landed supporting gigs for acts such as The Avett Brothers and TV on the Radio in September 2008. Aside from being heralded for its ability to blend a multitude of musical styles, the band is also known for its Backstage Community program which, with the help of fans, has made hefty donations to charity organizations like the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless.

Find your way over to the Eastman School of Music this weekend for the 15th Annual International Lotte Lenya Competition for the rising stars of musical theater. The 24 semi-finalists who auditioned in New York City in midMarch have now been narrowed down to 12 finalists. Hailing from Ireland, Australia, China, and the United States, these actor-singers have credentials ranging from roles on Broadway to the Metropolitan Opera House. They will compete for top prizes of $15,000, $10,000, and $7,500. The competition is sponsored by the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Inc., which promotes an understanding of his life and work, as well as the career of his wife, actress-singer Lotte Lenya (pictured).

SoundRabbit performs Sunday, April 14, 8 p.m. at Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. Free. 697-0235, bouldercoffeeco.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

The competition finals take place Saturday, April 13, with rounds at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., and the finals and awards at 8 p.m. All take place at Kilbourn Hall, Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. Free. 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Sound ExChange performs Sunday, April 14, 2 p.m. at ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Road. $10-$16. brownpapertickets.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10 Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub.

Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus,

402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N.

Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St. . Boulder

Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. 585-243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

The Abilene Pro-Am Jam w/ Chris “Hollywood” English.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. Free 21+, $5 unders.

[ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. The Cottage

Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. second Wednesday of every month, 9 p.m. Call for info.

Diarrhea Planet w/Big Brain & The Drug Cartel, Chika & The Wolves, and The Tabs. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. DJ Keven Atoms & Jim Kempkes to follow bands at midnight. $7-$9. Nate Coffee and the New Brew. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info.

Wet Brain, Party Plates, Obsessor, and Utah Jazz. Tala

Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 6 p.m. $5-$7.

Nightfall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. !Viola!. Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

18+ College Thursdays. ONE

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $5.

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $3-$10 after. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ]

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

THURSDAY, APRIL, 11 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Madeleine Snyder. Basin Bean, 616A Pittsford-Victor Rd. 585249-9310. 5 p.m. Free. Peg Dolan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup,

Foodlink Event w/Blues Poseurs. Johnny’s Irish Pub,

1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 6 p.m. Free.

St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3.

[ JAZZ ]

AudioInFlux w/Consider the Source. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke

Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 9 p.m. $8-$10. D’Jangoners. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian

Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 4583090. 6 p.m. Free. The Phat Kats. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Reggae Thursday. Pure Night

Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Dirty Bourbon River Show. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 8 p.m. $50, free w/ canned goods donation. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Our Friends Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

Serge & Friends w/Steve Melcher & Drew Moore. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 6 p.m. Free.

Soupcans w/Buckets, Limeworks, and Last Remaining Pinnacle. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $6-$8.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Ryan Montbleau Band w/Jesse Dee, MoChester, and Ben & Fran. Water Street Music Hall,

204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Jim lane. Bathtub Billy’s, 630 Ridge Road West. 865-6510. 4 p.m. Free.

Pat Kane w/Carin’s Pride Open Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

Pale Green Stars. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9:30 p.m. $5. [ CLASSICAL ]

Beata Golec: Embracing and Enjoying Modernity. SUNY

GCC, 31 Clara Barton Street. 585-243-6785. 7 p.m. $3-$8. Cabaret: “A Night in Paris”. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 8 p.m. $55-$200.

Nazareth College Symphony Orchestra: “Alumni Back on Stage”. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free.

RPO: The Music of Stan Kenton, The Artistry of Tony DeSare. Kodak Hall at Eastman

146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 6 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Tony DeSare, vocals. $15-$87. Sankara. India Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd. 244-1760. 8 p.m. $5-$15.

[ BLUES ]

[ JAZZ ]

Cold Sweat. The Beale New

AudioInFlux. Temple Bar and Orleans Grille and Bar-South Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 10 p.m. Free. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 16 Dan Schmitt & The Shadows. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. John Weyl. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Mama Hart Band. The Boardwalk Inn, 48 Merchants St. 391-3712. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

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FRIDAY, APRIL 12 Champagne & The Swooners w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Michael Vadala Trio. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Williamson, NY. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Mike P. w/Fresh Kids, Malicious Intent. California Brew Haus, 402

SPECIAL:

Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $15-$20.

Find us on the web! WaysideGardenCenter.com

[ REGGAE/JAM ] The Buddhahood. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

$45.00 each

complete inventory, price specials and more are all online.

124 Pittsford-Palmyra Road, Rt. 31 1 mile East of Lollypop Farm

Macedon, NY • 585-223-1222 EVERYDAY 9AM-6PM

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[ POP/ROCK ]

Anyone who heard the Sultans of String at one of the group’s high-energy performances at last year’s Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival can easily understand why the group is one of the hottest on the Canadian world music/folk scene. Spanish Flamenco, French Manouche, Arabic folk, and gypsy jazz are just some of global strains that merge seamlessly into the Sultans’ unique sound. And talk about cranking it up a notch: four strings are never enough for leader/violinist Chris McKholl. His fiddle has six.

Blended Soundz w/DJ Eddie Cain. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

The Sultans of String hold a CD release party Saturday, April 13, 8 p.m. at Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Road, Greece. $10-$20. 328-3103. — BY RON NETSKY

Burden My Surrender, Mobday, One Fate Remains, and Linchpin. Tala Vera, 155 State

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $7-$10.

St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

The Christopher Gerard Band.

Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Crush Cancer Benefit Concert ft. Yellow Jackets, Three Miles Lost, Fairport A Cappella.

Fairport High School, 1 Paddock Way. 585-234-2585. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15 Fairport High School, 1 Paddock Way. 585-234-2585. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15. Divided by Zero. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Dream Girls, Ian Downey is Famous, Shane Sweeney, and The Ruff Alley Rounders.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $6-$9. Fat City w/The Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free.

Fatel Sting, Punishing Timmy. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. The Grey Hollow Road. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 5856970235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Haewa w/Solaris. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Instead of Sleeping w/Silverfish, Alberto Alaska, The September Campaign, and There I Say is Lightning. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $7-$9. Something Else. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 7308230. 10 p.m. Call for info. 16 CITY APRIL 10-16. 2013

WORLD | SULTANS OF STRING CD RELEASE

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Even Steven w/Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Jennie Lowe Stearns & the Fire Choir w/The Johnny Dowd Band. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 9:30 p.m. $8-$12. Jim Lane. The Pint And Goblet Tavern, 300 Village Square. 624-4386. 6 p.m. Free.

LGBT Showcase: Julia Weldon.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for info. Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

The Imaginary Band. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Out of the Blue. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Hochstein Through the Ages - Spring Benefit. Penfield

Country Club, 1784 Jackson Rd. 377-1240. 6 p.m. Contact whitney.brice@hochstein.org or 454-4403 ext. 23. Call for info.

Lotte Lenya Competition. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 11 a.m. Free. Lotte Lenya Competition Evening Concert. Kilbourn Hall,

26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free.

RPO: The Music of Stan Kenton, The Artistry of Tony DeSare. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Tony DeSare, vocals. $15-$87. [ COUNTRY ]

Rebel’s Posse. Nashvilles,

4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DeeDee’s Wild College Party.

Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 9 p.m. 21+ free until 11 p.m. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body

Life in Color Rebirth Tour ft. Sander Van Doorn. Main Street

Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7 p.m. $49-$300. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info.

TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

DANCE YOURSELF FIT

[ JAZZ ]

You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising!

Frank’s Rat Pack. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gary Chudyk Solo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sultans of String. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $20-$23. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hedges Restaurant, 1290 Lake Rd. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

ASIII, Skeem SUccess, and DJ Kalifornia. ONE Nightclub and

Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 11:30 p.m. 21+. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Boname Family Benefit Concert: The Weight We Carry w/Tugboat, Sports, and Alberto Alaska. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

GROUP AND PRIVATE LESSONS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS My first dose of Pittsburgh’s Instead of Sleeping was the band’s song “Two Chords,” which is made of, you guessed it, two chords (Am and C, to be exact). Beneath the soft intensity of the quartet’s swirling dynamic — and plenty more chords — is a tantrum in waiting, a bristling urgency that aptly suits its neo-folk leanings. Instead of wasting its time thinking up a name that begins with “The” and ends with the letter “S,” Instead of Sleeping has expertly mastered a multi-instrumental approach, including two drum sets, to blow its sound beyond limitations and expectations. A good time, for sure. Silverfish, Alberto Alaska, The September Campaign, & There I Say is Lightning also appear. Instead of Sleeping plays Friday, April 12, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $7-$9. bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE The Root Beer Beaver Band.

Brothers from Other Mothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. The Chairs, my plastic sun, and Men Behaving Badly. Tala

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. Call for info. Cherry Bomb. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Cole Michaels. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 5856970235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Dark Hollow. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free.

Deerhoof w/People Get Ready, The Demos. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 9 p.m. $15. The Heavenly ChillBillies. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Make the Wind. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. The Midnight City Band. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Mulletude. Daisy Dukes, 2235 Empire Boulevard. (585) 6714880. 9 p.m. Free. Night Stalkers. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Order of the Dead. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Gift Certificates Available

INDIE ROCK | INSTEAD OF SLEEPING

Flaherty’s Macedon, 113 Pittsford Palmyra Rd. 2231221. Call for info. Springer. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $8.

Spirit

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays: Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ CLASSICAL ]

Action for a Better Community benefit ft. Jessye Norman.

Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 5 p.m. $25-$125. Community Organ Concert. Bethany Presbyterian Church, 3000 Dewey Ave. 663-3000. 2:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

DeMott Scholarship Benefit Concert. Penfield High School,

25 High School Dr. 2 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Greece Symphony Orchestra.

Hope Lutheran Church, 1301 Vintage Lane. 723-4673. 3 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Jessye Norman. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 5 p.m. $25-$125.

Jessye Norman Benefit Concert. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100. 5 p.m. $25-$125.

Pegasus Early Music: Zappa+Zappa. Memorial Art

Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 4 p.m. $10-$75. Pegasus: Zappa+Zappa. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 4 p.m. $10-$75.

RPO: The Remarkable Farkle McBride. Hochstein Performance

Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 2 p.m. Michael Butterman, conductor. Michael Connor, narrator. Advanced Hochstein Suzuki String Students. $10-$15. Sound ExChange. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Rd. 585-288-7170. 2 p.m. $10-$16.

Strings & Hammers: Krzysztof Penderecki Celebration. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus. 3 p.m. Free.

Strings and Hammers: Penderecki’s 80th birthday.

University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus. 3 p.m. Free. Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana. Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 3 p.m. $8-$10. continues on page 18

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NOW OFFERING YOGA FOR ARTHRITIS CLASSES Based on research conducted at Johns Hopkins University, Yoga for Arthritis combines ancient yoga practices with modern medical knowledge, offering modifications to address the needs of persons with rheumatoid and/or osteoarthritis. In a randomized clinical trial, program participation was associated with improved arthritis symptoms, physical fitness, psychological functioning, and quality of life. This program is endorsed by the Arthritis Foundation. Cindy DeCarolis, owner of Blissful Balance, completed a 30-hour training course in Yoga for Arthritis led by Stephanie Moonaz, Ph.D., who conducted the research and clinical trials at Johns Hopkins.

Visit www.relaxreleaserestore.com for class times and rates or call us at 585-474-1451

HOW TO BE AT PEACE NOW How to be at peace, now? By making peace with the PRESENT MOMENT. The present moment is the field on which the game of life happens. It cannot happen anywhere else. – Eckhart Tolle, Philosopher/Author.

A TEN WEEK COURSE IN

PRACTICAL PHILOSOPHY Wednesday nights beginning April 17, 2013 From 7-9:30p.m. at the AAUW House, 494 East Ave. Rochester. • Free Parking

INTERACTIVE, EXPERIENTIAL, and INFORMAL Tuition: $100, cash or check Mail to: School of Applied Philosophy, P.O. Box 525, Pittsford, NY 14534; or in person, from 6:15-6:45pm on your first night of attendance.

585-288-6430 • www.practical-philosophy.org

SCHOOL OF APPLIED PHILOSOPHY YOU ARE WISER THAN YOU KNOW Not for profit. Non Sectarian, Provisional Charter: NYS ED. Dept. Since 1989

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

SUNDAY, APRIL 14 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Rhythm Dogs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar

& Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose

& Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. [ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free.

Billy Kelly and the Blahblahblahs. Little Theatre,

240 East Ave. 11 a.m. $7-$25. Going For the One. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 7 p.m. $5-$10.

Hostage Calm w/Turnover, Storm the Bay, and Barbarossa. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Sound Rabbit. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 5856970235. 8 p.m. Call for info. SoundExchange. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Rd. 585-288-7170. 2 p.m. First, an installation project that enables musicians, performance artists, dancers, and listeners to interact with each other and the surrounding artwork. Then, gallery performances showcasing Marilyn Monroe classics, original compositions set to sign language, music for hand-clappers, and a small indie band. Then, a cabaretstyle seating concert program comprised of contemporary chamber music that features saxophone quartet Project Fusion; Tight Sweater, a minimalist trio for marimba, cello, and piano; and LIgNEouS 1, a work for marimba and string quartet. Last, an interactive piece customized for ArtisanWorks and created specifically for the particular performers and listeners at the event. $10-$16, children under 5 free.

Dolfish — one Max Sollisch — is quirky in his astute observations of the otherwise mundane. His delivery is hysterically deadpan, and his haphazard strokes across distorted strings are appropriate and somewhat epic and basically just really freakin’ cool. If you like guys like Hamell on Trial, you’ll love this cat from Columbus. Cottage Jefferson and Jenna Giuliani will make the scene complete. Dolfish plays Monday, April 15, 8 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $8-$12. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

[ CLASSICAL ]

Manic Monday Retro Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

David Hochstein Recital Competition Winners Recital. Hochstein

Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Barroom Buzzards Plus 2.

Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12. Kathryn Cufari. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Call for info. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Jam at Thirsty Frog. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Roger McGuinn. JCC

MONDAY, APRIL 15

Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 7:30 p.m. $35-$100.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

TUESDAY, APRIL 16

Dolfish w/Cottage Jefferson, Jenna Giuliani. Abilene Bar &

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $8-$12. Watkins & the Rapiers. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Monday Nights with the RPO.

Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive. 7:30 p.m. Tower Fine Arts Center Black Box Theatre. Free. 18 CITY APRIL 10-16. 2013

FOLK/PUNK | DOLFISH

Don Christiano-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. Free. Steve Donohue, organ. Geneseo Central Presbyterian Church, 31 Center Street, Geneseo, NY 14454. (585) 245-5516. noon. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251

Exchange Boulevard. 2328470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free.

Turnt Up Tuesday Dance Party ft. DJ Alykhan, Vampyre Eyes. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Julie Ketchum Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

TUESDAY, APRIL 16 [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Roc City Pro Jam. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Laura Grill. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 5856970235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward . The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17

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SOUTH WEDGE area businesses & restaurants

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7:30 p.m. Free. Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:15 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Johnny Rawls. Dinosaur Bar-

B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Live from Hochstein: Chroma Piano Trio . Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free. Spirits Rising. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Dave Sestito, Sexy Teenagers, and People Can Be More Awesome. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

The Dead Catholics w/The Years. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Moon Zombies. Temple Bar and

Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info. Free.

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271-4930

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Learn. Dance. Have Fun. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

Art

Chrisine Chin’s photographic work, “Shuttling Shakers,” is included in the current exhibit at Rochester Contemporary. PHOTO PROVIDED

A healthy helping of bad news “Eat It: Artists Explore Food & Consumption” THROUGH MAY 12 ROCHESTER CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER, 137 EAST AVE. 461-2222, ROCHESTERCONTEMPORARY.ORG WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY 1-5 P.M. | $1 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

During the Industrial Revolution, we moved systematically away from traditional, deliberate ways of feeding ourselves. And as this basic element of survival slipped from ours into bureaucratic hands, we became less reliant on our communities for genuine needs, and our relations grew brittle for lack of practice. There are attempts to reverse this, but we are mostly isolated, rabid consumers, unaware for the most part of where our goods come from, what goes into making them, and under what conditions they are created. The new show at Rochester Contemporary showcases contemporary artists who address these issues through diverse methods and media. At the front of the gallery space hang several large, colorful prints from the “Garden of Eden” series by Ontario, Canada-based photographer Andrzej Maciejewski, whose opulent images of food allude to Dutch Master painters both in subject matter and aesthetic. These altar-like, lush wonderlands of ripe fruit, legumes, and simple, sturdy tableware glow softly as they emerge from 20 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

obscure backgrounds, marked here and there with the ubiquitous round stickers that name dubious, exotic origins. The works speak at once of our detachment from those origins and the beauty and goodness of real food. The fact that we even need a photo session to point out the dignity involved in accepting help is a crying shame. But here we have Rochester-based Brady Dillsworth, a seasoned photographer who has turned his focus on the crucial issue of food security in Rochester. The artist teamed up with Foodlink for its capital campaign, putting faces and stories to the beneficiaries of the Rochester-based hunger-relief organization. Dillsworth visited Foodlink partner Calvary St. Andrews on Averill Street to create portraits of families and individuals who are struggling with food shortages. Each subject stands proudly, presenting bags and mini-carts full of needed goods. Some are working hard to support families through unexpected hard times. One single man simply holds a carton of eggs and a pineapple, taking no more than he needs to supplement his menu, and trusting that the assistance will remain. Some people being helped also volunteer there. The subjects were enthusiastic about sharing their stories and ensuring that supporters know they are making a huge difference, says Dillsworth. Other images show families enjoying the autumnal outdoors at the Foodlink farm stand on Conkey Avenue, which for the past few years has offered fresh, real food to residents who don’t otherwise have access to produce.

In the alcove at the rear of the gallery, a video

by New York artists Stefani Bardin and Brooke Singer, collaborating as “The Counter Kitchen,” underscores our pitiful understanding of food ingredients and chemicals. In “Market Research,” people on the street respond to the challenge to pronounce the ingredients of foods we eat as they are listed on the labels. Baffling chemical names overwhelm the straight-forwardsounding ingredients, and confounded faces are amused, embarrassed, or startled. One of the lingering questions is what the U.S. Food and Drug Administration means by “modified.” Perfectly paired with the previous video and sharing the space is “Commodity Cropism,” another work by Bardin in which a pair of hands shed the natural wrappers of various foods to reveal embedded images of the products of which they are a part of in a modified form. Viewers gain an idea of the vast collection of names soy, sugars, and corn hide under, and learn a bit about modified foods that are subsidized to be produced at alarming rates, tinkered with in countless ways, and slipped into our out-of-balance diets. If you’re grossed out by the playful works of Geneva, New York-based artist Christine Chin, which showcase imagined hybrids of inanimate objects and perfected biological elements, look into the disturbing, long history of humans tinkering with the life forms that we consume. This exhibit features works from Chin’s current project, “The Sentient Kitchen.” Countless creatives have envisioned the future of humanity aided (or tormented) by sentient

robots who take on unsavory tasks, thereby enhancing human life. In Chin’s clinical photos of biological/tool hybrids, she imbues manmade objects with complex biological qualities meant to perform a simple specific task that depreciates the user in value. A few of the specimens encourage laziness in developing tastes, or deny the ability to overindulge. “Sensitive Salter” is a shaker capped with a mouth that the photo boasts “dispenses salt to provide consistent gustatory salinity,” while the “Tasting Spoons” are familiar pieces of flatware, the bowl of each a limp, wet muscle covered in taste buds, which guarantee “gustatory sophistication,” according to Chin. The “Shuttling Shakers,” which hold parmesan cheese and have a clump of fingers at their bases, make manners obsolete by responding to simple commands. The artist really kicks you in the teeth with wisps of hair growing from the fleshy bits of each work. Also included are glossy mock cookbook pages with recipes such as “Eavesdrop Soup,” a dish which features aurally sensitive greens, complete with anecdotes and preparation directions. New York artist Tatiana Kronberg links

our relationship with food to other kinds of consumption in a satirical video. The infomercial-style work, “Cooking Chanel,” markets a kit for creating a cast of a designer handbag using gelatin and meat stew ingredients, in a mold of the iconic quilted purse. Accompanying the video are two queasy-making photographs of finished works, molded to perfection down to the stitching and double Cs of the brand. The useless bag provokes countless associations, including pouring resources into fashion, with disgust toward the lack of meaning behind these empty status symbols and their dubious origins. How easy is it to feed yourself from the leavings and rejected edibles of Rochester? How safe is it? You can find out by joining an experimental scavenge-for-dinner and installation event to be hosted at Rochester Contemporary on May 3 by national research and design collaborative Spurse. The group organizes public events and exhibitions that bring together diverse stakeholders in the urban environment. The Spurse installation at RoCo builds upon its recent project, “Eat Your Sidewalk,” and includes deceptively simple diagrams and charts that delineate courses of action toward shifting our resourcedistribution paradigm, as well as a grid of organized inedible objects scavenged from the Rochester landscape. Much of what we fear is what we have yet to attempt. To RSVP for the limited-space dinner call 461-2222. Learn more about the project at thecivilappetites.org.

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Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Folding Space: Karen Mahardy Glass MFA Thesis Show. Through Apr 27. Reception Apr 13, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Greece Museum, 595 Long Pond Rd. Art Show. The Greece Community & Senior Center art club, featuring Jeffery Kusz, Jeanette Zucco, Sheila McCleod, Laurie Caraballo, Patricia Newman, Lori Pacific, Linda Schneider and Jim Gaffney. 225-7221. greecehistoricalsociety@yahoo. com. greecehistoricalsociety.net. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and Elsewhere. Featuring Jim Patton and David Perlman. Through May 12. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Friday, April 19, 5-8:30 p.m. and Friday, May 3, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. “Nocturnal Devotions: The Artwork of Allie Hartley.” Reception Apr 12, 6-9 p.m. recordarchive.com. SPAS Gallery, 70 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY. MFA Thesis Exhibition. Through Apr 26. MFA Imaging Arts graduate students Nina Ramadan and Hsiang-Lu Meng will present their thesis exhibitions “Within the Walls” and “Parts of a Whole.” Reception April 11 5-8 p.m. ninaramadan. com, hsianglumeng.com. 585475-2884. rit.edu. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Breaking Currents: The 2013 Annual Student Art Exhibition. Through May 5. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Reception Apr 12, 7-9 p.m. 395-2805. brockport.edu/finearts. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Sticks and Stones: Words Will Always Hurt Me.. A BFA Senior Exhibition by Lindsey Galasse. Through Apr 23. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Closing reception Apr 19, 5-7 p.m. brockport.edu. [ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. Reception Dec 16 2-4 p.m. 244-9892. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Architectural Design Showcase 2013: “Genesis: The Art in Architecture.” Through Apr 26. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Painting The Gospel”” by local artists. Through April 30. 729-9916. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “The New Town Collection: A Gift of Hope” Photographic Prints by Henry Avignon. Through Apr 23. WedSat noon-5 p.m. and by appt. Also on display: a welded metal heart by Christine Knoblauch, engraved with the 26 names of the victims. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Spirit of the River” by Richard Margolis. Through May 18. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Backdoor Artists.” Through June 10. With Sue Higgins, Martin

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ART | ALLIE HARTLEY “NOCTURNAL DEVOTIONS”

Talented Rochester-based artist Allie Hartley returns to the Record Archive (33 1/3 Rockwood St.) this week, presenting a body of new drawings under the title “Nocturnal Devotions.” Hartley has also recently shown her work at hell-themed hipster haven Lux Lounge on South Avenue. Her stark, graphic works are darkly romantic and reminiscent of old Hollywood mysteries and horrors. Hartley’s wee works in black and white at times boast stained-glass-esque bursts of color, and feature vamps and sisters weird who dally with demons, and skeletal sirens swooning while contemplating the eternal mysteries swirling around them. Each panel resembles a film still starring bedroom-eyed, glamorous film stars, felines, serpents, and angels, if they belonged to Aleister Crowley’s cult. A reception for “Nocturnal Devotions” will be held on Friday, April 12, 6-9 p.m., and the show will remain on view through the month of April. The event is free to attend. For more information, call 244-1210, or visit recordarchive.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Heit, Nicki Millor, Emily Osgood, and Susan Sweet. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 275-3571. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Man vs Machine” Through May 30. Hours 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Featuring Bile, Cruk, Yewzer, John Magnus, Thievin’ Stephen, Spaceman, Derek Crowe, Mike Turzanski, Sidhe, Matt Ely, Doe Gawn, Adam Maida, and Clayton Cowles. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “LIFE and TIMES” by Cheryl Amati Martin American Way Collection. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery, 6475 Gulick Rd. Nature in Art: Selections from the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Schoenhals Symposium. Through Apr 19. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. Reception Apr 12 4:30-7:30 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano.. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org.

George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. A Photographer’s Path 16. 1st Floor Museum: Neil and Jamie Montanus: A Glimpse of the World and Tom Kirn: The Walk Through Photo Album. 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through the Student Lens 2013. Through Apr 14. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “H2O.” Through Apr 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Keshequa High School, 13 Mill St. Livingston Arts Student Art Exhibit. Through April 27. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Silver Print” Awards Ceremony, Book Release, and Exhibition Receoption. Studio 678, the Wilson Foundation Academy Photo Club. Exhibition on display through Apr 29. 2715920. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Nannette Nocon and John Kastner. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Adult Student Show. Admission free during workshop hours. 276-8959. mag.rochester.edu.; “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG” Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. “It Came continues on page 22

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Theater

Art Exhibits

For the slaves of Richmond, the Whipping Man is, likewise, memory and metaphor. He is the unseen brute to whom their masters sent them to be whipped and scarred. As they drink “liberated” wine and chew hardtack in place of matzoh, the characters’ conversations and conflicts take on an ethical dimension that gives the play scope despite the bluntness of its irony. What nuance the play has resides largely in the character of Simon, played by David Alan Anderson. He is the play’s wise old black man — a stereotype eased by Anderson’s humanizing embodiment of his decency, capacity for both hope and cruelty, and rock solid practicality. He seems to know almost everything as he waits for the return of his wife and daughter. The cast of “The Whipping Man,” now on stage at Geva Theatre Center. PHOTO BY ZACH ROSING, COURTESY OF INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE

Bearing the scars “The Whipping Man” THROUGH APRIL 28 GEVA THEATRE CENTER, 75 WOODBURY BLVD. TICKETS START AT $25 232-4382, GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

“The Whipping Man” by Martin Lopez begins in desolation and ends with not much more than a speck of hope — a meager sense of opportunity if the characters can somehow overcome years (even centuries) of experience (and history). Despite its refusal to provide easy answers for the many ethical and personal conflicts it portrays (though doesn’t necessarily illuminate), the play is almost unfailingly intense, dropping emotional bombshell after emotional bombshell until its final quiet 10 minutes. The 2006 play begins late at night on April 13, 1865, four days after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox and one day before Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. Caleb, a wounded Confederate soldier and the son of once-wealthy Jewish parents, returns home to Richmond. The family’s house is in ruins, shattered by artillery and fire, and picked bare by looters. It is deserted except for two slaves, the elderly but still vigorous Simon and the younger, less settled John, who need to teach their young master that things have changed. 22 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

If you think that sounds melodramatic and a little too neat, you’re reading me right. After a friendly reunion in which Caleb fails to recognize that he can no longer give orders, no matter how pleasantly, Simon realizes that the young man’s wound is gangrenous, and he and John must remove the leg. The preparation for the amputation makes for some harrowing moments but also gives the play its emotional marker. The dark secrets that tumble out thereafter — from desertion to miscegenation — are sometimes shocking but also sometimes predictable and even obvious. To reveal them in any detail would be unfair. Suffice it to say that just behind the story lurk an upstanding moral father who sells two slaves because one of them is pregnant, and an all-too-familiar sexual relationship between master and slave that is also (implausibly) romantic. Does that make the plot sound like a cousin

to a mystery story? In a way, yes. It parcels out suppressed information and then watches what happens — except there’s no easy solution at the end. What gives the play resonance is the unusual fact that the family and its slaves are Jewish. The three men celebrate a makeshift Seder that is more important to Simon and John than to Caleb, who lost his faith at Petersburg. The irony is dramatic but also obvious: Jews, for whom the liberation from slavery is the essential historical event and metaphor of their faith, now own slaves.

Rather than resisting the play’s melodramatic elements, director Tim Ocel apparently chose to emphasize them through a series of poses and gestures that feel larger and more mannered than called for by reality. He also lets two set pieces about eating go on too long. More importantly, Tyler Jacob Rollinson as John is capable of ferocious intensity but Ocel indulged his often-studied performance. The task was to keep the one while weeding out the other. Caleb, played by Andrew C. Ahrens, is the least fully developed character of the three even though he has the most to learn. His set speech to open Act 2 consists of a letter we learn about within the play, itself. Kendall Smith’s bleak light sheds little warmth within the ruined house, a strong set designed by Erhard Rom. The play will have more than 15 professional productions this season alone. I can understand why. It’s the kind of substantive melodrama that used to thrive on Broadway from the 1930’s through the 1950’s — such plays as “The Children’s Hour” (1939), “I Am a Camera” (1951), and “Inherit the Wind” (1955). I don’t mean that negatively. “The Whipping Man” is a well crafted, strongly written, accessible play that engages its audience emotionally. Its concern for ethical imperatives and conundrums after the dust settles are reassuring in a time of empty spectacle, even if the play sheds little new light on the inner struggles its characters bare and bear.

From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Under the Influence,” Artwork by Students from School Without Walls. Through May 12. Hours 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. Reception Apr 12, 2-3:30 p.m. 546-8400 x3716. abmiller@episcopalseniorlife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Nazareth College Department of Art Undergraduate Art Show. Through Apr 21. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. Reception Apr 5, 5-7 p.m. 389-5073. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Expressions of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again, Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. ntid.rit. edu/dyerarts. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. “Canis lupus familiaris,” Photographs by Gerry Szymanski.. Through Apr 30. Hours Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. p.m. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Spirit & Mind. Through May 1. 6452485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Mis en Scène. Featuring the work of Richard Jenks and Daniel Mosner. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Heroes and Villains. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m. recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. East It: Artists Explore Food & Consumption. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Senior Art Exhibitions. Gallery at the Art & Music Library. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m., Sun noon-10 p.m. Apr 5-9: Charlotte Hotchkiss. Apr 12-16: Caitlin Farmer. Apr 19-23: Lauren Fischer. Apri 26-30: Laura Hobbs. 275-4476.; Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Made in NY 2013. Through Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Handcrafted Jewelry by Lisa Johnson. Reception Apr 13, 12-4 p.m. Additional hours on Wednesdays 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. “The Elements” Photographs by Carissa Hurdstrom. Through Apr 30. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Rochester Art Club Spring Show. Through May 9. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in Joseph S Skalney Welcome Center. rochesterartclub.org. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake!

Donations accepted. 2257221. greecehistoricalsociety@ yahoo.com.

Comedy [ THU., APRIL 11 ] Kevin Bozeman. April 11-13. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

KIDS | COOL KIDS ECOFEST

The last few generations of humanity did a pretty good job of messing up the environment for the rest of us. So it’s up to the next generation to learn from our mistakes and start having a more positive impact on our planet. On Saturday, April 13, kids can learn what’s cool about green living at the 8th Annual Cool Kids EcoFest, held in The Forum at Genesee Community College (1 College Road, Batavia). From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., kids and adults can get a fun, free, hands-on education in the practices of recycling, eco-living, and sustainability. Outside, in the parking lot and plaza, there will be Pump ‘Em Up, a national tire-pressure check program with Dunn Tire; a Mercury Switchout drive-through with AAA; and recycling drives for agricultural plastics, plastic nursery stock, and e-scraps like computers, phones, printers, televisions, wirings, and much more. (In fact, it’ll take everything every except for personal or kitchen appliances.) Indoor activities include a book drive for American soldiers, a sneaker recycling drive, and more than 60 eco-vendors with green games, activities, demos, and art exhibitions. There will also be pizza party at 12:30 p.m., and a Wildlife stage show at 1 p.m. For more information on the EcoFest, call 637-3984 or go to genesee.edu. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Portraits of Pastries.”732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. Reception Mar 13 7 p.m. 585-473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. “As ready as I’ll ever be,” new work by Andrew Cho. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@rit.edu. rit.edu/fa/gallery. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Winners. 275-3361. urmc.edu/libraries/miner/. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. FLCC Arts Faculty Biennial Exhibition. Through Apr 19. 785-1369.

exhibition of the New Town Collection: A Gift of Hope 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. RIT MFA Photography Thesis Exhibitions. Through April 19. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Siskind Gallery at Visual Studies Workshop. Through April 19. Free. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org.

Art Events

[ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Anderson Alley Artists Second Saturday Open House. second Saturday of every month, 12-4 p.m. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St eve@evebotelho. com. andersonalleyartists.com.

[ WED., APRIL 10 ] The ARTS Experience. Through April 19. Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva. Workshops, performances hws. edu/festival. A Conversation with Henry Avignon. April 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor Artist Henry Avignon discusses his unique

[ THU., APRIL 11 ] Lecture with Scott Meyer. April 11, 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Free. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ FRI., APRIL 12 ] Book Signing: “With Fire: Richard Hirsch A Life Between Chance and Design” by Scott Meyer.. April 12, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Gallery r, 100 college ave 585-2563312. galleryr99@gmail.com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. Visual Studies Workshop Auction. April 12. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street 6 p.m. reception, 9 p.m. silent auction closes. 442-8676. vsw.org.

[ SUN., APRIL 14 ] Greece Community & Senior Center Art Club Show. 1:304 p.m Greece Museum, 595 Long Pond Rd. Free.

[ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Comedy Platypus. April 13, 9:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. Comedy competitions all based on audience suggestions $5.00. 797-9086. VIP@improvVIP. com. ImprovVip.com.

Dance Events [ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Century Ballroom Fundraising Ball. April 13, 7 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY An event hosted by Groove Juice Swing held at the Tango Cafe Ballroom to raise money for Seattle’s Century Ballroom. Free beginner swing dance lesson 7-8 p.m $10. 845706-2621. centuryballroom.com/ home/events/opportunity-dance. [ SUN., APRIL 14 ] The African American Cultural Legacy concert with Garth Fagan Dance Company. April 14, 5 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St To benefit Action for a Better Community, Inc $25-$125, register. 4542100. abcinfo.org. Culture and Commuity Sundays: Astrodance, RIT/NTID. April 14, 11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11-$13. 697-1942. rmsc.org.

Kids Events [ WED., APRIL 10 ] Children’s Film Festival. Through April 30. Various times at various libraries and centers cityofrochester.gov/article. aspx?id=8589952183. [ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Acorn Adventures. second Saturday of every month, 1011:30 a.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Pre-schoolers. $6 per session. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. Cool Kids: Eco-Fest!. April 13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road Takes place in The Forum Free. 6373984. generationcool.biz. Family Nature Club: Explore a Bird’s Life Library Program. April 13, 1-2:30 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East Free, register. 315-568-5987 x229. Tasha_Daniels@fws.gov. How I Became a Pirate.. Sundays JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 2 p.m., Sun 11 a.m., 2 p.m $15. 461-2000. tykestheatre.org. NanoDays. April 13, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11-$13. rmsc.org. Nature Explorers. Second Saturday of every month, 12:30-2:30 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Grades 2-4. $7 per session. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm.

[ SUN., APRIL 14 ] Perinton Historical Society Children’s Program - Clothing from Yesterday. April 14, 2:30 p.m. Fairport Historical Museum, 18 Perrin St. Free. 223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. Second Sunday Family Tour. April 14, 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ MON., APRIL 15 ] Monday Toddler Book Club: Dragons and Friends. 10:30, 11:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square April: Dragons and Friends. May: Color me Happy. June: Garden Stories Included in admission: $13, under age 2 free. 263-2700. thestrong.org.

Lectures [ WED., APRIL 10 ] Especially for Educators “steAm: Integrating the Arts into the STEM curriculum.”April 10, 4:30-7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $30, register. 2678971. mag.rochester.edu. Ferrari Humanities Talk: “Toleration in Reformation Europe: Laughter Versus Tidy-Mindedness” with Diarmaid MacCulloch.. April 10, 4 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room rochester.edu/college/ferrarisymposia. Jewels of the Jubilee. April 10, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Listen to the captivating history of the jewels from the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Neilly Lecture: Joseph Sassoon. April 10, 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room 275-4461. Nerd Nite. April 10, 7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. Two interesting presenters plus some fun trivia $5 cover benefits charity 232-2336. nerdnite.com/Rochester. The New York State Purple Martin Project. April 10, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St Free, register. 343-3040 x101. genesee.shutterfly.com. WIFS Presents: Emily J. Casey “Developing Your Team.”April 10, 7:45-9 a.m. $10 nonmembers. 690-9047. [ THU., APRIL 11 ] 2013 remanufacturing Industry Roundtable. April 11-12. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. remancouncil.org. 5th Annual America Seen Photography Lecture. April 11, 7:30 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Featuring photographer and urban planner, Sandy Sorlien Free. sjfc.edu. The Butterflies of Genesee Land Trust. April 11, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Presented by Carol and David Southby. Free, register. 340-8720. evanced.info/penfield/evanced/ eventcalendar.asp. Conference: Taking Play Seriously Acrosss the Lifespan. April 11-12. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Keynote by Lauren Dixon naz.edu/ news/taking-play-seriously.

LECTURE | ART AS ACTIVISM

There are many daunting challenges that we face as individuals, and as citizens in this wide, weird world. We can easily be overwhelmed by the magnitude of crucial matters that require our attention, and these matters are ever competing with numbing entertainment diversions. Some politically and socially conscious individuals choose to broach crucial subjects through artwork, at once seizing the attention of others and attempting to spark interest and initiative in them. On Friday, April 12, 5:30-7:30 p.m., University of Rochester’s Students for a Democratic Society will host an “Art as Actvism” evening in Morey Hall, room 321 on the River Campus. Panelists will share their thoughts on the intersection between art and activism and reveal how the combination is demonstrated through their art. Speakers include Heather Layton, UR senior lecturer in art, who created an18-foot rhinestone-encrusted drone replica as part of a recent installation exhibit in Massachusetts; Tara Najd Ahmadi, a visual and cultural studies graduate student and artist who is interested in the role of art in political activism; Erich Lehman of 1975 Gallery; and others. The discussion will be followed by an audience Q&A session. The event is free to attend, and free parking is available in the Rush Rhees Library lot after 5 p.m. Contact krickert@u. rochester.edu with questions or for more information. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Ethics and Vaccine Denial: Medical Myths, Lies, and HalfTruths” by Dr. Steven Novella. April 11, 7 p.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave Lecture free, dinner $35, register. 2711313. roam@frontier.com. Focus 45 Lunchtime Lecture: Social Media with Lisa KribsLaPierre. April 11, 12:15-1 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Bring lunch or purchase box lunch in cafe $3$6, free to members. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. History of Slavery in America. April 11, 7:30 p.m. MorganManning House, 151 Main St Free. 637-3645. Our Community Cafe: “Your Remarkable reinvention: Energize Your 3rd Age Options.”April 11, 5:30-7:30 p.m. American Association of University Women, 494 East Ave Free, register. ourcommunitycafe.com. [ FRI., APRIL 12 ] Among the Many Fires: Trials, Opportunities and Experiences of Native Americans in the Civil War. April 12, 10 a.m. Genesee Community College, Medina Campus Center, 11470 Maple Ridge Rd With Dan Hamner 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@ genesee.edu. Art as Activism Panel. April 12, 5:30-7 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Morey

Hall, room 321. Featuring Prof. Heather Layton of the UR Art Dept., Tara Najd Ahmadi, Erich Lehman, and others krickert@u. rochester.edu. rochester.edu. Northeast Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Conference. April 12-14. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Register. 475-6355. rit.edu. [ MON., APRIL 15 ] Humanities Talk: Lorraine Datson “Observation in the Enlightenment.”April 15, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room rochester. edu/college/humanities. Mended Hearts Rochester. April 15, 7:15 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Thomas P. Stuver, M.D., F.A.C.C., will speak about “Advances in Heart Valve Surgery.”Free. mendedheartsrochester.org. [ TUE., APRIL 16 ] Rochester Committee for Scientific Information Annual Meeting: Hydraulic Fractruring Issues. April 16, 7 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Xerox Auditorium, room 2580 James E. Gleason Building 9 Free. rit.edu. [ WED., APRIL 17 ] Former British Parliament Member Nocholas Bennett. April 17, continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Theater

Lectures

The cast of “Wicked,” currently on stage at the Auditorium Theatre through April 21. PHOTO COURTESY JOAN MARCUS

A broom with a view “Wicked” THROUGH APRIL 21 PRESENTED BY THE ROCHESTER BROADWAY THEATRE LEAGUE AUDITORIUM THEATRE, 885 E. MAIN ST. TICKETS START AT $37.50 | 800-745-3000, RBTL.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Since opening on Broadway in 2003, “Wicked” has had smashing success, breaking box-office records and becoming one of the most beloved modern musicals. It has a large, devoted fanbase and inspires the sort of passion in people so that they are eager to see it time and time again. That at least partially explains why the show is back in Rochester for the third time in the past six years, still playing to a packed — and very enthusiastic — house, as evidenced by Thursday night’s performance at the Auditorium Theatre. One of the longest-running shows currently on Broadway, “Wicked” is often mentioned in the same breath as “Phantom of the Opera” and “Les Miserables,” though what that means depends entirely on your personal feelings about those shows. The timing of the show’s return to Rochester also happens to capitalize on the revived interest in the magical land of Oz, thanks to the current success of “Oz The Great and Powerful” at the cinematic box office. If you’re bothering to read this review, it’s likely you’re already aware of the musical’s 24 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

basic plot. The story is loosely based off of Gregory Maguire’s novel, which cleverly invented a complex backstory for the “Wizard of Oz”’s Wicked Witch of the West, here known as Elphaba. The novel was born out of a desire to humanize one of the most famous villains of all time, though the story seen in the musical adaptation is significantly simplified and often altered outright in order to keep things light and ensure a happy ending for all of its major characters. The main focus here is on the friendship between Elphaba and Glinda that begins after they’re assigned to be roommates at Shiz University. The two women are total opposites. Elphaba is fiercely intelligent but misunderstood and feared due to her green skin, while Glinda is a bubbly social climber, drawn to wealth and popularity. The musical follows the ups and downs of their relationship over the course of several years, showing how they were each formed by their experiences into the women we recognize from the most famous Oz story, “The Wizard of Oz.” There’s a lot of plot crammed into the show, which makes it feel condensed and extremely rushed; that’s odd considering that so much of it was invented just for the stage. The problem is particularly obvious at the end of the first act, when Elphaba goes from honored guest of the Wizard to undesirable No. 1 awfully quickly. Any production of “Wicked” is only as

good as its Elphaba and Glinda. The two leads in this touring company (Jennifer

DiNoia and Hayley Podschun, respectively) are phenomenal. DiNoia has a powerhouse voice, and Podschun nails the infectiously bubbly energy that the role of Glinda requires. The downside of playing these parts, however, is that the two actors who originated them on Broadway — Idina Menzel and Kristin Chenoweth — were so good in their roles that everyone cast since is tasked with the duty of simply duplicating their performances. As a result, no actress is ever given the chance to make the part her own. So as good as DiNoia and Podschun are, I found myself constantly thinking, “Wow, they sound just like Kristin /Idina.” It left me curious about what the parts could have been if the actors had been allowed to put their own stamps on them. But that will never happen with audiences expecting to get precisely what they hear every time they listen to the soundtrack. The show looks fantastic. The sets, the costumes, the lighting and effects all add up to an impressive theatrical experience. But too often, it feels like spectacle for the sake of spectacle. Even the choreography has the feeling of dutifully rolling out the occasional dance number because this is a musical, and that’s what’s expected. But the empty glitz is best exemplified by the iron dragon that resides the top of the stage. Despite its light-up eyes, flapping wings, and smoke pouring from its nostrils, it serves no purpose in the show whatsoever. Stephen Schwartz’s score boasts a few legitimately great songs, but far too many that come across as generic and instantly forgettable. There’s a reason that most everyone is familiar with “Popular” and “Defying Gravity,” whether they’ve seen the show or not. The only other song that stuck with me at all was “The Wizard and I.” Still, I wasn’t humming a single one as I left the theater. Like the novel it is sourced from, the musical version of “Wicked” raises some thoughtful questions about the nature of evil, and whether people are born bad. But the musical constantly casts them aside in favor of more bright lights and shiny objects. Given some thought, it’s a little unseemly that a show that is critical of those who are so wrapped up in appearances that they’re unable to look beyond the surface of things is itself so consumed with the desire to be beautiful and popular.

4:30-6 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. brightonlibrary.org. Light Works! Presents Rev. Jeff and Meddy Jacques: Ministers, Mediums and Authors. April 17, 6:30 p.m. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point $5, $4 bring a friend. 585-424-6777. meetup.com/Light-Works. Science on the Edge Series: “Lake Sturgeon Repartriation: A ScienceBased Success Story for Genesee River Health.”April 17, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. With Jeff Wyatt $7-$15. 697-1492. rmsc.org. “Secret Gardens” with Genesee Country Master Gardeners. April 17, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St $10, register. 3433040 x101. genesee.shutterfly.com/ gardening. “So Far From Home: Elmira’s Confederate Prison Camp,” a lecture by Kerry Lippincott. April 17, 7:30 p.m. Geneva History Museum, 543 South Main St., Geneva Free. 315789-5151.

Literary Events [ WED., APRIL 10 ] “Honoring the Muse” with Alumni Writers. April 10, 7 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College Honors House, 4340 Lakeshore Dr., Canandaigua $2 , free with FLCC ID. 785-1367. Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “The Housekeeper and the Professor” by Yoko Ogawa.. April 10-11. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Wed 7 p.m., Thu 3 p.m 336-6060. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Women Who Love to Reaad: “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern. April 10, 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Bookshop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ THU., APRIL 11 ] Fifth Annual Poetry Competition Writing for Peace and Justice. April 11, 6 p.m. Nazareth College Golisano Academic Center, 4245 East Ave. Room 38 Free. 389-2685. mlebret5@naz.edu. Just Poets Open Mic: George Wallace. April 11, 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza 585 278 7501. bn.com. [ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Jan Surasky: “Rage Against the Dying Light.”April 13, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Literary Ready: David Seaburn. April 13, 5 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. National Indie Book Award Finalist for 2011, is the author of Charlie No Face (a coming-ofage story in which a misunderstood recluse and a young boy redeem each other’s lives through a most unlikely friendship) and Chimney Bluffs (a poignant and powerful story of three strangers, each facing a tragic loss, who together find friendship and healing) Free. 6375494. chrissygreenny@gmail.com. Reading: Author David Seaburn. April 13, 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Free. differentpathgallery.com. [ MON., APRIL 15 ] The Sun Magazine Discussion Group. third Monday of every month,

6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., APRIL 16 ] Books Sandwiched-in: “How Children Succeed: Grit Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character,” by Paul Tough. April 16, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Reviewer: Elaine Spaull Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Reading the World Conversation. April 16, 5:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown Room. “Maidenhair” with author Mikhail Shishkin and translator Marian Schwartz openletterbooks.org.

The park, a.k.a. Linear Park, is off Rt. 441, west of the Penfield Four Corners area. Follow the “Hike” signs. The hike will start at the kiosk near the Washington St. Bridge Free, register. 3408655. Rochester Birding Trip: Island Cottage Woods and West Lakeshore. April 13, 8 a.m. Meet at Island Cottage lot at Island Cottage Rd. and Edgemere Dr 671-5479. rochesterbirding.com. Serendipity Walk. April 13, 9:3011:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3, $10/ family requested donation. 3746160. rmsc.org. UR Well 5K Run For Your Life. April 13, 1 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. $10-$15. (585) 683-5734. urmc.rochester.edu.

[ SUN., APRIL 14 ] GVHC Hike. April 14, 1 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road Moderate 4 mile hike, East Esker trails free. 334-0972. gvhchikes.org.

Special Events [ WED., APRIL 10 ] Girls Rock! Rochester seeks volunteers. Through April 17. Seeking musical and non-musical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester. com. Email girlsrockrochester@ gmail.com for more info. Pittsford Chamber Small Business Expo. April 10, 5-8 p.m. Burgundy Basin Inn, 1361 Marsh Rd. pittsfordchamber.org.

[ THU., APRIL 11 ] Film: Two Who Dared: The Sharps’ War. Saturdays, 7:30 p.m First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd The story of Martha and Waitstill Sharp, a Unitarian minister and his wife, who leave their own children in the care of their parish in order to go to Prague at the onset of World War II to aid imperiled refugees. One of the children who was rescued by Martha Sharp will be on hand to answer questions after the film 865-5918. rochesterunitarian.org. Public Meeting: Concepts fro New Downtown Skate Park. April 11, 6-8 p.m. South Avenue Community Center, 999 South Ave cityofrochester.gov. Rochester Birding Association General Meeting. April 11,

7:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Thomas J. Poczciwinski talks about Short-eared owls in Western NY rochesterbirding.com. [ FRI., APRIL 12 ] Film: The Language You Cry In. April 12, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, RSVP. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. ROC Properties, A Neighborhood Party for Flower City Habitat for Humanity. April 12, 6-9 p.m. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Rd. $100, register. 585-288-7170. rochesterhabitat.org. Sylvester Hosmer Inn Dinner. April 12-13. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. 6 p.m $65, register. 294-8218. gcv.org.

[ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Bavarian Night 80th Anniversary Celebration. April 13, 7-11 p.m. St. Mary’s Ukranian Church Hall, 3176 St. Paul Blvd. Dance, food and drink available for purchase. Doors open at 6 p.m $6-$8. 944-9313. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. David Francis’s Magic Lantern Show. April 13, 8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $6-$8. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “From the RITz With Love: Shaken, Not Stirred.”April continues on page 26

Museum Exhibit [ WED., APRIL 10 ] “Bringing Down the Attic.” Through Aug. 3. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Explore the hidden collection at the museum Free. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. “Race: Are We So Different?” Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Game Time!. April 13, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. New original permanent exhibit featuring game and puzzle collections Included in museum admission $11-$13. 263-2700. rmsc.org. [ TUE., APRIL 16 ] Perinton Historical Society Program: Fashions Inspired by Downton Abbey. April 16, 7:30 p.m. Fairport Historical Museum, 18 Perrin St Museum. Free. 223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org.

Recreation [ WED., APRIL 10 ] Senior Sojourn. April 10, 9:3010:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Easy pace $3, $10 per family. 3746160. rmsc.org. [ THU., APRIL 11 ] UrbanFIT 6 week Session. Mondays,. Location changes weekly training@ fleetfeetrochester.com. fleetfeetrochester.com/training/ urban-fit. [ FRI., APRIL 12 ] Public Star Party: Jupiter!. April 12, 9-10:30 p.m. Northampton Park, near the ski lodge on Hubbell Rd. off Rt. 31 in Ogden. Held only if skies are clear Free. 703-9876. rochesterastronomy.org. [ SAT., APRIL 13 ] GVHC Hike. April 13, 10 a.m. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Moderate/hilly 6 mile hike, west side Free. 730-7143. gvhchikes. org. Public Hike at Channing Philbrick Park. April 13, 10 a.m. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

RECREATION | PHILBRICK PARK GUIDED TOUR

As of press time, Rochester seems to be actually resembling spring — there are decent temperatures outside, lots of sunshine, and we haven’t had any freakish snowstorms for at least the last day or two. So we advise that you soak up the warm weather before things get weird again. One way to make the most of the great outdoors this week is the Penfield Trails Committee’s guided tour of Penfield’s Channing H. Philbrick Park (1 Linear Park Drive, off of Route 441) on Saturday, April 13. From 10 a.m. to noon, hikers will be lead through the 19-acre park that has several waterfalls, trails along the Irondequoit Creek, and remains of the old mills that once bustled along the creek banks about 200 years ago. The hike is free. Participating hikers are asked to pre-register by calling Penfield Recreation at 340-8655, and will meet at the kiosk on the north side of the bridge by the park (keep an eye out for the “Hike” signs). — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Special Events 13, 5:30 p.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Ave 28th Puttin’ on the RITz Black Tie Dinner $125, register. 5863440. rit.edu/cast/ritz/index. php3?page=order. Genesee Valley Woodcarvers Show, Competition, and Sale. April 13, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Free admission. gvwoodcarvers.com.

Home Decor Benefit Sale for Habitat for Humanity. April 13, 9 a.m. Classic Home & Garden, 2854 Dewey Ave. Free. 585209-9131. facebook.com/ ClassicHG. Spring Fashion Show for Breast Cancer Coalition. April 13, 2-3 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Theme: Jane Austen 225-8951. greecelibrary.org. Spring Sale Show. April 13, 3-6 p.m. Gallery Salon & Spa, 780 University Ave. galleryhair.com/ events.

[ SUN., APRIL 14 ] Ballo Divertentissimo. April 14, 3-6 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way Pasta dinner & dance $5-$10. 594-8882. iaccrochester.org. Culture and Commuity Sundays: RIT Storytellers. 1-3 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11$13. 697-1942. rmsc.org. Durand Eastman Park Arboretum Tours. 2 p.m Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Meet at the kiosk on Zoo Rd. next to the park offices lot Free. 261-1665. Gothic Cathedral Tour. April 14, 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave Free, donations accepted. 325-4041. sfxcrochester.org. Spring Buzz Open House. April 14, 1-4 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000. jccrochester.org. Springtime Trolley Rides. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd 20 minute rides depart at noon, 12:30 p.m., 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m $4-$5, under age 12 free. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. “Traditions and Taste of Matcha.” April 14, 2-4 p.m. Kuma Gama Studio, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Door 2, Suite 228 Fee will be waived upon purchase of a tea bowl at the venue $20, register. 451-5674. info@happyearthtea.com. happyearthtea.com. [ MON., APRIL 15 ] Art of the Mix: Tax Day. April 15, 6-9 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. $50, register. 4612222. rochestercontemporary. org. [ TUE., APRIL 16 ] Rochester Celebrates Israel at 65 with Saul Kaye. April 16, 7 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Free. 461-0490. jewishrochester.org.

e st.

1927

Rochester International Film Festival. April 16, 7 p.m., Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 2486275. Free. rochesterfilmfest. org/best-of-the-fest/. [ WED., APRIL 17 ] Beer Tasting Seminar. April 17, 7 p.m. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Sample and learn about beers from around the globe Hosted by Fausto Angotti of The Brewhaus. 6 Beers & Light Snacks $25, register. 5821830. thelowermill.com. Electri…FYI! 2013 Upstate Electrical Trade Show. April 17, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. Free. 232-3221. eawny.com. A Very Special Happy Hour: Poetry and Spoken Word Night. April 17, 6-9 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way “Art of Xpression 2” by The Mocha Center. Singers, poets… and a drag show. Free food, drink specials, and free HIV testing. The MOCHA Center’s mission is to improve the health and wellness of LGBT communities of color. Ages 21+ only Free. 232-3230. info@ abilenebarandlounge.com. mochacenter.org.

Sports [ FRI., APRIL 12 ] Rochester Americans v Oklahoma City Barons. April 12, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Workshops [ WED., APRIL 10 ] Family Development Class: “Raising Your Spirited Child.”April 10, 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Indian Cuisine with Singh from Thali’s. April 10, 6-8 p.m. Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods, 349 W

SPECIAL EVENT | ART OF THE MIX: TAX DAY

John Lennon summed up everything I have to say about the IRS. Well, almost everything…and The Beatles were certainly more polite about it than I would be. So I’ll just point out that you can commiserate — or celebrate, depending on how your 2012 return shaped up — the tax deadline in style, with an appropriately themed “Art of the Mix: Tax Day” event at Rochester Contemporary Art Center (137 East Ave.). Yes, we’re talking booze. Join other Rochesterians and drown your sorrows or celebrate your gain on Monday, April 15, 6-9 p.m. Rochester’s top mixologists will concoct some scrumptious potions for forgetting and fizzy lifting draughts. Signature cocktails and amuse-bouche pairings will be provided by Char, Cheshire, Good Luck/Cure, Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, Lento, Max Rochester, Nikko, Salenas, Janine Wasley, The Daily Refresher, and Tony D’s. While in house, discover the art center’s current exhibit, “Eat It: Artists Explore Food and Consumption.” Only 80 tickets are available at $50 per person, with proceeds benefitting RoCo’s programming. Reserve your ticket by calling 461-2222. For more information, visit rochestercontemporary.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Commercial St $60, register. 267-7405. rosariopinos.com. Producers Workshop on Motion. April 10, 6-7:30 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St $3, $10 nonmembers, register. rctv15.org.

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Small Business Council Boot Camp #2: Dressing for Success. April 10, 7:45 a.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. Presented by: Peter Roberti, Adrian Jules $25, SBC members free. 271-1111. rochestersbc.com/.

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Stained Glass Classes. 6-9 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St The six-week introductory course will be led by Candace Roat and Marc Sulkes who will guide class members as they work on sun catchers, window displays, and more. The class meets every Wednesday from Apr 3-May 8, 6-9 p.m. in the Carriage House. Students should use the Fort Hill Avenue entrance $60-$70, register. 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. [ THU., APRIL 11 ] Abundance Theory. April 11, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. [ FRI., APRIL 12 ] Borosilicate Glass: Couples Date Night. April 12, 7-11 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $150, register. 349-7110. rocafc.com. Creative Spirits. April 12, 6 p.m. Best Foot Forward, 100 Cobblestone Court Dr. We supply the ideas and supplies, you bring the snacks and wine. Painting, book making, pen and inktwo hour classes full of inspiration. No experience necessary $30 per session. 398-0220. Vanessa@ BestFootForwardKids.com. BestFootForwardKids.com. Introduction to Relief Printing (Woodblock). April 12. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $30, register. 210-0075. rochestermakerspace.org. [ SAT., APRIL 13 ] Artisan Sausage Making 101 with Antonio Toscano. April 13, 12-3 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $90, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com.

THEATER | THEATREROCS SHOWCASE

Have you been to the Downstairs Cabaret Theatre or the Geva Theatre Center lately? OK, well, how about Geomantics Dance Theatre or PUSH Physical Theatre or the Rochester Children’s Theatre? Or how about seeing some shows from the Webster Theatre Guild or the Penfield Players? Yes, we know, there’s too much good theater in this city to keep up with everything. But you can catch up on a good portion of it at “It’s a Mad, Mad World,” the 5th Annual showcase by TheatreROCS, held this year in the Hart Theater of the Jewish Community Center (1200 Edgewood Ave.). The showcase on Saturday, April 13, will feature preview performances by 16 of the 20-plus local performing companies represented in TheatreROCS. The event begins at 7 p.m. with a wine and cheese reception, and the shows start at 8 p.m. The evening will also feature a silent auction and raffle, and the presentation of City Newspaper’s Rochester Theater Hall of Fame Award. Tickets are $15 general admission and $10 for students, and can be purchased by calling 461-2000. For more info and to see the full list of TheatreROCS companies, visit theatrerocs.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Creating Art Work with Pressed Flowers. April 13, 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Donations of used ink cartridges and cell phones accepted at the nature center for recycling Free, register. 359-

7044. sites.google.com/site/ hansennaturecenter. Healthy Alternatives Aromatherapy Class. April 13, 2-4 p.m. 458 Stone Rd $5, register. 787-6954. angelhd1@ hotmail.com.

Labor Lyceum. April 13, 10 a.m.noon. New York State United Teachers Hall, 30 N. Union St. “Building Worker Power Through Community Organizing.” Hear from organizers who have formed community-based grassrootsled worker centers that serve individuals from a wide range of occupations while advancing a broad working people’s agenda. Center organizers from Ithaca, Syracuse, and Rochester will share how these “organizing laboratories” help to combat wage theft, discrimination, low wages, sexual harassment, workers’ compensation hassles, and more Free. (607) 207-4994. Rochester Academy of Science Life Sciences Section. April 13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. RSVP. 334-0977. epixley@ rochester.rr.com. [ MON., APRIL 15 ] Family Development Class: “What Do You Want for Your Child?” April 15, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Smart and Sassy Springtime Cooking. April 15. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Apr 15, 6-8 p.m. Go with the Grains! May 6, 6-8 p.m. Simply Risotto. Jun 10, 6-8 p.m., Picnics, Parties, and Potlucks $30 per class, register. 461-1000. mycce.org/monroe. [ TUE., APRIL 16 ] Family Development Class: “Who’s Listening?”. April 16, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Film Event: Who Cares About Kelsey?. April 16, 7 p.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square The film tells the story of Kelsey Carroll who lived with homelessness, self-mutilation, abuse and ADHD. She was a likely high school dropout—until she encountered

an education revolution that’s about empowering, not overpowering, teens with emotional and behavioral disabilities. The film contains mature content and language. Adult discretion is advised. The event will feature a conversation with filmmaker Dan Habib and Kelsey Carroll Free, register. 5461700 x272. advocacycenter.com/ events/film-screening-who-caresabout-kelsey. Introduction to Stained Glass. April 16. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $120, six week class, register. 210-0075. rochestermakerspace.org.

Theater “33 Variations.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Apr 27. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $27. 454-1260. bftix.org. City Lights. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. The Grapes of Wrath. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. “The Importance of Being Earnest.”Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Thu-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 p.m $6$8. flcc.edu. “Measure For Measure.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave RCP’s Shakespeare Players. Through Apr 27. Fri Apr 12-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $9-$19. 234-7840. muccc.org. “No Child.” Through April 17. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Apr 21. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Wed Apr 17 7 p.m Tickets start at $27. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “Over the River and Through the Woods.”The Geneva Theatre Guild. Pat Collins Black Box Theater in the Geneva Community Center, 160 Carter Rd., Geneva. Through Apr 21. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m gtglive.org.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Bring your friends to this Adult Oriented shadow casted show. At RIT building 6(L.A.B.) room A205(basement), this show is rated R and not for kids $4 for entrance, $1 for a prop bag. rit.edu. Song Man. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E Main St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $25. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. TheatreROCS Showcase: It’s a Mad Mad World.”JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 7 p.m. reception, raffle, and silent auction. 8 p.m. performances $10-$15. 461-2000. theatrerocs.org. “The Threepenny Opera.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Through Apr 21. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $15-$17. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. The Vagina Monologues. Apr 13, 7:30 p.m. at the Hochstein School of Music & Dance and April 21, 7:30 p.m. at Ingle Auditorium at RIT $10-$20. vdayrochester@ gmail.com. “The Whipping Man.” Through April 17 and Through April 24. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Thu 6 p.m., Wed Apr 10 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7:30 p.m. Tue-Wed Apr 17 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Wicked.” Through April 21. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6:30 p.m Tickets start at $37.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl. org. rbtl.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

The Bible of the Beat Generation [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“On the Road” (R), DIRECTED BY WALTER SALLES NOW PLAYING

For reasons no critic quite comprehends, Neal Cassady commanded the attention and indeed the love of most of the major members of the Beat Generation, dominating their literature and their lives. The Beat saint, the holy goof, a car thief, street hustler, speed freak, and prodigious womanizer, he even accomplished the odd transition from one literary generation to another, joining Ken Kesey’s Merry

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 30

ROCHESTER’S

Pranksters, immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.” The first true cinematic adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road” (a superficial sketch of the characters, “Heart Beat,” appeared in 1980) adheres reasonably closely to the book, one of the important American novels of the 20th century and perhaps the best representation of the first modern counter culture. Anyone who knows the novel, the period, or even the literary chatter about it recognizes that the work is a roman á clef, a novel with a key, populated by fictional versions of well-known people, which makes the movie something of an exercise in identification. All the famous figures appear — Carlo Marx (Allen Ginsberg), Bull Lee (William S. Burroughs), Sal Paradise (Kerouac), and of course Dean Moriarty (Cassady). The movie begins abruptly without prologue or title, showing Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund), an inspired driver, parking cars in New York, then meeting Sal Paradise (Sam Riley) and Carlo Marx (Tom Sturridge) and launching the

Kristen Stewart and Garrett Hedlund in “On the Road.” PHOTO COURTESY IFC FILMS

new

famous friendship. From that point, the plot roughly follows the pattern of the book, with Sal narrating the story of his travels, initially leaving Ginsberg’s “nowhere Zen New Jersey” to journey back and forth across the country, periodically meeting up with Dean and his various wives and lovers. Now and then in his travels, hitching rides, working various jobs, Sal experiences something of the vast landscape of America, a Whitmanesque vision of the people and places that constitute the real spirit of the nation. Although it appeared in 1957, the novel actually deals with the previous decade, which the movie captures with a genuine sense of authenticity — the music, the clothes, the cars (especially the cars), and the general mood of a delayed post-war exuberance, which itself may account for the phenomenon of the Beats. In the great tradition of the picaresque, Sal, Dean, and their companions constantly travel and constantly stay one step ahead of the law, stealing food and gasoline, cadging money, freeloading from various friends, and collecting speeding tickets from unsympathetic highway patrolmen. In the same tradition, the film sometimes falls into a dull, repetitive pattern when the characters stop moving — as Dean says in the book, “The road is life.” The characters themselves display a kind of behavior perhaps more shocking in their time than now, including the use of heroin, marijuana, and Benzedrine (probably the key to Cassady’s

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Scare tactics [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Evil Dead” (R), DIRECTED BY FEDE ALVAREZ NOW PLAYING

“No” (R), DIRECTED BY PABLO LARRAÍN OPENS FRIDAY AT THE LITTLE

boundless energy) and some unusual sexual arrangements. Sal sleeps with Dean’s wife, Marylou (Kristen Stewart), while Dean looks on, and Dean has sex with anybody and everybody, including his two wives, some other women, Carlo Marx, and a weird salesman (Steve Buscemi). Though physically suited for the role of Dean Moriarty, Garret Hedlund runs out of dialogue, so that like the silly scenes of him jumping up and down in front of a hand-held camera, he seems confined to repeating himself over and over. Sam Riley is far too callow and passive for Sal Paradise, who after all is older than Dean and a man of some experience; instead, Riley looks like an adolescent worshipping the high-school football star. Amazingly, Kristen Stewart, the insipid princess of the “Twilight” saga, performs quite creditably both in and out of her clothes, showing a whole new possibility and some previously hidden talents. Too much of “On the Road” literalizes the novel, with characters delivering lines they’ve already written—Ginsberg quoting “Howl” before he even writes it, and Paradise writing the novel as he lives it. Like Kerouac’s book, the script finally runs out of steam, ending with a downbeat scene of farewell between Sal and Dean. It also includes, in Sal’s final voice-over narration, some of the lovely lyrical coda that almost compensates for the disillusionments of Dean’s various manipulations and betrayals. The road is life, but the end of the road turns out to be something else.

With 2012’s “Cabin in the Woods” still so fresh in the minds of moviegoers, Fede Alvarez’s new remake of Sam Raimi’s horror classic, “The Evil Dead,” has its work cut out for it. It has to find a way to make fresh the tropes of the now wellknown story that “Cabin” so cleverly sent up, as well as distinguish itself from the glut of poorly received horror remakes churned out over the past several years. Alvarez’s solution seems to be doing away with the quirky tone of Raimi’s film and amping up the gore to near absurd levels. But he manages to strike the right balance between staying true to the spirit of the original while still giving modern horror buffs exactly what they crave. In “Evil Dead,” five friends travel to a remote, yes, cabin in the woods to stage an intervention for their drug-addicted friend Mia (Jane Levy, the clear standout amongst the meat puppets) and help her kick the habit cold turkey. While there, they

A scene from the new “Evil Dead.” PHOTO COURTESY GHOST HOUSE PICTURES

stumble across a book, bound in human flesh, entitled “The Book of the Dead,” and naturally decide to read from it. No surprise, reading from this book awakens some demonic entities, allows them to possess the living, and generally makes things unpleasant for everyone in the cabin. The new film diverts from the plot of the original in some major ways, but a couple of early changes have the effect of making this group of kids out to be severely stupid when compared to those in Raimi’s film. The most significant of these changes is the characters actively deciding to read from the book as opposed to accidentally playing a recording of the demon-unleashing incantation. They’re also possibly a little too slow on the uptake regarding the tipping point between detox and demon possession. Helpful hint: trying to boil one’s own face off with scalding hot water is not typically a side effect of heroin withdrawal. The new Exhibit No. 1 in the argument that you can put as much violence and bloodshed into a film and still get an “R” rating, just so long as there’s no sex, “Evil Dead” is saturated with gooey, sticky gore. Alvarez’s decision to use mostly practical effects instead of CGI adds a tactile quality that adds to the throwback feel of his film. Some of the most cringe-inducing moments, however, come from the sounds of actions happening off-camera. If there is any justice in the world, “Evil Dead” will be an Oscar nominee next year in the categories of make-up and sound design. I’ve heard complaints that the new “Evil Dead” lacks the tongue-in-cheek humor of the original. Re-watching the first movie, I was struck by how straight it plays the material (for the most part). The goofiness everyone associates with the film doesn’t really come in until the campy sequel, and it apparently seeped over in everyone’s memories. Nearly all of the humor in the original is the byproduct of its inventively low-budget effects and unpolished acting.

What struck me most about the remake is its ability to maintain an atmosphere of fun while taking the material seriously. Lacking is the air of cynicism that I associate with a lot of recent horror, like the “Saw” franchise. Alvarez’s main concern is that his audience has a good time; you watch the mayhem unfolding onscreen, squeal, and try to cover your eyes, but you laugh your head off all the while. In 1988, the Chilean government was

forced to enact a referendum wherein the population would vote whether to keep then president/dictator Augusto Pinochet in power. A “yes” vote meant he stayed, “no” meant that democracy would win out and an election would be held to elect a new leader. “No,” Oscar-nominated last year for Best Foreign Film, tells the story of ad executive René Saavedra (Gael García Bernal, in one of his best performances), who was recruited to spearhead the No campaign. The film shows how Saavedra cannily used the language of advertising to turn the tide of the campaign and overthrow a fascist regime. Instead of depressing the public by focusing on the atrocities committed under Pinochet’s regime, Saavedra saw that the way to victory was by packaging happiness itself. His campaign highlighted the positivity that would come with the freedom of democracy by creating ads that resembled soda commercials more than anything else, complete with a catchy jingle. Though “No” is actually the final entry in director Pablo Larraín’s trilogy about the Pinochet regime, following 2008’s “Tony Manero” and “Post Mortem” in 2010, it’s not necessary to have seen those film to appreciate “No.” Larraín keeps the film light and funny enough so the two-hour running time zips by. Half historical drama, half satire, “No” documents the point when the Venn diagram of marketing and politics officially became a circle.

MARINA ABRAMOVIC: THE ARTIST IS PRESENT

Friday, Apr. 12, 8 p.m. For 736 hours over 78 days, Serbian performance artist Marina Abramović sat motionless on a chair in the atrium of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, facing one spectator at a time. This unprecedented tour de force of physical and emotional resilience is an entrancing reflection on human life as an art form. (Matthew Akers and Jeff Dupre, US 2012, 106 min., Blu-ray)

SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week.

Sunday, Apr. 14 , 2 p.m. Linda Goldstein Knowlton (The World According to Sesame Street) profiles Chinese adoptees in contemporary America in this deeply moving documentary. Issues of belonging, race, and gender are brought to life through these four articulate teenage girls, who approach life with honesty and open hearts. (Linda Goldstein Knowlton, US 2011, 88 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—Stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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30 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

[ OPENING ] 42 (PG-13): Brian Helgeland writes and directs this biopic about Jackie Robinson as he’s signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers under team GM Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford). Also starring Chadwick Boseman, Christopher Meloni, and Alan Tudyk. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster AS LONG AS YOU’RE HEALTHY (1966): The third in the Dryden’s Pierre Étaix series is an omnibus film composed of several shorts by the director. Dryden (Tue, Apr 16, 8 p.m.) MAGIC LANTERN SHOW! MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE: DRINK, TEMPERANCE, AND THE DELIGHTS OF VISUAL STORYTELLING (NR): David Francis and Joss March demonstrate this early form of cinematic storytelling in a live show made up of slides, images and short films. Dryden (Sat, Apr 13, 8 p.m.) MARINA ABRAMOVIC: THE ARTIST IS PRESENT (2012): Renowned Serbian performance artist is examined as she prepares for a retrospective of her work at the Museum of Modern Art. Dryden (Fri, Apr 12, 8 p.m.) NO (R): Part historical drama, part satire, this Oscarnominated film follows the unusual political campaign to defeat Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Starring Gael García Bernal. Little, Pittsford THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (R): Director Derek Cianfrance’s follow up to “Blue Valentine” stars Ryan Gosling as a smalltime bank robber and Bradley Cooper as the rookie cop who’s pursuing him. With Eva Mendes. Little, Pittsford ROSELAND (1977): James Ivory directs three interconnecting stories about romance, set in the famed Roseland Ballroom in New York City. Starring Christopher Walken. Dryden (Wed, Apr 10, 8 p.m.) SCARY MOVIE 5 (R): The latest in the long-running series of film spoofs parodies everything from “Paranormal Activity” to “Black Swan,” with a cast that includes Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan, Heather Locklear, Snoop Dogg, and Mike Tyson. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN (2011): This documentary explores issues of race, belonging and identity, following four teenage girls adopted from China as a result of the country’s One Child Policy. Dryden (Sun, Apr 14, 2 p.m.) SORRY, WRONG NUMBER (1948): A bedridden woman accidentally overhears a plot to murder her while on the telephone. Starring Barbara Stanwyck and Burt Lancaster. Dryden (Thu, Apr 11, 8 p.m.)

TRANCE (R): Danny Boyle’s mindbending heist film stars James McAvoy as an art auctioneer turned thief and Rosario Dawson as the hypnotherapist hired to determine where he hid the loot after he loses his memory. Also starring Vincent Cassel. Little, Pittsford [ CONTINUING ] ADMISSION (PG-13): Tina Fey and Paul Rudd star in this romantic dramedy, which means that even if the movie’s terrible, it will still be worth watching because hey, Tina Fey and Paul Rudd. Also starring Lily Tomlin, Wallace Shawn, and Michael Sheen. Canandaigua, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford THE CALL (R): Halle Berry plays a 911 operator who must use her wits to help an abducted girl escape the clutches of a violent serial killer from her past. Also starring Abigail Breslin. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster EMPEROR (PG-13): In this historical drama, Tommy Lee Jones plays General Douglas MacArthur during his postWorld War II investigation into the activities of emperor of Japan. Cinema EVIL DEAD (R): See reveiw on page 29. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE GATEKEEPERS (PG-13): This Oscar nominated documentary examines the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through interviews with six former heads of Shin Bet, Israel’s secret service agency. Cinema G.I. JOE: RETALIATION (PG-13): In this sequel based on the film inspired by a line toys, the G.I. Joes once again battle the evil forces of the Cobra empire. Starring Dwayne Johnson, Channing Tatum, Adrianne Palicki, and Bruce Willis. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster GINGER & ROSA (PG-13): Two teenage girls find their friendship tested as they make their way through the tumultuous era of 1960’s London. Starring Elle Fanning, Alice Englert, Christina Hendricks, Oliver Platt, Timothy Spall, and Annette Bening.  Little, Pittsford THE HOST (PG-13): Based on the Stephanie Meyer novel, where instead of vampires and werewolves, this time the love story involves alien invaders

bent on enslaving the human race. Directed by Andrew Niccol and starring Saoirse Ronan, William Hurt, and Diane Kruger. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown JACK REACHER (PG-13): Tom Cruise: action hero. Based on the popular series of novels by Lee Child, about one bad-ass homicide investigator. Vintage JACK THE GIANT SLAYER (PG-13): Bryan Singer directs this epic, action-adventure retelling of “Jack and the Beanstalk” starring Nicholas Hoult, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Ian McShane, and Bill Nighy. Canandaigua JURASSIC PARK 3D (PG-13): Steven Spielberg’s beloved adventure tale, about a dinosaur theme park that goes terribly wrong, returns to the big screen and gets the snazzy 3D treatment. Clever girl. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Cinema LORE (NR): A young girl must lead her siblings across war torn Germany after their Nazi parents are arrested by Allied Forces in this war thriller from acclaimed director Cate Shortland. Little OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R): Terrorists overtake the a White House in this action thriller starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Ashley Judd, and Melissa Leo. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster ON THE ROAD (R): See review on page 28. Little OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG): Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a cast stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Pittsford TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (PG-13): A marriage counselor, unhappy in her own marital situation, faces unforeseen consequences when she begins an affair with one of her clients. Starring Jurnee Smollett-Bell (“Friday Night Lights”), Vanessa L. Williams, Brandy Norwood, and ahem, Kim Kardashian. Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown

MUSIC! FOOD! FRESH AIR! ’s Y T I C

THURSDAY, MAY 2 5-9pm in

ROCHESTER’S EAST END Come out for CITY’s fourth annual night of FREE music on the streets. Listen to great local musicians, PLUS get ridiculous deals from neighborhood merchants on food, drink, goods, and services!

$3 $3 $1

standard 6-inch pitas at Pita Pit! for 2 cookies at Orange Glory Café!

50% off every book at Greenwood Books!

and many more! PRIZES FOR TOP BUSKERS PROVIDED BY:

Get more details at

rochestercitynewspaper.com or find the event on Facebook!

P.S. In case you don’t know: a “busker” is a street musician.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. CLEAN FURNISHED ROOM Quiet surrounding. Utilities, Cable, off-street-parking included. On ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. bus line, near bus stop. West Browse hundreds of online listings Rochester. Call 585-328-2771. with photos and maps. Find your House has security. Call anytime. roommate with a click of the mouse!

Shared Housing Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Land for Sale NY LAND BARGAINS- Herkimer County 59.9 acres, woods $68,000. Montgomery County 33.4 acres, fields $69,000. Otsego County 2.7 acres $29,000. Owner financing www.helderbergrealty.com CALL HENRY: 518-861-6541

Commercial/ Office Space ROCHESTER CITY 25 Canterbury Road off Monroe Avenue @ Route 490 — 1st floor office/commercial space 4059 SF, built in desks and work stations, Kitchen, confer room, large reception area, eight individual offices, large work area, on- site parking, Gross lease rate of $2800 includes utilities. Call Mercedes Brien @ Nothnagle Commercial 330-4890 292-8500 PC69787

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Retirement Property DISCOVER DELAWARE’S BEAUTY low taxes, milder weather! Distinctive, gated community, amazing amenities- equestrian facility, Olympic pool. New Homes mid $40’s. Brochures available 1-866-629- 0770 or www. coolbranch.com. SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes

$45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean.  772581-0080, www.beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption ADOPT: We will provide a loving home, beautiful life for your precious newborn baby. Expenses paid. Devoted married couple, Walt/ Gina. Call for info: 1-800-315-6957. ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, hapiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)4061924; www.davidandregisadopt.com BI-RACIAL MALE SEEKING Birth parents or family Genesee Hospital 4/16/69. Contact markk1332@ gmail.com PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293.

Automotive AAAA AUTO RECYCLING of your cars, vans and trucks. Up to $500. Free towing. Any condition. Up to $5,000 for newer cars. www. cash4carsrochester.com 585-4822140 ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer.

Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585305-5865 CASH 4 CARS TRUCKS AND VANS. Up to $800 running or not, more for newer models. We’ll be there in 30 minutes. 585-482-9988 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

Events **GUN SHOW** - HAMBURG FAIRGROUNDS, NY** Reschduled from prior date. May 4th- 5th. Erie County Pistol Permit Department in attendance. For vendor info: (716)542-9929. www.nfcshows.com

For Sale BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $20 585-880-2903 DINING ROOM TABLE Antique 1929 Dark Wood. Need work! Asking $200 or best offer Call 585773-1255 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 55 CANTERBURY ROAD Two immaculate office suites for lease: 1,575 square feet consisting of 5 offices, large conference room, reception area. Ground floor with parking at the door. Fully handicap accessible. 671 square feet consisting of a reception area and large office. Ground floor with parking at the door. Move-in condition. Immediate availability. Call Doug Burkhardt, owner. Office 271-1720. Cell phone 820-3631. Or e-mail at DBurkhardt@FirstRealtyRochester.com and I will send you floor plans, photos, and descriptive information. 32 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

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stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827. GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. $12 bold, also Daisy Pinwheel $3 585-880-2903 585544-4155 HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-8002903 PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 PERSIAN RUG Hand-made Qashqai Tribal Rug. (Southern Iran) 6 1/2’x9’1” condition excellent Ivory, Salmon, Navy Blue circa 1950 $3500.00 Call for appointment 585-586-0617 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 TV RCA Big 35” w/ remote $35 585-225-5526 VCR - EMERSON , Records no remote (but you can buy one). Nice. 585-880-2903 $25 WALKER FOR HANDICAPPED use. Next to New condition. Red. $50 585-383-0405

Jam Section BLUES/ROCK BAND Needs bass player. Experienced musicians, we have all the pieces but you! Call Mike 424-4122 or 738-1151. CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. I SAY New Wave peaked in 197781. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@ aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585266-6337 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585458-9722 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist,

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Lost and Found CAT FOUND March 14th Cobbs Hill area. Black with some white. No Collar. Friendly. Distinctive features. Call 442-0617 to identify. LOST COMPOSITION BOOK REWARD FREE RENT TO RITE PERSON REWARD ANYWAY ron. east8888@gmail.com

Miscellaneous GRAND OPENING SALE! Used, Vintage and Handcrafted Accessories, Furniture, Gifts. Classic Home & Garden, 2854 Dewey Ave., Greece. ClassicHG.com. April 1314. 9 to 3.

REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/ DVR Upgrade to new callers. CALL 1-866-755-3285 (AAN CAN) SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

DRUG & ALCOHOL Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480577-1172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay/ Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN)

A Fabulous Foursquare for You

Sales Associate ReMax Plus 585.746.9875

Park Ave 23 Somerton St Modern Commercial building for lease 1400+ sq ft $1,500 per month 8 car parking, May divide

333 Inglewood Drive

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN. www. woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county” NEED VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices ... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Call Power Pill. 1-800-374-2619 (AAN CAN)

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

27 W Boulevard Pkwy, Charlotte:

WONDERFUL HOME WITH ALL THE BEAUTY & CHARM! GREAT BIG BEDROOMS! GREAT KITCHEN WITH APPLIANCES INCLUDED, GREAT CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION! MANY MAJOR UPGRADES. $99,900.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Mind Body Spirit

Jim Speedy

RochesterSells.com

HomeWork

Restored with love in the 19th Ward neighborhood, 333 Inglewood Drive offers both vintage charm and mechanical updates. This early 20th century American Foursquare home is located on a picturesque residential street – you’re greeted by stately trees and ample front yards as you pull up to the home. Mature plantings around the property itself offer a chance to stretch your gardening muscles and the backyard, with a two car garage, could easily accommodate a patio/lawn combo.

coming onto the enclosed porch. This porch would make a perfect four-season room with the addition of a space heater or wood stove.

Entering the house from the side door brings you into the kitchen, which has decorative tin work and original cupboards that offer plenty of storage. A handy coat closet passes all the way through the wall to the front foyer for a lot of storage options or the possibility for a cozy first floor powder room. A pass-through to the dining room offers a breakfast bar/seating area that can be used in either room. Hardwood floors begin in the dining room, which also features a large picture window that lets in the sunlight and provides a view of the backyard. If you’re a bird watcher this would be an excellent place for a feeder or two. Hardwood floors and unpainted, original woodwork continue throughout the first floor.

The attic and basement are both unfinished so they can function as storage or be converted into more living space. The basement does have plumbing and has in the past held a full bath so the possibility of a rec room/living area for a growing family is definitely there.

The living room holds the crown jewel of the house, a fireplace flanked by book cases in the original gumwood trim that adorns the entire first floor. The front foyer holds the other end of the pass-through closet for coats and boots. Guests who enter the home from the front door have shelter from the weather by

The second floor has three bedrooms, each with decent closet space. The bathroom is good sized and gives the new homeowner an opportunity for a double sink and other updates while still maintaining space with a large linen closet right in the room for convenient towel access.

333 Inglewood Drive is listed at $79,900 and offers 1200 square feet of living space. It is just minutes away from shopping and dining on Chili Avenue and Thurston Road. The 19th Ward neighborhood also offers superb housing stock, the active 19th Ward Community Association (www.19wca.org), a diverse population, and convenient access to downtown, the University of Rochester campus, and the picturesque Genesee Valley Park. For more information, visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R195807 or contact Robert Piazza-Palotto of RE/MAX Plus at 585-314-8383. by Roberta Ryan Roberta is a Landmark Society volunteer.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

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585-244-3329 ext. 23

34 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet • Maintenance • Pruning • Design

Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

Rent your apartment special third week is

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Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

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released! For a FREE CD, please call 1-800-385-8470 (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.thehomemailer. com (AAN CAN)

DEDICATED COMPANY DRIVERS Local & Regional Opportunities. $2,000 Sign On Bonus. Avg. weekly pay of $850-$1,000. Must have necessary authorization to travel into Canada 866-723-6470 www. NFITruckingJobs.com

POOL DIRECTOR and Swim Specialists needed at outstanding Finger Lakes overnight camp. June 23- August 22. Live-in position. www.campsenecalake.com. Contact acantor@jccrochester.org or call 585-461-2000 x263

DRIVER- HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com

RGIS PROVIEDS RGIS provides: • Regular part-time work (30 hours) • Starting pay 9.00 + incentive pay • Promotion opportunities • Paid Training • Paid Travel & Per Diem • Transportation provided • Overnights (3 consecutive nights) Required •Generally leave on Monday return on Thursday • Group health plan after 90 days • Preemployment Screening Required •Equal Opportunity Employer • No Experience Needed Call Mike Snead @ 585-427-2300

DRIVER- Two raises in first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately!

THE THINK AND GROW RICH of the 21st Century! Revolutionary breakthrough for success being

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@lifespan-roch.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER seeks volunteers to: teach American Sign Language, do clerical work, and organize a teen soccer league. Contact Claudia at 262-7044 or cgill@cfcrochester.org DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org

age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php

GIRLS ROCK ROCHESTER seeking musical and non-musical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester.com. Email girlsrockrochester@gmail. com for more info.

SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!!

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED tinyurl.com/rochester2013 for research study on organizational tolerance for heterosexism and workplace well-being in the metropolitan Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, New York areas. You do not need to identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual to participate. Survey takes approximately 15 minutes. You are eligible to be entered into a drawing to win a $10 gift card. For further information, contact Trevor Gates, College at Brockport, (585)204-7144, or email tgates@ brockport.edu. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-Time. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

Legal Ads [ CITATION BY PUBLICATION ] THE STATE OF TEXAS TO: JAMES EDWARD VIGIL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: “YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. YOU MAY EMPLOY AN ATTORNEY. IF YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER WITH THE CLERK WHO ISSUED THIS CITATION BY 10:00 A.M. ON THE MONDAY NEXT FOLLOWING THE EXPIRATION OF TWENTY DAYS AFTER YOU WERE SERVED THIS CITATION AND PETITION, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU.” GREETINGS: YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to appear and answer before the Honorable 340th District Court, San Angelo, Texas, at the Courthouse in Tom Green County, Texas, at or before 10:00 o’clock a.m. of the Monday next after the expiration of 20 days from the date of service of this citation, then and there to answer the ORIGINAL PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF CHILD filed in said Court September 10, 2012 against JAMES EDWARD VIGIL, Respondent and said suit being Cause Number C120618F on the docket of said court and entitled: In the Interest of XAVIER JAMES VIGIL The nature of which suit is a request to dissolve marriage by divorce and matter of conservatorship of minor child/children. The court has authority in this suit to enter any judgment or decree dissolving the marriage and providing for division of property for any matter in the interest of the child/ children including, but not limited to, the appointment of a conservator and order for child-support, all of which will be binding upon you.” Issued and given under my hand and seal of said Court at San Angelo, Texas on this the 20th day of March, 2013 Sheri Woodfin, District Clerk 340th District Court Tom Green County, Texas By:Natoschia Fry Deputy DISTRICT COURT OF TOM GREEN COUNTY, TEXAS [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of DUTCHMAN PROPERTIES, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on October 1, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 14001-0031. The purpose of the LLC is

to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of VAN LATHAM, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on September 7, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of ZUCCHINI PEOPLE GAMES, LLC, filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on February 19, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted by law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GVH - 3 LLC. GVH -3 filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/28/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: 267 Pearl Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Marciano Brothers LLC, Articles of Formation filed with the NYS Secretary of State (SSNYS) on 0827-2012. Office location Monroe County, SSNYS designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the company may be served. SSNYS shall mail a copy of any process to 435 Parma Center Road, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rochester Home Inspections & Engineering, PLLC a Professional Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 03/04/2013. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY

36 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1065 Wickerton Lane, Webster, NY 14580 Purpose: practice the profession of Engineering. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] R and S Group Consulting, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 26, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Bosworth Field, Mendon, New York 14506. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ACCOUNTABLE HEALTH PARTNERS, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Accountable Health Partners, LLC was filed with SSNY on January 31, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: Attn: Robert McCann, M.D., FACP, c/o Highland Hospital, 1000 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Flat Decor, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on March 6, 2013. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Flat Decor, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Flat Decor, LLC served upon him or her is 2 Old Brick Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Flat Decor, LLC is formed for the purpose of operation of an importing and exporting business, domestic retail and wholesale sales and any other activities that are lawful for a limited liability company in the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] AT&T Mobility proposes to collocate new antennas adjacent to existing antennas at a centerline height of 120 feet on the 150-foot smokestack of a building located at 4095

East Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 61130673MAT c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B St, Burlington, MA 01803, or via telephone at 781-273-2500. [ NOTICE ] AT&T Mobility, LLC proposes to modify an existing wireless telecommunications facility on a water tank at 2128-B Penfield Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. Three additional antennas will be mounted at a top height of +/-142 feet above ground level. Any interested party wishing to comment on the facility’s potential effects on historic properties may send comments to: Project 61130671-SLF c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B Street, Burlington, MA 01803 or via telephone at (717) 449-4085. [ NOTICE ] ATMOSTFIT LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Howard Charles Cragg, 515 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Davidandjill.net LLC Arts. of Org filed NYSS 1/22/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SS is designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SS shall mail a copy of process to 20 Buckingham St., #5, Rochester, NY 14607 which is also the principal business location. General purpose. [ NOTICE ] JC JONES PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/25/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. [ NOTICE ] MADOH MUSIC GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be

served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jeremiah Abiah, 126 W. 129 St., Ste. 3, NY, NY 10027. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Milachi Media, LLC, 33 East Market St., Corning, NY 14830, proposes to install a transmission system on a tower with a total height above ground of 90.2 meters at location 43? 09’ 23.22’’ N, 77? 36’ 30.00’’ W. The tower will be properly lighted with red steady lights or as specified by the Federal Aviation Administration. The proposed tower has FAA study number 2013-AEA942-OE. Comments regarding any significant environmental impact as defined in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Section 1.1307 shall be submitted to the Federal Communications Commission as an informal comment in the form of a written petition setting forth in detail the reasons justifying or circumstances necessitating environmental consideration in the decision-making process. The comments may only raise environmental concerns. [ NOTICE ] NAMCO DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/17/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 20135, Rochester, NY 14602-0135. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Dunleavy Irish Dance, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/12/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 101 Lincoln Pkwy, Suite D, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activity

filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC at 445 Peck Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Obsidian Group, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 11/14/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 15 Alger Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Scrapbook Creations Retreats, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 01/23/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, P.O. Box 1171, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of, Tricia Marsh Holistic Health Coach, LLC was filed with SSNY on 3/1/2013, county, Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 166 Monteroy Rd Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license (Serial Number pending) for beer has been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer at retail in a ball park for a golf cart under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 100 Craig Hill Dr., T/O Clarkson, Brockport, New York 14420 in Monroe County for consumption on a golf course.*CPM Golf, LLC DBA Deerfield Country Club [ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of Homewise MGMT.LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/13/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 3177 Latta Rd,Ste. 160, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful Purpose

Notice is hereby given that a license (Serial Number pending) for beer and wine has been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 100 Craig Hill Dr., T/O Clarkson, Brockport, New York 14420 in Monroe County for on premises consumption. *CPM Golf, LLC DBA Deerfield Country Club

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. Of M&M Gardens LLC, Art. of Org.

Notice is hereby given that a license (Serial

[ NOTICE ]

Number pending) for beer, liquor, and wine been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer, liquor, and wine at retail in a restaurant under the under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1290 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607 in Monroe County for on premises consumption. *Secession Company, LLC DBA The Revelry [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by S & H ENTERPRISES OF ROCHESTER INC dba RAJ MAHAL RESTAURANT,368 Jefferson Rd., Rochester NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Supreme Court, Monroe County on the 15th day of March 2013, bearing Index Number 13/2696 a copy of which may be examined at the office of the Monroe County Clerk, located at 39 West Main Street, Room 115, Rochester, New York 14614, grant me the right to assume the name of Veronica Christine Griffin-Pevc. My present address is 195 Penhurst St, Rochester, NY 14619 ; my date of birth is March 3, 1995; my place of birth is Rochester, NY ; my present name is Veronica Christine Kitchenman [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ICSH PROPERTIES, LLC.. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 20 Hinsdale St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aristo Management, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1142 Mount Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ASSURED EDGE SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts.

of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BCW CHEMICALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BURKWIT LAW FIRM, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: Charles F. Burkwit, 16 E. Main St., Ste. 450, Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CandyBearLand, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 3340 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CAPITAL WATER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/27/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated

Legal Ads as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of KREAG-WOOD EAST, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Todd Clicquennoi, 44 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of CRESCENT BEACH RESTAURANT AND HOTEL LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DAVID PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Faith Performances, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on February 15, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at P.O Box 64607, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JUNIOR IV ENTERPRISES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1881 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Operation of restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KAYJOR PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: BITACHON PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mason-Bauman Agency LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northern Attachments LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 741 Maple Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PEARTREE HEALTH STRATEGIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 29 Leland Rd., Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to

the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Strong Will Development, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 280 Marne St., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Qualification of Forward Development, LLC. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in North Carolina (NC) on 12/29/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the NC address of LLC: 128 S. Tryon St., Ste. 900, Charlotte, NC 28202. Arts. of Org. filed NC Secy. of State, 2 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Fish, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of VALLEYCREST CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 156 Valley Crest Road, Rochester NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Zitka Island, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Timothy Farrell, 854 Esjay Drive, Victor, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Force-520 Metro LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/20/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Michael B. Kaplan, 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal address. Address to be maintained in DE: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 South DuPont Hwy, Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St.,

[ NOTICE ] PATRIOT LAWN AND LANDSCAPE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 38 Summertime Trl., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] PAULA J. MARTIN CPA, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/8/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1344 University Ave., Ste. 235, Rochester , NY 14607. Purpose: To Practice the profession of Public Accountancy. [ NOTICE ] RENT FROM US, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/8/2012. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Marchioni & Associates, 2024 W. Henrietta Rd., Ste. 3G, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] SHIRE SENIOR LIVING LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/7/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 2515 Culver Road Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 57 Meadow Cove Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Direct4U Marketing & Telecom Solutions LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 2/20/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 42 Matthews Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is marketing services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CONSUMER SERVICES OF WESTERN NY LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CONSUMER SERVICES OF WESTERN NY LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Wood Team Limo, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March

8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2171 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/05/2005. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC, 1259 LAWRENCE RD., HILTON, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1744 MANITOU ROAD, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1744 Manitou Road, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/20/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 152 Snowy Owl Ridge, Rochester, NY 14612, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ]

GAMACA HOLDINGS, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on March 7, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 508 Pipeline Way, Webster, NY 14580. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1349 South Avenue Properties, LLC. (the Company). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on March 14, 2013. The office of the Company within the State of New York is in the County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of the State of New York is hereby designated as Agent of the Company for the purpose of service of Process. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him/her is PO Box 93031, Rochester, NY 14692. The character and purpose of the business of the Company shall be purchase, remodeling , sale or rental of residential units.

Advanced Custodial Equipment and Supply, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York 14610. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PRIVATE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is TGS KITCHENS, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed 2-22-2013 with the New York State Secretary of State, (SSNY) who is designated as Agent for Service of Process against the LLC. The SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 4391 Lake Avenue, Rochester, N.Y. 14612. Purpose - any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VISTA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Vista Property Management, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary

cont. on page 38

NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS APPEARING AS OWNERS OF CERTAIN UNCLAIMED PROPERTY HELD BY COMPANION LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY The persons whose names and last known addresses are set forth below appear from the records of the above named company to be entitled to abandoned property in amounts of fifty dollars or more: DOMINIQUE BOLLER LAURIE CLEVELAND KEITH FOXTON MICHELLE KOVACK ESTATE FOX LANDSCHOOT JOSEPH MUNIZ ROBERT PENDERGRASS TYQUAN RUTHER

151 NEWCOMB ST 556 BERRY RD 209 HUMPHREY RD 253 MATILDA ST - #1 170 HILLENDALE ST 2109 MANITOU ROAD 475 E BROAD ST 119 WOODBURY STREET

ROCHESTER, NY ROCHESTER, NY SCOTTSVILLE, NY ROCHESTER, NY ROCHESTER, NY SPENCERPORT, NY ROCHESTER, NY ROCHESTER, NY

A report of unclaimed property has been made to Thomas P. DiNapoli, the Comptroller of the State of New York, pursuant to Section 701 and/or Section 1316 of the Abandoned Property Law. A list of the names of the persons appearing from the records of the said insurance company to be entitled thereto is on file and open to the public inspection at the principal office of the corporation located at Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha NE 68175 where such abandoned property is payable.

[ NOTICE ] TROUTSNOBS GUIDE SERVICE AND OUTFITTERS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 3/4/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of

Such abandoned property will be paid on or before September 30th next to persons establishing to our satisfaction their right to receive the same. On or before the succeeding October 10th, such unclaimed funds still remaining unclaimed will be paid to Thomas P. DiNapoli, the Comptroller of the State of New York. Upon such payment this company shall no longer be liable for the property.

COMPANION LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37

Legal Ads > page 37 of State on 3/13/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 77339, Rochester, NY 14617, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICES ] Index No. 13/1704 Summons SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 And EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants TO DEFENDANT JAMES F. STEWART, JR.: You are hereby summoned and required to submit to plaintiff’s attorneys your answering papers on this motion within the time provided in the Notice of Motion annexed hereto. In case of your failure to submit answering papers, summary

judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Notice of Motion. The basis of the venue designated is the residence of defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York 14622. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 14614-1397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 Index No. 13/1704 NOTICE OF MOTION FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT IN LIEU OF COMPLAINT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR. EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that upon the Summons, Dated February 13, 2013, and the affidavit of Henry R.

Ippolito, Esq., sworn to on February 13, 2013, the plaintiff will move this Court at a Special Term thereof, the Hon. John J. Ark presiding at the Hall of Justice, 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, New York on May 22, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, for an Order pursuant to CPLR 3213 directing the entry of judgment for the plaintiff against James F. Stewart, Jr., making a judgment of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, Quincy, Illinois, entered on October 2, 2012, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., a judgment of the State of New York, and ordering judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. in the amount of Six Hundred Fifty-two Thousand One Hundred Thirty-three and 45/100 Dollars ($652,133.45) in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, with expenses and court costs in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, in the amount of Five Hundred Seventy-four and 40/100 Dollars ($574.40),

Adult Services OVER 100,000 WEEKLY WE EEKLY READERS

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38 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013

together with interest from October 2, 2012, and the costs and disbursement of this action. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all answering papers shall be served on the undersigned on or before the twentieth (20th) day after personal delivery of the Summons to you. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 14614-1397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Index No. 13/1704 AFFIDAVIT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v JAMES F. STEWART, JR. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants STATE OF NEW YORK ss.: COUNTY OF MONROE HENRY R. IPPOLITO, being duly sword, deposes and says: 1. I am an attorney licensed by the State of New York, and I am a member of Chamberlain D’Amanda Oppenheimer & Greenfield LLP, attorneys for the plaintiff. 2. I make this affidavit in support of a motion for summary judgment in lieu of complaint based upon my personal knowledge, the plaintiff’s records, and the records of the original forum. 3. This is an action to convert a judgment entered in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012 in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, the Honorable Scott E. Walden presiding, into a New York State judgment. 4, Attached as Exhibit A is a court authenticated and exemplified copy of the Illinois default judgment. It bears the stamp “Filed October 2, 2012.” The inside of the cover bears a certification from Lori R. Geschwandner, the Clerk of the Circuit Court, that she has compared the default judgment attached as Exhibit A with the original judgment on file and that it is a true copy. 5. The cover backing also contains the certification by the Honorable Scott H. Walden, a Judge of the Court, who granted the default judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012, that Lori R. Geschwandner’s signature in her certificate

is true and genuine, and that on the date of her certificate, February 4, 2013, she was the duly elected Clerk of the Court, and that full faith and credit are due to all her official acts. 6. Finally, the cover backing contains a certificate by Lori R. Geschwandner that Scott H. Walden’s signature is true and genuine, and that at the time of his signing, February 4, 2013, he was a duly qualified and acting Judge of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois in and for Adams County, and that full faith and credit are due his acts. 7. As a judgment of a sister state, it is entitled by the United States Constitution to full faith and credit by New York State. Since it was obtained by default in appearance by defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., however, the summary enforcement filing procedure of CPLR Article 54 cannot be used. Accordingly, the procedures of CPLR Section 3213, motion for Summary Judgment in Lieu of Complaint, are being used. The default judgment is unsatisfied in whole, the amount of $652,133.45 plus interest from October 2, 2012 remains unpaid, and enforcement of the judgment has not been stayed. 8. The judgment debtor is James F. Stewart, Jr., and his last known address is 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York14622. WHEREFORE, deponent requests that summary judgment be granted: 1. Making the State of Illinois judgment into a New York State judgment entitled to all enforcement procedures as a judgment of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. 2. Allowing the entry of judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., in the amount of $652,133.45, plus Illinois expenses and court costs in the amount of $574.40, plus interest from October 2, 2012, together with the New York costs and disbursements of this action. Henry R. Ippolito Sworn to before me this 13th day of February, 2013. Notary Public K. WADE EATON Notary Public, State of New York Monroe County Commission Expires July 22, 2015 Exhibit A DEFAULT JUDGMENT No. 12CH-31 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS, ADAMS COUNTY IN PROBATE Filed Oct 02 2012 Randy E. Frese Clerk Circuit Court 8th Judicial

Circuit ILLINOIS, ADAMS CO.LINDA J. STEWART, Plaintiff,vs. JAMES F. STEWART Jr. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC, Defendants, Now, on this 2nd day of October, this cause comes on for prove up hearing. Plaintiff appears by her attorney, RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, and Defendant, James F. Stewart Jr. having been duly served with notice and failing to appear after having been three times called in open court to plead, answer or otherwise appear. NOW, THEREFORE, upon motion of Plaintiff, it is ORDERED, as follows:1. Judgment is entered for Plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart and against James F. Stewart Jr. in the amount of six hundred and fifty two thousand, one hundred thirty three dollars and forty five cents ($652,133.45), and expenses and court costs in the amount of five hundred seventy four dollars and forty cents ($574.40). 2. Defendant, James F. Stewart, Jr. is hereby ordered to render a full and complete accounting of all his actions as trustee of the Linda J. Stewart irrevocable Trust (“Trust”), including an accounting as to all moneys and properties received and disbursed by him, all income collected by him in the administration of the Trust, and all charges for compensation made by him against the trust property. Defendant is to deliver said accounting to RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, attorney for Plaintiff. 3. James F. Stewart Jr. is hereby ordered to deliver any remaining Trust funds, passbooks, checking accounts, certificates of deposit, and any other Trust property in his possession to Roxanne J. McCarron, successor trustee. 4. A permanent injunction is hereby entered against Defendant James F. Stewart Jr. Defendant James F. Stewart Jr., his agents and assigns are hereby permanently enjoined and ordered not to withdraw, encumber, transfer, or in any manner to deal with the assets of the Trust. 5.The Trust is hereby reformed to remove James F. Stewart, Jr. and any issue of Defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. as beneficiaries. 6. The injunction against Eagle One Investments, LLC is hereby lifted as to successor trustee Roxanne Jewel McCarron for all purposes delineated in the Trust. 7. Assessment of attorney’s fees reserved. ENTER: October 2, 2012

Thomas J. Ortbal Judge Pc: RaNae A. Dunham Inghram Roxanne McCarron James F. Stewart, Jr. [ PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 997 Beahan Road LLC; its Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on March 1, 2013; the County within New York in which its office is to be located is Monroe; the Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served; the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is 369 Bostwick Road, Phelps, NY 14532; the purpose of its business is to conduct any lawful business under law. [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 9899/10 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006 WFHE4 3476 Stateview Boulevard Ft. Mill, SC 29715 Plaintiff vs. ROBERT BROWN AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF VALERIE N. DUNBAR A/K/A VALERIE NICOLE DUNBAR, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF VALERIE N. DUNBAR A/K/A VALERIE NICOLE DUNBAR, CITY COURT OF ROCHESTER, GREEENWOOD TRUST COMPANY, MICHAEL F. ELIO, MONROE SEALERS, INC., MRC RECEIVABLE CORP., NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, PINNACLE CREDIT SERVICES LLC, ROBERT J. SCHILIRO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING THROUGH THE IRS JOHN DOE (Said name being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, and any parties, corporations or entities, if any having or claiming an interest or lien upon the mortgaged premises.) Defendants This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this

summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon Joanne M. Winslow, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 7th day of March, 2013 at Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the Following property: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, being Lot No. 5 of the WebsterWalrath Tract as shown by a map thereof made by W.R. Storey, Surveyor and filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office April 29, 1914, in Liber 34 of Maps at page 21, excepting however, a strip of land 7.49 feet in width off the south of said lot which was heretofore conveyed to Maude Hembree and Ella M. Skeels by Warranty Deed dated September 16, 1915, and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 970 of Deeds, at page 276. Said property hereby conveyed is situate on the south side of Raeburn Avenue, is forty (40) feet wide both front and rear and about one hundred (100) feet deep. These premises are also known as 31 Raeburn Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619 Richard S. Mullen, Esq Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street Rochester, New York 14614

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

The Continuing Crisis

— Professor Peter Froehlich, who teaches computer science classes at the highly competitive Johns Hopkins University, contractually grades “on a curve,” automatically marking the highest grade an A, with other grades trailing based on their proximity to the class’s best. One clever student tried to organize the entire class for December’s final exam, to persuade everyone to do no work at all -thus rendering the “highest” grade a zero, meaning an A for everyone. (Of course, if a single student broke ranks, everyone except that student would receive an absolute zero.) Fortunately for the students, according to InsideHigherEd.com, the class held together, and a shocked professor Froehlich nonetheless honored his contract, giving everyone an A (but subsequently closing the loophole). —Thieves broke into the home of Earlie Johnson in Muskegon, Mich., in February and made off with several flat-screen TVs, but what really irked him was that they also stole his entire DVD pornography collection, consisting, he said, of the films of every African-American porn star since the 1970s. (“I’m not no scum bag guy, pervert, or nothing like that,” he told WZZM-TV. “I just thought it was cool to own my own porn collection. It keeps my relationship (with his fiance) fresh and tight.”) As soon as the news of Johnson’s misfortune spread, several adult video companies donated DVDs to help restore the collection. —Sex Is Dangerous: (1) Officers from the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority reported in March that a lion had attacked a couple having sex in the bush, killing the woman and sending the man dashing down a road wearing nothing but

his condom (which reduced his chances of receiving help from motorists). (2) Near Daytona Beach, Fla., in February, Ms. Asia Walker, 30, driving her boyfriend around, could not resist his amorous advances and soon lost control of the car. It left the road and plowed completely through a vacant house. She was briefly hospitalized, but her boyfriend was not hurt.

Fine Points of the Law

Even though the British government refused to grant trademark protection to the Italian maker of “Jesus Jeans” because it would be “morally offensive to the public,” the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office had no such qualms and approved the application in 2007. Since then, according to a February Wall Street Journal story, the company has prevented a dozen other companies from using such clothing names as “Jesus First,” “Sweet Jesus,” “Jesus Couture” and, most recently, “Jesus Surfed.”

People Different From Us

A persevering Brooklyn, N.Y., high school teacher, Ronald Grassel, finally relented and submitted himself to a psychiatric evaluation that had originally been ordered in 1997 after he angrily and overenthusiastically dumped teachers’ union literature in his principal’s office. Grassel had refused the exam and been benched, and for 14 years was neither fired nor paid while he filed a series of unsuccessful legal actions to overturn the decision. According to a March New York Post report, when he finally submitted to an exam in 2011, he was declared fit (his world-class obstinacy apparently not counting against him) and in September 2012 was back on the job.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 32 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): A passionate encounter is in the stars, but before you decide to get up close and personal with someone, make sure you know your partner well. Aggressive behavior and jealousy appear to be present and can lead to a relationship that is questionable. Avoid unpredictable, overindulgent partners. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll attract plenty of interest. Before you enter into a relationship, make sure the person you are considering is no longer attached to someone else. Secret affairs are prevalent and will eventually lead to heartache. Keep everything out

in the open and platonic until you are certain. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Forward motion will help you forget the past and move on from heartbreak. Put greater emphasis on finding someone who shares your interests and values. It’s difficult to make a relationship work when you don’t share the same standards regarding what a relationship should entail. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Spare your heart from the aggravation that will transpire if you let someone take advantage of your kind and loving personality. Think twice before you do too much for someone eager to take without giving back. Equality will

be necessary if you are to find true love and happiness. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Put your best foot forward and get involved in challenges, events and activities that will bring you in contact with admirers. Love at first sight is in the stars, and once the love bug bites, there will be no turning back. Follow your heart and enjoy the moment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You may be eager to find love, but you are likely to overlook some of the fundamental requirements you have when it comes to a partnership. Don’t jump into a relationship for the wrong reasons. It’s just as lonely being

in a poor relationship as it is being single. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Opposites do attract, and that’s exactly what’s in store for you. Don’t look for a mirror image of you when the one who will hold your interest has a broad spectrum of the things you aren’t likely to experience on your own. Compromise mixed with adventure equals love. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You can talk your way into anyone’s heart with your passionate expression and unique and captivating knowledge and experience. Share your thoughts and desires, and before you know it, someone just as creative and

imaginative as you will want to share your world. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll have trouble making up your mind when it comes to love. Before you get into trouble, make sure you don’t make suggestions or promises that will compromise any of the potential relationships that interest you. Honesty will buy you the time required to pick your partner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may know what you want when it comes to a personal partner, but don’t count on the person you are interested in being as sure as you. An unexpected change of heart is likely to leave you feeling baffled,

confused and uncertain how or if you should respond. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Getting back to basics will lead to a solid love relationship with someone with whom you share history, interests and common ground. Altering your current living arrangements will seal the deal. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ll be attracted to someone who can offer you comfort, security and a practical lifestyle -- though once you have what you think you want, you are likely to feel a lack of freedom to explore the unique and unusual adventures that you desire. Be careful what you wish for.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39

40 CITY APRIL 10-16, 2013


April 10-17, 2013 - City Newspaper