Issuu on Google+

“Lightning Dance” by Gregg Analla

The Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute For Social Equity Meharry Medical College NIMHD/Health Disparity Research Center of Excellence University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome (RCHDEE) Marriott Hotel at Vanderbilt University 2555 West End Avenue Nashville, TN 37203 MAHRTISE May 13-24, 2013e For Social Equity

2013

1

Front Cover Art by Gregg Analla Gregory has roots in many different parts of New Mexico. His father was from Laguna Pueblo, west of Albuquerque, and his mother is from Isleta Pueblo, just south of the city, but Gregory grew up in Gallup, close to the Navajo Nation. His grandparents were particularly important in his life and instilled in him a love for his Native American culture and traditions. As a boy, Gregory enjoyed participating in traditional ceremonies, such as the Eagle Dance and Buffalo Dance. Today he lives in Albuquerque, where he is a painter, sculptor and musician, working with Native American images and sounds. He is also a Pueblo Teaching Artist at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.

2 MAHRTISE 2013

Scholar, Researcher, Visionary, and Humanitarian Moses Alfred Haynes, MD, MPH President/Dean Emeritus Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School Founding Director, Drew Meharry Morehouse Consortium Cancer Center Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science Los Angeles, California Dr. Haynes’ professional and personal life demonstrates a quest and a commitment for excellence, supporting diversity and transformative knowledge and skills for all people. As a scholar, Dr. Haynes has served on numerous national governmental committees including, the President’s Committee on Health Education, the President’s Cancer Council, various key committees at the National Cancer Institute, the Fogarty International Center, and led the committee for the groundbreaking study on the Burden of Cancer for the Institute of Medicine entitled: The Unequal Burden of Cancer: An Assessment of NIH Research and Programs for Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved. He assisted the Office of Minority Health / HRSA in assessing its grant funding role with the four, historically black, medical schools in a pivotal study on a shared mission between HRSA and the schools entitled: Assessment of Historically Black Medical Schools’ Participation in HRSA-Supported Health Professions Training Programs. Dr. Haynes’ research and his mentoring of scores of health service researchers who have led the nation’s efforts in research on health disparities in cancer, infant mortality, injury, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases and have contributed to the advancement and improvement of health care for underrepresented populations. He has worked tirelessly over the decades improving research opportunities for health care professionals as a mentor. As the President/Dean of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, his impact as a scholar, researcher, mentor, administrator, and humanitarian is of national and international recognition and pride. This annual Institute honors the legacy of Dr. M. Alfred Haynes and symbolizes the work that continues to be done in shaping and molding the next generations of scholars and researchers in health disparity research. Dr. Haynes is retired and currently lives in California with his wife Hazel, daughter, and grandchildren. MAHRTISE 2013

3

The Message from the Former Center Director Paul D. Juarez, PhD Former Founding Center Director NIMHD/Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine UT Health Science Center Memphis, Tennessee

This research training institute is named in honor of Dr. M. Alfred Haynes, past President/Dean of Charles R. Drew Post Graduate Medical School in Los Angeles, CA. Throughout his career, Dr. Haynes has led national efforts to bring attention to health disparities and for the need to increase the numbers of underrepresented minority professionals in the health sciences and health professions. He has been ahead of his time in acknowledging the importance of community medicine, providing culturally competent care, and engaging community in health services research. Dr. Haynes has been a pioneer, a visionary, and on a very personal level, a mentor and inspiration to me and countless others for over thirty years. While he is unable to be with us here today to kick off the third, annual Institute in his honor, he is with us in spirit. This is an exciting institute, established under the leadership of Dr. Patricia Matthews Juarez, past Director of the Research Training Core, to promote trans-disciplinary research and training in a new research paradigm, that we call the public health exposome, among early and mid-level investigators who share our passion and recognition for the need to address health equity as a cornerstone of a national strategy for eliminating health disparities. On behalf of the National Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Medical College, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity and the Exposome, and with the support of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), I welcome you to the 2013 M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity. We thank you for accepting this challenge and engaging with us in our quest to eliminate health disparities through the promotion of health and social equity.

4

MAHRTISE 2013

Former Director of the Research Training Core Patricia Matthews-Juarez, PhD Former Director, Research Training Core NIMHD/Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine UT Health Science Center Memphis, Tennessee We are delighted that you have chosen to join us for the 2013 Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity, hosted by the NIMHD/Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry and the Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome at the UTHSC. The goals of this Institute are to: 1) prepare health services researchers to address health disparities from a systems’ perspective, and 2) diversify the national health care research workforce. The Institute is structured to train and mentor junior faculty members working in the area of health disparities and to prepare them to engage communities in all phases of the research enterprise. We seek to create a cadre of junior faculty member who are prepared to address the complexity of health disparities and will serve as the academic faculty pipeline for health disparities investigators trained in the public health exposome paradigm. As emerging health disparities scientists, it is our expectation that you will add to the number of minority and faculty members, who are well prepared to examine, explore, and influence the national health disparities research agenda . This Institute brings us together to share information, interest, knowledge, and skills as social, behavioral, clinical and basic scientists whose tasks are to learn to work together as we explore and examine questions of the relationships between the natural, built, social, and policy environments shape, advance, and challenge our understanding of the nature and interplay between personal health, public health, environmental health, the human genome and health disparities. As scholars in this Institute, we are hopeful that when you leave, you will be more confident in collaborating with investigators from other disciplines and convinced of the importance of engaging communities in your work. During the two weeks that you are with us, you will work to expand your knowledge and understanding of health disparities, equity and the exposome and have access to senior scientists who are willing to assist you in achieving your own goals and objectives. With that in mind, we have put together a course of study what we believe will make this both an enjoyable and informative experience for everyone. Thank you for choosing to participate in the third annual M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity. MAHRTISE 2013

5

The Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity Goal: The overall goal of the Institute is to expand your knowledge and understanding of health disparities, equity and the exposome while improving and enhancing your research skills and comfort in working collaboratively. Course Information: The Institute is designed to expose and enhance the knowledge and skills of scholars about the application of the public health exposome paradigm to health disparities research, encourage the use and analysis of large secondary data sets, and provide an introduction to the use of multi-level, spatial, computational, and community-engaged research methods and techniques. The Institute pairs scholars with research mentors and community partners to provide different insights into how and why different communities experience health disparities. Additionally, the scholars will receive an overview of health disparity research methods, models, applications and analytics. This overview will focus on research theory, methodology, and applications and include an introduction to public participatory GIS and multi-level, spatial, and computational analysis. Sessions will include a review of national and state secondary data sets and comparative effectiveness studies used for improving health outcomes for communities. The Institute will provide scholars with opportunities to work directly with their mentors and community partners on topics such as, 1) Research Design; 2) Analyses of Large Databases; 3) Survey Methodology, 4) Assessment of Health Status; 5) Measurement of Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Disparities; and 6) strategies for engaging the community in research and dissemination of results. The Institute will  Expand the scholars’ knowledge and understanding of health disparities research models and analytics;  Improve and enhance the scholars’ skills in engaging the community in health services research;  Provide opportunities for scholars, community partners, and research mentors to collaborate on health services research that seeks to eliminate health disparities;  Develop and nurture trans-disciplinary teams;  Provide networking opportunities for scholars’ and  Introduce scholars to innovative approaches and analytics needed to address the intersect between personal health, the human genome, and environmental health. Target Audience: Underrepresented minority and other junior faculty from an array of disciplines who are interested in developing a research career in health services, health disparity, and translational research, including medicine, dentistry, public health, nursing, health policy, social work, psychology, sociology, health care management and health care administration Participating Institutions of 2013 Scholars and Planning Committee Belmont University Governors State University Louisiana State University Meharry Medical College Meharry Youth Wellness Center Northwestern University

Tennessee State University University of Tennessee at Knoxville University of Tennessee Health Science Center University of New Mexico

Participating Community Agencies Centro Savila, Albuquerque, New Mexico E. Chicago Community Health Center Louisiana State University Health Center Martin Luther King Health Center Matthew Walker Comprehensive Community Health Center Metro Nashville Davidson County Public Health Department Pacific Institute for Research & Evaluation

6

MAHRTISE 2013

SCHOLARS Ramona Bhatia, MD Fellow FSM Feinberg School of Medicine Department of Medicine/Division of Infectious Diseases Northwestern University Chicago, Illinois Ramona Bhatia, MD, MS, is a third year infectious diseases fellow. She completed her undergraduate degree in 2002 at Northwestern University, where she graduated magna cum laude in three years with a BA in biologic sciences and psychology. She continued at Northwestern, where she obtained a MS in Physiology (2003) and MD (2007). Dr. Bhatia finished her internship and residency in internal medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX in 2010. Her research interests focus on health disparities in HIV-infected persons in the Chicago community and in other resource-limited settings. She has received funding from the Centers for AIDS Research and Global Health Initiative as a young investigator and hopes to pursue secondary analysis of large datasets and community-based participatory research on HIV disparities with her mentor, Dr. Adam Murphy. Project: Investigating prostate cancer treatment disparities in HIV-infected men using large datasets. Mentor Flora Ukoli, MBBS, MPH, DrPh Professor, Department of Surgery Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Flora holds a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery from the University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. She received her MPH in Epidemiology from the Graduate School of Public Health University of Pittsburgh, PA, in 1998. And in 1980 received her DPH. Public Health. University of Glasgow, Scotland/United Kingdom. She has been funded by the Department of Defense for prostate cancer research and is currently a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation scholar at Meharry. Community Partner Adam B. Murphy, MD, MBA Assistant Professor, Department of Urology Northwestern University Jesse Brown VA Medical Center Chicago, Illinois Dr. Murphy is an inaugural 2011 M. Alfred Haynes Research Institute for Social Equity scholar with strong community ties and public health roots. He is currently completing a research fellowship in Dr. Rick Kittles' lab on genetics and health disparities sponsored by the Department of Defense Physician Research Training Program. He has been funded by the NIH Office of AIDS Research (CFAR grant) to evaluate the role of HIV status on prostate cancer treatment disparities. In February, 2012, he received a 5 year VA Career Development Award to further his work in the role of vitamin D in aggressive prostate cancer. MAHRTISE 2013

7

SCHOLARS Colin Cannonier, PhD Assistant Professor, Economics College of Business Administration Belmont University Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Cannonier holds a PhD in Economics from Louisiana State University. He also has master’s degrees in Economics from Louisiana State University and Williams College and an undergraduate degree in Business, Economics and Social Statistics from the University of West Indies (Jamaica). His professional experience includes work as a Country Economist and Statistician at the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank undertaking missions and providing technical assistance to national statistical offices in the member countries. His research focuses on issues in Health Economics, Law and Economics and Demography. He has published articles in Economics of Education Review and the Review of Economics of the Household. Project : The role of public policy and education in affecting fertility, women’s empower-

ment, and women’s preferences on health outcomes. Mentor Patricia Matthews-Juarez, PhD Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine University of Tennessee Health Science Center l Memphis, Tennessee Dr. Matthews-Juarez is an established medical administrator and educator with specific experience in primary care education, cultural competency, cancer control, and prevention. She publishes and presents in the areas of cultural competency and health disparities. She is the primary author of Cultural Competence in Cancer Care: A Health Care Professional’s Passport. She serves as chair of national grant review panels since 1985 and has received numerous honors. She is a past Vice Chair of the Department of Family Medicine and a past Administrator for the Drew Meharry Morehouse Consortium Cancer Center and its National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. Dr. Matthews- Juarez received her doctorate in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University in social policy. Community Partner Kara Mitchell, PhD Assistant Professor College of Business Administration Belmont University Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Mitchell earned her Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where she taught in the Center for Business and Economic Research. Her research focuses on public finance economics with a particular interest in the economics of publicly-funded programs for the poor and vulnerable communities. 8

MAHRTISE 2013

SCHOLARS Emmanuel Clottey, MPH, DrPh Public Health Department of Kinesiology and Health Science Louisiana State University Health Science Center Shreveport, Louisiana Dr. Clottey has performed as an educator in a variety of settings in Ghana, Kenya, and the US. He has a background in Biochemistry, Theology, Community work, and Public Health and has served as a Pastor, Hospital Chaplain, Researcher, and Educator. His research interests include grandparents raising their grandchildren, and the role of Community Based Organizations (CBOs) and Faith Based Organizations (FBOs) in Public Health. He is committed to collaborating with CBOs and FBOs to address the health challenges of underserved populations. Project: Addressing the health and wellbeing needs of grandparents raising their grandchildren in the Shreveport-Bossier City Metro Area, Louisiana. Mentor Jill Rush-Kolodzey, MD, DrPH Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine Louisiana State University Health Science Center Shreveport, Louisiana Dr. Rush-Kolodzey is a public health Academician concerned with promoting health equity in the Shreveport/Bossier area and across the state of Louisiana. She has worked extensively with academic institutions and community organizations to address health challenges across Louisiana. She is currently the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program Director and Master of Public Health (MPH) Program Director at the School of Allied Health Professions. She is a member the National Coastal Research Group, the American Academy of Family Practice, and the American Public Health Association. Community Partner Janet Mentesane, MSW Executive Director Martin Luther King Health Center Shreveport, Louisiana Ms. Mentesane has over 30 years of non-profit experience. She manages all daily operations of the Martin Luther King Health Center and is responsible for all grant administration. Ms. Mentesane is a member of the National Free & Charitable Clinic Association. The Martin Luther King Health Center is a non-profit primary health care clinic and licensed pharmacy for uninsured patients. Ms. Mentesane has a passion to eliminate health disparities through quality health care service delivery to underserved populations.

MAHRTISE 2013

9

SCHOLARS Ron Hagan, PhDc Lecturer Department of Mathematics University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Ron Hagan completed his M.S. in Mathematics at the University of Tennessee in 2000. Since 2002, he has served as a lecturer in the mathematics department at UT. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Computer Science under the direction of Dr. Michael Langston. Working with Dr. Langston's graph theory team, his current research focuses on the use of efficient high throughput algorithms for mining large datasets using graph theoretic approaches. Project: The Use of Graph Algorithms in the Analysis of Health Disparity Data Mentor Michael Langston, PhD Professor Engineering & Computer Science Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Dr. Langston is a faculty member in the University’s Genome Science and Technology Program. He is best known for his long-standing work on combinatorial algorithms, complexity theory, and design paradigms for sequential and parallel computation. His present research efforts are primarily focused on the development, synthesis, analysis and high performance implementation of graph algorithms for the analysis of high throughput biological data. He serves as a collaborating scientist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To complement his basic research program in the foundations of algorithmic analysis, he leads a team of in the development of portals through which the community at large may access the team’s computational tools, and in the development of mapping, scheduling and load-balancing mechanisms with which their algorithms can be realized on Altix, Cray, IBM and other supercomputer platforms. Community Partner Donna Antoine-LaVigne, PhD Associate Director, Community Partnership/Outreach Office Jackson Heart Study Jackson, Mississippi Dr. Antoine-LaVigne received her PhD from Kennedy-Western University, Thousands Oaks CA. She currently serves as the Associate Director, Community Outreach and Partnership Office for the Jackson Heart Study. She was instrumental in laying the foundation for the Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach. Strategically targeted outreach and community engagement activities lead to the successful recruitment of 5301participants and retention of 80% of the cohort. Additionally, she has consulted with the Mississippi Health Department, taught in the Jackson State University School of Health Sciences, and created community partnerships and coalitions to address health disparities in the African American community. 10

MAHRTISE 2013

SCHOLARS Tara Hook, MD Instructor Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Fellow Department of Pediatrics Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Hook is a native of North, South Carolina. She a graduate of Meharry Medical College. Dr. Hook is currently a faculty fellow in the Primary Care Training and Enhancement (PCTE) Fellowship, Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Program. Her academic interest is in family and community medicine and will complete residency training at Meharry Medical College in Family Medicine. Dr. Hook is committed to eliminating health disparities and empowering vulnerable populations with the tools to take an active role in their health care. Project: What is the relationship between obesity and depression in adolescents: which comes first or are they co-related? Mentor Paul D. Juarez, PhD Former Founding Center Director NIMHD/Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine UT Health Science Center Memphis, Tennessee Dr. Juarez co-directs the new Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity and the Exposome in the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis. He was recognized for his contributions to the field of public health through his work in youth violence prevention, health disparities, and environmental health. He received his doctorate in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University. Dr. Juarez has published widely on topics of injury, environmental health, and use of secondary data sets for community intervention. Community Partner Leah Alexander, PhD, MPH Department of Public Health Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Alexander is an Assistant Professor in the School of Graduate Studies & Research. She is the co-director of Project SAVE, an HIV/AIDS community-based project for Region IV. She holds a PhD in health education/health promotion and a master's degree in health behavior both from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. She is a 2011 inaugural fellow of the M. Alfred

MAHRTISE 2013

11

SCHOLARS Stephanie Holt, MD Instructor Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Fellow Department of Pediatrics Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Holt received her doctorate of medicine from the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency at the University of Texas at Houston Medical School and she is board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. Currently, Dr. Holt is a faculty fellow in the Primary Care Training and Enhancement (PCTE) Fellowship, Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Program. She will be continuing her training in the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine fellowship at Emory University in the summer of 2013. Her interests are improving infant and child health. Project: Determining the prevalence of breastfeeding intention and initiation among adolescent mothers in a Tennessee WIC population. Mentor Paul D. Juarez, PhD Former Founding Center Director NIMHD/Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine UT Health Science Center Memphis, Tennessee Dr. Juarez co-directs the new Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity and the Exposome in the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis. He was recognized for his contributions to the field of public health through his work in youth violence prevention, health disparities, and environmental health. He received his doctorate in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University. Dr. Juarez has published widely on topics of injury, environmental health, and use of secondary data sets for community intervention. Community Partner Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, MD, MPH Director, Bureau of Family, Youth, and Infant Health Metro Nashville Davidson County Public Health Department Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Wyche-Etheridge oversees programs that provide support for at-risk pregnant teens, promote community health screenings, and educational and maternal health programming. She serves as the chair of the board of directors for CityMatCH. She also serves on the Board of Directors for the National Healthy Start Association. She completed her pediatric internship and residency at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. in 1996, and the Masters in Public Health in 2000 from the Harvard School of Public Health as a Commonwealth Fund Harvard University Fellowship in minority health policy. 12

MAHRTISE 2013

SCHOLARS Regina Offodile, MD Assistant Professor Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Fellow Department of Professional and Medical Education Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Regina Stokes Offodile, MD, CHSE completed her medical education at Charles Drew University King/Charles Drew Medical center In Los Angeles, CA. She completed a breast surgery/breast oncology fellowship at Stanford University. She is in the Division of Clinical Skills and Competencies. She currently instructs the first and second year medical students at Meharry Medical College on clinical skills, physician patient interaction and clinical correlations of breast disease. She is a faculty fellow in the Primary Care Training and Enhancement (PCTE) Fellowship, Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Program. My research interests lie in the area of educational assessment, simulation and the use of standardized patients to teach cultural competency. Project: The Use of Standardized Patients to Teach Medical Students Cultural Competence in Adolescent Medicine and Adolescent LGBT Populations. Mentor Xylina Bean, MD Chair, Department of Pediatrics W. K. Kellogg Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Bean is a board certified pediatrician and neonatologist. She is a past chief of Neonatology and Director of High Risk Children’s Medical Programs at King/Drew Medical Center. She was also an Associate Professor at Drew and Clinical Professor at UCLA. She is the Founder and CEO of SHIELDS for Families, a non-profit organization. Dr. Bean also co-founded the Wilmington Community Clinic, a FQHC clinic. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine and completed her residency and fellowship at Martin Luther King, Jr. General Hospital in Los Angeles, California. Community Partner Michelle Williams, MD Medical Director Matthew Walker Comprehensive Health Center Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Williams holds a faculty position at East Tennessee State University, Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt Medical School. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics; a member of Cumberland Pediatric Foundation; the Tennessee Quality Improvement Coalition; the American Cancer Society Physician Council and the program committee of Tennessee Primary Care Association. She was appointed to the Metropolitan Nashville Hospital Authority, Board of Director in 2009. She is a general member of two state advisory committees, Bureau of TennCare and the Tennessee Breast & Cervical Cancer Screening Program. MAHRTISE 2013

13

SCHOLARS Zo Ramamonjiarivelo, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Health Administration Governors State University University Park, Illinois Dr. Ramamonjiarivelo received her Ph.D. in Administration, Health Services from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her interest is in health disparities specifically, the effect of trust in health care institutions and providers on medication adherence and hypertension control among Southern African men. Her interests include health disparities in access to preventive care and in quality of care for racial/ethnic minorities. Project: "Disparities in Access to Health Services in a Community of South Chicago" Mentor Robert Weech-Maldonado, PhD Professor and L.R. Jordan Endowed Chair Department of Health Services Administration University of Alabama Birmingham, Alabama Dr. Weech-Maldonado is Director of the Analysis Core for the Deep South Resource Center on Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) and Co-Leader of the Research Program for the UAB Minority Health & Health Disparities Research Center (MHRC). He is a national expert in health disparities, cultural competency tools for healthcare organizations, racial and ethnic differences in patient experiences with care, and long -term care. He was the PI of the CAHPS Cultural Competence Item Set, a project funded by AHRQ and the Commonwealth Fund to develop and test patient-centered measures of cultural competency. He also developed and tested the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool for Hospitals (CCATH), an instrument that assesses hospital’s adherence to the cultural and linguistic appropriate services (CLAS) standards. His recent work focuses on examining the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Community Partner Jenise Ervin, RN, MSN Director of Public Health Park Forest Health Department Park Forest, Illinois Ms. Ervin has worked in variety of health settings including pediatrics and maternal child health, in hemodialysis with adults, with hospice and in the area of public health. Her passion is to improve the health outcomes of new born babies with the “Healthy Mom’s, Healthy Kids” program with the Chicago Department of Public Health. She is the current Director of the Park Forest Health Department. She is a professional member of The Illinois Nurses Association, the American Nurses Association, the Illinois Home Care and Hospice Association and an alumnus of Sigma Theta Tau. She is also a former Albert Schweitzer Fellow. 14

MAHRTISE 2013

SCHOLARS Kee J.E. Straits, PhD Research Assistant Professor Department of Psychology University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico Dr. Straits received her doctoral degree in Psychology from Utah State University. She completed her internship in Clinical Child Psychology at the UNM School of Medicine Children’s Psychiatric Center, and a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in research and evaluation at the UNM Department of Psychiatry-Center for Rural and Community Behavioral Health. Her work focuses on increasing the cultural competence and effectiveness of mental health interventions and systems that serve youth, and increasing the number of competent Native and Latino health professionals committed to serving their communities. Project: Mental health needs, barriers, and strengths of immigrant Latino families and their children impacted by deportation. Mentor Steven P. Verney, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Psychology University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico Dr. Verney is an Alaska Native (Tsimshian) ,Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Students at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Department of Psychology. He is currently a Senior Fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at UNM for Hispanic and American Indians and is a past fellow in the American Indian Alaska Native Program at the University of Colorado. He is also the Director for the Research Core of an NIMHD-funded New Mexico Center for the Advancement for Research and Engagement on Health Disparities. He research focuses on mental health disparities, especially the role of culture in cognition and assessment and in cognitive deficits associated with aging. Community Partner William G. Wagner, PhD, LISW Founder and Executive Director Centro Savila Outpatient Mental Health Program Albuquerque, New Mexico Dr. Wagner is a bi-lingual social worker and psychotherapist, He works with immigrant and refugee populations that have experienced trauma. He has published on issues surrounding trauma and recovery, access to behavioral health care services and the impact of Medicaid Managed Care on New Mexico’s public health safety net. As a cultural anthropologist, he has studied the intersection of culture, language, identity, economic status and access to healthcare. .

MAHRTISE 2013

15

SCHOLARS Derek L. West, MD Post Doctoral Research Fellow Fellowship in Nanotechnology Northwestern University Chicago, Illinois Dr. West is a graduate of Loyola-Stritch School of Medicine. And completed a transitional internship at Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois in 1999 and residency training in diagnostic radiology at Northwestern McGaw Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois in 2003. He completed an interventional radiology fellowship at Northwestern McGaw Medical Center in 2004. He is board certified by the American Board of Radiology with a certificate of added qualifications in interventional radiology. Dr. West is finishing a research fellowship in nanotechnology at Northwestern University with an emphasis on pancreatic cancer treatments. Project: Ending environmental health disparities and communicating environmental health risks. Mentor: Chau-Kuang Chen, EdD Associate Professor, School of Graduate Studies and Research Director, Institutional Research Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Chen is an expert in generalized linear models, survival analyses, multivariate time series analyses, and artificial intelligence modeling approaches. He was one of the first statisticians to incorporate a variety of sophisticated techniques--ordered logit/clog log, proportional hazard, transfer function of autoregressive integrated moving average, grey forecasting model, artificial neural network, support vector machine, and gene expression programming--into higher education processes and outcomes. Dr. Chen earned his MS degree in Counseling and Guidance at the University of Kansas, a Certificate in Data Processing at the Electronic Computer Programming Institute in Kansas City, and both MS degree in Statistics and EdD degree in Higher Education from Oklahoma State University. Community Partner Darryl Hood, PhD Professor Department of Neurotoxicology Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Hood is a nationally recognized expert in the area of Neurotoxicology, with an intense focus on the effects of exposure to environmental pollutants on the developing brain and the resulting consequences on early-life cognitive processes. The specific environmental pollutants of interest in his studies are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These environmental pollutants are primarily released as emissions from combustion processes and from industrial polluters throughout the United States and disproportionately affect minority populations in urban areas. His laboratory has been investigating, characterizing and publishing the health effects resulting from in utero exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for well over a decade.. 16

MAHRTISE 2013

SCHOLARS Yolonda Winfrey, MD Instructor Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Fellow Department of Pediatrics Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Winfrey is a graduate of Meharry Medical College’s School of Medicine. Dr. Winfrey is currently completing a Primary Care Training and Enhancement Adolescent Medicine Faculty Development Program at Meharry Medical College. She has an interest in decreasing High risk behavior among teenagers in addition to improving the health of minority and underrepresented populations with a focus on Adolescents. She will continue her training as a Family Medicine Resident at the University of South Alabama Medical Center in Mobile, AL. Project: Self-Esteem, Educational goals and Aspiration as Determinants of Tobacco Use in 12th Graders. Mentor Frieda Hopkins Outlaw, PhD Director, Meharry Adolescent Health and Wellness Center Associate Professor Department of Pediatrics Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Outlaw received her PhD from The Catholic University of America. She completed postdoctoral study at the School of Nursing University of Pennsylvania where she examined the meaning of prayer for persons with cancer. She iss an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and serves as the Director of the Meharry Adolescent Health and Wellness Center, a HRSA and Baptist Healing Trust funded Center. She was recently appointed by Mayor Karl Dean as a member of the Nashville Healthy Lifestyles Committee. Community Partner Millard D. Collins, M.D., FAAFP Associate Dean, Office of Student & Academic Affairs Associate Professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine Meharry Medical College Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Collins is board-certified in Family Medicine. His clinical expertise includes inpatient medicine with maternity and newborn care, outpatient services and care of the elderly. He currently serves as Associate Dean of Student & Academic Affairs. Mentoring and inspiring students to maximize their potential as both healthcare providers and community leaders is a primary focus. Additionally, his roles as both clinician and administrator provide many opportunities to address the issues of healthcare disparities. MAHRTISE 2013

17

Monday, May 13, 2013

(SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT)

LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 7:30AM - 8:00AM Continental Breakfast 8:00AM - 8:10AM Introduction

Patricia Matthews-Juarez, PhD

8:10AM - 9:10AM Overview of the Public Health Exposome

Paul Juarez, PhD 9:10AM - 10:10AM The Mrs. Hazel Haynes Symposium on Women’s Health

Health Disparities: Role in Women’s Health PonJola Coney, MD 10:10AM - 10:30AM Break 10:30AM - 12:00PM Conceptualizing Race and Diagnosing Disparities

Thomas LaVeist, PhD 12:00PM Shuttle to Meharry Medical College 12:15PM - 1:00PM Boxed Lunch 1:00PM - 2:30PM Theory to Praxis: Social Movement and Measures to Improve Health

through CBPR Nina Wallerstein, DrPh Lorenda Belone,PhD, MPH Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH Location: Faculty Affairs & Development Conference Room-Meharry 2:30PM - 2:45PM Shuttle to Marriott Hotel 2:45PM - 4:15PM Contextualizing the Racialized-Gendered Social Determinants of

Health: Operationalizing “Race” & Ethnicity Nancy López, PhD

4:30PM – 6:00PM Reception: Sponsored by New Connections (RWJF)

Introduction of the Scholars Patricia Matthews- Juarez, PhD

18 MAHRTISE 2013

Dinner on Your Own

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

(BUILT ENVIRONMENT)

LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 8:00AM—8:30AM Continental Breakfast 8:30AM - 9:30AM The Social Determinants of Health Disparities

Paula Braveman, MD, MPH 9:30AM - 10:30AM Discussion: Take Away Lessons 10:30AM - 12:00PM Community Mapping: Tools for Community Action

Wansoo Im, PhD 12:00PM - 1:30PM Lunch

1:30PM - 3:30PM The Pamela C. Williams’ Lecture

Determinants of Life: Environmental Health Science, Policy and Practice Through the Lens of Health Disparities Maureen Lichtveld, MD, MPH 3:30PM - 3:45PM Break

3:45PM - 4:30PM Discussion: Take Away Lessons

Dinner on Your Own

MAHRTISE 2013

19

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

(NATURAL ENVIRONMENT)

LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 8:00AM - 8:45AM Full Breakfast/Morning Feedback 8:45AM - 10:00AM Using NASA Remotely Sensed data for Public Health Applications

Mohammad Al-Hamdan, PhD

10:00AM -10:30AM Biostatistical Issues in the Designs and Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

Vincent Agboto, PhD, MS

10:30AM - 12:00PM Evaluating U.S. Heat Waves Using Remote Sensing and Meteorological

Reanalysis Data Bill Crosson, PhD 12:00PM – 1:30PM Lunch

1:30PM – 3:00PM Environmental Justice, Community Advocacy, and Training

Darryl Hood, PhD Robert C. Wingfield Jr., PhD Kimberly Jackson, BS, MS Sue M. Estes, MS

3:00PM - 3:15PM Break

3:15PM - 4:30PM Pericytes and Cytomegalovirus Neuropathology: Implications for CNS

Disease Models Donald J. Alcendor, PhD, MS

4:30PM—5:00PM

Discussion: Take Away Lessons

Dinner on your own

20 MAHRTISE 2013

Thursday, May 16, 2013

(POLICY ENVIRONMENT)

LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 8:00AM—8:30AM 8:30AM - 10:00AM

Continental Breakfast Thinking about Alternative Approaches to Disparities Research Robert Levine, MD

10:00AM - 10:15AM

Break

10:15AM—12:00PM

Federal Perspective: Research in Health Disparities Stephanie Bailey, MD, MS Local Health Perspective on Health Disparity Research & Health Equity Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, MD, MPH

12:00PM – 1:30PM

Lunch

1:30PM - 3:45PM

Reducing and Eliminating Health Disparities in Tennessee Bruce Behringer, MPH Monique Anthony, MPH, CHES Derrick L. Boswell Vincent Pinkney, MBA

3:45PM - 4:00PM

Break

4:00PM – 5:00PM

Presentations by 2012 Scholars of Academic Achievement Janella Melius, PhD, LCSW Mohamed Kanu, PhD, MPH Keon Gilbert, DrPh, MA, MPA

5:00PM – 5:30PM

5:30PM - 6:30PM

Discussion: Take Away Lessons

Dinner

MAHRTISE 2013

21

Friday, May 17, 2013

(EPIGENETICS / EXPOSURES)

LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 8:00AM—8:30AM

Continental Breakfast

8:30AM - 9:45AM

The Southern Community Cohort Study: a population laboratory for disparities research William Blot, PhD

9:45AM - 10:30AM

Take Away Lessons

10:30AM-10:45AM

Break

10:45AM - 12:00PM

12:00PM

1:30PM-6:00PM

Quantative Assessment of Sensory Function Towards Rescuing Exposure-induced Phenotypes in Minority Infant Populations Darryl Hood, PhD Lunch

Individual Project Development Dinner on your own

22 MAHRTISE 2013

Monday, May 20, 2013

8:00AM—8:45AM 8:45AM

******AT MEHARRY MEDICAL COLLEGE******

Continental Breakfast Shuttle to Meharry Campus

9:00AM -10:00AM

Research to Understand Health Disparities and Move Toward Health Equity George Rust, MD, MPH

10:00AM-11:00AM

Environmental Health: An Introduction to Computational Analysis Michael Langston, PhD

11:00AM - 12:00PM

12:00PM - 1:30PM

Multi-Level Analysis with Exposome Database Use Barbara Kilbourne, PhD Lunch

1:30PM - 2:30PM

Use of GIS as a Tool for displaying Health Disparity Data: A Demonstration Katy Kilbourne, MS and Tyler Skelton, MS

2:30PM - 2:45PM

Break

2:45PM - 4:00PM

How to Use Spatial Analysis in Health Disparities Research Paul Robinson, PhD

4:00PM - 4:30PM

Discussion: Take Away Lessons .

4:45PM

Shuttle Back To Marriott Hotel Dinner on your own

MAHRTISE 2013

23

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 8:30AM - 9:00 AM Continental Breakfast 9:00AM - 2:00PM Individual Project Development - Meharry Medical College 2:00PM - 3:30PM Video Conference Lecture: The Faculty Career

Phillip Clay, PhD Professor, City Planning Massachusetts Institute of Technology 3:30PM - 4:30PM Individual Project Development

5:00PM - 6:30PM Dinner

24 MAHRTISE 2013

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 7:30AM—8:00AM

Continental Breakfast

8:00AM - 5:00PM

Work with Research Mentors, Community Partners and Technical Support Faculty

Lunch and Dinner on Own

MAHRTISE 2013

25

Thursday, May 23, 2013 LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 7:30AM—8:00AM

Full Breakfast

8:00AM - 10:00AM

Work on Own - Individual Project Development

10:00AM-12:00PM

Health Disparities Research Project Presentations by Scholars *Each Scholar Has 20 Minutes for Presentation 10:00AM 10:25AM 10:50AM 11:15AM 11:40AM

12:00PM—1:30PM

Scholar #1 Emmanuel Clottey, MPH, DrPh Scholar #2 Regina Offodile, MD Scholar #3 Ramona Bhatia, MD Scholar #4 Colin Cannonier, PhD Scholar #5 Zo Ramamonjiarivelo, PhD

LUNCHEON: Scholars, Mentors and Community Partners Speaker: Rueben C. Warren, DDS Director, National Center for Bioethics in Research and Healthcare Professor, Bioethics Tuskegee University

1:30PM - 4:00PM

Health Disparities Research Project Presentations by Scholars *Each Scholar Has 20 Minutes for Their Presentation 1:30PM 1:55PM 2:20PM 2:45PM 3:10PM 3:35PM

5:00PM—6:30PM

Scholar #6 Kee Straits, PhD Scholar #7 Derek West, MD Scholar #8 Yolonda Winfrey, MD Scholar #9 Stephanie Holt, MD Scholar #10 Tara Hook, MD Scholar #11 Ron Hagan, PhDc

Reception with Mentors and Community Partners

Dinner on Own

26 MAHRTISE 2013

Friday, May 24, 2013 LOCATION: Marriott Hotel - Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 8:00AM - 8:30AM Continental Breakfast

8:30AM - 10:00AM

Thoughts, Reflections, and Lessons Learned Scholars

10:00AM-11:30AM Break (Picture Taking)

11:30AM - 1:00PM The Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity

Awards Luncheon

Introductions: Mrs. Hazel L. Haynes Wife of M. Alfred Haynes, MD Family Members of Dr. Haynes Introduction of Speaker: Tennille L. Marley PhD, MPH Doctoral Fellow Alumni, RWJF Center for Health Policy University of New Mexico Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Arizona State University Nation Building: Exercising the Sovereign Muscle of Navajo Nation Health and Wellness Speaker: Gayle Dine’Chacon, MD Surgeon General Navaho Nation Associate Professor Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine Director, Center for Native American Health (CNAH) Associate Vice President for Native American Health University of New Mexico Health Science Center Presentations: The M. Alfred Haynes’ Social Equity Award Achievement Awards to Scholars Special Presentation: Pat Matthews-Juarez, PhD Paul D. Juarez, PhD Adjourn MAHRTISE 2013

27

Selected and Recommended Readings American Dietetic Association. (2011). Practice Paper of the American Dietetic Association: Addressing Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 446-456. Booske, B. C., and et. al., (2010). Grading and Reporting Health and Health Disparities, Preventing Chronic Disease, 7(1). Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publication. DeMeta, D. I., & Califf, R. M. (2011). A Historical Perspective on Clinical Trials Innovation and Leadership Where Have the Academics Gone? Journal of the American Medical Association, 713-714. Gibbons, M. C. (2011). Use of Health Information Technology among Racial and Ethnic Underserved Communities. Prospective Health Information Management. Grembowski, D., Bekemeier, B., Conrad, D., & Kreuter, W. (2010). Are Local Health Department Expenditures Related to Racial Disparities in Mortality? Social and Science Medicine , 2057-2065. Haynes, M.A. and Smedley, B.D. (1999). The Unequal Burden of Cancer: An Assessment of NIH Research and Programs for Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved,; Committee on Cancer Research among Minorities and the Medically Underserved, Institute of Medicine; Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Kramer, M. R., Cooper, H. L., Drews-Botsch, C. D., Waller, L. A., & Hogue, C. R. (2010). Do Measures Matter? Comparing Surface-Density-Derived and Census-Tract-Derived Measures of Racial Residential Segregation. International Journal of Health Geographics. 9:29. Melloni, C., Berger, J. S., Wang, T. Y., Gunes, F., Stebbins, A., Pieper, K. S., et al. (2010). Representation of Women in Randomized Clinical Trials of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. Journal of the American Heart Association , 135-142. Primm, A. B., Vasquez, M. J., Mays, R. A., Sammons-Posey, D., McKnight-Eily, L. R., Presley-Cantrell, L. R., et al. (2010). The Role of Public Health in Addressing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mental Health and Mental Illness. Preventing Chronic Disease, 1-7. Warren, R., Tarver, W. A. (2010). Foundation for Public Health Ethics at Tuskegee University in the 2 1st Century. Journal of Healthcare for the Poor and Underserved, 21(3):46-56. Webb, B. C., Simpson, S. L., & Hairston, K. G. (2011). From Politics to Parity: Using a Health Disparities Index to Guide Legislative Efforts for Health Equity. American Journal of Public Health , 554-560. Weinick, R. M., Chien, A. T., Rosenthal, M. B., Bristol, S. J., & Salamon, J. (2010). Hospital Executives' Perspectives on Pay-for-Performance and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Care. Medical Care Research and Review , 576-589. White III, A.A. and Chanoff, C. (2010). Seeing Patients Unconscious Bias in Health Care, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Engelman, K., Daley, C., Gajewski, B., Ndikum-Moffor, F., Faseru, B., Braiuca, S., et al. (2010). An Assessment of American Indian Women's Mammography Experiences. BMC Womens Health. Frey, L. R., Botan, C. H., Friedman, P. G., and Kreps, G. L. (1992) Interpreting Communication Research A Case Study Approach, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

28

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected and Recommended Readings Behar-Horenstein, L. S., Childs, G. S., & Graff, R. A. (2010). Observation and Assessment of Faculty Development Learning Outcomes. Journal of Dental Education, 1245-1254. Cora-Bramble, D., Zhang, K., & Castillo-Page, L. (2010). Minority Faculty Members' Resilience and Academic Productivity: Are They Related? Academic Medicine, 1492-1498. Dressler, W., Oths, K., Gravlee, C. (2005) Race and Ethnicity in Public Health Research: Models to Explain Health Disparities. Annual Review of Anthropology, 34:231-252. Drummond-Young, M., Brown, B., Noesgaard, C., Lunyk-Child, O., Maich, N. M., Mines, C., et al. (2010). A Comprehensive Faculty Development Model For Nursing Education. Journal of Professional Nursing, 152-161. Elzubeir, M. (2011). Faculty-led Faculty Development: Evaluation and Reflections on a Distributed Educational Leadership Model. Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation, 90-96. Gusic, M. E., Milner, R. J., Tisdell, E. J., Taylor, E. W., Quillen, D. A., & Thorndyke, L. E. (2010). The Essential Value of Projects in Faculty Development. Academic Medicine, 1484-1491. Hebel, J. Richard, McCarter, Robert J. (2006). Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Sudbury, Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. Lieff, S. J. (2010). Faculty Development: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow: Guide Supplement 33.2 – Viewpoint. Medical Teacher, 429-431. McLeod, P. J., & Steinert, Y. (2009). Peer Coaching as an Approach to Faculty Development. Medical Teacher, 1043-1044. Politzer, R., Yoon, J., Shi, L., Hughes, R., Regan, J., Gaston, M. (2001) Inequality in America: The Contribution of Health Centers in Reducing and Eliminating Disparities in Access to Care. Medical Care Research and Review, 58(2):234-248. Price, E. G., Gozu, A., Kern, D. E., Powe, N. R., Wand, G. S., Golden, S., et al. (2005). The Role of Cultural Diversity Climate in Recruitment, Promotion, and Retention of Faculty in Academic Medicine. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 565-571. Robins, L., Ambrozy, D., Pinsky, L. (2006). Promoting Academic Excellence through Leadership Development at the University of Washington: The Teaching Scholars Program. Academic Medicine, 81(11), 979-983. Smedley, B. D., Stith, A. Y., and Nelson, A. R., (Eds) (2003). Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare: Committee on Understanding and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Institute of Medicine; Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Thomas, P. A., Diener-West, M., Canto, M. I., Martin, D. R., Post, W. S., & Streiff, M. B. (2004). Results of an Academic Promotion and Career Path Survey of Faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Academic Medicine, 258-264. Yager, J., Waitzkin, H., Parker, T., & Duran, B. (2007). Educating, Training, and Mentoring Minority Faculty and Other Trainees in Mental Health Services Research. Academic Psychiatry, 146-151. Rust, G., Taylor, V., Herbert-Carter, J., Smith, Q., Earles, K., Kondwani, K. (2006). The Morehouse Faculty Development Program: Evolving Methods and 10-year Outcomes. Family Medicine, 38(1), 43-49.

MAHRTISE 2013

29

Selected and Recommended Readings Berger, J. T. (2008). The Influence of Physicians’ Demographic Characteristics and Their Patients’ Demographic Characteristics on Physician Practice: Implications for Education and Research. Academic Medicine , 100-105. Blustein, J. (2008) Who is Accountable for Racial Equity in Health Care? Journal of the American Medical Association, 299(7):814-816. Chasen-Taber, L., Fortner, R., Hastings, V., & Markenson, G. (2009). Strategies for Recruiting Hispanic Women into a Prospective Cohort Study of Modifiable Risk Factors for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. BMC Preganancy Childbirth . Cohen, M. H. (2009). Undocumented Women: Pushed from Poverty and Conflict, Pulled Into Unjust Disparity. Journal of Public Health Policy, 423-426. Engelman, K., Cupertino, A., Daley, C., Long, T., Cully, A., Mayo, M., et al. (2011). Engaging Diverse Underserved Communities to Bridge the Mammography Divide. BMC Public Health. Etowa, J., Bernard, W., Oyinsan, B., & Clow, B. (2007). Participatory action research (PAR): an approach for improving black women's health in rural and remote communties. Journal of Transcultural Nursing , 349-357. Glass, N., & Sharps, P. (2008). Collaborative Research to Reduce Disparities for Abused Women and Their Children. Journal of Obstetric Gynecology and Neonatal Nursing , 478-479. Gourlay, M., Lewis, C., Preisser, J., Mitchell, C., & Sloane, P. (2010). Perceptions of Informed Decision Making About Cancer Screening in a Diverse Primary Care Population. Family Medicine , 421-427. Jabson, J. M., Donatelle, R. J., & Bowen, D. (2011). Breast cancer survivorship: the role of perceived discrimination and sexual orientation. Journal of Cancer Survivorship , 92-101. Lockwood, J., McCaffrey, D. F., Setodji, C. M., & Elliott, M. N. (2010). Smoothing Across Time in Repeated Cross-Sectional Data. Statistics in Medicine, 584-594. Love, C., David, R. J., Rankin, K. M., & Collins, J. J. (2010). Exploring Weathering: Effects of Lifelong Economic Environment and Maternal Age on Low Birth Weight, Small for Gestational Age, and Preterm Birth in AfricanAmerican and White Women. American Journal of Epidemiology, 127-134. Matthews-Juarez, P. & Weinberg, D.A. (2006). Cultural Competence in Cancer Care: A Health Care Professional's Passport. Houston, TX: Baylor College of Medicine. Pearson, T. L. (2010). Cardiovascular Risk in Minority and Underserved Women Cardiovascular Risk in Minority and Underserved Women. American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 210-216. Peckham, E., & Wyn, R. (2009). Health Disparities Among California’s Nearly Four Million Low-Income Nonelderly Adult Women. Los Angeles: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Polek, C., & Hardie, T. (2010). Lesbian women and knowledge about human papillomavirus. Oncology Nurse Forum , 191-197. Satcher, D., Pamies, R.J., and Woelfl, N.N. (Eds.). (2006). Multicultural Medicine and Health Disparities. New York: McGraw-Hill. Sims, C. M. (2010). Ethnic Notions and Healthy Paranoia’s: Understanding of the Context of Experience and Interpretations of Healthcare Encounters Among Older Black Women. Ethnicity and Health, 495-514.

30

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected and Recommended Readings Aschengrau, A., Weinberg, J. M., Janulewicz, P. A. and et al., (2012). Occurrence of mental illness following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) - contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study. Environmental Health, 11:2. Beatty, A. L., Haight, T. J., and Redberg, R. F., (2011). Associations between respiratory illnesses and secondhand smoke exposure in flight attendants: A cross- sectional analysis of the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute Survey. Environmental Health, 10:81. Cheng, J. J., Wallace – Schuster, C. J., Watt, S., and et al., (2012). An ecological quantification of the relationships between water, sanitation and infant, child, and maternal mortality. Environmental Health, 11:4 Farooq, U., Joshi, M., Nookala, V., and et al., (2010). Self- reported exposure to pesticides in residential settings and risk of breast cancer: a case- control study. Environmental Health, 9:30. Ferdinands, J. M., and et al., (2008). Breath acidification in adolescent runners exposed to atmospheric pollution: A prospective, repeated measures observational study. Environmental Health, 7:10. Few, R., Lake, I., Hunter, P. R., and et al., (2009). Seasonal hazards and health risks in lower – income countries: field testing a multi- disciplinary approach. Environmental Health, 8:s16 Frosch – Morello, R., Jesdale, B. M., Sadd, J. L, and Pastor, M., (2010). Ambient air pollution exposure and fullterm birth weight in California. Environmental Health, 9:44. Garruto, R. M., Reiber, C., Alfonso, M. P., and et al., (2008) Risk behavior in a rural community with a known point – source exposure to chronic wasting disease. Environmental Health, 7:31. Grandjean, P., Eriksen, M. L., Ellegaard, O., and Wallin, J. A., (2011). The Matthew effect in environmental science publication: A bibliometric analysis of chemical substance in journal articles. Environmental Health, 10:96. Grinsven, H., JM van, Ward, M. H., Benjamin, N., and Kok, T. M., (2006). Does the evidence about health risks associated with nitrate ingestion warrant an increase of the nitrate standard for drinking water? Environmental Health, 5:26. Hahn, S., Schneider, K., and et al. (2010). Consumer exposure to biocides- identification of relevant sources and evaluation of possible health effects. Environmental Health, 9:7. Holdstock, D. (2008) Environmental Health: Threats and their Interactions. Environmental Health Insights, 2: 117122. Levy, J. I., Buonocore, J. J., and Stackelberg, K. V. (2010). Evaluation of the public health impacts of traffic congestion: a health risk assessment. Environmental Health, 9:65. Manassaram, D. M., Backer, L. C., Messing, R., and et al. (2010). Nitrates in drinking water and methemoglobin levels in pregnancy: a longitudinal study. Environmental Health, 9:60. Merlo, D. F., Vahakangas, K., and Knudsen, L., (2007). Scientific integrity: critical issues in environmental health research. Environmental Health, 7:59. Myatt, T. A., Kaufman, M. H., Allen, J. G, and et al. (2010). Modeling the airborne survival of influenza virus in a residential setting: the impacts of home humidification. Environmental Health, 9:55.

MAHRTISE 2013

31

Selected and Recommended Readings Resnik, D. B. (2008). Environmental Health Research Involving Human Subjects: Ethical Issues. Environmental Health Insights, 2: 27-34. Soderqvist, F., and et al., (2011). Childhood brain tumor risk and its association with wireless phones: a commentary. Environmental Health, 10:106. Sugiyama, T. (2008). Environments for Active Lifestyles: Sustainable Environments May Enhance Human Health. Environmental Health Insights, 2:93-96. Ustun- Pruss, A., Vickers, C., Haefliger, P., and Bertollini, R. (2011). Knowns and unknowns on burden of disease due to chemicals: a systematic review. Environmental Health, 10:9. Whitworth, K. W., and et al., (2011).Kriged and modeled ambient air levels of benzene in an urban environment: an exposure assessment study. Environmental Health, 10:21. Zeka, A., Melly, S. J., and Schwartz, J. (2008). The effects of socioeconomic status and indices of physical environments on reduced birth weights and preterm births in Eastern Massachusetts. Environmental Health, 7:60. Kessel, F., Rosenfield, P. (2008). Toward Transdisciplinary Research Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S225-S234. Lurie, N., & Dubowitz, T. (2007). Health Disparities and Access to Health. Journal of the American Medical Association , 1118-1121. Nash, J. (2008). Transdisciplinary Training: Key Components and Prerequisites for Success. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S133-S139. Pisu, M., Wang, D., & Martin, M. Y. (2010). Presence of Medical Schools May Contribute to Reducing Breast Cancer Mortality and Disparities. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and underserved , 961-976. Ruddy, G., Rhee, K. (2005). Transdisciplinary Teams in Primary Care for the Underserved: A Literature Review. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 16(2), 248-256. Rust, G., Cooper, L. A. (2007) How Can Practice-based Research Contribute to the Elimination of Health Disparities? Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 20: 105-114. Starfield, B., & Shi, L. (2004). The Medical Home, Access to Care, and Insurance: A Review of Evidence. Pediatrics , 1493-1498. Woolf, S. H., Johnson, R. E., Fryer, G. E., Jr, Rust, G,, Satcher, D. (2008) The Health Impact of Resolving Racial Disparities: An Analysis of US Mortality Data. American Journal of Public Health, 98: S26-28. Braveman, J. (2010) Health Economics, Grayslake, IL: Pharmaceutical Press. Bodenheimer, T.S., and Grumbach, K. (2010) Understanding Health Policy A Clinical Approach, San Francisco, CA: McGraw-Hill. Community Research for Change e-Workbook, First Nations Centre Des Premieres Nations, Downloaded February 24, 2011. Davis, R., Cohen, L. (2005) A Community Resilience Approach to Reducing Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Health. American Journal of Public Health, 95(12): 2168-2173.

32

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected and Recommended Readings Elder, L. & Paul, R., (2004). The Miniature Guide to the Human Mind, Tomales, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Elder, L., (2001). The Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking: Concepts & Tools, Tomales, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Gasser, U. & Palfrey, J., (2010) Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives, New York, NY: Basic Books. Mallon, W.T. & Vernon, D.J., (2004) The Handbook of Academic Medicine: How Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals Work, Washington, DC: American Association of American Medical Colleges Paul, R. & Elder, L., (2007). The Thinker’s Guide for Students on How to Study and Learn a Discipline, Tomales, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Paul, R. (2006). The Thinker’s Guide to Fallacies: The Art of Mental Trickery, Tomales, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Paul, R., (2002). A Miniature Guide for Those Who Teach On How to Improve Student Learning, Tomales, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Paul, R. & Willsen, J. (1995). Critical Thinking: How to Prepare Students for a Rapidly Changing World, Tomales, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Smith, D.E.P., Knudsvig, G.M., & Walter, T.L., (1998). Critical Thinking: Building the Basics, Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publisher Company Brian Dunning (Producer). (2008). Here Be Dragons: An Introduction to Critical Thinking [DVD]. Available from http://www.amazon.com/Here-Be-Dragons-Introduction-Critical/dp/B001CB153C Critical Thinking: What Is It and Why It Counts www.insightassessment.com/pdf_files/What&Why2010.pdf Strategies for Success: Critical Thinking www.alamo.edu/sac/history/keller/accditg/ssct.htm The Critical Thinking Community www.criticalthinking.org What Is Critical Thinking? www.criticalreading.com/critical_thinking.htm Braveman, P. (2006). Health Disparities and Health Equity: Concepts and Measurement. Annual Review of Public Health, 27, 167-194 Braveman, P., Gruskin, S. (2003). Poverty, Equity, Human Rights and Health. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 81(7) Kjellstrom, T., Mercado, S., Sami, M., Havemann, K., Iwao, S. (2007). Achieving Health Equity in Urban Settings. Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 84(1) Sen, A. (2002) Why Health Equity? Journal of Health Economics, 11:659-666.

MAHRTISE 2013

33

Selected and Recommended Readings Abes, E., Jones, S. (2002). Factors That Motivate and Deter Faculty Use of Service-Learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 9(1). Bickel, J., Brown, A. (2005). Generation X: Implications for Faculty Recruitment and Development in Academic Health Centers. Academic Medicine, 80(3), 205-210. Bland, C., Schmitz, C. (1986). Characteristics of the Successful Researcher and Implications for Faculty Development. Journal of Medical Education, 61, 22-31. Bringle, R., Hatcher, J., Games, R. (1997). Engaging and Supporting Faculty in Service Learning. Journal of Public Service and Outreach, 2(1), 43-51. Brutkiewicz, R.R. (2010). Research Faculty Development: An Historical Perspective and Ideas for A Successful Future. Advances in Health Sciences Education. Giles, D., Eyler, J. (1998). A Service Learning Research Agenda for the Next Five Years. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 73, 65-72. Hendricson, W., Anderson, E., Andrieu, S., Chadwick, G., Cole, J., George, M., Glickman, G., Glover, J., Goldberg, J., Haden, N., Kalkwarf, K., Meyerowitz, C., Neumann, L., Pyle, M., Tedesco, L., Valachovic, R., Weaver, R., Winder, R., Young, S. (2007). Does Faculty Development Enhance Teaching Effectiveness? Journal of Dental Education, 71 (12), 1513-1533. Houston, T., Clark, J., Levine, R., Ferenchick, G., Bowen, J., Branch, W., Boulware, D., Alguire, P., Esham, R., Clayton, C., Kern, D. (2004). Outcomes of a National Faculty Development Program in Teaching Skills. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 19, 1220-1227. Howard, J. (1998). Academic Service Learning: A Counternormative Pedagogy. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 73, 21-29. Hitchcock, M., Stritter, F., Bland, C. (1993). Faculty Development in the Health Professions: Conclusions and Recommendations. Medical Teacher, 14(4), 295-309. Randolph, S., (2006). Program Assessment for the HBCU/Hispanic Health Services Research Grant Programs. Baltimore, MD.: Center for Medicare &Medicaid Services. Selwa, L. (2003). Lessons in Mentoring. Experimental Neurology, 184, S42-S47. Stouthamer-Loeber, M., (1992). The Nuts and Bolts of Implementing Large-Scale Longitudinal Studies. Violence Victims, 63-78. Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda, (2005). An Interactive and Contextual Model of Community-University Collaborations for Research and Action. Health Education &Behavior, 84-101. Vogt, W. P., (2005). Dictionary of Statistics and Methodolgy A Nontechnical Guide for the Social Sciences, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Zlotkowski, E. (1998). A Service Learning Approach to Faculty Development. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 73, 81-89.

34

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected and Recommended Readings Berk, R., Berg, J., Mortimer, R., Walton-Moss, B., Yeo, T. (2005). Measuring the Effectiveness of Faculty Mentoring Relationships. Academic Medicine, 80(1), 66-71. Blixen, C., Papp, K., Hull, A., Rudnick, R., Bramstedt, K. (2007). Developing a Mentorship Program for Clinical Researchers. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 27(2), 86-93. Chew, L., Watanabe, J., Buchwald, D., Lessler, D. (2003). Junior Faculty’s Perspectives on Mentoring. Academic Medicine, 78, 652. Grigsby, R., Hefner, D., Souba, W., Kirch, D. (2004). The Future-Oriented Department Chair. Academic Medicine, 79(6), 571-577. Hawkins, J., Fontenot, H. (2010) Mentorship: the Heart and Soul of Health Care Leadership. Journal of Healthcare Leadership, 2, 31–34. Jackson, V., Palepu, A., Sxalacha, L., Caswell, C., Carr, P., Inue, T. (2003). Having the Right Chemistry: A Qualitative Study of Mentoring in Academic Medicine. Academic Medicine, 78(3), 328-334. Leslie, K., Lingard, L., Whyte, S. (2005). Junior faculty experiences with Informal Mentoring. Medical Teacher, 27(8), 693–698. Lewellen-Williams, C., Johnson, V., Deloney, L., Thomas, B., Goyol, A., Henry-Tillman, R. (2006). The POD: A New Model for Mentoring Underrepresented Minority Faculty. Academic Medicine, 81(3), 275-279. Luna, G., Cullen, D. (1995). Empowering the Faculty: Mentoring Redirected and Renewed. ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, Washington, DC. Morahan, P., Kasperbauer, S., Aschenbrener, C., Triolo, P., Monteleone, P., Counte, M., Meyer, M. (1998) Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers. Academic Medicine, 73, 1159-1168. Morrison-Beedy, D., Aronowitz, T., Dyne, J., Mkandawire, L. (2001). Mentoring Students and Junior Faculty in Faculty Research: A Win-Win Scenario. Journal of Professional Nursing, 17(6), 291-296. Pololi, L., Knight, S. (2005). Mentoring Faculty in Academic Medicine: A New Paradigm? Journal of General Internal Medicine, 20, 866–870. Randolph, Suzanne, (2006). Program Assessment for the HBCU/Hispanic Health Services Research Grant Programs. Sambunjak, D., Straus, S., Marusic, A. (2006) Mentoring in Academic Medicine: A Systematic Review. Journal of the American Medical Association, 296(9), 1103-1115. Sands, R., Parson, L., Duane, J. (1991). Faculty Mentoring Faculty in a Public University. The Journal of Higher Education, 62(2), 174-193. Schrodt, P., Cawyer, C., Sanders, R. (2003). An Examination of Academic Mentoring Behaviors and New Faculty Members’ Satisfaction with Socialization and Tenure and Promotion Processes. Communication Education, 52(1), 17-29. White III, A. A. (2011). Seeing Patients: Unconscious Bias in Health Care. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

MAHRTISE 2013

35

Selected and Recommended Readings Aboelela, S., Larson, E., Bakken, S., Carrasquillo, O., Formicola, A., Glied, S., Haas, J., Gebbie, K. (2007). Defining Interdisciplinary Research: Conclusions from a Critical Review of the Literature. Health Services Research, 42 (1), 329-346. Abrams, D. (2006) Applying Transdisciplinary Research Strategies to Understanding and Eliminating Health Disparities. Journal of Health Education and Behavior, 33, 515-531. Atwal, A., Caldwell, K. (2005). Do All Health and Social Care Professionals Interact Equally: A Study of Interactions in Multidisciplinary Teams in the United Kingdom. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 19, 268–273. Austin, W., Park, C., Goble, E. (2008) From Interdisciplinary to Transdisciplinary Research: A Case Study. Qualitative Health Research, 18, 557-564. Emmons, K., Viswanath, K., Colditz, G. (2008) The Role of Transdisciplinary Collaboration in Translating and Disseminating Health Research Lessons Learned and Exemplars of Success. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S204-S210 Gray, B. (2008). Enhancing Transdisciplinary Research Through Collaborative Leadership. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(2), S124-S132. Hadorn, G., Hoffmann-Riem, H., Biber-Klemm, S., Grossenbacher-Mansuy, W., Joye, D., Pohl, C., Wiesmann, U., Zemp, E., (2007) Handbook of Transdisciplinary Research. Springer Science. Zurich, Switzerland. Hall, K., Stokols, D., Moser, R., Taylor, B., Thornquist, M., Nebeling, L., Ehret, C., Barnett, M., McTiernan, A., Berger, N., Goran, M., Jeffery, R. (2008). The Collaboration Readiness of Transdisciplinary Research Teams and Centers Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s TREC Year-One Evaluation Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S161-S172. Hays, T. (2008). The Science of Team Science: Commentary on Measurements of Scientific Readiness. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S193-S195. Holmes, J., Lehman, A., Hade, E., Ferketich, A., Gehlert, S., Rauscher, G., A brams, J., Bird, C. (2008). Challenges for Multilevel Health Disparities Research in a Transdisciplinary Environment. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(2), S182-S192. Klein, J. (2008). Evaluation of Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Research: A Literature Review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S116-S123. Masses, L., Moser, R., Stokols, D., Taylor, B., Marcus, S., Morgan, G., Hall, K., Croyle, R., Trochim, W. (2008) Measuring Collaboration and Transdisciplinary Integration in Team Science. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S151-S160. Srinivasan, S., O’Fallon, L., Dearry, A. (2003). Creating Healthy Communities, Healthy Homes,Healthy People: Initiating a Research Agenda on the Built Environment and Public Health. American Journal of Public Health, 93 (9), 1446-1450. Stokols, D., Hall, K., Taylor, B., Moser, R. (2008). The Science of Team Science: Overview of the Field and Introduction to the Supplement. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35, S77-S89.

36

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected and Recommended Readings Carey, T. S., et. al., (2005). Developing Effective Interuniversity Partnerships and Community-Based Research to Address Health Disparities. Academic Medicine ; 80(11): 1039–1045. Egede, L., Strom, J., Durkalski, V., Mauldin, P., & Moran, W. (2010). Rationale and Design: Telephone-Delivered Behavioral Skills Interventions for Blacks with Type 2 Diabetes. Trials. Faseru, B., Cox, L., Bronars, C., Opole, I., Reed, G., Mayo, M., et al. (2010). Design, Recruitment, and Retention of African-American Smokers in a Pharmacokinetic Study. BMC Medical Research Methodology. Gwadz, M., Colon, P., Ritchie, A., Leonard, N., Cleland, C., Riedel, M., et al. (2010). Increasing and supporting the participation of persons of color living with HIV/AIDS in AIDS clinical trials. Current HIV/AIDS Reports , 194-200. Keppel, K., Bilheimer, L., Gurley, L. (2007) Improving Population Health and Reducing Health Care Disparities. Health Affairs, 26(5):1281-1292. Lau, A., Chang, D., & Okazaki, S. (2010). Methodological challenges in treatment outcome research with ethnic minorities. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology , 573-580. Lie, D., Lee-Ray, E., Gomez, A., Bereknyei, S., & Braddock, C. (2011). Does Cultural Competency Training of Health Professionals Improve Patient Outcomes? A systematic Review and Proposed Algorithm for Future Research. Journal of General Internal Medicine , 317-325. Lurie, N., Dubowitz, T. (2007) Health Disparities and Access to Health. Journal of the American Medical Association, 297(10):1118-1121. Minkler, M., Wallerstein, N. (2008). Community Based Participatory Research for Health: From Process to Outcomes. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons Publishers. Ramsden, V., McKay, S., Crowe, J. (2010) The Pursuit of Excellence: Engaging the Community in Participatory Health Research. Global Health Promotion, 17: 32-42. Sadler, G., Gonzalez, J., Mumman, M., Cullen, L., Lahousee, S., Malcarne, V., et al. (2010). Adapting a Program to Inform African American and Hispanic American Women About Cancer Clinical Trials. Journal of Cancer Education, 142-145. Sarkar, U., Schillinger, D., Lopez, A., & Sudore, R. (2011). Validation of Self-reported Health Literacy Questions Among Diverse English and Spanish-Speaking Populations. Journal of General Internal Medicine , 265-271. Yeary, K., Flowers, E., Ford, G., Burroughs, D., Burton, J., Woods, D., et al. (2011). Development of a Community-Based Participatory Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention to Address Disparities, Arkansas, 2008-2009. Preventing Chronic Disease; 8 (2). Friedberg, M., Coltin, K., Safran, D., Dresser, M., & Schneider, E. (2010). Medical Home Capabilities of Primary Care Practices that Serve Sociodemographically Vulnerable Neighborhoods. Archives of Internal Medicine , 938944.

MAHRTISE 2013

37

Selected and Recommended Readings Andersen M., Krewski , D. 2010. The Vision of Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: Moving from Discussion to Action. Toxicological Sciences. 117(1), 17–24. doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfq188 Advance Access publication June 23, 2010. Athersuch, TJ. 2012. The role of metabolomics in characterizing the human exposome. Bioanalysis (2012) 4(18), 2207– 2212 ISSN 1757-6180. Balshaw, DM. Challenges and opportunities in geospatial analysis of environmental exposures. NIEHS. Accessed on 4/17/13 at: http://www.aag.org/galleries/project-programs-files/AAG_NIH_Jul2012_GeoFrontiers_Balshaw.pdf Birnbaum, LS. 2010. Applying Research to Public Health Questions: Biologically Relevant Exposures. Environ Health Perspect. 118(4): A152. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1002015. PMCID: PMC2854739. Brunekreef, B. 2013. Exposure science, the exposome, and public health. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. doi: 10.1002/ em.21767. Buck GM, Lynch CD, Stanford JB, et al. Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive Developmental Toxicants. Environ Health Perspect. 2004;112(1):79-86 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC1241801/?tool=pubmed Buck Louis, G. M., Yeung, E., Sundaram, R., Laughon, S. K. and Zhang, C. (2013), The Exposome – Exciting Opportunities for Discoveries in Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 27: 229–236. doi: 10.1111/ppe.12040 Bushel, P. R., Heinloth, A. N., Li, J., Huang, L., Chou, J. W., Boorman, G. A., Malarkey, D. E., Houle, C. D., Ward, S. M., Wilson, R. E., et al. (2007). Blood gene expression signatures predict exposure levels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 18211–18216. Centers for Disease Control. Exposome and Exposomics. Accessed on 4/17/13 at: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/ exposome/ Chadeau-Hyam M, Athersuch TJ, Keun HC, De lorio M, Ebbels TM, Jenab M. Sacerdote C, Bruce SJ, Holmes E, Vineis P. Meeting-in-the-middle using metabolic profiling- a strategy for the identification of intermediate biomarkers in cohort studies. Biomarkers. 2011. 16(1):83-8 http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/1354750X.2010.533285 (Abstract Only) Chadeau-Hyam, M, Ebbels TM, Brown IJ, Chan Q, Stamler J, Huang CC, Daviglus ML, Ureshima H, Zhao L, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Elliott P, De lorio M. Metabolic profiling and the metabolome-wide association study: significance level for biomarker identification. Journal of Proteome Research. 2010. 9(9):4620-7 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC2941198/?tool=pubmed

*Additional Reading in Public Health Exposome Donald J. Alcendor, MS, PhD. Devieux, J. G., mallow, R. M., Rosenberg, R., and et. al. (2005). Cultural Adaptation in Translational Research: Field Experiences. Journal of Urban Health, 82 (2 Suppl 3):iii82-iii91. Wiener, L., Zobel, M., Battles, H., and Ryder, C. (2007). Transition From a Pediatric HIV Intramural Clinical Research Program to Adolescent and Adult Community-Based Care Services: Assessing Transition Readiness, Social Work in Health Care, 46 (1):1-19. Alcendor, D. J., Knobel, S., Desai, P., Zhu, W. Q., and Hayward G. S. (2011). KSHV Regulation of Fibulin-2 in Kaposi’s Sarcoma: Implications for Tumorigenesis. The American Journal of Pathology, 179 (3):1443-54. Alcendor, D. J., Knobel, S. M., Desai, P., et. al. (2010). KSHV downregulation of Galectin-3 in Kaposi’s Sarcoma. Glycobiology, 20 (5):521-32. 38 MAHRTISE 2013

Selected Publications and Recommended Readings by Institute Faculty Mohammad Z. Al-hamdan, PhD Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Al-Hamdan, M. Z.; Crosson, W.L.; Estes, M.; Estes, S.; Quattrochi, D.; and Liu, Y. (2013). Estimating ground-level PM2.5 concentrations in the southeastern U.S. using Geographically Weighted Regression. Environmental Research, 121, 1-10. ISSN 0013-9351, 10.1016/j.envres.2012.11.003. Kent, S.T; McClure, L.A.; Judd, S.E.; Howard, V.J.; Crosson, W.L.; Al-Hamdan, M.Z.; Wadley, V.G.; Peace, F.; and Kabagambe, E.K. (2013). Short and Long-term sunlight radiation and stroke incidence. Annals of Neurology, 73(1): 32-37. Kent, ST; Kabagambe, EK; Wadley, VG; Howard, VJ; Crosson, WL; Al-Hamdan, MZ; Judd, SE; Peace, F; McClure, LA. 2013b. The relationship between long-term sunlight radiation and cognitive decline in the REGARDS cohort study. The International Journal of Biometeorology, DOI 10.1007/s00484-013-0631-5. Al-Hamdan, M. Z.; Crosson, W. L.; Economou, S. A.; Estes, M. G.; Estes, S. M.; Hemmings, S. N.; Kent, S. T.; Puckett, M.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Rickman, D. L.; Wade, G. M.; McClure, L. A. (2012). Environmental Public Health Applications Using Remotely Sensed Data. Geocarto International, DOI:10.1080/10106049.2012.715209. Al-Hamdan, M. Z.; Cruise, J. F.; Rickman, D. L.; and Quattrochi, D. A. (2012). Characterization of Forested Landscapes from Remotely Sensed Data Using Fractals and Spatial Autocorrelation. Advances in Civil Engineering, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/945613. Crosson, W.L.; Al-Hamdan, M.Z.; Hemmings, S.N.; and Wade, G.M. (2012). A daily merged MODIS Aqua-Terra land surface temperature data set for the conterminous United States. Remote Sensing of Environment, 119: 315324. doi:10.1016/j.rse.2011.12.019. Moreno, M. J.; Al-Hamdan, M. Z.; Rickman, D. L.; Ye, J. (2012). Relationship between Watershed Land-Cover/ Land-Use Change and Water Turbidity Status of Tampa Bay Major Tributaries, Florida, USA. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 223:2093–2109. DOI 10.1007/s11270-011-1007-2. Al-Hamdan, M.; Crosson, W.; Economou, S.; Estes, M.; Estes, S.; Hemmings; S.; Kent, S.; Dale Quattrochi, D.; Wade, G.; McClure, L. (2011). Using NASA Remotely Sensed Environmental Data in a National Public Health Study. Proceedings of the 2011 Urban and Regional Information Systems Association GIS in Public Health Conference. Atlanta, GA. Al-Hamdan, M.; Cruise, J.; Rickman, D.; Quattrochi, D. (2010). Effects of Spatial and Spectral Fractal Dimensions in Forested Landscapes. Remote Sensing. 2(3): 611-640.

Resolutions on

Estes Jr., M. G., Crosson, W. L., Al-Hamdan, M. Z., Quattrochi, Dale A., and Johnson III, H. (2010). Validation and Demonstration of the Prescott Spatial Growth Model in Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Journal of the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association, 22(1):5-21. Estes Jr., M. G., Crosson, W. L., Al-Hamdan M. Z., and et. al. (2009). Use of Remotely Sensed Data to Evaluate the Relationship Between Living Environment and Blood Pressure. Environ Health Perspect 117 (12):1832-1838. Al-Hamdan, M.Z., Crosson, W. L., Limaye, A. S., and et. al. (2009). Methods for Characterizing Fine Particulate matter Using Ground Observations and Remotely Sensed Data: Potential Use for Environmental Public Health Surveillance. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, 59(7):865-881.

MAHRTISE 2013

39

Selected Publications and Recommended Readings by Institute Faculty William Blot, PhD Blot, W.J., Cohen, S.S., Aldrich, M., and et.al. (2011). Lung Cancer Risk Among Smokers of Menthol Cigarettes. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 103 (10):1-7. Cohen, S., Sonderman, J., Mumma, M., Signorello, L., and Blot, W. J. (2011). Individual and Neighborhood-Level Socioeconomic Characteristics in Relation to Smoking Prevalence Among Black and White Adults in the Southeastern United States: A Cross-Sectional Study. BMC Public Health, 11:877. Juvela, S. (2003). Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Risk Factors for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Journal of the American Heart Association, 34 (6):e34-36. Devesa, S.S., Blot, W.J., and Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. (1998). Changing Patterns in the Incidence of Esophageal and Gastric Carcinoma in the United States. Cancer, 83 (10):2049-2053. Signorello, L., Hargreaves, M., Blot, W. (2010) The Southern Community Cohort Study: Investigating Health Disparities. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 21(1):26-37. Paula Braveman, MD , MPH Braveman PA, Kumanyika S, Fielding J, Laveist T, Borrell LN, Manderscheid R, Troutman A. Health disparities and health equity: the issue is justice. Am J Public Health. 2011 Dec;101 Suppl 1:S149-55. doi: 10.2105/ AJPH.2010.300062. Epub 2011 May 6. Braveman PA, Egerter SA, Cubbin C, Marchi KS. An approach to studying social disparities in health and health care. Am J Public Health. 2004 Dec;94(12):2139-48. Braveman P, Gruskin S. Defining equity in health. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Apr;57(4):254-8. Braveman P, Egerter S, Williams DR. The social determinants of health: coming of age. Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:381-98. doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031210-101218. Review. Braveman P, Gruskin S. Poverty, equity, human rights and health. Bull World Health Organ. 2003;81(7):539-45. Epub 2003 Sep 3. Review. Braveman PA. Monitoring equity in health and healthcare: a conceptual framework. J Health Popul Nutr. 2003 Sep;21(3):181-92. Braveman P, Schaaf VM, Egerter S, Bennett T, Schecter W. Insurance-related differences in the risk of ruptured appendix. N Engl J Med. 1994 Aug 18;331(7):444-9. Braveman P, Miller C, Egerter S, Bennett T, English P, Katz P, Showstack J. Health service use among low-risk newborns after early discharge with and without nurse home visiting. J Am Board Fam Pract. 1996 Jul-Aug;9 (4):254-60. Braveman PA, Cubbin C, Egerter S, Williams DR, Pamuk E. Socioeconomic disparities in health in the United States: what the patterns tell us. Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr 1;100 Suppl 1:S186-96. doi: 10.2105/ AJPH.2009.166082. Epub 2010 Feb 10. Braveman P, Cubbin C, Marchi K, Egerter S, Chavez G. Measuring socioeconomic status/position in studies of racial/ethnic disparities: maternal and infant health. Public Health Rep. 2001 Sep-Oct;116(5):449-63. Braveman P. Social conditions, health equity, and human rights. Health Hum Rights. 2010 Dec 15;12(2):31-48. Braveman P. What is Health Equity: And How Does a Life-Course Approach Take Us Further Toward It? Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb 10. [Epub ahead of print] 40

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected Publications and Recommended Readings by Institute Faculty Paula Braveman, MD , MPH Braveman P, Barclay C. Health disparities beginning in childhood: a life-course perspective. Pediatrics. 2009 Nov;124 Suppl 3:S163-75. doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-1100D. PonJola Coney, MD Kaiser Family Foundation report, Putting Women’s Health Care Disparities on the Map, available at: http:// www.kff.org/womensdisparities/. Hart LG, Larson EH, Lishner DM. Rural definitions for health policy and research. Am J Public Health 2005; 95:1149–55. Rural Policy Research Institute. Choosing rural definitions: implications for health policy. Rural Policy Research Institute Health Panel Issue Brief No. 2. Columbia (MO): RUPRI; 2007. Chandra A, Martinez GM, Mosher WD, Abma JC, Jones J. Fertility, family planning, and reproductive health of U.S. women: data from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. Vital Health Stat 23 2005;(25):1–160. University of Washington Rural Health Research Center. Poor birth outcome in the rural United States: 1985-1987 to 1995-1997. Final Report No. 119. Seattle (WA): UWRHRC; 2008. Gould JB, Sarnoff R, Liu H, Bell DR, Chavez G. Very low birth weight births at non-NICU hospitals: the role of sociodemographic, perinatal, and geographic factors. J Perinatol 1999;19:197–205. Frost JJ, Frohwirth L, Purcell A. The availability and use of publicly funded family planning clinics: U.S. trends, 1994–2001. Perspect Sex Reprod Health 2004;36:206–15. Colwill JM, Cultice JM. The future supply of family physicians: implications for rural America. Health Aff 2003;22:190–8. Coney, P., Ladson, G., Sweet, S., Legro, R. S. (2008). Does Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Increase the Disparity in Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular-Related Health for African American Women? Seminars in Repro Med, 26:36-38. Coney, P. J. (2004). Needed: A Catalyst for Change. Advances in Renal Replacement Therapy, 1 (1):110-112. Coney, P., Washenik, K., Langley, R.G. B., DiGiovanna, J. J., Harrison, D. (2001). Weight Change and Adverse Event Incidence With a Low-Dose Oral Contraceptive: Two Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials. Contraception, 63:297-302. Darryl B. Hood, PhD Sheng, L., Ding, X., Ferguson, M., Hood, D.B., and et. al. (2010). Prenatal Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure Leads to Behavioral Deficits and Downregulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, MET. Toxicological Sciences. doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfq304 McCallister, M. M., Maguire, M., Ramesh, A., Hood, D.B., and et. al. (2008). Prenatal Exposure to Benzo(a) pyrene Impairs Later-Life Cortical Neuronal Function. Neurotoxicology, 29(5): 846-854. Stokes IV, S.C., Hood, D. B., Zokovitch, J., and Close, F. T. (2010). Blueprint for Communicating Risk and Preventing Environmental Injustice. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 21:35-52.

MAHRTISE 2013

41

Selected Publications and Recommended Readings by Institute Faculty Paul D. Juarez, PhD Hull, P. C., Canedo, J., Reece, M.C., Juarez, P., and et. al.. (2011). Using a Participatory Research Process to Address Disproportionate Hispanic Cancer Burden. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 21 (1):95-113. Levine, R. S., Agboto, V. K., Juarez, P., and et. al. (2010). Increased Black-White Disparities in Mortality Following Life-Saving Innovations: A Possible Consequence of United States Federal Laws. American Journal of Public Health, 100:11, 2176-2184. Eyler J, Bradley LR, Goldzweig I, Schlundt D, and Juarez, PD. The Relationship Between Service-Learning Interventions and Teen Seatbelt Use In Quality of Service Learning Interventions In Research for What? Making Engaged Scholarship Matter (Ed, Kashen, et. Al.) (2010) Information Age Publishing. Benford, M. L., VanCleave1, T. T., Lavender, N. A., Kittles, R. A., and Kidd, L. (2010). 8q24 sequence variants in relation to prostate cancer risk among men of African descent: A case-control study. BMC Cancer, 10:334. Flores, C., Pino-Yanes, M., Kittles, R. A., and et. al. (2012). African Ancestry Is Associated with Asthma Risk in African Americans. PloS One, Vol. 7, Issue 1, e26807 Murphy, A.B., Ukoli, F., Freeman, V., Kittles, R. A., and et. al.. (2012). 8q24 risk alleles in West African and Caribbean men. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Michael A. Langston, PhD Benson, M., Langston, M. A., Adner, M., and et. al. (2006). A Network-Based Analysis of the Late-Phase Reaction of the Skin. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 118(1):220-225. Debroni, J., Eblen, J. D., Langston, M. A., and et. al. (2010). A Complete Resolution of the Keller Maximum Clique Problem. Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA 11), 129-135. Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD Bleich, S. N., Jarlenski, M. P., Bell, C. N., and LaVeist, T. A. (2012). Health Inequalities: Trends, Progress, and Policy. Annual Rev. Public Health, 33:7–4, doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031811-124658. Reese, A. M., Thorpe, R. J., Bell, C. N., Bowie, J. V., and LaVeist, T. A. (2012). The Effect of Religious Service Attendance on Race Differences in Depression: Findings from the EHDIC-SWB Study. Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine. doi:10.1007/s11524-011-9659-1. Nuru-Jeter, A. M. and LaVeist, T. A. (2011). Racial Segregation, Income Inequality,and Mortality in US Metropolitan Areas. Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 88 (2). doi:10.1007/s11524010-9524-7. Nguyen, G. C., LaVeist, T. A., Harris, M. L., and et. al. (2010). Racial disparities in utilization of specialist care and medications in inflammatory bowel disease. Am J Gastroenterol, 105(10): 2202–2208. doi:10.1038/ ajg.2010.202. Bell, C. N., Thorpe Jr., R. J., and LaVeist, T. A. (2010). Race/Ethnicity and Hypertension: The Role of Social Support. Am J Hypertens., 23(5): 534–540. doi:10.1038/ajh.2010.28. LaVeist, T. A. (2005). Minority Populations and Health. Sanfransico, CA: Jossey-Bass.

42

MAHRTISE 2013

Selected Publications and Recommended Readings by Institute Faculty Maureen Y. Lichtveld, MD, MPH Goldstein, B. D., Osofsky, H. J., and Lichtveld, M. Y. (2011). The Gulf Oil Spill. The New England Journal of Medicine, 364:1334-1348. Smilth, A. P., Lichtveld, M. Y., Miner, K.R., Tyus, S. L., and Gase, L. N. (2009). A Competency-Based Approach To Expanding the Cancer Care Workforce: Proof of Concept. MEDSURG Nursing, 18 (1):39-50. Barbeau, D. N., Grimsley, L. F., Lichtveld, M., and et. al. (2010). Mold Exposure and Health Effects Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Annual Review of Public Health, 31:165-178. Nancy López, PhD López, N. 2013. Contextualizing Lived Race-Gender & the Racialized-Gendered Social Determinants of Health, in Mapping “Race”: Critical Approaches to Health Disparities Research. Laura Gómez and Nancy López (editors). New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 233 pp. Rodriguez, C., López, N., Argeros, G. 2013. Latinos and the Color Line in the U.S.: Measuring Outcomes by Race and Ethnicity. Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, SAGE Publications and Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University Robert A. Scott and Stephen M. Kosslyn, . López, N. 2013. Some Critical Thoughts on the Census Bureau’s Proposals to Change the Race and Hispanic Questions, Guest Commentary 1/10/13. National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP). Bird, C., Lee, T., López, N. 2013. Visions of Leadership in American Indian Education: Voices from New Mexico, American Journal of Education, Lee, T., López, N. 2013. It is best to know who you are through your culture: Transformative Possibilities for Native American Youth, in Cultural Transformations: Youth and Pedagogies of Transformation, Korina Jocson (editor), Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. López, N. 2011. Racially Stigmatized Masculinities: Conceptualizing Latino Male Schooling in the United States, in Invisible No More: Understanding the Disenfranchisement of Latino Men and Boys. Pedro Noguera, Edward Fergus and Aida Hurtado (editors). New York: Routledge, pp. 235-254 (Provided in the application packet). Trans-disciplinary “Race” Working Group. 2010. Trans-disciplinary Guidelines for Research on ‘Race, Institute for the Study of “Race” & Social Justice, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy, University of New Mexico. Lopez, N., Ybarra, R. Creating Alternative Discourses in the Education of Latinos and Latinas, New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., 2004, 247 pp., A Journal of Book Reviews, Arizona State University, http://edrev.asu.edu/ reviews/rev481.htm, retrieved 10/12/07. López, N. 2003. Hopeful Girls, Troubled Boys: Race and Gender Disparity in Urban Education, New York: Routledge, 223 pp.; Revised Edition in progress. (Reviewed in Contemporary Sociology, March 2004, 33(2): 241242; American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 110, No. 2 (September 2004): 516–18.

MAHRTISE 2013

43

Selected Publications and Recommended Readings by Institute Faculty Patricia Matthews-Juarez, PhD Matthews-Juarez, P. (2013). Developing a Cadre of Transdisciplinary Health Disparities Researchers for the 21st Century. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 24(1), 121-128. Matthews-Juarez, P, Juarez, P., Faulkner, RT. Social Media and Military Families: A Perspective. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment. (In Press). Matthews-Juarez, P., Faulkner, RT. (2013). The nation’s response to Hurricane Sandy: lessons learned from New Orleans. Ethniconline.com. Retrieved from http://www.ethniconline.net/articles/featured-articles Matthews-Juarez P. and Juarez P. D. (2011). Cultural competency, human genomics, and the elimination of health disparities. Soc Work Public Health. Social Work in Public Health, 26(4):349-65. Juarez P. D. , Robinson, P. L., and Matthews-Juarez, P. (2002). 100% access, zero health disparities, and GIS: an improved methodology for designating health professions shortage areas. J Health Soc Policy, 16(1-2):155-67. Guidry, J. J, Matthews-Juarez, P., and Copeland, V. A. (2003). Barriers to breast cancer control for AfricanAmerican women: the interdependence of culture and psychosocial issues. Cancer, 97(1 Suppl):318-23. Chen, C. K. , Matthews-Juarez, P., and Yang, A. (2011). Effect of Hurricane Katrina on Low Birth Weight and Preterm Deliveries in African American Women in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Journal on Education, Informatics, and Cybernetics. Matthews-Juarez, P. and Weinberg, Armin D. (2006). Cultural Competence in Cancer Care: A Health Care Professional’s Passport. Baylor College of Medicine George, Rust, MD, MPH Heisler, M.B., Rust, G., Pattillo, R., and Dubois, A.M. (2005). Improving Health, Eliminating Disparities: Finding Solutions For Better Health Care For All Populations. Ethnicity and Disease, 15 (2 Suppl 2):S1-4. Rust, G., Baltrus, P., Ye, J., and et. al. (2009). Presence of a Community Health Center and Uninsured Emergency Department Visit Rates in Rural Counties. Journal of Rural Health, 25 (1):8-16. Rust, G., Satcher, D., Fryer, G.E., Levine R.S., Blumenthal, D.S. (2010). Triangulating on Success: Innovation, Public Health, Medical Care, and Cause-Specific US Mortality Rates Over a Half Century (1950-2000). American Journal of Public Health, 100 (Suppl 1):S95-104. George, Rust, MD, MPH Wallerstein, N., and Duran, B. (2010). Community-Based Participatory Research Contributions to Intervention Research: The Intersection of Science and Practice to Improve Health Equity. American Journal of Public Health, 100 (Suppl 1):S40-S46. Pang, T., Sadana, R., Hanney, S., and et. al. (2003). Knowledge for better health- a conceptual framework and foundation for health research systems. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 81 (11):815-820. Braveman, P. and Gruskin, S. (2003). Defining equity in health. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 57 (4):254-258. Beach, M.C., Gary, T.L., Price, E.G., and et. al. (2006). Improving health care quality for racial/ethnic minorities: a systematic review of the best evidence regarding provider and organization interventions. BMC Public Health, 6:104.

44

MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Vincent Agboto, PhD, MS Assistant Professor/Director, Meharry Medical College Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics Vanderbilt University Medical Center l Nashville , Tennessee Dr. Agboto’s areas of research interests include the development of new Bayesian methodologies to design experiments and novel ways to design health disparity epidemiological studies. He is an adjunct assistant professor in the department of biostatistics at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is currently involved in many National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Center of Disease Control (CDC) funded collaborative health disparity research in youth violence, injury prevention, health disparities in HIV/AIDS, diabetes and cancer with faculty at Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt University in Nashville. Dr. Agboto is involved in development and community health projects in the United States and Togo (West Africa). He has programming skills in SAS, SPSS, Stata, Splus and R, Matlab and Mathematica. He also has extensive experience on Linux workstations as well as in the Windows and Mac environments. Donald J. Alcendor, PhD, MS Associate Professor Center for AIDS Health Disparities Research Division of Microbial & Immunology and Obstetrics & Gynecology Principal Investigator & Director of the Community Outreach Core, Project SAVED Meharry Medical College l Nashville , Tennessee Dr. Alcendor research interest is Bacterial Vaginosis and Increase Risk for HIV-1 Acquisition; KSHV Regulation of Fibulins in Kaposi’s sarcoma: Implications for the Role of Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Tumorigenesis (AIDS related malignancy); Identification of Dysregulated Genes in the Brain after HIV Infection: Implications for HIV associated Dementia; and Models for Cytomegalovirus Induced Congenital Disease and its impact on the blood-brain barrier. Selected as a minority scholar in Cancer Research by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), he has also received the Nashville Business Journal Health Care Hero Award in Research. He is a committee member on the independent Research Evaluation and Decision Panel (REDP) for the AIDS Cancer and Specimen Resource of the NCI-AIDS Malignancy Program. He is a Brain-onchip investigator in partnership with Vanderbilt and the Cleveland Clinic. Mohammad Z. Al-Hamdan, PhD Senior Research Scientist Universities Space Research Association National Space Science and Technology Center l Huntsville, Alabama Dr. Al-Hamdan received his PhD and MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He is a Senior Research Scientist with the Universities Space Research Association at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL and an adjunct assistant professor at the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and an adjunct assistant professor at the School of Public Health of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His research interests include the applications of remote sensing and GIS to hydrology and air quality modeling, environmental assessment and public health. Dr. Al-Hamdan has been involved in a number of environment and health linkage projects that are funded by NASA, CDC and/or NIH, and has published numerous articles on environmental public health issues. He is working with NIMHD/ Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry on Environmental Health and large data sets. MAHRTISE 2013

45

FACULTY Bruce Behringer, MPH Deputy Commissioner Continuous Improvement and Training Tennessee Department of Health l Nashville, Tennessee Mr. Behringer is currently the Deputy Commissioner of Continuous Improvement and Training at the Tennessee Department of Health in Nashville TN. Mr. Behringer received his BS from the Pennsylvania State University and his MPH from the University of North Carolina. He has worked in various organizations such as the Office of Rural and Community Health and Community Partnership at East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN and the Virginia Primary Care Association Inc., Richmond, VA. Mr. Behringer serves on the Department of Veterans Affairs, National Veterans Rural Health Advisory Committee and has served as Vice-Chair (2008-9) and Co-Chair (2009-10) on the Tennessee State Comprehensive Cancer Care Coalition. William Blot, PhD Professor of Medicine Vanderbilt University l Nashville, TN CEO, International Epidemiology Institute l Rockville, MD Dr. Blot is involved in the design, conduct and analysis of epidemiologic studies into the causes of cancer and other diseases. Prior to co-founding IEI in 1994, he directed research into the causes of cancer for 20 years at the National Cancer Institute, where he was chief of the Analytic Studies Section of the Environmental Epidemiology Branch and chief of the Biostatistics Branch. Dr. Blot has mapped the distribution of mortality from cancer across the United States, assessed changing trends over time, and described the magnitude of cancer in the American population. His analytical research in the United States and abroad has helped clarify the contributions of demographic, occupational, dietary, lifestyle (including tobacco and alcohol consumption) medical and other factors as causes of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, stomach, lung, kidney and other organs. Dr. Blot has also led various multi-center, case-control and cohort epidemiologic studies and directed large-scale clinical trials on the effects of dietary supplements on disease prevention. He currently directs the Southern Community Cohort Study, supported by the NCI, the Martell Foundation and others, to assess reasons for racial disparities in cancer incidence and mortality. Paula Braveman, MD, MPH Professor Family and Community Medicine Director, Center on Social Disparities in Health University of California l San Francisco, California Dr. Braveman’s interests include documenting and understanding socioeconomic and racial or ethnic disparities in health, particularly in maternal and infant health; translating research into information to inform policies to reduce health disparities; methodological and conceptual issues in studying socioeconomic and racial or ethnic inequalities in health in the U.S. and internationally. She is also interested in developing measures of experiences of racial discrimination for use in studies of adverse birth outcomes among African-American women in the U.S.; measuring socioeconomic factors in U.S. health research; and the concept and measurement of health inequalities in the U.S. and internationally. 46

MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Chau-Kuang Chen, EdD Associate Professor, School of Graduate Studies and Research Director, Institutional Research Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Chen is an expert in generalized linear models, survival analyses, multivariate time series analyses, and artificial intelligence modeling approaches. He was one of the first statisticians to incorporate a variety of sophisticated techniques--ordered logit/ clog log, proportional hazard, transfer function of autoregressive integrated moving average, grey forecasting model, artificial neural network, support vector machine, and gene expression programming--into higher education processes and outcomes. Dr. Chen earned his MS degree in Counseling and Guidance at the University of Kansas, a Certificate in Data Processing at the Electronic Computer Programming Institute in Kansas City, and both MS degree in Statistics and EdD degree in Higher Education from Oklahoma State University. Phillip Clay, PhD Professor, City Planning Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, MA Dr. Clay is widely known for his work in U.S. housing policy and community-based development. He is a founding member of the National Housing Trust and president of the Board of The Community Builders, Inc., the country’s largest nonprofit affordable housing developer. In addition, Dr. Clay has served on the policy advisory council of the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae). He served as Chairman of the Board of a local community college from 2002 to 2006. He serves as a member and Vice Chair of the MasterCard Foundation board, serves on the Kresge Foundation Board, and the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative Board of Directors. In addition, he serves on the Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Clay received his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his doctorate in city planning from MIT. Since 1975, he served as associate head of the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Associate Provost and MIT Chancellor. His publications include two books: Neighborhood Renewal: Middle-Class Resettlement and Incumbent Upgrading in American Neighborhoods, and Neighborhood Politics and Planning (with Rob Hollister). PonJola Coney, MD Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Virginia Commonwealth University-MCV Campus l Richmond, Virginia Dr. Coney has taken a keen interest in increasing the presence of women and minorities in positions of senior faculty rank and leadership. She was a founder of the unique professional organization, Society for Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine. She mentors numerous residents, fellows, and junior faculty who continue to seek her counsel. She has created and implemented a core curriculum for disadvantaged students seeking admission to professional schools. She has trained numerous undergraduate students and residents. Dr. Coney completed her internship and residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Pennsylvania Hospital (University of Pennsylvania) in Philadelphia, PA. MAHRTISE 2013 47

FACULTY Stephanie B. Coursey Bailey, MD, MS Interim Dean College of Public Health Service Tennessee State University l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Bailey is the current Interim Dean of the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs at Tennessee State University and recently served for four years as the Chief for Public Health Practice of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At the CDC she oversaw programs and offices focused on public health law, public health system standards, agency accreditation, surveillance for emerging issues in public health practice and CDC's portfolio management to the states. Dr. Bailey has been honored with many awards including the "Excellence in Public Health Award" for local Leadership by The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), the Citizenship Award from Northwest Civitan, an inductee into the Academy for Women of Achievement (YWCA), Milton and Ruth Roemer Prize for Creative Public Health Work (APHA), the Jim Parker Award . (APHA), the Dr. Nathan B. Davis Award for Outstanding Government Service in the category, Career Public Servant at the Local levels (AMA), the Balderson Lifetime Public Health Leadership Award, the Howell Special Meritorious Service to Public Health Award (SHA), the Contemporary Black History Maker's Award and the ESRI Public Health Leadership Award. She was featured in a book authored by Carole Woltring and Carole Barlas entitled, Journey to Leadership: Profile of Women Leaders in Public Health. Dr. Bailey received her B.A. in Psychology from Clark University in 1972 and her M.D. from Meharry Medical College in 1976. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Grady Memorial/Emory University and then went on to obtain her M.S.H.S.A. from the College of St. Francis in 1993 Bill Crosson, PhD Research Fellow Universities Space Research Association National Space Science and Technology Center l Huntsville, Alabama Dr. Crosson is an expert in the use of NASA environmental datasets for applications in health, climate and water resources. He is a Research Fellow with Universities Space Research Association at the National Space Science and Technology Center, part of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. He received a B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Georgia, Athens, an M.S. in Applied Mathematics from Clemson University, Clemson, SC and a Ph.D. in Meteorology from Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL.

48

MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Gayle Dine’Chacon Surgeon General Navajo Nation Associate Professor Department of Family and Community Medicine University of New Mexico Health Science Center l Albuquerque, New Mexico Gayle Dine'Chacon, MD is originally from Chinle, Arizona and Dine'. She is the Surgeon General for the Navajo Nation. She is board-certified in Family Medicine and an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico, School of Medicine. She is also the Director of the Center for Native American Health (CNAH) and Associate Vice President for Native American Health at the UNM Health Sciences Center. As the director of CNAH , she continues to develop the center to meet the health priority needs of New Mexico's 22 tribes and urban Indian populations. Green Ekadi, PhD Assistant Professor Master of Science in Public Health Program School of Graduate Studies and Research Director, Meharry Census Information Center Project Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Ekadi is a former Assistant Minister of Agriculture in the Republic of Liberia, West Africa, responsible for the agricultural planning and all agricultural projects sponsored by the World Bank, the European Economic Community (now The European Union), and the African Development Bank, for the country. His research interests are economic evaluation of projects and small area analysis of health disparities and disaster resilience. He presents on small area analysis and costbenefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. Dr. Ekadi holds a doctorate degree in Economics and teaches Health Economics and Health Finance, among other subjects. He is a Fellow of the World Bank Economic Development Institute and studied at Vanderbilt University under a Fulbright Scholarship. He also holds a Master of Science degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, a Certificate in Regional Planning from the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom, and a Certificate in Agricultural Credit Planning from FinAfrica, Milan, Italy

MAHRTISE 2013

49

FACULTY Sue Estes, MS Associate Program Manager Public Health Applications Marshall Space Flight Center NASA/URSA l Huntsville, Alabama Ms. Estes serves as NASA’s Associate Program Manager for Public Health Applications. She joined the AST and USRA in 2006. Ms. Estes received her B.S. from the University of Alabama in Health Care Management and a M.S. from Birmingham-Southern College in Private and Public Management with an emphasis on Health. She is involved in research utilizing public health data with remotely sensed data and analyzing the health impacts of the environment. Current research focuses on establishing partnerships between NASA environmental researchers and public health professionals in academia, federal, state and local government. As Deputy Program Manager for NASA Public Health Applications, Ms. Estes has over 20 years of experience working in Public Health as a Hospital and Nursing Home Administrator. Keon L. Gilbert, DrPH, MA, MPA Associate Professor School of Public Health St. Louis University l St. Louis, Missouri Dr. Gilbert received his DrPH from the University of Pittsburg, PA and his MPA from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. He joined the faculty of St. Louis University’s School of Public Health after completing a Kellogg Health Scholar Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Gilbert's key research interests include social capital, health disparities, African American Men's health, and interventions to prevent chronic diseases. . Darryl B. Hood, PhD Professor Neuroscience and Pharmacology Co-Director/Environmental Context of Health Disparities NIMHD\Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Hood is a nationally recognized expert in the area of Neurotoxicology, particularly with respect to the effects of negative environmental exposures on the developing fetus and subsequent effects on learning, memory and behavior. The impact of ongoing research conducted in Dr. Hood’s laboratory at Meharry Medical College utilizing innovative experimental models has contributed to an understanding of the etiology of a number of exposure-influenced cognitive disorders such as autism spectrum disorder in children who live and play in communities that are adversely impacted by pollution. Currently, Dr. Hood is the Principal Investigator of the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) funded Meharry Medical College-Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Consortium. The research conducted in Dr. Hood’s laboratory and under this consortium continues to contribute to the scientific database that the US EPA is using to reassess the maximum allowable ambient levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from industrial smokestacks. Such reassessments form the basis of prevention and intervention strategies that lead to public policy changes which serve to decrease the negative cognitive health effects associated with exposure to environmental pollutants in susceptible and vulnerable populations. 50

MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Wansoo Im, PhD Associate Professor Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Im is the founder of VERTICES, LLC, a geospatial information services company that provides innovative and interactive map-based solutions. Dr. Im is also the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Community Mapping (CCM). He specializes in unique decision support systems that utilize spatial data visualization and modeling techniques. He is an adjunct faculty member at Rutgers University and at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). Dr. Im received his Ph.D. from the School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and his Masters in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His work was featured in The New Yorker magazine for his community participatory internet mapping project in 2006 as well as in the New York Times in 2008. His recent projects utilize community participatory geographic mapping systems in government applications, statewide environmental organizations, education, and non-profit organizations. Kimberly Jackson, BS, MS Founder, HIDE Health Impacts of Degraded Environments. LLC l Nashville, Tennessee Ms. Jackson is the Founder of HIDE, dedicated to researching the potential health impacts of degraded environments. She is currently investigating the impact of energy retrofits on the indoor air quality of 100 homes participating in the Go Green North Nashville program. She has examined the disproportionate rates of asthma in East Nashville as part of her graduate studies at Lipscomb University’s Institute for Sustainable Practice. With a background in statistics, her future research interests include developing a holistic pollutant index to be used as an identifier of environmentally burdened communities that would provide a more accurate assessment of the potential effects of microscale or localized pollution based not only upon the built environment, but on social determinants as well. Ms. Jackson holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Statistics from Harvard University and a Master of Science degree in Sustainability from Lipscomb University. She is also a LEED Green Associate.

MAHRTISE 2013

51

FACULTY Paul D. Juarez, PhD Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine UT Health Science Center l Memphis, Tennessee Dr. Juarez is the former Principal Investigator of the NIMHD/Health Disparity Research Center of Excellence at Meharry, the Nashville Urban Partnership Academic Center of Excellence to prevent youth violence (NUPACE/CDC), the Jackson Teen Seat Belt Study (CDC), and Program Director of the TN State Model Area Health Education Center (HRSA). He currently is leading efforts to develop an interactive, public participatory, web portal to enable academic and community partners to use GIS to jointly plan, conduct, and evaluate interventions that target the reduction of health disparities at a neighborhood level. Dr. Juarez previously served as the Scientific Director for the Meharry-State Farm 2006 National Safety Summit and Nashville Health Disparities Summits in 2005 and 2007. He directed the new Environment Context of Health Disparities/Facility Core in the Center. He has been recognized for his contributions to the field of public health through his work in youth violence prevention in south central Los Angeles with a chapter in the 2005 book: “Faces of Public Health.� Dr . Juarez has served on over 30 grant review panels for the Centers for Disease Control, HRSA, MCHB, National Institutes of Health, and the Office of Minority Health, US DHHS. Dr. Juarez received his doctorate in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University and held academic appointments at Charles R. Drew University, UCLA School of Medicine, USC School of Medicine, and California University, Long Beach, Department of Social Work. Mohammad Kanu, PhD, MPH Associate Professor /Interim Director, Master of Public Health Program Department of Health Administration & Health Sciences Tennessee State University l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Kanu received his Ph.D. in Public Health and MPH from Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, his M.A. in Anthropology, and his B.A. in History from Fourah Bay College, University of Sierra Leone in 1993. He teaches courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels in Public Health, International Health, Environmental Health, Research Methods, Public Health Policy, and many more. He has completed evaluation projects and authored several technical/evaluation reports and delivered numerous national, state and local presentations. He is currently an Associate Professor and Interim Director of the Master of Public Health (MPH) Program in the Department of Health Administration and Health Sciences at Tennessee State University. Barbara Kilbourne, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine Meharry Medical College Professor, Sociology Department Tennessee State University l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Kilbourne is currently an Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine at Meharry Medical College and Professor of Sociology at Tennessee State University . Her expertise lies in social epidemiology and quantitative methods. In this capacity, she has worked as a data analyst for multiple federally funded projects, in addition to publishing her own work focusing on medical sociology. Her research interests include health disparities in breast cancer screening and treatment, diseases of the circulatory system, alcohol disorders, youth violence and infant mortality 52 MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Michael A. Langston, PhD Professor Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Tennessee l Knoxville, Tennessee Dr. Langston is a member of the University’s Genome Science and Technology Program faculty. He is best known for his long-standing work on combinatorial algorithms, complexity theory, and design paradigms for sequential and parallel computation. His present research efforts are primarily focused on the development, synthesis, analysis and high performance implementation of graph algorithms for the analysis of high throughput biological data. For nearly three decades, Dr. Langston has studied the theme that mathematical structure begets algorithms, beginning with well-quasi order theory, moving on to fixed-parameter tractability, and now con centrated on practical application in computational biology. Additionally, he serves as a Collaborating Scientist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To complement his basic research program in the foundations of algorithmic analysis, he leads a team of students and associates in the development of portals through which the community at large may access the team’s computational tools, and in the development of mapping, scheduling and load-balancing mechanisms with which their algorithms can be realized on Altix, Cray, IBM and other supercomputer platforms. Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Policy, Director, Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health l Baltimore, MD Dr. LaVeist is a medical sociologist and health services researcher who specializes in health and healthcare disparities. He has developed several widely used measures including measures of patient attitudes which predispose their use of healthcare services, and most recently a measure of cultural competency of healthcare organizations. His research and writing has focused on three broad thematic research questions: 1) What are the social and behavioral factors that predict the timing of various related health outcomes (e.g. access and utilization of health services, mortality, entrance into nursing home? 2) What are the social and behavioral factors that explain race differences in health outcomes?; and 3) What has been the impact of social policy on the health and quality of life of African Americans? His work has included both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Dr. LaVeist seeks to develop an orienting framework in the development of policy and interventions to address race disparities in health-related outcomes.

MAHRTISE 2013

53

FACULTY Robert S. Levine, MD, MPH Director, Research Core Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor Department of Family and Community Medicine Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Levine has longstanding research and clinical interests in public health and racial and ethnic health disparities. His clinical practice includes general prevention, smoking cessation and weight management. His writings include more than 250 scientific works, and he has directed and collaborated on numerous peer-reviewed scientific projects. Presently, he is focusing on geographic variations in racial disparities, searching in particular for communities that have successfully overcome the barriers of poverty. Dr. Levine’s academic experiences include collaboration with county and state health departments, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Pan American Health Organization, the World Health Organization, and the United States Agency for International Development. For eleven years, he was on the faculty of the University of Miami School of Medicine where he was Associate Director of its World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Pesticide Epidemiology. A member of the Meharry faculty, he has assisted with the development of training programs in farm worker safety, and has collaborated on scientific papers showing elevated risks of illness among racial and ethnic workers in high risk occupations. His affiliation with the MMC-VU ARCH consortium program allows him to work collaboratively with colleagues in the Basic Sciences in translational research investigating the role of environmental contaminant exposure on geographic variations health outcomes among minority populations. Dr. Levine earned his M.D. from Bowman Gray (now Wake Forest) University in 1968. He completed residency training in General Preventive Medicine at the University of Kentucky in 1972, and in 1974. Maureen Y. Lichtveld, MD, MPH Professor and Chair Freeport McMoRan Chair of Environmental Policy Associate Director Population Sciences, Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences l New Orleans, Louisiana Dr. Lichtveld, has a 29 year career in public health and currently is professor and chair, of the department of environmental health sciences, Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her research interests are environmentally-induced disease, including asthma and cancer; health disparities, environmental health policy; community-based participatory research; and disaster preparedness. She holds an endowed chair in environmental policy and is associate director population sciences, Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium. In 2008, Dr. Lichtveld received the Herbert Nickens Award from the Intercultural Cancer Council for leadership in cancer health disparities and educating minority health professionals in cancer care. In 2007, she was awarded Woman of the Year by the City of New Orleans for her contributions to science and well being. Dr. Lichtveld is the principal investigator (PI) for Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana, an NIH-funded novel pediatric asthma intervention examining the relationship between exposure to Post -Katrina mold and exacerbation of childhood asthma.

54

MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Nancy López, PhD Founder/Director Institute for the Study of Race and Social Justice Associate Professor of Sociology RWJF Center for Health Policy University of New Mexico l Albuquerque, New Mexico Dr. López is an associate professor of sociology and directs and co-founded the Institute for the Study of "Race" & Social Justice, housed in the RWJF Center for Health Policy. Dr. López has been named the Inaugural Academic Leadership Academy (ALA) Faculty Fellow, UNM Division for Equity and Inclusion (DEI). Dr. López received National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD) funding for a workshop on "race" in health policy research (April 2011). She co-edited a volume based on this workshop entitled, "Mapping 'Race': Critical Approaches to Health Disparities Research" (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, Critical Issues in Health and Medicine Book Series, forthcoming August 2013). She has also received funding from the Sociological Initiatives Foundation for a study of discipline in a diverse New Mexico public school, as well as funding from the NM Public Education Department for a study entitled, "Indian Education in New Mexico, 2025." Her book Hopeful Girls, Troubled Boys: Race and Gender Disparity in Urban Education (New York: Routledge, 2003) focuses on Dominicans, West Indians, and Haitians to explain why girls of color are succeeding at higher rates than their male counterparts. Her current work focuses on the creation of meaningful conceptualizations of "race" in as a dynamic multi-dimensional and multi-level social construction. The daughter of Dominican immigrants, Dr. López was born in New York City and she was raised in NYC public housing; spanish is her first language. Patricia Matthews-Juarez, PhD Professor Department of Preventive Medicine Director The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome College of Medicine University of Tennessee Health Science Center l Memphis, Tennessee Dr. Matthews-Juarez is an established medical administrator and educator with specific experience in primary care education, cultural competency, cancer control, and prevention. She publishes and presents in the areas of cultural competency and health disparities. She is the primary author of Cultural Competence in Cancer Care: A Health Care Professional’s Passport. She is a national fellow of the National Conference on Primary Care Access, a senior fellow on Community Based Medical Education, Chair of the Publication and Communication Committee of Coastal Research Group, Board member of the Intercultural Cancer Council, and Chair of the Community Advisory Board for the Meharry Wellness Center. She serves as chair of national grant review panels since 1985 and has received numerous honors. She is a past Vice Chair of the Department of Family Medicine and a past Administrator for the Drew Meharry Morehouse Consortium Cancer Center and its National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. Dr. Matthews- Juarez received her doctorate in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University in social policy. MAHRTISE 2013

55

FACULTY Tennille L. Marley, PhD, MPH Doctoral Fellow Alumni RWJF Center for Health Policy University of New Mexico Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Arizona State University l Phoenix, Arizona Dr. Marley holds a PhD in sociology and a is a dissertation fellow alumni at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. She grew up on the White Mountain Apache Indian Reservation in eastern Arizona. Marley’s dissertation examines the relationships among indigenous knowledge, land, local history/historical trauma, and diabetes within an American Indian community, using “place” as an anchoring concept. Her research interests include American Indian Health policy, diabetes in American Indian communities, and the incorporation of indigenous knowledge in health research. She holds an MPH from the University of Arizona. . Janella Melius, PhD, LCSW Assistant Professor Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Work WinstonSalem State University l Winston-Salem, NC Dr. Melius completed her PhD in social work at Norfolk State University, VA with specialized training in community development. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Work at Winston-Salem State University, NC. Her training and background involves interdisciplinary collaborations between social services, medical, education and legal systems. Dr. Melius has over fifteen years of experience as a clinician, and is an expert in the field of foster care. Her area of research focuses on the ecological risk, and protective processes influencing health related behaviors among minority populations who are exposed to adversities.

56 MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Charles Mouton, MD, MS Dean, School of Medicine Senior Vice President for Health Affairs Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Mouton is board certified in Family Medicine and holds a Certificate of Added Qualifications in geriatrics. He is also a Certified Medical Director. Dr. Mouton holds a Master of Science degree in Clinical Epidemiology from the Harvard University School of Public Health. He received his medical degree from the Howard University College of Medicine and earned the bachelor’s degree in Engineering from Howard University. Dr. Mouton completed a family practice residency at Prince George’s Hospital Center in Cheverly, MD, and completed a geriatrics fellowship at The George Washington Medical Center. His major areas of research interest are violence and elder mistreatment in older women, elder mistreatment, health promotion and disease prevention in minority elders (especially exercise in the elder), ethnicity and aging, and quality health care for minorities. Dr. Mouton is past president of the DC Academy of Family Physicians and previously served as Section Chair of the Family Medicine Section of the National Medical Association Charlene Porsild, PhD Associate Research Professor Public Administration Assistant Director The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at University of New Mexico l Albuquerque, New Mexico Dr. Porsild is a Native of Canada's Yukon and earned a BA from the University of Alberta, an MA from the Universite' d'Ottawa, and a PhD from Carleton University. A former Fulbright Scholar, she is author of the award winning, “Gamblers and Dreamers: Women, Men, and Community in the Klondike” (1998), and co-author of, “Place Names of Montana” (2010). An advocate for northern and southern borderlands studies and a champion of minority students. She is currently Associate Research Professor of Public Administration and Assistant Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Porsild is working on a study of the movement of disease and medical technology across borders from Mexico to Canada in the 18th and 19th centuries. Paul Robinson, PhD Director, Charles Drew Medical GIS Lab Charles Drew University l Los Angeles, CA Dr. Robinson is a medical geographer, with a concentration in the application of GIScience theory and methods to understanding and addressing health and medical related problems and issues. Dr Robinson’s research is located at the intersection of time, space, place and health. Dr Robinson’s work can be found in Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Urban Health, Health Affairs as well as in scholarly books such as Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities (2010, NYU Press). Dr Robinson is the Director of the Charles Drew Medical GIS lab. MAHRTISE 2013

57

FACULTY George Rust, MD, MPH, Professor, Family Medicine Director. National Center for Primary Care Founding Director, Faculty Development Morehouse School of Medicine l Atlanta, Georgia Dr. Rust dedicates his career as a family practice physician to improving healthcare access, quality, and outcomes for low-income and uninsured segments of the population. He is a graduate of Loyola University School of Medicine, and completed family medicine residency training at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, and a Master’s of Public Health degree from University of Illinois Chicago. Since 1991, Dr. Rust has been a physician, teacher, researcher, and leader at the Morehouse School of Medicine. He is board-certified in both Family Practice and Preventive Medicine, and is a Professor of Family Medicine with a joint faculty appointment in the Dept. of Community Health and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Rust led the development of the National Center for Primary Care at Morehouse School of Medicine. He is also the founding director of the Morehouse Faculty Development program. Rueben C. Warren, DDS, DrPH, MPH, MDiv Professor, Bioethics Director, National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL Dr. Warren serves as the Director of the National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care and as Professor of Bioethics at Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Alabama. He also serves as the Director of the Institute for Faith-Health Leadership and Adjunct Professor of Public Health, Medicine and Ethics at the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Warren was the Director of Infrastructure Development for the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities within the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD during Fiscal years 2005 through 2007. During his appointment he was on leave from the National Center for Environmental Health-CDC/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in Atlanta where, he served as Associate Director for Environmental Justice. As Associate Director at CDC/ATSDR, he had the opportunity to lead the agency that held the responsibility for Environmental Justice and Minority Health. From 1988 to 1997, Dr. Warren served as Associate Director for Minority Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prior to joining CDC, he served as Dean and Associate Professor of the School of Dentistry, Department of Preventive Dentistry and Community Health, at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. Currently, He a Clinical Professor, Department of Community Health/Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine and Adjunct Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, both in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Warren is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Dental Public Health, School of Dentistry and Adjunct Professor in the School of Graduate Studies and Research at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, TN.

58 MAHRTISE 2013

FACULTY Nina Wallerstein, Dr. PH Professor , Department of Family and Community Medicine Director, Center for Participatory Research Director, Community Engagement and Research Component The Clinical Translational Science Center University of New Mexico l Albuquerque, New Mexico Dr. Nina Wallerstein, Dr. P.H., is professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, and was the founding director of the Master in Public Health Program at the University of New Mexico until 2007. She currently is the director of the Center for Participatory Research, and the director of the developing community engagement and research component of the Clinical Translational Science Center. She received her DrPh at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. For over 25 years, she has been involved in empowerment/popular education, and participatory research with youth, women, tribes, and community building efforts. She is the co-editor of Community Based Participatory Research for Health, 2nd edition, 2008 (with Meredith Minkler); co-author of Problem-Posing at Work: Popular Educator's Guide; and author of several health and adult education books and over 100 articles and book chapters on participatory intervention research, adolescent health promotion, alcohol and addictions prevention research, empowerment theory, and popular health education. Her current research interests focus on community capacity and health development in tribal communities, culturally appropriate translational intervention research, participatory evaluation, and community-based participatory research processes and outcomes. R. C. Wingfield Jr., Ph. D. Associate Professor Discipline Coordinator Department of Chemistry Fisk University l Nashville, TN Dr. Wingfield serves as Associate Professor and Discipline Coordinator within the Department of Chemistry. He is also serving as the Director of the Community Environmental Toxics Awareness and Sustainability Program as well as the Environmental Health and Safety Coordinator for Academic Affairs. He has had over twelve years of industrial experience in chemical process and product development. His continuing interests are in environmental justice and sustainability education, eliminating racial health disparities, fate and transport of pesticides and other toxics in the environment, reducing community exposure to toxics. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from Fisk University in 1964. He received his PhD from the University of Cincinnati in 1971 in Physical Bio-organic Chemistry. He served as External Process Leader and Co-Chair of a statewide Steering Committee to develop an Environmental Justice Strategic Plan for the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation from 1998 to 2000. From July 2003 to October 2004, he chaired the Nashville Health Disparities Coalition. Since April 2006, he has served as co-host on the WFSK, 88.1 FM, “Health Watch: Pathway to Better Health� weekly radio show.

MAHRTISE 2013

59

FACULTY Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, MD, MA Director Family Youth and Infant Health Bureau Metropolitan Nashville/Davidson County Public Health Department l Nashville, Tennessee Dr. Wyche Etheridge is the director of the Family Youth and Infant Health Bureau for the Metropolitan Nashville/Davidson County Public Health Department, as well as serving as the Medical Services Director. She received her BS in English, and Spanish while filling the requirements for Medical School from Amherst College, Amherst MA. She earned her MD from the University of Massachusetts in Worcester, MA and completed her training in Pediatrics at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC. She completed her fellowship in Minority Health Policy while earning a Master’s in Public Health in order to better be able to address health needs at the community and population level. Dr. Wyche Etheridge is nationally known for her work in infant mortality and health disparity elimination. She is a sought after lecturer, is an avid “pipe-liner “for students at all educational levels, and she holds numerous leadership positions at the local, state and national levels.

TECHNICAL STAFF Katherine A. Kilbourne, MS Research Assistant Health Disparities Research Center at Meharry Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Ms. Kilbourne earned her MS from Tennessee State University in Agricultural Sciences with a focus in plant science in conjunction with a Masters Certificate in Geospatial Information Systems. She has experience in development of disease severity risk modeling. Katy is currently working with the Health Disparities Research Center at Meharry Medical College as a GIS analyst and data manager Tyler Skelton, MS Research Assistant Health Disparities Research Center at Meharry Meharry Medical College l Nashville, Tennessee Ms. Skelton earned her Master’s degree from Tennessee State University in Plant Science. She holds a Masters certificate in Geospatial Information Systems and the bulk of her research experience has incorporated the tools and techniques of GIS. She is currently working as a research assistant for the Health Disparities Research Center at Meharry Medical College. Her research interest include utilizing GIS to understand how the natural environment influences health outcomes as well as learning new techniques to simulate the natural environment in GIS.

60 MAHRTISE 2013

2013 Planning Committee Members Patricia Matthews-Juarez, PhD Former Director, Research Training Core Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Health Equity, and the Exposome (RCHDEE) UT Health Science Center College of Medicine Memphis, TN pmatthe3@uthsc.edu Paul D. Juarez, PhD Co-Principal Investigator Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry Professor Department of Preventive Medicine Director, The Research Center for Health Disparities, Health Equity, and the Exposome (RCHDEE) UT Health Science Center College of Medicine Memphis, TN pjuarez@uthsc.edu Ayesha Harmon Keller, MSW Program Coordinator, RWJF Meharry Medical College 1005 D.B. Todd Blvd Nashville, TN 37208 (615) 327-6378 aharmon@mmc.edu Keydron Guinn, PhD Acting Executive Director, RWJF Center for Health Policy Meharry Medical College 1005 D.B. Todd Blvd Nashville, TN 37208 (615) 327-6378 kguinn@mmc.edu Daniel L. Howard, PhD Former Executive Director, RWJF Meharry Medical College Robert S. Levine, MD Director /Research Core Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry NIMHD Professor Department of Family and Community Medicine Meharry Medical College 1005 D.B. Todd Blvd Nashville, TN 37208 (615) 327-5507

Kathleen McEnerney, PhD Dean, College of Health Sciences Tennessee State University 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd. Nashville, TN 37209 615.963.5924 kmcenerney@tnstate.edu Frieda H. Outlaw, PhD, RN, FAAN Director Meharry Youth Health Center 1704 Charlotte Avenue Nashville, TN 37208 (615) 891foutlaw@mmc.edu Charlene Porsild, PhD Associate Research Professor, American Studies Assistant Director, RWFJ Center for Health Policy University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM cporsild@unm.edu Linda Redd, MSHSA, MBA Program Manager NIMHD Meharry Center of Excellence Meharry Medical College 1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd Nashville, TN 37208 (615) 327-6862 lredd@mmc.edu Robert Valdez, MD Former Director RWJF Center for Health Policy University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM Teresa Young, BS Program Coordinator Faculty Affairs and Development Meharry Medical College 1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd Nashville, TN 37208 (615) 327-6789 tyoung@mmc.edu

MAHRTISE 2013

61

Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity is supported in part by Award Number 5P20MD000516 Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry/NIH-National Institute On Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), D55HP23199 Faculty Development in Primary Care, and D34HP16299 Health Resources and Services Administration/Centers of Excellence. The content of the Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity is solely the responsibility of the organizers and does not necessarily represent the official views or opinions of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institutes of Health, or the Health Resources and Services Administration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The 2013 Dr. M. Alfred Haynes Research Training Institute for Social Equity is supported in part by a generous gift from The Dr. M. Alfred and Hazel Haynes Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program. Special thanks to Dr. Vincent Haynes, Encino, California, for his support and assistance for the Health Disparity Research Center of Excellence at Meharry. Special thanks to Mr. Gregg Analla, artist, for his generous donation of the painting, “Lightening Dance” presented to Mrs. Hazel Haynes in honor of the contributions made by Dr. M. Alfred Haynes to the nation for all people who give voice to health and wellness. Special thanks to the Department of Pediatrics: Dr. Xylina Bean, Chair, Ms. Zuay Thompson, Program Coordinator and Mr. Roosevelt T. Faulkner, Sr. Research Assistant. Sponsors of this Institute include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s New Connections, OMG Center for Collaborative Learning, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Center , University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and The Research Center for Health Disparities, Equity, and the Exposome, College of Medicine at UT Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.

62 MAHRTISE 2013


MAHRTISE 2013 Program Brochure