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KEEPI N G THE S TUDE NTS OF RHEA COU NTY HIGH SCH O OL I NFORMED SI N CE 1996

HALLOWEEN EDITION

The Eagle's Nest EXTENDED REVIEW SECTION FEATURING SPOOKY GOODIES! PAGE 5 & 6

FRIGHTENING PUZZLES! PAGE 12

VOLUME 11, NUMBER 3

GREEN STATE GOLF CHAMP PAGE 9

Autumn attractions are fun for fall By CORY SMITH CORY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

Anyone searching for a good time this fall can find it just about anywhere they look. The local area is buzzing with the flurry of activity including several haunted houses, fall festivals, and alternatives to traditional Halloween activities. No matter what you are looking for, it is available. All of the attractions mentioned here can be found within about an hour’s drive from Dayton. If you like a good fright, our area is positively crawling with classic haunted houses and haunted walks. In Spring City, you’ll find The Haunted Forest at the Veterans Park, put together by the RCHS baseball team. The forest will be open for business from seven until ten from October twenty-seventh until the thirty-first, and the cost to travel the trail is five dollars. On Dayton Mountain, in the old Walden’s Ridge School, is Terror on the Mountain, a guided tour of multiple themed rooms followed by a haunted maze. The haunt is located on top of the mountain just off of highway thirty. The haunt fires up around “dark-thirty” and stays open until around eleven. It only costs five dollars to be schooled...in fear. Oblivion X is located on the corner of Church and First Street in downtown Cleveland. The haunt is open from October twenty-seventh through the thirty-first. The cost to go through the haunt is ten dollars. For more information and detailed directions visit www.oblivion-x.com. If you’d rather head towards Chattanooga, there are two you might be interested in: At Cerberus Industries genetic research lab, deep in the heart of Lookout Mountain, something has gone terribly wrong. The Haunted Cavern at Ruby Falls leaves you

PHOTO BY CORY SMITH

Taylor and Keely Sullivan (extreme left and right) and friends seem to have survived last Saturday night’s Terror on the Mountain just fine. The attraction is hosted by the Kiuka Volunteer Fire Department, and you can visit October 27, 28, 30, and 31. Admission is $5.

260 feet inside the mountain to find your way back out through passages full of genetic nightmares. It’s a bit pricey—twenty dollars, but many people say it’s worth it. Also in Chattanooga, you can find The Theatre of Blood in the Encore Theatre on Brainerd road near the tunnel. Admission

here is twelve dollars, but you can get a dollar off admission if you bring a nonperishable food item for the Community Kitchen. The Theatre of Blood is a more skitbased haunted-house, featuring unique set designs, beautiful costumes, and experi-

enced stage actors. Speaking of skit-based attractions, Dayton First Baptist will be performing Judgement House again this year, a religious presentation in a walk-through style. The see AUTUMN page 3

Government “by the people,” right? People? It’s a very well-known fact that anyone who har- of the students I spoke to expressed anger and annoybors a political opinion must be a regular voter, ance with the political system in America. Elyssa Evans had this to say: “There’s no point in voting. It’s not like right? Wrong. By RACHEL THURMAN RACHEL@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

PHOTO BY GREG CAMPBELL/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Chattanooga mayor Bob Corker (left) is running against State Representative Harold Ford, Jr. (right) for Tennessee’s open seat in the U.S. Senate in the highest-profile race this election season.

According to Rhea County’s voter registration office, there are 26,719 people registered to vote, but due to relocation or death only 18,904 of those people are eligible to actually vote. Seems like a pretty high number doesn’t it? Right now you’re probably wondering what the point is, aren’t you? Well, only 7,000 out of the 18,904 that were eligible actually bothered to vote in the last election. See the point now? People aren’t voting like they used to, and more specifically people ages 18-26 aren’t voting at all. Rhea County isn’t exactly known for its lack of political opinions, so why aren’t these young people taking that fervor to the polls? Dissatisfaction with the system is one reason. Many

what we have to say is going to be taken seriously anyway.” While it may sound asinine to some, this is how a lot of people feel. It’s not that they don’t care what happens with the government, it’s that they don’t think they can do anything to change it. Although apathy where politics are concerned may be disheartening, ignorance is even worse. There are no civics classes in any of the junior high schools or in this high school. Most students only have a vague understanding of how the government actually works. It seems that many aren’t even aware of the fact that America isn’t a democracy—it’s a republic. As if that isn’t bad enough, 4 out of 5 students I spoke to were unaware that there were two amendments to Tennessee’s Constitution that are going to be voted on in the upcoming election. In addition to the see VOTE page 3

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The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

JROTC members continue to hone skills By RUSTY HUNTER JROTC PRESS LIASON

The JROTC Battalion is still going strong this year. The Battalion will travel to Sweetwater to lead the Veteran’s Day Parade on November 11. Not only this, but the Battalion will be providing Color Guards to all local schools and Spring City Care Center on November 10, and the Herald News on November 8. Special teams are continuing to do well. The Rifle Team has recently started practicing on Mondays to prepare for their upcoming competitions. The Color Guard has been doing an excellent job at representing our Battalion at all home football games and the the American Legion. The Raider Team has been working hard this season, as well. They traveled to Catoosa County, Georgia on September

22, coming in 16th place out of 50 teams. THey also competed at Cedars of Lebanon State Park in Wilson County on October 20. So far, they have competed in three competitions and will finish their season with the Harrison Bay competition on the weekend of October 27. The Pentathlon Team ended their season 4-3, with wins over Cumberland County, Stone Memorial, Clinton County, and White County. On October 24, the Pentathlon Team will travel to Cookeville to compete in the annual Pentathlon Tournament. The companies worked hard to train all the new cadets and prepare them for Squad Competition, in which members of the National Guard came and graded them on their performance in drill and military courtesy. We would like to congratulate Charlie Company, First Squad,

Band competes in Crossville and Chattanooga

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Sergeant Major Boles leads the Color Guard in presenting the colors at a recent home football game.

led by Cadet Sergeant Jeremy Welch, and consisting of Quinton Carter, Chris Danniels, Daniel Davis, Josh Linger, and Julius Smith for winning the Squad Competition. These cadets will receive a drill ribbon, and the company will receive the Squad Competition streamer.

If you are not in the JROTC program already, now is the time to join. This week alone, we have had ten new students join, and would love it if we had even more. If you are interested, that is the first step. Come on down and get some information on a wonderful, life-changing program!

This could be murder! Theatre Arts begins rehearsals for the winter play, coming in November. By RACHEL THURMAN RACHEL@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

Those of you out there who thought that Theatre Arts class was no more at the beginning of the year—fear not! Theatre students are busily working away at this semester’s play. It’s called This Could Be Murder. Described by one Theatre student as a “farce version of Clue” it’s a comedy and a detective story all rolled into one. The play’s plotline revolves around the “Polly Dewitt (pronounced “DoIt”) My Way Show,” and although I was only allowed permission to certain parts of the play’s outline and cast list, I can tell you that Polly figures heavily in the story. The play also centers around the

murder of several characters that are involved with Polly’s show. There’s a surprise ending which I can’t give away—you’ll just have to go and see it for yourself. This play is a comedy, and the jokes are set on the slapstick side of the fence, so be prepared to laugh—a lot. Also be prepared for puns and plays on words. (Get it, “Polly Dewitt My Way Show”?) The play begins on Friday, November 17 with two in-school performances. The 4th-5th period performance will be acted by the main cast, and the 5th-6th period performance will feature a set of understudies, who will also perform Saturday night. The main cast will also be handling the Friday night performance. I’m told this use of a second cast is due to the larger than usual size of the Theatre Arts classes. Another result of the large classes is that this production is more in the hands of the students than in previous years.

PHOTO BY RUSTY HUNTER

The brass section zips by Cody Matthew and Beth Trinder on the percussion line at the Choo Choo Classic competition in Hixson on October 7.

By COURTNEY JORDAN COURTNEY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

The Golden Eagle Marching Band has gotten down to business for the past couple of months perfecting their show to perform at two of the most well-known events for marching bands. On September 30 they traveled to Crossville Tennessee, bringing along four buses of students and one UHaul carrying instruments and equipment. Hosted there was the Upper Cumberland Marching Band Festival where bands would receive scores of their performances, but only for their personal reference. The intense competition came later, on October 7. Tensions were high for bands all over East Tennessee that had a show prepared to present in front of some very critical judges at this season’s Choo Choo Classic held at Hixson High School. These judges have seen thousands of marching bands, and they know a good band when they see one. RCHS was ranked in class 3A for competition, as was Cleveland High School, their lifelong rival. During the awards ceremony, Rhea County Band students, directors, and fans sat nervously on the edge of their seats anticipating the scores. The announcer briefly paused between each band’s scores and

rankings. Sadly for the Eagles, Cleveland High came in first place with Rhea County following in second. However, the band shook it off, knowing they have yet another show to prepare for the football playoff games, this time featuring music from the Eighties.

BAND STATS Upper Cumberland Marching Band Festival Crossville, TN September 30, 2006 Band overall: Division 1 Rating Percussion: 2 Drum Majors: 2 Color Guard: 2

Choo Choo Classic Hixson High School October 7, 2006 Band overall: Division 2 Rating 2nd place in AAA Percussion: 2 ( 3rd place overall ) Drum Majors: 2 Color Guard: 2

PHOTO BY BETH FORE

Polly Dewitt (Noele Roberts) reacts to the news of her producer’s sudden death, while Edwina Meddleton (Danielle Hickman), Marti Truman (Allie Labrozii), Satynn Lining (Kara Buckner), Shag Berber (Daniel Kelly), and Vinnie Romano (Zak Barnes) look on.

Like pictures?

We’ve got pictures! We take lots of pictures for The Eagle’s Nest, and only a few of the lucky ones make it into the paper. Well now, we’ve started posting the extras online! To view pictures from Homecoming, as well as other events throughout the year, head to http://www.rchseaglesnest.org

The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

Woodshop provides valuable support By RILEY BREWER RILEY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

The students in the vocational department are starting the year off right, with hard work and a productive mindset. This dedication and efficiency is helping the entire school and many community mem-

AUTUMN from Page 1 program will be held at the church, and due to past turn out, it is recommended that any larger parties should make reservations to attend. The presentation is free. However, there is a sugested donation of two dollars. Haunted houses not your style? There are still several other activities going on around here: On Saturday October twentyeighth, Walnut Grove Full Gospel Church is hosting a fall festival with a hay ride. Food will be available as well as “trunk-or-treat” for anyone searching for an alternative to trick-or-treating. The hay ride will take off around dark. The church is located in Dayton, next to the Medical Center. Other area churches often host similar events. On October thirty-first, All Hallows Eve, the Dayton Merchants are sponsoring the first annual Pumpkin Festival held downtown. The festivities are scheduled to kick off at three in the afternoon and expected to run until ten in the evening. Scheduled events are face painting, hay rides, a coloring contest, a pumpkin carving contest, a costume contest, Merchant Treating from three until eight, and a movie in Centennial Park. Merchant “Treating” is a safe alternative to trick-or-treating from the downtown merchant shops. Music will be performed by multiple artists, inflatables will be set up, and there will be areas for skateboarding. Food and game booths will also be open on the Court House Lawn. With all of this local activity, no one has an excuse to stay at home with the, ‘There is nothing happening worth going to’ line. So get out and enjoy all the area has to offer!

bers out in various ways, from graphic arts helping the basketball players show their school spirit with brand new sweatshirts to woodworking classes providing teachers with a good place to store a few of their many books. Mr. Heath’s woodshop projects so far this year have included a pine chest and two end tables for Mrs. Davis, nine lockers for the freshman girl’s basketball team, wall files for teachers, and four podiums for Meigs County teachers. Additionally, RCHS students will be

able to spot some of woodshop’s handiwork in the upcoming school plays. Woodshop built a round table, platforms, stairs, and many other items for Theater Arts and also supervised the cutting of wood and general prop formation. Ms. Ballentine gushed that they “love woodshop” for all of their help. People with a piece they would like built should contact the school and provide Mr. Heath with dimensions for the object and/or a picture. The fee is only the cost of materials plus 15% to help pay for other wood-

AUTUMN EVENTS GUIDE The Haunted Forest Spring City, Veteran’s Park October 27–31; 7–10 Haunted walk sponsored by the RCHS Baseball Team

Terror on the Mountain Walden’s Ridge School October 27, 28, 30, 31; “dark-thirty”–11:00; $5 Haunted house

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shop costs. Another busy vocational class is Mr. Webb’s hydroponics class. These students have worked to build a specialized hydroponics watering system for their plants. The system would allow students to grow their plants with nutrient water instead of soil, and the class has been constructing the system themselves without any outside assistance. Mr. Carder’s Culinary Arts III class has also started a student-run project. The Culinary Arts III students plan to record a Food Network-style instructional video on how to cook certain foods. The video will feature and be directed by the students themselves, and it will be shown to the beginning classes as a way to help the newer students learn and let the more experienced students refine their skills through self-critique. All of the vocational students and teachers hope that this fantastic work ethic is maintained throughout the school year.

VOTE

Oblivion X

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Cleveland October 27–31; $10 http://www.oblivion-x.com Haunted house

lack of classes centered around government and politics there are no student organizations which focus on politics. This is more disturbing when one is aware of the fact that there used to be chapters of the Young Republicans and Young Democrats at this school. The good news is, it seems that more students are taking an active interest in voting and politics. Christine Morton, who has already voted in this year’s election, had this to say, “There’s nothing that you can do after you turn eighteen that outweighs the ability to vote. I’ve waited to vote for years and now that I can, it’s awesome.” The Philosophy Club has spent two weeks discussing younger people who don’t vote and what can be done to change it. It also seems that more and more students are opposed to those who don’t vote. Bethany Henderson said this, “Listen, if you’re old enough to vote and you don’t, then you don’t have any right to complain about the government.”

The Haunted Cavern Ruby Falls October 27–29, 31; 8:00–until; $20 Haunted walk through caves! http://www.hauntedcavern.com

Theatre of Blood The Encore Theatre (Brainerd road, near the tunnel) October 27–31; 7:30–until; $12 Skit-based haunted house http://www.thelittlehouseofhorror.com

Judgement House First Baptist Church, Dayton October 28–31; 5:00–10:00 weekend, 7:00–9:00 weekdays; $2 donation http://firstbaptistdayton.org/

Walnut Grove Fall Festival Walnut Grove Full Gospel Church, Dayton (near the hospital) October 28; free Food, hayrides, activities

City of Dayton Pumpkin Festival October 31; 3:00–10:00; free Music, food, inflatables, skateboarding, vendor booths

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Student Life The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

Unusual activity at RCHS raises concerns By ALEX GREEN ALEXG@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

The story goes like this: About thirty years ago, a new high school was being constructed in Rhea County during one of the hottest summers in East Tennessee history. There was nothing particularly special about that summer of ‘74—actually, the only thing stirring in sleepy Rhea County was the heavy construction equipment lumbering around the new school’s construction site. All of the old timers sat around the local coffee shop and argued over whether it had been a good idea to hire an “outside” firm to build the school. But in late July, the talk changed. Rumors surfaced that late one evening, two workers vanished from the school construction site. On the last Tuesday of the month of July, an equipment operator, Joe Hamilton, and a laborer, James Price, had disappeared after they stayed late to finish preparations for the paving of the student parking lot. The following morning, crews returned to the school to find some company equipment that the two workers had been using in need of minor repairs, and some tools scattered around. But the two men never showed up for work. The head of the construction firm was contacted by officials, but had no helpful information to give. Shortly thereafter, all investigations concerning the missing employees were dropped. But local talk about the incident only intensified. “Where did these men go?” Some figured they had perhaps fought, broke some equipment, and run off. Others had heard a rumor that they were criminals—fugitives from another state—and

had stolen some money from the site office and headed off somewhere else. A few, the usual conspiracy-minded folks, spoke of murder. Nothing came of it, however; life quickly returned to normal, the talkers found other things to talk about, and the new high school opened its doors to students for the 1974-’75 school year. The new high school was a great improvement for the county, and appreciated by students and faculty alike. Except for a few malcontents, it seemed. Rhea County Sheriff ’s department records show an unusual amount of vandalism reported during the first months of classes at the new Rhea County High School. Much of it involved student’s vehicles. There are dozens of reports of minor damage to cars in the student parking lot from the Fall of 1974— scratches on fenders, bent or snapped-off antennas, air let out of tires—things of that nature. Some incidents, however, were more disturbing. One report, from September 10, 1974, describes a 1968 Galaxie with, not scratches, but gashes found near the bottom of the passenger-side door after school. The scrapes were relatively thin, but had actually succeeded in puncturing the steel in places. They ranged from eight to eleven inches in length. Probably the most troubling report is dated a little more than a week later, September 18. It seems that a student returned to his car after school to discover that each one of its windows had been smashed. Not only that, but the rear-view mirrors, headlights, and taillights were shattered. The police report is careful to note the fact that all the glass from the windows was found

“ The bone fragments were

human; pieces of fingers, to be exact. It seems that a body, or part of one, at least, lay buried under a corner of the parking lot.

PHOTO BY ALEX GREEN

Trouble spot: the southeast corner of the parking lot saw several cars mysteriously vandalized in 1974.

on the ground outside the car—as if they had been broken from the inside. Yet the student claims his car had been locked all day. Unfortunately, all of the most severe incidents of vandalism in the parking lot occurred in the southeast corner, in the parking spaces near the grass and trees in front of the tennis courts—a place difficult to observe from the school building during the day. The Sherriff ’s department posted a watch from time to time, but no one was ever spotted in the area during the school day, let alone apprehended. After a while, the vandalism seems to have stopped; there are no more police reports after November of that year. This bizarre bit of RCHS history might have remained in obscurity, except for an event that came to the Eagle’s Nest’s attention as we followed the school’s renovations this summer. It seems that workers prepping the parking lot for resurfacing were clearing away an especially cracked and mangled patch of asphalt in the corner in front of the tennis courts when, in the dirt

below the surface, they discovered suspicious-looking bone fragments. The pieces were sent to the Knoxville Regional Crime laboratory for identification, and the workers’ hunch was confirmed—the bone fragments were human; pieces of fingers, to be exact. It seems that a body, or part of one, at least, lay buried under a corner of the parking lot. State law requires that the area be excavated to discover exactly what’s there, but since tests showed the bone fragments were more than ten years old, the School Board was able to petition for a delay. The corner of the parking lot will not be dug up until school breaks at the end of the semester. This discovery has caused some of those familiar with the old disappearences, especially the more superstitious, to wonder about those early incidents of vandalism. Could one or both of the workers have met an untimely end that night? Could the damage to cars and other unexplained occurences have been caused by some see CONCERN page 6

RCHS students participate in judgement house By RYAN SMITH RYAN@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

Bombs have been flying recently at First Baptist Church Dayton. The church is presenting the walk-through drama called Judgment House for a second year in a row. Judgment House is a dramatic presentation where groups are led from room to room by a guide. Each room contains a scene and part of a story that eventually ends up with the audience being confronted with truth of Heaven and Hell. The founder of Judgment House, Tom Hudgins, started the drama “as a Christian alternative to Halloween,” in 1983 at his home church in Clearwater, Florida. The franchise has proven itself to be a very effective way of reaching the lost. Last year’s Judgment House presentation, titled Reality on the Highway, resulted in just fewer than 100 salvations and many more rededications.

This year’s version is entitled Land of the Free, Home of the Brave, and chronicles the lives of four soldiers from childhood to the battle field. Two of these soldiers were saved at a young age, the other two are unsaved. As the soldiers fight and die on the battle field, they are confronted, along with the audience, with the reality of death and the final Judgment. There are hundereds of FBC Dayton church members helping put on the performance. Everything from cast refreshments to child care to security has to be taken care of. Many of these workers are high school students and members of the FBC youth group. One of these students, sophomore Katie Arnold, says, “Judgment House is great for people who are trying to get back on the right path, and even better for new believers. I really love being in Judgement House, even though it is very time conusming. And the snacks between scenes are great!” When asked about his experience at Judg-

This year’s Judgement House theme is “Land of the Free, Home of the Brave,” and deals with trauma in wartime.

ment House, RCHS Eagles Nest reporter Alex Green said, “It was great; it hit home on a lot of levels. It was nice to see both extremes of life after death, and it makes me appreciate the destination that I know I have.” “Judgement House was awesome!” raved Rhea County senior James Capps, who attended the production last Sunday, “I cried.

Everyone should go see it.” If you would like to attend Judgment House there are still four more performances this year that will take place on October 28-31. Please call 775-0255 if you have any questions or if you would like to make a reservation. Walkins are available, but it is suggested to make a reservation because time slots are limited.

The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

Chattanooga band Nevertheless releases strong debut album Something that will definitely cause a music fan to jump for joy is when a hot, local band hits it big. Well music lovers, now is the time to hop to your feet! Nevertheless, a Christian rock band from

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Click? You might want to keep clicking. Adam Sandler’s latest film may not be well-written, mature, or even funny, but isn’t that what fans have come to expect from him? Click is a modern variation on the “It’s a Wonderful Life” theme. In his role as Michael Newman, an overworked architect who can’t find a way to balance his office and his family, Sandler sticks to the kind of performance which made him successful in the first place—heavy

MUSIC REVIEW

DVD REVIEW

by Kelli French

by Rachel Thurman

Chattanooga, recently released their debut album entitled, Live Like We’re Alive this past September. The tracks on this album range from catchy, drum-on-your-steering-wheel beats to ballads that are perfect for singing (or screeching) along. The music is so wonderfully put together that it can brings chills to the skin of the listener. As awesome as the music is, the lyrics, however, make Live Like We’re Alive an absolutely amazing album. Each and every phrase has important meanings that bring a message into the song. God, love, relationships, and struggles are themes carried out throughout the entire CD. Track five, entitled “Lover,” refers to a person as a lover who fails and to God as a lover who is faithful and graceful. It illustrates God catching a person in His hands and circling them just like a wedding band. Another amazing song, “Perfect Chemistry,” talks about a man who is in love with a woman. He realizes that he is nowhere near perfect, but if he can love her like God loves her, that it will be what she needs, whether or not he is her ‘perfect chemistry.’ The tenth track on the album, “O’ Child,” is an incredibly beautiful song. The lyrics are from the point of view of God, who wishes to be closer to this person. Since it is so easy for Christians to relate to the man in this song, promising lyrics such as, “You cannot do this alone, I gave you my word, and I gave you my life so that you will not be on your own,” are a major encouragement. Nevertheless certainly has the potential to be one of the best Christian rock bands in the industry. This album is a great way to put an end to a bad day and it also makes for some great road tunes. If you dig the rock scene, as well as meaningful and encouraging lyrics, go pick up a copy of Live Like We’re Alive. Got MySpace? Add Nevertheless to your friends list at http://www.myspace. com/neverthelessband!

on the temper tantrums and schmaltzy comedy. The basis of the film is simple. While on a trip to Bed, Bath, and Beyond in search of a universal remote Sandler’s character comes across a slightly creepy Christopher Walken in the “beyond” section. Walken offers him a universal remote that’s not on the shelves—for free. Now, isn’t there a maxim somewhere about accepting free things from strange people in the backs of

PHOTO BY TRACY BENNETT/COLUMBIA PICTURES

Adam Sandler takes total control of his life as Michael Newman in Click, released this month on DVD.

department stores? The catch comes when Newman gets home and realizes that it’s really a universal remote. That’s right kids, the creepy man gave him a remote which would alter his life as though it were a DVD. There’s even a button on the remote which accesses a DVD menu of Newman’s life, which includes “past chapters” and a “making of ”

section. While this may not be the strongest of premeses for a film to rest on, it wouldn’t be entirely annoying if it were more entertaining. Unfortunately, the creators of this film decided that scary casting (David Hasselhof, for example) and jokes on the average see CLICK page 6

Lost Colony worth a visit BOOK REVIEW by Kelly O’ Rourke This fall, fans of Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl series had something to cheer about as September saw the release of the notorious child-genius-slash-criminal mastermind’s fifth adventure. In Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony, Colfer has brought Fowl back in full force, bringing with him all the humor, magic, and chaos that have come to be expected of the boy prodigy’s exploits. The Lost Colony reunites favorite characters from previous books as Artemis Fowl, Holly Short, and their companions are once again forced to fight a new enemy. This time, a bloodthirsty new species of The People threaten hu-

manity’s sovereignty on the Earth’s surface, and Artemis must catch one and stop the human and magical worlds from colliding (once again). However, there’s a twist—a twist in the form of Minerva Paradizo, a girl who may yet be just as smart as Artemis and who is just as set on finding a fairy for her own purposes. Like always, Artemis’s new tale is told with Colfer’s trademark wit, suspense, and endearing characters, both old and new alike. Fans will be delighted by the newest addition and the surprising twist ending of the book will leave them wanting more. Newcomers should not be diverted by the frequent use of words such as ‘fairy’ or ‘magic’; this isn’t a kid’s book in the traditional sense. Colfer’s elaborate plots, cutting sarcasm, and his personal, modern take on Irish folklore certainly deserves the self-given title of ‘Die Hard with fairies,’ and it will entertain anyone in search of a good read.

Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony, Miramax hardcover edition, released September 2006. $16.95.

The Departed delivers complicated intrigue The movie The Departed directed by the legendary Martin Scorsese has finally arrived after great anticipation. Leonardo DiCaprio plays Billy Costigan, an undercover cop who has infil-

MOVIE REVIEW by Bryan Boling

Live Like We’re Alive from Nevertheless, released September 2006 on Flicker Records. $12.98.

trated the Irish mafia. Just out of the academy Costigan is assigned as a deep undercover agent whose sole assignment is to gain all the information he can about mafia boss Frank Costello (Jack Nickolson). In parallel to Costigan is Matt Damon’s character, Collin Sullivan. Sullivan, who was recruited by Costello as a boy, has infiltrated the police force and even gained a high position in the Special Investigations Unit. Sullivan gives Costello any and all

PHOTO BY ANDREW COOPER/WARNER BROS PICTURES

Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) warns Costello (Jack Nicholson) that he is taking too many chances in Warner Bros. Pictures’ crime drama “The Departed.”

information possible while Costigan gives all he knows to the only two people who know his true identity, Sergeant Dignam (Mark Wahlberg) and Oliver Queenan

(Martin Sheen). As the two men gradually fall deeper into their double lives, the two see DEPARTED page 6

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The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

A rather grainy screen capture taken from the Oct. 21 surveillance video. Is there something in the hallway?

CONCERN from Page 5 supernatural force? The answer will probably never be clear, but certain events at RCHS since the beginning of this school year have confirmed the fears of some. Members of the custodial staff report several odd incidents that stand out from the usual run of noises in the night. The most puzzling, they say, was the discovery of some letters scuffed into the hallway floor near Mrs. Guffey’s room, in the northeast corner of th building. The letters, l-e-a-v-e-b-e, were noticed on the floor one evening in mid-Septem-

Tricks & Treats abound in the RCHS library By MRS. AUSTIN RHEA COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARIAN

What do urban legends and ghost stories have in common? They both seem to grow bigger and better with each telling. On a recent trip to Las Vegas, my sister told me a whopper of a story about a dead body found under a bed in a hotel room, in Vegas of course. She swore that it was her boss that detected the odor and then the decaying body. I hated to tell her that I had seen the same story on Myth Busters, right down to the spraying of the room freshener. I don’t think I convinced her that her boss had told her an urban legend and by the same token, once you have seen a Haunted Tennessee is ghost or someone you just one of the books know has seen one the of spooky local legends the librarians can story keeps on going. help you dig up. I remember hearing “I want my golden arm” at my first slumber party and being scared to death while loving it the entire time. This is the season we best love to scare ourselves. Harvest moons, cool dark windy nights with rustling leaves just seem spooky. We have a couple of thrillers here in the library if you are in the mood to scare yourself. Actually, we have some urbanlegend-type ghost books that are based on ghost sightings here in Tennessee. I found Haunted Tennessee with a legend occurring as nearby as the Cumberland Plateau between here and Crossville quite fun. We also have More Haunted Tennessee, Ghost Stories of the Old South, The Infamous Bell Witch of Tennessee, The Granny Curse and Other Ghosts and Legends From East Tennessee, and 100 Ghastly Ghost Stories. Stop by the library and we can hook you up with more than a golden arm! We can find you the perfect thriller.

ber, quite a while after all the students had left for the day. They were not too difficult to mop up; they seemed to be mostly composed of dirt scuffed onto the floor. But it seemed senseless—if it was a prank, or an attempt at vandalism, why those letters? A couple of teachers, also, claim to have witnessed what they have called “unusual activity.” Mr. Daugherty, in fact, recalls the initial events, back at the opening of the new school: “I was here back when all this happened, and well remember the rumors and speculation about what had happened to those two men,” he says. He recalls having just purchased his first car, a ‘74 Malibu Classic,

and being a little uneasy when the parking lot vandalism started. “It wasn’t long before some people began to suspect that something more than an unhappy student was at work,” he says. Daugherty has also been witness to some more recent odd occurrences. “There have been plenty of times when I’ve been working late, and hear a faint knocking on my door; when I’d check, no one would be there.” “I had not known the names of the men in question before,” he says, “but now I understand—well, maybe I understand— why I am always finding “JH” written on things.” According to Mr. Daugherty, about the same time the letters were discovered on the floor near Mrs. Guffey’s room, he found a “JH” written in red on his overhead projector. “I didn’t think much about it at the time,” he says, “but as word got around about those words on the floor, I wasn’t sure what to think—I’m still not sure.” Thanks to the new security cameras, video evidence has come to light, as well. Early Monday morning, while he was doing a quick routine scan through the footage recorded over the weekend, something caught Mr. Messimer’s eye. “There’s usually nothing to see,” Messimer says. “I don’t even know why this stood out. But on Saturday night’s tape from the cam-

Scary movies so bad, they’re...scary Craig Williamson sacrifices his sanity and sense of good taste to bring you the worst frightening fare possible. The Puma Man (1980) Can we agree that any movie containing the line “You cannot escape me! You can no longer jump into space!” is a winner? The film follows Professor Tony Farms as he discovers he has all the powers of a puma. One of which is apparently the power to jump into space. Also, he can fly. A puma can do that, right?

The Evil Dead (1981) The Evil Dead is a classic in the horror genre. Filmed in a reallife abandoned cabin, it features some sort of evil, destructive zombie creatures doing what they do best. That is, being evil and destructive. This movie is not for those with weak stomachs, as it’s pretty graphic. Don’t worry though, in true B-movie style, the zombie guts are made of creamed corn dyed green.

The Touch of Satan (1971) This film stars Michael Berry, best known for his roles in Being John Malkovich and O Brother, Where Art Thou?... as the set medic. In this film, Berry plays Jodie Thompson, who is some sort of vagrant, who meets the Strickland family, a family with a dark secret. This movie successfully mixes unintentional humor (the best kind) with just a bit of horror to make a movie that I actually enjoy somehow.

Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964) Martian children are obsessed with TV shows from Earth about the wonderful Santa Claus. Upset that they have no one to bring presents and good cheer to their children, the Martians decide to take Santa from Earth. Sure, it’s still fall and Halloween isn’t quite here, but it’s never too early to start preparing for Christmas.

Manos: The Hands of Fate (1966) A vacationing family is stranded at a lodge which serves as the headquarters for a pagan cult and all sorts of ridiculous events ensue. For example, the leader of the cult has several undead wives who have a ten minute wrestling match in the sand for some reason. The movie ends with “The End?” on a title card. I’ve been waiting 30 years for the sequel, but no such luck.

era on the east end of the building, near Mrs. Faulkner’s room, you can see...something.” The section of the security tape in question is from around shortly after midnight. According to Messimer, there are some odd shadows, with no discernable source, followed by “something that sounds like a foot shuffle...you have to listen very carefully. Something brushes by the camera lens soon after, and then, and this is the weird thing, you can see a locker door come slowly open. I’ve looked at it several times—there’s no one there.” Mr. Messimer adds that there was no evidence anyone had been there over the weekend, and nothing was reported missing or stolen from any lockers in that part of the school. Is there some sort of paranormal activity taking place in the halls of Rhea County High School? No one can say for sure. Mr. Messimer has agreed to let the Eagle’s Nest make a copy of the portion of the security tape from last weekend, and we’ve posted the clip on the Web. Go take a look and decide for yourself.

VIDEO CLIP! Be sure to check out the video footage on our web site:

http://www.rchseaglesnest.org/video

CLICK from Page 5 preteen’s humor level would suffice. The Special Edition DVD version of the film comes with the usual slew of subtitles and audio overdubs, as well as commentary by cast and crew and a deleted scenes section. The truly interesting parts are the featurettes on the special effects and make-up, the “futuristic” cars, and “fat suit” footage. There’s also a featurette about the director, but the one about what it was like working with the dogs in the film is worth more of your time. This is a good DVD to rent if you’ve got plenty of money to burn and no problem with bad jokes and a frightening cast, but if you’re a fan of a higher breed of both film and comedy, then it’s best to just skip it.

DEPARTED from Page 5 organizations become aware of the existence moles in their operations. Sullivan and Costigan find themselves with only two options, discover the identity of each other or be discovered. The movie weaves a tale of betrayal and deceit with enough twists and turns to rival some of the giants of the crime/ mafia genre. By and large, the movie is extremely well directed, but it is on the brink of being too long, with a running time of 152 minutes. The casting is well done; however, there were times when you could accuse the cast of over-acting. The seedy characters and scenes of crime and violence may be too disturbing for many, but if you’re a fan of the genre, of Scorsese’s work, The Departed is worth watching. You’ll find yourself entertained and aesthetically pleased by the directing and action of the film.

Fish & Field

The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

7

Elk hunting in Tennessee a possibility By JIMMY KELTCH JIMMY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

Currently, we cannot hunt elk in Tennessee. In fact, anyone who fires on an elk could face imprisonment. However, things many no be this way for long. Could Tennesseeans hunt elk legally— though under strict conditions—over the next year or so? At its September meeting in Nashville, the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Commission heard a preliminary report on the possibility of establishing an elk hunt in Tennessee. The report, prepared following a request last May from the commission, suggested the possibility of establishing a hunting season for elk as early as 2007. “This is a very preliminary report,” TWRA Chief of Wildlife Greg Wather

warned. “Whether or not the agency will recommend an elk season will depend on the results of a more intensive study of the status of Tennessee’s elk herd and its survival and reproduction rates, which will be conducted this winter. Recommendation on how to set up the hunt will be made to the commission at its December meeting, after the agency has had an opportunity to take public comments.” Wather said that any proposed hunting season would be strictly limited, and take place only on public lands. “And there are several alternatives that the agency is considering, including quota hunts similar to Tennessee’s current big game quota hunt system, quota hunts with an application fee, and issuing a permit.” Funds raised from issuing elk-hunting permits would be channeled back into the state’s elk management program.

PHOTO BY TIJMEN VAN DOBBENBURGH

Once-extinct elk have made enough of a comeback in Tennessee for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency to consider allowing limited hunts.

Load up your black powder By JIMMY KELTCH JIMMY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

Archery season is rounding off and muzzleloading is here. A week of muzzleloading and archery opens November 4th and runs through the 10th. A limit of one antlerd and four non-antlered is required for this hunt. After that, archery opens up for another week, running through the November 17th, followed by rifle, muzzleloader, and archery with an antlered limit of two starting on November 18th and running through December 3rd. For a complete column, please check out the TWRA hunting and trapping guide. Rabbit season opens November 11th and closes February 28th with a daily bag limit of five. Of course, for all of you who prefer to enjoy the outdoors with a good hunting dog or two, remember to get your dogs in shape before you take them hunting. If you take an out-of-shape dog on a two-day hunt without running him normally, there is a real chance that a heart attack may occur—no joke. Dogs have been known to keep running rabbits no matter what, so be responsible for them. Your dog should be run a recommended two to three times a week prior to hunting.

PHOTOS BY JIMMY KELTCH

Right before your very eyes, Mr. Derlak ties up a humdinger of a fishing lure!

‘Lak’s Lures: By JIMMY KELTCH JIMMY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

He is one of our own: Mr. Derlak, lure maker extrordinaire. I bet you did not know that Mr. Derlak made his own fishing lures. He started way back during his freshman year in high school. First, it was a hobby, but later it became a passion. When asked what motivated him to create his own lures, he replied, “My grandpa used to make them so I thought it would be cool.” He currently is able to earn a profit off his lures, which average $2.00 a piece. But

Has Mr. Derlak found the perfect hobby?

the money is not what keeps him interested. “It goes deeper than money. There is a feeling you get when you catch a fish with a lure that you made yourself—a feeling of satisfaction.” Those of you interested in making your own lures are in luck—it doesn’t cost much! You can buy the supplies in bulk so they’re cheaper; the hook, according to Mr. Derlak, is the costliest part of the lure, and they are only about 11 cents apiece. To make a simple lure, Mr. Derlak first cuts out a piece of buck jig hair,

choosing from colors ranging from charcoal black to lime green. Mr. Derlak chooses these colors because they are the least affected by water clarity and resemble a life like color pattern. Then, he molds a jig head and ties it on. This is a simple hobby that anyone can do, and that gives the avid fisherman a great sense of satisfaction. Anyone with questions about or an interest in this hobby, feel free to get in touch with Mr. Derlak.

Crappie creel legal catch limits significantly lowered By JIMMY KELTCH JIMMY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency voted last week to reduce the Crappie creel limits from the original 30-a-day limit to 15-a-day at the same size of 10 inches. This new law takes effect March 1, 2007. People who break this law will receive severe penalties to be announced later. Since the mid 1990s, TWRA biologists have documented a steady decrease in catch and harvest of white crappie from what were historically some of the best crappie producing reservoirs in Middle

and East Tennessee. “There are numerous reasons for concern pertaining to crappie populations in our more productive reservoirs such as Chickamauga and Watts Bar. In addition, our smaller, less productive reservoirs, are experiencing problems as well. We are faced with less habitat, lower fertility, poor years of spawning success, unstable water levels in the springtime, and other environmental factors. Also, fishing pressure is higher and anglers are more effective due to innovations in technology and communication,” Mike Jolley, Region III Fisheries Biologist said. “Also, we must take into consideration the new Tennes-

see Valley Authority’s Reservoir Operation Study that calls for main stem reservoirs such as Watts Bar and Chickamauga, to be filled one month later than normal, May 15 instead of April 15. This is important to our crappie anglers because much of the preferred spawning habitat is not under water during the peak of the crappie spawn in April. Stable, full pool water levels in the springtime are essential to successful crappie reproduction, as well as other game fish.” TWRA has received numerous requests from anglers to reduce the crappie creel limit. Because of these requests, for the last

two years in Region III, TWRA creel clerks have been asking crappie anglers on Chickamauga and Watts Bar reservoirs if they would support going to a 15 crappie per day creel limit. “2,204 crappie anglers were interviewed with 90% in support of a 15 per day creel limit,” Jolley said. Additional TWRA surveys conducted during this same timeframe on Tims 1/0 Ford, Woods, and Normandy reservoirs had similarly high support (66-77%) for a creel limit reduction. Crappie anglers, beware this coming spring. Get your fishing guide and check into all the details early next year.

8

The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

an

Sportsm

T H G I L SPOT

Jonathan Burwick What about this awesome 7 pound 8 ounce, 24 inch largemouth bass? This slob was caught by one of our own, Jonathan Burwick. He hooked this baby on a bed before spawn. His secret lure you ask? None other than a Bomber Model A chartreuse crawdad. He caught it with a six foot, six inch ABU rod with an Ambassador 5500 reel loaded with a 14 pound Trilene XL line when he was out fishing with Daniel Morgan just past Blue Water. Good catch, Burwick!

Mr. Carder

^

^Mr. Derlak This almost-state record spotted bass was caught on an 8 pound test! With a weight of five pounds, it was only a

While fishing on the San Juan River in New Mexico, Mr. Carder

few ounces off the official Tennesee record books. It was caught November 3, 2005 before a strong cold front hit. The

hooked this beautiful rainbow trout in these majestic blue waters.

extraordinary part about this fish is that it was caught with a green and black 1/4 ounce “bucktail” jig that he rigged

This wasn’t the only good catch of the day, though, as he succeeded

up himself. Being the honorable fisherman that he is, Derlak tossed the fish back in to be caught another day -- a very

in racking up on trout during this fishing trip. Mr. Carder frequently

respectful act of kindness that is honored by many. Good catch Mr. D, and keep on keeping on with the outdoors.

takes trips all over the U.S. to clear his mind and sharpen his fishing skills. Happy travels and good luck fishing, Mr. Carder!

GEAR REVIEW

Tips from the pros Mr. Hudson

Mr. Derlak Use natural looking colors that fish eat. Min nows: w hite, grey, and silver; cr ay fish: brow n, black, and green. Use bait that is the size of what fish are feeding on. As the water gets cooler, fish slow down.

Mr. Fields When hunting the whitetail rut, hunt all day. Always know what is behind your shot.

Gold Tips hit the mark Engineered for extreme precision, Gold Tip’s all-new Pro Hunter graphite shafts are tested to a straightness tolerance of +/-.001" and a weight tolerance of 1 grain per dozen for unparalleled accuracy and consistency. What does this mean? A really, really, good arrow. I myself have shot and owned Gold Tips. They’re probably one of, if not the best, arrow on the market. The Pro Hunter series is a little expensive, costing around $110 a dozen. The XT

Hunter series is second in line, costing $79.99, followed by the Expedition Hunter series at $64.99 a dozen. Gold Tip arrows were recommended by half of the outdoorsmen I talked to. If you want an arrow you can depend on to make the kill make Gold Tips your choice. (Featured at all Legends, Bass Pro Shops, and Cabella’s stores nationwide.) —Jimmy Keltch

Duck decoys are a must, and featherlight ones are the best. Cool weather fish don’t travel all the way back to spawning grounds to feed for winter. Winter fishing requires a slow presentation. Lifejackets and a ready fire source are requirements during cold fishing season because cold winter water accelerates hypothermia and can even kill you.

Most folks think that fishing stops in the fall when the leaves start changing and they are thinking more about deer, squirrel, rabbits, and does than they are fish. But the truth of the matter is that some of the biggest fish and largest quantities of fish are caught from October through the end of November. It’s true that fishing in the fall requires a little more work and you have to dress a little warmer, but the rewards for all the effort can really pay off. Now is the time to catch crappie in big numbers. (In Georgia they call them ‘crappie’ with the crap rhyming with trap, in Tennessee we rhyme crap with crop.) You can usually find them in water six to eight feet deep, and they can be caught with grubs or jigs aound stumps and other cover. I especially like to crappie fish in the fall with minnows, using a big bobber in water about six feet deep. The trick to this fishing is to know when to set the hook when a crappie attacks your minnow. Let him run with the minnow a little before you set the hook, and don’t try to set it on the first bite or you’ll just pull it way from him. They may not necessarily take the bobber under. Most of the time a crappie will just run with the bait at the same depth. Good luck, and let me know how it goes!

Mr. Carder

Have a knack for the outdoors? We’d like to hear from you! If you’ve got a favorite piece of gear, some tips for outdoorsmen, or make a notable catch or kill, we’d like to feature you. To be considered, send an email to

jimmy@rchseaglesnest.org

Trout fishing in the month of October has been a little slow—too much water on the Hiwassee and too little water on the Tellico. Fishing is tough, but you can succeed. The flies of choice are the Hiwassee Gnat, and a yellow and white Mickey Finn Streamer. For you spinner boys and girls, a small rapala, and yellow and white rooster tails work well. Good luck and keep your fly lines tight!

Sports

The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

9

Green wins second title By RYAN SMITH RYAN@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

On his second straight visit to Old Fort Golf Club and the TSSAA Class AAA State Championship, Hunter Green claimed his second straight state championship title. Green, who was the medalist in almost all of his matches all season, captured the title in a spectacular finish. The first round of the state tournament took place on Tuesday, October 3rd, and Green, a junior, shot 70. This score was good enough to gain Hunter a second place finish on the day, while Kyle Cothran, a senior from Soddy Daisy, was leading the tournament. Even though Hunter was not in the lead, he was still in prime position to claim his second straight title going into day two of the tournament. Green started off hot on day two, birdying two of the first three holes, but soon after he found himself in a bit of a slump on the rest of the front nine, and shot a below average 38. The defending state champion would have to make another amazing comeback if he was going

to regain his title, and he did. Kyle Cothran choked on the second day of the tournament meaning Green’s main competition was Jack Belote, a junior from Bolton High School. After trailing most of the tournament to various opponents, Hunter finally made his rally on the back nine, where he birdied four holes to put him into a tie for first place with Belote going into the final hole. Green hit his tee shot in the hazard, and hit his third shot over the green, but was saved by a Belote three-putt. So after 36 holes Green and Belote were tied with a score of 141. This caused a playoff hole to be played on hole number one. Number one is a tight dog leg right par four with a pond short of the green. Hunter hit a three iron off the tee, and then reached the green on his second shot with a wedge. He went on to seal the victory with a two-putt par while Belote three-putted for the second consecutive hole. When asked about his dramatic playoff victory Hunter replied, “It’s great to win twice, and maybe we can make it a third.”

PHOTO BY CATHY CHAPMAN/THE HERALD NEWS

Members of the RCHS Golf team celebrate Hunter Green’s second win at the state championships. From left: Zack Drake, Coach Ruehling, Hunter Green, Jacob Davis, Ryan Maddux, and Kelly Lane

Green is already looking forward to next year, and his last attempt to lead the entire Rhea County team to state, not just himself as an individual.

Varsity football heads to playoffs By JIMMY KELTCH JIMMY@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

With an overall record of 6-3 and a region record of 5-1, the Golden Eagles prepare at home for the 1st round of the playoffs after defeating Cleveland 28-7 on a cold Friday night. The playoffs await, but only after war with White County, which is also senior night. The second half of the season started off rocky with a rough defeat by McMinn 35-15, but the Eagles bounced right back with, pounding Walker Valley, 42-13. Penalties hurt the Eagles against Walker Valley. Seven penalties in the first half alone cost 70 total yards. The Eagle’s offense tallied 5 touchdowns on 31 plays in 12:39 of playing time. The defense more than doubled that with 76 plays in 35:21. Cole Thurman led in tackles with eight, followed by Pritchett with seven. Caleb hit Mckinnon with a sixty yard, and Randy with a forty yard touchdown pass. Pritchett also had an amazing night, with two touchdowns and a total of 84 yards on five carries. On Homecoming night, the Eagles emerged victorious with a 28-0 win over Chattanooga Central. Caleb racked up with 23 completions for 270 yards and two touchdowns in three quarters. Justin Hackler recovered a fumble and Ryne Anderson contributed 68 yards in six catches. Moffett compiled some good stats for night with 51 yards on three grabs. The region championship was decided by a loss to Red Bank 25-15, but the stateranked Lions only won by the narrowest of margins. Rhea County showed them what Eagle Pride was about. Cleveland sure got a taste of Rhea County after getting stomped 28-7 at their house. This was the first time in 20 years that Rhea County beat Cleveland two years in a row. The Clevaland game was a game of rivaly and dispute. “There have been arguments since the beginning,” coach Fitzgerald said.

“We return all of our 5 starters,” Green said, “And if there was ever a year that we had a chance to make it to state as a team, then this is it.”

Freshmen football wraps up sucsessful season By ALEX GREEN ALEXG@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

PHOTO BY SHANE WALKER

Tim Dodson sends an extra point kick through the uprights during the Walker Valley game, extending his near-perfect record for the season.

The Rhea County Eagles Nest staff would like to tell Tim Dodson how good of a job he has done kicking for us. Tim has only missed one extra point all season. Congragulations Tim, and keep it up. We would also like to honor some of the players for striving through their injuries for the team. Of these a few come

to mind: Dustin Cagle, Casey Mckinnon, Levi Coxey, Nathaniel Corvin, A. J. Brown, Brandon Mcleroy, and many others whom I have not mentioned have fought through some kind of injury play after play, practice by practice in agonising pain. Keep up the good work, team, and we will see you in the playoffs.

The Rhea County freshman football season has come to an end, and the team finishes with a 7-2 record on the season. This year’s team has been considered as one of the best freshmen units in the state, with blow-out wins against Soddy Daisy, White County, and McMinn. The only two stumbling blocks came against Ooltewah in week one and Cleveland in the last game of the season. This year’s freshmen have showed great talent and an even stronger desire to win. Coach Nichols’ team was definitely a force to be reckoned with in East Tennessee. Now that the season is over, however, Coach Nichols must prepare to train a whole new unit for the up-coming season. The freshmen players have already joined the varsity team practices, as they prepare for the next level of Rhea County football. The players are optimistic about their football careers at Rhea County, and they hope that soon they will be playing under the friday-night lights. The players will certainly form a formidable team in the coming years, and Rhea County has many expectations for the young Eagles-but they have proven that they are up to the challenge.

10

The Eagle’s Nest • Halloween Edition • October 2006

Volleyball closes season with tournament play By BETH FORE BETH@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

The lady eagles volleyball team took part in the Bledsoe County tournament on September 30. Our ladies went against the teams from Bledsoe County, Grundy County, Whitwall, Marion County, and Sale Creek. The competition was tough,

but the Eagles overcame all five teams to bring home first place for the second time this season. Varsity setter Laura Stockton said, “Everyone did their jobs incredibly well and with the best of their abilities which helped contribute to the fact that we won first place.” On October 2, the team played out the last scheduled game of the season on Stone Memorial’s home court. The team had plenty of brilliant saves, great plays, and did an overall fantastic job. Unfortunately, the bad overcame the good and they lost 25-18, 23-25, and 25-19. On Monday October 9, the team par-

RCHS wrestlers excited about coming season By KELLI FRENCH KELLI@RHEACOUNTYEAGLESNEST.ORG

The season is approaching for the sport that involves no helmets, no pads, and ... no pants? The 2006-2007 wrestling season is about to begin. The very first practice will be held after school on October 30. This year’s varsity team consists of eleven returning members and three new players. “As a coach, I feel we have a chance to

have a special season. Last year, we took steps forward and we hope to continue in the right direction,” said an excited Coach Brown. One of the many encouraging things about this year’s team is that there are four returning state qualifiers, including two-time state qualifiers Hunter Daniel and Jacob Henley, along with Nate Corvin and Cody Graves. Coach Brown expressed his high hopes for the guys: “I’m expecting

ticipated in the districts by facing off with Mcminn County, who the team had not suffered a loss to all season. The game was very exciting and kept the whole crowd on their toes. The team took it all the way to five games with the scores of 30-28(loss), 20-25(win), 16-25(win), 25-19(loss), and 16-14(loss). So regretfully, the team was beaten by McMinn and lost their spot in the district tournament. The team’s final record for the entire season was 23-18. The team coach, Ms. Eldredge, said, “Even though the season ended earlier than we would have liked it

to, I felt we had a fantastic year. We took our talent and gave it our all, and that is all I can ask from my girls. I am very proud of the entire team, and though the seniors will be missed, I am truly enthusiastic about the potential and talent for the upcoming year.” The team captains, Adrienne Lawson and Leayn Carter said, “We had a ton of fun this year and we think that the whole team did great. We’re both proud of the way that we came together to pull off our season and we hope that the team has the same luck next year.”

a big year from our returning state medalists. We hope to bring some medals back to Rhea County!” Coach is also thrilled about the rest of the team and their upcoming season. The wrestlers are clearly just as pumped as Coach Brown. “I’m really excited about kicking butt and taking names!” said Junior Nate Bates, who is obviously ready for the season to begin. The season opener is an in-school match against Greenback on November 29, followed by a regular home match versus Stone Memorial and

Walker Valley on December 5. “With the excitement the team has shown in the off-season, our potential as a team is endless. I’m very excited about another great year of Golden Eagle’s Wrestling!” said Coach Brown. The team is getting ready for an awesome season and it is coming up fast. Wrestling matches are totally intense and completley worth your while, so come out and support our Golden Eagle wrestlers! And wrestlers, put on your game faces...and your singlets...and get out there and stick ‘em to the mat!

RCHS GOLDEN EAGLE

Basketball

RCHS GOLDEN EAGLE

Wrestling Location

Weigh-in/ Wrestle

Cumberland Co.

8:00/9:00 am

Home

1:30/2:00

Knoxville Catholic

4:30/6:30

Date

Opponent

November 11

Cumberland Scrimmage

November 29

Greenback

December 1–2

Pilot/Taco Bell Tournament

December 5

Stone Memorial, Walker Valley

Home

5:30/6:30

December 7

Cookeville, McMinn Co., McMinn Central

Home

5:00/6:00

December 9

Farragut Duels

Farragut

8:00/10:00 am

December 11

Greenback

Greenback

1:30/2:00

December 12

Chattanooga Central

Chattanooga Central

5:00/6:00

December 16

Tullahoma Duels

Tullahoma

TBA

January 4

Bradley County

Bradley County

5:00/6:00

January 6

Chattanooga Central Tourney

Chattanooga Central

7:00/9:00 am

January 9

Hixson, Red Bank

Hixson

5:00/6:00

January 11

Cumberland Co., Chattanooga Christian

January 12–13

Home

5:30/6:00

Brentwood Tournament

Brentwood High

TBA

January 18

Maryville, William Blount

Stone Memorial

5:30/6:30

January 19

Cleveland

Cleveland

5:00/7:00

January 23

East Ridge, Ooltewah

Home

5:00/6:00

January 25

Boyd Buchanan

Boyd Buchanan

5:30/6:00

January 27

Region Duals

TBA

TBA

February 2–3

State Dual Champoinships

TBA

TBA

February 9–10

Region Championships

TBA

TBA

February 14–16

State Tournament

TBA

TBA

Date

Opponent

Location

Team

November 16

Bledsoe County

Home

Girls & Varsity

November 17

Sequoyah

Home

Varsity

November 21

Tellico

Home

Girls, JV & Varsity

November 24

Lincoln County

Cleveland

Girls & Varsity

November 25

East Ridge

Cleveland

Girls & Varsity

November 28

Chatt. Central

Away

Girls, JV & Varsity

December 1

Bradley Central

Away

Girls, JV & Varsity

December 5

Red Bank

Away

Girls,JV & Varsity

December 8

McMinn County

Home

Girls, JV & Varsity

December 11

Chattanooga Central

Home

Girls, JV & Varsity

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Editorial PERSPECTIVE:

Procrastination does a body bad By RILEY BREWER RILEY@RCHSEAGLESNEST.ORG

As the school year picks up momentum, many students are falling prey to the monster commonly known as procrastination. Why do we procrastinate? Sometimes the alternatives to working are just too tempting while the work itself feels without reward. Often, people simply allow themselves to adopt the “I’ll do it later” policy because they “just don’t feel like” working now. We seniors especially seem to live the procrastinator’s way of life, doing in advisory period what could have—and rightfully should have—been done the night before. However, the more I begin to find myself postponing assignments or chores whose eventual completion is necessary, the more I realize that I—and all of my fellow procrastinators—am wasting the most precious and indiscriminate gift given: life. All of us are granted a single lifetime

to accomplish our goals and to impact the world. Whether your goal is to be a stayat-home mom whose memory will live on most vividly in her children or to become a world-renowned performer whose abilities are immortalized in film and literature, you have only so much time to make these dreams come true. When we procrastinate, we seem to think that we are making our lives more enjoyable and therefore making the best of what time we do have. But, this way of thinking does not fully realize the true consequences of procrastination. The true consequences of procrastination are found when you spend an entire week worrying about writing an essay but do not actually sit down and work until

the day before it is due, or when you do not receive as high a grade as you would like on a test because you neglected to study until five minutes before the test started and then spend the next week worrying about how your average has been affected. In either situation, life is not at all more enjoyable, and we have wasted valuable time that we can never regain by worrying about the results of our procrastination. In the end, you will worry about these assignments for a longer period of time than they actually take to complete. How is spending a week dreading writing an essay a better, more enjoyable use of our short time? A single lifetime is enough to accomplish great things, and all of us here today

“All of us are granted a single lifetime to accomplish our goals and impact the world.

are enjoying the thrills of living: breathing fresh October air, rooting for our favorite football team, learning all that we can (maybe even learning the joys of love or real friendship!), and becoming a new person every day, reborn with the fresh knowledge that each day brings. Of course, not all of these aspects of living will come to us naturally. Rather, we have to work to make the best of what we have and of who we are. But, how can we do this if we spend all of our time worrying about what has to be done and what should have already been done? Let us all try our best in the new winter season to truly enjoy life to its fullest extent by not letting our minds be bogged down with a thousand undone tasks. Instead, do what needs to be done now, and then spend the rest of your time enjoying all that life has to offer. This will be hard to do, but I have complete faith that this task—unlike yesterday’s math homework—will be completed by all who undertake it.

Oops! We were wrong... Mr. Hudson writes, well, not a letter exactly, but: Yes, we doubted the Master, and changed his spelling of a tasty fish to that of a, well, un-tasty haberdashery component. Between ‘brims’ and ‘croppies,’ we just wish these fishermen would learn how to speak straight! Apologies to Mr. Hudson for monkeying with his impeccable spelling, and other sportsmen who may have caught the error!

If you’ve got a question about school policies or procedures, or why we do what we do the way we do, Mr. Levengood wouldn’t mind hearing it, and just might answer it right here in the newspaper. Simply email your questions or concerns to

questions@rchseaglesnest.org We’ll take care of the rest; we’ll even keep your question anonymous, unless you instruct us otherwise. Sound good? Of course it does!

The Eagle's Nest R H E A C O U N T Y H I G H S C H O O L’ S S T U D E N T N E W S P A P E R

Riley Brewer and Andrea Kendall EDITORS Courtney Jordan and Cory Smith LAYOUT Jeff Ferrell ADVISER

George Hudson ADVISER EMERITUS

Riley Brewer Courtney Jordan Andrea Kendall SENIOR STAFF

Kelli French Jimmy Keltch Shane Walker

Bryan Boling Alex Green Kaity Kopeski Cory Smith Rachel Thurman JUNIOR STAFF

Beth Fore Alex Janow Ryan Smith Craig Williamson

THE EAGLE’S NEST 405 Pierce Rd. Evensville, TN 37332 PHONE: (423) 775-7821 FAX: (423) 775-7889 EMAIL: info@rchseaglesnest.org WEB SITE: http://www.rchseaglesnest.org

PUZZLES COMPILED BY KAITY KOPESKI

Just for Fun


The Eagle's Nest 11.3