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SEPTEMBER 2010 TASTE

THE GRUELING LIFE of a CHEF A FIRST LOOK at HADDINGTON’S EXCLUSIVE GUIDE to CHEESE PAIRINGS DINNER and EXOTIC ENTERTAINMENT + HEALTHY LIVING IN AUSTIN

featuring art by

ADAM VOORHES & ROBIN FINLAY

The Aus Ta vern tin, T exas

Never too far from 12th and Lamar!

New Ownership, New Management! All New Expanded Food and Beer Menu

All New HDTV’s Throughout! 922 West 12th Street

(512) 320-8377

tavernaustin.com

SEPTEMBER 19–22 and 26–29 We’ve come together with some of the best restaurants in Austin for a week of decadence and fine flavors. Make reservations with one of our featured dining spots during Austin Restaurant Week for fabulous $25 to $35 three-course meals. It’s your chance to try a new place or check out an old favorite. A portion of the proceeds will help the Sustainable Food Center.

www.restaurantweekaustin.com

September 2010

editor’s note

600 West 28th Street, Suite 203 Austin, TX 78705 p: 512.502.5041 // f: 512.502.5044 info@rareaustin.com

publisher

Taylor Perkins

editor

writers

Caitlin M. Ryan

Andrea Bearce Adrienne Breaux Nicole Carbon Sarah Morgan Samantha Pitchel Laura Romer Sarah Seidel Scarlett Steakley Amy Wald JW Walthall

art director Lindsey Eden Turner

advertising, marketing, & events Taylor Perkins

content manager Samantha Pitchel

web & interactive director Josiah Spence

design assistant Maren Jepsen

copy editor Emily Reynolds

intern Tarin Goodnight

photographers Jonathan Allen Sam Marx Alison Narro Romina Olson Trevor Ray Thompson Matthias Vohwinkle JW Walthall

cover art Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay, Ice Cream

contents art Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay, Tomatoes in a Box

advertising inquiries: advertising@rareaustin.com subscriptions: subscriptions@rareaustin.com back issues: backissues@rareaustin.com

I can recall my most recent, poignant meal as one that lasted three courses, three bottles of wine, and three hours with my family. Last month, they visited me in Austin and, being the family that we are, most of our days revolved around food. During that impressive meal, I considered the “collective brain” that functions behind each dish placed on a table. That shared curiosity is what led our staff to take an in-depth look behind the scenes at some of the city’s most popular restaurants, exposing the blood, sweat, and tears that chefs and restaurateurs alike pour into their service (figuratively speaking—no health code violations here). Behind any serene ambiance of a quality restaurant lies a grueling fabric of colleagues and critics pushing each other further. You’d be surprised by how many personalities are blended together to create exceptional service in Austin—from the groundbreaking of a project like Haddington’s to the closing shift at Jeffrey’s. If you’re kicking yourself because you haven’t indulged in a good meal out lately, Austin really is hell-bent on providing vast amount of quick-and-healthy options. With so many people leading the charge, we’ve profiled the top players. From fully prepared Mel’s Meals to farm-fresh delivery service Greenling, Austin is never short on creative spins for healthy products. But don’t get too carried away with following a perfect diet: Life changes minute by minute; make sure you don’t skimp on dessert.

Follow us: @rareaustin / Friend us: facebook.com/rareaustin Subscriptions are $38 per year. Sign up at www.rareaustin.com

Copyright © 2010 Rare Magazine. All rights reserved.

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Caitlin M. Ryan editor

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adam voorhes and robin finlay

On The Cover :: Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay Austin’s Next Sweetest Thing

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downtown

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campus / hyde park

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midtown

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east

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south

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Haddington’s J. Blacks H2Orange Antonelli’s Cheese Shop Greenling Life of the Kitchen Salt + Time Dinner and Entertainment Healthy Eating in Austin Balcones Distillery Cooking Classes

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Maps/Index September Events

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The W Residences

The Austonian

Four Seasons

The Spring

Your Downtown luxury real estate resource. urbanspacerealtors.com 512 457 8884 Contact us to learn about which downtown luxury property best fits your urban lifestyle. follow us:

+

@_urbanspace

real estate for urban lifestyles

ON THE COVER This month’s featured local artist

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ADAM VOORHES & ROBIN FINLAY Samantha Pitchel Photo by Jonathan Allen

Tucked away in an industrial center on the far East Side, photographer Adam Voorhes and designer Robin Finlay’s studio space is packed full of eclectic props from past and future projects: Against one wall, a vintage schoolroom setup left over from an editorial spread is covered with football helmets and camera equipment. Across the room, fresh bread and pasta is laid out on a table, ready for an upcoming shoot. The pair, who focus mainly on commercial photography, have their hands in a number of assignments at any given time, and their studio is a testament to the wide variety of their interests. It’s likely that you’ve seen this couple’s work without even realizing it. Voorhes and Finlay create unique images for clients like BMW, Southwest Airlines, Livestrong, and Bluetooth, among many others, and they specialize in bringing out the inherent beauty in common items. When they’re not dreaming up new concepts, they’re exploring personal projects involving mouthwatering food pairings, up-close anatomy, and more. One of Voorhes’ recent sets, “Exploded,” utilizes intricate glass-and-wire construction to present the inner workings of an Etch-a-Sketch, a gun, a telephone— and even a frog, mid-dissection. Perhaps more exceptional than the work they create, the two have a strong connection that informs and enhances the work they do together, as well as the life they live outside the studio.

After studying at Brooks Institute of Photography, Voorhes moved to New York and spent time assisting on shoots and building up a portfolio and client list. When a project brought him to Austin he (understandably) fell in love with the city and decided to relocate. Finlay, born and raised in Brady, Texas, studied design at Texas Tech and broke into art direction at Hallmark Cards in Kansas City, eventually returning to the city she always dreamed of calling home. The two met when a local magazine brought the photographer and art director together for a project; soon after, Finlay began tailoring assignments specifically for Voorhes. “I know how he likes to light and I know how he likes to shoot,” Finlay explains. “My favorite projects were for him. I would try to come up with things just

for him, just so I could work with him. I think he was the first photographer I insulted.” “She was very rude,” Voorhes says, smiling. “She was the first art director I tried to please, which was awesome because it was someone who was pushing me to do better work, and that’s not common—good enough is good enough most of the time, and that’s a bummer, and to have someone who is willing to take the time to work with you and make something better, and put as much work into it as you’re willing to put into it, is rare.” The pair continued to work together, becoming more involved in each other’s work and collaborating on personal projects as well as assignments. Their professional relationship quickly grew into something deeper and, four

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[Vorhees’] perspective [is that] commercial photography is one of the highest forms of photographic art that the majority of people will see…They’re going to see a billboard, they’re going to see a picture of a bottle somewhere, and if it’s done really well, even that simple object, whether they realize or not, that’s art. robin finlay

and a half years later, their partnership has led this married couple down the aisle and into their own studio, where they spend their days dreaming up groundbreaking design concepts. “When people come to us with a bit of copy and say, ‘We need an image for that’…A lot of it’s brainstorming,” says Finlay. “Brainstorming over dinner, brainstorming on a flight to California, whenever we have a second to sit beside each other, if it’s not about the house it’s about images.” “It’s nice to know a photographer so well,” she continues. “I don’t always see what he sees and I don’t always understand what he wants, but I’ve developed more of an understanding of the way he approaches things, and it helps me tailor ideas and my styling more to him.” Voorhes does seem to have a signature style. His images play with light and space but also with perception, representing everyday objects in unique ways that challenge the viewer to see endless possibility in the otherwise familiar—things like air conditioners, ice cream cones, office supplies, and the aforementioned frog. While his interests are widely varied, culinary photography has always been a particular passion. “I really like exploring objects, and treating food like this graphic thing that you’re exploring visually instead of just

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food. That’s why we started playing around with it,” he explains. That job certainly comes with perks. Voorhes recently got an exclusive look inside a university lab that is attempting to create the perfect tortilla chip, some scientific research that came in handy on a packaging design assignment. They’ve also got a thirst for cocktail portraiture; in addition to working on some of Absolut’s iconic ads, they’ve photographed dozens of colorful, icy concoctions for assorted features and campaigns. Voorhes and Finlay explain that they generally receive recipes from clients to re-create in the studio, and as a result the two are quickly becoming expert mixologists. Learning unexpected new skills is all part of the design process, Voorhes explains. “I think just getting older and doing more work and having more experiences makes you more sophisticated in the way you see things—an object or the world around you or the meaning in the copy in an ad…I think a lot of the people we’re trying to cater to are very sophisticated and smart, so the more we work, the smarter we get and the more we can see.” Finlay is inspired by Voorhes’ respect for their work and audience, and her personal design philosophy has evolved through their partnership. “His perspective [is that] commercial photography is one of the highest

forms of photographic art that the majority of people will see,” she says. “They’re going to see a billboard, they’re going to see a picture of a bottle somewhere, and if it’s done really well, even that simple object, whether they realize or not, that’s art.” “Stuff that’s good is some of the best art that’s being created in the world,” Voorhes agrees, “and the people that are producing that work are hiring some of the best artists in the world.” Voorhes and Finlay can certainly count themselves among that group. But the pair doesn’t let their impressive workload and success affect the way they run their business. “For the most part we just hang out and make images, which isn’t a bad way to spend a day. We hang out with the dogs,” laughs Voorhes. “They’re great with clients, they entertain very well,” adds Finlay, reaching down to pet the massive bulldog lying at her feet. “I’m also really excited about bringing more focus and more attention to Austin,” Voorhes says. “It’s such a cool city and there is so much creativity here, there are really talented people and I want to see more business from all over to come here.” – Voorhes Photography www.voorhes.com

OCTOBER 14TH | 6–9PM

AMOA–LAGUNA GLORIA

TICKETS ONLINE at AMOA.ORG/LADOLCEVITA or call 512.495.9224, ext. 223 Experience the decadence of a night in “the sweet life” at the 21st Annual La Dolce Vita Food & Wine Festival. Savor bites from more than 50 of Austin’s most prestigious chefs. Sip fine wines and cocktails from Texas and around the world from Twin Liquors and local vineyards and spirit producers. Visit the Scotch and Cigar Lounge with your friends while enjoying majestic views of the Laguna Gloria grounds.

GUEST

COLUMN

AUSTIN’S NEXT SWEETEST THING JW Walthall Photos by JW Walthall

There were cookies. There were cupcakes and cake balls. There was frozen yogurt (froyo, to the hip). Dessert trends have come and gone in Austin, often following those of other cities like New York and Los Angeles. Yes, cupcakes, cookies, and froyo still remain popular, but just as baggy jeans gave way to skinny fit, what is next?

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La Boite’s macaron offerings: orange blossom, sweet cream, vanilla + cardamom, blackberry, pistachio + chocolate ganache, lemon + basil, fleur de sel (caramel) RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

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First, what defines, starts, and dictates such food trends? La Condesa Pastry Chef Laura Sawicki says they must be accessible, both physically (at local trailers or restaurants) and flavor-wise, meaning nothing too odd or out of the ordinary. She also contends that successful trends often have a strong connection to nostalgia and playfulness. Diners will often explore and take risks with a main course, but stick to the comfort of flavors such as chocolate and caramel for dessert. Executive Pastry Chef Philip Speer of Uchi and Uchiko feels the blurring of the sweet and savory boundary has become more mainstream. Gourdoughs, which combines donuts and savory items like bacon or chicken, exemplifies the popularity of this shift. Palates are being expanded, and once-exotic flavors and ingredients, such as peanut butter curry, are more acceptable. Speer says the trailer trend itself is here to stay, and that such daring entrepreneurship allows for chefs to take one single idea and run with it. Both Speer and Sawicki agree that media and pop culture help set these food trends, broadcasting ideas that culinary Public Relations firms have been cultivating. Shows on the Food Network and cooking spots on Good Morning America bring those trends to Austin faster than before.

Sweet potato whoopies with honeyed cream cheese grace the display case at Walton’s Fancy and Staple.

Walton’s ever-popular Lone Star macarons are made with local pecans and a bittersweet chocolate ganache.

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A twist on traditional macarons, Walton’s macaron sandwiches have flavored buttercream and berries between two lemon cookies.

– La Boite www.laboitecafe.com Walton’s www.waltonsfancy andstaple.com

Accessibility…memories of the past, easy technique, and even “self-contained vessels” for ease of eating are all necessary qualities for this “next big trend.”

Victoria Davies, who runs La Boite on South Lamar, has seen the popularity of one pastry explode over the past few months: the macaron. “Just seeing macarons makes you want to try them. Tasting them gets you hooked,” Davies says. She always has two standard flavors on hand—a hazelnut shell with caramel fleur de sel, and another with pistachio and chocolate. Additional flavors rotate with the seasons or for special occasions, such as their Maker’s Mark 46 for the product’s launch. Davies’ business partner Dan Bereczki began making macarons earlier this year as an exploration of his engineering passion—quite fitting since these delicacies are not easy to craft. On recent weekends, however, La Boite, established as a coffee trailer, has sold

over 200 macarons, not counting their wholesale business for parties and even local restaurants. Davies joked, “I’m afraid we’re going to become a macaron shop.” Pastry Chef Sandi Reinlie of Walton’s Fancy and Staple knows that pastries that connect with childhood memories work well. While macarons are a newer creation, she also makes whoopie pies, basically modified cupcake tops with a creamy frosting in the middle. Her sweet potato whoopie with honeyed cream cheese has been offered since Walton’s doors opened and have sold well. She often sells her delicious Lone Star macarons with a local pecan shell and a bittersweet chocolate ganache. Macarons (naturally gluten free) and whoopie pies allow for endless flavor combinations, something important for any dessert trend. The difficulty

behind the technique of macarons may hinder their popularity, though; most pastry chefs hate making them, and home cooks can find them impossible. Accessibility, exciting and endless flavor combinations, memories of the past, easy technique, and even “self-contained vessels” for ease of eating (think cupcakes or donuts) are all necessary qualities for this “next big trend.” Should we consider ice cream sandwiches? Most everyone I spoke with began licking their lips and opening their eyes just at the mention. Soft-serv? Fresh fruit paletas? Hand-held pies? They are all contenders in this culinary show, and in the end you determine the winner. You define the trend. What do you like? Go out, eat, and enjoy!

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Carmina Burana 8pm | Sept 24, 25 ~ 3pm | Sept 26 The Long Center Choreography: Stephen Mills | Music: Carl Orff Musical Accompaniment by Conspirare and The Austin Symphony

Performed live by more than 100 choral singers from the GrammyŽ-nominated group Conspirare and The Austin Symphony, Stephen Mills’ interpretation brings to life all of the emotion of this powerful and iconic music.

Kai

Choreography: Stephen Mills | Music: John Cage Contemporary rhythmic dance set to the exotic and experimental music of John Cage.

Tickets starting at $27 Visit www.balletaustin.org or call 512.476.2163 Production Sponsors

Season Sponsor

Season Underwriter

Media Sponsors

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Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay 19 Ice Cream

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Mulberry owner Michael Polombo plans to open Haddington’s Pub in downtown Austin this December.

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Coming Soon:

Haddington’s Grown Up Pub Grub Andrea Bearce Photos by Sam Marx

A plywood skeleton sits on a fenced-in corner of West Sixth Street and Nueces, offering passersby few hints about the much-anticipated pub that will inhabit the lot. But what may look like a rough sketch to outsiders is the fruition of a well-laid plan set in motion by restaurateur Michael Polombo. Polombo is known in Austin as the owner of the wildly popular wine bar, Mulberry, and in New York for his similar ventures, Bin 71 and Barcibo. The former financier has made a name for himself transforming miniscule floor plans into upscale urban watering holes, offering weary city-dwellers a respite in the form of a cool glass of Prosecco and a wedge of creamy Delice d’Argental. But while Polombo has thrived on this successful formula for years, he has long dreamt of opening something more unassuming, something more rustic. For him, Haddington’s will be a dream realized. Set to open in December, Haddington’s will be a traditional American pub, but will exude the charm of British influence. Carefully crafted cocktails, an impressive wine list, and hand-drawn cask ale will draw people off the streets and into the intimate

atmosphere designed by local architect Michael Hsu. Polombo says he aims for the mood to be lively, but comfortable enough for people “to have the option to sit down and have a fantastic meal that’s second to none in the city.” Surrounded by wood elements and a tasteful touch of taxidermy, patrons will dine on distinctly unpretentious fare. “We try to take great care with the food,” Polombo said. “And yet we don’t have to make it art.”

To ensure authenticity, Northcutt traveled to London to apprentice at the Anchor & Hope, a tavern lauded for elevating pub grub from greasy sidekick to artful showstopper. “I think that’s a really compelling aspect of what we are doing here,” Polombo said. “Claiming a British influence is not just a talking point.” Polombo’s insistence on continuity and quality is a positive sign for the reception of Haddington’s. He says he is pleased to contribute to the growing sophistication of Austin’s restaurant industry.”

Chef Zach Northcutt will produce dishes that espouse the British-born “It’s really exciting to see the culinary scene in Austin develop,” he said. philosophy of head-to-tail cooking “It’s exciting to be in a place like that.” by breaking down whole animals and using lesser-known cuts of meat.

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J. BLACK’S: A TEXAS-SIZED EXPANSION Nicole Carbon Photos by Trevor Ray Thompson

As its name implies, J. Black’s Feel Good Lounge just feels right. This Austin original is led by Brian Franzman, Sean Fric, and Judson Sutherland. It’s an upscale lounge on the western part of Sixth Street, with better than average—as in, legitimately good—bar food, a wide selection of wines and cocktails, and attentive, friendly service. J.Black’s is a place you can feel good about going to, whether if it’s for a rewarding glass of fine wine after a hard day’s work, happy hour with the girls, brunch with friends, or a night out on the town. Now, J. Black’s is giving our great state even more to feel good about as they expand northward into the Dallas and Fort Worth markets. The restaurant moved onto Dallas’ Henderson Avenue this year, joining the flux of local trendy bars and restaurants that continue to pop up. Up next is Fort Worth’s So7 neighborhood—an up-and-coming urban area

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that fronts West 7th Street, the main thoroughfare that connects the Cultural District and West Fort Worth. This fashionable location is pedestrian-friendly and will soon be home to Chuy’s, Barcadia (think Kung Fu Saloon), and an upscale sushi restaurant, among others. J. Black’s critically-lauded Austin menu is to remain consistent across all three locations, the only culinary difference

being that each city’s kitchen pledges a commitment to using local products unique to its area. The Austin kitchen is run by executive chef Josie Paredes—one of the city’s few female chefs who comes with over 20 years of experience. Before joining J. Black’s, Paredes worked with Eddie V’s and Asti, learning to concoct culinary gems that pair well with classic

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The critically-lauded Austin menu is to remain consistent across all three locations, the only culinary difference being that each city’s kitchen pledges a commitment to using local products unique to its area.

Left to right: Sean Fric, Brian Franzman, and Judson Sutherland

and creative cocktails or finely crafted beers and wines. Her food can be described as “female-friendly,” meaning it can be eaten daintily, leaving the ladies unfettered. And where there are happy ladies, men are sure to follow. Some of J Black’s standout items include Texas Kobe Sliders and a newly added sausage pizza (the dough is homemade) called Shiner, Texas. The spicy sausage is sourced from Shiner,

Texas’ oldest—and only—grocery store, Patek’s, which gives the pizza its name. One foodie friend devotedly frequents J Black’s for their Pigs in a Blanket, which are made with Niman Ranch hot dogs and wrapped in that very same homemade pizza dough. My personal Austin favorite? The hummus, which I declare the best in town. Libation-wise, the cocktail menu is separated into two categories: “classic” and “specialty.” Choose an old standard like the Manhattan and know it’s made with consistency, or choose the special Manhattan Night for a unique twist on an old favorite. If grapes are more your speed, the wine list is parallel to that

of any fine-dining restaurant in town, including over 60 bottles, without the ridiculous mark up. Rest assured that J. Black’s will not forget its Austin roots and does not intend to change drastically in order to adapt to the Dallas and Fort Worth markets. In fact, they are committed to bringing that relaxed Austin vibe to each of the new establishments. After all, Franzman, Fric and Sutherland have built a concept that just feels good and would not take it to a market ill fit for the friendly Austin brand. – J. Black’s Feel Good Lounge www.jblacks.com

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Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay 27 Tomato & Mozzarella

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Bleed and Drink Orange Scarlett Steakley

When the great minds behind Austin’s premier advertising agency, GSD&M Idea City, championed a plan to put the University of Texas’ most recognized landmark right into the public’s hands, a harmonious, burnt-orange chord was struck.

H2Orange was conceived by Tim McClure who teamed up with fellow GSD&M cofounder Steve Gurasich to deliver a UT-branded water bottle to the marketplace. Not surprisingly, both McClure and Gurasich are Life Members of the Texas Exes alumni association. The water itself is “purified Texas water in a UT Tower-shaped bottle whose purchase funds academic scholarships, fellowships, and internships for The University of Texas at Austin students.” The Corpus Christi Municipal Water District meticulously “purifies that water to exacting EPA standards, then the Oneta Bottling Company further purifies H2Orange using a combination of activated carbon, ozone, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and deionization.” Remarkably, H2Orange serves as the first license of the UT Tower for a consumable product, and H2Orange is the first project to combine a collegiate shaped water bottle with funding for academic scholarships at a major university.

University of Texas President William Powers Jr. (center) with H2Orange CEOs Tim McClure and Steve Gurasich

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The initial idea was born a few years ago when McClure was on his way to an event at the Blanton Museum of Art. That evening, McClure took a particularly poignant look the UT Tower and

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thought how great it would be if every UT student and Longhorn fan could hold the UT tower in some way, shape, or form. While at the Blanton, McClure was offered a bottled water and the idea flashed through his brain like a lightning bolt. He then decided to seek out a way to offer all UT enthusiasts purified Texas water encased in their very own miniature UT Tower. With marketing geniuses McClure and Gurasich at the project’s helm, H2Orange has nothing but the brightest minds behind it, pushing to make it a household product within the UT community.

launched MindMeld Alliance, a virtual alliance of creative solutions companies that provide 21st Century solutions to marketing problems. Gurasich, another one of GSD&M’s five founding UT Austin graduates to found GSD&M, served as the company’s CEO until 2007. He is now a managing partner of several real estate endeavors, such as the 448-acre Lake Pointe on Lake Austin and the 500-acre Falconhead in Bee Cave. While McClure and Gurasich are majority shareholders, H2Orange is also backed by a small group of

H2Orange is the first project to combine a collegiate shaped water bottle with funding for academic scholarships at a major university. “We have an H2Orange website that allows UT students, Texas Exes, and fans to see just how much scholarship money their H2Orange purchases are generating,” Gurasich says of the project’s intended community involvement. Catering even more to the savvy collegiate community are Facebook and Twitter links and a burgeoning blog. “It’s a brand that can literally communicate with its customers daily,” he explains. As stated in his biography, McClure is a “21st century legend builder.” He was one of five University of Texas at Austin graduates who founded Austin’s GSD&M in 1971. GSD&M’s blue chip clients include Southwest Airlines, BMW, MasterCard, PGA TOUR, AT&T, and the United States Air Force. In 2001, McClure launched Mythos, a branding group for major companies. Most recently in 2010, he

investors who serve as champions for the brand. H2Orange will launch distribution in Austin and select distribution in major Texas markets as it gains speed this fall. The UT Tower bottled water will be available at grocery and convenience stores, select restaurants, bars, and retail outlets, and multiple locations across the UT campus. A natural fit, H2Orange has also been named the Official Water of the Texas Exes Tailgating parties, and the water will also be available at the Etta-Harbin Alumni Center, home of the Texas Exes in Austin, so that its proceeds may also benefit the Texas Exes Scholars program. “H2Orange is a win-win-win for the University, for Texas Exes, and for deserving students,” says Jim Boon, executive director of the Texas Exes. – H2Orange www.h2orange.com

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A Stink so Good

Caitlin M. Ryan Photos by Alison Narro

Practice makes perfect. And that’s exactly the mentality that owners of Antonelli’s Cheese Shop, Kendall and John Antonelli, encourage within their customers. With an entire store devoted to education in cheese and cheese-pairings, the couple has made a stereotypically highbrow concept accessible to Austin’s masses by facilitating instruction, trial and error, and pushing palates and pairings to the limit.

While honeymooning in Grenada three years ago, the spunky young couple made the bold decision to eschew corporate America and follow their bliss: an unwavering love for cheese. So longstanding was this love that John had previously formed and funded a “gourmet grilled cheese club” out of his home in high school. After their honeymoon, the Antonellis breathed new life into the same concept, and reopened a similar club out of their home. Rather quickly, their devotion to cheese became serious. John undertook internship after internship—which included studying under Hervé Mons (one of the world’s leading affineurs) in France— and both Kendall and John attended a “cheese boot camp” at the famed Murray’s Cheeses on New York City’s Bleeker Street. To truly test the limits of exploration, the couple then traveled around the European continent. “We traveled parts of France, Italy, and Switzerland on a glorified cheese tour,”

Kendall says. “It was truly amazing. It was there that we realized it was the cheese itself, the cheese-makers, and their stories that we loved and were passionate about.” The couple has been working as business partners since the opening of their Hyde Park cheeseshop in early 2010. Everything within the red-walled store is done with purpose. The first thing the Antonelli’s staff explains to customers is how the cheese case is arranged—by increasing flavor profile, from right to left. Possible alcoholic pairings are arranged in similar fashion on a corresponding wall. John cordially steps up behind the counter, asking his customers a series of questions while handing out samples, all in an attempt to hone in on the perfect selection of fromage. If any doubt lingers, informational chalkboards detailing cheese style, flavors, and examples hang in clear sight behind the counter.*

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Most remarkable about the Antonelli’s experience is the staff’s genuine respect for the craftmanship behind cheese-making and the corresponding goal of passing that knowledge along. For example, some fresh cheeses (like Chevre) are ready to eat immediately after production, while washed-rinds (like Taleggio) may have to be washed with an acidic solution, rubbed, and flipped two to three times per week in order to create a hardened exterior. Such are the interesting nuances any willing participant is guaranteed to learn when visiting with the shop’s approachable owners. Upon explaining how to create the perfect cheese plate, Kendall says that, while it really takes years to understand, the magic number seems to be

staff favorites Decadent pairings from the pros at Antonelli’s

*See the chart with an exclusive pairing section on page 33

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Most remarkable about the Antonelli’s experience is the staff’s genuine respect for the craftmanship behind cheese-making and the corresponding goal of passing that knowledge along. sitioned the shop as Austin’s premier authentic cheese retailer. Other local mainstays, like the Alamo Drafthouse, have taken note of Antonelli’s grand reception within the community, and the two Austin businesses offer occasional joint tasting events, with more on the horizon.

between three and five different styles of cheese. Pick three different styles you like, she suggests, and do not to stress over perfection. “Consider your purpose, plate the cheeses in order [according to style] clockwise, serve at room temp, and enjoy!” Kendall says of her no-fail approach for would-be cheese-hosts. And such a spirited attitude is precisely what has earned Antonelli’s Cheese Shop its devoted customers and po-

“There’s nothing John and I do better than get excited about cheese,” Kendall shares. “So the best job for us was to share that passion and those stories with others.”

kendall john

buffalo mozzarella with mas de gourgonnier olive oil and fleur de sel

john

ossau iraty with hennepin by ommegang brewery

bonne bouche by vermont butter & cheese co. with la quercia organic prosciutto and prosecco

kelly

pure luck ste. maure with apple cider confit with calvados michael

ali

goat gouda by central coast creamery with kaka’wa cocoa beans

dante by the wisconsin sheep dairy coop with french wild strawberry jam

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The Official Antonelli’s Cheese Guide

Pairings suggested exclusively for Rare readers!

CHEESE STYLE

FLAVORS

EXAMPLES

BEER

WINE

FRESH

Mild, Milky, Tangy

Mozzarella, Feta, Chevre, Ricotta, Fromage Blanc

Lambic

White: light, citrusy, crisp, refreshing (Muscadet, Pinot Grigio)

SOFT-RIPENED/ BLOOMY-RIND

Creamy, Mushroomy, Buttery

Brie de Meaux, Camembert, Bonne Bouche

Belgian Witbier, German Hefeweizen, Biere Brut

Anything Bubbly (Champagne, Prosecco)

WASHED-RIND

Meaty, Creamy, Truffle

Taleggio, Red Hawk, Epoisses

Pale Ale, IPA

Blush Rose, Aromatized Wine (Vermouth)

SEMI-SOFT

Cool Cellars, Wet Hay

Tomme Crayeuse, Appalachian

Saison, American Blonde Ale

Unoaked Earthy Whites (Vouvrays, Macons, or Rhone Varietals)

FIRM

Grassy, Fruity, Nutty, Brown Butter

Pondhopper, Clothbound Cheddar, Landaff

German Pilsner, Tripel

Red: light to medium body, ashy, grape (Pinot Noir, Rioja, Beaujolais), Rich Oaked White Wines (New World Chardonnay, Oaked Sauvignon Blanc)

HARD

Almond, Salty, Caramel, Pineapple

Parmigiano-Reggiano, Dante, Dry Jack, 12-Month Manchego

Tripel, Belgian Strong Ale, Bock

Red: full-bodied, dark fruit, earthy, spicy, rich (Cabernet Savignon, Merlot, Barolo)

BLUE

Acidic, Peppery, Minerally

Gorgonzola, Roquefort, Rogue River Blue

Porter, Stout, Brown Ale

Port, Sherry, Ice Wine

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Too Good to be True? Just Good to be Green. Straight from Farm to Home. Laura Romer Photos by Alison Narro

Finally, a day has come when shopping at the grocery store no longer involves shopping at the grocery store. Enter—from your computer—Greenling. A provider and home deliverer of locally grown, organic food, Greenling seeks to cut out the shopping part of grocery shopping. Founder and CEO of Greenling, Mason Arnold—who also goes by the preferred title of the Cookie Monster— started the company in 2005. After working with an environmental consulting firm and then owning his own environmentally responsible landscaping business for two years, the native Austinite decided to take his passion for sustainability to the masses by focusing on food. “It’s at the very core of everything,” Arnold says.

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Greenling has the largest supply of local food of any retailer, as well as the largest selection of certified organic non-local food. Aside from the usual farm fare of fruits and vegetables, shop online for local, organic milk products, grass-fed meats and poultry, and toss some non-local dry goods into your shopping cart such as grains, sugars, pastas, and salsas. Come Thanksgiving time, you can even order yourself a fresh, local-pastured, never-frozen turkey right in time for

the big holiday meal. Greenling’s newest addition will be recipe baskets containing everything needed to make a meal already portioned out with step-by-step instructions. Jessica Evans, who serves as Arnold’s Lemon Aide, emphasizes the company’s access to foods that one can’t even buy at the farmers’ markets. “Greenling works with over 65 farms now, so you’re essentially going to one farmers’

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Because we work directly with the farmers and then directly with consumers, we cut out a lot of the waste of the traditional supply chain. mason arnold, founder market that has them all there without having to waste time and gas to find them throughout the city,” says Evans.

competitive and still drop it right on someone’s doorstep.”

Greenling’s customers range from young professionals to couples to families, but they are all people who understand the benefits of local and organic groceries. According to Arnold, “Once you understand that, you’re either going to the farmers’ markets and interacting directly with people, or we’re a good choice if you don’t have time to do that all the time.”

All of this with no delivery fee. Prices are comparable to what you could find at farmers’ markets and natural food stores. “We’re able to do that because we don’t have retail centers that we have to upkeep and maintain since it’s an online interface,” Arnold says. “Because we work directly with the farmers and then directly with consumers, we cut out a lot of the waste of the traditional supply chain so we’re able to be

“We want it to be convenient,” Evans says. “We make it very easy to receive food delivery, even letting people choose how they want to pay.” These options include up front online or when you receive right at your door one of the 900-plus happy green crates of organic goodness that are sent out weekly. You don’t even have to be home to receive delivery.

Even the Cookie Monster himself makes use of Greenling. “It’s almost embarrassing that I end up at home and say ‘hi’ to the delivery driver who comes and brings me my food from where I work,” laughs Arnold. It’s not too good to be true. It’s just good to be green. And right from your home. – Greenling www.greenling.com

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From Dusk ‘Til Dawn The Grueling Life of the Kitchen JW Walthall Photos by JW Walthall

Bleeding fingertips. Sweat-soaked chef coats. Tears falling from a young girl’s eyes in the back stairwell. Scars that bring back memories, and paychecks that make you want to forget. Life in restaurants is not all flowers and candy, as anyone who has read Anthony Bourdain knows well. Having worked as a host, a waiter, a floor manager, and as a pastry chef at establishments around Austin, I have seen and lived the day-to-day. The hours and the schedule became more of a lifestyle than a job. A Monday morning in a kitchen—one that does not serve lunch—starts around 10 o’clock. The chef has only partially recovered from a long, grueling weekend, and the prep cooks work before they have to head back to culinary school that night for classes. They run through their long prep lists, knowing that the next few hours will not be easy. The deliveries begin to pile up. Large 50 pound bags of flour and sugar just stare at the pastry chef asking to be taken away. Cases of butter must be unpacked and arranged in the dairy cooler. Even with two people, the task takes a while. Peaches, onions, and carrots are in their own bins. Herbs are separated and labeled. Not a single

piece of cardboard remains—boxes are broken down and stored outside for recycling. But the fish order never arrived; it was mis-delivered and will not come until tomorrow. The chef runs hurriedly to Whole Foods or Quality Seafood to find replacements, if possible. Harlan Scott, the General Manager of Parkside, noted that working in restaurants can be a very grey-collar profession. Hostesses may be just-graduated high school students. Waiters might be undergrads or even pursuing their Master’s or PhD. Some have found their career, having worked in the job for over twenty years. Others, yes, may be dropouts just earning cash for their lifestyle. Chefs and cooks have a mix of college degrees, culinary school, and self-taught technique. All, though, have chosen their profession not out of necessity, but out of passion. Executive Chef Shawn Cirkiel of Parkside is married with two kids. His days start at the gym after taking his son to school at 7:30am. His phone has already started to ring, even before his morning meetings with purveyors, construction

contractors, or his staff. During a busy season, he often lucks out if he finds even one day off amid the late nights to see his wife and find rest. Deegan McClung runs similar hours at Jeffrey’s as the Executive Chef but has the blessing of working with his wife, Kate, who is the General Manager. Twice a week he is at Boggy Creek Farm by 8:30am and won’t leave the kitchen until after 11pm. Otherwise his mornings may start by sorting through invoices, planning menus for both regular service and large private parties, or looking at the weekly sales. Deegan and Kate occupy different worlds at the restaurant—he in the kitchen and she on the floor—but they both say they would never see each other if it weren’t for their jobs. Parkside, a large restaurant in the heart of downtown, can easily serve 300 to 400 people on a Friday or Saturday night, along with a large area upstairs for their numerous private parties. In one week, the kitchen staff has put in over 1000 hours and the servers, bartenders, and bussers over 400.

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Jeffrey’s, a smaller fine-dining restaurant in the Clarksville neighborhood, will seat over 200 diners on a busy night. Five cooks will be in the kitchen, and 14 staff will run the front. Kate Wallace McClung, the manager at Jeffrey’s, noted that most everything is made from scratch—fresh bread,

The afternoon comes. The manager and hostess have called to confirm all the reservations for the evening. Prep is winding down in the kitchen just before service. The bartender fills containers with freshly squeezed juice and restocks wine and liquor bottles from the day’s deliveries. Servers have polished all the flatware and wine glasses

Their happy hour starts at 1am, when they hope to have a few before they head home and open a bottle of wine or whiskey. They suffer for their passion. stocks, sauces, and often their own ricotta cheese. They pride themselves on their passion for quality. No shortcuts are taken, out of principle.

and are researching the new wines and menu items—ones that have just been printed and inserted into leather books diners will pick up that night.

The pay disparity between line cooks and waiters has confused those in the industry for years, when you consider that most cooks cannot afford to eat at the restaurant where they work. On average, they earn between ten and twelve dollars an hour. There is no health insurance, and vacations are few and far between, if they happen at all. Ironically, the diet of cooks is often “poor” and late at night—bread, butter, cheese, and sometimes fast food. Stress from the job and tasting food all day kills almost any appetite. Their happy hour starts at 1am, when they hope to have a few before they head home and open a bottle of wine or whiskey. They suffer for their passion.

The doors open. The happy hour crowd enters and regular diners take their seats. Order tickets start to roll out of the printer. Back in the kitchen a line cook slices off a chunk of his thumb on the mandoline. The food he was preparing has to be trashed, the cutting board cleared and washed, and his finger bandaged with that ugly blue kitchen Band-Aid and covered with a tight, latex finger condom.

To outsiders, what happens day-to-day may seem like chaos, slightly controlled. To those inside, it’s normal. The experience and skill of the managers and chefs keep the doors open every day. Every hiccup has happened before, and they know just how to hold their breath and move on.

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Customers send special requests to the kitchen, requests that sometimes offend chefs who spent hours, days, and weeks developing menus they feel represent the best techniques and their personal creativity and tastes. Placatingly, the kitchen, waiters, and managers respond with a smile. A group of twenty diners arrives for a friend’s birthday. They order round after round of drinks but become distracted from ordering food despite the waiter’s best efforts—throwing off the hopes of timing their meal around all the other diners in the restaurant.

The restaurant is at capacity, and several of the staff are “in the weeds,” meaning they are overwhelmed and cannot keep up with the tables and orders piling in. A diner begins berating a waiter and then the manager. Another yells at a hostess, eventually bringing her to tears. Nothing went wrong, but they both brought their overly aggressive personalities to dinner. Waiters can end up serving as counselors to couples or friends when personal disputes erupt at their table. Physical threats are even made from time to time, but once again the experience and skill of the staff diffuses any situation. In the kitchen a small reach-in cooler breaks down, rendering it useless. All the items have to be moved, making the efficient dancing movement of the line cooks less beautiful. The power goes out briefly, shutting the electronic ordering system down requiring the waiters to handwrite tickets and run credit cards on those old, clunky mechanical swipers. The cooks find flashlights to cook in the dark while the diners begin to enjoy the real, candle-lit ambiance. Ten minutes before closing, a group of people come in and ask to be seated. They order several courses, keeping the waiter, manager, bartender, busser, dish washer, and kitchen staff at work two hours later than expected. The night ends with the sous-chef running through the inventory and making the order for tomorrow. Perhaps a can of Lone Star sits on the stainless steel prep table next to the spindle full of order tickets from the previous five hours. The floors have been cleaned, and all the containers have been covered, labeled, and put away. The cigarette butt can out back is just a bit fuller, the door locked, ready to be opened the next day.

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Former vegan and current owner of Salt & Time, Ben Runkle gives us more than just pickles and salami. Sarah Seidel Photos by Romina Olson

When we arrive at “the shop” in Niederwald, Runkle and his assistant, Thomas, have just filled the sausage maker with a mixture of ground pork and Runkle’s own pancetta, spiced with ginger, garlic, and chili powder. Though Salt & Time mostly offers dry cured meats, Runkle has made hotdogs and fresh sausages over the last few weeks to sell to the public at HOPE Farmer’s Market. The casings in place, Runkle turns on the machine, and within seconds the first batch of sausage is snaking across the counter while Thomas coils it and pops any remaining air bubbles. After ten years as a vegan, Runkle decided that eating pork from the farm “down the road” was better than eating heavily processed monocultureproduced soy. He joined a meat Community Supported Agriculture farm with Marin Sun Farms in northern

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California, later apprenticed with the farm as a butcher, and finally “hounded chefs and butchers around the Bay Area to tell me all their secrets.” When he moved to Austin, he says it was inevitable that he would begin his own salumi business. Vital to Runkle’s post-veganism and to his business are the locally-sourced, locally-produced ingredients he uses. “I think it’s the butcher’s job to build the relationships with farmers and visit the farms to see how animals are raised and treated,” Runkle says. “It’s one of my favorite parts of the job.” For his farmer’s market customers, Runkle lists the farms from which he sources on a blackboard, as well as in his weekly emails. This list is in addition to his walk-in display of cured meats (Sopressata, Genoa, Chorizo, Brianza, Tuscano, and Peperoni Salumi)—not to mention his pickled items,

which I’ll get to in a minute—and he’s pretty much solved any meat-eating dilemma. Several of his customers have even told him that his salumi takes them back to Italy. “That’s about the highest compliment I can get,” Runkle says. “It’s right up there with, ‘I don’t eat pork, but I made an exception for Salt & Time.’” As for pickling, which involves so much more than your average pickle, he uses both vinegar brining (how most commercially available pickles are made) and salt brining (an older form in which vegetables are submerged in a salt brine and natural yeasts ferment the sugars to create tangy, sour flavors). So what exactly does Runkle pickle? Just about anything: jalapeños, garlic, cucumbers, okra, radishes, fennel, beets, squash, and lately, eggplant.

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After ten years as a vegan, Runkle decided that eating pork from the farm “down the road” was better than eating heavily processed monoculture-produced soy. But what truly sets Salt & Time apart in the charcuterie market (though Runkle prefers the Italian term “salumi”) is the dry curing process. To dry cure a meat is twofold: first, he ferments the meat in a high-humidity, high-heat environment for 48 hours until it reaches the correct pH, and then he transfers it to a cool (50-60° F), dry (73% humidity), and dark room

where the meat will hang for at least two months. Runkle is the only person in town to use this process. Eventually, Runkle would like to have a Salt & Time storefront in Austin, but for now his goal is to expand to other farmers’ markets sometime in September and to sell to more of the Austin restaurants he admires.

Until then, you can find a selection of his salumi in Antonelli’s Cheese Shop, on Hotel St. Cecilia’s charcuterie plate, or meet Runkle and sample his full range of meats and pickled products every Sunday from 11-3pm at the HOPE Farmer’s Market at 5th and Waller. – Salt & Time Salume www. saltandtime.blogspot.com

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SIDE DISHES BELLY DANCING TANGO, OR FIRE? Sarah Morgan Photos by Sam Marx

There’s something different about dinner. Breakfast? It has “fast” in the name, it’s a grab-and-go, on-the-move affair. Lunch? It’s casual, a break in the middle of a long day. But what all of this is really leading up to is dinner. Multiple courses, elaborate dishes, sometimes hours of preparation—dinner is an event.

Most days, we overlook dinner, treating it like just another meal. But there’s a long history of nights filled with food and entertainment, of putting on your finest clothes and sitting down with a table full of friends. This tradition goes back to Ancient Rome when dinner was accompanied by plays, poetry readings, or music. Today we watch some TV over a quick meal and call it a night, but every now and then we have the chance to give dinner its due. There are a few places in Austin that know how to take us back to the old days of dinner, of whiling the hours away over decadent meals and good conversation while enjoying exotic entertainment. For something a little different, there’s Phara’s Mediterranean. The restaurant is dark and cozy, with a large outdoor

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There are a few places in Austin that know how to take us back to the old days of dinner, of whiling the hours away over decadent meals and good conversation while enjoying exotic entertainment. seating area that twinkles with strings of lights. Start with the shawarma hummus plate—thinly sliced lamb served with creamy hummus and warm, fresh pita bread. Move on to a main course of spicy beef tenderloin. Phara herself will typically greet you at some point during the evening. Then, around 8 pm, the entertainment begins. Dancing with scarves or finger cymbals called zils, a belly dancer circles through the crowd to upbeat, rhythmic music. “We have a belly dancer every night of the week,” says Phara, the owner of the restaurant. “In the Mediterranean, it’s part of the culture. It’s an art form and an expression of

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happiness. That’s what I wanted to bring here, a feeling of happy times,” she says. Phara is one of the main dancers at the restaurant and one of the most experienced. What began as a hobby has become an integral part of her life since she began dancing about 25 years ago, even helping her get through tough times when she lost her son, Christopher, to complications due to cystic fibrosis in 2004. The restaurant is dedicated to him. “Right after I lost Christopher, the restaurant was up for rent, and I thought maybe I can do something good out of something tragic,” she says. Now, Phara’s offers one of the most distinctive dining experiences in Austin. You can finish off the evening with mango ice cream, or move your party to the hookah lounge and sample the exotic shisha flavors. “I want the customer to feel that it’s their place when they are here, to feel like they are at home and I want everyone to leave with a happy experience,” Phara says. OPA! Coffee & Wine Bar is a family owned and operated busi-

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ness, situated in a house along eclectic South Lamar. Diners and coffee-hounds alike flock to OPA! for the main patio; the area features a giant oak tree strung with lights that twinkle above scattered tables, benches, and swinging chairs. The relaxed area feels like it was made-to-order for a long warm summer evening somewhere in coastal Greece. Frequenters describe OPA! as more of a “social coffee shop” than traditional dining venue, with a menu that boasts beer, wine, and coffee in addition to small Mediterranean plates. Not an institution to be outdone, OPA!’s entertainment aspect is rounded out by board games, live music, and… fire dancing. A variety of members from two fire troupes—Sangre del Sol and Elemental Uprising—perform each Friday night for OPA!’s patio patrons by way of fire-eating, breathing, and body-burning. The group’s performances include “stunning and extraordinary costume design and original fire props, with the option of integrating live music and graphic art installation.” “Watching the fire dancing [at OPA!] helps take people to a whole other place within themselves that sparks a flame of inspiration and passion,” says troupe leader Sage Tonya Jacote. “To dance there every week is an honor.” If you’re looking for more something with more Latin flair and taste, dinner at Buenos Aires Café on a night that showcases Tango offers a glimpse into Argentinean culture. Sample the empanadas with the delicious chimichurri sauce, or try one of their special dishes of roasted lamb or chicken while enjoying a deeply intense show of Tango. “The passionate music is imbedded in us and in our food,” says Paola Guerrero, the manager of Buenos Aires Café and the daughter of chef and owner, Reina Morris. “Reina really and literally wants to be able to sit in Austin and realize that special feel of the city of Buenos Aires… It is why we play Argentine music at the café,” she says. Buenos Aires has Tango every Thursday night at their East Austin location, though they also plan to incorporate Tango into their new location in West Austin’s Hill Country Galleria soon after opening in September. As different dancers come in throughout the month, diners can experience different forms of the dance, from the traditional Tango, to more of a modern mix, which is what Guerrero and her partner, two of the dancers at the restaurant, perform. “To me Tango is more than dance. It is very personal. It is part of who I am as a person. Some will tell you it is a reflection of the soul, others that it’s the dance of emotion, of passion

and of pain, and even others will say Tango is a philosophy of life,” she says. In addition to the dancing, twice a month the restaurant offers a live Tango musician to accompany the dancers. From the ancient Romans to 1950s supper clubs, there is a long history of dinner-time entertainment. In Austin, whether it’s the Middle East or South America, Phara’s Restaurant, OPA!, and Buenos Aires Café can take your evening to new heights. What are you doing for dinner tonight? – Buenos Aires Café, 2414 South 1st, 1201 East 6th Street, www.buenosairescafe.com OPA! Coffee and Wine Bar, 2050 South Lamar, www.opacoffeewine.com Phara’s Mediterranean, 111 East North Loop, www.pharas.com

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a fridge away from home Amy Wald Photos by Alison Narro

For dieters and the allergyplagued alike, fast food can be a one-way ticket to a fast disaster. With calorie and fat content that is through the roof, the classic hamburger and fries is a cringe-worthy meal for anyone with a healthy conscience. But while it is easy for many foodies to float in deliberate pools of ignorance, the gluten intolerant and other food-sensitive individuals are not so lucky.

So what is a vegan, vegetarian, diabetic, or disillusioned dieter to do in today’s hectic, schedule-driven age where healthy eating takes a backseat to life’s crazy, time-consuming demands? The answer: look to the new wave of health-conscious businesses in Austin.

And with frozen meals and drivethrough fare increasingly becoming dinner-table staples out of necessity, it’s no wonder that Austin, a city well known for its emphasis on health and fitness, is beginning to long for meals-on-the-go options that adhere to its health-conscious identity.

Imagine whole restaurants filled with the pre-packaged to-go sections of Whole Foods and Central Market— with meals that are not only portioned out, but labeled with nutritional information and specific dietary needs (non-dairy, vegan, gluten-free, etc.). This dream has quickly become a tasty reality over the past few years as businesses such as MyFitFoods, Tasty Healthy Meals, Simply Fit Meals, and Snap Kitchen have cooked and baked their way into the Austin scene, redefining our visions of affordable fast food.

Echoing the high culinary standards held by so many Austinites, Berson knows that the words local and fresh are part of the recipe for success in this neck of the woods: “First and foremost, [Snap Kitchen] protects the integrity of our food,” he stresses. “All of our meals are chef-driven, and we use local and organic ingredients as much as possible.”

“There are so few alternatives where someone can eat real food and still lose weight,” explains Snap Kitchen’s founder Martin Berson of the challenges Americans face in a culture that’s always on the move and often insensitive to common dietary concerns.

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Berson’s commitment to providing quality, nutritious meals that also cater to those watching gluten, sodium, or calorie levels reflects the sentiments of similar local fast-food alternatives. So next time you’re short on time and craving a juicy Big Mac or seven-layer burrito, take a detour to one of the following businesses and try their balanced, portion-controlled offerings on for size. Your waistline and blood sugar will thank you.

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Simply Fit Meals Simply Fit Meals’ owner Chris Sanchez puts a spin on balanced meals by offering three portion sizes based on calorie count (5K, 10K, and Marathon) so customers can tailor their food intake for optimum energy. Meals combine vegetables, proteins, and low-glycemic grains to fill customers’ stomachs without emptying their wallets. Whether the containers hold cinnamon French toast, green chili chicken enchiladas, or Greek salad and hummus, their contents feature healthy twists on classic restaurant favorites. Vegetarian and wheat-free options are available, with prices starting at $4.75.

Note-Wo rthy Features: Delivery friendly, meats ground in-house, 21-day program available

Must-Try Dish: Spaghetti and bison meatballs, served with broccoli 2405 Nueces Street, Suite A www.simplyfitmeals.com

Tasty Healthy Meals Also known as Mel’s Meals, Tasty Healthy Meals provides a menu that caters to everyone on the healthy food chain—from vegans to low-carb dieters. Desserts are sugar-free and selections fall in line with popular diets without skimping on flavor. Owner Melissa Sterns’ unique combinations include apricot stuffed pork tenderloin, kale and roasted beet salad with a blueberry vinaigrette, and an eggplant and chicken curry. Sides are as low as $1.25, with most meals priced at $6–7.

Note-Wo rthy Features: Free delivery for MoreHands Maid Service customers

Must-Try Dish: Sweet-potato pancakes 706 North Lamar Boulevard www.tastyhealthymeals.com

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Snap Kitchen As one of the newer contenders in the healthy fast food market, Snap Kitchen boasts a menu consisting of fresh, local ingredients. Vegans and vegetarians can take comfort in their signature gluten-free vegetable lasagna (which bypasses pasta carbs completely by replacing noodles with thin layers of veggies), and dieters can defeat their hunger by munching on 100-calorie quinoa and fruit snack bars between meals. The store has two locations, with a registered dietitian on staff to help customers create the perfect dietary plan for their individual needs. Prices average between $5–10, depending on portion size.

Note-Wo rthy Features: Delivery friendly, 21-day challenge available, on-site nutritionist

Must-Try Dish: Ginger chicken stir-fry The Triangle: 4616 Triangle Avenue 6th and Lamar: 1014 West 6th Street www.snapkitchen.com

MyFitFoods Created by former personal trainer Mario L. Mendias, MyFitFoods believes that a lifestyle complete with proper nutrition is more than half the weight-loss battle—80 percent to be exact. The store offers a fridge full of preservative-free, unprocessed choices that range from breakfast tacos to chili, and are based on a 40/40/20

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breakdown—40 percent low glycemic carbohydrates, 40 percent lean protein, and 20 percent healthy fats. Meals can be pre-ordered, picked up, delivered, or microwaved on-site, with most prices falling between $7–9.

Note-Wo rthy Features: Delivery friendly, 21-day challenge available

Must-Try Dish: Lean lemon turkey, served on a bed of asparagus

Braker: 10740 Research Boulevard Bee Caves: 3201 Bee Caves Road, Suite 105 William Cannon: 4301 W William Cannon, Building G, Suite 300 Lamar: 4200 North Lamar www.myfitfoods.com

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To p 10 Mo st Co mmo n Sympto ms fo r Food Intolerances fro m Kim Lo ve

PUTTING ‘LOVE’PERSPECTIVES TO THE TEST Taylor Perkins As a busy young professional, I have always found it very difficult to stay as proactive with my health as I would prefer. I tend to eat what’s around or fast, and I rarely pay attention to the ingredients of what I consume. My reaction was like that of most guys when I heard of a program called the “Love Cleanse,” but I had no idea what I was about to discover about myself once I embarked on a month-long journey of teaching myself what my food intolerances were.   I always equated the word “allergy” to something that made me cough or sneeze or to someone that has to carry around epinephrine in case they accidentally eat a peanut. Cue Kim Love, founder of the Love Cleanse, who permanently changed the way I eat and think about the foods I ingest and taught me think of food “intolerances” rather than defining everything with an allergy label. My first week was very interesting: a green smoothie in the morning with some fresh-cut fruit, and an organic protein shake for breakfast. No bacon, no eggs, no orange juice, no Fruity Pebbles; not the type of breakfast I grew up on with a mom who cooked everything in the same grease.

Of course, food intolerances

are not responsible for everything, but they are often at the root of many of our low-level symptoms. The Love Cleanse program is designed to allow one to discover the food intolerances, to cleanse and to feel the impact of living free of processed foods. I recommend starting one’s health inquiry with food. Otherwise, one is often just treating symptoms and using a bandaid. After the program, if things are left, then one can choose how to treat. •• Stubborn Weight Holding or Weight Gain – yes, if you consume an intolerant food, it creates •• inflammation in the body which can manifest as difficulty losing weight or weight gain. •• Seasonal Allergies – some of the more common trigger foods for

“seasonal allergies” are dairy, corn and citrus but any food that you are reactive to can trigger congestion/sneezing •• Decreased Energy – many of us begin to attribute lower energy to a normal part of the aging process, but food intolerances or even just eating a high quantity of processed foods can take a serious toll on your daily energy •• Pain Issues •• Digestive Symptoms including IBS, gas, bloating, diarrhea •• Increased Stress/Anxiety – food intolerances can also inflame our consciousness and emotions •• Depression •• Skin Ailments – including acne and rashes •• Insomnia or Sleep Disturbances •• Hormone Symptoms for Women

After just a few days of the cleanse, however, I immediately noticed the absence of certain ailments I had unknowingly borne, from general fatigue to dull mental acuity. Moving through the program, I really stuck to the rules and eventually reached the all-important reintroduction phase—I resumed eating fish, chicken, specific foods like tomatoes, and finally, red meat, all of which had been previously eliminated. Because of the way Love structures the cleanse—with elimination and reintroduction—I was able to notice how each food affected me, if at all. Love was crucial in helping me take note of all reactions, and I was able to learn what I need to steer clear of in my daily life…what the consequences of eating each would be afterward if I did not. Eating healthy and paying attention to a diet is a full-time job, but if you make the decision to step up your quality of life and want to do something good for yourself, I can think of no better way to do it. I still drink the same green smoothies I had when on the program every morning, eat only vegetarian lunches, and then allow myself most anything I want for dinner. Kim Love’s Love Cleanse taught me that being healthy is completely worth the commitment, and that what I put into my body directly affects what I’m going to get out of it.

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Hill Country Galleria 12800 Hill Country Blvd. • Bee Cave, TX 78738

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Monday, nov. 1

7:00-9:00PM

For TICKeTs CaLL 512-472-5992 or vIsIT WWW.ausTInLyrICoPera.orG

Tuesday, nov. 2

7:00-9:00PM Wednesday, nov. 3

4:00-5:30PM 5:30-7:30PM 7:30-9:00PM Thursday, nov. 4

4:00-5:30PM 5:30-7:30PM 7:30-9:00PM FrIday, nov. 5

7:30-9:30PM

9:30-Midnight saTurday, nov. 6

6:00-9:00PM 9:00-Midnight

Alamo Drafthouse 20 th Anniversary Showing, Pretty Woman Tickets Available The Long Center Opera Dudes’ Season Kickoff Invitation Only Austin Lyric Opera Blues Guitar Music Workshop Sponsor Appreciation Party Unplugged Concert, Seth Walker Tickets Available Austin Lyric Opera South of the Border Music Workshop Sponsor Appreciation Party Unplugged Concert, Latino Music Tickets Available The Long Center 40th Anniversary Concert, Asleep at the Wheel Featuring Ray Benson, Willie Nelson, and Guest Artists Tickets Available VIP Cowboy Party Invitation Only The Long Center & Hyatt Regency Ballroom La Traviata by Giuseppe Verdi Tickets Available Black Tie and Boots Dancing and Gambling Emporium Invitation Only

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Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay Bread & Butter

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CHIP TATE’S

BLUE CORN

WHISKY What does it take to run Texas’ first whisky distillery since Prohibition that produces such innovative products as the only whisky distilled from blue corn and a rum-like spirit made from local Texas ingredients? An imaginative foodie with a fermentation obsession: Balcones Distillery owner Chip Tate.

Adrienne Breaux Photos by Matthias Vohwinkle

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The star of the Balcones Distillery, located in Waco, is Baby Blue, a whisky made from roasted Hopi blue corn. There’s also Rumble, a rum-like spirit featuring Texas wildflower honey, mission figs, turbinado sugar and Texas Hill Country spring water. Since beginning production in early 2009, Balcones’ products have been a hit and received impressive accolades, like the Double Gold & Silver in this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition. These drinks aren’t run-of-the-mill; it takes guts, love, and a little scientific obsession to take a chance on these types of spirits. Tate’s fascination with good drinks started way before he distilled his first whisky—his childhood was filled with early tastes (sips only, of course). An early education about the finer things was all-inclusive: Tate fondly remembers growing up in a house where both food and drink were explored. “Although the term ‘foodie’ wasn’t really thrown around then, I remember peering around the corner in my pajamas to try to see what was going on at the dinner parties my parents threw,” Tate recounts. “My mom was really a great cook—still is. It took a while, but my dad has finally gotten in to cooking in the last few years, too. Before that, though, he claimed he couldn’t boil water, which was why my mom vowed that no son of hers would not know how to cook.  She got a bit more than she bargained for though. After a few months, I basically took over the whole kitchen.” A self-proclaimed science geek in high school, Tate studied physics and worked for a nuclear engineering company early in college. Add in a Philosophy degree, a Master’s in Divinity, and a near-complete Master’s in Education, and you have quite the varied school experience. But fortunately for drinklovers everywhere, Tate also developed a healthy enthusiasm for home beer brewing in college.

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Starting the Balcones Distillery wasn’t a shiny, order-equipmentfrom-a-catalog endeavor; Tate and his team custom built incredibly intricate and complicated distilling equipment from scratch.

He took the Institute of Brewing’s diploma exam, a three-day long exam intended to give those in the brewing industry a chance to earn the equivalent of a four-year brewing degree credential, in 2002. As chance would have it, while Tate was studying for the exam, the Institute of Brewing combined with the Guild of Distillers. This merger forced Tate to study the science of distilling— and an idea became deeply rooted. Though Tate would eventually move on from beer brewing to the world of whisky, he doesn’t like to think of leaving one for the other.

“I have always been fascinated with the process of imagining how raw ingredients can combine and be transformed through heat and fermentation—first bread, then beer, now distilling… Ultimately, when I made the move from being a beer drinker first and foremost to a whisky drinker, the transition from brewer to distiller came shortly thereafter.” A summer in Scotland working at the Bruichladdich Distillery in 2008 sealed his whisky fate. Upon returning home, he and some bold colleagues—like Stephen Germer, a major investor and

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sales handler, and Balcones’ production manager Jared Himstedt—got to work. Starting the Balcones Distillery wasn’t a shiny, order-equipment-from-a-catalog endeavor; Tate and his team custom built incredibly intricate and complicated distilling equipment from scratch. This handmade equipment gives every person who works for Balcones Distillery, from Tate to his colleagues and band of enthusiastic interns, a supernatural understanding of how distilling works—and makes for some darn fine whisky.

Though you might imagine the home Tate shares with his wife (of the incredibly supportive and understanding of distilling obsession kind) and four children full to the brim with distillery technical manuals, brewing magazines, and stray equipment parts, he assures us he does have interests outside of the fermentation world. But, like someone completely in love with what he does, Tate admits that some aspect of the distillery is usually running through his mind. So in love is Chip Tate with distilling whisky and his distillery, that fermentation will be part

of his future for a long time to come. “Distilling whisky, and perhaps related spirits of interest, is the only plan at the moment,” Tate says. “I know interests can change, but the current plan is to keep distilling for a while—maybe 30 to 40 years—and then go from there.”

– Balcones Distillery www.balconesdistilling.com

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Learn. Cook. Live. The corners of the world meet in cooking class JW Walthall Photos by JW Walthall

Twelve strangers stand around a table. Some are couples, there together, and others are alone. Conversations begin, and a just-sharpened knife sits between them. Soon, they will share a common story. The evening is not the plot from an Agatha Christie novel, but a mystery will be solved—how to master the technique of Thai cooking. These twelve people are at a class offered by Chef Jam Sanitchat at Thai Fresh in South Austin, one of several classes she teaches on a weekly basis. Like Miss Marple, Sanitchat will lead her students through the puzzle, but this time it is a culinary one. People love Thai food and often are drawn to it for dietary reasons, as it can easily be vegetarian, vegan, and even gluten free. Sanitchat begins every dish by having her students Jam Sanitchat of Thai Fresh teaches cooking students in her Vegetarian Thai Favorites class.

become familiar with the ingredients— seeing them, smelling them, tasting them raw, and in some cases learning how to grown them in a garden. She wants people to be comfortable with these staples so they learn more than just a recipe. Tonight they learn coconut soup, pad thai, a red curry, and mango sticky rice—all part of her Vegetarian Thai Favorites Class. By the end, all the students know each other, enjoying the communal atmosphere, and leave with new friends and another mystery solved. Chef Danika Boyle of La Petite Pêche has just returned from one of her

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Eating is a lifestyle; how can you be a part of it if you don’t have the tools? I want to get Americans back in the kitchen, either theirs or ours. Myrna Kallergis, Silver Whisk

and how of cooking. She has a very strong personal connection with food, especially local and sustainable, and wants people to have more confidence in the kitchen. “Cooking for yourself is the biggest investment for your health, both physical and emotional,” she says. “Knowing how to cook is the gift that keeps giving. It is an art meant to be shared with friends and family. It is not just a painting on the wall.”

Myrna Kallergis prepares bananas for her next dish. Her Silver Whisk Cooking School will open this Fall in Lakeway.

Facing page: Eating healthy at the Natural Epicurean Academy

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culinary tours in France. Here in Austin, she teaches hands-on classes in her culinary studio on the East Side Friday and Saturday nights. Boyle focuses on teaching technique, not just a recipe, as she wants her students to understand both the why

The Natural Epicurean Academy, opened less than a year ago by the owner of Yoga Yoga, focuses on designing your health through diet. Their extensive schedule of classes will lead you through the basics of vegetarian, vegan, macrobiotic, Ayurvedic, and raw food. Dimitra Kristicos, the operations manager, says they take a holistic view—physical, mental, energetic, and emotional—and want students to learn not just technique, but also how to shop and read labels. The classes are geared toward beginners and experienced cooks looking to learn more about diet, nutrition, and health. Chef Myrna Kallergis has a lot of energy and passion for both cooking and teaching. This fall, she will open her Silver Whisk Cooking School in

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a state-of-the-art culinary studio in Lakeway. Her courses are run more like a culinary school, focusing on ranges of technique, styles, and ingredients. She wants you to learn how to shop and cook from the market, how to make stocks and sauces, why we sear meat, and how to chop that onion. “Eating is a lifestyle; how can you be a part of it if you don’t have the tools?” Kallergis asks. “I want to get Americans back in the kitchen, either theirs or ours.” The Sustainable Food Center, the organization that operates many of our farmers markets in Austin, just began offering public cooking classes through The Happy Kitchen program. They focus on improving health through better nutrition, teaching hands-on classes that build skills of food selection and preparation. After each class, you even get a bag of groceries to take home to try that week’s recipe. The next time you have a free evening with friends, consider a cooking class. We take dance lessons. We have a personal trainer at the gym. However, life can be so much more fulfilling if we learned how to cook for ourselves and were able to share that with each other. That mystery isn’t hard to solve.

GUIDE TO FEATURED CLASSES Thai Fresh Classes offered once a week. $55 per person. Private classes available. 512.494.6436 www.thai-fresh.com

La Petite Peche Classes offered Friday and Saturday nights. $60 per person. Private classes available. 512.799.2340 www.petitepecheandco.com

The Natural Epicurean Academy Extensive course calendar. $45 – $75 per class, $195 – 225 per series. 512.476.2276 www.naturalepicurean.com

Silver Whisk Cooking School Extensive course calendar. Membership, course series available. $65 – $225 per class 512.826.8841 www.silverwhiskcooking.com

The Happy Kitchen Series of 6 classes, beginning September 29. $175 per person for the series. 512-236-0074 ext. 103 katy@sustainablefoodcenter.org

OTHER RECOMMENDED CLASSES At Table Chef Laura Arnold www.attable.com

Cooking by Design Chef Beth Pav www.cookingbydesign.com

Dai Due Chef Jesse Griffiths www.daidueaustin.net

Chef du Cinema www.chefducinema.com

Marilyn Scher Cooking Classes www.marilynschercooking.com

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YOGAVIDA.NET

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downtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3

24 Diner 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5400 www.24diner.com Austin Land & Cattle Co. 1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.1813 www.austinlandandcattle company.com

4

Beauty Bar 617 E. 7th St. 512.391.1943 www.beautybar.com

5

The Counter Café 626 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.708.8800

6

Creekside Lounge 606 E. 7th St. 512.480.5988 www.thecreeksidelounge.com

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

80

219 West 219 W. 4th St. 512.474.2194 www.219west.com

Crú 238 W. 2nd St. 512.472.9463 www.cruawinebar.com Delish 209 W. 3rd St. 512.739.2460 www.delish-cupcakes.com

15 16 17 18 19

Imperia 310 Colorado St. 512.472.6770 www.imperia-austin.com J. Black’s 710 W. 6th St. 512.433.6954 www.jblacks.com

32

Jo’s 246 W. 2nd St. 512.469.9003 www.joscoffee.com

33

Key Bar 617 W. 6th St. 512.236.9389 www.keybaraustin.com

34

20

La Condesa 400 A W. 2nd St. 512.499.0300 www.lacondesaaustin.com

21

Malaga 440 W. 2nd St. 512.236.8020 www.malagatapasbar.com

35

Malverde 400-B W. 2nd St. 512.705.0666 www.malverdeaustin.com

36

Mean Eyed Cat 1621 W. 5th St. 512.472.6326 www.themeaneyedcat.com

37 38

22 23 24

El Sol y La Luna 600 E. 6th St. 512.444.7770 www.elsolylalunaaustin.com

Moonshine 303 Red River St. 512.236.9599 www.moonshinegrill.com

25

Mulberry 360 Nueces St. 512.320.0297 www.mulberryaustin.com

Frank & Angie’s Pizzeria 508 West Ave. 512.472.3534 www.hutsfrankandangies.com Halcyon 218 W. 4th St. 512.472.9637 www.halcyonaustin.com Hut’s Hamburgers 807 W. 6th St. 512.472.0693 www.hutsfrankandangies.com RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

31

Jeffrey’s 1204 West Lynn 512.477.5584 www.jeffreysofaustin.com

El Arroyo 1616 West 5th Street 512.478.2577 www.ditch.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. 512.494.6916 www.hotdogscoldbeer.com

30

26 27 28 29

Nau’s Enfield Drug 1115 West Lynn St. 512.476.1221 www.naus-enfield-drug.com The Parish 404 E. 6th St. 512.479.0474 www.theparishroom.com The Ranch 710 W. 6th St. 512.465.2016 www.theranchaustin.com Silhouette 718 Congress Ave. 512.478.8899 www.silhouette718.com

ARTS & LEISURE

Speakeasy/Terrace 59 412 Congress Ave. 512.476.8017 www.speakeasyaustin.com

43

Stubb’s 801 Red River St. 512.480.8341 www.stubbsaustin.com

Alamo Ritz 320 E. 6th St. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

44

Tiniest Bar in Texas 817 W. 5th St. 512.391.6222 www.tiniestbarintexas.com

AMOA 823 Congress Ave. 512.495.9224 www.amoa.org

45

Wahoo’s 509 Rio Grande St. 512.476.3474 www.wahoos.com

Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd St. 512.476.2136 www.balletaustin.org

46

Mexic-Arte Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512.480.9373 www.mexic-artemuseum.org

47

Paramount Theatre 713 Congress Ave. 512.472.5470 www.austintheatre.org

Walton’s Fancy & Staple 609 W. 6th St. 512.542.3380 www.waltonsfancyand staple.com

SHOPPING

39 40

HEALTH & BEAUTY

By George 524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5951 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

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Hem Jeans 908 W. 12th St. 512.478.5326 www.hemjeans.com

Avant Salon 507 Pressler St., #800 512.472.6357 www.avantsalon.com

49

Kickpleat 918 W. 12th St. 512.445.4500 www.kickpleat.com

Joie de Vie 713 E. 6th St. 512.542.9220 www.joyoflifesalon.com

50

Milk + Honey Spa 204 Colorado St. 512.236.1115 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

Nest 1009 W. 6th St. 512.637.0600 www.nestmodern.com Threshold Furniture & Design Studio 801 W. 5th St. 512.476.0014 www.thresholdinteriors com Touch of Sass 500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.478.7277 www.touchofsass.net

41

Underwear 916 W. 12th St. 512.478.1515 www.shop-underwear.com

42

Waterloo Records 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.474.2500 www.waterloorecords.com

LIVING 51

Austin City Living 1145 W. 5th St. 512.323.9006 www.austincityliving.com

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Gables Park Plaza 115 Sandra Muraida Way 512.477.7275 www.gables.com/parkplaza

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Urbanspace Realtors 801 W. 5th St. 512.457.8884 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

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Van Heuven Properties 311 W. 5th St. Ste. 100 512.480.8944 www.downtownaustinliving.com

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23

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27 43

54

25

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8 20 22 7 18 50

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MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2 3

Tripp T-Shirts 2405 Nueces St. 512.478.7477 www.myspace.com/tripptshirts

Cuatro’s 1004 W. 24th St. 512.243.6361 www.cuatrosaustin.com

Tyler’s 2338 Guadalupe St. 512.478.5500 www.tylersaustin.com

15

Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512.452.5010 www.thundercloud.com

25

Wish 2322 Guadalupe St. 512.391.9009 www.ishopaac.com

6

FoodHeads 616 W. 34th St. 512.420.8400 www.foodheads.com

11

23

24

Epoch Coffeehouse 221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.454.3762 www.epochcoffee.com

10

Salvation Pizza 624 W. 34th St. 512.535.0076 www.myspace.com/ salvationpizza

Toy Joy 2900 Guadalupe St. 512.320.0090 www.toyjoy.com

Spider House 2908 Fruth St. 512.480.9562 www.spiderhousecafe.com

5

9

13

22

14

El Greco 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.474.7335 www.elgrecoaustin.com

8

Quack’s Bakery 1400 E. 38th 1/2 St. 512.538.1991

Asti 408 C E. 43rd St. 512.451.1218 www.astiaustin.com

4

7

82

Aster’s Ethiopian 2804 N. I 35 512.469.5966 www.asters ethiopian.com

12

Fino 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.474.2905 www.finoaustin.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4206 Duval St. 512.458.3168 www.hydeparkbarand grill.com Judges’ Hill Restaurant 1900 Rio Grande St. 512.495.1800 www.judgeshill.com Kerbey Lane Café 2603 Guadalupe St. 512.477.5717 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Mother’s Café and Garden 4215 Duval St. 512.451.3994 www.motherscafeaustin.com

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Torchy’s Tacos 2801 Guadalupe St. 512.494.8226 www.torchystacos.com Trudy’s 409 W. 30th St. 512.477.2935 www.trudys.com

SHOPPING 18

Buffalo Exchange 2904 Guadalupe St. 512.480.9922 www.buffalo exchange.com

19

Cream Vintage 2532 Guadalupe St. 512.474.8787 www.creamvintage.com

20

Forbidden Fruit 108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.453.8090 www.forbiddenfruit.com

21

Room Service Vintage 107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.451.1057 www.roomservicevintage.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Austin Children’s Theater 4001 Speedway 512.927.6633 www.austinchildrens theater.org

27

Bass Concert Hall 510 E. 23rd St. 512.471.2787 www.utpac.org

28

Elisabet Ney Museum 304 E. 44th St. 512.458.2255

29

Frank Erwin Center 1701 Red River Street 512.471.7744 www.uterwincenter.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30 31

Alite Laser 504 W. 17th St. 512.328.1555 www.alitelaser.com Waterstone Aesthetics 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.373.7546 www.waterstoneaesthetics.com

LIVING 32

512 Realty 600 W. 28th St. 512.322.0512 www.512realty.com

33

M.J. Neal Architects 4220 Duval St. 512.320.0764 www.mjneal.com

34

Venue on Guadalupe 2815 Guadalupe St. 512.473.3706 www.venueonguadalupe.com

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45

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12

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10

23

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24 2 25

9

UNIVERSTY OF TEXAS

27

university of texas

mlk, jr.

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midtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9

84

34th Street Café 1005 W. 34th St. 512.371.3400 www.34thstreetcafe.com Apothecary Café & Wine Bar 4800 Burnet Rd. Ste. 450 512.377.9621 www.apothecaryaustin.com Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512.467.9552 Blue Star Cafeteria 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.7827 www.bluestarcafeteria.com Fonda San Miguel 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.459.4121 www.fondasanmiguel.com

10 11 12

New World Deli 4101 Guadalupe St. 512.451.7170 www.newworlddeli.com

19

Phil’s Ice House 5620 Burnet Rd. 512.524.1212 www.philsicehouse.com

20

Sampaio’s 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.469.9988 www.sampaiosrestaurant.com

13

Taco Shack 4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.8533 www.tacoshack.com

14

Teo 1206 W. 38th St. 512.451.9555 www.caffeteo.com

15

Flying Saucer 815 W. 47th St. 512.454.8200 www.beerknurd.com

Waterloo Ice House 1106 W. 38th St. 512.451.5245 www.waterlooicehouse.com

Ginny’s Little Longhorn Saloon 5434 Burnet Rd. 512.458.1813 www.ginnyslittlelonghorn.com

16

Kerbey Lane Café 3704 Kerbey Ln. 512.451.1436 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

Adelante 1206 W. 38th St. 512.452.5322 www.adelanteaustin.com

17

Atomic Cherry Boutique 5535 Burnet Rd. 512.258.2226 www.atomiccherry boutique.com

Maru Japanese Restaurant 4636 Burnet Rd. 512.458.6200 www.austinmaru.com

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

21

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.452.7753 www.backhomefurniture.com

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.6531 Precision Camera 3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.7676 www.precision-camera.com

22

Russell Korman 3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.9295 www.russellkormanjewelry.com

23

Second Time Around 5100 Burnet Rd. 512.451.6845 www.secondtimaroundatx.com

24

Soigne Boutique 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.300.2929 www.soigneaustin.com

25

Strut 3500 Guadalupe St. 512.374.1667 www.shopstrut.com

SHOPPING

18

Blue Elephant 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.371.3259 www.shopblueelephant.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Dart Bowl 5700 Grover Ave. 512.452.2518 www.dartbowl.com

27

The Art Pad 4520 Burnet Rd. 512.323.0802 www.theartpadstudio.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 28

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512.454.4262 www.ilovebobsalon.com

29

Bodhi Yoga 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.478.2833 www.bodhiyoga.com

30

Rae Cosmetics 1206 W. 38th St. 512.320.8732 www.raecosmetics.com

LIVING 31

Avenel 3815 Guadalupe St. 512.699.9200 www.ownhydepark.com

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29

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31 25 RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

85

E

east side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

Justine’s Brasserie 4710 E. 5th St. 512.385.2900 www.justines1937.com

14

Boggy Creek Farm 3414 Lyons Rd. 512.926.4650 www.boggycreekfarm.com

The Liberty 1618 1/2 E. 6th St. 512.600.4791

15

3

Buenos Aires Café 1201 E. 6th St. 512.382.1189 www.buenosairescafe.com

Lustre Pearl 97 Rainey St. 512.469.0400 www.lustrepearlaustin.com

16

4

Cheer Up Charlie’s 1104 E. 6th St. 512.431.2133 www.cheerupcharlies. blogspot.com

Progress Coffee 500 San Marcos St. 512.493.0963 www.progresscoffee.com

17

Rio Rita 1308 E. 6th St. 512.524.0384 www.riorita.net

5

Clive Bar 609 Davis St. 512.494.4120 www.clivebaraustin.com

18

Sam’s Bar-B-Cue 2000 E. 12th St. 512.478.0378

6

East Side Café 2113 Manor Rd. 512.476.5858 www.eastsidecafeaustin.com

19

The Scoot Inn and Bier Garten 1303 E. 4th St. 512.478.6200 www.scoot-inn.com

7

East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. 512.467.4280 www.eastsideshowroom.com

8

El Chile 1809 Manor Rd. 512.457.9900 www.elchilecafe.com

9

The Good Knight 1300 E. 6th St. 512.628.1250 www.myspace.com/ thegoodknightaustin.com

2

10

86

Blue Dahlia 1115 E. 11th St. 512.542.9542 www.bluedahliabistro.com

13

G’raj Mahal Café 91 Red River St. 512.480.2255 www.grajmahalcafe.com

11

Hoover’s Cooking 2002 Manor Rd. 512.479.5006 www.hooverscooking.com

12

Juan in a Million 2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.472.3872 www.juaninamillion.com

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

20 21

Shangri-La 1016 E 6th St 512.524.4291 www.shangrilaaustin.com Shuck Shack 1808 E Cesar Chavez St 512.472.4242 www.shuckshack.com

22

TC’s Lounge 1413 Webberville Rd. 512.926.2200 www.myspace.com/ tcswednesdays

23

Thunderbird Coffee 2200 Manor Rd. 512.472.9900 www.thunderbirdcoffee.com

24

Uncorked 900 E. 7th St. 512.524.2809 www.uncorkedtastingroom.com

25

Vivo 2015 Manor Rd. 512.482.0300 www.vivo-austin.com

SHOPPING

38

26

Big Red Sun 1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.480.0688 www.bigredsun.com

Okay Mountain Gallery 1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.okaymountain.com

39

Salvage Vanguard Theater 2803 Manor Rd. www.salvagevanguard.org

27

Blue Genie Art Industries 916 Springdale Rd. 512.444.6655 www.bluegenieart.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

28

Break Away Records 1704 E. 5th St. 512.538.0174 www.breakawayrecs.com

29

Deanfredrick 902 E. 5th St. 512.493.0943 www.deanfredrick.com

41

30

Domy Books 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.476.3669 www.domystore.com

42

Kemestry Salon 2124nE. 6th St. 512.322.9293 www.kemestrysalon.com

31

East Side Pedal Pushers 1100 E. 6th St. 512.826.3414 www.eastsidepedal pushers.com

43

Method.Hair 1601 E. 5th St. 512.469.0044 www.methodhair.com

44

Vain Salon 1803 Chicon St. 512.524.1057 www.vainaustin.com

32

Goods East 1601 E. Cesar Chavez 512.476.3287 www.goodseast.com

33

Snake Eyes Vinyl 1211 E. 7th St. 512.220.7019 www.snakeeyesvinyl.com

34

Solid Gold 1601 E. 5th St. 512.473.2730 www.solidgoldacademy.com

40

Art Palace 2109 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.artpalacegallery.com

36

BiRDHOUSE Gallery 1304 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.birdhousegallery.com

37

Mone’ Musel Fine Art 208 San Marcos St. 512.300.7790 www.monemusel.com

Esty Skin Studio 1210 Rosewood Ave. 512.903.8225 www.estyaustin.com

LIVING 45

Good Life Team 1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.892.9473 www.goodlifeteam.com

46

Urbanaxis Mortgage 900 E. 6th St. 512.473.2947 www.urbanaxismortgage.com

47

urbanspace Realtors 900 E. 6th St. 512.476.0010 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

ARTS & LEISURE 35

Birds Barbershop 1107 E. 6th St. 512.457.0400 www.birdsbarbershop.com

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39

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44

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13

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10 5 15

35

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

87

S

south side

MAPS & INDEX

1 2

14

The Black Sheep Lodge 2108 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.707.2744 www.blacksheeplodge.com

Matt’s El Rancho 2613 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.462.9333 www.mattselrancho.com

15

Botticelli’s 1321 S. Congress Ave 512.916.1315 www.botticellissouth congress.com

3

Broken Spoke 3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.6189 www.brokenspoke austintx.com

4

Doc’s MotorWorks Bar & Grill 1123 S. Congress Ave. 512.448.9181 5207 Brodie Ln. Suite 100 512.892.5200 www.eatdrinkdocs.com

5

Ego’s 510 S. Congress Ave. 512.474.7091

6

Freddie’s Place 1703 S. 1st St. 512.445.9197 www.freddiesplace austin.com

7

8 9 10 11 12 13

88

FOOD & DRINK

Green Pastures Restaurant 811 West Live Oak St. 512.444.4747 www.greenpastures restaurant.com The Highball 1142 S Lamar Blvd. 512.383.8309 www.thehighball.com Home Slice 1415 S. Congress 512.444.7437 www.homeslicepizza.com

27

Bows + Arrows 215 S Lamar Blvd # C 512.579.0301 www.shopbows plusarrows.com

Maudie’s Hacienda 9911 Brodie Ln. 512.280.8700 www.maudies.com

28

16

By George 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.8600 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

Olivia 2043 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.804.2700 www.olivia-austin.com

29

Downstairs Ste. E, 2110 S Lamar Blvd. 512.687.0489

17

Paggi House 200 Lee Barton Dr. 512.473.3700 www.paggihouse.com

30

18

Feathers Boutique 1700 S. Congress Ave. 512.912.9779 www.myspace. com/31622902

Perla’s Seafood and Oyster Bar 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.291.7300 www.perlasaustin.com

19

Polvos Mexicana & Bar 2004 S. 1st St. 512.441.5446 www.polvosaustin.com

20 21 22 23 24

Hotel San Jose 1316 S Congress Ave 512.852.2350 www.hotelsanjose.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4521 West Gate Blvd. 512.899.2700 www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com Jo’s 1300 S. Congress Ave. 512.444.3800 www.joscoffee.com Kerbey Lane Café 2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.445.4451 www.kerbeylanecafe.com RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

Trophy’s 2008 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.0969 www.myspace.com/trophystx Trudy’s 901 Little Texas Ln. 512.326.9899 www.trudys.com Uchi 801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.916.4808 www.uchiaustin.com Vespaio 1610 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.6100 www.austinvespaio.com

25 26

Austin Handmade 2009 S. 1st St. 512.383.9333 www.austinhandmade.com Blackmail 1202 S. Congress Ave. 512.326.7670 www.blackmailboutique.com

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512.457.5100 www.thelongcenter.org

HEALTH & BEAUTY 41

Avant Salon 9600 S. IH-35 512.291.5000 www.avantsalon.com

42

Birds Barbershop 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.8800 www.birdsbarbershop.com

43

Hairy Situations Salon 1708 S. Congress Ave 512.442.6412 www.hairysituationaustin.com

31

Goodie Two Shoes 1111 S. Congress Ave. 512.443.2468 www.myspace.com/austingoodietwoshoes

44

32

Prototype Vintage Design 1700 1/2 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.7686 www.prototypevintage design.com

J. Buccio Salon 6800 West Gate Blvd. 512.326.1153

45

33

Service Menswear 1400 South Congress Ave. 512.447.7600 www.servicemenswear.com

Massage Envy 9600 Escarpment Blvd., Ste. 860 512.288.3689 www.massageenvy.com

46

34

Spartan 215 S Lamar Blvd 512.579.0303 www.spartan-shop.com

PATH Salon Ste. C, 3100 South Congress Ave 512.447.7284 www.pathsalon.com

47

35

Spectacle Sunglasses 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.382.6197

The Waxing Studio 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.284.6000 www.thewaxingstudio.com

48

36

Stag 1423 S. Congress Ave. 512.373.7824 www.stagaustin.com

Yoga Yoga 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.358.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Waterloo Ice House 9600 South IH 35 512.458.6544 www.waterlooicehouse.com

SHOPPING

40

LIVING 37 38 39

ARTS & LEISURE

49

Alamo Drafthouse 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Dorado Soapstone 2157 Woodward St. 512.444.8600 www.doradosoapstone.com

50

The Irons Austin 2607 Stacy Ln. 512.589.5798 www.theironsaustin.com

Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.351.5934 www.austinartgarage.com Austin Lyric Opera 901 Barton Springs Rd. 512.472.5927 www.austinlyricopera.org

51

Park Lane Guest House 221 Park Ln. 512.447.7460 www.parklaneguesthouse.com

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34 17 27 40 39

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290

44 21

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41 24 RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

89

W

west side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3

Chez Zee 5406 Balcones Dr. 512.454.2666 www.chez-zee.com Daily Juice 2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.628.0782 www.dailyjuice.org

4

Deep Eddy Cabaret 2315 Lake Austin Blvd 512.472.0961

5

Fabi and Rosi 509 Hearn St. 512.236.0642 www.fabiandrosi.com

6

Fion Wine Pub 2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd. 512.266.3466 www.fionwinepub.com

7

Fion Wine Pub 11715 FM 2244 512.263.7988 www.fionwinepub.com

8 9 10 11 12

90

Abel’s on the Lake 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.904.0572

Hula Hut 3825 Lake Austin Blvd 512.476.4852 www.hulahut.com Iguana Grill 2900 N. Ranch Road 620 512.266.8439 www.iguanagrillaustin.com Magnolia Café 2304 Lake Austin Blvd 512.478.8645 www.cafemagnolia.com Mangia 2401 Lake Austin Blvd Austin 512.478.6600 www.mangiapizza.com Maudie’s Café 2608 W. 7th St. 512.473.3740 www.maudies.com

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

13

Maudie’s Milagro 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8080 www.maudies.com

25

Goodwill 701 Newman Dr. 512.478.6711 www.austingoodwill.org

14

Mozart’s Coffee Roasters 3826 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.2900 www.mozartscoffee.com

26

The Hip Chick 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.330.1701 www.thehipchick.com

15

Nu Age Café 2425 Exposition Blvd. 512.469.9390 www.nuagecafe.com

27

16

Hutson Clothing Company 3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512.732.0188 www.hutsonclothing.com

Siena 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.349.7667 www.sienarestaurant.com

28

17

Thistle Café 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.1000 www.thistlecafe.com

Mad About Shoes 900 RR. 620 South, Ste. A-109 512.970.0466 www.madaboutshoes austin.com

29

Waterloo Ice House 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.418.9700 www.waterlooicehouse.com

RunTex 2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.9464 www.runtex.com

30

Sanctuary 2600 Exposition Blvd. 512.478.8500 www.sanctuaryaustin.com

31

Apricot Lane Boutique 12800 Hill Country Blvd., G-145 512.263.1176 www.apricotlaneusa.com

Santa Fe Optical 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.1913 www.santafeoptical.com

32

Beehive 3300 Bee Cave Rd. Suite 400 512.347.0800

Tyler’s 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.9888 www.tylersaustin.com

33

Valentine’s Too 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.9488 www.valentinestoo.com

18

SHOPPING 19

20 21 22

Cupidz Closet 3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512.328.6446 www.cupidzcloset.com Dolce Baby 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8882

23

Fab’rik 12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512.263.1644 www.fabrikaustin.com

24

Fetch 3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512.306.9466 www.yourdogwilldigit.com

34 ARTS & LEISURE 34

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512.458.8191 www.amoa.org

35

Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512.288.1490 www.austinzoo.org

36

Texas Sailing 103 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6193 www.texassailing.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 37

Lakeway Resort and Spa 101 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6600 www.dolce-lakeway-hotel.com

38

Massage Envy 3201 Bee Cave Rd., Suite 156 512.306.0777 www.massageenvy.com

39

Milk + Honey Spa Hill Country Galleria 12700 Hill Country Blvd. 512.236.1116 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

40

Yoga Vida 3620 Bee Cave Rd. 512.480.8489 www.yogavida.net

41

Yoga Yoga 2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.381.6464 www.yogayoga.com

LIVING 42

Alexan Vistas 7000 FM 2222 512.794.8439 www.alexanvistas.com

16 18 42

2222

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lake austin

9

33 13 17 westlake dr

620

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mount bonnell

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28

6

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620

360

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30

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36

35th street

34

cap

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8

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5 3 10 11 4 29

20

41 RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

91

N

north side

MAPS & INDEX

1 2 3 4 5

12

23

Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512.454.7534 www.pyaustin.com

33

Austin Catering 8530 Burnet Road 512.291.5180 www.austin-catering.com

Waterloo Ice House 8600 Burnet Road 512.458.6544 www.waterlooicehouse.com

Massage Envy 10515 N. Mopac, Ste. 210B 512.834.3689 www.massageenvy.com

13

Truluck’s 10225 Research Blvd. 512.794.8300 www.trulucks.com

24

Petticoat Fair 7739 Northcross Dr. 512.454.2900 www.petticoatfair.com

34

Pure Austin 4210 W. Braker Ln. 512.342.2200 www.pureaustin.com

25

Tiffany & Co. The Domain 512.835.7300 www.tiffany.com

35

Skye Salon & Boutique 13359 N. Hwy 183 512.336.2639

26

Uptown Modern 5453 Burnet Rd. 512.452.1200 www.uptownmodern austin.com

36

Vanity Rocks 9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512.258.0009 www.vanityrocks.com

37

Yoga Yoga 2167 Anderson Ln. 512.380.9800 www.yogayoga.com

38

Yoga Yoga 12001 Burnet Rd. 512.490.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Burger House 4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512.346.7200 www.burgerhouse.com

SHOPPING

Crú The Domain 512.339.9463 www.cruwinebar.com

14

Hoover’s Inc. 5800 Airport Blvd. 512.374.4500 www.hoovers.com

Barney’s New York Co-op The Domain 512.719.3504 www.barneys.com

15

27

Jasper’s The Domain 512.834.4111 www.jaspers-restaurant.com

Betsey Johnson The Domain 512.833.6111 www.betseyjohnson.com

16

Bicycle Sport Shop 10947 Research Blvd. 512.345.7460

28

Free People The Domain 512.719.9909 www.freepeople.com

6

Kerbey Lane Café 13435 N. Hwy 183 512.258.7757 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

17

7

Maudie’s 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.832.0900 www.maudies.com

18

8 9 10 11

92

FOOD & DRINK

Manuel’s 10201 Jollyville Rd. 512.345.1042 www.manuels.com Melting Pot 13343 Research Blvd. 512.401.2424 www.meltingpot.com Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd 512.258.6464 www.shandeezaustin.com Trudy’s 8820 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1474 www.trudys.com

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

ARTS & LEISURE 29

19

Intermix The Domain 512.835.0110 www.intermixonline.com

30

20

Inviting Affairs 3742 Far West Blvd. 512.331.2133 www.invitingaffairs.com

21

Loft The Domain 512.377.6857 www.lofthomedecor.com Luxe Apothetique The Domain 512.346.8202 www.myspace.com/ luxeapothetique

Zinger Hardware 2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512.533.9001 www.zingerhardware.com

LIVING

The Global Arts Group 11100 Metric Blvd. 512.467.9400 www.theglobal artsgroup.com

22

Zara The Domain 512.491.0920 www.zara.com

Alamo Lake Creek 13729 Research Blvd. 512.219.8135 www.drafthouse.com Alamo Village 2700 W. Anderson Ln. 512.467.1320 www.drafthouse.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 31 32

Avant Salon 9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512.502.8268 www.avantsalon.com Birds Barbershop 6800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1200 www.birdsbarbershop.com

39

aloft Austin The Domain 512.491.0777 www.starwoodhotels.com

40

Alpha Granite 915 W. Howard Ln. 512.834.8746 www.alphagraniteaustin.com

41

Give Realty 3420 Executive Center Dr. 512.338.4483 www.giverealtyaustin.com

10

40

29 6 35

9

parmer

39 14 25 the domain 5 15 19 22 38 3 27 17 21

183

16

34 13

8

31

s

eat

gr

l hil

33

7

183 / research blvd

mesa

360

18

braker

mopac / loop 1

36

11 1 12 32

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1

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prin

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28

30

2

n ln.

anderso

lamar

burnet

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37

24

41 far west

20

4 2222

23

northl

and / k

oenig

26

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

93

A

Jenny and Johnny Photo by Autumn De Wilde

HAPPENINGS

ART West End 1st Thursday September 2 1st Thursday Gallery Night B Scene September 3, 6 – 11 pm Blanton Museum of Art Michael Long: ‘Argentina Expressions’ Through September 18 L. Nowlin Gallery Red Dot September 16 – 26  Women and Their Work Leslie Sealey September 11 – 29 Wally Workman Gallery PAPER 2 September 2 – October 2 Gallery Shoal Creek Character Sketch September 9 – October 9 grayDUCK Gallery Unveiled September 24 – October 16 Visual Arts Center at UT Deconstruct + Reconstruction September 24 – October 23  Visual Arts Center at UT

Coldtowne Theater www.coldtownetheater.com

Joseph Phillips and Shawn Smith August 26 – October 9 d berman gallery

Community Night Every Wednesday, 5 pm Austin Children’s Museum www.austinkids.org

New Works: Okay Mountain August 28 – November 14 Austin Museum of Art

ENTERTAINMENT Austin Poetry Slam Every Wednesday, 8 pm The Independent www.austinindependent.com Argentine Tango Classes Every Saturday, 1 pm Esquina Tango www.esquinatangoaustin.com Coldtowne Improv Every Saturday, 10 pm

96

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz Every Wednesday, 8 pm Little Woodrow’s South Park Meadows www.littlewoodrows.com Cinema East September 5 www.cinemaeastaustin.com Margaret Cho September 12 Paramount Theatre www.austintheatre.org/ Fantastic Fest September 23 – 30 Various Locations www.fantasticfest.com

The Frontier Brothers Photo by Devlin Shand

WELLNESS Austin Farmer’s Market Every Saturday, 8 am – 12 pm Every Wednesday, 4 pm – 8 pm www.austinfarmersmarket.org Manor Farmer’s Market Every Wednesday, 5 pm www.manorfarmersmarket.org Street Salsa Every Sunday, 2 pm Ruta Maya www.rutamaya.net Tai Chi with Guy Forsyth and Angel Quesada Every Tuesday, 1 pm Ruta Maya www.rutamaya.net

Mind Body Soul Experience September 4 Art of Living Austin Center www.artoflivingaustin.org

Seawolf September 11 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

The Whigs September 24 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Yellow Bike Project September 4 Austin Farmers Market Downtown www.austinyellowbike.org

Wild Frontier Fest: Holy Fuck with Frontier Brothers, Rocketboys, LAX, Quiet Company September 11 Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

The Drums September 25 ND at 501 Studios www.ndvenue.com

Mindfulness Meditation September 5 Eastside Yoga www.eastsideyoga-austin.com Heavy Metal Fitness Ride September 6 Lamar Pedestrian Bridge www.socialcyclingatx.com

Balmorhea, Mother Falcon September 15 Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com Bruce Robison September 16 Antone’s www.antones.net

The Black Crowes September 25 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com Stone Temple Pilots, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club September 25 The Backyard ww.thebackyard.net

SEPTEMBER MUSIC Titus Andronicus September 1 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com The Strange Boys September 1 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com The English Beat September 2 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Rodrigo y Gabriela September 3 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com Ringo Deathstarr September 4 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Sleep September 10 Mohawk www.themohawk.com

The Tallest Man on Earth September 18 Antone’s www.antones.net

Ratatat September 27 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com

The Smashing Pumpkins, Bad City September 20 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com

Pavement, Woven Bones September 28 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com

Pixies, Fuck Buttons September 21 – 22 Austin Music Hall www.austinmusichall.com

The Trishas September 28 The Belmont www.thebelmontaustin.com

Pepper, Shwayze September 23 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com

Uncle Lucius September 28 The Continental Club www.continentalclub.com/ austin.htm

Film School, TV Torso September 23 The Parish www.theparishaustin.com

Cocorosie September 30 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings September 24 La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com

RARE SEPTEMBER 2010

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RARE MAGAZINE :: September 2010 :: Food