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Fast Food Strikes: The Redeeming of King’s Dream p. 6 Blues Titan Arthur Adams on Blues, Roots and Leaves p. 11 The Buzz About the Blue Grotto Bistro p. 12 Q-Film Festival Sept. 6-8

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The Local Publication You Actually Read

On Aug. 26, port truckers at Carson-based Green Fleet Systems, went on strike for 24 hours in a bid to get unionized. Photo by Robin Doyno.

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

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Green Fleet Truckers Strike for Union/ to p. 7

SCIG Weighs Price of Job Creation

By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor Buried beneath the court battles over the construction of a $500 million rail yard facility is the project’s impact on job creation. The Southern California International Gateway Project, which would border Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach, would allow the Port of Los Angeles to send trucks to the facility, about four miles away. There, container cargo would be loaded onto BNSF Railway trains, which would be shipped throughout the region and out of California. The project is expected to handle more than 2 million additional truck trips a year and more than 2,887 more train trips annually. SCIG Impact on Area Jobs/ to p. 3

September 6 - 19, 2013

hree days before fast food workers across the country went out on a one-day strike, port truckers at Carson-based Green Fleet Systems did the same. This was a show of determination in their bid for union recognition from a company that has responded to them with hostile hardball tactics. They went on strike Aug. 26 at 5 p.m., and returned to work the same time Aug. 27, with a rally of supporters cheering them on. “This is the first time as port truck drivers that we are doing this, exercising our rights,” Green Fleet Systems employee Ramon Guadamuz said. “We started in May last year, working together, exercising our right to form our union. We have been struggling” against illegal tactics by Green Fleet Systems, he said. “One of the things they do is they have a anti-union petition, they intimidate every single worker to sign it. They say, if they don’t sign it, they’re going to fire” the truckers who refuse. Green Fleet was fined more than $380,000 for wage violations against four workers early this year by the California Labor Commissioner’s office, around the same time that Australian-owned Toll Group became the first port trucking firm to sign a union contract since the industry was deregulated in 1980. That’s also when the Green Fleet workers formalized their struggle, with a letter to Green Fleet declaring their desire to form a union. Drivers at American Logistics International did the same, citing specific labor law violations.

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HARBOR AREA

Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Teachers, Students Feel a Bit Less Stress By Joseph Baroud, Editorial Intern

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Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Edsource.org released a report in August, entitled: Schools Under Stress: Pressures Mount on California’s Largest Districts identifying areas in which California school districts have been stressed. Edsource.org compiled a list of stress factors that have made the most impact on students’ performances, from direct influences such as teacher layoffs and the amount of counselors available, to indirect ones such as the national foreclosure crisis and poverty. The Great Recession of 2007-09 caused the California school system to endure its share of concessions. According to Edsource.org, the 2007-2008 state’s annual school budget was $71.1 billion and for the 2011-2012 school year it was $64.1 billion. Budget constraints have resulted in teacher and counselor layoffs. The Los Angeles and Long Beach school districts however, have seen more improvements compared to other districts. EdSource reported that the 37,713 teachers who work in the LAUSD were laid off in the 2011-2012 school year. In the spring of 2011, the number dipped to 5,456 and by the spring of 2013 it was zero. In 2011-2012 the Long Beach Unified School District had laid off 3,464 teachers. By the spring of 2011 it was

CENTRAL SAN PEDRO NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL What is Community Policing and how does it affect you? What is LAPD’s Use of Force Policy and how does it affect you? The public is invited to a Town Hall Meeting with the Los Angeles Police Department on Use of Force Policies

TOWN HALL MEETING SAT., SEPT. 21

September 6 - 19, 2013

10 am - 2 pm (lunch provided) Boys & Girls Club Liberty Plaza 100 W. 5th St., San Pedro

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Morning presentations and moderated discussion Afternoon workshops and problem solving: • Communicating with LAPD • LAPD Service and Community Concerns • Narcotics in Harbor Division • Gangs, Graffiti and Public Safety Featured guests include: Deputy Chief Bob Greene, LAPD • Chief Ronald J. Boyd, Port of LAPD • Capt. Nancy Lauer, LAPD Harbor Division Superior Court Judge Peter Mirich • Fernando Reign, Urban Peace Institute

Everyone is encouraged to participate. This event is free and open to the public For more information contact: 310-918-8650 or visit www.centralsanpedro.org

5,456 and by the spring of 2013 they had laid off zero. The report noted that teacher layoffs hurt and demoralized staff inside the classrooms. Layoffs have resulted in larger class sizes. In the 2008-2009 school year, K-3 classes held 20 students per class. Other California school districts have seen a great increase, but the EdSource report shows that LAUSD has maintained a solid average of 24 students enrolled in every K-3 class. The Long Beach School District suffered in that area, posting a 30-student per classroom mark in the K-3 grade level. In 2013, the state legislature approved the Local Control Funding Formula, a new system of funding schools. The formula will give school districts $712 for each K-3 student if a viable effort is made to reduce class size to an average of 24 students per class. The number of school counselors available has also been depleted. School counselors are what’s available for students facing problems and lacking the financial resources to receive services off campus. The report states that the LAUSD had 884 counselors in the 2007-2008 school year. By the 2011-2012 school year, that number had dropped to 666 and is now at 626 for the 2012-2013 school year. The Long Beach Unified School District saw a smaller decline in counselors. They had 131 in the 2007-2008 school year, 119 in 2011-2012 and 116 in 2012-2013.

Indirect factors can have the same, if not, more of an influence on student performance in school. Factors such as poverty, divorce, family issues, residential issues and such, play a significant role in the student’s mental well-being, and therefore, his or her ability to concentrate, focus and perform well at school. By the 2011-2012 school year, the EdSource report shows that poverty among LAUSD students was at 33 percent, compared to 27 percent in 2007. In the LBUSD, 27 percent of students lived in poverty in 2011, compared to 25 percent in 2007. Seventy-seven percent of LAUSD students qualified for the federal free and reduced-price meals program in 2011, which is a 5 percent increase from 2007. Seventy percent of LBUSD students qualify for reduced-price or free meals, a 2 percent increase from 2007. The report noted that childhood poverty has increased student needs for individual attention, tutoring, counseling and dropout prevention. The foreclosure crisis in the previous six years played an important part in the diminishing statistics that school districts began witnessing. The EdSource report shows that in 2008 Los Angeles homes saw 13,511 foreclosures and Long Beach saw 1,784 of them. But, in 2012 only 6,271 homes were foreclosed in Los Angeles and 883 of them in Long Beach. That is more than a 50 percent decrease in both cities. School Stressors Decrease/ to p. 4

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Garden Restoration Volunteer Opportunity

People are welcome to volunteer their gardening services at the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum, 9 to 11 a.m. Sep. 7. Volunteers remove overgrowth and invasive species, clear debris and sweep the walkways of a shaded area inside of the museum. Details: (310) 603-0088 Venue: Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum Location: 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez

Volunteer Workday at Portuguese Bend

The Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy is conducting volunteer workday at the Portuguese Bend, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Sept. 14. Help restore habitat by planting and watering native shrubs. To RSVP call the number below. Details: (310) 541-7613; info@pvplc.org Venue: Portuguese Bend Reserve Location: Rancho Palos Verdes

Research Program Ice Breaker

The research staff at the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is hosting an event to give those interested the opportunity to learn more about marine research, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 22. Research staff will introduce local Southern California marine animals, research facilities and discuss projects to be conducted by high school and college students interested in a future science career. The program is free and is open to students 16 years or older. Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

Harbor L.I.T.E.S. Fashion Show, Fundraiser

Join the ladies of the Harbor L.I.T.E.S. at their annual fundraiser, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sept. 28, at the DoubleTree Hotel in San Pedro. All proceeds go to support the Los Angeles Police Department Harbor Division and its youth programs. Details: (310) 833-5991 Venue: DoubleTree Hotel Location: 2800 Via Cabrillo Marina Madea Ballroom

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SCIG Impact on Area Jobs Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. chief economist Robert Kleinhenz, who noted that the LAEDC has not done an official study on the SCIG project, said that generally the project can only improve Southern California’s economic landscape. “SCIG is a part of the transportation and infrastructure improvements that anticipates improvement in the port’s numbers,” Kleinhenz said. “The numbers had been steady over the past few years, but the job numbers will eventually take off.” According to BNSF Railway, the project’s sponsor, the SCIG would create about 1,500 construction jobs per year over the three years of construction. The SCIG would also be creating about 22,000 direct and indirect jobs in Southern California by 2036. “About 450, once it’s constructed,” said BNSF spokeswoman Lena Kent. The problem with BNSF’s current proposed plan is that it would displace more than 1,000 workers from area companies that would have to move, than it would hire permanently, once it is built, said Coalition for a Safe Environment founder Jesse Marquez—one of the project’s most fervent opponents. “The SCIG project will create a certain number of permanent workers,” said Marquez via email. “When you do the math SCIG creates less permanent jobs than the existing. So we have a net loss of jobs. The port’s argument is that they will just relocate somewhere else. The trucking have already stated there is no where to relocate to, at least locally. So odds are if they do re-open somewhere else it would be far away and local driver residents would also lose their jobs. That’s not exactly true, Kent said. A labor agreement, worth $255 million, with the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council ensures that “once the facility is up and running locals will be given priority,” Kent said. “Additionally, BNSF’s goal is to facilitate

Jesse Marquez, community activist and head of Community for a Safe Environment. File photo.

SCIG Jobs/ to p. 5

The Local Publication You Actually Read September 6 - 19, 2013

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from p. 2

School Stressors Decrease

The report claims foreclosures contribute to higher rates of students relocating. Also, it depresses performance on standardized tests and increases the probability of the student dropping out of school. Other stressors that EdSource reported about include: Shorter instructional years, unemployment, health coverage, cutting

summer school programs and security threats. Statewide districts have seen an influx in those areas, but the Los Angeles and Long Beach school districts have remained constant in those areas. The unemployment has seen an average decline of 2 percent throughout the state, with some districts seeing as high as a 5 percent drop.

Edsource.org released a report in August, entitled: Schools Under Stress: Pressures Mount on California’s Largest Districts identifying

September 6 - 19, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

areas in which California school districts have been stressed. Edsource.org compiled a list of stress factors that have made the most impact on students’ performances, from direct influences such as teacher lay-offs and the amount of counselors available, to indirect ones such as the national foreclosure crisis and poverty. The Great Recession of 2007-09 caused the California school system to endure its share of

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Community Announcements:

Harbor Area from p. 2

Eric Garcetti to Keynote PortTechEXPO 2013 SAN PEDRO — Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will be the keynote luncheon speaker at the fourth annual PortTechEXPO 2013 , from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept.11, at Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles in San Pedro. The event focuses on connecting the business community, entrepreneurs and investors to explore new environmental, energy, transportation and security technology innovations and solutions for the maritime industry. Kicking off the event will be Federal Maritime Commission Chairman Mario Cordero. Cordero was appointed as chairman by President Barack Obama in April. Los Angeles City Councilman Joe Buscaino also will be among the speakers and lead the Clean Tech-Cool Tech afternoon segment of the event. This year’s conference, themed “Global Technology Solutions for Ports and Beyond,” will feature dozens of technology exhibitors, live demonstrations of sustainable products and services, and interactive displays. An Entrepreneur Pitch Competition takes place the day before the EXPO and culminates during the EXPO luncheon when the awards are announced. The top 10 Pitch Competition finalists will also be EXPO exhibitors, with the winning pitch presented during the luncheon. Details: www.porttechla.org/events/port-tech-expo Venue: (310) 519-1801 Location: 110 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

Campus Clinic Serves Community By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

demonstrating true leadership by providing muchneeded health care to underserved members of our community,” Councilman Mike Gipson states in clinic literature. “It’s a great partnership for the city and our residents.” “We’re a fully integrated health clinic for everybody in the family,” says John Merryman, senior director of marketing and public relations for the South Bay Family Health Center. He also notes it’s a free clinic, with no one turned away due to inability to pay. Assistance is available for enrollment in Medi-Cal and similar programs. Merryman explains how the clinic was

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said. One technology that had been proposed was a non-polluting electric MagLev Train manufactured by American MagLev Technologies, Inc. who even offered to build a demonstration project at the port free and the port refused, a coalition press release stated. “The company has even offered to build the manufacturing facility in the LA Harbor area,” The statement read. “Two other innovative technologies rejected by the port were the Advanced Maritime Emission Control System for container ships and the Advanced Locomotive Emission Control System for locomotive train engines, which can capture over 90 percent of the smoke stack polluting exhaust.” “The inclusion of these technologies will create more jobs with our proposed technology,” Marquez said. Marquez recognizes that in the short term there would be more expenses in terms of construction. However, he believes those expenses are worth it, when considering the environmental impacts of reducing global warming impacts on fishing, agriculture and public health. He believes that the trucks and trains that would be passing through the Harbor Area communities would be adding hundreds of tons of more air pollution each year, which will increase public health problems such as asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, leukemia and other diseases to neighboring residential and community centers. He cited that the California Air Resources

SCIG Jobs

Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements

September 6 - 19, 2013

the transition of the existing businesses in such a manner as to preserve associated jobs,” wrote Kent in an email. “BNSF has held numerous meetings with site tenants and/or their representatives and BNSF has offered moving cost assistance, a year’s notice (they currently have 30 days), and a rent subsidy to make up the difference between their old rent and whatever their new rent might be, within some limits. BNSF has continued to meet with the tenants to resolve this issue.” Marquez does not dispute the company’s claims on job construction job creation. He does, however, offer an alternative that might be more convincing to the environmental concerns of local residents and create even more jobs. One of the California Environmental Quality Act studies prepared for the environmental impact report offers an alternative site to build the rail yard facility. The coalition is recommending the use of Pier 500 for the BNSF Project. The Port Master Plan shows an area called Pier 400, where the Maersk terminal is. The lower fourth part of Pier 400 is considered Pier 500, in the ocean. In late 2011, Hyundai Merchant Marine Co. Ltd., a Seoul company that owns shipping terminal operator California United Terminals, signed a memorandum of understanding that also commits it to help build Pier 500. While the memorandum solidifies the company’s relationship with the Port of Los Angeles, Pier 500 is probably more than a decade away from completion. Moreover, Pier 500 is not high on the Port of Los Angeles priority project list, POLA spokesman Phillip Sanfield said. “Pier 500 is still being evaluated and we are looking at different [options] in terms of projects,” Sanfield said. “We are looking at other ways to assist the current tenant at Pier 400.” Working with existing terminals is just more efficient. A project that would have a faster turnaround and not be as costly as building a massive new terminal from scratch, for example, Sanfield said. “SCIG is a completely different project,” he said. Still Marquez believes the Pier 500 proposal would create far more construction jobs because it would be built in the ocean, enabling the hire of hundreds for pile driver jobs. Plus, the zeroemission technology and locomotive exhaust technology, which the coalition is proposing, also would have an impact on job creation, Marquez

Board found that California spends more than $2 billion on health care related to pollution. The proposed 153-acre rail yard’s environmental impact report and a 50-year lease were approved May 8 by the Los Angeles City Council despite opposition from Long Beach, the Air Quality Management District, the National Resources Defense Council, the Long Beach Unified School District and other group. Six entities are suing the City of Los Angeles and the Port of Los Angeles for giving the green light to more forward with the SCIG. Plaintiffs in the lawsuit include The Coalition For A Safe Environment, Community Dreams, California Kids IAQ, the Apostolic Faith Center, the National Resources Defense Council and the City of Long Beach An attempt to settle out of court recently took place but neither POLA nor the City of Los Angeles had anything to offer, Marquez said. Which means now we will go to court,” he said.

of four South Bay health centers, with the others located in Gardena, Redondo Beach and Inglewood. There’s also a mobile van serving the Hawthorne School District. Bonnie Franco, clinic services manager, says the Carson center operates part-time as a satellite of the Gardena location. She’s waiting for the appropriate licensing to become a separate fulltime facility, which she expects to happen in a couple of weeks. According to the South Bay Family Health Care 2012 annual report, its entire budget for all centers amounts to slightly more than $17.5 million. Most of its revenue (53 percent) comes from programs at various levels of government. Another 45 percent comes from a category labeled “community support,” while the remainder is split between contributions and private insurance. Merryman notes that besides Carson, the cities of Rancho Palos Verdes, Hawthorne, Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach also fairly regularly provide South Bay Family Health Care with block grant funding. He adds that the clinic receives some funding from the Affordable Care Act. “We’re big proponents of ACA,” he says. “It increases health care.” Franco explains how the clinic manages serving the high school student body and the general public. “We have two entrances,” she says. “The public has an entrance and the students access through the school entrance.” She also says the clinic, with two nursepractitioners and 12 support staff, sees about 21 to 25 patients per day. For students, the center performs services, typically provided by a school nurse, but students may also get sports physicals and what Merryman terms confidential services related to pregnancy and drugs. Carson Wellness Center is on the northeast corner of Carson High School, 270 E. 223 St. Walk-ins are welcome but appointments may be made at (310) 802-6170. Hours are Monday and Wednesday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Friday, 7:30 a.m to 2 p.m..

The Local Publication You Actually Read

When an on-campus health clinic hosted a fair at Carson High School Aug. 15, it did more than observe National Health Care Week, it called attention to how, since 1999, the South Bay Family Health Care has operated one of the first wellness centers in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Despite its location, the community wellness clinic serves both the high school and the surrounding general population. It recently underwent a major office expansion and it is about to implement full-time service hours. “The City of Carson has supported [South Bay Family Health Care] because they’re

originally placed on the high school campus in 1999 after two studies by South Bay Family Health Care and the City of Carson confirmed the area was medically underserved. “There was no clinic in this area,” Merryman adds. “It was a pocket without any affordable health care.” Carson deems the center such an important community resource that it’s provided Community Development Block Grant funding between $10,000 and $15,000 annually for the past eight years. “We’re very grateful for the money we’ve received over the years [from Block Grant funding],” Merryman comments. “We’re lucky not to have been cut.” South Bay Family Health Care was founded in 1969 as the South Bay Free Clinic in Hermosa Beach. It has expanded throughout the years as its patient base has grown. Its school-based community wellness center in Carson is one

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Suddenly The Movement Super-sizes—

Fast Food Strikes Would Redeem King’s Dream By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

September 6 - 19, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

“Nobody who is willing to work hard should have to live in poverty,” said Rob Tejada, a 19year-old McDonald’s worker who went out on strike on Aug. 29. Tejada works side-by-side with parents who are trying to raise families on near-minimum-wage pay. That sentiment used to be regarded as virtually axiomatic, but it’s now regarded as revolutionary—even utopian. And, in some ways, it always has been. The day after the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, thousands of fast food workers like Tejada went out on a one-day strike in 58 cities. They had a key demand: to increase pay to $15 per hour. That’s more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour and 67 percent higher than the $8.94 per hour median wage for frontline fast-food workers. It’s the fourth such one-day strike since just after Thanksgiving of this past year. It began in just one city: New York. But the number of cities involved has exploded from just seven in the last round to more than eight times that just a few weeks later. These cities include Los Angeles and San Diego, here in Southern California, as well as Southern cities from Texas to Georgia and the Carolinas—places that have always been quite hostile to workers organizing. Rev. William Smart, president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a representative of the faith community supporting the strikes, drew a direct connection between the march, the strike and conference’s support for both. “At SCLC we’re concerned about the wages of workers,” Smart said. “Part of the dream was that workers can get good jobs and good wages... This is a low-wage industry... an industry that doesn’t have to be. Fast food is a billion-dollar industry, it’s continually making profits, but that never gets down to the workers. So we need to organize so that the workers can get a fair share of the profits by increasing their wages.” Smart also commented on the March on Washington. “Remember it was jobs and freedom,” Smart said. “And part of the jobs, we called for a minimum wage of $2 an hour. And, the equivalent of that today is close to $15 to $15.27 [an hour]” It was not surprising, therefore, when Georgia Rep. John Lewis—the only surviving speaker from the 1963 March— joined the fast-food strikers in Atlanta after seeing media reports about them. “Fifty years ago, yesterday, when I was 23 years old, had all of my hair and a few pounds lighter, we marched for jobs and freedom,” Lewis told the crowd of strikers and supporters. “We’re still marching for jobs…. We need more than a minimum wage, we need a livable wage. I do not understand how people survive when they are being paid starvation wages. In a country like ours we can do much better.” Indeed, according to calculations by economist Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic Policy Research, the minimum wage today would already be well over $15 per hour, if the minimum wage had 6

President of the Los Angeles branch of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Rev. William Smart, supports the fast food strikes. File photo

kept up with productivity growth since 1969 — as it had for the previous 22 years. “That’s like a job for a high school student, maybe, who still lives with their parents,” said Tejada , regarding what he’s now being paid. “But not for someone who has two or three kids and has to pay full rent, among some other bills.” But you don’t have to take Tejada’s word for it. Thanks to the energy, courage, imagination and passion of fast-food strikers before him, the national media has already taken note and recognized the basic truth of their argument. As the New York Times noted in an Aug. 7 editorial, “The fast-food workers who have been walking off their jobs illustrate a central fact of contemporary work life in America: As lowerwage occupations have proliferated in the past several years, Americans are increasingly unable to make a living at their jobs. They work harder and are paid less than workers in other advanced countries. And their wages have stagnated even as executive pay has soared.” “Seventy percent of these fast-food workers are aged 20 or over; so they’re not teenagers; and, of that 70 percent, about a third of them have college degrees,” Robert Hiltonsmith, a policy analyst at Demos, told Reuters. Such basic facts fly directly in the face of derogatory, demonizing comments from conservative strike critics that tried—and largely failed—to disrupt the flow of enthusiastic tweeting the day of the strike. One particularly active troll produced the following, among others: there are winners and losers if you are striking you are probably the latter and #workforminimumwage if you Get high 3 times a day and just love your dreadlocks you probably #workforminimumwage if you did not graduate high school twenty years ago and just now getting a GED you may #workforminimumwage if you spent most of Math class working on Rap lyrics you may #workforminimumwage But the simple fact is, the minimum wage is well below what it was in the 1960s, while education levels are much higher today than

they were then. What’s more, the fast food sector is not alone in being mired in low-wage work. It’s an affliction that affects the entire restaurant industry, as revealed in a 2011 study, “Behind the Kitchen Door,” conducted by the Restaurant Opportunities Center of LA, in conjunction with UCLA. There are 276,000 people working the region’s restaurant industry. Among the survey’s findings: • the median hourly wage for Los Angeles restaurant workers has actually declined over the past 20 years, and in 2009 was only $9.24 per hour—just 30 cents per hour more than the national median wage for front-line fast-food workers. • 89.8 percent of employers do not provide health insurance • 89.4 percent of employees do not get paid sick days • 58.3 percent of employees have worked when sick • 44.1 percent of employees have experienced overtime wage violations; and 26.7 percent have worked “off-the-clock” • 42.9 percent of employees were burned and 42.4 percent were cut while on the job The combination of low-pay, wage theft, lack of benefits and unsafe working conditions shows that fast food workers are remarkably similar to restaurant workers as a whole—and, indeed, to low-wage workers across the economy, which is a big part of why their strikes have resonated so powerfully. “The strikes reflect the need of a huge portion of the workforce, which is service workers, food service workers, restaurant workers who cannot live on minimum wage,” said Sophia Cheng, research and policy coordinator at ROC-LA. What’s more, she pointed out the tipped minimum wage—$2.13 per hour—has not been raised in 20 years. “Overall, when you’re raising the minimum wage, as workers we have more in our pockets to spend,” Cheng said. “So there’s been a lot of studies to show that increasing the minimum wage actually helps the economy, rather than killing jobs.”

So she strongly supports increasing the minimum wage. But benefits are also crucial, especially sick days. “Paid sick days would be a very tangible type of benefit restaurant workers need that not only benefits workers, but also benefits the public, because it’s a food safety issue,” Cheng explained. The restaurant industry bitterly fought against paid sick days in San Francisco a few years ago. But a follow-up study showed that most employers are pleased with how things have turned out, while most employees use only a fraction of the sick days they earn, but feel much more secure on a daily basis. One last thing, Cheng adds, is the role of race and gender, concentrating women and people of color in the lowest-paid and hardest jobs. “So it’s actually a gender issue as well, which is why some prominent feminists like Sandra Fluke have come out to support the fast food strike today in LA,” Cheng said. For an even broader view, in a Bloomberg News op-ed in mid-June, “The Capitalist’s Case for a $15 Minimum Wage,” venture capitalist Nick Hanauer wrote: The fundamental law of capitalism is that if workers have no money, businesses have no customers. That’s why the extreme, and widening, wealth gap in our economy presents not just a moral challenge, but an economic one, too. In a capitalist system, rising inequality creates a death spiral of falling demand that ultimately takes everyone down. The op-ed was accompanied by a cartoon comparing the current minimum wage to the pre-Copernican, geocentric worldview, and the $15 per hour minimum wage to the modern, heliocentric world view. But the insight—though valid—is not really all that new. As far back as Adam Smith—and beyond—economic thinkers understood the circular nature of economic wellbeing. In Book 1, Chapter 8 of The Wealth of Nations, Smith wrote: Servants, labourers and workmen of different kinds, make up the far greater part of every great political society. But what improves the circumstances of the greater part can never be regarded as an inconvenience to the whole. No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable. It is but equity, besides, that they who feed, clothe and lodge the whole body of the people, should have such a share of the produce of their own labour as to be themselves tolerably well fed, clothed and lodged. Those are the words of the so-called “father of capitalism.” How little they resemble the words of capitalists today. But even that could still change, with organized pressure from below. “What you have to do is stick together and never, ever give up or give in,” Lewis told the strikers in Atlanta. “They said back in the 60s, we couldn’t win. That we couldn’t get a civil rights act; that we couldn’t get a voting rights act; we couldn’t get a fair housing act, but we did it.... Sometimes you have to find a way to make a way out of no way.”

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Greenfleet Truckers Strike for Union Green Fleet truckers rally support for their union bid during the 24-hour strike. Photo by Robin Doyno.

guys who had walked out were taken back. And, as a supporter of organizing efforts, I really look forward to Green Fleet recognizing the union, and signing a contract with these folks.” The process of getting this far has not been easy, Guadamuz explained. “It was a long way,” Guadamuz said. “We had to educate every single coworker to let them know our rights.” Among other things, Green Fleet promised workers that if they didn’t join the union—which would legally provide job protection—they would have long-term job security, the exact opposite of what unionization legally entails. But systematic lying is nothing compared to harassment and intimidation. “The company are doing interrogation. ‘Why do you want union?’ That’s illegal,” Guadamuz said. “Some guys, they got scared. Didn’t understand their rights. That’s why it took a little while to [advance] step-by-step.” Faced with that mindset, it’s obvious why the

one-day strike sends a powerful message to other Green Fleet workers who may want a union, but have been intimidated until now. “What Ramon and his co-workers showing his other co-workers is that they don’t need to be scared,” Weiner said. “They’re taking this courageous action to go out on strike for a day. And other workers are scared.... Port drivers, fastfood workers and Walmart workers are terrified of losing their job, and speaking up and standing up for their rights.... They can stand up for their rights and demand a living wage and respect and that’s spreading; it’s now spreading to the port, that fever, that port drivers aren’t going to take it any more.” The Local Publication You Actually Read September 6 - 19, 2013

“They saw the success that drivers at Toll had achieved with winning their union election last year and negotiating a great first contract, and I think [that] has inspired drivers at a lot of other port trucking companies, including Green Fleet,” said Nick Weiner, the Teamsters’ port campaign director. Green Fleet mostly employs hourly workers, unlike most port trucking companies, while a third of their workforce is mis-classified as “owner-operators.” More recently, as the organizing has continued, drivers filed specific charges of harassment and intimidation with Region 21 of the National Labor Relations Board. The NLRB investigated Green Fleet and issued an Unfair Labor Practice complaint alleging that the company broke federal labor law with retaliatory anti-union actions. Officially, the truckers are striking to protest the unfair labor practices, which gives them protected status under U.S. labor law, although the spirit is similar to the unsanctioned 24-hour fast food strikes. “We are so excited,” Guadamuz said. “We’re not going to run away.” It’s not just a matter of asserting legal rights, but also asserting their basic humanity in the face of Green Fleet’s routine abuse, he explained. “They don’t take our respect as human beings,” Guadamuz said. “They look at you like you are [an] object.” This is reflected in systematic mistreatment, long before the recent organizing drive, he explained. “When you get sick, you have to go to the doctor. And when you get sick, the company refuse[s].... cause they don’t believe you are sick,” Guadamuz said. “They force you to work sick. They don’t care you can make a horrible accident. When you have fever, you have stomach aches, you’ve got headaches––they don’t believe you. That’s really terrible. We are human beings.” Likewise, “When you’ve got a special day at school with your kids, you need to go,” but, “they deny that day or half-day, and that’s horrible. We are human beings, we are not a machine.” That’s why he said, “The purpose of this strike is to be clear [to] the company they have to respect all their employees.” “This is obviously a serious issue we have here with Green Fleet,” said Teamster spokeswoman Kara Deniz. “But, if you look at the coverage, there is all over the country, there’s one-day low-age strikes taking place, you know, from fast food workers to the port. So really, this is a movement, part of a larger picture going on nationwide.” “Once the Green Fleet drivers decided to take this action, the Teamsters Joint Council approved strike sanctions, sanctioned the strike, the LA County Federation of Labor, the AFL-CIO for LA County sanctioned the strike,” Weiner said. “So there’s a tremendous outpouring of support for these courageous drivers throughout the labor community in Los Angeles.” It’s impossible to say for sure, but that support—represented by a crowd of several hundred on Tuesday afternoon—appeared extremely helpful in assuring the strike’s success. Green Fleet delayed accepting the strikers’ return for about half an hour. “It was enthusiastic,” said labor lawyer Diane Middleton. “It was another pivotal point in organizing the truckers. It was a victory. The

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Sarin and Syria

Geneva Protocols on Chemical Warfare and the Rule of Law By James Preston Allen, Publisher

September 6 - 19, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

In February 2012, the last surviving veteran of the Great War, or as Americans were told, “the war to end all wars,” died. Florence Green was nearly 111 years old when she died in Norfolk, England, and she never saw the grim horror of gas warfare in the trenches between Germany and France. The world community under the aegis of the League of Nations (the precursor of the United Nations) was horrified by the deployment of chemical weapons on both sides during World War I. It wasn’t until Sept. 7, 1929, that the Geneva Protocols on Chemical Warfare was registered as a treaty—more than a decade after the end of the war. Obviously, that wasn’t the last war. But in every conflict since, there has been a growing reticence and moral abhorrence over the use of chemical weapons. So much so that when the Nazis gassed the Jews in concentration camps during World War II, it was deemed a “war crime.” And the perpetrators responsible are, even now, still being prosecuted. The United States has signed on twice to the Protocol treaties—once in 1925 and again in 1975. Yet, we have one of the largest, if not the largest, stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons in the world and have used ones like Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. One interesting note to all of this is that tear gas is included on the list of chemical agents that are not for military use, but is not banned for “riot suppression” domestically. Sarin gas is on the list of chemicals prohibited from use on domestic populations. And, I have found several references supporting this interpretation. In recent times the United Nations Protocol Against Chemical Weapons has been interpreted to cover internal conflicts as well international ones. In 1995, an appellate chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia stated that, “there had undisputedly emerged a general consensus in the international community on the principle that the use of chemical weapons is also prohibited in internal armed conflicts.” In 2005, the International Committee of the Red Cross concluded that customary international law includes a ban on the

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use of chemical weapons in internal as well as international conflicts. The question now before the U.S. Congress, as well as the United Nations, is what to do with a violation of international law on chemical warfare? The president should not, and must not, act alone like we have done so many times in the past. Nor should it be the burden of just one nation to enforce these protocols. The dilemma facing President Barack Obama after his bluster of sword rattling about crossing “the red line” on the use of sarin gas is what to do with a coalition of the unwilling: a Congress that is divided, an electorate that is skeptical of yet another Middle East conflict and a politically split U.N. Security Council. This might seem simplistic for a man educated on constitutional law, but if the facts are in and the Assad government in Syria can reasonably be accused of violating international law, why waste your time arguing with Congress? Pack up Attorney General Eric Holder, Secretary of State John Kerry then take the case against Beshar AlAssad and his generals to the international court at the Hague in Belgium. Present the case and ask for an indictment. We like to hold ourselves up to be a nation of laws, as we like to tell the world. But if we don’t follow the laws that apply universally, then we are no more moral or righteous than those whom we call murderers, tyrants or terrorists. The use of chemical weapons in Syria was not a direct act of aggression against the United States, our citizens or territories. This does not amount to the necessity of an Act of War by Congress. Nor by default in the absence of congressional action, give the president the authority to act without congressional consent, unless there were a further eminent threat. In other words, the president must prove to the world and the people of this nation that we actually stand behind our treaties and our laws. Take Mr. Assad to the international court and charge him with crimes against humanity. Then you may have the standing to do something with the military to arrest those convicted of mass murder and illegal use of siren gas on a civilian population. Until then, Congress should vote “NO” on the authorization of force by this president. Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 18

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila zamna@randomlengthsnews.com

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

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How to End California’s Prison Strike

Both sides must set aside their profound differences and look at steps to relieve the worst elements of solitary confinement By Tom Hayden. This op-ed originally appeared at the Los Angeles Times on August 16, 2013. At least 300 inmates are now several weeks into a fast that could soon lead to organ failure and death for many of them. Events are moving rapidly, but as I write, nothing has been resolved. And, as California corrections chief Jeffrey Beard made clear recently in an Op-Ed for this newspaper, the sides are far apart. Beard, presumably reflecting Gov. Jerry Brown’s views, paints the strike leaders as dangerous gang leaders who are pressuring inmates into a hunger strike to “restore their ability to terrorize fellow prisoners, prison staff and communities throughout California.” That rhetoric is hardly designed to lead to conflict resolution. On their side, the strikers are demanding an immediate end to what they see as inhumane conditions, including indefinite solitary confinement, which they see as a violation of the 8th Amendment ban on cruel and unusual punishment. Neither side is going to change its basic position. But even if some of the biggest issues can’t be resolved, there is nevertheless an honorable way to end the California prison hunger strike before any of the strikers die. The first thing that’s needed to prevent a

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Lori Lyna Hirsch-Stokoe Food Writer Andrea Serna Arts Writer Malina Paris Culture Writer Calendar 14days@randomlengthsnews.com Photographers Terelle Jerricks, Betty Guevara, Contributors Danny Simon, Slobodan Dimitrov, Robin Doyno, Greggory Moore, Tom Hayden

Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Matt Wuerker Advertising Production Mathew Highland, Suzanne Matsumiya Advertising Representatives Mathew Highland, Tom Potts reads@randomlengthsnews.com adv@randomlengthsnews.com Editorial Interns Joseph Baroud, Cory Hooker Display advertising (310) 519-1442 Classifieds (310) 519-1016

tragedy is an immediate shift from the heated rhetoric to conflict-resolution measures. The governor’s negotiators have demanded that the hunger strikers end their fast before any issues can be resolved. Whatever its philosophical merits, that demand is likely to cost lives. The courts have already ruled that California prisons don’t meet constitutionally guaranteed standards. Does the governor really want a legacy of inmates starving to death on his watch? To prevent deaths, both sides will have to put their philosophical differences on hold and focus on key measures that would bring relief from the worst agonies of solitary confinement, even if the state is unwilling to end it completely. The strikers, for their part, must accept that some of their “core demands,” including the call for a far more humane approach to incarceration in the state’s Special Housing Units, are nonstarters with the Brown administration. The governor, for his part, should immediately ask his representatives to begin delivering on the strikers so-called supplemental demands. These include such measures as fixes to prison air conditioning systems, fresher food and the right to a weekly continued on following page www.randomlengthsnews.com

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

RANDOMLetters Print is Not Dead

National Security versus “Rights”

James, I just posted this in response to your City Watch article. What crap is this, James? I have to take issue with your assessment of our national security vs. the so-called “rights” of mixedup nut-balls like Manning and his right to blab to everyone on the globe-our national classified documents. You also ask us - as readers about how much of our “individual rights” are we willing to give up for our security. You allude that our American “citizens” are wonderful, innocent beings and that we don’t need to help our government who is trying to do to stem terrorism and control the millions of nut-cases (such as Manning). Folks like Manning hurt far more than help. Snowden, he’s even worse. Moreover, I’m not worried about the NSA “coming after me”? Why should they? James, are you living in Paranoiaville? And BTW, Manning is so screwed up, he released those important documents, NOT to be a champion of our liberty, safely and rights, but to get attention to himself from another homosexual who had previously rejected him. He and now some in the media want to make a hero out of this twerp of a male, who wishes to become a woman called “Chelsea Manning.” Geezus…what a weirdo. We need to constrain and marginalize - not liberalize people like him. My liberty and your security will be better for it if we do. The fact is James, most of us would rather have better security and a government that tries to do it’s best to get ahead of those

Richard, The beautiful woods of Oregon must be having some effect on you, or maybe not! It’s easy to be lulled into some sense of tranquillity and distance from urban realities. I presume that the forests up there don’t have surveillance cameras and that the Spotted Owl, an endangered species, is not a terrorist target like the Port of Los Angeles might be. The balance between individual or collective “socalled-rights” of the citizens and providing for national security is one steeped historically in our national political dialogue. I presume you would also have protested Daniel Elsberg’s release of the Pentagon Papers during the Vietnam War. However, aside from the personalities involved in this current round of “leaks” to the media and the public, there are greater issues of privacy vs. security that are to be settled. Both Bradley (Chelsea) Manning and Edward Snowden have contributed greatly to this evolving discussion that will affect even you on your distant travels in paradise. I might add that these “individual rights” that you so cavalierly wish to toss aside for the sake of security from terrorism, are precisely the ideals that so many brave Americans have fought and died to defend over the course of the last two centuries, both in wars and in social movements. Defenders of liberty have often been demeaned by their contemporaries with derogatory defamations. James Preston Allen, Publisher

Acting Like They Own It

At the last Wilmington Neighborhood Council, WNC, 26 June 2013 Board Meeting, it clearly began to appear to the public lobbyist, Donald Compton, that the chickens are coming home to roost for the likes of long time WNC Officers Cecelia Moreno

from previous page

Ending Prison Strike

granted long ago because they are the right thing to do. Even some Brown administration officials privately acknowledge that many of the demands are reasonable. But the administration has refused to take any action as long as the hunger strikes continue. The prisoners, for their part, feel that if they end their action without any concessions from corrections officials, the pressure will be off, retribution will be taken and the status quo will resume. There is an urgent need to

put aside the toxic resentments and suspicions that date to California’s prison wars of decades past. Both sides need to focus on what is possible right now, and turn their immediate attention to preventing unnecessary deaths in the present stalemate. After that, the sides — with court intervention if necessary — can continue to deliberate on further reforms. Tom Hayden, a former state senator, is the author of “Street Wars” and is a longtime advocate of prison reform.

and never made a public statement as to why he left, but has been willing to express his leaving to anyone who calls his office after 4 p.m. When the lobbyist asked him why he left, he said because he had been dissed by Ms. Moreno for no good reason and when the lobbyist asked him why he thought Ms. Moreno and Patrick Wilson dissed him by keeping the 3 June, 2012 committee proposed action item off of the following WNC board meeting agenda for an up or down vote, as per the long established protocol set in motion by former chair Tom Dalgren, he said because Cecilia and Pat has been there as officers for so long that they think they own the place. Finally D.O.N.E.Administrator

Ms. Amber Meshack has launched an investigation into, for starters, the poor financial record keeping by Cecelia and Wilson, as per enclosed the true copy of what Cecelia Moreno called a mean spirited letter at the 26 June meeting, that did illicitly a formal apology from Ms. Moreno that helped get Cecelia and Pat a vote of confidence from the full WNC board. Later, by phone, Ms. Meshack told the lobbyist the WNC BYLAWS are also being looked at, especially the part dealing with selection of 20 out of 23 seat holders with transparency to suit the general rule followed by most other Neighborhood Councils. Donald Compton Wilmington

September 6 - 19, 2013

phone call. The strikers have also called for reopening the Pelican Bay visitors’ center and allowing visits of four to six hours on weekends and holidays for family members, who often must travel hundreds of miles to Pelican Bay. And they want the right to take one photograph per year, to purchase more art supplies from the canteen, to sell or give away artwork and to have more access to educational courses and current books. Many of these supplemental demands should have been

and Patrick Wilson, both of whom have been serving as officers since the WNC was first formed, more than eleven years ago. When Jack Babbitt, also an original founder, of sorts, in that core group, got his full of the officers, just mentioned, on 3 June, of last year, as Co Chair of the Joint Transportation and Land Use Planning Committee, and quit the WNC entirely, by, he told the lobbyist in private, being dissed by WNC Chair Cecilia Moreno, who had ignored the unanimous vote of said joint committee to put the concept to the legal drag strip issue on the agenda for the following WNC agenda as an action item. Mr. Babbitt just stopped coming to the WNC, about ten years ago

The Local Publication You Actually Read

It appears that reports of the demise of newspaper print have been greatly exaggerated. In his August 9-22 article, “Back to the Future,” James Preston Allen reported Amazon’s $250 million purchase of the Washington Post, the Boston Red Sox owner’s sale of the Boston Globe for $70 mil and the O.C.Register’s plans to launch a new sister daily, the Long Beach Register. Further on, Allen cited the amazing statistic that approximately “40 percent of the people” in the US lack Internet access and yet still have at their disposal “some 7000 weekly newspapers nationwide” that are prospering and still able to provide them with good oldfashioned printed news information. And they say print is dead? Now that many small papers have been gobbled up by media megaliths and the online mass market, and the Internet and the smart phone with its multipurpose capabilities are expanding their paper-free connections into virtually every area of human activity, the refusal by these print weeklies to “go digital” and hold out instead for those who, like myself, are not content with a strict diet of electronic news reading matter is very encouraging. That we are to be allowed a choice in the digital/print marketplace is especially meaningful in light of the discovery over the last 15 years of research that neural growth, especially in children, develops at an increased rate with printed matter and decreases when children are exposed exclusively to electronic text. It may be a factor that determines how fully in touch the rest of us are with what we read. The legacy of newspapers is a proud old tradition, and the thrill and immediacy of reading that headline or editorial or the breaking front page article, is an aesthetic, tactile contact with reality and with the world that no digital, easilydeleted story can quite convey. The fact that Random Lengths can maintain both the “intimacy”

of a local printed bi-weekly and the speed and convenience of an online independent news source as well shows that adaptation need not be a one-way street. Anthony Greeley San Pedro

nutballs like him and Snowden. They are sick examples of our liberty and freedom. Richard Pawlowski Oregon

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The George Deukmejian Courthouse Opens in Long Beach on Sept. 9

On August 27, the outside of the $490 million Gov. George Deukmejian courthouse was unveiled to the public for the first time. The new facility will replace the Long Beach Courthouse, which was built in 1958. Pictured from left are Clifford Ham, Judge James Otto, Chip Hastie (Vice-President Clark Construction Judge Vicencia, and Stephen I Reinstein ( Chief Executive Officer, Long Beach Judicial Partners LLC. Photo by Betty Guevara.

In Solidarity with Fast Food Workers

Sixty Cities, Thousands of Workers Congressman John Lewis saw the fast food strike in Atlanta on TV this past August and showed his support by joining the workers. His act of solidarity coincided with the 50th anniversary March on Washington, at which he spoke alongside Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The following is a transcription of Rep. Lewis’ remarks: Let me thank you for all that you are doing. All over the country there are hundreds and hundreds of people engaged in similar protests. So I wanted to come and just lend my voice, and maybe walk some. You must remember, 50 years ago, yesterday, when I was 23 years old, had all of my hair, and a few pounds lighter, we marched

just. What you have to do is stick together. And never, ever give up or give in. They said back in the 60s, we couldn't win. That we couldn't get a civil rights act that we couldn't get a voting rights act. We couldn't get a fair housing act, but we did it. And sometimes you have to use your marching feet, sometimes you have to make a

September 6 - 19, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Rep. John Lewis at a fast food workers’ strike, Aug. 29, 2013. File photo.

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for jobs and freedom. We're still marching for jobs. We need more than a minimum wage, we need a livable wage. I do not understand how people survive when they are being paid starvation wages. In a country like ours we can do much better. So one side's saying “wages.” Stop spending hundreds and thousands of millions and billions of dollars on war. Spend some of our resources to pay people a decent wage. When we marched on Washington 50 years ago, I said we don't have anything to be proud of. The hundreds and thousands of our sisters and brothers cannot be here, because they are receiving starvation wages. And the same things is true today, fifty years later. How can people live, how can you make it. With four children [reaches out to put his arm around a mother standing next to him... college? That's not right. That’s not fair. That’s not

little noise. I spoke at the march on Saturday. I said that we need to make some noise. And sometimes we are too quiet. And sometimes you have to find a way to make a way out of no way. And sometimes you have to find a way to get in the way. Now, I know some of your coworkers may be a little afraid. You must tell them, “Don't be afraid. Be of good courage.” We must remember that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on April 4, in 1968, died in Memphis trying to help the sanitation workers—and that's what this is all about. Some people are getting richer and richer, and doing better and doing better, and others are getting poorer and poorer. That's not right. That's not fair. That's not just. So get out there. Keep walking, keep marching, keep talking, keep pushing and keep pulling and you will have a great victory, and you can count on my help.

D

J Gary Wagner, host of radio program Nothin’ But the Blues, said that the key to understanding the blues lies in understanding its roots. “The ability to adapt to circumstances demonstrates wisdom,” Wagner said. “It is the wisdom of human adaptation that created the music we call blues. It was born of a sense of outright oppression and was intended as a distraction from the cruelty of life. That is why it works.” Arthur Adams, from Medon, Tenn. embodies the soul of the blues. Recently Adams appeared at a Labor Day Fundraiser for KKJZ, the Blues Bash at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles.

As a young man, Adams attended Tennessee  State University, where he studied music and played in the school’s resident jazz and blues band. For many years, Adams led the house band at BB King’s Blues Club in Universal Citywalk. BB King was a major early influence on the young Adams. “My mom and dad wouldn’t let me listen to the blues but when the gospel music would go off the radio, I would stay up and listen to BB,” Adams said. “I met him in 1979 and then again in 1990. I was playing at The Mint on Pico Boulevard. BB King came to see me and that’s when we talked. After that we went into the studio and recorded ‘Mean and Evil’ and ‘I Got Something Up My Sleeve.’” Adams said his music lives on in hip hop. R&B singers like Montell Jordan have sampled his songs.

A prolific songwriter and vocalist with a soul-driven sound, Adams collaborated with some of the most successful songwriters in the country. On his 1999 album Back on Track, Adams collaborated with King and Will Jennings on the songs, “Got You Next To Me” and “Long Haul.” Jennings composed the love theme in the film, Titanic, has been an active collaborator in Adams’ music. “Arthur is unique,” Wagner said. “He is a gift. His music is full of the love that is in him.” Adams returns Wagner’s fondness. “I would do anything for Gary. He has helped so many of the blues artists. I want to do anything I can to return

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment ACE • Art, Cuisine, & Entertainment

by: Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Writer

Arthur Adams Continued on page 17.

September 6 – 19, 2013 September 6 – 19, 2013

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Entertainment September 5

Filet mignon steak kabob and ground beef kabob along with Saffron rice. Paul Aghilipour (left) Frank Ravalli (right).

Rendition Band The Rendition Band will be at Godmother’s Saloon from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sept. 5. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

September 6

Flamenco Guitarist Ricardo Diaz Ricardo Diaz is playing at Alvas Showroom, 8 p.m. Sept. 6. Ricardo presents an evening of amazing and passionate music and dance. You will be transported to the south of Spain. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W 8th St., San Pedro AWOL AWOL will be playing at Godmother’s Saloon from 9 to 10 p.m., Sept. 6. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

September 7

Richard Sherman Trio The Seaside Community Church presents the Richard Sherman Trio, 7 p.m., Sept. 7. Tickets are $25. Details: (310) 375-4441; www.seasidecommunitychurch.org Venue: James Armstrong Theatre Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance Tadic, Manring, Garcia Trio The Tadic, Manring and Garcia Trio will play at Alvas Showroom, 8 p.m. Sept. 7. The trio will blast the sounds of the fretted and fretless electric basses, acoustic guitars, South Indian kanjira, North Indian tabla, mbwata, paiste cymbals and miscellaneous percussion. Admission is $20.

September 6 - 19, 2013

Independent And Free.

Calendar continued on page 14.

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The Buzz Around the Blue Grotto Bistro by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

R

estaurateurs with a background in hospitality are a breed unto themselves. For them, its not enough that the food is great and the services prompt and courteous. They have to craft — like an artist — the complete dining experience that causes the dinner guest to boast about the restaurant as if they discovered it. Paul Aghilipour has two mottoes. The first: “Blue Grotto Bistro. Where life is about good food, good wines and good friends.” The other and less spoken about is: “Keep it simple, keep it fresh, keep it bold and keep it intriguing.” In fact, Paul likes keeping people talking,

spurring on the growing buzz about the Blue Grotto. He sees the Bistro carving a deeper niche in San Pedro through its extensive menu that allows a culinary adventurer to experience elements of different dishes from countries that ring the Mediterranean Sea, including Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Morocco and Tunisia. He even includes gluten free and vegetarian dishes. “You want to cater to all different kinds of taste,” Paul said. “The dinner menu has almost 68 selections, which is way too large for a restaurant this size.” Paul sees his extensive menu as being a tapas paradise, where culinary adventurers can get a

little bit of this and a little bit of that as they work their way through the menu over the course of time. In terms of meat, there is the rib eye, fillet mignon and New York steak to choose from. In seafood there’s shrimp, cioppino, fillet of sole, salmon and mahi mahi. Paul has even included fish and chips on his lunch menu, utilizing the sand dab as the fish of choice for this menu item. “Here we keep everything simple, fresh and intriguing,” he said. “We don’t pan fry anything. Everything is broiled with herbs. “A lot of people think that Mediterranean food is about the spice. But it’s really about the herbs.” Several months ago, Frank Ravalli bought Think Bistro at the 25th and Western shopping center. Frank purchased the restaurant from Paul’s brother, Kashi Aghilipour. He then hired Paul to run it. Paul encountered Frank by chance at Kashi’s restaurant, Think Prime Steakhouse, 8 years ago. The two became fast friends and went into the wine business together. Before then, the pair worked in close proximity to each other and didn’t even know it. Paul ran his wine import-export business out of the World Cruise terminal and Frank ran several businesses related to waterfront technology. So when they met, they (pardon the corny cliché) got along like two peas in a pod. The two bonded over wine. “Wine is good for your health, so why not make it into a business,” Paul quipped. Paul notes that Frank had always wanted to open a restaurant that complements the greatest loves in his life. “Frank loves to cook, he loves to eat good food, good wines with good friends,” Paul said. “That’s what life is about.” The sale of Think Bistro was the opportunity Frank was looking for. It was a no-brainer hiring Paul to run the restaurant, given his 25 years in the hospitality industry. Paul gained a lot of his knowledge and training by starting off at the very bottom. He worked in restaurants and hotels. He made his way up the harsh gaze of French chefs, where a mistake could result in an apprentice cleaning up the mess after the chef throws a dish that the apprentice made onto the floor. The Bistro’s biggest selling dinner entrée is the fillet mignon kabob and the ground beef kabob with saffron rice, roasted tomato and red onion doused with lemon juice. For lunch is the linguine and clams entrée and the shrimp scampi. They also have on the menu a the Blue Grotto burger with a pound-and-a-half patties that could satisfy the biggest appetite. And, just when you thought you had enough, the bistro offers a plethora of dessert options that can satisfy the sweetest tooth. The Bistro’s dessert menu includes the Italian dessert, tiramisu, made of ladyfingers dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks and mascarpone cheese, and flavored with cocoa. Apple Strudel, Mandarin orange cake with pineapple and more. The buzz at the Blue Grotto Bistro is getting louder. Go check out their $10 lunch specials and find for yourself what the buzz is all about. Details: (310) 548-4797 Venue: The Blue Grotto Bistro Location: 1420 W. 25th St. San Pedro

San Pedro’s Original ArtWalk— Fine Dining • Live Music Special Performances • Food Trucks! Gallery 345

Works on paper, canvas, and board as well as small works, jewelry, hand knit scarves from France, and other mixt media exhibited at Gallery 345. Artists include Gloria D Lee and Pat Woolley as well as a guest artist. 345 W. 7th Street, San Pedro CA 90731 310 545 0832 or 310 374 8055 for appointments Open 1st Thursday 6-9 p. m.

The Loft Gallery

The Medium is the Messsage: Carolyn Applegate, Hiroko, Stevie Love, Da Aie Park, Bret Price and Kenzi Shiokava. Open Studios: Candice Gawne, Carol Hungerford, Sam Arno, Daniel Porras, Murial Olguin, Jan Govaerts, Anne Marie Rawlinson, & Nancy Towne Schultz. • Open First Thursday 6–9 p.m. Open Saturdays & Sundays 2-5 p.m. 401 S. Mesa St. • 310.831.5757

Transvagrant and Warschaw Gallery

14 Featuring…

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Paintings by Craig Keith Antrim, Philippa Blair, Katy Crowe, Nat Jones, Ron Linden, Lida Lowrey, William Mahan, Jay McCafferty, Peggy Reavey,Yong Sin, Gary Szymanski, Maggie Tennesen, Marie Thibeault & Ted Twine. Show runs Sept. 7 through November 9, 2013. Artists reception is on Saturday, September 7, 4–7 p.m. Organized by Transvagrant @ Warschaw Gallery. This exhibition sponsored in part by the San Pedro Arts, Culture and Entertainment District and the San Pedro Chamber of Commerce. (310) 600-4873 • 600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

Richard Lopez Studio

Displaying acrylic works on canvas, including florals that expose rich, vibrant color as well as Cosmic Abstracts, using sanding, glazing and energetic celestial imagery. Currently showing a new 72 x 84 Cosmic Abstract work in progress that explores the link between the inner and outer realms of existence and the quest to find peace by bringing these into harmony. Presently, there are three existing openings of art classes for intermediate and advanced students. Richardlopezart@gmail.com 372 7th St. • 562.370.7883 • Ralopezart.com

Michael Stearns Studio 347

September 6 – 19, 2013

Hosting the opening of powerful marine photographs from native artist, Joel Gitelson appropriately titled, “Local Waters”. As a Los Angeles County Lifeguard and Paramedic, Joel has spent many moments on the Pacific Ocean. His passion for the sea has been instilled through his large format photographs, and by viewing these pieces up close, you will be able to experience what is incredible about our local aquatic environment. Please join us for the First Thursday Artwalk on September 5th from 6:00pm to 9:00pm. Michael Stearns Studio 347 is located at 347 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. For further information, please visit www.michaelstearnsstudio. com or call (562) 400-0544.

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Calendar from page 12. Details:

com

(800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom.

Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St.,

San Pedro

Q Film Festival by: Katrina Guevara, Guest Columnist

September 8

Oceans of Sand The Oceans of Sand will be playing at Alvas Showroom, 4 p.m. Sept. 8. The band will blend the guitar, bass, keyboards, drums, sax and flute together into a beautiful sound. Admission is $15. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

September 13

Jay Edwards Jay Edwards is playing at Godmother’s Saloon from 9 to 10 p.m., Sept. 13. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmothersaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Community/Family September 7

Kids Day of Service Whole Foods Torrance and the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy are hosting Kids Day of Service, 9 a.m. Sept. 7. Launch seed bombs to revegetate the coastal bluff. Reservations are required. Details: www.wfmpelicancove.eventbrite.com Venue: Pelican Cove Location: 6400 Palos Verdes Drive South, Rancho Palos Verdes

O

utfest took place in Los Angeles last July. Now it is the City of Long Beach’s turn to screen LGBT films at its 20th Q Film Festival from Sept. 6 to 8 at the Art Theatre and The Center Long Beach. The Center Long Beach’s President and Chairman Ron Sylvester, who has been a member of the Q Film Festival since 2009, said the festival has been amazing. “Long Beach is a great diverse and accepting LGBT community,” said Sylvester. “We are thrilled to be able to offer great LGBT entertainment for one full weekend.” Sylvester also said the film festival has a new addition this year. “There’s something for everyone from dramatic feature films to the dramatic documentary I Am Divine, as well as short

programs, not just men’s and women’s, but more diversified.” Featured films include: Reaching for the Moon, G.B.F., I Am Divine, Who’s Afraid of Vagina Wolf?, Corpus Christi, Getting Go: The Go Doc Project, among other films. I Am Divine, Homeboy, and First Period are just a few of the titles that will make their debuts in Long Beach. Films like Reaching for the Moon and G.B.F. first premiered at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. Lee Meriwether, known as Catwoman in the 1966 Batman movie, will make a special guest appearance on Sept. 7. The actress and former model will also appear in the West Coast premier of feature film Birthday Cake and short film Remember to Breathe.

Independent And Free.

First Saturday Bird Walk Join the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy for the First Saturday Bird Walk, 8:30 a.m. Sept. 7. Binoculars are provided for a slow, easy walk. Details: (310) 547-0862 Venue: George F. Canyon Preserve and Nature Center Location: 27305 Palos Verdes Dr. E., RPV Calendar continued on page 15.

A still photo from a scene in the film, G.B.F., which is set to screen at the Q-Film Festival Sept. 6-8. File photo.

G.B.F. stands for the ever-trendy term Gay Best Friend. Three prom queen frontrunners battle for attention through being awarded a trophy G.B.F. According to the comedy, “Once you’re out, you’re in.” I Am Divine is a documentary about the infamous character responsible for shaking the drag queen scene and inspiring Disney’s Little Mermaid character Medusa. If you want to learn about the fascinating stories behind Divine’s absurdity, stay tuned for the film, which debuted at SXSW (South by Southwest). Birthday Cake is a mockumentary and sequel to short film Groom’s Cake. The movie, filmed in Long Beach, follows two gay lovebirds (Chad Darnell and Rib Hillis) as they prepare for their adopted daughter’s birthday. It is a lighthearted take on the complexities of mad hatters, despite the fact that their own baby won’t remember the vivid moments that take place. Homeboy chronicles the lives of 20 to 40year-old Latino former gangsters in Los Angeles. Many of the gay cholos discuss the suppression of their identity, as well as their breakdown. Heterosexual Jill is a coming-of-lesbian story. The journey has comedic catastrophes and memorable lines, such as “Don’t flatter yourself, all dykes look the same.” First Period is a comedy that playfully says “vagina is the center of your problem.” Period. The Q Film Festival benefits the LGBT community of Long Beach. The city has been an epicenter for the LGBTQ community for decades. According to the Q Films website, “We advocate the inclusion of all individuals into a free and just community, without judgment or restriction due to sexual orientation or gender expression.” According to The Center’s website, the social service serves approximately 21,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender clients through 23 different programs and services. Some of the center’s other programs include QSpeak and Long Beach AIDS Ride. For full details and ticket information visit: www.qfilmslongbeach.com.

SUSHI BAR

September 6 - 19, 2013

Japanese Restaurant Sushi Bar 380 W. 6th St. • 832-5585

14

GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT: The Devil Wears Prada (2006)

September 20 | 8PM Andrea “Andy” Sachs is an aspiring journalist fresh out of college who lands the job “a million girls would kill for.” Purchase tickets online for $4 tickets at the door $6 cash only.

HP LOVECRAFT FILM FESTIVAL & CTHULUCON – LA

September 27, 28 & 29 Now in its 3rd year at WGT – Celebrate the master of gothic horror with an eclectic mix of vendors and dining specials. Tickets and festival schedule at www.hplfilmfestival.com/

THE SAN PEDRO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

October 4 & 6 Now in its 2nd year at WGT, SPIFF presents new feature and documentary films from top international film festivals around the globe. Titles, show times and ticket prices to be announced.

“WHEN DO YOU FORGIVE?”

October 5 | 4:30 & 8:30PM Houston author and playwright Sheila Young brings her newest play to the WGT stage for two performances only. “Sometimes it takes a stranger to see what we can’t see ourselves.” $15 - brownpapertickets/ event/398461

478 W. 6th St. • Historic Downtown San Pedro • 310.548.2493

The Warner Grand Theatre is a facility of the City of Los Angeles, operated by the Department of Cultural Affairs. For Information and Tickets, Please Visit WarnerGrand.org, GrandVision.org or ExperienceSP.com

Calendar from page 14.

September 8

Nature Sing Along The Palos Verdes Land Peninsula Conservancy hosts the Nature Sing Along, 2 to 3 p.m. Sept. 8. Everyone is invited to join a free musical celebration of the natural world at the White Point Nature Education Center. Details: www.pvplc.org Venue: White Point Nature Education Center Location: 1600 W. Paseo del Mar., San Pedro

September 11

Spanish as a Second Language for Seniors The Long Beach Senior Latino Club is hosting a weekly beginners level course in Spanish as a second language starting Sep. 11. The class will focus on teaching students how to read, write and speak Spanish. It’s open to people who are at least 50 years old. The 12-week sessions cost $25, with a pre-registration fee of $10 also required. Space is limited, so call the number below as soon as possible to reserve a spot. Details: (562) 570-3514 Venue: Long Beach Senior Center Location: 1150 E. 4th St., Long Beach

September 14

Weekly LALALA 10th Anniversary Event The Weekly LALALA presents its 10th Anniversary Event, 10 a.m., Sep. 14 and Sep. 15. There is no charge for the event. Details: (310) 781-7171; www. weeklylalalausa.com Venue: Torrance Cultural Arts Center Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance

September 14

Fathers & Suns Rise by: Melina Paris, Music Columnist

W

— doing so in a total of four hours. Listening to their album on Bandcamp I was struck by just how much it sounded as though I was in the room listening to them live. This phenomenon particularly comes through on their number, “Takin’ A Walk,” a 1960s California sound with hard psychedelic grooves. Fathers & Suns are in the middle of living their dreams saying they are really pleased to be playing in Long Beach and have people like their music. Jesús and Arturo both look forward to enhancing their guitar playing and make new experimental sounds. “Mama Provides shaped our sound and defined us; it said we’re here,” Jay adds. “I’m interested to see where that takes us. This process will make us better musicians and make our sound more cohesive than it already is.” Fathers & Suns are an environmentally and socially conscious group of men highly connected to their community. They printed their CD packaging with Forest Stewardship Council certified eco - friendly paper for instance. Forest Stewardship Council certified products are sourced in an environmental, social and economic responsible manner. “The packaging was Arturo’s idea,” Jay says. “I definitely brought that to the band but we are all on the same page with the community,” Arturo says he will claim that responsibility. “We love Long Beach and this is our home.” With their Buskerfest win followed by their most recent show at The Prospector it’s clear Long Beach loves Fathers & Suns. The house was packed and they had the audience’s rapt attention. Through this set, I saw their dynamic come alive. Jesús’ distinctive voice immediately captures Fathers and Suns Continued on page 16.

Ranger Guided Family Walk Join the LA City Rangers for a guided family hike through the White Point Nature Preserve, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sept. 14. This occurs every second Saturday of the month. Details: www.pvplc.org Venue: White Point Nature Preserve Location: 1600 W. Paseo del Mar., San Pedro

September 15

White Point Home Tour The White Point Home Tours are being offered from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 15. Enjoy a self-guided tour of five modern, traditional and mid-century homes including two artist homes and studio residences. Guests will be invited to a reception afterwards with food, wine, live music and a silent auction. Tickets are $55 in advance and $65 at the door. Details: (310) 541-7613; www.pvplc.org

September 22

Research Program Ice Breaker The research staff at the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is hosting an event to give those interested the opportunity to learn more about marine research, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sep. 22. Research staff will introduce local Southern California marine animals, research facilities and discuss projects to be conducted at CMA by high school and college students interested in a future science career. The program is free and is open to students 16 years or older. Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro Salt Marsh Open House Join the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Education Staff for Salt Marsh Open House, 2 to 4 p.m. Sept. 22. Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro Calendar continued on page 16.

September 6 – 19, 2013

Thou,’ which is quite punk to something like ‘All My Friends Are Animals’ which has a drum machine in it, or ‘Rooster,’ which is very folksy and probably embraces the psychedelic folk element the most out of all of it.” Their name is reflective of their former band name (Program Love). They were in Program Love, which was made up of only three of the current members sans Jay, gigging three times a week between Long Beach and Los Angeles. Before disbanding they tried to get Jay in the mix but Arturo thought it best to just wipe the slate clean, include Jay and become a different band. “The name Program Love said it all but we took that philosophy and incorporated it into Fathers & Suns,” Jay says. It worked out for the better and was one of their best transitions in music. Elaborating on the interpretation of their name, they say they are all fathers in a sense. They spawn ideas and philosophies through music and are fathers to melodies and harmonies. There is a lot of overlapping of musical inspirations with Fathers & Suns. Bob Dylan, Red Hot Chili Peppers and The Beatles as well as a mixture of California bands, heavy metal, punk and oldies like, Chuck Berry and Ritchie Valens to grunge, gangster rap and ska core (Death metal with ska and reggae). Including the band members’ unique favorites, their musical muses, inspire a sound in Fathers & Suns that is truly unlike anything you have ever heard before. They have begun work on their second album and the approach to their records to do it themselves to maintain creative control. The first band started at Chestnut House, a community for artists in Long Beach. They returned there to record part of their first album, Mama Provides,

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

inners of the 2013 Long Beach Buskerfest, Fathers & Suns took away possibly six pounds of wooden nickels in winnings. Buskerfest is an annual concert that is part of the Long Beach Summer and Music series. It starts in June and culminates in August with Buskerfest. The event in Downtown Long Beach East Village Arts District brings together local bands that compete for the grand prize. Fresh off their win, I spoke to the band about Buskerfest, their philosophies and what comes next. Fathers & Suns is comprised of Arturo Bandini and Jesús Lara on guitar and vocals, Luis Renteria on drums and percussion, and Jay Penev on bass, vocals and keys. The bands compete for wooden nickels that the audience gives out to their favorite acts. Luis explains busking is going out on the street, opening up your guitar case and playing for money. It’s supposed to be busker-style playing, which means no amplification. They say that’s what the rules have been in the past, but people keep finding ways around it. “We were prepping to do this really stripped down set, more acoustic and worrying about projection of our vocals,” Luis added. “As we’re walking through the venue the first band we see are completely plugged in and rocking out. So we went back to our studio, picked up our gear and said let’s do this 100 percent.” Luis says that initially he described their sound like Fleet Foxes and The Flaming Lips put together. But then psychedelic-folk rock became their label and direction. “As long as we are individually and collectively moved by the music, it becomes our music.” Jay explains. The record has vast differences from song to song. From something like ‘Where Art

Yoga Plus Guided Nature Walk Equinox and Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy present the Yoga Plus Guided Nature Walk, 2 to 5 p.m. Sept. 14. De-stress with a free yoga session led by Equinox trainers followed by a journey through restored lands now home to the federally endangered El Segundo blue butterfly. Meet in front of the Pelican statue for the beginning of the walk. Free public parking is provided in the lot at Pelican Cove. The walk is free and open to the public. Details: (310) 541-7613 ext. 201; www.pvplc.org Venue: Pelican Cove Location: 6400 Palos Verdes Dr. South, Rancho Palos Verdes

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Calendar from page 15.

Theater/Film September 5

RED RED is playing from Aug. 21 to Sept. 5. American abstract expressionist and celebrated bad boy of the art world, Mark Rothko, had just landed the biggest commission in the history of modern art, a series of murals for the exclusive Four Seasons restaurant. Rothko works feverishly with his young assistant Ken, but when Ken gains the confidence to challenge him, Rothko faces the agonizing possibility that his crowning achievement could also become his undoing. Shows from Thursday to Saturday begin at 8 p.m. and on Sunday at 2 p.m. Details: (562) 436-4610; www.ictlongbeach.org Venue: International City Theatre Location: 300 E Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

September 7

EQUUS EQUUS will be showing at the Long Beach Playhouse from Sept. 7 to Oct. 5. Dr. Martin Dysart, a psychiatrist, is confronted with Alan Strang, a boy who has blinded six horses in a violent fit of passion. This very passion is as foreign to Dysart as the act itself. To the boy’s parents, it is a hideous mystery; Alan always adored horses. General admission is $24. For times and dates, visit the website below. Details: (562) 494-1014; www. lbplayhouse.org Venue: Long Beach Playhouse Location: 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

September 8

Japanese Folk Song, Dance Show Nanka Ninhon Minyo Kyokai presents the Japanese Folk Song and Dance Show, 1 p.m.. Sept. 8. Tickets are $10. Details: (310) 327-3609 Venue: James Armstrong Theatre Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance

September 15

Independent And Free.

Elephant in the Room The Shine Community Arts Company presents Elephant in the Room, 6:30 p.m., Sep. 15. Everybody sees the 700 pound problem, but nobody wants to do anything about it. Tickets are $25. For more information visit the website below. Details: (323) 252-5501; www.shinetac.org Venue: James Armstrong Theatre Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance

Art September 5

South Bay Watercolor Society – 2013 Annual Juried Exhibition The National Watercolor Society hosts this exhibition of local watercolor artists, Sept. 5 through Sept. 15. The reception runs 2 to 5 p.m. Sept. 8. Details: South Bay Watercolor Society, Annual Exhibition Venue: National Watercolor Society Location: 915 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

September 6

September 6 - 19, 2013

Rhapsodies en Bleu Eva Marie Vargo, creative director at Ma Griffe and formerly from San Pedro, returns to the exhibit world with her newest acrylic paintings depicting a departure in style from previous years through Dec. 31, at Ma Griffe Galerie in San Pedro. An opening reception is scheduled from 5 to 9 p.m. Sept 6. This departure is evident in the predominant dramatic presence of dark shades of blue. Eva Marie normally approaches a canvas with no sense of what she will create and lets the creativity flow as she applies paint with brushes, cloth, Calendar continued on page 17.

16

Picking Delicious Chili by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

The Delicious Chili and Brewfest was an mitigated success in that it turned out a large crowd on a hot Sunday. Sure, there was the beautiful views of the marina across the way and the waterway leading into the Los Angeles river. Ten dollars for parking, $10 for admission, and a good $30 for five small cups of beer from the visiting breweries and 10 small cups of chili was a pretty good deal as long as the chili was there. But I did have a little bit of beef with the competition. How do you run out of Chili at chili competition? Lack of logistical foresight apparently. There were 10 contestants in Long Beach’s inaugural chili festival. I was able to try seven of them. Two contestants ran out of chili and the last one kind of turned me off as I observed how the chili team was handling their chili. Looking

at three beefy-looking guys pour chili into the a large bowl and then using a way too small ladle to scoop the chili into the small white cups with their ungloved hands was not appetizing. I did have three favorites and a close runner up. Gone with the Wind Chili Verde was a huge tasty surprise and was my favorite at the festival. Very soupy green chili with finely cut chicken with a moderate amount of heat to satisfy a chili connoisseur. Tri-tip Chili had one of the longest lines of the Chili contestants. Theirs had at least two different types of beans, with finely chopped tri-tip beef. The flavor of each ingredient seemed to pop out with every spoonful. Pools Brew was the third runner up. Their chili had a soupy quality where the elements of the chili

Continued from page 11.

Arthur Adams

what he has done for us.” A big hulking bear of a man, with a sweet tenor voice, Adams sound is often reminiscent of the haunting lilting sounds of Clarence Carter and Tyrone Davis. Romantically inspired songs such as, “I Thrive on Your Vibe” and “If I Did Not Have You” reveal the big heart inside of the even bigger man. Onstage Adams displays a powerful energy, demonstrating his freight train guitar styling in a way that evokes envy and amazement from younger guitar hero wannabees. His writing has set his work apart. “I try to think of what people would like to hear as they go through the day-to-day of their lives,” Adams said about his songwriting method. “What makes them feel good, what makes them feel happy, even what makes them feel mad.” What you hear is sometimes tender and dreamy, sometimes bluesy, and sometimes hard pounding with his blues guitar. His most recent release Feet Back In The Door, is produced by the successful young blues

artist Keb’ Mo’. Another collaboration in Adams career was with the iconic folk/blues/jazz singer Nina Simone. Adams said he wasn’t playing anywhere at that time, he was at a low point in his music career. He sent a tape to Eddie Singleton, an old friend of his who was co-managing Nina Simone. When he met with Simone she did not want a singer or a guitar player, she wanted a bass player. “I had never played the bass before,” Adams said. “I borrowed a friend’s bass guitar and learned forty of her songs on the bass. Adams landed the job and they toured England and the United States as a three-piece act: Simone, Adams and her drummer. It was an educational experience for Adams to play with Simone. “I was able to follow her because I have a good ear,” he said. “She was good [in every musical category]. It was an experience that I will never forget.” Adams is working on a brand new album and lucky blues fans can catch him at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano coming up Oct. 13 with Black Label, Jim Summers and Friends.

seem to almost melt into a kind of chili broth. The remainder of the chilies were good but had something was flawed or just plain off about them. Moose Tracks Fired up Chili was comparable to Pools Brew. Whereas Pools Brew tomato base came through strongly, Moose Tracks had an element that subdued the chili’s tomato base. Scoville Chili was a sweet, meaty chili with a slight kick at the end of each taste. As I sampled this chili, it seemed as if something was off. I thought the prepping of this chili could have been improved. Chili in the Buff had a good balance of beans, tomato and meat but the choice of meat made the overall product too salty for my taste. Vegetarian Chili was the biggest disappointment. Entering a chili competition with a vegetarian option is already an uphill climb in the first place. That’s generally why most vegetarian dishes are jam packed with flavor and texture, to make up for its lack of meat. But for this team to enter a pot of pinto in some spicy ketchup made me really hot under the collar. They could have at least put in some interesting varieties of beans and finely chopped vegetables, or thrown in some tofu. The chili was more akin to V-8 tomato juice than chili. It’s too bad that Delicious Chili chose to not reveal the results of the competition until 5 p.m., an hour before closing. I got through the gates a little after 11 a.m. and was thoroughly fried and gone by the time 3 o’clock rolled around. This was just the inaugural event. I think next year’s Delicious could be even better. Lets just hope they can work out the logistical kinks that will allow contestants offer more chili for a chili festival. It’s never a good thing to have an attendee complain of there not being any chili at a chili festival.

Fathers and Suns Continued from page 15.

Fathers & Suns attention: it’s soulful, strong and expressive. The harmony that he and Arturo, with a deeper voice and mellower delivery, lay down capture that folk and 1960s California sound. Within one song Fathers & Suns can go from folk to psychedelic and hard core rhythms. With Jay’s exceptionally strong playing, he can drop his bass to bottomless depths. Drummer, Luis credits Jimmy Chamberlin of Smashing Pumpkins for discovering he could be emotional instead of focusing on the technicality of drums. Indeed he does as he infuses raw power and fun into his playing while wearing a huge smile the entire time. Together, these suns have risen high and they shine their luminous light throughout this big, small town by the sea: their beloved Long Beach.

Calendar from page 16.

Big Nick’s Pizza

Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

Iron City Tavern

Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash, soups and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crépes and pastas. Take a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING S i n c e 1 9 61 we’ve extended a hearty welcome to visitors from every corner of the globe. Delight in an aweinspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the Award-Winning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www. Portsocalldining.com

SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 • www.spiritmarine.com Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfortable dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, meat pies, salmon, swordfish & vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 8320363 • www.whaleandale.com Keep An Eye Out for San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure

San Pedro Brewing Company A microbrewery and American grill, SPBC features hand-crafted award-winning ales and lagers served with creative pastas, bbq, sandwiches, salads and burgers. A full bar with made-from-scratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Live music on Saturdays. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 • www. sanpedrobrewing.com

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

September 7

14 14 is An exhibition of paintings by Southern California artists. Falling in and out of critical favor for more than three decades, painting remains compatible with a stunning multiplicity of styles and aesthetics. Painting has not simply survived but continues to thrive in an era dominated by spectacle, fragmentation and aesthetic indifference. Artist’s reception, Saturday, Sept. 7, from 4 to 7 p.m. Venue: Warschaw Gallery Location: 600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro Conversation with Matthew Barney Special effects master Gabe Bartalos sits down for a conversation with legendary artist Matthew Barney, 8 p.m., Sept. 7. The two will sit down and share their insight on special effects for films. Prior to the event, the University Art Museum, which is Cal State Long Beach’s fall exhibition, will host its grand opening from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 and $50 for VIP seating. Details: (562) 985-7000; www.carpenterarts.org Venue: Carpenter Performing Arts Center Location: 6200 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

September 8

Tea Time Dais Ma Griffe Gallery is hosting Team Time Dais, 12 to 3 p.m. Sept. 8. In the Gallery Garden, under the gazebos, over tea and canapes, there will be a discussion moderated by Artists Eva Marie Vargo on the hot topic of the day, Out of the Bleu. Admission is $18 and it includes tea and door prizes. Details: (310) 547-2154; www.magriffegalerie. com Venue: Ma Griffe Gallery Location: 3624 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

September 13

Lucha Libres at the Museum of Latin American Art The Museum of Latin American Art will host an evening of live Mexican lucha libre, 8:30 p.m. Sept. 13, to honor the beginning of Hispanic Heritage Month. Ten luchadores (wrestlers) will bring the high pitched excitement of the ring to the audience during several matches. There will be food and drink available for purchase, vendors selling lucha libre related merchandise and an opportunity for guests to have their photo taken with a luchador. The Museum’s galleries will be open at 8 p.m. so that guests can view Katharsis, an exhibition drawn from the Photography Collection that is both a documentary and an artistic journey through the real and imaginary realm of lucha libre mexicana. Details: www.molaa.org Venue: Museum of Latin American Art Location: 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

September 18

Art and Design Alumni Exhibition The Alumni Art and Design Exhibition will be presented from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Sept. 18. This is an invitational show featuring 80 works of art in varied media created by 24 alumni from the Art and Design Department at California State University, Dominguez Hills. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Details: (310) 243-3334; www.cah.csudh.edu/ art_gallery Venue: Cal State Dominguez Hills, La Corte Hall A-107 Location: 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

September 21

Gallery Azul – Peace in The Chaos New works by Estela Gama will open during the September First Thursday San Pedro Art Walk, 5 to 9 p.m. Sept. 21. Peace in the Chaos is an exhibition that echoes that struggle of trying to feel happy despite the environment that surrounds us. That fight every human has with themselves, of trying to fit into a society that has forgotten about the true meaning of coexisting. Details: www.galleryazul.com Venue: Gallery Azul Location: 520 W. 8th St., San Pedro

September 6 – 19, 2013

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfortable gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766

The favorite local cafe for the point Fermin area of San Pedro great breakfasts, lunches and even dinner. Serving traditional offering for breakfast along with specialty omelets, espresso and cappuccino. Lunches include a delicious selection of soups, salads, burgers and sandwiches with hearty portions as well as Chef’s Creations. Dinners feature Top Sirloin Steak or Prime Rib as well as a kids menu. Beer and wine are served. Free Wifi and is pet friendly on the patio. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. close to Cabrillo Beach and the Korean Bell, Point Fermin area- 508 West 39th St., San Pedro. 310- 548- 3354

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Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also offers classic Italian dishes and sauces based on tried-and-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com

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and even her hands and fingers. In this exhibit Eva Marie has also implemented a variety of tools to scratch away paint on the canvas for various effects. Magically she loses all sense of time and place as the imagery manifests itself figuratively and literally “out of the bleu.”

17

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013143691 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Level 2 Languages, 1374 W. 37th Street, San Pedo CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Mark Sanden, 1374 W. 37th Street, San Pedo Ca 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in 07/24/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Mark Sanden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 24, 2013. Notice- In acxcordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13, 09/17/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013143691 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Housewife on Wheels, 3470 S. Leland St., San Pedo Ca 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Diane Taylor Carbone, 3470 S. Leland St., San Pedo Ca 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Diane Taylor Carbone. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 11, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/05/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013143692 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Victory Property Investments, 100 Aquarium Way, #2, Long Beach, CA 90802. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Luz Victoria Osuna, 723 N. Leland Ave., San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/

09/19/13, 10/04/13, 10/18/13

Luz Victoria Osuna. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 11, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/05/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013139431 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Soulera, 510 Shepard St., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Andrew Jonathan Soto, 510 Shepard St., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Andrew Jonathan Soto. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 5, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of

STARTING A NEW BUSINESS?

the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/03/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013168713 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Crème De La Crust, 6622 W. 86th Pl, Apt 1, Westchester, Ca 90045. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Andrea Marie Philips, 6622 W. 86th Pl., Apt

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013181766 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Rameses Tax Services, 24328 Vermont Ave., Unit315, Harbor City, Ca 90710. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Gary L. Bodaheley, 3060 Gold Star Dr., Apt 294, Long Beach, CA 90810. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Gary L. Bodaheley. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as

provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 09/05/13, 09/19/13, 10/04/13, 10/18/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013183307 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Rolling Hills General Store Decor, 26947 Rolling Hills Rd., Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Pauline Lupo-Becker, 28718 Mt. Langley Ct, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Pauline Lupo-Becker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Sep. 03, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 09/05/13, 09/19/13, 10/04/13, 10/18/13

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Statement of Abandoment of Use of Fictitious Business Name File No. 2012220894 Date Filed 11/05/2012 Seaside Healing Arts, 615 W. 9th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731 Registered Owner(s): Body Shop Day Spa, Inc., 4001 Inglewood Ave., 101-639, Redondo each, Ca 90278. Business was conducted by a corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. ( A registant who declares as true informaiton which he or she knows tobe falseis guilty of a crime.) Body DS/ Beth Hurewitz, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on July 11, 2013.

1, Westchester, CA 90045. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in 08/01/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Andrea Philips. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Aug. 13, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 09/05/13,

07/25/13, 08/08/13, 08/22/13, 09/05/13

Or just renewing your existing Fictitious Business Name (DBA)?

File or publish your DBA today with Random Lengths News and receive a FREE 6-month subscription to the Los Angeles Harbor Area’s leading progressive newspaper

www.RandomLengthsNews.com 1300 S. Pacific Ave. San Pedro, CA 90731

September 6 - 19, 2013

310-519-1442

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September 6 - 19, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


Rln 9 5 13 edition