Issuu on Google+

LB Living Wage Proposal Makes November Ballot p. 5 Lieu Holds Line on CSU Presidents’ Salaries p. 5 Minuteman’s Mike Watt Redefines San Pedro Through His Lens p. 11 SP Brewery Seeks More Wins, Opens New Bottling Company p. 12

Have You Caught It Yet? By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Graphic: Matt Highland

I

west San Pedro Neighborhood Council. “Probably because of the all the different projects that are about to come online at the same time. We have the Watercut, Crafted, and now the Iowa... This is a good thing.” But this optimism doesn’t fully explain the attraction of a floating war machine to a town already accustomed to seeing container ships resembling metal skyscrapers floating up the Main Channel almost daily. So, Random Lengths News turned to Bryan Moss, who served on the venerable ship 60 years ago in February 1952, during the Korean War. Moss was on the ship for less than a year, but the sounds, sights and smells of the ship stuck with him. “It was a big ship,” Moss said when asked

what memory of the ship stuck with him most. He began rattling off the ship’s statistics the way a child who collects baseball cards rattles off the stats of players in the major leagues—except he was there when some of those stats were notched. “It was three football fields in length, and it was 58,000 tons when it was fully loaded,” Moss said. “It had nine, 16-inch batteries and we had fired about 4,000 shells at the marine coast, 16-inch shells, which is 2,700 pounds and each one the size of a Volkswagen and it made a lot of noise when it went of.” Six decades later, Moss still remembered the alarm system that warned when the big guns were going to fire, sounding like

June 1 - 14, 2012

f you live or work in close proximity to San Pedro, there’s a good chance you’ve caught the fever… the fever for the USS Iowa, that is. The fever has been slowly spreading since 2010, but with the arrival of the 60-yearold battleship and its official opening a month away, it is now approaching epidemic proportions. “I’m very excited,” president of Jericho Development and Rancho Palos Verdes resident, Alan Johnson said. “It’s going to be a very good for the town… “I know a ship like that will bring people from the larger Los Angeles area for years to come.” “I’m hopeful and optimistic about what it can do for our town,” said Diana Nave, president of North-

Have You Caught the Iowa Fever?/ to p. 1 3

HARBOR AREA

Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area

Hahn Hosts Meeting on Rancho LPG

AIDSWalk Long Beach

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor On May 24, Rep. Janice Hahn hosted a meeting with community members, representatives from Rancho LPG and its workers’ union, and the Environmental Protection Agency to discuss the issue of the Rancho facility’s threat to public safety. Also attending was Lisa Pinto, a top staffer for Rep. Henry Waxman, whose new district includes portions of San Pedro. Those present represented both neighborhood councils and homeowners’ associa-

Tall Ships Seek Volunteers

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Rancho Rep in Denial About Earthquake Zone

2

tions, which have played a leading role in advocating for removing Rancho’s LPG facility. “[Ron] Conrow, the Plains rep. [which owns Rancho LPG] just kept contending that they were in legal compliance with the rules and regs,” said Connie Rutter, a retired oil and gas industry consultant who is working with homeowner activists. “He contended that, according to one source, they weren’t on an earthquake rupture zone… Janet [Gunter] and I both snorted at that,

but he didn’t back down.” Calling it “incredibly outrageous,” Gunter chimed in. “Ron Conrow, on behalf of Rancho, still contends (despite all the documentation from U.S. Geological Survey, the Los Angeles Building and Safety Department, etc.) that they are not on an earthquake fault nor in a liquefaction and landslide area,” Gunter said. “The document that Rancho keeps citing as their verification of this is the (Federal Emergency Management Agency)

map, which (for some obscure reason) does not identify the fault… However, the premiere authority on seismic mapping… is of course, USGS! “The fact that Rancho is continuing to deny this very real fact on the seismic issue [means] they have a completely twisted sense of reality and are just doing everything they can to insulate themselves from the truth.” On the other hand, another Rancho employee, Tom Vuoso, who had worked there for more than 20 years, made remarks that strengthened the critics’ hand. “[He] referenced the fact that the facility was ‘ready to move for years’… and that ‘the Port was going to move us and all hazardous facilities to Energy Island… and we were amenable to that,’” Gunter said. Rutter concurred. “He said they had thought they were going to move and they were accepting of that,” Rutter said. The Port of Los Angeles has long denied this account, claiming that it abandoned plans to build Energy Island because of uniform opposition from the energy companies. Homeowner activist Jody James recalled that, “June Smith, president of Coastal Neighborhood Council, very forcefully told everyone in the room that… ‘this facility endangers the lives of perhaps thousands of people—and the school children are to be counted as people!’ Nonsensical regulations that allow lowball counting of the vulnerable individuals is insulting! “There is no other right thing to do but relocate the Rancho facility to a sane and geologically acceptable spot. It is not possible to make this safe.” Yet, the EPA seemed firmly committed to just such a nonsensical position. “[The] EPA guys made it clear that as long as a company complied with Part 112 of the Clean Air Act, they would be free to do just about anything,” said former port lawyer Pat Nave, who played a key role in drafting the Port Community Advisory Committee’s resolution on Rancho. “Pat gave an excellent analogy in describing what Jared Blumenfeld from the EPA said,” Gunter recalled. “He said, ‘Basically, what Blumenfeld said is that if a nuclear plant was sitting next to the White House… if they were obeying the regs… the EPA couldn’t do anything, no matter how unsafe that would be.’” “I was so frustrated listening to the industry people and the regulators talking about complying with the regulaEarthquake Risk/ to p. 6

Participate in the 24th annual AIDS Walk Long Beach, starting at 7:30 a.m. June 2, at the Aquarium of the Pacific, raising funds to end new HIV infections in the South Los Angeles County cities in the South Bay and Greater Long Beach area. If you cannot walk or run, donate, participate or register. Details: http://aidswalklb.kintera.org Venue: Aquarium of the Pacific Location: 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach

The TopSail Youth Program needs help sailing its twin brigantines. The San Pedro-based tall ships Irving Johnson and Exy Johnson are the venue for the TopSail Youth Program. Volunteers are needed for the spring and summer voyage seasons. No prior sailing experience needed. Orientation meetings for new volunteers take place once each month. The 90minute meetings are followed by a tour of one of the ships if available. Come to the up coming meeting at 10 a.m. June 9 at the Los Angeles Maritime Institute offices in San Pedro. Training will be offered to all volunteers after a background check is completed. Details: (310) 833-6055 Venue: Los Angeles Maritime Institute Location: Berth 73, San Pedro

Relay for Life in Wilmington Celebrate, remember and fight back, starting at 9 a.m. June 9 and 10 in Wilmington. Relay For Life is a fun-filled overnight event designed to celebrate cancer survivors and raise money for research and programs offered by the American Cancer Society. Teams of people will gather at Banning High School’s track and take turns walking or running laps. Each team tries to keep at least one member on the track at all times. Details: (510) 677-4575 Venue: Banning High School track Location: 1250 Lakme Ave., Wilmington

Harbor Community Adult School Celebrates 100 Years Harbor Community Adult School will be celebrating 100 years of adult education in San Pedro at its upcoming graduation ceremony on June 13, 2012 at the Warner Grand Theater in San Pedro. The event will honor high school graduates, 8th grade diploma recipients and ESL completers. Students from the Family Literacy Program also will be recognized. The event will be a bittersweet occasion because of the state of the Los Angeles Unified School District budget. The district is looking to possibly close the entire Division of Adult and Career Education, or at least drastically reduce the number of adult schools from 30 to 10. This past year’s enrollment was 8,347students. In September 2012 enrollment could be zero.

Empowering Our Community Harbor Occupational Center is hosting a job fair from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on June 7, with about 30 companies in attendance. Bring your resume and dress to impress in business attire. Details: (310) 547-5551, (310) 547-5346 (TDD) Venue: Harbor Occupational Center Location: 740 N. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

from p. 1

Have You Caught the Iowa Fever? a louder version of the sound a car makes when the key is in the ignition while the door is open. “Buzz...buzz...buzz...bang,” Moss mimicked. Moss was about 10 years old when World War II ended. He recalls watching film reels at the movie theaters and deciding he’d rather be in the navy than a “ground-pounder” as army infantryman were pejoratively called. When he says this, one is reminded of just how huge a role film and television played in the elevating and conflating of America’s military with strength, democracy and the “American Way.” Moss fondly recalls his nine-month tour of duty on the ship as radio man traversing the Pacific Ocean, starting at Korea and motoring up as far north as Russia’s coast. He believes people are more drawn to a battle ship than a carrier because they are more like floating cities compared to carriers, which he likened to a cramp box that discouraged a communal living experience. Then again, that may just be his bias talking. The Iowa sat in Tuscan Bay, in Tampa Bay Florida for a long time in disuse. Moss heard from his buddies in Long Beach, veterans with an interest in the Iowa, that Robert Kent, president of Pacific Battleship, Inc., was looking to bring the USS Ranger to Long Beach. Moss recounted approaching Kent in 2008 and inviting him to lunch in Pasadena about acquiring the Iowa and station it at Port of Los Angeles. Soon after this meeting, Moss said he and his group began lobbying Los Angeles elected officials to bring the Iowa to Los Angeles, and the rest, as they say, was history.

Kent said his group was pursuing both the Ranger and the Iowa and were initially looking to put one or the other in the slip in Long Beach. Kent noted that none of it would have happened if the communities of San Pedro, Wilmington, and Harbor City had not gotten behind the project and spread the word about it. “If the community hadn’t came out with that one loud strong voice, I really don’t think we would be sailing into LA,” Kent said. “ It probably would have been a killed project. Remember the Port originally said no in March 2010. They said they had no room for it.” Officially speaking, the Port of Los Angeles rejected Kent’s application because his group hadn’t secured the USS Iowa yet and according to news reports at the time, there were still questions about his group’s ability to

raise the funds necessary to get the Iowa to Los Angeles anyway. As communities and elected officials got behind the USS Iowa and monetary support increased, those initial concerns became less of an issue. Kent explained that the Pacific Battleship’s business plan assumes that the Iowa will be selfsufficient right from the start, buoyed by ticket sales. He acknowledges, however, that the group will have to continue its fundraising activities through the life

of the ship. Kent indicated they’ve raised enough money to open the ship, after which it should be selfsupporting. He said the ship will be opened in phases and more parts of the ship will become available as funds become available. “Just like the Midway when they first started their project down there, it didn’t go everywhere,” Kent said. “They only had the flight deck open and maybe the hangar open. And each year, more funding was raised and more money was available from the ticket sales and they opened the ship in phases. That’s exactly what we’re goIowa Fever/ to p. 4

Korean War Veteran, Bryan Moss joined the May 30 press boat to view the USS Iowa when it was a mile away from the Los Angeles Harbor breakwater. A television news reporter asked Moss, “Is the Iowa as big as you remembered?” “Hell, yeah! that the dumbest question of the week,” he said jokingly. “That’s the main thing that I remember.” Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

The Local Publication You Actually Read June 1 - 14, 2012

3

from p. 3

Iowa Fever

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

ing to do too… Our goal right now is to get the ship open on July 7.” The Iowa has dozens of sponsors. Some are sponsors monetarily while others provide in-kind donations, taking care of work for which the Pacific Battleship Group itself doesn’t have to shell out money. When asked about the intense support the battleship has received from the state of Iowa, Kent said that connection has been there since the ship came off the assembly line in World War II. He explained that Iowa’s capital has a 25-foot model to which generations of school children come and are taught about the ship. He said he hopes Californians step up in a similar way in support of this battleship. From an economic development standpoint, the USS Iowa is being modeled after the development efforts around the aircraft carrier, USS

4

Midway, which was docked in San Diego in 2004. Kent says that San Pedro is where San Diego was before the Midway. “Our Ports O’Call was very similar to what they had which they called Seaport Village which is their restaurant little area down there and shops,” Kent explained. “And that was also on the decline.” The Midway arrived amidst the Port of San Diego’s waterfront revitalization efforts. “It created all of these critical mass of people coming in down to the port area,” Kent explained. “And now Seaport village is almost 100 percent leased, it’s got plenty of restaurants there now, it’s brought a lot of people and it has created a lot of jobs and a lot of businesses.” The Iowa is expected to have a $240 million boost to the local economy. “Whether it will be a success in the long term, nobody can or would say for sure. But with the projects that are coming online this summer, it’s a start,” Nave said.

Hotel Workers Step Closer to a Living Wage By Kevin Walker, Editorial Intern and Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor On at least five days per week, Martina De Santiago drives from her rented home in Inglewood to her job as a lobby attendant at the Hilton Long Beach. The City of Long Beach has invested hundreds of millions of dollars subsidizing its tourism industry within the past several decades, but De Santiago is typical of the industry’s struggling, underpaid workers. Rather than sharing the benefits, her low wages are subsidizing the industry as well. De Santiago’s job includes cleaning public areas, the bathroom, the executive meeting center, and making sure guests have clean towels in the exercise rooms and pool areas. When she started working at the Hilton 10 years ago, her starting hourly wage was $7.25. Today, she earns $10.70. “I find (the $10.70) to be very little in 10 years that I have (at the Hilton),” said De Santiago, in Spanish. “I am somewhat making a living. I only make enough to cover what I need to cover (in expenses).” After paying her utilities, insurance, part of the monthly $1,400 rent she splits with her three sons and at least $60 a week in gas, she is left with barely anything. “But (my coworkers and I) are there because we are accustomed to the place; one knows the people, the job,” De Santiago, 47, said. “Though on more than one occasion we’ve been told, ‘If you are not comfortable here, you can leave.’ “A dignified wage; we don’t want to earn a fortune.” She and other hotel workers recently gathered more than 30,000 signatures in about six weeks in order to qualify a city ordinance on the Novem-

Long Beach hospitality workers contend that hotels with more than 100 rooms, such as the Hilton Long Beach and the Long Beach Hyatt, can afford to and should pay employees a living wage of at least $13 an hour. The issue will go before voters in the November ballot.

LOS ANGELES—The Los Angeles Unified School District and the Service Employees International Union announced May 25 their agreement with the school district for 10 furlough days between July 2012 and June 2013. The tentative agreement preserves thousands of union jobs and full-year assignments totaling more than $40 million. The district will designate the positions to be restored. “With this agreement, the District recognizes the valuable role played by the SEIU membership in helping students learn,” said Superintendent John Deasy in a released statement. “I’m especially grateful that our partners with SEIU took this action during these tough economic times.”

Occidental Petroleum Applies to Re-drill Carson Oil Wells ber ballot, that if passed, hotels with more than 100 rooms would be required to pay employees at least $13 an hour and provide a minimum of five days of paid sick leave.   On May 22, the Long Beach City Council voted 8-0 to put the proposed ordinance before voters in November. The decision was lauded by supporters who qualified the ordinance earlier in the month when they submitted the signed petition to the city clerk’s office.  “I’m very happy about the outcome today,” said Romeo Trinidad, a Long Beach Hilton employee of 11 years. “I’m very confident [about the election] because of the strong community support. We feel it. We saw it.” If voters decide to enact the proposed ordinance, workers like Trinidad, who makes 10.70

an hour, will see a substantial rise in wages, which have often failed to keep pace with inflation. Restless supporters of the ordinance packed the city hall chambers and were audibly annoyed when Vice Mayor Suja Lowenthal announced the living wage ordinance agenda item was moved to the end of the docket. After an hour and a half of sitting through the tedious business of Long Beach city government, the eager crowd got its chance for public comment. “I would like to respectfully urge you as civil servants to do the bidding of the citizens who reside here, vote here, and pay taxes here,” said Erin Foley, a resident of the Second District. “We citizens say this is not too much to ask… for these highly profitable businesses…to be reStep Closer to Living Wage/ top 6

New Hiring Policies Impact CSUF President By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

California Postsecondary Education Commission for what they termed more “appropriate” comparisons. More recently, Lieu has attacked the CSU trustees for spending $766,000 for a conference at a Los Angeles hotel, including alcohol and catering.

Raising Tuition to Pay Financial Aid

At the August meeting, the trustees also approved a 12 percent increase in annual tuition for full-time undergraduates to $5,472. With campus-based fees averaging $950, total fees now are $6,422. According to a statement by Rebuild the Dream, an organization protesting at the Sallie Mae shareholders meeting May 24 in Delaware, “More student debt means more profits. More borrowers falling behind means more fees—and more profits.” Other austerity measures the board took to address this past year’s $500 million cut included reducing enrollment by about 10,000 students and cutting campus budgets by a combined $281 million. Since the state’s fiscal crisis began in 2008, CSU has reduced the number of total employees by 4,125, or 8.8 percent.

City’s Budget Crisis Crimps Neighborhood Councils Los Angeles—With the release of the new budget, neighborhood councils are dealing with renewed cutbacks that will likely affect some councils’ ability to hold normal elections. Neighborhood councils were once allocated $50,000 a year each. This past year they were allotted $42,500. This year is not so certain. At a recent Wilmington Neighborhood Council Meeting, it was announced that there will be a selection rather an election to fill in three at-large seats on the council because of the city’s budget crisis. Wilmington Neighborhood Council president Cecilia Moreno indicated that the board’s decision will be based upon a candidate’s level of support from the community. Neighborhood Council elections cost $5,000. If there are more than three candidates, the community can advocate for the candidates of their choice. Then the board decides based on community support. It was learned during the meeting that the city cut two more people from the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment staff. Community activist Jesse Marquez, who was in attendance, asked if the council office was asked to step in to oversee elections, noting that the council office has access to money that could pay for the elections. The board said “they took those steps already” and there just wasn’t any money.

Mayor Celebrates State Enterprise Designation

San Pedro—On May 23, Mayor Antonio VilaNews Briefs/ to p. 6

June 1 - 14, 2012

Hirschman, $100,000 more than his predecessor. Lieu responded by introducing two bills. The first died with this past year’s special session, but an amended version, Senate Bill 755, was introduced in regular session this January. It placed several limits on hiring CSU presidents, including a salary limit, no pay hikes within three years of raising student tuition, a requirement that salaries be discussed in open session and hiring preference given to CSU employees and Californians. According to Sotero, the senator agreed to withdraw his bill and work with the board on reforms he proposed in a letter and white paper of Jan. 17. Lieu argued, “CSU leadership has utterly failed to ask…whether CSU’s budget and California could afford…gigantic raises for CSU executives.” Lieu also claimed the trustees relied on “slanted” data, that salary comparisons were from institutions with medical schools, law schools, nationally prominent sports programs and much larger endowments than those in the CSU system. At the January meeting, the board voted to adopt a new policy limiting compensation for presidents paid by state general funds to be no more than 10 percent above the previous incumbent’s base pay. They also discarded compensation data that had been provided by the defunct

Carson—Occidental Petroleum recently launched an effort to get community support to dig 200 new wells onto a 6.5-acre site inside an industrial park near the Home Depot Center. According to the Depart of Toxic Substances Control, clean up of the site was completed in 2003 after decades of oil extraction activities. Critics of Occidental’s proposal argue that drilling in such a dense urban area, littered with old abandoned wells, in addition to being next to two tectonic plates, pose a number of dangers to the surrounding community. Occidental is also seeking permission to use the controversial extraction method, hydraulic fracturing—or fracking. The method works by spraying fluids at extremely high pressures to fracture underground rock to release oil. Fracking is a highly contested activity because critics argue that it threatens to contaminate groundwater supplies—a position supported by several studies. Occidental officials said they do not anticipate using it but would like the option. If Occidental’s proposal is approved, several thousand feet of new pipe will be installed under Victoria Street.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

The job of California State University Fullerton’s new president, Mildred Garcia, is among the first to be affected by CSU hiring guidelines adopted at a Jan. 25 CSU Board of Trustees meeting, following a storm of criticism when the board approved a 25 percent salary increase for an incoming president in August 2011. Garcia, who has served as president of CSU Dominguez Hills since 2008, will start as the new president of CSUF on June 11. According to Erik Fallis, a CSU spokesperson, she and a northern university president, Leroy Morishita of CSU East Bay, are the first two hired under the new reforms. Sen. Ted Lieu, who represents Carson as part of the 28th District in the state Senate, played a key role in the reforms. The senator is waiting to see how those reforms are implemented and if they actually work, according to his communication director, Ray Sotero. Fallis responded that the resolution passed by the board in January set a new policy and implemented it so that there was no lag time. In May the board froze executive salaries. On Jan. 25, Lieu testified to the board and reported they “moved unanimously to adopt a cap on salaries for campus presidents, inserted firstever consideration of fiscal conditions into their policy, and changed the formula for comparing salaries.” The controversy began when the board voted to pay new CSU San Diego president, Elliot

LAUSD, SEIU Announced Tentative Furlough Agreement

5

Step Closer to Living Wage from p. 5

sponsible for paying their hard working, under compensated workers a living wage because they

[ the hotels] are highly subsidized through tax abatements and other mechanisms provided by the city.” Advocates of the proposed ordinance have long argued that the larger downtown hotels like Hyatt and Hilton benefit from friendly city policies meant to attract business, but have failed to disperse profits to workers in a fair manner. This unfairness, they say, has forced many full time hotel workers onto state assistance just to make ends meet—yet another public subsidy for the hotels. A raise in workers’ pay will shift this burden, they believe, from taxpayers to the hotel companies that employ them. “These ordinances…decrease health care costs to the taxpayers, because now you have healthier workers who can afford their own healthcare,” Dr. Merna Terkos Donahoe, a professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Labor Studies at California State University Dominguez Hills said. They also claim  that other cities in California that have passed higher minimum wages than required by the state have seen other, less tangible

benefits to the community such as reduced absenteeism in schools. More tangible, supporters say, are the additional revenues a living wage ordinance will bring into Long Beach, as hotel workers who reside in the city will be able to spend more money on local goods and services. “When you think about keeping money in our community, that’s done through paying folks who have to spend that money…But if a company is making record profits and making tons of money that’s going to folks who have the ability to put it in a bank,” said Ben Fisher, a resident of the Second district. This sentiment is shared by hotel workers, who feel that the companies they work for have used profits largely for purposes of corporate expansion rather than increased wages for their employees. Advocates for the living wage ordinance stress that it is simply meant to make the day-today life easier for hotel workers, and that Long Beach’s high cost of living makes a $13 an hour wage a necessity. “If you look at what it actually takes to live in Long Beach, to eat in Long Beach, the minimum wage is not going to cut it. The living wage is what you need to provide for yourself,” said Christine Petit member of the Steering Committee for the Long Beach Coalition for Good Jobs and Healthy Communities. “What we are really talking about is $2,000 a month. It’s not very much.” Calls were made to the general managers of both the Hilton Long Beach and the Long Beach Hyatt Hotel, two of the largest hotels in the city, but neither returned calls to Random Lengths News. Representatives from the hospitality industry were silent at the meeting, however several speakers voiced their support for a delay in order for the council to commission a third party report to assess the impacts of the proposed ordinance.   Mike Murchison, a local lobbyist and consultant, admonished council members for their quick decision to place the unaltered proposal up for a November vote. “This is not just the impact to the hotels, in my opinion, this is an impact to your general fund...you’re willing to spend $430,000 to put

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

from p. 2

6

JOB FAIR 2012 Thurs., June 7, 2012 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon

Harbor Occupational CenterSan Pedro/Wilmington Skills Centers 740 N. Pacific Avenue—San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 547-5551 — Fax (310) 547-4974 Hearing Impaired Call (310) 547-5346 TDD

Sponsors: Beacon House Association of San Pedro, California Credit Union, Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council, Congresswoman Janice Hahn - 36th District of California, Councilman Joe Buscaino - Los Angeles 15th District, Department of Public Social Services/GAIN Program, The Home Depot, Los Angeles Community Development Department, Random Lengths News, San Pedro Chamber of Commerce and Wilmington Chamber of Commerce

Earthquake Risk

tions that I finally actually stood up and started in on them,” Nave said, which is what lead to his remark: “‘Compliance with regulations doesn’t solve anything. That’s why we have politicians,’ I told them. Politicians know and are responsible for how their communities ought to be.” “I also said that three parties who ought to be at the table weren’t there, (British Petroleum), Valero and the Port of Los Angeles. BP and Valero because they store their butane at Rancho instead of building tanks on their own property and the port because they want to eventually have a Rancho terminal at Berth 145 and are leaving some lines in place so they can connect it some day. The connections with all three are what make Rancho’s risky material storage enterprise valuable, going forward,” Nave explained. As for effective political action, Nave volunteered, “If I were Hahn, Waxman, Richardson, and Buscaino, I would tell the city and the port ‘Don’t come to me for help on anything until you get this taken care of.’ For example, the very next day the city council committee heard an application for a grant for $58 million for Homeland Security. What a perfect opportunity to ask for a plan of action from the port, et al.” Hahn’s office promised that there would be further meetings in the future, with more parties involved in the process—specifically citing the ones named by Nave.

this on the November ballot, spend a couple dollars and get a report back.” He continued, “You all should have at least have a fairly balanced, educated position on what this means.” These reservations were not shared, however, by the cheering crowd that gathered outside of city hall after the council’s vote. Though the council’s vote might be viewed as procedural, given that the proponents gathered the qualifying signatures that were required, the vote and their presence at the council were viewed as steps in the right direction. “For me it was important to go so that the council would see the people, to show them we really are interested in having the proposal become law,” De Santiago said.

from p. 5

raigosa visited the new Harbor BusinessSource Center for a collect fist pump celebrating the Harbor Gateway’s designation as an State Enterprise Zone. As of May 1, state tax credits and deductions and city business incentives will be available to Harbor Area businesses. Incentives include a 35 percent Department of Water and Power electric rate discount for new businesses; a state tax credit worth up to $37,400 within five years for hiring local or disadvantaged workers; and a credit for 100 percent of sales and use taxes for purchasing qualified machinery and electronic devices. The purpose of the Enterprise Zone is to stimulate the local economy and put local residents to work. This past year, Gov. Jerry Brown called for repealing the State Enterprise Zones believing that $500 million per annum investment bought meager returns. Though the Enterprise Zones weren’t a part of the governor’s budget proposal for this fiscal year, the California Association of Enterprise Zones has been working with the Department of Housing and Community Development and the governor’s office to reform the popular program. The enterprise zone covers portions of San Pedro, Harbor City, Wilmington, and Harbor Gateway and offers tax credits and deductions including a 35 percent DWP electric rate discount for new businesses and a state tax credit worth up to $37,400 within five years for hiring local or disadvantaged workers.

Rec and Parks Employee Arrested for Pilfering 800 Gallons of Gas

Los Angeles—A month after the uproar when Los Angeles City Controller Wendy Greuel released a scathing report that $7 million in fuel expenditures were unaccounted for, a city employee and a city resident were arrested after a lengthy investigation into gasoline thefts from city fueling facilities. Southeast Division detectives received a tip that someone was stealing gasoline from city fueling facilities in April and that the suspect was possibly a Los Angeles City Department of Recreation and Parks employee. Surveillance was set up on fuel stations at Southeast and 77th Street Area Community Police Stations and a Department of Transportation fueling site. After many hours of surveillance two suspects were identified. On May 21, 46-year-old Michael Anthony Lee, a 12-year veteran of the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, assigned to Algin Sutton Recreation Center, and an accomplice, 47-year-old Shane Anthony Gansterer, a resident of Los Angeles, were arrested by Southeast Detectives. Lee was booked for embezzlement and is being held on $50,000 bail. Gansterer was booked for receiving stolen property and is being held on $20,000 bail. Lee was reportedly on duty when the thefts occurred. He is believed responsible for stealing more than 800 gallons of gasoline within a three-month time period.

Remembering the First Amendment This far and no farther By James Preston Allen, Publisher

Having Our College Students’ Backs By Congresswoman Janice Hahn

cial constraint of monthly student loan payments beginning 6 short months after graduation. So far more than a dozen of my colleagues in the House have joined my effort to get this bill passed and in the coming days and weeks I will be working hard to get far more of my colleagues to support it. To speed up this process, a few days ago I wrote to the Chairman and ranking member of the Education and the Workforce Committee urging them to expedite a hearing on my bill. At this critical time in our economic recovery our college grads need every opportunity to succeed. As a mother and a former teacher, this is a critical issue for me. That is why, in addition to advocating for my legislation, I have been encouraging my congressional colleagues to come together to stop the interest rates on college loans from doubling come July 1. So far both the House and the Senate have failed to come up with a solution, which makes my legislation even more important. The message Congress sends to students should be clear and unambiguous: “If you are willing to work hard and earn the grades to get into college, but need financial assistance to get your degree, we have your back. And once you finish college you will have the time to find a job before you begin paying back your college loans.” Now isn’t the time to walk away from our grads. They already have a host of complex problems and confounding challenges to solve. They shouldn’t also be slowed down by financial constraints we could easily alleviate.

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIII : No. 11

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

www.randomlengthsnews.com

Advertising Production Mathew Highland, Suzanne Matsumiya Advertising Representatives Mathew Highland, Chad Whitney reads@randomlengthsnews.com adv@randomlengthsnews.com Editorial Intern Kevin Walker Display advertising (310) 519-1442 Classifieds (310) 519-1016 www.randomlengthsnews.com

Speech/ to p. 8

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #08916627). All contents Copyright 2012 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

June 1 - 14, 2012

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Assoc. Publisher/Production CoGretchen Williams Entrée ordinator Calendar Suzanne Matsumiya 14days@randomlengthsnews.com info@graphictouchdesigns.com Photographers Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks, Slobodan Dimitrov, Terelle Jerricks Diana Lejins editor@randomlengthsnews.com Contributors Assistant Editor Congresswoman Janice Hahn, Zamná Ávila Danny Simon reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg Matt Wuerker Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

do with reading the Bill of Rights in our government class and being clandestinely encouraged by sympathetic teachers. I even remember that at one point a student was brought into juvenile court by his parents for being “incorrigible,” along with a list of complaints. The parents presented the juvenile judge with a copy of one of our finer publications. And on the back, printed boldly in black and white on this damning piece of evidence—was a reproduction of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The judge, eyeing this “incorrigible document” had the presence of mind to ask, “And just what do you find wrong with the Bill of Rights that it is leading your son astray?” So over the years, I have come to understand that for many people the Bill of Rights has become more like the American flag, it is just a symbol of our freedom, not a body of laws that actually protects our liberties. That is unless you stand up and say, “this far and no farther.” It is one thing to have this founding document revered and encased in glass at the Smithsonian Museum or printed in some textbook as some ancient document. It is quite another to put it into practice to test that these truths remain self-evident, testing to see if this old parchment still holds any meaning in the town square or the public school. I would argue that too many only give lip service to the idea when they blithely regurgitate the Pledge of Allegiance: “With liberty and justice for all.” The actual ideals are still an anathema to those who have power. Just look at the police responses to the Occupy movement across this nation or the pepper spraying of student protesters at UC Davis this past year. Things haven’t changed that much from the days when Gov. Ronald Reagan ordered the tear gassing of People’s Park in Berkeley or the Los Angeles Police Department’s brute force response at the 1967 Century City anti-war rally, later deemed a “police riot” whereby the commanders lost control of their officers. It wasn’t the first time or the last time here in Los Angeles as we have witnessed throughout the interceding years. So here I am, all these years later standing in the town square demanding once again, “this far and no farther,” engaging in staredown contests with the CEO of the very or-

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Between all the caps, gowns and tassels, it’s difficult not to realize that graduation season is once again upon us. Across the country, college graduates will sit side by side in stadiums and arenas as their proud parents look on, waiting for their chance to stride onto the stage and be handed the key to their future. As they wait they will be the audience for speaker after speaker who will attempt to share the wisdom they have accumulated throughout the years and impart a valuable lesson about life to come. Recently, I had the honor of being one of those commencement speakers, addressing a very young, but eager, collection of graduates from Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy. On the podium I faced a sea of bright and determined young adults who believe with every fiber of their being that they can change the world. However, as a member of Congress, I could not reassure them that my colleagues have their backs as they go out and stake their claim in the world. College students are increasingly distracted by the crushing burden of college loan debt and the inability of Congress to come together and make the common sense changes required to give them the best shot once they graduate. That is why I introduced H.R. 4286, the “Student Loan Grace Period Extension Act” which will extend the grace period for federal subsidized and unsubsidized student loans from 6 months to 12 months. This bill will provide students with an expanded window after graduation where they can search for a job without the finan-

It came to me the other day as I was standing in the middle of a public street at a local farmer’s market. I had to defend my self, my newspaper and the First Amendment from the most exquisite form of censorship: The denial of distribution in public places with the added threat of arrest if I didn’t stop. And, it doesn’t seem to get any easier either. Let me start at the beginning. Back when I was in high school, when the Vietnam War was raging, the free speech movement was just being born on college campuses. I was an idealistic student with access to a Unitarian Church mimeograph machine and a seemingly endless supply of paper. The only problem was that as students, we were prohibited from distributing “unauthorized” literature on campus, under threat of suspension if we were caught. Our group never was. Many years have passed since those youthful days. I was surprised recently when two things happened. First was a chance encounter at the Long Beach Airport with a woman who attended the same high school as I did, who was only a few years behind me. She also fought free speech battles at the school, inspired by some previous students unknown to her. However, she and her friends were caught and expelled. They hired an ACLU lawyer and fought to have the state law overturned and advanced the cause of students’ rights and free speech on California public school campuses. The second was the discovery of an original copy of one of our first mimeographed publications by an old high school friend that contacted me via Facebook. For those of a younger generation, the mimeograph is the grandfather of the modern copy machine. What struck me upon reviewing this long forgotten document was the No. 1 item on a list of grievances that demanded, not asked, but demanded, that the administration, “allow any student the right to express a grievance concerning an activity, school policy or incident to the administration and the student body [in the school quad] during lunch on a daily basis.” Back in those days, that was a bold demand. And as I think about it today, I’m not sure too many of today’s students would be so bold, even though they have every right to do so. I’m not so sure how we mustered up the courage to confront our school’s administration back then, but I’d bet that it had something to

7

RANDOMLetters Cal States Need New Leadership

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Our state’s public colleges are in desperate shape.   The crises in higher education in California has been escalating for three decades, and what was once a model for the country is now a major embarrassment and failure. The problems are high tuition, poorly paid teachers, overcrowded classrooms, inadequate curriculum opportunities, student loan debt, deteriorating infrastructure, overpaid administrators at the trustee’s office, some college presidents with extravagant perks and Chancellor Charles Reed who is an inept, anachronistic, ineffective, failed leader.

8

The cliche about starting at the top fits the state college system in California.  Since 1998 Mr. Reed, who is from Florida, has mismanaged the direction of out 23 campuses, skewed priorities to benefit his office at the expense of students, faculty and hard working campus employees. Moral has never been worse around the state including our two local schools- Cal State Long Beach and Cal State Dominguez Hills. It doesn’t have to be this way. It’s past time for the College Trustees, Governor Brown and Lt. Governor Newsom to send Chancellor Reed a clear message, lets put a real educator, tireless and progressive, to work to repair the 14-years of damage. Chuck Levin Los Angeles

Food Trucks

I have long been, and continue to be a supporter for bringing food-trucks to San Pedro. However, since the initial pilot program of three months, agreed to by the ACE committee, this attraction to San Pedro has grown completely out of hand, and is now a free-for-all for whichever food vendors wish to show up. That the ACE committee is a sub-set of the Chamber of Commerce makes the situation even more egregious. This event was created in my restaurant in October 1997 as an arts and dining night. It has suffered twice from, (possibly wellmeaning), people adding non arts/ dining elements to this night, and twice it had to be built up again

from ruin to become a successful event once more. The map below [not shown] shows June 2012 positioning of 11 trucks on or adjacent to the 300 block of 7th Street, and one on the 300 block of 6th Street. This is unfair, discriminatory and probably grounds for civil legal action. My repeated requests over 5 months for more fairness and equity have been met with only adding more trucks to my block in a sort of ‘screw you; you can’t do anything to stop this’ attitude. For May and June  First Thursdays I have three trucks opposite my business, instead of two, as previously. Presumably, with a lack of oversight from the Arts District, I will continue to face three or even more of them, (not that anybody has had the intelligence to invite food trucks on another of the approx. 29 nights each month which are vacant. Instead we have to adulterate a successful arts night born from the hard work and sweat of others). Andrew Silber San Pedro Dear Andrew,  As you will recall when I was chairman of the ACE committee the plan was to spread the food trucks out so as to create more foot traffic through out the district. This would give people the experience of “being safe” walking the streets during a nighttime activity and possibly returning at some other time.   That this strategy has been poorly executed and every excuse given as to why eleven food trucks now need to be coalesced into one and a half blocks is beyond me. I personally fault the current leadership of the ACE district for not taking better control of this portion of the most well attended event in the historic arts district of San Pedro. This event now has so much momentum behind it that it truly is garnering regional recognition, not because of the food trucks, but because of the art, fine dining and music options on this night.   It is easy to see how the food truck issue could become so dominant that from p. 7

Speech

ganization on which I sit on the board of directors with at the San Pedro Chamber of Commerce. The same CEO who told me she’ll fix this, but then refuses to let me as a member of that board review the new farmer’s market contract to address First Amendment concerns. Some people have counseled me to be polite, others have said, “We’re working on it,” and the CEO says, “I’ll ask legal counsel for advice.” To all of this, there is really only one answer. If you are going to proceed as a legally incorporated non-profit 501c(6) in this country, you have to abide by the law, not choose the ones that are most convenient. Especially in this case, where freedom of speech was first and foremost in the minds

the original purpose of this event would be lost to the zeal of the food truck fad. James Preston Allen Publisher

Endorsement?

Was that really an endorsement for Ms. Hahn? Or are you looking to stir the pot and maybe get a return phone call from the Richardson camp? Just wondering. Keep up the good work. Frank Pereyda San Pedro Thank you, Frank. I mean what I say and I say what I mean. Yes that was for real. James Allen Publisher

44th and the 33rd

Just read RL’s recent issue “Battle For The 44th.” So what about an article on the new 33rd CD? Central San Pedro will be part of the new 44th CD, and those of us who live in the Northwest part of San Pedro (NWSP) will be part of the new 33rd CD. Being part of the 33rd CD, it now seems that we here in NWSP have been alienated from the rest of San Pedro. NWSP is not even mentioned in the political mailings being sent out by candidates running for the new 33rd CD, which I have been trying to correct. So tell us, who will be the man to represent NWSP,  Collett, Bloomfield or Waxman? Dave Rivera San Pedro Dear Dave, Talk about a dog-legged gerrymandered district, the new 33rd Congressional district is almost as strange as the former 46th district that snakes its way from Huntington Beach to Palos Verdes along the coast! What I can tell is that a Ron Paul activist, Christopher David, is running against  a total of three other Democrats, one Independent, one Green, and one

of the founding fathers. Not some of it, or part of it, but all of it! Even to the extent that if someone wants to hold a prayer service in the middle of the market, you let him or her do it, because you don’t have the authority to stop them. Americans have to put up with this kind of backpedaling by a group that would espouse the commercial free market principles while discounting the free market of ideas. You can’t have one without the other. A vigorous civic debate of the issues of our time has as much standing at the farmer’s market as it does at City Hall, either inside or out. And if the San Pedro Chamber cannot guarantee this, then the city should revoke their permit for a street closure until they can figure it out.

Dedicated to Craig Schaffer who brought me the Freedom of the Press U.S. postage stamps.

Libertarian running in California’s first open primary since the implementation of Proposition 14. This should be a real slug-fest but who knows who any of these folks are?  Bruce Margolin (D), is a marijuana legalization lawyer, Tim Pape (D) is a TV editor, David William Steinman, (Green party) who used to be editor of Random Lengths News and Henry A. Waxman (D), is the old dog incumbent who accused Marcy Winograd of being anti- Israel for her comments about justice for Palestine. My natural endorsement would lean towards Steinman based on his solid environmental politics, although Margolin wouldn’t be a bad choice either—legalize pot and tax our way out of the deficit. James Preston Allen, Publisher

Community Alerts

Marine Research Project— Public Comment, Meeting

The Port of Los Angeles has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Report for the City Dock No. 1 Marine Research Center Project, which plans to offer a unique and ideally located site for use as a multi-faceted marine research facility. The proposed project site is located at Berths 56–60 and Berths 70–71, on the south end of the Port’s Main Channel, in a prime location of the San Pedro section of the Los Angeles Waterfront. Berths 57-60 were formerly used for warehouse operations, and Berths 70-71 is the previous site of the Westway liquid bulk tank farm. Facilities envisioned at this site include government and academic marine research laboratories, support activities for research vessels, a research and development park, business incubator for emerging marine environmental companies and educational support facilities. The port host a public meeting on June 12, 6 p.m., at Port of Los Angeles Administration Building, located at 425 S. Palos Verdes Street in San Pedro, to present its findings and provide opportunity for public comment. Written comments will also be accepted during the public comment period through July 9. A copy of the document is available for public review at the following locations: • POLA website •POLA Environmental Management Division, 222 W. 6th Street, 10th Floor, Suite 1080, San Pedro • Los Angeles Public Library, at San Pedro Branch and Wilmington branches. Written comments on must be submitted be postmarked by July 9. Submit written comments to: Christopher Cannon, Director of Environmental Management, Port of Los Angeles, 425 S. Palos Verdes St. , San Pedro, CA 90731 Or may be sent via email to ceqacomments@portla.org, which must include the project title in the subject line, attached to the email in letter format and include a valid mailing address. Questions should be directed to the Port of Los Angeles Environmental Management Division at (310) 732-7693. Details: www.portoflosangeles. org.

ALEC Normalizes Corruption in Statehouses Across the Land By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

“It is a worrisome marriage of corporations and politicians, which seems to normalize a kind of corruption of the legislative process”

—Lisa Graves, Executive Director, Center for Media and Democracy

Though civil rights organizations were just starting to pay close attention to American Legislative Exchange Council, the Florida shooting death of Trayvon Martin cast a harsh light on “Stand Your Ground” laws, which have been identified in an uptick in “self-defense” shooting deaths in the state.

siCo, Wendy’s, Mars Inc. and Kraft Foods. In April, ALEC announced it was disbanding the Public Safety and Elections Task Force—responsible for both laws Color of Change was targeting—supposedly to refocus its attention on economic issues. But Color of Change decried the move as “nothing more than a public

relations stunt aimed at diverting attention from its agenda, which has done serious damage to our communities.” Its anti-ALEC campaign has continued, and just this past week Amazon.com became the latest company to severe ties with ALEC.

Corruption/ to p. 10

June 1 - 14, 2012

began investigating ALEC as well. “We began working on ALEC a year ago,” Nick Surgey, a legal associate at Common Cause told Random Lengths News. “We got to July 2011, we had significant evidence ALEC was involved in lobbying.” This might seem obvious at first glance. But, Surgey explained, ALEC has always portrayed itself publicly as an “educational” organization, thus qualifying for 501 (c) 3 tax exempt status under the IRS tax code. “ALEC claims they don’t spend a single dollar lobbying. We only have to show they do some lobbying,” Surgey explained. “We contacted the IRS in August with a modest filing” and kept on digging. “During the course of my research, it became clear that ALEC not only engaged in some lobbying, but that it was systematic. The entire organization exists in order to promote legislation…It became clear to us that it was ALEC’s entire reason for existing.” In the end, Common Cause put together a 4,000-page complaint, which was filed in April 2012, with the pro bono assistance of Phillips & Cohen, a whistleblower law firm that has recovered more than $7 billion in fines and settlements. But by then, ALEC had become truly notorious. On Feb. 26, 2012, a 17-year-old black teenager named Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by a wannabe cop, George Zimmerman, who police questioned, but released without charge, citing Florida’s so-called “stand your ground” law, which vastly expanded the right to use deadly force. As the Trayvon Martin case grabbed national attention, people became aware that such laws--dubbed “kill at will” by critics--had been passed by dozens of states since Florida lead the way in 2005. It was the National Rifle Association that got the ball rolling in Florida, but once that law was passed, it was an ALEC task force pushed the “model legislation,” nationwide—something that has become standard practice by ALEC. This happened despite intense state-by-state opposition from law enforcement—both prosecutors and police—who accurately foresaw nothing but trouble coming from such laws. The nation’s leading online civil rights group, Color of Change, had already begun a campaign against ALEC in December, 2011, pressuring companies to leave ALEC over its support for voter ID laws that suppress minority, youth and low-income voting. But in the wake of the Trayvon Martin shooting, the visibility and effectiveness of Color of Change’s anti-ALEC campaign skyrocketed. More than a dozen top companies quickly quit ALEC, including McDonalds, Coca-Cola, Pep-

The Local Publication You Actually Read

For almost four decades, the American Legislative Exchange Council, known by its acronym, “ALEC,” has worked hard on behalf of corporate America and right wing causes, helping to draft, build support for and pass laws through state legislatures across the nation—and doing so in relative anonymity, even as it skirts numerous state laws limiting corporate gift-giving and other forms of influence-peddling. It was never really clear why ALEC’s existence stayed such a secret, particularly since it wasn’t a secret. It’s just that, somehow, people seemed to ignore it, even though it wielded staggering amounts of power in legally questionable ways. Then, on March 15, 2011, University of Wisconsin historian William Cronin—the incoming president of the American Historical Association—decided to start a blog. And for his very first post he wrote about ALEC and its role in the barrage of pro-corporate, antiunion, right wing legislation that was causing such an uproar in Wisconsin and other states at the time. The post was titled, “Who’s Really Behind Recent Republican Legislation in Wisconsin and Elsewhere? (Hint: It Didn’t Start Here),” and it got roughly 800,000 hits in just 10 days. Suddenly, everyone was talking about ALEC. Among other things, Cronin discussed ALEC’s membership structure—cheap memberships for state legislators ($100 a year), pricey ones for corporations ($7,000 and up). He called attention to ALEC’s close relationship with the State Policy Network, “which helps coordinate the activities of a wide variety of conservative think tanks operating at the state level throughout the country,” and he gave examples of earlier research—including a 2002 report from Defenders of Wildlife and the Natural Resources Defense Council, entitled “Corporate America’s Trojan Horse in the States. These were indicative that ALEC had attracted attention from time to time, but never anywhere near as much as was warranted by its power. He offered specific leads and suggestions for further research—leads that were immediately taken up by participants in his comment thread and others across the Internet. A few months later, another Wisconsinbased organization, the Center for Media and Democracy, obtained “more than 800 model bills approved by companies through ALEC meetings,” said Executive Director Lisa Graves. The Center for Media and Democracy analyzed and marked up the bills, then posted them at a new website, ALEC Exposed, which went live in July 2011. “Though thousands of ALEC-approved model bills have been publicly introduced across the country, ALEC’s role in facilitating the language in the bills and the corporate vote for them is not well known,” the Center for Media and Democracy noted in a Frequently Asked Question sheet posted on its site. Around the same time, Common Cause

Meanwhile, ALEC itself has already admitted the changes are only skin-deep. “ALEC’s decision won’t impact the important issues we’ve worked on,” the chair of the disbanded task force, Republican State Rep. Jerry Madden of Texas, told the Christian Post. Brendan Fischer, a law fellow with the Center for Media and Democracy, fleshed out what Madden meant. “This includes prison privatization, bills to put more people in prison for more time, anti-immigrant bills like Arizona’s Senate Bill 1070, as well as the ‘Stand Your Ground’ and votesuppression laws that have recently attracted attention,” Fischer told Random Lengths News. “These laws all remain on the ALEC books.” What’s more, some of the problems raised by these more controversial bills are present in other ALEC legislation as well. “These ‘model bills,’ like all of the legislation in the ALEC bill set, were voted on by corporations and special interest groups sitting as equals with legislators,” Fischer pointed out. “This

9

from p. 9

Corruption

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

small circle of privileged individuals approved these bills with little impact from the populations that would actually be affected by them.” In addition, Fischer added, “ALEC allows corporations and special interest groups to have an inordinate amount of influence and access to state legislators. Despite many states having laws against corporations or lobbyists giving expensive gifts to legislators, through the ALEC ‘scholarship program,’ corporations can essentially buy flights and rent hotel rooms for elected officials so they can attend ALEC conferences.” Though many of the individual activities in which ALEC engages may seem innocent and unexceptional (others, such as de facto corporate gift-giving, are not), it is the totality of ALEC’s activities that constitutes a corruption of the democratic process. A similar point can be made about the legislation ALEC promotes. Bills get considered and passed individually, but ALEC develops them like product lines, with carefully crafted cumulative effects far beyond what first meets the eye. ALEC’s deregulatory and privatization agendas cumulatively shifts power away from individual citizens and structures that empower them toward private power structures—corporations, trade associations, foundations, and groups like ALEC itself. ALEC’s role in undermining public education via so-called “education reform” is a microcosm of how it operates across the board. This became clear when Random Lengths spoke with education writer, consultant and activist Jeff Bryant. In some cases, what was striking was the sheer number of bills being pushed. Bryant pointed

10

to Maine, citing “13 education bills with ALEC ties.” In other cases, it was a matter of relentless chipping away at public institutions—such as raising the cap on the number of charter schools in North Carolina from 100 to 150. Charter schools are exploding in numbers nationwide, even though research shows they actually underperform public schools on average, while increasing racial segregation. Still other laws seem to offer sensible benefits to certain children—but with hidden costs that require relevant experience and understanding to appreciate. As an example, Bryant cited an ALEC-modeled piece of legislation that would provide special needs children with a voucher “to attend any school of [their] choice, even private religious academies”—schools that have previously been excluded from public funding. Not only does such legislation potentially fund separatist, authoritarian institutions with public money, it also disperses scarce resources for the most costly aspect of public education within the past several decades, thus making it that much harder for public schools to meet the needs of all the students they serve. “It’s a really sinister group that is really destructive across many areas, including public education,” Bryant concludes. But the destructive impacts can be harder to see on a case-by-case basis, which is why the organizing activities of the Center for Media and Democracy, Common Cause, Color of Change and others have been so invaluable. After decades of operating in the dark, the spotlight is finally being focused on ALEC, and people are starting to see the cumulative effects that ALEC has had in mind all along. An online version of this story is available at RandomLengthsNews.com, with live links to many of the documents and stories cited.

Photo By Mike Watt

By James Preston Allen, Publisher

M

ike Watt, the legendary San Pedro punk rock bassist, rises early when he’s in town and launches his kayak within eyesight of the cliffs where Richard Henry Dana once described, in his book “Two Years Before the Mast,” when he landed there in 1835 to retrieve cow hides. Watt is an avid photographer, a documentarian if you will, from the same perspective as Dana– from sea to shore– and in his latest creative expression “Mike Watt, on and off bass, a photographic memory,” he poses his diary annotations against his pictorial documents. This is a perspective that many who no longer go down to the sea in ships don’t see of this town.

Watt, like that other San Pedro bard, Charles Bukowski, is creating with this pictorial book a certain persona of the blue collar philosopher, not one soaked in the watering holes with bourbon but down at the shore in saltwater and memories. The photos are uniquely stunning, glimpses of the boarder line between the sea and the steel, bathed in early morning light of this place that you’d probably miss if you weren’t right there at the precise time. The sunrise behind the huge hammer-head cranes or the early morning clouds obscuring the sun above the Vincent Thomas Bridge are singularly beautiful, but the writings paired with them aren’t there for explanation. The words across from the bridge picture is titled, “for John Coltrane on what would’ve been his seventy sixth birthday” reads in part:

that part of us stowed –put away, either learned or showed or even guessed at– who could know? These come from an intensely personal conversation that Watt seems to be having with himself, now past 50 years, wondering about his life as a legendary punk rock icon and reflecting on his time on the road, his place amongst the galaxy of musicians and those in his life who helped him

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community. Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

The Legendary Punk Rock Bassist’s Photobook Reveals a Different Side

Watt to page 15.

June 1 – 14, 2012 June 1 – 14, 2012

11 11

Entertainment June 1

Alphonso Johnson’s Tribute Band Internationally acclaimed bassist and chapman stick artist Alphonso Johnson has accumulated numerous performing, recording, teaching, producing, composing and publishing credits during his illustrious career. His touring and recording credits read like a “Who’s Who” of jazz and fusion and he is considered one of the top performers in the world on his instrument. On this night, he’ll be featuring the music of Josef Zawinul & Wayne Shorter from Weather Report. Tickets are $20 Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro James Taulbee Organist and choirmaster James Taulbee will be performing at 12:15 p.m. June 1 at the Trinity Lutheran Church in Manhattan Beach. Taulbee is the Director of Music and Organist at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Westwood. Details: (310) 937-7275 Venue: Trinity Lutheran Church Location: 1340 11th St., Manhattan Beach

June 2

24th Annual Family Concert Winners of the annual concerto competition will be featured with the orchestra. Performance begins at 7 p.m. in the Marsee Auditorium. Tickets are $10. Details: www.centerforthearts.org Venue: El Camino College, Marsee Auditorium Location: 16007 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance

June 1 – 14, 2012

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Gonzalo Bergara Quartet The Gonzalo Bergara Quartet brings their fiery Entertainment Calendar to page 16.

12

Jason Welke, Greg Arn and James Brown will be opening Port Town Brewing Company in June 2012.

San Pedro Brewing Co.:

Brewing Up The Competition By Michael Koger, RLn’s Brew Columnist

W

alk to the back of San Pedro Brewing Company, you’ll find trophy case called the Hall of Foam filled with first and second place medals, ribbons, and beer mugs from competitions in the past few years. You won’t find any from medals or plaques from 2011 because there wasn’t any room for them. But Jason Welke’s pride in those victories are as evident in the pride he takes in the beers he brews. “I make every single beer to be the best beer possible,” Welke, the brewmaster at San Pedro Brewing Company tells me. Welke, Brewing Company owner James Brown, and restaurants manager, Greg Arn, are the reasons for the Brewing Company’s success. The San Pedro Brewing Company team, BrewCo for short, signed up for these competitions to see how they stack up against large breweries like Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada, two breweries that they have beaten in past competitions, along with dozens of others. “We go to these competitions for three reasons,” Brown states. “Comparison, marketing and to receive notes.” Their medal collection lets beer drinkers know they are drinking high quality, well made beer. In fact, their “Hall of Foam” display case is not big enough to hold all of their accolades. Every beer competition is judged by a blind panel tasting, which submits tasting notes to the breweries who are competing. “If there are any off flavors present in the beers, the panel will tell us in the notes,” Brown says.

The BrewCo team is preparing for three important competitions: the Los Angeles County Fair, the San Diego County Fair and the California State Fair. The first two competitions feature breweries from all over the world, but the California State Fair features breweries only from California. They also are preparing to attend the Great American Beer Festival in Boston, which is one of the largest gatherings of brewers and beer fans in the world. Another reason they like to compete: They want to put the Los Angeles beer scene on the map. “What we like to do is take the glory of Southern California beer and bring it to Los Angeles,” Welke says. Southern California is rich in beer communities like San Diego, Orange County and the Pasadena area. The Los Angeles beer scene is just starting to grow. Welke acknowledges there are “little pockets” of breweries coming together. Torrance has three operating breweries with a number of others in the works. The El Segundo and downtown Los Angeles areas also have new or soon-to-open breweries and brewpubs. However, San Pedro Brewing Company is only one of a handful of breweries in the area to compete. Welke points out that all of their beers not only look good but taste fantastic. He credits patience and focus for BrewCo’s brewing success. “Our beer is about time,” Welke says. “I give it time to clarify and taste better... I brew beer I want to drink.” He says he “focus[es] on the fundamentals of beer” by using “traditional ingredients.” He does not use the same ingredients for a pale ale that he would use for a pilsner. That makes the difference. Their focus on basic styles of beer also sets them apart from other breweries in California. “Everyone is doing hoppy beers,” Welke says. This is true. California breweries and drinkers seem to love hoppy, bitter beers. Welke prefers to focus on Pilsners, Lagers and other European styles. This focus on traditional style beers has led Welke and Brown to launch a bottled beer venture called Port Town Brewing Company. For the first time ever, the Brewing team will distribute beers distilled in San Pedro Brewing Company’s own brewery vats. Welke and Brown admit being pushed to take this step after patrons continually asked where else can they could buy BrewCo’s beers. Starting in June, BrewCo fans and will be able to get Port Town Brewing Company beers at a handful of beer bars across the South Bay. “Our flagship beer is going to be a German style Pilsner,” Welke said. Welke also says he would like to try brewing other styles such as Stouts and Porters. Welke gives me a bottle of the Pilsner to try, and it is delicious. It’s crisp, refreshing and should be able to appeal to both craft beer fans and the average drinker. Between the juried beer competitions and the rollout of Port Town Brewing Company, June is going to be a busy month for the BrewCo team. But judging from their wall of fame, they’re ready for the competition.

• Happy Hour •

Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 519-8200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro The Chowder Barge • Try the 34oz. captain’s mug! (310) 830-7937, 611 N. Henry Ford, Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington Godmother’s Saloon • Live jazz from Mike Guerrero Trio: 7 p.m. every Wed. (310) 833-1589, 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Mike Watt. Photo By Mike Watt Contiued from page 11.

Watt

EntréeNews Propeller Club Celebrates Scholarship Fund’s 25th Anniversary

San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour: 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 8315663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

365 W. Sixth Street, San Pedro, Calif • 310-547-2348

Friday, June 22, 2012

(Every Fourth Friday of the Month)

Dance Class 7 p.m. • Band Starts at 8 p.m.

Come join Barry Anthony, Sylvia Rodriguez and LA’s hottest swing band, “The Swing Of Things” for SWING PEEDRO, an evening of wonderful music, friends and dancing to your favorite Classic Big Band Swing songs. You’ll hear the songbooks of Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Harry James, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, Nat King Cole and many more while dancing and socializing with friends at the People’s Palace in the heart of San Pedro! New to dancing? Take the free one hour dance lesson with our pro instructor at 7, learn some steps and at 8, the music and the dance begin! Don’t have a partner? Come along and dance with our instructors, guests and suave Peedro staff dancers. Free light refreshments! Advance tickets available for $17, online at www.experiencesp.com and www.peoplesyogahealthdance.com and Swingpeedro.com Tickets at door $20. Call (310) 547-2348 for info and tickets. Get your tickets early!

June 1 – 14, 2012

Wednesday, June 13 will mark the 25th Anniversary of the ILWU/Propeller Club Memorial Scholarship Fund Seafood Feast. This years’ event will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Ports O’Call’s San Pedro Fish Market and will feature a menu including scampi, grilled swordfish, smoked halibut, shrimp, herring, octopus, mostaccioli, green salad, rolls, dessert, soft drinks, beer and wine. All proceeds will go to the ILWU/Propeller Club Memorial Scholarship Fund which will assist San Pedro, Wilmington and Long Beach area high school seniors entering college. Tickets are $40 before June 1, and $50 thereafter. Propeller Club: (818) 951-2842 ILWU Local 63: (310) 521-6363 ILWU Local 94: (310) 832-1109

Ports o’ Call • Happy Hour: Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

arrive and survive. He writes in one piece dateline (november 26, 2006- frankfurt, germany] [He uses no capital letters except for “I” which is the obvious central focus]; my philosophy is to continue to plow. I have enough insecurities to worry about, weighting me down as well. Maybe it’s foolish but hey, I know a lot of people have got a lot of peer pressure to deal with, especially young ones. A long time ago I told myself I was gonna let that all go. Amongst all of his thoughtful wanderings are two characters who travel with Watt throughout his life: his father who he affectionately calls “pop,” and D. Boone, his partner in his first band The Minute Men, who died early on and whom he repeatedly has paid homage to over the years. D. Boon’s spirit still seems to ride along with Watt on every road trip down this punk-rock road of one night stands that this blue-collar bassist plays. Watt is now intent on leaving something more behind than a blast of energized exploding 60 second songs, but something he hasn’t completely gotten his hands around. These pictures and words end up searching for a redefinition both inside and out of the man and the musician, not unlike the town of San Pedro itself, looking into the mirror to understand its own reflection.

Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766

13

Big Nick’s Pizza Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

June 1 – 14, 2012

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

14

Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also o f fe r s c l a s s i c Italian dishes and sauces based on triedand-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com The Chowder Barge

L.A. Harbor’s famous floating restaurant, surrounded by boats in Leeward Bay Marina. Dine inside by our fire place, or outside on our deck . This unique spot ser ves great sandwiches, burgers, fish & chips, wings and of course, the BEST clam chowder anywhere! Try our sourdough bread bowl and daily specials. Wine and beer on tap or by the bottle, featuring our 34oz Captains Mug! The new owners have kept the “funkiness” of the old barge, and stepped it up several notches. Watch the games on our big screen TVs, utilize our WiFi and enjoy our XM tunes. THE place for your next party. Hours: Mon, Tues 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Wed, Thurs 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Fri, Sat, Sun 9 a.m.–8 p.m. 611 N. Henry Ford, (at Anaheim) Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington • (310) 830-7937 www.ChowderBarge.com

Fancy Melts “Fancy” barely begins to describe it. Our secret recipe old-world bread has been a San Pedro staple since 1975. Now we use it to create the most amazing grilled sandwiches you’ll ever try. Come taste what everyone has been talking about... Delivered right up to your car window if you wish. Fancy Fever... Catch it! Call your order ahead for made–to–order, no–waiting pick-ups! Hours: Tues–Fri 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. 2331 Alma St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4331 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the darling café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash soup and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crepes and pastas. The best indulgence is taking a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com NIKO’S PIZZERIA Downtown San Pedro’s newest restaurant features a full Italian menu, as well as pizza, and a beer and wine bar. We carry a wide selection of beers on tap and by the bottle. Watch sporting events on plasma TV screens throughout the restaurant. Delivery service to all of San Pedro, Port locations, and hotels. 399 W. 6th St., San Pedro (at the corner of Mesa and 6th sts.) • (310) 241-1400 PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING Since 1961 we’ve extended a hear ty welcome to visitors from every corner of the globe. Delight in an awe-inspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the Award-Winning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www.Portsocalldining. com

PRONTO’S FRESH MEXICAN GRILL & PRONTO’S BURGERS

(25th and Western) 2420 S. Western Ave. , San Pedro, (310) 832-4471

Los Angeles 110 W. El Segundo Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 527-7323 Gardena 13890 S. Normadie Ave., Gardena, (310) 327-5615

www.prontosmexgrill.com.

San Pedro Brewing Compnay SPBC has an eclectic menu featuring pastas, steaks, seafood, sandwiches, salads, delicious appetizers, and great BBQ. Handcrafted ales and lagers are made on the premises. A full bar with made-from-scratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 www.sanpedrobrewing.com SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 www.spiritmarine.com

Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfor table dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, English pies, venison, salmon, swordfish & vegan/vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live Music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-0363 www.whaleandale.com San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure Pick Up Your 2012 Copy Today!

Taxco Mexican Restaurant We are proud to serve our community for over 25 years. We offer some of the most unique Mexican dishes around, including the best fajitas in town in a great family atmosphere. Catering for every occasion. Beer, wine and margaritas to your taste. Tony and Vini Moreno welcome you. Hours: 9 a.m. to 10 .m. daily. Major credit cards accepted. 29050 S. Western Ave., San Pedro (at Capitol and Western) • (310) 547-4554 www. sanpedro.com, click on RESTAURANTS

To Advertise for as low as $55 per/month Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

San Pedro’s Original ArtWalk— Fine Dining • Live Music Special Performances • And Now Food Trucks!

Gallery 345

Artists Gloria D Lee and Pat Woolley of Studio 345 exhibit works on paper and canvas as well as books and small works for wall or table. Open for 1st Thursday 6-9pm. Open by appointment other times. Please call first: 301.545.0832 or 310.374.8055 • 345 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731

The Loft Gallery

Curious Matters— Assemblages by J. Preston Allen showing with works by Anne Olsen Daub. Open Studios: Candice Gawne, Carol Hungerford, Sam Arno, Marshall Astor, Murial Olguin, Jan Govaerts, Anne Marie Rawlinson, & Nancy Towne Schultz 401 S. Mesa St. • 310.831.5757 • Open 6–9pm & by appt.

Williams’ Book Store BOOK SIGNING • June 7th “Finding Sane Relationships In A Crazy World” by: Cynthia M. Ruiz • 5:30-8pm

443 W. 6th St. • 310-832-3631 williamsbooks@aol.com www.williamsbookstore.com

Parkhurst Art Gallery

Latest works by world renowned artists: Rino Gonzalez., James Zar, Cao Yong, Roy Tabora and Violet Parkhurst. Painting with the Masters: Art classes–All levels welcome, weekly Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Sign up now. Custom framing and fine art resoration services. Open Mon–Sun 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. 439 W. 6th St. • 310.547.3158

Lazy Dog Studio

Union Art Works • 402 West 5th St. • 310-833-1282 Gallery 381 • 381 West 6th St. • 310-809-5082 Dwelling • 387 West 6th St. • 310-547-4222 Neil Nagy • 408 West 6th St. • 310-617-3459 Mike Rivero Studio • 414 West 6th St. • 310-720-3407 Dekor Antiques and Gallery • 445 West 6th • St. 310-831-1800 fINdings Art Center • 470 West 6th St. • 310-489-1362 Arcade Gallery Ovation • 479 West 6th St. • 267-909-0799 Ancient Arts Stained Glass • 333 West 7th St. • 310-832-7613 Lauren Kilgore’s Studio 339 • 339 West 7th St. • 310-514-1238 Studio 345 • 345 West 7th St. • 310-374-8055 / 310-545-0832 Allyson Vought • 356 West 7th St. 424-210-7475 Human Array Gallery • 357 West 7th St. • 408-475-8867 Nancy Crawford • 360 West 7th St. • 310-732-7922 Gallery Ls • 362 West 7th St. • 310-541-4354 Paul Turang • 364 West 7th St. • 310-547-9771 Gallery Neuartig • 366 West 7th St. • 213-973-8223 Jim Harter • 368 West 7th St. • 310-533-8753 Studio MNX • 370 West 7th St. Meredith Harbuck • 372 West 7th St. • 310-528-7184 Yoon Jin Kim • 374 West 7th St. • 310-514-2143 Julia Strickler • 376 West 7th St. • 310-908-3824 Shannon LaBelle • 378 West 7th St. Hiroko • 382 West 7th St. • 310-514-8881 San Pedro Chamber Board Room Gallery • 390 West 7th St. • 310-832-7272 Gallery at the Vault • 407 West 7th St. • 310-548-6585 Shalla Javid Studio • 407 West 7th St. Unit 119 A • 918-557-2165 Scott Boren Borenstudios • 412 West 7th St. Yong Sin • 414 West 7th St. • 310-221-0283 Medéa Gallery • 445 West 7th St. • 310-833-3831 Gallery 478 • 478 West 7th St. • 310-732-2150 Croatian Cultural Center • 510 West 7th St. • 310-406-9330 Norm Looney • 318 S. Pacific Ave. • 310-548-6293 Transvagrant at Warschaw Gallery • 600 S. Pacific Ave • 310-547-3606

Dickies® Dickies Girl® Military Surplus, Tactical Gear, Workwear, Footwear & More.

310.514.1800 321 W. 6th St., SP

Don’t Forget: Father’s Day • 06-17-12

Don’t Forget: Flag Day • 06-14-12

Nautical Gifts • • • •

Flags for All Seasons Jewelry Nautical Lamps Nautical Decor

310.833.8500

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

“A Trip On The Wild Side” featuring: Photographer Renae Sandberg. Tues – Sat 12-6pm 361 W. 7th St. • 310.293.1332

301 W. 7th St., San Pedro, Calif. 90731

302 W. 7th Street • 310. 833.1589 –Entertainment Calendar– Sun 6/3

9pm San Pedro Slim Brian Young & the Blues Station 4pm

Thurs 6/7

Riptides

7pm

Fri 6/8

Daddyos Seat Belt 5 Mile Radius Jack Benny Blues Choyce Lavender Velvet

9pm

Fri 6/1

First

Sun 6/10 Fri 6/15 Fri 6/22 Sun 6/24

9pm 4pm 9pm 4pm

Karaoke Every Tuesday at 8pm with Amorette Jazz Jam every Wednesday 7 - 11pm

– www.godmotherssaloon.com –

June 1 – 14, 2012

Sun 6/17

4pm

15

Entertainment Calendar from page 12. jazz blend, starting at 8 p.m. on the Annex stage in San Pedro. Influenced by Django Reinhardt and Hot Club style, the music has been described as a new kind of Gypsy jazz. Djangofest ’09 Artist of the Year, with guitar, clarinet, and a honed rhythm section, this “blazing quartet” brings the Hot Club to San Pedro. Cost is $15. Details: (310) 833-4813, www.grandvision.org Venue: Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

June 3

Blues Lovers Brian Young and The Blues Station Band will give a three-hour performance beginning at 4 p.m. June 3 at Godmothers Saloon. Details: (310) 833-1589 Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

June 10

Carol Welsman Quartet Releases New CD Carol Welsman is an internationally acclaimed singer and pianist whose expressive vocal styling and dynamic stage presence have captivated audiences around the world. She has sold more than 60,000 CDs in Canada alone, something few jazz artists in Canada have experienced Carol’s newest CD, “I Like Men” Reflections of Miss Peggy Lee was voted Top 5 Album Pick of the Year 2009in USA Today. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W 8th St., San Pedro Calendar to page 17.

RandomNotes Summer Magic Begins with Music By B. Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

E

very summer we all like to get out away from our hot, and sometimes, stuffy houses to do something slightly different by enjoying our family, friends and random strangers in relaxed outdoor settings. This summer we have laid out some suggestions that you might not have considered and those we know you will be happy with. The concert season is already well underway with Coachella and Doheny already done and getting ready for the next year. We had four local festivals starting with the 28th Annual Topanga Blues Festival that happened on May 2, followed by the Blues Band Weekend with Brophy Dale, Big Rockin’ Daddy and a grip of other folks at Costa Mesa’s OC Market Place on May 12. The following weekend, Leimert Park in Los Angeles launched the Springtime Blues Festival May 17, with the aim of making it an annual event. The 22nd Annual Dylanfest in El Segundo brought 500 fans of Bobby D out into the beautiful Southern California sunshine. Finally, on May 26, the Simi Valley Cajun & Blues Festival with the legendary James Cotton headlining the two-day event. This is what I love about Southern California, we have a lot of

good music and the climate is the best, maybe outside of Southern France. Let the party begin. June 1 is Friday Night Live ROQ at the Races which opens with indie band Rebelution. This group has been selling out venues from New York to Los Angeles with their Peace of Mind CD. Other bands on subsequent Fridays are as follows: The Wailers, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Jimmy Cliff, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Iration, and X on July 13. Details: www.hollywoodpark.com The 5th Annual Santa Clarita Blues Festival fires up on June 2 .The one-day festival features Austin Scott and the Triple Threat Band, The Laurie Morvan Band and five other groups for another afternoon in the sun. This is a free event that takes place in Mountain View Park in Santa Clarita. Details: www.tomsrecovery.com. June 16 and 17, the Playboy Jazz Festival, is going to make this Father’s Day a happy one. This year the top of the bill goes to The Christian McBride Big Band and the Ramsey Lewis Electric Band with 18 other jazz and blues artists. Comedian Bill Cosby is the emcee of this 34th annual event. Details: www.playboyjazz.com.

The 26th Annual Long Beach Bayou Festival returns to the Rainbow Lagoon on June 23 and 24. This year we did not have the headliners like we had the previously. Particularly in the past two years The Bayou Festival stopped and it turned into a rhythm and blues show with Tito Jackson ending the two-day event. Last year we had Dr. John, who actually fit as a headliner for the festival. You could not get any more New Orleans flavored than the good Dr. John. This year we are back to the more traditional Cajun and zydeco sounds. Returning is Geno Delafose and French Rockin’ Boogie with 13 other (mainly) zydeco bands on the main stage. Barbara Morrison and Guitar Shorty are returning this year, with Sherry Pruitt and seven other groups working the blues stage. This is one of the most family friendly events going for a large festival. Lots of great food from Louisiana is served up and a large tented dance floor to shake a tailfeather. Details: www. longbeachbayoufestival.com. From July 12 to Aug. 30, some of the best local bands will come out to make your sweet summer nights groove with free outdoor concerts for the family from 6 to 9 p.m., at the Los Angeles Waterfront. Each week a different band and genre of music will be featured. Bring your chairs and enjoy the show. Location: Harbor Boulevard at Vincent Thomas Bridge, San Pedro Continued on page 17.

478 W. 6th St. • San Pedro 310.548.2493

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Tickets & Info: Williams Bookstore, www.WarnerGrand.org & www.WarnerGrandTheater.org

SUSHI BAR

Japanese Restaurant Sushi Bar 380 W. 6th St. • 832-5585

Sat 6/1, 7pm • “The Struggle” - This innovative pop-opera exposes the turmoil within ourselves. “We wear masks to hide the shame of our personal challenges. When will we stop pretending and become lovers of the truth?” A new work by Ashley R. Holmes presented by Triedstone MBC. NOTE: Due to some dark content and sensitive subject matter, parental discretion is advised. Tickets $15 cash at the door or http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/244749. Sat 6/9, 8pm • “San Pedro City Ballet’s 2012 Spring Recital: THE LITTLE MERMAID” - Students of this nationally recognized dance school, from beginner to advanced, take us to the magical underwater world of the Little Mermaid and her friends. Tickets $15 - $20 and information at sanpedrocityballet.org or 310.732.1861. Sun 6/10 •“Dancing on the Silver Screen” - Students of Lomita’s Dancemark Studio present their Spring recital inspired by dance in film. Tickets $15 - $20 cash at the door. For information, call 310.428.6761. Sat 6/16, 8pm • “On With the Show: Musicals From the Silver Screen” - Golden State Pops and a cast of exceptional singers bring Broadway to the Warner Grand with selections from classics including: “West Side Story”, “South Pacific,” “Sweeney Todd,” “Hairspray” and more. Tickets $15 - $45 at GSPO.org or 310.433.8774.

June 1 – 14, 2012

Fri – Sun, 6/29 thru 7/1, 2pm & 7:30pm • “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” - “Joseph” was the first Andrew Lloyd Webber/Tim Rice musical to be performed publicly. Encore Entertainers, one of the southland’s premier theatre training academies, presents a colorful, fully staged production of this smash Broadway hit. Tickets and information at encoreentertainers.org.

16

Random Notes from page 16.

Art Spotlight

Community/Family June 2

National Trails Day Help repair the trails that thousands of people enjoy each year between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. Details: (310) 541-7613 Venue: Portuguese Bend Reserve Location: Park Place Rd., Rancho Palos Verdes

June 3

Muller House Museum’s First Sunday Series “Love & Lumber: the Diary of a Ship Captain’s Wife” is the topic of Muller House Museum’s First Sunday Series. Local business owner Steve Cole will share his grandparents’ life aboard the Espada, a classic lumber schooner that sailed from San Pedro to Washington in the early 1900s. The museum and gift shop open at 1 p.m., the program begins at 1:30 p.m., and a tour of the museum is available at 3 p.m.. Light refreshments served. A display on the same topic will be featured through the month of June. Free, but donations welcome Venue: Muller House Location: 1542 S. Beacon St., San Pedro

June 5

Cabrillo Marine Aquarium’s Meet the Grunion The Aquarium will open at 8 p.m. and a film on grunion begins at 9 p.m. in the John M. Olguin Auditorium. Prior to the predicted run, everyone will gather on the beach to await the grunion. The program cost is $5 for adults and $1 for seniors, students, and children. Warm clothing is recommended. Grunion may be caught by hand in the months of March, June, and July which is the open season and grunion catchers 16 years and older must have a valid California fishing license. During April and May grunion may be observed, but not captured. Details: (310) 548-7562; www.cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

Theater/Film June 1

Torrettes Spring Spectacular The Torrettes dance and drill team presents their Spring Spectacular at 7 p.m. June 1. Girls from kindergarten through 8th grade compete and perform throughout Southern California in parades, competitions and shows. This show is the culmination of their exciting and competitive season. Tickets are $11.50. Details: (310) 781-7150 Venue: Torrance Cultural Arts Center Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance

June 2

The Struggle The Struggle is an innovative pop-opera that exposes the turmoil within ourselves, at 7 p.m. June 2, at the Warner Grand. Parental discretion is advised. Tickets are $15. Details: http://tinyurl.com/7gvo64u Venue: Warner Grand Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro Cinderella The South Bay Ballet presents two performances of Storybook Ballet – Cinderella at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. June 2. Tickets are $18. Details: (310) 781-7171 Venue: Torrance Cultural Arts Center Location: 3330 Civic Center Dr., Torrance

June 5

The Barkleys of Broadway This clever story, starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, about a perpetually bickering but successful show business couple was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Screenplay. Screening begins at 1:30 p.m. Tickets are free. No reservations required. Details: (310) 440-4500; www.skirball.org Venue: Skirball Cultural Center Location: 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles

June 9

San Pedro City Ballet The San Pedro City Ballet will perform a 2012 Spring recital at 8 p.m. June 9 with classic, jazz, modern, hip-hop and original choreography. Details: (310) 548-2493; www.sanpedrocityballet.org Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

June 10

Accidental Icon: The Real Gidget San Pedro filmmaker Brian Gillogly brings to life the story of the Real Gidget, one of the first young women to surf at Malibu in the 1950s, at 4 and 6:30 p.m. This documentary film showcases Kathy “Gidget” Kohner Zuckerman and her father’s story, Gidget that led to decades of stories in print and on film inspiring girls around the world to ride the waves. Tickets are $20 to $25. Details: http://tinyurl.com/TheRealGidget Venue: The Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

June 8

World of Penguins Penguin expert Dee Boersma will discuss her research on seabirds like the Magellanic Penguins in a special presentation themed to coincide with the new June Keyes Penguin Habitat. The event begins at 7 p.m. June 8. Tickets are $5 for the public and free for aquarium members, teachers and students with valid I.D. and advanced reservations. Details: (562) 590-3100; www.aquariumofpacific.org Venue: Aquarium of the Pacific Location: 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach

June 9

Green Long Beach! Festival–Change is in the Air Take part of the 4th annual Green Long Beach! Festival, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 9, on the Marina Green on East Shoreline Drive. The Green Long Beach! Festival is an annual event to bring together local businesses, green groups, artists, musicians and educators to celebrate the environment and encourage ecological awareness in the public through commerce, government, community organizations and the arts. Details: www.greenlb.org

June 10

Nature Walks Enjoy a challenging three-hour hike to view the 21-acre habitat restoration work and the birds now living in the habitat. The hike begins at 9 a.m. and is strenuous. Participants are advised to bring sun protection, water and walking shoes. No reservations are required. Event may be cancelled due to rain. Details: (310) 541-7613; http://www.pvplc.org/_lands/ three_sisters.asp Venue: Three Sisters Reserve Location: The end of Ocean Terrace Dr., Rancho Palos Verdes

June 1 – 14, 2012

On June 9, TransVagrant and Warschaw Gallery will host an artist reception for its latest exhibit, PSST: Art in San Pedro 2000-2012. The exhibit will feature selected works by artists living and working at the southern end of LA’s 110 Freeway. The artists featured includes Craig Antrim, Philippa Blair, Ray Carofano, William Crutchfield, Michael Davis, Linda Day, Eric Johnson, Austin and Lyda Lowrey, Ron Linden, Jay McCafferty, Danial Nord, Harold Plople, Peggy Reavey, Fran Siegel, Maggie Tenneson, Marie Thibeault, and Ted Twine. The Artists’ Reception is from 4–7p.m. PSST’s curator, Ron Linden notes that as a result of its isolation from Los Angeles’ various art centers due to geography, ”San Pedro enjoys an underground reputation as an artists’ community unique for its eclecticism. Many artists showcased here are conducting successful national and international careers; yet remain virtually unknown in their own community.” This exhibition reveals the variety of viewpoints and subject matter as well as the technical and conceptual concerns that define the visual arts in San Pedro. An exhibition catalog is available with contributions by Peter Frank and Peter Plagens. PSST runs through August 4. Warschaw Gallery hours are Monday – Saturday, 11a.m. – 6p.m. This exhibition funded in part by generous support from the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles, CRA/LA. Venue: Warschaw Gallery Location: 600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

Calendar from page 16.

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

The Taste in San Pedro at the Port of Los Angeles is another great family value, happening Aug. 3 and 4 at the Los Angeles Waterfront. Enjoy the food from restaurants around the South Bay, live music, craft and merchandise booths, children’s activities and more. This is one of the best run events in the Harbor. Though I have my differences with the San Pedro Chamber of Commerce in regards to the talent, this year’s Chamber selection will attract who they’re aiming to bring to this fantastic event. The fact that we are not using any of our beautiful parks is another issue. The San Pedro Chamber has this event down to a fine science when it comes to producing such a large event. If you do anything this summer, The Taste in San Pedro is the place to be. Details: www.tasteinsanpedro.com This year marks the Long Beach Jazz Festival’s 25th Anniversary and this year’s line up is a doosie with Blackbyrds, Ron Isley and the Isley Brothers, Poncho Sanchez, David Sanborn and 12 other acts performing from Aug. 10 through 12. Details: www.longbeachjazz.com On Aug. 25 and 26 The Los Angeles Guitar Festival returns to the Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center. The headliners are Eric Johnson, Albert Lee, Renegade Creation with Robben Ford and Michael Landau, John Jorgensen (The Hellcasters, Elton John Band), Peppino D’Agostino and Doug MacLeod. Details: www.laguitarfetival.com On Aug. 25, the H20 Festival comes to Los Angeles State Park with Snoop Dogg and Alejandro Sanz headlining. This one-day festival brings English and Spanish artists together. “We Speak Music” is the emphasis. Details: www.h20musicfetival.com The KJAZZ Blues Bash is happening at the Carpenter Center at Cal State Long Beach, September 3. Blues harp player James Cotton will be back in the Southland with special guest Robby Krieger of the Doors. Details: www.longbeachblues.org The summer officially ends with the Port of Los Angeles Lobster Festival on the weekend of Sept. 14 through 16. This has been one of the great places to get Maine Lobster and a festival with first class music. Previous headliners include: X, The English Beat and Jason Mraz, who has performed on the big stage of this event. The past few years have been curated by Mr. Shovel of the now defunct Indie103 radio station. The level of talent at this event is staggering. Every year has been a treat. Details: www.lobsterfest.com

17

Alma Woods, Living Treasure By Danny Simon, Special Contributing Writer

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

“I love life,” says Alma Reaves Woods, “I love people. They can have their idiosyncrasies, I have mine. I always try to listen with an open heart.” At the Watts Senior Center and Rose Garden, the prize-winning blooms are slumbering peacefully. Inside, line dancers shuffle to music that competes with the slamming of dominoes. The Rose Garden is the one meeting place for august denizens of Watts. Woods frequently visits for lunch to stay connected to the community. Nearby is the Los Angeles Public Library Alma Reaves Woods Watts Branch, which was named in Woods honor to pay tribute to her more than 50 years of community service. “I didn’t ask for that,” says Woods. She humbly sees her contribution as a part of an ongoing War on Poverty. And, while the library is a victory, other battles continue to rage. After years of being caught in a whirlwind of community activism, Woods is circumspect in answering direct questions, making her a reluctant witness to her own history and her role within the history of Watts. Woods loves to pepper her speech with idiosyncratic phrases delivered with a slight Southern accent. For instance, if she’s asked about the veracity of a statement, Woods might begin her reply with, “Look into my deep purple eyes.” Her eye color changes from red to blue back to purple depending upon her whimsy. Or, if she wants to express vexation or a sense of finality, Woods might exclaim, “Father, mother, sister, God!” Playfully coy, Woods prefers to meander through time, space and emotion making it easy to lure observers into surmising that her memory is fading. But as if to answer my unspoken question, she recites Paul Laurence Dunbar’s A Negro Love Song, a favorite poem she learned as a child. Alma Reaves was born Aug. 9, 1924 in Little Rock, Ark., one of five children to parents who separated when she was a teenager. Her father worked as a mechanic for the Missouri Pacific Railway who later moved to Los Angeles. He sent for Alma and her sister Beatrice with the promise that he would provide a place to live and money for college. The sisters boarded a train bound for Los Angeles after Alma completed junior college. “I just knew it was the land of milk and honey,” says Woods, recollecting her dreamy anticipation of what her life would be like in Los Angeles, as did many black Southern migrants who relocated here during the war boom. But her exhilaration soon waned when her father reneged on his promise. That wound of disappointment remained with Woods, who harbored dreams of becoming a biologist. It was this wound, at least in part, that inspired

18

Alma Reaves Woods, a long time library volunteer and literacy advocate, had a public library in Watts named after her in 1996 by the City of Los Angeles.  Photo: Danny Simon.

Woods to spend her life helping children find literacy and education in South Los Angeles. The sisters moved in with a family friend near Central Avenue. Woods found her first job at S.H. Cress (near Vernon and Central Avenue), where she made $18 a week selling dime store fare. Housing covenants in Los Angeles created a segregated black population. Culturally diverse, Central Avenue served as the black community’s communal and commercial hub. Woods found the scene both familiar with its rural inclusiveness and exotic with its cosmopolitan charm. Although under-aged, Woods and her sister would dress up and slip into jazz clubs. “We knew how to be very sophisticated... The southern kids were more mature and had class... We wore gloves out. These kids here didn’t do that. [But] We were so poor it was pitiful.” After living in Los Angeles for five or six years, Reaves met and married Oliver Woods. The couple had three sons before separating. Woods kept her married name because the couple never officially divorced. Woods supported her children by working at various positions for the city. Through the years, Woods has studied at USC and UCLA. A born auto-didact with a love of books, Woods believes that power is found in knowledge of oneself and the world. At Nickerson Gardens, Woods encountered children lacking a positive relationship with reading and education. Believing that the local schools were doing an insufficient job, Woods began collecting donated books and pushing them around the neighborhood in a little wooden cart. She became the de facto literacy advocate of Nickerson Gardens, teaching children to read and encouraging teenagers to stick with education.

“Education is life,” Woods says. After the 1965 Watts Riot/Revolt, Woods joined many community voices in shaping the identity of the Watts Health Center, the Charles R. Drew Post Graduate Medical School and Martin Luther King Jr. Multi-Service Ambulatory Care Center (the institutional names have changed as time passed). Woods recalls that the meetings with USC and UCLA representatives often became heated because she and other members of the community were understandably suspicious and frustrated with the supposed good intent of white interlopers after years of neglect and ghettoization. Woods recalls the enfranchisement process with mixed emotions as those meetings and subsequent events led to some controversial results and often demonization of the black community. Still, Woods found her voice during that period of political engagement, as did many others, and she continues to work within the community as the fight for access to comprehensive health care continues in South Los Angeles.

Talking with Woods during lunch is fascinating, but time is short, and she’s a busy woman with appointments to keep. She needs to visit the library and inquire about the poor state of the shrubbery that lines the entrance. The library took a lifetime of fundraising and advocacy on the part of Woods and other community members, so she wants to make sure it’s properly maintained. Although Woods is proud that the library was built, she doesn’t think much of it being named in her honor (after an 8-year political fight), and she takes pride in what she considers her greatest accomplishment, “Look into my deep red eyes! I’m so grateful to almighty God that I reared three boys in Nickerson Gardens Housing Development, the largest one in this city. Never had to go to jail to get anyone out…Never had to go and get anyone back into school…That’s more important to me than anything else,” says Woods, who delivers her customary parting phrase before driving away: “Love, light and blessings.”

Wilmington NC Meeting:

Green-up or Shut-up? By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

Though the gymnasium in Banning Park’s Senior Center was air conditioned May 23, temperatures rose anyway at the Wilmington Neighborhood Council meeting. Wilmington residents concerned about the Clean Up Green Up campaign learned that the vote on the issue was going to be tabled. It wasn’t made immediately clear for how long the issue would be tabled. Clean Up Green Up is a grassroots initiated effort in Boyle Heights, Pacoima, and Wilmington to create Green Zones. According to the www.cleanupgreenupla.org website, Green Zones would prevent and reduce pollution in those communities and help protect the health of all residents while streamlining the permitting process for businesses and providing them with access to business support programs. During the first half-hour of the meeting, supporters of the Clean Up Green Up campaign distributed informational handouts about Clean Up Green Up and a bullet point dossier of Wilmington’s biggest blight and pollution offenders such as illegal container yards that dot much of the community. The specific objectives of Clean Up Green Up, as listed on its website are: • Protect public health by using planning tools to mitigate pollution in these heavily impacted communities • Invest in economic development with financial and planning incentives to retain jobs and create new, green enterprises • Reduce existing environmental hazards through streamlined inspection and enforcement; and • Expand public-private partnerships to leverage outside resources

Cecilia Moreno, Wilmington Neighborhood Council board president cited several reasons for tabling the issue, including: Outreach to businesses wasn’t sufficient and shifting definition of Clean Up Green Up. Gabriella Medina, Councilman Joe Buscaino’s deputy liaison for Wilmington explained that the council office didn’t have a position on the issue but was concerned that there wasn’t enough community input, particularly from the business community. To Green Up supporters, the Wilmington board’s explanation smelled funny. Contrary to Moreno’s assertion, they repeatedly noted in the public comment period the wide-ranging support the campaign has received from individuals and organizations throughout the community. According to the Clean Up website, more than 30 local businesses in Wilmington are in support of Clean Up Green Up. Medina said the council office has been holding brainstorming session with 45 organizations in the community on the issue. The Clean Up Green Up initiative was made into a non-agendized item and public comment was moved to end of the meeting, causing a significant number of the audience to leave early, never to return the rest of the evening. Moreno, for her part, tried to encourage residents to stay encouraged and stay involved. “While I encourage you to continue being passionate about the issues, you need to respect the work that this board has done,” Moreno said. Longtime Democratic activist and community resident, Rick Pulido, registered his displeasure with the motion by talking out of turn at the podium during a public commenter’s time, when Green-up/ to p. 22

Employment

Sales Random Lengths is looking for an experienced advertising/print salesperson. We are the Los Angeles Harbor Area’s oldest independent newspaper. We are a stable and growing company, open for over 30 years. The candidate should have 2 or more year’s experience in outside sales. Bi-lingual is a plus. Please email resume and cover letter with salary history to james@randomlengths news.com. Monthly base salary and commission. EOE Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub. net (AAN CAN) Actors/Movie Extras needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/ day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109 for casting times /locations. Movie Extras. People needed now to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON 877-824-7260

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Business Opp ALL CASH VENDING IN YOUR LOCAL AREA.  Be your own boss-25 machines/ candy all for -$9,995.00.  1-877-915-8222. Vend 3. 880 Grand Blvd, Deer Park, NY. (AAN CAN) Takeover Payments On Existing Loans 20-50% OFF thousands of homes available. No Credit requirements. CALL Today 805-683-8600 Please no section-8 (AAN CAN)

Professional Services MOBILE NOTARY—South Bay. I come to you. Certified to notarize loan documents. Bonded. Paula Bills, commission #1894472. (310) 691-9921.

Career Training EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com

Education Teach English Abroad! 4-week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates

teaching in 60+ countries! www.teflworldwideprague. com info@teflworldwideprague.com Educational tutoring by certified & experienced Special Education & Reading teacher. Patient, well-trained, creative & structured. An expert in positive reinforcement. Reasonable rates negotiated. 310-528-1111. Academic and occupational consulting and guidance assistance with the college admissions process, admission essays, resume revision and job searches. Call for a free consultation! 424-210-5771. For more info: http://guidedachievements. info.

Adoption Service PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (AAN CAN)

Dating Services EroticEncounters. com  Where Hot Girls Share their private fantasies! Instant Connections.   Fast & Easy.   Mutual Satisfaction Guaranteed. Exchange messages, Talk live 24/7, Private 1-on-1. G i v e i n t o Te m p t a t i o n , call now 1-888-700-8511 New! Free to Try! 4 Services! 1-877-660-3887 Instant Live Connections! 1-866-8173308. Hundreds of Local Women! You Choose! 1-877747-8644. Connect With Live (18+) Local Ladies! 1-866530-0180 (AAN CAN)

CLASSIFIED ADS Psychics

PSYCHIC GLORIA Help on all love, money, health problems. Guaranteed results in 3 days. Reunite lovers.

310-470-9046

GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC Love Specialist, Stops Divorce, Cheating, Reunites Separated Partners, Solves Severe Problems. Never Fails.FREE 15 MINUTE Reading By Phone 254-4206794 (AAN CAN)

Pets Adopt a pet from the Harbor Care Center, 957 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro. 888452-7381.

Automotive

WANTED TO RENT—

Looking for a one-car garage to store vehicle in San Pedro, Harbor City or Lomita. Please call 310-766-6824 evenings or weekends. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. WeCome To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com CAR OWNERS EARN $600/ MONTH.Safely rent out your car anytime you are not using it. You control the price, times & people for each rental. Re-

Bulletin Board Don Marshall CPA, Inc. (310) 833-8977

Don Marshall, MBA, CPA Specializing in small businesses CPA Quality Service at very reasonable rates

www.donmarshallcpa.com

Buy it now at Williams Bookstore, Random Lengths News office and The Tobacco Leaf at Western & 25th

25 indoor & outdoor stalls

• Armed Response Alarm System • Web-based Video Monitoring • Electronic Access Control • 24-Hour Availability • Self-Serve Free Hand Wash • WIFI Hotspot • Free Charging Station (310) 707-2207 www.8thstreetgarage.com

REAL ESTATE Room For Rent

$140 PER WEEK! SAN PEDRO SRO Hotel has rooms available. A clean, tranquil setting for the best price. Alex (310) 514-3919.

Apartment / House For Rent

TA K E - O V E R PAY M E N T PROGRAM. $800-$1200. 2 and 3 bedroom homes available!!! Call today (805) 683-8600 (AAN CAN) Special—$199 to move in, no deposit! Newly remodeled single unit for $670/mo, 1 bdrm unit $850/mo. Wood & tile flooring, secured property, quiet area, close to bus lines. Gas included. 2040 S. Pacific Ave., SP. Call Francisco, 310872-4831.

Commerical Real Estate For Lease

San Pedro – For Lease S.Pacific Ave. office suites & retail space in the “Arts District”. Several choices available.

A-Delta Realty 310/831-6670

Rommates ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listingswith photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

LEGAL FILINGS City Dock No. 1 Marine Research Center Project

HD-006-08 Notice is hereby given under the auspices of the California Environmental Quality Act (California Public Resources Code Section 21000 et seq.), that the Los Angeles Harbor Department has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIR) for the City Dock No. 1 Marine Research Center Project located at the Port of Los Angeles, San Pedro, CA 90731. A public comment meeting will be held to further discuss the findings of this Draft EIR on June 12, 2012, from 6 to 9 P.M. at the Harbor Administration Building, Board Room, located at 425 South Palos Verdes Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. Copies of the

Golden West Realty NEW LISTING IN WILMINGTON! 

Please help!

The animals at the Harbor Animal Shelter have ongoing need for used blankets, comforters, pet beds.* Drop off at Harbor Animal Shelter, 957 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro.

888-452-7381, x 143

PLEASE SPAY/NEUTER YOUR PET! *In any condition. We will wash and mend.

Three bedroom, 13/4 bath home on a large corner lot. Features include a covered patio off the living room, a spacious yard with fruit trees, and a detached 2 car garage. This “1 Owner Home” is conveniently located to shopping, parks, and freeway.

LARGE 4 BEDROOM FAMILY HOME

Large 4 bedroom, 2 bath home so near the channel you can see the ships moving past. It has an island kitchen with a nice dining area. There is a large backyard just behind the 2-car garage. A long driveway is suitable for boat, rv, or any other toys. This home is also large enough and the floorplan is suitable for extended family. Come on down...Reduced to $298,000.

For more information call Golden West Realty

310.548.2881

www.goldenwestsanpedro.com 1 5 1 7 S . G a f f e y S t . • San Pedro, CA 90731

Draft EIR will be available for review starting May 24, 2012 at: Los Angeles Public Library, San Pedro Branch, 931 South Gaffey Street, San Pedro, California; Los Angeles Public Library, Wilmington Branch, 1300 North Avalon Boulevard, Wilmington, California; and the Los Angeles Harbor Department, Environmental Management Division, 425 South Palos Verdes Street, San Pedro, California. Electronic copies of the Draft EIR can be obtained at http:// www.portoflosangeles.org, or by sending a request to Kevin Grant, Project Manager, Los Angeles Harbor Department, 425 South Palos Verdes Street, San Pedro, CA 90731, or by calling (310) 732-7693. Written comments should be sent to the address above or via e-mail to ceqacomments@ portla.org no later than July 9, 2012. Comments sent via email should include the project title in the e-mail’s subject line and a valid mailing address within the email. NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION The City of Los Angeles Harbor Department (LAHD) has prepared this Initial Study/ Mitigated Negative Declaration (IS/MND) to address the environmental effects of the Berths 195-200A WWL Vehicle Services Americas (WWL), Inc. Project (hereafter ``proposed project``). The project site is bounded by Alameda Street to the northwest, South Avalon Boulevard to the west, East Water Street to the south, and Berth 200B to the east. The project site is also situated north of Berths 187-191 (Vopak) and the East Basin Channel. The primary goal of the proposed project is to accommodate current and anticipated needs of WWL, while accommodating necessary boundary changes resulting from the previously evaluated and approved Berth 200 Rail Yard Project. The existing WWL facility is composed of Berths 195200A. Implementation of the proposed project would result in the rehabilitation of Berths 196-199 and construction of two additional railroadloading tracks on the southern portion of the project site. In accordance with Government Code 65962.5, a hazardous waste property listed by the Department of Toxic Substances Control overlaps the project site. The former Koppers facility, located at 210 South Avalon Boulevard, Wilmington, CA 90744, overlaps the northwest corner of the project site. This IS/MND includes a discussion of the proposed project’s effects on the existing environment, including the identification of mitigation measures to reduce potential impacts. No significant effects that could not be mitigated to a less than significant level were identified. In accordance with the CEQA Statutes and Guidelines, the IS/MND is

continued on following page

June 1 - 14, 2012

Angeles is the way it is. Bread and Hyacinths: the Rise and Fall of Utopian Los Angeles is the gripping, little-known saga of the great battle between Job Harriman, the West Coast’s leading socialist, and General Harrison Gray Otis, publisher of the Los Angeles Times—a battle for the future of Los Angeles. Written by Lionel Rolfe, Nigey Lennon and Paul Greenstein, Bread and Hyacinths was originally published in 1992 by California Classics Books. It is reprinted by Random Lengths News and available for $15.

Vintage Auto & Motorcycle Storage

Storage Containers for rent in San Pedro, at 15th and Centre Streets. 310 544-7400.

Serving San Pedro and the entire South Bay since 1980

8/12

Bread & Hyacinths This is the book that explains why the city of Los

Storage Available

Real Estate Investor seeks to purchase commercial or multi-unit residential properties in San Pedro. No Agents please. 310-241-6827

The Local Publication You Actually Read

DBA filing and publishing $120 (310) 519-1442

layRides provides insurance, driver-screening & support. Text (415)868-5691 for details+ special offer. Free to join. www.RelayRides.com/ Car (AAN CAN)

Reach 63,000 Harbor Area Readers

19

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012056170 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Grande Coin Laundry, 1202 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Eric S. Golden, 25241

Nueva Vista, Laguna Niguel, CA 92677. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant

who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Eric S. Golden, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 3, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious

for public review on the Port of Los Angeles’ website at: http://www.portoflosangeles. org; the LAHD Environmental Management Division located at 222 West 6th Street, San Pedro; the Los Angeles City Library San Pedro Branch at 931 S. Gaffey Street; and at the Los Angeles City Library Wilmington Branch at 1300 North Avalon, Wilmington.

2012. Please submit written comments to: Christopher Cannon, Director, City of Los Angeles Harbor Department, Environmental Management Division, 425 S. Palos Verdes Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. Written comments may also be sent via email to ceqacomments@portla. org. Comments sent via email should include the project title in the subject line and a valid mailing address in the email. For additional information, please contact the LAHD Environmental Management Division at (310) 732-3675.

from previous page

LEGAL FILINGS

being circulated for a period of 30 days for public review and comment.

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

The 30-day review period will start on May 21, 2012 and end on June 20, 2012. A copy of the document is available

20

Comments on the IS/MND should be submitted in writing prior to the end of the 30-day public review period and must be postmarked by June 20,

Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012056171 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Harbor Day Preschool, 580 W. 6th St., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: C0124596. Registered owner(s): San Pedro United Methodist Church, 580 W. 6th St., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Wayne Lebsack, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 3, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012060465 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Got It Right Entertainment, 3745 Stephen M White Dr., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Michael B Stribling, 3745 Stephen M White Dr., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S.

Michael B Stribling, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 6, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12

Fictitious Business Name ‘Statement File No. 2012076043 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Ofeliaí’s Bookkeeping Service, 1350 W. 9th Street, #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Ofelia Familathe , 1350 W. 9th Street., #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above April 18, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Ofelia Familathe, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 25, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012060859 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) YKM Services, 305 W. Santa Cruz St., #6 San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Raul Madrigal, 305 W. Santa Cruz St., #6 San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above April 18, 2012. I declare that all information in

this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Raul Madrigal e, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/03/12, 05/17/12,

05/31/12, 06/14/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012088229 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Century Motorcycles,1640 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Gwendolyn Rutherford, 630 W. 24th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. Timothy Hickerson, 525 W. 22nd Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by a general partnership. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Timothy Hickerson, Partner/Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012089406 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Das Boot, 2317 S. Gaffey, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Eric Swanson, 2317 S. Gaffey, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business

is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Eric Swanson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012082131 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) RDS Consulting, 1180 W. 7th Street Apt #1, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Rodel Filio , 1180 W. 7th Street Apt #1, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced

to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false,

is guilty of a crime.) S. Rodel Filio, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012082130 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Wingstop, 1685 Pacific Coast Hwy, Harbor City, CA 90710. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: 3351374. Registered

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS owner(s): B&S Ventures, Inc.,1199 Rancho Rd., Arcadia, CA 91006. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) B&S Ventures, Inc, S. Barjar Pithawalla, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 3, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012091567 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) A-Delta International, (2) LA Express Appraisals, 15915 Ventura blvd., #303, Encino, CA 91436. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: C0797611. Registered owner(s): Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura blvd., #303, Encino, CA 91436. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above 5/22/2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) Kraakevik Corporation, Patti Kraakevik, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 15, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12,

Amerigold Mortgage, (12) Amerigold Productions (13) AmerigoldProperty Management (14) Amerigold Realestate, (15) Amerigold Realestate Services (16) Amerigold Realty Advisors, (17) Amerigold Estates, (18) Amerigold Securities, 7420 Alida Place, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): John R. Aube, 7420 Alida Place, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above 2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) John R. Aube, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 15, 2012. Notice-In accordance

with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

The Local Publication You Actually Read

06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012092847 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Amerigold Group, (2) Amerigold Realty, (3) Amerigold Appraisal, (4) Amerigold Appraisals, (5) Amerigold Appraisers, (6) Amerigold Exchange, (7) Amerigold Films, (8) Amerigold, (9) Amerigold Financial, (10) Amerigold Investments, (11)

June 1 - 14, 2012

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012100260 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Mr. Big’s Gourmet Hot Dogs, 655 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: 3456745 Registered owner(s): Big’s Gourmet, Inc., 1536 W. 25th Street #275, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) Big’s Gourmet, Inc., Sedward Nunez, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 23, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12,

21

from p. 18

Green-up

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

the board attempted to move on to the next item of business. Many people who showed up early left by 8:15 p.m. never to take their 3 minutes at the podium. Coalition for a Safe Environment found-

22

er, Jesse Marquez, spoke during the public comment, noting the importance of a community plan and sticking to it. He said that Clean Up Green Up was about putting in new green technology companies in place of Wilmington’s bad and dirty neighbors like Pick Your Part Junkyard, which had one of its buildings gutted by fire more than a year ago. He also noted the proliferation of open container yards where port trucks would leave

their empty trailers until they were used again. Marquez said he knows eight such Green-tech companies that are ready to move in. Some people in attendance questioned the board’s interest in the community’s concerns. “If you don’t support Clean Up Green Up, then you’re supporting cancer,” said community resident and supporter of the Green Up campaign, Jessica Martinez, before she began recounting her family’s struggles in coping with cancer. Wilmington Wire blog founder, Kat Madrigal’s comment was tearful. She recalled a close family who is afflicted with leukemia and said she was shocked that people aren’t taking the issue more seriously. “It’s unthinkable that you’re even thinking about not supporting Green Up Clean Up,” she said. Flavio Mercado, Clean Up Green Up’s GIS Mapping expert, spent his three minutes presenting a former science fair project that won second place. The experiment was simple. It involved three jars of Vaseline. One jar was placed outside without lid, another open jar was placed inside also without a lid, and a third jar was in a closet with a lid on. After three weeks, the jars that were uncovered had pollutants in them, demonstrating the level of Wilmington’s pollution problems. Towards the end of the meeting, at-large board member Anabell Romero responded to the raw feelings of Green Up Clean Up supporters by trying to explain that tabling the issue did not mean the board was against it, but just that they needed more time to study the proposal. However, the words of Romero, a University of Southern California graduate student and NPR journalist, were interpreted by some to mean that the board was divided on the issue and that she sided with the Green Up supporters. This, in turn, caused Moreno to take Romero to task, leaving Clean Up Green Up supporters even more confused about where the neighborhood council stands.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

June 1 - 14, 2012

23

24

June 1 - 14, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


RLn 05-31-12 Edition