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Judge Pete Mirich Speaks on Court Closures p. 8

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Brothers On the Line Comes to LAHIFF’s DocSunday p. 11 Former Byrds Bassist Comes Full Circle p. 15

Bankrupting Nature: Living Within Our Planetary Means p. 24

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

Doctors Get Stiffed On Insurance Payments: Internal Dispute Between PMA and ILWU Leaves Millions in Unpaid Bills

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April 19 - May 2, 2013

The notions that “Art imitates life... Life imitates art...” feel like quaint clichés. Beneath the inundation of visual junk food via social media and television, there’s a sense of apocalyptic foreboding that if something doesn’t change now, we’re going to hell in a handbasket. And, it isn’t just religious conservatives picking up that sense. Psycho-Pass, the television adapted anime of the manga, Inspector Akane Tsunemori is set in a seemingly utopian future where it is possible to instantaneously measure a person’s mental state, personality, aptitude and probability of committing crimes, through a device installed in the citizens’ bodies called a psycho-pass. The protagonist is in law enforcement. The antagonist is a terrorist trying to destroy this utopia. Before the story ends, the labels of antagonist and protagonist falls from law enforcement and terrorist alike, leaving behind only the villain. The villain being the system that undergirds the dystopian underbelly of the future where people’s lives are predetermined by an irrationallyrational machine: a machine that controls all the necessities of life. Food Revolution/ to p. 6

Graphic: Mathew Highland

Local Gardeners, Health Conscious Consumers on the Front Line

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Michael DeWinter and Christi Mendoza peruse the produce at the Harbor Farms market at the Corner Store in San Pedro. Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

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April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

HARBOR AREA

Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

SPHS Softball Field is Off-limits to Home Games By Joseph Baroud, Editorial Intern

The San Pedro High School baseball and softball teams have been prohibited from using the baseball field during their home games this past school year. A lawsuit filed with the U.S. District Attorney’s office in June 2011, resulted in the ban of home games being played at the school’s baseball field. Balls that were hit over the fence landed inside of an apartment complex that was across the street from the field. It seemed to be tolerable initially, but a couple of balls came close to inflicting harm onto some of the tenants’ infants. “Some balls went over the fence and came close to hitting a couple of babies,” said Aadil Naazir, assistant principal at San Pedro High School. Naazir said that deficient funding is playing the biggest role in the lengthened period of time taken to resolve the issue. “We are in the process of raising the nets, but it’s going to cost somewhere in between $75,000 and $100,000.” Naazir was hopeful that the project will be completed during the summer and the field will be back in order for the next season. The only problem is, some students won’t have a next year and are dealing with the inconveniences of having to travel for every game. “The problem is that for some of these boys, it’s their senior year and they can’t play a home

game,” wrote Andrew Linares, a parent of a student on the baseball team, in an e-mail. “We had to travel as far as Moorpark in the Valley. We played six games that week and we had to travel and it cost myself about $170 in gas and more for parents in bigger vehicles.” Linares said that this is an issue stemming from the school and the apartment tenants, yet the players and the parents have to pay the price. “I understand the problem, but the apartment owners aren’t doing anything to fix the problem either.” Linares said, “Why do the kids have to pay the price? Why are the parents paying out of pocket?” And, with the city spending about $500,000 on a local skatepark project, Linares wonders why the schools aren’t a priority in the city’s budget. “The town is overlooking our students, with two skatepark festivals that cost the city money, [they] could have had some money put towards our students.” To resolve the issue of balls going over the fence, the fence has to be raised. The base must strengthened and deepened to support a higher fence. The project is scheduled to begin in June and to be completed near the end of the summer before the start of the fall semester in August. Hopefully, this is an eye opener for all sides of the table to step up their game.

City Idles on Pressing Eco-Issues By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

Committee will consider the SCIG on April 29, according to Angelo Logan, executive director of East Yards Communities for Environmental Justice. Meanwhile the Long Beach Harbor Commission has joined the City of Long Beach in objecting to the SCIG. Although Long Beach

City Idles/ to p. 5

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Chevron refinery fire in Richmond, Calif. File photo

Mayor Bob Foster has expressed a desire to work things out, there have been no contacts according to Port of Los Angeles officials. But even if there were, local environmental activists and the Natural Resources Defence Council have much more fundamental objections than Long Beach does, calling for on-dock rail yards rather than off-dock ones located in residential communities. Those deeper objections may help to explain the official silence so far. That should surely change in the weeks and months ahead. Regarding Rancho LPG, evidence continues to mount that the regulatory framework protecting the public is wholly inadequate. On April 5, federal investigators looking into this past year’s fire at Chevron’s refinery in Richmond, Calif. said that the incident reveals a need for stronger state oversight. The U.S. Chemical Safety Board stated that California’s multiple regulatory agencies charged with refinery oversight lacked the necessary staff and training, and that more rigorous state regulations are needed.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

The Los Angeles City Council has yet to officially schedule any action on two major items of local health, safety and environmental concern—the Rancho LPG facility and BNSF’s proposed off-dock rail yard, the Southern California International Gateway. But that doesn’t mean that nothing is happening. The Trade Commerce & Tourism

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Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements Western Avenue Visioning Committee

The Western Avenue Visioning Committee will host an open house for the community to review their ideas, provide input and learn about efforts to improve Western Avenue, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 20, at Peck Park Community Center in San Pedro. Details: (310) 544-5228 Venue: Peck Park Community Center Location: 560 N. Western Ave., San Pedro

Gathering for the Grand

The Gathering for the Grand provides the means for Grand Vision to continue important preservation work at the Warner Grand Theatre and high quality music production at the Grand Annex for families and youth. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. April 21, at the Palos Verdes Golf Club in Palos Verdes. Details: GrandVision.org Venue: Palos Verdes Golf Club Location: 3301 Via Campesina, Palos Verdes Estates

San Pedro Democratic Club Meeting

Congresswoman Janice Hahn’s staff will give a presentation, from 7 to 8:45 p.m. April 22, explaining their day-to-day activities, responsibilities and how they can be of assistance to constituents. Venue: The Whale & Ale Restaurant Location: 327 W. 7th., St San Pedro

Fighting World Hunger: Intercultural, Interdisciplinary, Sustainability

Marymount College presents Fighting World Hunger: Intercultural, Interdisciplinary, Sustainability, at 7:30 p.m. April 23, at the Chapel on the Main Campus. The event will feature speakers and activities that focus on what we can do to fight hunger locally and globally. Reception and discussion follow in the P.E.A.C.E. Center. The event is free. Details: (310) 303-7223; www.marymountpv.edu. Venue: Marymount College Location: 30800 Palos Verdes Drive East, Rancho Palos Verdes

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Mental Health Center Blood Drive

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Support Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 24, at the San Pedro Mental

Health Center Blood Drive. Venue: San Pedro Mental Health Center Location: 150 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Prospective Member Meeting

The Associates, one of two support groups for the Palos Verdes Art Center/Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education, invites prospective new members to their April 25 meeting. Meetings take place at 6 p.m. at the Palos Verdes Art Center, Promenade on the Peninsula. Details: (310) 541-2479; www.pvartcenter.org Venue: PVAC, Promenade on the Peninsula Location: 550 Deep Valley Drive, Suite 261, Rolling Hills Estates

AIDS Assistance Thrift Store Spring Art Sale

The AIDS Assistance Thrift Store Spring Fundraising Art Event starts from 6 to 9 p.m. April 27 in Long Beach. The event is an opportunity to acquire some amazing art. This year, they’ll be featuring a gallery of contemporary art generously donated to us by a collection of acclaimed Southern California artists. They also have a huge selection of unique art donations from the past year: paintings, sculpture, folk art, mixed media, photography and more. A $10 suggested donation at the door is requested. Refreshments and appetizers are available. Venue: AIDS Assistance Thrift Store Location: 2011 E. 4th St., Long Beach

LAMI 20th Anniversary Fundraiser Reception

Experience how the Los Angeles Maritime Institute uses the sea to educate youth, from 3 to 6 p.m. April 27, at Ports O’Call Restaurant in San Pedro. The event will raise funds for the TopSail Youth Program. Venue: Ports O’Call Restaurant Location: 1199 Nagoya Way, San Pedro

Casino Night at the Elks

Come join Councilman Joe Buscaino for Casino Night, starting at 6 p.m., April 27, at the Elk’s Lodge in San Pedro to raise funds for the Eastview Little League All Kids Play Foundation. This foundation helps keep community’s children off the streets and on the playing field. The event features: • Blackjack, craps, 3-card poker and roulette. • A huge silent auction with over 70 items to bid on. • Food created by the chefs at the Elk’s • A separate Texas Hold ‘Em Tournament with prizes • 50/50 raffle, a no-host bar, DJ and dancing from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. Tickets for the event are $30. One hundred percent of the proceeds got toward the Eastview Little League All Kids Play foundation. Details: (310) 864-2814 continued on following page

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Community Announcements Ride for Kids

Come join hundreds of your motorcyclist (and scooter) friends at the Los Angeles Ride for Kids®, starting at 8 a.m. May 5, at American Honda Motor Co. in Torrance. The Ride for Kids ® program supports the efforts of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation to find the cause of and cure for childhood brain tumors. Registration opens at 8 a.m. There is $40 minimum donation. Details: http://larideforkids.org/the-event/registerto-ride/ Venue: American Honda Motor Co. Location: 1919 Torrance Blvd., Torrance

The 2013 Long Beach QFilm Festival

Submissions now being accepted through June 8, for the 2013 Long Beach QFilm Festival, which will take place Sept. 6., at the Art Theatre and The Center in Long Beach. The Long Beach QFilm Festival annually presents narrative features, documentaries and short films that embody the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community. There is a nominal fee for each submission Submit via www.withoutabox.com. The full festival line up of films as well as passes and tickets for purchase will be available beginning in mid-August through the Long Beach QFilm Festival website, www.qfilmslongbeach.com.

Lights, Camera, Ocean

Cabrillo Marine Aquarium’s Youth on Board video contest is the perfect opportunity for youth in Southern California to have their voices heard. Cabrillo Marine Aquarium’s video contest is for middle school and high school students in Southern California. Participants are tasked with creating a video that is 60 seconds or less without dialogue, featuring their inspiring impressions of Southern California’s ocean. Entries will be judged on originality, creativity and how effectively the message conveys the inspirational nature of the ocean. One grand prize trophy will be awarded to the winning entry (group or individual) and gift certificates to the Aquarium’s gift shop will be given to individual winners. They will be awarded at the Aquarium on World Ocean Day Saturday, June 8. Visit the website at www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org to download a complete list of video contest rules and an entry form.

Long Beach AIDS Ride

Phone Bank from Home for Marriage Equality

Join The Center as part of the National Equality Action Team to help local communities win marriage equality in Delaware, Rhode Island, Minnesota and Illinois. Volunteers currently help via weekly phone banks from home, as well as weekend volunteer trips in April and May where transportation and housing are provided. Volunteers will be calling IL, DE, RI and MN from their homes using a computer and telephone. Volunteers will be talking to supporters of marriage equality in those states providing information on where we are in the fight for marriage equality, and how they can help. For each shift, volunteers will be provided with training via a conference call during the first 20 to 30 minutes, and support during their shift via email, phone and instant message. Details: www.marriageequality.org/neat

SPIFFest Calls for Entries

After a typical long delay, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments April 16, in a case brought by American Trucking Associations, Inc., challenging the Port of Los Angeles Clean Trucks Program. A decision is expected in June. Although ATA, along with the rest of industry, has long claimed to share public pollution concerns, a brief exchange in oral arguments seemed to show that ATA rejects the entire purpose and premise of the CTP. “Could the terminal say, we have a pollution problem and only modern trucks can come and unload here?” Justice Sotomayor asked ATA’s attorney, Daniel Lerman. “No,” he replied, without qualification. The exchange was striking, since ATA did not challenge CTP’s core regulation of trucks. In addition, the most weighty and controversial provision that had been challenged—requiring companies to own and maintain their own vehicles and hire drivers as regular employees— was already thrown out by a lower court, and Los Angeles had declined to appeal. But the ATA challenged the decision anyway, as deep pocket corporate interests so often do. Federal law generally prohibits state and local governments from passing rules and regulations that impact interstate commerce. However, there are exceptions, and one of those is for government entities, such as the port, acting as business entities or “market participants,” what’s known as the “market participant doctrine.” The CTP was intentionally modelled on similar exceptional cases, such as the licensing and regulation of taxis serving international airports. It regulates activities centered on its property, not open to the general public. Going into oral arguments, the question is framed rather narrowly, over whether a few provisions of the CTP are legal under this approach. These include whether the port can require licensed motor carriers to provide offstreet parking and post placards in trucks so the public can report violations and whether the port can ban carriers that violate its standards. But it’s possible that the court might rule more broadly than the case at hand, perhaps even undermining long-standing practices, much as its Citizens United ruling undermined over 100 from p. 3

City Idles

“This patchwork system of regulation has serious challenges,” said Don Holmstrom, director of Chemical Safety Board’s Western Regional Office. But problems are similar throughout the United States, he explained. “[T]he current U.S. regulatory system for process safety is largely reactive; companies generally have a default right to operate, subject to penalties when accidents occur or their activities otherwise draw negative attention from regulators,” he said. “In the case of the Chevron refinery fire, the reactive system of regulation simply did not work to prevent what was ultimately a preventable accident.” This is precisely what local activists fear could happen with Rancho LPG. In contrast, Europeans have developed a proactive approach, which “places the impetus on industry to evolve with current best safety practices, wherever they have been developed, to ensure that process hazards have been adequately identified, evaluated and controlled,” Holmstrom said.

years of election finance law. This prospect has brought an array of state and local government representatives into the case filing friend of the court (aka amicus) briefs. As National Resources Defense Council lawyer Melissa Lin Perrella explained on NRDC’s Switchboard blog the Port of Los Angeles’ adoption of the CTP was necessary to allow the port to expand its business and to remain competitive and is well in line with widespread business practices in the private sector. NRDC itself played a key role in litigating the China Shipping Settlement, which signaled the end of port development without taking responsibility for community health and environmental impacts. But this landmark achievement only served to bring the port in line with how large-scale corporations are increasingly doing business in the world today. “The total spent on sustainable business programs by large companies (those with revenues of more than $1 billion) in Australia, Canada, the U.K., and the U.S. will reach $60

billion this year,” Perrella wrote. Since the market participant doctrine allows state and local governments to take the same sorts of actions that private enterprises might take, the CTP ought to be allowed, proponents argue. “If our name was Walmart, you wouldn’t even be having this lawsuit. We’re operating like a private company,” said former Harbor Commission President David Freeman, in a quote Perrella cites to lead off her blog post. At the original trial, Freeman testified specifically: [W]e quickly realized that in order to grow the port, we had to abate the pollution because the people in San Pedro and Wilmington were not only angry and not only suffering from terrible air pollution, but they had learned that the law was there to protect them, and the NRDC and others had filed lawsuits, and they had stopped the port from growing. So green growth which is what we called it was an absolute CTP Faces Supreme Court/ to p. 23

April 19 - May 2, 2013

The San Pedro International Film Festival is calling for entries for the Oct. 4 through 6, film festival. SPIFF is organized in partnership with the Croatian Cultural Center of Greater Los Angeles and City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs. Call for Entries are open until Aug. 19. The San Pedro International Film Festival was founded to celebrate the diverse culture and community of San Pedro with a wide spectrum of independent film, documentaries and shorts. Details: www.spiffest.org

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Registration for the Long Beach AIDS Ride now is open. Riders can choose between a 40- or 75mile route that winds down the coast. Details: http://longbeachaidsride.org

Clean Trucks Plan Goes to Supreme Court

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Manufacturers Sue EPA

On March 15, the National Association of Manufacturers filed suit challenging the Environmental Protection Agencies stronger standards on fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) or soot. The standards were announced in December, just meeting a court-imposed deadline. The EPA’s new rules were the result of a previous suit by health and environmental activists, lowering the annual exposure standard for soot to 12 micrograms per cubic meter, down from 15. “EPA estimates that meeting the annual primary fine particulate standard of 12.0 μg/m3 will provide health benefits worth an estimated $4 billion to $9.1 billion per year in 2020—a return of $12 to $171 for every dollar invested in pollution reduction,” the EPA stated in a released summary of the rule. “Estimated annual costs of implementing the standard are $53 million to $350 million.” EPA stated that it plans to make designations about which counties aren’t in attainment with the rules by the end of 2014, but a map on its website shows just seven counties out of attainment, all in California, including Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside. In contrast, 10 days later, on March 25, EPA announced its proposal to find the South Coast air basin in attainment for the coarse particulate matter standard (PM10). This reflects a 3-year record of meeting the required goals. EPA is also proposing to approve the state’s maintenance plan that demonstrates how the area will continue to achieve the standard for at least the next 10 years.

Study: World’s Top Industries Run at Loss When Environmental Costs Considered

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

The world’s leading production and processing industries—agriculture, forestry, mining, fossil fuel generation, etc.—have unpriced, unpaid natural capital costs totalling $7.3 trillion or 13 percent of global economic output, according to The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity program’s recent report. The program is sponsored by the United Nations Environmental Program. According to the report, Natural Capital—the 100 top externalities of business, none of the top 20 regional industry sectors with the biggest environmental impact would be profitable, let alone cover their cost of capital, if the environmental impacts from greenhouse gases, land and water degradation and the loss of other ecosystem services were taken into account. The report identified the most significant overall costs came from greenhouse gases ($2.7 billion or 36 percent), water consumption and land use (both at $1.9 trillion and 25 percent). Other major impacts came from air, land and water pollution. Costs due to catastrophic events, such as droughts and storms, were not included. The regional sectors with the largest costs in terms of natural capital were identified as coal-fired generation in eastern Asia and in North America, land use from cattle ranching in South America and Southern Asia, and water use in wheat farming in Southern Asia.

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The Great Food Revolt

This past month, Congress passed and President Barack Obama signed a bill including a rider that critics of bioengineered food have derided as the Monsanto Protection Act. The provision allows the Secretary of Agriculture to give producers— whether they’re farmers or bio-engineering companies like Monsanto—a temporary permit to continue selling a product even after the product’s non-regulated status has been revoked. (See sidebar, “The Farmers Assurance Provision” for more on this.) Tactics such as these have done little to engender trust from the general public as companies like Monsanto take shortcuts and cut corners to rush their products to market, effectively limiting consumer choices while claiming to do the exact opposite. But the fact of the matter is that a wide array of processed food is composed of genetically engineered ingredients and nearly impossible to avoid. This is leading to a fiercer fight for control of healthy and affordable food choices and it’s happening on a grassroots level. Jim Montgomery, co-leader of the Yes on 37 campaign, says narrowly losing the initiative last year was a blessing in disguise. “Volunteers kept coming back saying what’s next, what’s next?” Montgomery said. “If we had won the battle, people would have gotten complacent instead of energized in taking the next step.” Montgomery said that the next step in the plan is targeting Whole Foods, Traders Joes, and Costco in labeling products with ingredients that were themselves genetically engineered or made using genetically modified organisms. And, perhaps most importantly, getting companies to self-label as, Whole Foods, who announced recently they will begin self labeling GMO and GE products in 2018, has. Montgomery noted that there are efforts in 22 states to pass legislation to label food with GE and GMO ingredients. “I’m very happy that we’re in a place that’s at a tipping point,” he said. Montgomery sees the fight for affordable GE- and GMO-free food as on par with today’s Equality Movement and the Apartheid Divestment

Jim Montgomery shows off his his miniature “food forest” in his backyard. Montgomery is co-leader of the Torrance/South Bay region of labelgmos. org, a statewide community action organization that got Proposition 37 on the California ballot this past November. Since their narrow defeat at the ballot box, the organization has transition into grassroots organization intent on continuing the fight for labeling genetically engineered ingredients in food products. Photos: Terelle Jerricks.

as gardeners planted seeds. What’s interesting about these local farmers is that they seem firmly aware of their place on the macro-level of food production and their relationship to people elsewhere in the world dealing with the same issues, but on a more desperate level. A tomato gardener selling goods at the Harbor Farms second Saturday market, James Mitchell, inquired whether this reporter was aware of suicides in India. He was referring to the suicide crisis of farmers in India suffering under crushing debt, moneylenders and the destructive policies associated with the introduction of expensive genetically modified cotton seed. That there are studies showing that the high number of suicide are due to a variety of factors not directly attributable to Monsanto is beside the point. The staying power of the Indian farmer suicides narrative is due to the fact the factors that are connected to the farmers suicide are actually related to the structures that allow so few companies with a global reach to have such control over so many lives in the world. For a 49-year-old Jet Propulsion Laboratory rocket scientist like Montgomery, the Indian farmer suicides is as powerful a dystopian narrative as Psycho Pass—a narrative that provides a problem that only a grassroots solution can solve. The way Montgomery sees it, the solution to

Movement of the 1980s. On the weekend of April 13, Harbor Farms staged their third outdoor market at the Corner Store in the White Point neighborhood of San Pedro. Harbor Farms, a community organization dedicated to increasing urban farming in the Harbor Area, is the brainchild of high school teacher Rachel Brunkhe. Brunkhe founded Harbor Farms in her backyard with the mindset of spreading the urban garden lifestyle by building community. When she began installing a vegetable garden in her yard, the produce became the point of sale and the point of conversation, establishing friendships

The Farmers Assurance Provision The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, an arm of the USDA, is responsible for protecting U.S. agriculture from pests and diseases. APHIS regulations provide procedures for obtaining a permit or for providing notification prior to “introducing” a regulated article in the U.S. Regulated articles are defined as organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or for which there is reason to believe are plant pests. The regulations also provide for a petition process for the determination of nonregulated status. Once a determination of nonregulated status has been made, the organism (and its offspring) no longer requires APHIS review for movement or release in the United States. What the so-called Monsanto Protection Act does is give a temporary get-out-of-jail-free card upon the request of farmers and bioengineering companies like Monsanto. At first, the provision was slipped in anonymously, but soon after its passing, one Republican stepped forward to claim credit. Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) actually wrote the provision with help from Monsanto before inserting it into House Resolution 933. Blunt has been a friend to the Monsanto Corp., whose headquarters is in Blunt’s state, for many years. According to OpenSecrets, since 2008 Blunt has received more than $90,000 in contributions from Monsanto. Blunt’s wife, Abigail, serves as the head of U.S. government affairs for the processed food giant Kraft. Kraft and Monsanto have worked together in the past to strike down any anti-GMO bill. For example in 2012 California’s Prop 37, which required labeling of GMO foods, both Kraft and Monsanto donated around $10 million dollars to defeat the bill. Though lasting only six months, this provision could be an eye-opening example of truly how much power both Monsanto and other major corporations have over our Congress. —Cory Hooker contributed to this article

Harbor Farms founder, Rachel Brunkhe and her daughter, Alma, at the Second Saturday Open Air Market on April 13.

food scarcity is re-establishing micro-level food production in the same vein as the Victory Gardens during World War II. “Today, the revolution is going back to the past but doing it with the knowledge we have in the future,” Montgomery said. “We know so much today about what it takes to grow good healthy food. It’s not Monsanto and the big Agriculture. They paint a pretty picture, but they’re part of the problem.” In Montgomery’s vision, organizations such as Harbor Farms and Make a Green Noise, a nonprofit organization Random Lengths News profiled this past December, are the kind of people who are on the front lines of this war for access to quality affordable food, and doing so by converting existing food deserts into food forests. “Every community could have a food forest,” Montgomery explained. “They all could be Food Revolution/ to p. 25

Doctors Getting Stiffed on Insurance Payments Internal Dispute Between PMA and ILWU Leaves Millions in Unpaid Bills By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

“It’s not fun,” the doctor said. “If you don’t get paid, you don’t get paid.” He said he hasn’t been paid since November 2012. He noted that he still has overhead of rent, utilities and payroll. “They are starting to pay, but they are way behind,” the doctor continued. “The worst part is that no one can answer questions.” Lina explained that previously, the health care benefits of longshore workers were so generous that policy holders were able to cover people that were not even in their immediate family, including cousins and girlfriends. Apparently, those days are over. Lina said Blue Shield has been requiring policyholders to fill out lengthy forms designed to get as much personal information as possible to make sure the policy holder only gets the benefits to which they are entitled. According to the ILWU Memorandum of Understanding with the Pacific Maritime Association signed in 2008, the Joint Trustees, consisting of representatives from the union and the PMA, were to instruct the Plan Consultant to issue a request for proposals for a third party administrative management of their claims office to replace Cigna, their long time insurance administrator. Random Lengths News contacted the PMA, but they refused to comment for this story. Random Lengths also asked Benefits Specialist John Constanho at the ILWU Local 10, to explain the situation, but said he didn’t have permission to speak on the issue. The Joint Trustees of the benefit plan, half of whom are ILWU and half from the PMA, were supposed to have instructed the plan consultant in 2010 to conduct a feasibility study of transferring the claims office from a third party provider to an in-house administration, but given the fact the PMA and the union are remaining mum on the subject. It’s not even clear that the study even took place and its recommendations acted upon. However, one source from the ILWU explained that the choice to choose Zenith was a decision by the PMA that was contested by the ILWU and was settled in arbitration against the union’s proposal to use another company. “Under a PPO, you can go to any provider,” the doctor explained. “But if a patient doesn’t go to a provider on the Blue Shield preferred list,

The worst of it is that when Blue Shield/ Zenith sends the check to the patients, they include the doctor’s tax identification number on it. Creating a situation where the doctors have to pay the taxes on money they may never have received. At least one doctor placed the blame squarely on the PMA, explaining that the employers forced the insurance provider onto the ILWU. “The PMA just did it and they went from the best to the worst in the matter of months.” The PMA didn’t have anything to say for itself and the union remained tight-lipped about the situation.

Preemptive Protest

Members of the Harbor Chapter of Witness for Peace Southwest, defending the sovereignty of Venezuela in front of the Pacific Heights Air Force Base in San Pedro. The group calls for a U.S. foreign policy based on cooperation and respect, not on aggression and militarism. Photo Courtesy of Rachel Brunkhe of Witness for Peace Southwest

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Health care providers in San Pedro have been getting pinched by what’s long been considered the gold standard of health insurance since October 2012. The pinch is a result of changes in the ILWU’s health insurance provider—changes that appear to result from actions by employers and enforced by labor arbitration. But information about what’s going on is difficult to obtain. Local health professionals say the impact has been hospital-, medical facility- and healing centerwide. These sources say entire medical practices have been affected, and medical professionals such as massage therapists, acupuncturists and other contractors have either seen their hours cut back or were laid off altogether. “I’m in trouble,” acupuncturist James Ko said. “We have not gotten any payments from October to January. By January, a lot of our claims were rejected.” Ko explained that 60 percent of his clients have ILWU insurance benefits. “I leave messages. I got two return phone calls for two claims, but I didn’t get much help on them [the two claims]. Business has gone downward sharply,” Ko said. Dr. Lina Jia, she’s known as Dr. Lina, says it’s gotten pretty bad. She has one massage therapist that she has to pay out of pocket because of the problems with the ILWU’s insurance benefits. Lina said only $1,200 in claims have been paid since March, a significant drop from the $150,000 her practice brings in a typical month. Lina has been getting by on her savings since November 2012, but doesn’t know how much longer she can hold on. “What are my options?” she asked, rhetorically. “I could get a business loan, close my office and close my business. I can’t sleep and I’ve been getting headaches because of the stress.... It’s even causing me to have high blood pressure.” The most galling thing is that when they file claims with the insurance, they are made to wait on the phone for an hour before being told that either the claim has been rejected or that the claim was not in the computer. One local health care provider, who asked to remain anonymous, says the problem isn’t Blue Shield, but rather a third party, Zenith, who actually pays the claims.

they send disbursement checks intended to cover the medical bills directly to the patient—checks that often come in $2, $10 and even $30,000 denominations.…Can you imagine a patient going back to the doctor after receiving that kind of money? “Policies stay active 5 to 10 years before we get to the worst policies.” He noted that it is statically proven that patients are less likely to stick with a health provider if insurance providers give the health care payments directly to them [the patient]. “They will just go for a check up only if they absolutely need to,” he explained.

Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements

April 19 - May 2, 2013

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San Pedro Still On the Verge Discovering the Secret Assets By James Preston Allen, Publisher

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

I have lived in this seaport community for 40 years now and I’m still discovering secrets in this close-knit town, secrets that even some of the long-time residents don’t know or understand. Situated as we are on the edge of Los Angeles, home to the largest seaport in North America, you can see the giant cargo cranes perched like huge praying mantises lifting cans from the giant cargo ships that haul 42 percent of all the imports into this country. Looking southward toward the silhouette of Catalina Island, the Pacific Ocean is not directly west of the mainland. And the town of San Pedro acts as the political anchor to the 15 District, with some hardly recognizing that this, and Wilmington, were annexed at a key point in the expansion of Los Angeles—just one year before Hollywood was annexed and six years before a vast expanse of the San Fernando Valley was added. Some of the residents here have never had the good fortune to traverse the 26 miles to the heart of downtown Los Angeles to the actual City Hall, but instead partaking in the centralized sporting or cultural events there. I’m thinking of Dodger Stadium, the Coliseum, LA Live, MOCA or the Los Angeles Zoo. It is our distance from all of this that separates and keeps this place near the Harbor different, isolated and at times irrelevant to the rest of the City. This distance makes us distinctly separate from the glitz and hype of Hollywood and the Westside and disconnected from the politics surrounding City Hall in downtown Los Angeles. We send to the Emerald City only one elected council member, a handful of lobbyists, and a few community activists, like a colony sends “ambassadors” to the seat of the empire. And, over the course of many decades, the relationship between us and this empire’s largest armature—the Los Angeles Harbor Department—has been both contentious and hostile. This tension between port control of the tidelands and the community has only recently subsided into a kind of “environmental truce” emanating from the China Shipping terminal lawsuit and the mitigation funds derived from this and other negotiations and legal judgments. Some have called this the “end of the 100 Year War.” But some remain skeptical. The erection of the Vincent Thomas Bridge to Terminal Island in 1963, heralded the modern era of this community with both the promise and scourge of all things new. The

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old ferry to Terminal Island was made obsolete and urban renewal in the 1970s demolished most of old Beacon Street. But with the bridge came the final freeway link to the rest of Los Angeles and then the containerization of shipping that emanates via these arteries boosted both volume and traffic. Only later, in the 1980s was the scourge of modernization made clearer to locals with the closure of the Todd Shipyard and most of the tuna canneries. The unspoken secret of this era is that through “free trade” treaties and overseas competition, some 35,000 blue collar jobs were lost in the Harbor Area. Some still lament the shipyard closure and many more still reminisce about the days when their mothers, brother and others worked in the canneries. You could tell they were working when the smell of tuna quaffed in the breeze. The local job market has never fully recovered. It took nearly four decades for both the City of Los Angeles and local business leaders to recognize the mistake of urban renewal and even then, there was not much political will to change direction. It was only with the election of Mayor James Hahn and his sister Janice to city council, and the forced concession of the Port of Los Angeles legal decree that environmental concerns trumped economic trade imperatives. The first leg of the “Bridge to Breakwater” promenade was built and promises of more “community friendly” developments on the west side of the Main Channel were discussed. It seemed that not unlike the early 1970s, San Pedro was on the verge of being discovered, again. One of the other secrets about this town is that it has been “discovered” by a succession of people over the course of its history. The first of these discoverers was Juan Cabrillo, who anchored off the beach that bears his name. Even then, I’m sure that the locals looked upon “being discovered” with both joy and concern over what this meant for their future. Since the time I first discovered San Pedro, I have come to realize that people here still embrace “discoverers” who come here to build, develop or modernize the same way—with uncertain antipathy and glee. What this commentary may add to or subtract from the current exuberance surrounding the development of the next leg of San Pedro’s Waterfront at the Ports O’ Call Village may be just as uncertain and may be debated well into the next decade. What I can say for certain is that if the LA Waterfront Alliance does not address the critical issues of reconnecting the waterfront Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 8

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communi- Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila ties of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

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to the community and respecting the architectural and aesthetic cultural history of this place; and if the Port of Los Angeles does not address key transportation and parking issues that integrates what’s left of the historic downtown arts district, the damage they cause could be greater than any

economic revival they promise. Any competent architect or urban planner knows the value of context and siting of a planned development. My advice is to listen to the history of this place and be careful of the secrets that it holds.

Nailing Shut the Doors of San Pedro Courthouse By Judge Pete Mirich

The doors of the San Pedro Court will be permanently locked on June 14 in the wake of an $85 million budget shortfall and four consecutive years of budget slashing endured by the Los Angeles Superior Court. It represents another chapter of nearly 20 California courthouse closures forced by more than $1.2 billion of state funding cuts to the judicial branch. The community “court” conducts business at two San Pedro locations (both closing)—the Beacon Street court with one department and the main courthouse with four departments located in San Pedro’s business district between 5th and 6th streets. The termination of the community’s local forum for rendering decisions in a fair and impartial manner, while adhering to the guiding principles of the state and federal constitutions, is something that should distress anyone concerned with equal and open access to justice. Seven years ago, San Pedro’s criminal caseload was transferred to the Long Beach Courthouse, forcing victims, witnesses and Harbor Division police officers to travel to

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that location for court hearings. Under the new realignment plans, Harbor Area residents will now be travelling to Long Beach for traffic citations and landlord-tenant cases, Downey for small claims, Norwalk for collections, and downtown Los Angeles for personal injury and probate cases. Local lore has it that at the time San Pedro was annexed to the City of Los Angeles, a promise was made that San Pedro residents would always have a community court where citizens could look for justice and wrongs-to-berighted. This most likely traces back to a special election in 1909 when an overwhelming number of voters from San Pedro (726 in favor and 227 against) and Los Angeles (11,587 in favor of and 109 against) cast ballots in favor of the merging the two cities. At that time, the Los Angeles City Council ratified a consolidation committee’s recommendations, which included establishing a police court to “protect the interests of said portion of the consolidated city.” The inauguration of the Beacon Street Nailed Shut/ to p. 10

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

RANDOMLetters Letter to POTUS

Dear Mr. President I’m from San Pedro, California. I am aware of your administration that has interest in the mental health field. Years ago I was diagnosed with bipolar and I’ve had a lot of problems getting the right help and help and the right medication trying to find the right levels. I finally got the help I needed through Providence Little Co. of Mary San Pedro Hospital with the psychiatrists getting the right diagnosis. Through San Pedro Mental Health Clinic my psychiatrist there working with the hospital, even though they are separate entities. I am thankful that they saved my life and saved my sanity. I judge that by my relationship with my and my family and my strongest faith in God. Richard Joseph Tribbetts San Pedro

A recent news item reported that, if Wendy Greuel is elected Mayor of Los Angeles, she’ll hire Dick Riordan as a her senior budget advisor. That decision was made, no doubt, to get Greuel a few votes. But if Angelenos remember the mess Riordan made when he was boss at City Hall, they may not

I agree with you about reading the Art of War and being careful with N. Korea—what else can we do but wait until he strikes us? This continuous threat has to be dealt with and the longer we wait, that nutball Kim will be empowered with even more nukes. Anyway, I know this may seem odd to you but again, I have to agree with you about the leveraging of L.A.’s transit money and creating a rail line to the Port. It would be perfect use of capital for all of L.A.—and especially San Pedro and hard pressed Wilmington. But, when and if this does indeed happen, I would be tempted to again live down south and struggle with all the excess traffic and L.A.’s ugliness. I still care a bit about S.P., but I’m not holding my breath however. And BTW, I do still read RLN if though I now happily live up here. I read RLN, knowing it’s a good read with honest, pragmatic intent and a special community spirit. 70 years there was enough. Just FYI—We are living in the smallest navigable harbor in the world—Depoe Bay a tiny fishing and whale watching town. Attached are a few photos of Depoe Bay. One of which, I shot on top of the small bridge to the entrance of our harbor. If you’re ever up this way (on the Central Oregon Coast), let me know and I’ll show you around and buy you breakfast. Dress warm. Richard Pawlowski Depoe Bay, Ore.

The funding has been slashed for the marine biology program I teach at Pierce College. This is a one-of-a kind field study program I developed over the past 30 years. I have indications that this may be short-term and funding will be partially restored next year, but at present the program is severely affected. The first class scheduled to be cut is the summer course to Bahia de los Angeles, in the Gulf of California, unless I can raise enough funds to save it. It is the culminating course and most valued by students. I have taught it for 26 consecutive years. Many of my students have been planning and saving for a year or more for this experience. I am committed to raise $10,000 over the next two months. Raymond A. Wells, Ph.D. San Pedro Professor of Biology Pierce College Marine Science Program

there are some who still don’t get the idea of tolerance. If this were Facebook he would surely be “unfriended” immediately. If he were to use this language in a courtroom, he would be held in contempt—which is how I personally hold him. And, if he were to speak this way in a public meeting, the microphone would be turned off. So Mr. Unvert, you neanderthal blow-hard, we actually have printed your less offensive rants before, but now I’ve let you have your nasty racist rant published and we have outed you for what you are. Just don’t make a habit of More Letters/ to p. 23

Words From an Incoherent, Cowardly Bigot

Yes—ALLAN [sic] YOU ASS-HOLES, I support you when you stop trying to make the harbor area community like a mexical shit-hole Tiajuana [sic] North--------------- )-:) “…whose money is it anyway?” [Publisher’s note: I think he’s referring to my last editorial] yes, it’s based on trust, and WS and the JEW bankers are fucking us over, so why aren’t you pushing for the reinstatement of the Glass-Steagall financial bill that was instituted during the great depression by FDR, that the thief and moron Clinton did away with, that caused the financial meltdown of 2008?

Do you want to do a national service, lets hear from you on this issue—you morons— You speek [sic] of free speech but you ass-holes will not publish my comments—lets see if you have any balls? Richard [who cowardly goes by the pseudonym Smith and resides in San Pedro, rather than Long Beach] Dear Readers, I realize that more than a few of you will be as offended by this bigoted letter, as we are. But we reprint it here for the sake of free expression and to let you know that

April 19 - May 2, 2013

OMG! Boss Riordan May Be Coming Back to City Hall

On the Money

Biology Program in Peril

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Mr. Tribbets received a response from the White House, signed by President Barack Obama. The letter read: “Thank you for writing to me. I have heard from many Americans whose lives have been affected by mental health issues, and I appreciate your perspective. The needs of people with mental illnesses have gone unaddressed for far too long. Since the first White House Conference on Mental Health over a decade ago, doctors and researchers have made extraordinary progress in diagnosing and treating mental illnesses, and promoting mental health. Yet, many families still lack access to the treatments and community resources needed to help their loved ones recover. As a longtime supporter of mental health parity, I recognize that we must do more to improve services for individuals and families. My administration has coordinated health forums around the country, bringing together citizens, health care professionals, and elected officials to discuss solutions for better care. We have also taken an important step by funding biomedical and behavioral research grants at the National Institute of Mental Health. People living with mental health illnesses, community organizations, as well as health and social service agencies can work collaboratively to better understand, diagnose and treat these illnesses. Together we must overcome the fear.…For more information on mental health assistance and health care reform, visit www.MentalHealth.gov or www.HealthCare.gov.”

want him back! While he was still campaigning to become Mayor, Riordan was already plotting to subject the City’s civil service system to a radical make-over. His plan was to eliminate the Board of Civil Service Commissioners, and to turn the system into a collection of separate departments, accountable only to him. As Mayor, Riordan moved quickly to implement his plan. He convinced the Civil Service Commissioners he’d appointed to follow him, ignore the Charter. He persuaded them they had no power to enforce the civil service rules— no duty to oversee the civil service system. He turned the Commission into an appeals body. For 7 years, Riordan worked— behind closed doors—to put this New Paradigm in place. He empowered Department Managers and told them they would not be expected to follow “every inefficient procedural safeguard.” Moreover, he let them know they would no longer be subject to Commission oversight. The new City Charter became effective on July 1, 2000. But as Boss of the City, Riordan rejected the civil service provisions in that Charter. He decided for four million Angelenos, that the whole City would pretend those provisions don’t exist. Samuel Sperling Monterey Park

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from p. 8

Nailed Shut

Courtroom occurred in 1928 after a dedication ceremony where the grand officers of the Native Sons of the Golden West cemented the cornerstone into San Pedro’s new City Hall building. Department 88C now occupies that space on the building’s 6th floor, just below “Seventh Heaven,” which housed the city’s jail (the reason for the distinctive bars which surround the building’s top floor). The other four departments of the community courthouse are in a building on a site which was approved in 1963, in accordance with the recommendation of the Harbor Area Courthouse Site Selection Committee and upon order of the Board of Supervisors. The courthouse structure, nearly 50 years old, was dedicated in 1969 during an aggressive building phase of capital building projects initiating from state legislation. An Executive Officer’s Report from 1965 memorialized the context, which informed the decision giving San Pedro a municipal courthouse: “As the result of the work of a metropolitan trial courts survey, a three-year study conducted by the county, and the efforts of the Court’s branch courts committee, state legislation was enacted in 1959 providing for a redistricting of the entire county…. It looked toward the establishment of a system of multi-judge district courts strategically located to serve all the residents of the county efficiently and conveniently.”

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Thus, it is clear that the San Pedro courthouse was originally part of a movement to assure that justice was available at a local level.

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Blaming courtroom closures on the current state budgetary crisis is a simple enough answer. However, discerning historical trends affecting the courts’ development provides a better understanding of the demise of the San Pedro Courthouse. California’s population growth has placed enormous strain upon the court system. In the 50-year span from 1950 to 2000, California’s population grew from 10 million to more than 34 million inhabitants. The combined superior and appellate court filings for the year 2000 totaled 8,649,552. It is only through modern technology that the courts have been able to keep up with the demand for its services. Some technological advances include computerization (to facilitate case management, calendaring, jury management, recordkeeping, exhibit tracking and statistics gathering), using kiosks to pay traffic tickets, video recording of proceedings and establishing e-mail and electronic data inter-agency exchange systems such as between the court and the Department of Motor Vehicles. It was important to find new ways of dealing with issues in the context of a judicial system that continued to face a burgeoning population and that was becoming increasingly complex. Thus, by the year 2000, the structure of the trial court became “simplified’ through the adoption of an amendment to the state constitution that provided for what is known as “court unification.” Statewide unification of the judicial system occurred in order to yield efficiencies associated with a single payroll system, a single computer system, uniform rules and the sharing of cases among judicial districts in the same county in order to eliminate the “overloading” of certain courts while others had spare time to take on additional cases.

Unification resulted in the merger of the previous variety of trial courts into a single-level system called the “Superior Court of the State of California.” Before unification, the San Pedro Courthouse was a branch location of the Los Angeles Municipal Court Judicial District and the courthouse was owned by the County of Los Angeles. After unification, the court was absorbed by the Superior Court of the State of California and the building was transferred to the state. On a statewide level, after unification the Superior Court included 440 court locations and 1,980 bench officers (1,579 judges and 401 commissioners or referees). Nevertheless, by maintaining community and neighborhood courthouses, the Superior Court of Los Angeles County could still boast that it was the largest neighborhood court in the nation. Larry Stirling, one of the legislative architects of the unification plan, who also served as a municipal and superior court judge, said it was anticipated that unification would result in reduced court bureaucracies. Although significant savings and efficiencies were initially realized, after unification another centralized bureaucracy, The Administrative Office of the Courts, continued to expand and now has as many highly-paid employees as there are judges. Stirling, expressing the same sentiment of many other bench officers, advocates significant legislative downsizing to the AOC and re-directing its funds to the local courts. For the present, however, in order to operate

within the budgetary restrictions, the Los Angeles Superior Court is closing 10 courthouses, laying off a massive number of employees and regionalizing cases. Indeed, justice is being squeezed. In order for society to maintain faith in the judicial process, citizens expect that those who wear the black robe and who are given authority to render decrees affecting lives and liberty will be accessible. However hard judges may strive to follow the laws enacted by legislators (or the public through the initiative process) and make efforts to be fair and impartial while following Constitutional due process and equal protection mandates, society suffers when justice becomes inaccessible. Unfortunately, the residents of San Pedro, Wilmington and Harbor City who have been served for so many years by a community courthouse will learn this firsthand along with residents of other smaller communities throughout the state. This will be the case especially for those who must rely upon public transportation and who do not have the funds to seek outside dispute resolution services. Fines and fees will increase with long lines in court clerk offices, the impact of which will fall most heavily upon those who can least afford it. At this point, it is the state legislature holding the hammer and determining the number and depth of the nails which are being driven into courthouse doors. Judge Mirich was elected to office in 1988 from a field of 17 candidates. He is a San Pedro native and has presided over cases at the San Pedro Courthouse for the past 24 years.

Struck by the Wonder, Beauty of Yosemite Valley By Cory Hooker, Editorial Intern Yosemite Valley is one of the most recognizable natural monuments in the world. One of few memories I can vividly remember as a child is Tunnel View, the first and one of the most popular scenic points in the park. I was about 4 years-old when my family first brought me there. It absolutely blows away any man made structure and forms itself into what I like to call a natural cathedral, which is proper considering the 6- to 7-hour “pilgrimage” it takes to get there. This past month I was able to visit again, and once more it left me speechless. Snow was still prevalent in the higher altitudes but on the valley floor there was very little snow. Looking at pictures years back, you could see how beautiful the snow seems to accent the land and trees of the valley. But now, Yosemite’s snow is melting more quickly every year. This is the same snow that runs through Yosemite Falls, the tallest waterfall in North America. So, in years when there is little snow in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, Yosemite Falls can dry up by the late summer. With the decrease in snowfall and increase in the actual melting process the falls might begin to dry up more quickly than ever. Many Californians don’t recognize that the Yosemite Valley was actually carved by glaciers. Now, with the threat posed by global warming, its ill effects on the state—drought and the destruction of a natural wonder—have become more apparent. The giant rock structures Yosemite is famous for, began to form about 114 million years ago. They were cut and carved by the slow-moving glaciers. A recent study published by scientists from both the National Park Service and the University

of Colorado concluded that Lyell Glacier, the largest glacier in Yosemite National Park, has become stagnant and is diminishing at a rapid rate. Nestled about 12,000 feet high in Sierra Nevada mountains, Lyell Glacier is one of the largest out of California’s 130 glaciers. It was first discovered by Sierra Nevada pioneer John Muir in 1871. The Lyell Glacier stands atop of the Tuolumne River, which leads straight to the Hetch Hetchy reservoir, one of the largest sources of San Francisco’s drinking water and power. Along with California’s glaciers, snowpacks are also expected to diminish by as much as 90 percent this century. Snowpacks account for about one-third of California’s water supply. Los Angeles alone receives about 430 million gallons per day from the Owens Rivers, which runs directly through the Sierra Nevada range. With major drought issues in California already, it seems that it can only be getting worse as the temperature increases. Farmers will have to endure a longer drought than ever before, maybe one that will not end. So, this means not only is our water at stake, but our produce and the well being of farmers. It seems to be much too late to stop the eventual evaporation of California’s glaciers. Instead of dwelling on it, humans should become more motivated about doing something to slow down the process of climate change through lifestyle changes, legislation and innovation. I don’t think I have seen the same Yosemite Valley that John Muir explored, but I do believe that my niece and nephew, and their children, should be able to experience a strong enough semblance of the Yosemite that I experienced as a child.

Brothers On The Line Tells Labor history At LAHIFF by: Cory Hooker, Editorial Intern

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ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment ACE • Art, Culture, & Entertainment

hen Sasha Reuther decided to make a documentary about the United Auto Workers’ early struggles, he didn’t know if there would be an auto industry at its completion. “I didn’t know it was going to be so timely,” said Sasha, grandson of Victor Reuther, a powerful UAW figure. “We began making the film in 2007 and that was when we didn’t know if we were going to have an American auto industry anymore. The question was, ‘Is anyone going to care about the UAW when I finally finish the film?’” Since then, the percentage of Americans that belong to a union has hit its lowest point in nearly a century. In 2012, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that union membership in America was at 11.3 percent. By age, the rate was highest among workers 55 to 64 (14.9 percent) and lowest within ages 16 to 24 (4.2 percent). The documentary aims to give a brief but vital history lesson, a lesson that has vanished from our history books. Sasha believes that some grassroots activist groups are the key to increasing interest in labor studies. “We’re so fortunate, from the film’s perspective, that activists rose up in Wisconsin, there was the Occupy movement and now Michigan is a right to work state, which is surprising,” Sasha said. “All of these things have contributed to activists and the general public being curious and excited about labor studies. About how do we get in this position, where do we pick up the pieces? Where are the positive worker stories?” The story I’m telling is a very positive story of how a big piece of the middle-class was built by the UAW.” UAW Continued on page 17.

April 19 – May 2, 2013 April 19 – May 2, 2013

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Big Nick’s Pizza

Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

April 19 – May 2, 2013

Earth Day Special Edition.

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

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Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also offers classic Italian dishes and sauces based on tried-and-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com Catalina Bistro & Express Grill With the soaring span of the Vincent T h o m a s Bridge above and bustling vessel traffic on the Main Channel alongside, the Catalina Bistro and Express Grill in the new Catalina Express terminal is the most exciting place to dine in the Harbor. The Grill is a wonderful surprise for a quick bite or coffee for locals and travelers. The Bistro and adjacent bar make the new Catalina Terminal the place to go for casual dining and drinks on the heated patio. From 1/3lb angus burgers, homemade soups and clam chowder on Fridays you can’t go wrong. Join us for breakfast and lunch daily and dinners on Friday & Saturday nights. Catalina Sea & Air Terminal, Berth 95, San Pedro 310-707-2440

Iron City Tavern

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfor table gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766 Lighthouse Cafe

The favorite local cafe for the point Fermin area of San Pedro great breakfasts, lunches and even dinner. Serving traditional offering for breakfast along with specialty omelets, espresso and cappuccino. Lunches include a delicious selection of soups, salads, burgers and sandwiches with hearty portions as well as Chef’s Creations. Dinners feature Top Sirloin Steak or Prime Rib as well as a kids menu. Beer and wine are served. Free Wifi and is pet friendly on the patio. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. close to Cabrillo Beach and the Korean Bell, Point Fermin area- 508 West 39th St., San Pedro. 310- 548- 3354 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash, soups and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crépes and pastas. Take a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com Nazelie’s Lebanese Cuisine

Nazelie’s Lebanese Cuisine is a favorite of the neighborhood for the terrific kabobs, beef or chicken shawarma, lamb dishes and falafel. Nazelie’s chicken and rice soup with lemon is like a warm embrace—it takes chicken soup to a whole new level. Nazelie uses a recipe handed down in her family for generations, starting with homemade chicken broth, and adding a refreshing touch of lemon for taste and nutrients. Nazelie’s Lebanese Café, 1919 S.Pacific Avenue, San Pedro. (310) 519-9122.

PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING Since 1961 we’ve extended a hearty welcome to visitors from ever y corner of the globe. Delight in an aweinspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the AwardWinning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www. Portsocalldining.com San Pedro Brewing Company A microbrewery and American grill, SPBC features hand-crafted award-winning ales and lagers served with creative pastas, bbq, sandwiches, salads and burgers. A full bar with made-fromscratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Live music on Saturdays. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 • www.sanpedrobrewing.com SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 • www.spiritmarine.com Think Café Think Café is giving downtown San Pedro a taste of sophistication for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Located in the heart of downtown on 5th Street, Think Café is a magnet for locals and business types alike. Enjoy patio dining for a latté in the morning, soup and salad at midday, or a wonderful rendezvous in the evening, perfect for enjoying a selection from the wine list. The Café also boasts a selection of imported beers. Breakfast at the Café offers everthing from bacon and eggs to eggs Benedict, with a wide variety of dishes to awaken your taste buds. 302 W. 5th St. Suite 105, San Pedro • (310) 519-3662

Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfor table dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, meat pies, salmon, swordfish & vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-0363 • www. whaleandale.com San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure

2013 Edition

Coming Soon!

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

• Happy Hour • Baramee Thai Restaurant • $2 beers, $4 appetizers and wine & sake specials. (310) 521-9400, 354 W. 6th St., San Pedro Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 5198200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro Godmother’s Saloon • (310) 8331589, 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766

Ports o’ Call • Happy Hour: Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. Live jazz from Mike Guerrero Trio every Wed. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour: 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 831-5663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Trusela’s • Happy Hour: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Tues. to Sat. (310) 547-0993, 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

Petal Panache A Feast for the Eyes and Palate Column and Photo by: Lori Lynn Hirsch Stokoe, Guest Columnest

Edible flowers are so darn pretty.

It is easy to use them to garnish the plate and call it good. No complaints. But cooking with edible flowers is not just about putting a pretty posy on the plate. It is about matching the flavor, texture and color so it harmonizes with the dish.

Quesadillas Florales Recipe

Continued on page 16.

April 19 – May 2, 2013

• 2 cups of corn masa flour
 (maiz selecionado y nixtamalizado) • 1/4 teaspoon of sea salt • 1-1/4 cups of water • edible flower petals • brie cheese 1. Sprinkle flour with salt. 2. Add water and mix thoroughly to form a soft dough. 3. Form masa into a ball, cover masa with damp cloth and let rest 5 minutes. 4. Roll dough between the palms to form balls about the size of a golf ball. 5. Cover masa balls with a damp cloth to keep moist. 6. Place a sheet of plastic wrap on a tortilla press. Place one ball in the center and cover with another sheet of wrap. 
Close lid and press down on lever. 7. Open lid and remove top layer of wrap. 8. Place a few edible flower petals on the tortilla in a decorative pattern. 9. Then re-cover the tortilla with plastic wrap, apply the press again to embed the petals into the dough. 10. Leave tortillas in individual wrappers until ready to cook.

ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

Savory flowers such as chive blossom and society garlic pair well with main courses and vegetables. Sweet aromatic flowers such as roses and lavender pair well with desserts. Almost all of them work in a salad. Lemon-scented geranium petals can enhance a fruit salad, while peppery nasturtiums add zip to a pasta salad with goat cheese. Striking blue borage complements any dish that has cucumber — especially Greek salad. The quesadillas florales recipe below can be paired with almost any edible flower because it is a neutral dish. In decorating the tortillas, the colors and design are most important. The addition of flowers elevates the simple cheese quesadilla to another level for entertaining. And, it’s so easy! Be sure to choose flowers that are edible and eat only in moderation. Some flowers are poisonous and others just aren’t that tasty. To be safe, grow your own edible flowers without pesticides or chemicals or purchase edible varieties in the produce section of the supermarket. Before incorporating flowers into your dish, rinse in cool fresh water then gently dry on paper towels. Some edible flowers you’ll see growing in the Harbor Area: • borage – bright blue color/ cucumber flavor • chive – pale purple/ onion flavor

• lavender – purple/ floral, pungent • nasturtium - vibrant orange/ zesty-peppery • rose – multi-colored/ aromatic • scented geranium – pink, purple, red/ flavor varies with variety • society garlic - pale purple/ savory, garlicky • squash blossom – yellow/ hint of zucchini flavor • viola – purple, white, yellow/ mild pea or lettuce flavor Thank you to all the passionate gardeners in our charming corner of Los Angeles for showering the neighborhoods with your beautiful, breathtaking and sometimes edible flowers.

13

San Pedro’s Original ArtWalk— Fine Dining • Live Music Special Performances • Food Trucks! Gallery 345

Spring Fling Works on paper, canvas, and board as well as small works, jewelry, hand knit scarves from France, and other mixt media exhibited at Gallery 345. Artists include Gloria D Lee and Pat Woolley as well as a guest artist. 345 W. 7th Street, San Pedro CA 90731 310 545 0832 or 310 374 8055 for appointments Open 1st Thursday 6-9 p. m.

The Loft Gallery

Galleries A and B: Redondo Beach Art Group—Juried Show. Runs through May 24. Open Studios: Candice Gawne, Carol Hungerford, Sam Arno, Daniel Porras, Murial Olguin, Jan Govaerts, Anne Marie Rawlinson, & Nancy Towne Schultz. 401 S. Mesa St. • 310.831.5757 • Open 6–9pm & by appt.

Richard Lopez Studio

Earth Day Special Edition.

Currently showing Spring-inspired Florals as well as Cosmic Abstracts, using sanding, glazing and dynamic color imagery. Presenting a new study of local dock workers developing from sketches into candid portraits of paint on canvas. Three existing openings of art classes for intermediate and advanced students. • Richardlopezart@gmail.com 372 7th St. • 562.370.7883 • Ralopezart.com

Michael Stearns Studio 347

April 19 – May 2, 2013

Introducing displayed works on canvas using paint with a pure, pulsating application of color and sculpture utilizing elements from nature set against newsprint cuttings and alluring images. The magnetic impressions explore the organic and mystical spirit of the world and combine robust pigments, movement and rhythm. Highlighting the opening of new pieces from local artist, Lori LaMont and her dynamic watercolors that provoke discussion and the exchange of ideas. Please join us for the First Thursday Artwalk on May 2nd from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, and an Artist’s Reception on Saturday, May 4th from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. Michael Stearns Studio 347 is located at 347 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. For further information, please visit www.michaelstearnsstudio.com or call (562) 400-0544.

14

Transvagrant and Warschaw Gallery

Flowmaster III: Recent Works by Merwin Belin, Troy Cherney, and Dave Smith Working in an offbeat, politically and socially charged manner, and exhibiting as an ensemble for the third time, each approaches their subjects with an inherent irony. Organized by Ron Linden, Flowmaster III entended through May 10. Gallery hours are Mon. – Sat., 11a.m. – 6 p.m., and by appointment. (310) 600-4873 • 600 S. Pacific Ave. San Pedro

Toulouse Engelhardt, John York: Troubadours That Have Come Full Circle by: B. Noel Barr and Melina Paris

A

ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

lvas Showroom buzzed with excitement as we waited for Toulouse Engelhardt and John York to play on April 6. Toulouse was the star of the night as the 12string master engaged us with an over-the-top performance and stories from his days on the road. John brought another side of the Americana story as one of the troubadours of the folk rock scene of the 60s. John opened the show with an amazing set of covers and original music. He allowed us to step off into a world that only existed for a brief moment in our collective conscious. John’s raspy style of singing is firm with conviction and the understanding of the gentle nuances of great songs and performance. John opened with Dylan’s “The Chimes of Freedom,” one of the several Byrds songs covered over the course of the evening. The room was spellbound as the words and melody fell like rainwashing your soul in a new morning light. “As we listened on one last time, and we watched with one last look, as we gazed upon the chimes of freedom flashing.” In a phone interview after the show, John recounted the backstory of the song “The Bells of Rhymney,” and why The Byrds would not do this song live. “The band decided they could not do this song justice live,” John explained. “What had been done in the studio was the best they could ever do with it.” Pete Seeger composed the music for this song and Welsh poet Idris Davies wrote the lyrics. At Alvas, John took on this song as a challenge

and brought it! As he played, his bass soared as it lamented the deaths resulting from a mining disaster and strike. John was an established bassist and guitarist before the Byrds, and he continued on long after the Byrds. Even now, he tours with The Trio, a duo with Barry McGuire, and sometimes does solo performances in concert with Toulouse Engelhardt. The Byrds, like many bands, have gone through personnel changes over the course of the group’s history. John hooked up with the band when bassist Chris Hillman left to start the more bluegrass oriented Flying Burrito Brothers. He believes Byrds guitarist, Clarence White, was the one that got him in. “I had done some gigs with Clarence White and Gene Clark,” John explained. “I had been playing bass for The Mamas and Papas and the drummer was Eddie Hoh. When Gene Clark had some gigs at the Whiskey, he hired Eddie to play drums. I would imagine Gene asked, ‘what about a bass?’ When Chris left The Byrds, I’m thinking that it must have been Clarence who said he knew a guy who plays the bass, but it’s never been verified.” John only was with the Byrds from 1968 to 1969. But in that brief stint he co-wrote songs on the albums, Dr. Byrds and Mr. Hyde and The Ballad of Easy Rider. He also performed on Bob Dylan’s non-album single “Lay Lady Lay.” And that’s not to forget he also performed on the cut, Live at The Fillmore in 1969. Before he joined the Byrds, John was in the Bees and The Sir Douglas Quintet. With The Sir Douglas Quintet in 1966, John played on Continued on page 19.

April 19 – May 2, 2013

15

Entertainment

Continued from page 13.

Petal Panache

April 19

Hot Rod Hits (Beat Theatre Vol 3) Join the Grand Prix edition of Beat Theatre, from 7 to 10 p.m. April 19, at the Cultural Alliance of Long Beach. There is a $5 cover. Details: http://scabsallover.bandcamp.com/ Venue: Cultural Alliance of Long Beach Location: 727 Pine Ave., Long Beach

April 26

Motown Comedy SLAMM The Motown Comedy SLAMM will be held at the Alpine Village on April 26, at 7:30 p.m. The Comedy SLAMM, is also hosting the John Gibson CD Release Party and Singles Dance. Details: (323) 321-5660 Venue: Alpine Village Location: 833 W. Torrance Blvd., Torrance

April 27

Aquanet Celebrate a time in music that you’ll never forget, starting at 4 p.m. April 27, at Club Ripples in Long Beach. You show me a man who doesn’t enjoy a good themed party and I’ll show you the bold face of a liar! Details: (562) 433-0357; www.clubripples.com Venue: Club Ripples Location: 5101 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach Tim Weisberg and Friends Tim Weisberg and his band will be performing at Alvas Showroom on April 27, at 7:30 p.m. Sounds from the band include: flute, guitar, bass, drums, percussion and keys. Tim specializes in the combination of Jazz and Rock genres of music. Tickets will cost you $25. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alva’s Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

May 3

Earth Day Special Edition.

Frictional Alvas Showroom will host the band Frictional on May 3, at 8 p.m. Frictional plays music that combines elements of punk, jazz, blues and fusion. The band will be creating music using the guitar, baritone ukulele, tenor guitar, bass, drums and vibe. Tickets will cost $20 to this event. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alva’s Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

April 28

How To Land Your Prince Like Kate Middleton Hosted by Emmy Award winning, best selling author Dr. Carole Lieberman, The Queen Mary, is pleased to announce a celebration of the second anniversary of Prince William and Kate Middleton. The one night event is the second in the series of special engagements held in the historic ship’s Diana: Legacy of a Princess exhibit and Tea Room. An indulgent selection of sweet and savory treats will be served with tea as Dr. Lieberman presents her sought after advice on how good girls can use bad girl tactics to land their very own prince. 7–9 p.m. Details: www.queenmary.com Venue: The Queen Mary Location: 1126 Queens Hwy, Long Beach

Community/Family

April 19 – May 2, 2013

April 20

American Indian Pow Wow California State University, Dominguez Hills, will host a Native American Pow Wow from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The Native American Pow Wow is a social and sacred gathering of Native American tribes. The Dominguez Pow Wow will feature exhibitions of the traditional songs and dances, singing, drumming and flute music. This year’s theme will be aimed toward honoring Native American victims of violent crimes. This event is open to the public, but families are requested of them to bring their own chairs. Details: (310) 243-2438; www.csudh.edu/csl Venue: Cal State Dominguez Hills University Location: 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

Earth Day Fair and Coastal Bird Fest Join the 43rd annual Earth Day Celebration of our Ocean Planet, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 20, at Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro. 16 Calendar continues on page 17.

11. Heat an ungreased skillet or comal over medium-high heat, add tortilla to the pan and cook about 50 seconds on each side. 12. Keep tortillas florales warm between folds of cloth napkins. 13. Heat plain tortillas for the bottom of the quesadilla, top with slices of brie cheese. 14. When brie starts to melt, top with a decorated tortilla. 15. Slice into quarters. Lori Lynn Hirsch Stokoe blogs about food and entertaining at “Taste With The Eyes.” www. tastewiththeeyes.com. Add more to your dish at http://tinyurl/rln-entree

UAW

any younger!” So, long story short, I shelved the other projects that I was considering and began to piece together a team and funding to pursue what would become Brothers On The Line.” Documentaries such as this one show us how incredibly important this labor movement was for the middle class and the struggles they endured in achieving their status. It leaves you asking the same questions that Sasha asks: “Why doesn’t my generation know anything about this story? My grandfather is telling pieces of American history that are so important for us, why has labor been really washed out of the history books? Why are we getting little bits and pieces of the Civil Rights movement and all the amazing things that Dr. King did, but alongside him were these amazing labor activists that we really don’t get to learn about in typical high school history books. It’s about time this story is unearthed.” --Brothers on the Line screens locally May 5, DocSunday, at the Warner Grand Theater as part of the Los Angeles Harbor International Film Festival. From May 2 to 5 the Los Angeles Harbor International Film Festival will be screening movies and documentaries. Tickets are available at Williams’ Book Store and www. brownpapertickets.com.

Calendar continued from page 16. Participation options include joining the beach clean up, grunion egg hatching, guided walks to the salt marsh and more. Between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. stop by the auditorium and exhibitor booths to view presentations throughout the day and see what people are doing to help care for the earth. Listen to musicians sharing about the ocean through songs. Learn about our coastal environment and take part in our salt marsh open house, habitat walks, coastal bird walks and bird lectures from experts in the field. Educate yourself about daily choices we can make to protect our planet. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro PVPLC Earth Day Celebration Families enjoy this volunteer day beautifying a native plant demonstration garden and trails, taking a guided nature walk, and creating art taught by Art At Your Fingertips, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. April 20 at the White Point Nature Preserve. The event is free and open to the public. Details: (310) 541-7613; www.pvplc.org Venue: White Point Nature Preserve Location: 1600 W. Paseo del Mar, San Pedro

April 24

Alaska Back Country Adventure The Sierra Club hosts the Alaska Back Country Adventure on April 24, at 7 p.m. Wilderness outings expert Ron Henke, takes you on a trip to the rarely visited Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This will include lots of information for people who are interested in doing trips on their own without spending a fortune. Details: (310) 383-5247 Venue: Palos Verdes Library Community Room Location: 701 Silver Spur Rd., Rancho Palos Verdes Senior Capstone: Project Showcase The Marymount College seniors, presents Senior Capstone: Project Showcase on April 24, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Seniors will present a series of short lectures on their Capstone Research Project, which is a project that seniors undertake to demonstrate their comprehension of a specific area of interest and the ability to apply what they have learned in class to the real world. Details: (310) 303-7223; www.marymountpv.edu Venue: Marymount Waterfront Campus Location: 222 W. 6th St., San Pedro Wild Birds Unlimited Join expert birder Bob Shanman of Wild Birds Unlimited for a guided bird walk, starting at 8:30 p.m. April 24 at the George F Canyon Nature Preserve in Rancho Palos Verdes. The walk is free Calendar continues on page 19.

A rare evening of both acoustic & electric blues with master blues guitarist Bernie Pearl, founder of the original Long Beach Blues Festival and original host of “Nothing But the Blues.” Mike Barry will be on bass with Albert Trepagnier on drums.

50% 15% Off Any 8

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April 26 • 8:00 PM

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1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro, CA www.AlvasShowroom.com

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for College Students, Union Members, Veterans, and SSI Patients. Must Present RLn Coupon and valid ID.

April 19 – May 2, 2013

www.brownpapertickets.com/event/349867

ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

Major corporations have contributed to declining union member numbers purely out of financial gain. Many red states have also passed anti-union laws, which aim to, not only provide corporations larger profits, but also to weaken one of the Democrats’ biggest financial contributors: unions. Sasha’s is really trying to prove in the documentary that both corporations and unions can work together in unison. “This is not a story about a money hungry union that is out there to squeeze big business, but it shows a perfect example of how there can be harmony,” Sasha said. “The film is often embraced by unions across the board and I think that the longshoreman’s union will be equally excited about the film because it speaks to a high in unions, when unions were really on top of their game. “The story itself is much bigger than the UAW. Sure, it is mainly their history but it’s a time in our American history, where it’s really obvious that when labor was doing well, when unions were strong and powerful, our economy was doing well and our country was very successful.” The film features a vast amount of archived footage and interviews documenting the struggles of the UAW. A large amount of footage, including clips from the 1930s recorded by the UAW’s press department. “They believed in covering their own story,” Sasha said. “They didn’t really wait for the typical news media to tell what the union was doing. They had their own photographers and journalist. I didn’t know at the time when I began research on the film that they had their own 16 mm camera men that were documenting what they were doing. So, many of the strike line conflicts, some of the negations and then eventually meetings with dignitaries like Martin Luther King Jr. and presidents were really documented by UAW cameras. The really cool thing about this film is a lot of this footage has never been seen or used

before.” Sasha was able to gain access to the rare UAW footage thanks to the Walter Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs, which houses the largest labor archive in the country, located at Wayne State University in Detroit. “The team of archivists that already worked at the library were so excited that a Reuther family member wanted to come and that was going to invest all this time into digging up history,” Sasha said. “So, in their off hours they actually gave me some of their time and were excited to contribute to the film.” Sasha’s family history, of course, played a major role in his decision to create the documentary. “I grew up with my grandfather telling stories, the same ones over and over; so, when I was a kid, I didn’t really appreciate them so much,” Sasha said. “When I was in high school and I got excited about filmmaking, I always had the family story in the back of my mind. “My grandfather had an assassination attempt on his life and for all the days that I knew him he wore a glass eye. So here was a person that was just this really interesting mysterious character that would tell me these stories of picket line conflict and negotiations. Not just only in the United States, but my grandfather was the international director of the UAW and he spent a lot of time overseas. So his stories always were flavored with coming back from Japan and hearing their stories, working in India for a while and just beginning to appreciate how workers were treated there.” His grandfather’s memorial service, in 2004, ultimately pushed Sasha to create the film. “At his memorial in Washington, D.C., my wife and I were stunned by the number of distinguished politicians, trade unionists, civil rights leaders, and other dignitaries in attendance; all there to pay respects to a fallen ally in the fight for social justice,” Sasha said. “My wife nudged me a few times, saying ‘Hey, you know that ‘dream’ family film project? I think we should get on that immediately, as your access to these luminaries is unparalleled...and they are not getting

Victor Reuther, File photo.

Continued from page 11.

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18

April 19 – May 2, 2013

Earth Day Special Edition.

Feed the Feeble: Music tHat Feeds the Soul by: Melina Paris, Music Columnist

It’s a little ironic that I attended an event called

large and small provides a unique perspective on the musical experience. “Music is something that is played right in front of you that you effect,” he said. “Don’t give that experience up because it’s really being taken away from us. Now it’s seems you go hear music and there’s 5,000 people and big video screens and you need binoculars to see the people on stage, come on! Try to go somewhere, lay down $15 to 20 and sit with 50 or 100 people in a room and let somebody move you with music.” There was a time that John followed a different muse, making world music. We asked about his passion for middle-eastern music and his practice of incorporating the oud (a pear shaped stringed instrument played throughout the Middle East) into his music. “I did an album in 2000 called Claremont Dragon and that was the end of a time when I was really obsessed with the instruments of the world,” he said. It was during an almost three decade period where John was trying to make a musical bridge. He explained that at the time, it was really important that his music broadened the musical palate of the people who listened to his music.

Story Time with the Rangers Your children will enjoy spending time with the Los Angeles City Rangers at the White Point Nature Education Center listening to nature-themed children’s stories for young people of all ages, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. April 27, at the White Point Nature Preserve in San Pedro. Details: (310) 541-7613; www.pvplc.org Venue: White Point Nature Education Center Location: 1600 W. Paseo del Mar, San Pedro

Theater/Film April 19

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare The Long Beach Shakespeare Company presents the Complete Works of William Shakespeare on April 19, at 8 p.m. This is an all-female performance, which will cover the entire Shakespeare’s repertoire in fewer than two hours. Tickets for this show will be $20. The show also takes place April 20, 26 and 27 at the 8 p.m. Details: (562) 997-1494; www.lbshakespeare.org Venue: Long Beach Shakespeare Theatre Location: 4250 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach

April 22

Rock the Boat Marymount College presents a screening of the documentary, Rock the Boat, at 7 p.m. April 22, at the Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro. The screening of the film is in honor of Earth Day. How do we transform our city landscapes to actually benefit the environment? How do we manage our natural resources to create livable, sustainable cities in our immediate future? For more information about the film visit: http://rocktheboatfilm.com The director and kayakist from the film will be in attendance to facilitate a Q&A after the screening. Recommended for adult audiences. Free. Details: (310) 303-7223; www.marymountpv.edu Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

“Maybe the listeners would hear the Claremont Dragon and they would say, ‘What is that?’” he said. “They would look at the liner notes and see it is an oud, or an Irish tin whistle or Irish harp. Then, maybe they would seek out people who could really play those things.” We asked if John felt like he made that bridge. “A small group of people responded to that. I would always include an exotic instrument in my performances,” John said. “At some point I went to Dublin Ireland, I really felt at home among the Irish people. I realized that pretty much all my life I had felt uncomfortable being a white guy around all this music. On some deep subconscious level, I sort of came to the end of a cycle and got very comfortable in my own skin.” Beyond the neon idolatry of popular idioms there are players who come to us in a full circle to the innocence of truthful song craft and performance. John and Toulouse Engelhardt are standard-bearers in that truth.

Who Kidnapped the Easter Bunny? The Peck Park Theater Academy presents Who Kidnapped the Easter Bunny? April 26 through 28, at the Peck Park Community Center in San Pedro. Who Kidnapped the Easter Bunny? is musical “whodunit” by Alan Dale Monroe. Tickets are $5 for adults and $2 for children. Details: (310) 548-7580 Venue: Peck Park Community Center Location: 560 N. Western, San Pedro Spring Festival of One-Act Plays Marymount College Theatre presents Spring Festival of One Act Plays, at 8 p.m. April 26 and 27, at the Grand Annex in San Pedro. The presentation features several one-act plays that will showcase Marymount College student talent. Tickets are $10 general, $5 student or senior. Details: (310) 303-7223; www.brownpapertickets. com Venue: Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro Calendar continues on page 20.

April 19 – May 2, 2013

the single, “She Digs My Love.” In the years following his time with the Byrds, John was working in the studio as well as touring with the Mama’s and Papa’s, Johnny Rivers and the touring band of former Byrd bandmate, Gene Clark. He has worked with various artists with roots in the sixties, including his bandmates in Kaleidoscope, Chris Darrow and Chester Krill. John has also worked with writer and producer impresario Kim Fowley, and has united with Skip Batten, his replacement in the Byrds on another project. In the 2000s, John had recorded and performed with Toulouse Engelhardt and Remi Kabaka. He is currently touring with Barry McGuire (Eve Of Destruction) in a show they call, Trippin’ the 60’s. John and Barry McGuire are playing at The Coffee Gallery Backstage April 17 and 18. In May, he’ll be performing at a show called “A Byrd Winging it Alone,” followed by a Q-and-A at The Coffee Gallery Backstage. “To my mind people don’t want to hear me talk they want to hear me play music,” John said. “I’m not sure but if he really wants me to try I will. I would love it if people would come out and hear the music. There’s not many of us left.” Fifty years of playing good music on stages

April 27

Santa Cruz Island Annual Boat Trip The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium will host their annual Boat Trip to Santa Cruz Island from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 27. Admission will be $55 per person for the boat ride and island adventure. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

April 26

Continued from page 15.

Troubadours Who Came Full Circle

Calendar continued from page 17. and open to the public. Venue: George F Canyon Nature Preserve Location: 27305 Palos Verdes Dr. East, Rolling Hills Estates

ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

“Creating a Culture of Tomorrow” and covered a band there named Feed the Feeble. The event took place at The Gina MW Gallery in Long Beach. The band’s name comes from the idea that music empowers people when they feel weak or lost, when they feel feeble. The event was, in large part, about living your dreams and finding how that works on an individual level to create and share with the world. Thereby, creating our own culture of tomorrow rooted in our strengths. The entire band was not present on that evening, but that actually made it quite an intimate performance. The two members performing were Vanessa Acosta on trumpet and Menchie Caliboso on acoustic guitar. The other members are Chris Walker on drums and Lee Van Over on bass. Menchie writes most of the lyrics and explains she brings it to the band and from there it evolves. Their latest release is a three-song extended

play called Between Sessions with the songs “Lustful,” “The Beacon/Soul Mate” and “Still.” They classify their EP as alternative soul. It’s evident Menchie and Vanessa have a strong connection. It came through in their powerful set. No wonder, they have played together since their college days at San Francisco State University. Their set opened with a new number that is yet untitled. Vanessa’s melancholy trumpet playing echoes like a voice in the background on this soulful number. Menchie’s rhythm on her acoustic guitar is solid and harmonious. On the first untitled number and “Lustful,” Vanessa’s horn offers emotional depth to the songs, while simultaneously expanding the expression of them into a hybrid sound blending rock and soulful jazz. In fact, when I asked what genre they classify themselves Menchie joked. “That’s probably one of the hardest questions we’ll have today, huh?” she asked playfully.

She added that she they really like to blend it up because they all come from different musical backgrounds. Experimentation is in their nature and it works for them. They rock, they improvise with jazz influences, and they ooze with soul. From what I heard that evening their ease in all of this is seamless. In short, Feed the Feeble jams. The next number “The Beacon/ Soulmate” starts with a guitar solo moving into a rocking rhythmic lead with vocals from Menchie. Then the song breaks off into a trumpet solo, followed up by a slower hypnotic beat with ethereal background vocals from Vanessa. Something worth noting in regards to their sound: Menchie’s crystal clear vocals combined with Vanessa’s deep soulful voice offers an amazing contrast in tones culminating in distinctive harmonies together. Their next number, “Still” talks of revolution coming: We’re empowered and we believe Justice, liberty and equality Generations have observed, Take the streets And your voice will be heard On this number, Menchie’s guitar sounds like a blend of American folk with gypsy music. Vanessa’s horn paces the melody emblematic of people growing tired of waiting for change until it breaks off into a soaring solo. This song has the power to stir emotion with the rich blend of musical styles and the reformist-activist lyrics. “Journey Song,” they told me later, was sort of an experiment made up mostly on the spot. The song is a blend of folk and jazz. Menchie skillfully improvised on her guitar while Vanessa spontaneously went into a zone between singing with her voice as well as her trumpet, chanting, “Life is such a journey.” The audience was just as rapt in the music as the musicians were in that moment. Watching the pair communicate through music only was like seeing rhythms supported by wind.

19

Calendar continued from page 19.

May 2

L.A. Harbor International Film Festival The Warner Grand Theatre will host the L.A. Harbor International Film Festival on May 2 and May 5. The Film Festival celebrates in 10th anniversary by showing a series of films and short films over the duration of the two days it is being hosted. For program information and times, visit www. laharborfilmfest.com. Tickets for this event range from $10 to $60. Details: (310) 548-2493; www.grandvision.org Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro Raise the curtain at tinyurl/rln-theater

Art April 26

Long Beach AIDS Assistance Foundation Thrift Store Art Sale Try art. It’s delicious, from 6 to 9 p.m. April 26, at the Long Beach AIDS Assistance Foundation Thrift Store Art Sale. You will be your opportunity to acquire some amazing art, socialize with other art enthusiasts, and to help a great cause. This year will feature a gallery of contemporary art generously donated by a collection of acclaimed Southern California artists. Venue: Long Beach AIDS Assistance Foundation Thrift Store Location: 2011 East 4th St., Long Beach

April 28

Quilt Show & Antique Tool Display San Pedro Bay Historical Society is hosting its Annual Quilt Show & Antique Tool Display from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Muller House Museum. Details: (310) 833-1707; sanpedrobayhistoricalsociety.org Venue: Muller House Museum Location: 1542 S. Beacon St., San Pedro

Earth Day Special Edition.

May 2

The Art of Ron Reeder Reeder’s artwork will open from 6 to 9 p.m. May 2 at Richard Lopez Studio in San Pedro. An artist reception is scheduled from 4 to 6 p.m. May 4. Reeder uses color with a sense of whimsy to produce dynamic results. Presented pieces will range from several methods of expertise and artistry, including paint on canvas, sketches and assemblages. By allowing viewers to develop their own interpretations of the scenes he creates, Reeder’s artwork reflects his sense of style, and he enjoys incorporating abstract elements into his pieces as he works in a variety of mediums. Details: (562) 370-7883 Venue: Richard Lopez Studio Location: 372 W. 8th St., San Pedro Lori LaMont Michael Stearns Studio 347 art show is featuring Lori LaMont, from 6 to 9 p.m. May 2, with a gallery opening from 4 to 6 p.m. May 4. LaMont produces fascinating images that spark contemplation and dialogue with images of human figures and fantasy works involving birds and animals that tell colorful stories and captivate the viewer, allowing them to draw their own conclusions. LaMont uses largescale canvases with vibrant watercolors that often require numerous months of full-time work to finish. The watercolors represent LaMont’s first direct engagement with our sports culture and feature concepts that question the notion of athletics in modern-day society while pushing people to look at the reality behind the glamour and celebrity. Details: (562) 400-0544 Venue: Michael Stearns Studio 347 Location: 347 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Coming Up:

April 19 – May 2, 2013

This Is Not An Art Show Venue: Cornelius Projects Location: 1417 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

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Best of the Best: Student Art Exhibitions Details: (310) 303-7223; www.marymountpv.edu Venue: The Arcade Gallery Location: 479 W. 6th St., San Pedro U n c ove r m o r e a r t a t t i ny u r l / r l n - a r t entertainment

LoterÌa: MoLAA Reimagines the Permanent Collection by: Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Columnist

T

he Museum of Latin American Art owns more than 900 pieces of contemporary Latin American Art. Its collection represents one of the most significant collections of this field in the United States. At the time of the museum’s inception, the art collection of the Robert Gumbiner Foundation was the basis of the museum’s effort. Within the past decade, the collection has grown to represent more than 350 Latin American artists from 20 Latin American countries. This year MoLAA has returned to its roots with exhibitions curated to present a fresh look at an under-appreciated asset. Nudged into a corner by a tight budget, deprived of the funds to bring in traveling shows, the curators have unearthed a treasure trove of newly interpreted works from their own collection. The exhibit Lotería is prime example of the newly populist practice of curation, not always executed with this much imagination and talent. Curator of Education, Gabriela Martinez has married the Mexican game of Lotería with images from the permanent collection in a warm, poignant, humorous and thought provoking presentation. The game of Lotería may be a mystery to those of us who grew up on this side of the border. A bingo-type game that uses images instead of numbers, Lotería made its way from Italy to Latin America during the colonial period, eventually establishing itself in Mexico. Most people are probably familiar with its images, including La Sirena, The Mermaid, or El Corazón, The Heart. For this current interpretation of the permanent collection, the curators matched up works of art from MoLAA’s Collection to corresponding Lotería symbols. Some matches, like El Nopal (The Cactus) are literal, some like La Dama (The Lady), are conceptual while others like El Cazo

(The pot) are based on formal qualities. Works from many of the most respected Latin American artists are included in the show, and it provides an insight into the symbology that has always existed within Latin American Art. Cuban artist Wilfredo Lam gives us La Garza, The Heron. Francisco Toledo of Mexico represents La Rana, The Frog, with his playful dancing frogs, a popular subject for the artist. It is sometimes jarring to see the Lotería cards paired with topics of gender identity, civil war or social upheaval, but this gives the exhibit the power intended by the artists that is sometimes lost on museum walls. La Dama, The Lady, meant to be an elegant lady taking a stroll down the city sidewalk is paired with a cracked and broken porcelain doll, a digital photograph by Costa Rican artist Pricilla Monge. The doll wears a gaudy gold gown with the smeared lipstick of a child playing in her mother’s wardrobe. Two completely separate attempts at femininity, with neither representing an attainable image. Dávid Alfaro Siquieros jars us with “The Heroic Voice,” paired next to the card El Valiente, The Brave. Siquieros speaks against state oppression with his statement on the killing of Ruben Salazar during the 1970 Chicano Moratorium. The local community has never forgotten the protest, and the violent police response, which took place here in Southern California. Led by the Chicano Student Movement it gained worldwide attention and was an important piece of the American civil rights movement. The female image of Democracy breaks the chains of oppression in a classic Siquieros pose. Moving through the galleries, a reminder of the importance of this collection greets the visitor

at every turn. The museum has worked over the years to inch into the 21st century, away from a provincial reputation, and toward modernism. Criticism for the removal of the chief curator, Cecilia Fajardo-Hill was the topic of controversy at the end of the past year. But this exhibition, along with exhibit Intersections, in the front gallery, proves that there is still much to be discovered in the museum vault. Founder Robert Gumbiner stamped MoLAA with an image they are not always comfortable living within. Now it seems the curatorial staff has picked up the challenge to recreate their mien with success. This is good news for us all. MoLAA is one of only a handful of museums nationally addressing the art and culture of the exploding Latino community. “MoLAA is distinguishing itself through compelling exhibitions, outstanding educational programs and exciting cultural events,” MoLAA CEO Stuart Ashman, states. “Our expanding permanent collection includes work by important modern Latin American masters as well as by emerging contemporary artists, making MoLAA the place to see the latest trends in artistic expression from Mexico, Central and South America, and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean.” More than 40 pieces are included in this show, exhibiting artists from across Latin America. A large number of Cuban artists are included. If you are curious to experience the fine art of Cuba, you can avoid the trouble created by Jay Z and Beyoncé. MoLAA can take you to Cuba, as well as the rest of Latin America in the same day. Exhibition runs through May 12. Details: (562) 437.1689; www.molaa.org Venue: Museum of Latin American Art Location: 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013034874 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Unique Designs and Promotional Products, 4309 Everett Ct, Vernon CA 90058. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): David E. Soto Jr., 435 W. 1st Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 02/1/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ David E. Soto Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 21, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

03/07/13, 03/21/13, 04/04/13, 04/18/13

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013038133 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Absolute Supervision, 1714 W. 238th St. Los Angeles, CA 90501. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Robert Anthony Torres 1714 W. 238th St., Los Angeles, CA 90501. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 50839, Los Angeles, CA 90050. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 01/1/2008. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Robert Anthony Torres. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 26, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Pro-

22

fessions Code). Amended (New Filing): 03/07/13, 03/21/13, 04/04/13, 04/18/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013038134 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Good Look Feel Good, 565 W. 15th St. #F, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Carlos Hernandez, 565 W. 15th St. #F, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 07/04/2011. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Carlos Hernandez. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 26, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

03/07/13, 03/21/13, 04/04/13, 04/18/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013040861 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Miss Astrid, 1575 Spinnaker Dr., 105B, Ventura CA, 93001. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Richard Lynn Parks, 1575 Spinnaker Dr., 105B, Ventura CA, 93001. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 01/15/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Richard Lynn Parks. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 28, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 03/07/13, 03/21/13, 04/04/13, 04/18/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013056859 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Harbor Foot and Ankle Podiatric Medical Group, 1360 W. 6th Street #150W, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Bruce D. Levine DPM. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above March 13, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Bruce D. Levine, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 13, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013048326 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Local 420 Patients Collective, 600 S. Pacific Ave., #104. County of Los Angeles. Articles of incorporation: 46-1717368. Registered owner(s): General Organics, 11 Hillrise, Dove Canyon, CA 92679, California. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above February 15, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Peter Jason Cappely, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 12, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

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all inclusive— filing and publishing

Call 310-519-1442 for details

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013056858 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Myfunkysocks, 4005 Admirable Dr., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Kerry Rizzo, 4005 Admirable Dr., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above October 1, 2010. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Peter Jason Cappely, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013062328 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Soderstrom Garage Doors, 1221 Lyndon St., #10, South Pasadena, CA 91030. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Derek Soderstrom, 1221 Lyndon St., #10, South Pasadena, CA 91030. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above October 1, 2010. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Derek Soderstrom. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 29, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013056860 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Zelaya Services, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Mauricio Zelaya, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A

registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Mauricio Zelaya. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013044529 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Babes Secret Stash, 1767 W. Chandeleur Dr., San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Connie Lepkosky, 1767 W. Chandeleur Dr., San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Connie Lepkosky. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013038133 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Absolute Supervision, 1714 W. 238th St., Los Angeles, CA 90501. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Robert Anthony Torres, 1714 W. 238th St., Los Angeles, CA 90501. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Robert Anthony Torres. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 1, 2008. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the

expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013068852 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Alpha Omega Arts & Designs, 455 W. 6th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Thomas T. Asuncion, Jr. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above April 1, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Thomas T. Asuncion, Jr, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 5, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13, 05/30/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013062323 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fantasy Spa mobile Pet Grooming, 2671 S. Cabrillo Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Adrian Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. Erica Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by a married couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above April 1, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Adrian Garcia, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 5, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13, 05/30/13

Camp Applications Available By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

Applications for summer camp are currently being accepted at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Carson. Executive Director Kim Richards said that there are spaces for 140 members on a firstcome first-serve basis. Any applicants who don’t get one of the 140 slots, but are club members, will be placed on a waiting list. Basic membership fees are $5, while the fee for summer camp is $70 per child per week. Richards also advises that scholarships are available for families who may not be able to afford the summer camp fee. The funds are available thanks to a Community Development Block Grant from the City of Carson. “City funding has been steadily declining the last four to five years,” Richards admits. The city’s ability to fund nonprofits has become limited. For this year, however, the city made available $11,500 to underwrite camp scholarships and transportation. “Let’s say a woman has three kids between ages six and 12, she’s unemployed, on public assistance, can’t afford the fee,” Richards explains. “We’ll give you documents to see if the family meets standards set by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.” She further stresses that HUD sets the standards by which families may qualify on the basis of income verification, to determine if they may receive assistance with all or a portion of the fee depending on income level. “If applying for a scholarship, parents must bring a copy of their current tax return and three most recent paycheck stubs,” Richards adds. According to club literature, its vision is, “Through successful partnerships and

collaboration, we will ensure that 90 percent of the youth being served are on track to graduate on time, be healthy and active, as well as give back to their community.” Boys & Girls Clubs of Carson opened a clubhouse in 1992. Richards says it operates with a budget of about $1.5 million, from donors, foundations, membership fees and the aforementioned block grants. There are also activities at six local schools, plus an administrative office. The Los Angeles Unified School District funds the school-based sites. Former Mayor Vera Robles DeWitt said she started trying to bring a club into Carson in 1989, when she was on the city council. She said she spoke to Eleanor Montano, who at that time was with the Wilmington Boys & Girls Club, about how the organization was considering opening new clubs. DeWitt suggested Carson. “We had an outstanding parks and recreation program but the cost was too expensive,” DeWitt maintains. “People complained about the expense and we needed another vehicle.” Richards said that some of the most popular programs include the AIM (academic achievement for middle school students) program, College Bound (for high school students) program, SMART Girls, Triple Play and a DJ/Recording Arts course. She says in calendar year 2012 the club served 2522 youth. For questions about applying for summer camp call (310) 549-7311. For details about collaborating with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Carson for sponsorship activities, contact Kim Washington at (310) 522-0500.

from p. 5

CTP Faces Supreme Court

In oral arguments, the Port’s attorney Steven Rosenthal, repeated that argument: “This Port undertook these actions as a reasonable and genuine response to the needs to build and grow a port. If we are prohibited from taking what are substantively limited actions to control trucking, then essentially we’re going to be in a posture in which this Port will be disabled by its surrounding community from doing what it needs to do to compete.”

Response to “Just Whose Money is It Anyway?”

If any issue galvanized free-market and fiscal conservatives, it would be fiscal and monetary policy. Publisher James Preston Allen mentioned the long-term success of infrastructure projects. Federal spending on transportation is a sound investment to most conservative-libertarian (not old!) guys such as myself. A Republican champion of federal transportation projects, President Dwight David Eisenhower, enacted the Interstate Freeway system which we have today, a law which had about one hundred pages, as opposed to the monstrously prolix legislation enacted by Congress today. The same President who wanted to facilitate national commerce also warned about the Military-Industrial-Complex, where the increasing amount of our nation’s wealth is being wasted. However, Allen tricks out the common fallacy used by more “social policy” minded or “progressive” liberals to justify public project expenditures: government spending money creates jobs and jump-starts the economy. First, spend and spend some more, Keynesian economics has been discredited. US President Jimmy Carter’s “malaise” and Japan’s lost decade debunk the benefits of increased government spending. A propos, French free-market Frederic Bastiat denounced this “deficit spending” regimen in “The Broken Window” Fallacy. According to modernliberal assertions, the government can create a job by breaking a window, then hiring a glazier to replace it. However, the economic consequences rest not on the seen, but the unseen, “behind the scene” effects of this policy. The time, money, and manpower spent on fixing the window diverts those resources from other pursuits, purchases, and possibilities. The building owner, for example, could have spent that money sprucing his premises. The glazier could have installed another window in a new business. The government could have allowed the taxpayer to

documents—with more than 50 workers from six ports to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that port drivers clearly are misclassified as “independent owner-operators.” Had the Obama administration acted on this information to enforce existing labor law, the invalidated employer mandate provision of the Clean Trucks Program would not have been necessary—its basic provision would have been enforced at every port in the country. Whatever decision the Supreme Court hands down in June, the line-up of amicus briefs already attests to a shifting landscape of allegiances that is bound to continue shifting even more in the future.

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April 19 - May 2, 2013

Like clockwork, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce weighed in with an amicus brief supporting the ATA, but tellingly, the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce agreed with the ports logic and business strategy, and submitted a brief “to emphasize the importance of the CTP and the Port’s Clean Air Action Plan to the future growth of the Port, the surrounding communities

and the regional economy.” Clean air isn’t just good business for the port, but for the entire region, the chamber was arguing—a truly remarkable shift of outlook and allegiances on its part. On the other hand, in a disappointing move, the Obama administration weighed in to support the ATA, not only with an I brief, but with a request to be heard at oral arguments, which the court granted. Not only that, the Obama administration has failed to do anything comprehensive about the underlying problem that the employer mandate provision was intended to address—the costshifting and exploitation of truckers who are misclassified as independent contractors. In January 2011, Random Lengths reported on an exhaustive study providing conclusive proof of systemic labor law violations in the port trucking sector. (“Employee Misclassification IS the Business Model for Port Trucking,” RLn, Jan. 13, 2011, p. 5) Big Rig: Poverty, Pollution, and the Misclassification of Truck Drivers at America’s Ports, was a collaboration of Change to Win and the National Employment Law Project, which, we reported at the time, “includes a combined re-analysis of 10 previous surveys covering 2,183 workers at seven major ports; along with a totally new investigation, based on Internal Revenue Service employment law and extensive 2-hour interviews—plus reviews of employment

from p. 9

writing back with this lack of civility. James Preston Allen, Publisher

keep their money and spend it as he sees fit. In short, the problem centers on creating wealth, which then funnels into jobs, projects, and other expenditures. Governments do not create wealth, but they do print money. To the extent that governments print, borrow, and spend currency, they limit expansion, enterprise, and entrepreneurship in the private sector, where jobs are increased, wealth is created, and prosperity is promoted. Arthur Christopher Schaper Torrance Dear Mr. Schaper, So, we finally agree on infrastructure being the economic tool of government. This is no social spending program, but it does have social benefit. It is one of the essential economic building blocks for a sound economy. Just look at China. Let me ask you who pays for the street outside your home, the sidewalk outside your business or the sanitation system you use when you flush the toilet? Hint, it’s not private enterprise or the “free market.” As much as you castigate the Keynesian economic model, you can’t deny that it was this approach that was used during the Great Depression to successfully end that economic disaster, which was created by the unregulated free market of the roaring ‘20s. If you study the history of economics you will find that it was the “free market” model of “hands off the markets” that produced the great crash of 1929 and when all the dust has settled, it will be blamed for the imploding of the sub-prime mortgage bond market in 2007. Deregulation has more risk and than it does benefit. Just ask the people of Greece or Cyprus. I, however, don’t argue for a single solution economics. What I argue against is the drift towards the domination of corporate monopolies, the imperial rule of the military-industrial complex and the threat of a constant war economy, as well as the creation of an elite class of über-rich, non-taxpayers with offshore tax havens based upon the myth of trickle down economics. James Preston Allen, Publisher

The Local Publication You Actually Read

business necessity for us to grow.... NRDC asserts that the market participant doctrine was created to protect precisely the program at hand. The Port must have the authority to set business standards on its property for the benefit of its operations and to protect local communities. The Clean Truck Program has dramatically reduced toxic air pollution from port trucking and has enabled the Port to grow ‘green,’ ATA’s legal challenge threatens this progress.

RANDOMLetters

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Bankrupting Nature: Denying Our Planetary Boundaries A new book argues that global warming is just one of 10 different ways in which we risk destroying the natural foundations that all human civilization depends upon. By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

Bankrupting Nature: Denying Our Planetary Boundaries Anders Wijkman and Johan Rockström Routledge; 206 pages; $44.95

April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Johan Rockström was the lead author of a 2009 featured study in Nature magazine, “A safe operating space for humanity,” which was briefly mentioned in Random Lengths’ 2010 Earth Day feature on the environment and the economy. Although the range of impacts studied was quite sweeping, the key concept was remarkably simple: global warming is but one of nine or 10 different ways in which human civilization is threatening to cross boundaries of overconsumption and overuse. These, will undermine the natural foundations on which our civilization is built. Thus, we need to attend to a much broader range of environmental concerns in order to ensure the long term well-being of humanity, as well as the planet we share with so many other forms of life. The environmental concerns include three fully global problems: climate change, ozone depletion and ocean acidification. Other problems that have the greatest impact on the ecosystem level include: nitrogen and phosphorus flow, agricultural land use, biodiversity loss and freshwater consumption. Then, there are two more that can’t be fully quantified yet, which includes: chemical pollution and atmospheric aerosol load. Directly or indirectly, all these problems entail the erosion of nature’s ability to provide what have recently come to be known as “ecosystem services,” which was the subject of Random Lengths’ 2005 Earth Day feature on the UN Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Report. Although climate change has gotten far more political attention over the past two decades, the planetary boundaries research showed that it’s only one piece of the larger challenge facing humanity—the challenge of living within our means on a planetary basis. Now, more than four years after the Nature study was published, Rockström, who heads the Stockholm Resilience Center, has co-authored a book with a prominent Swedish politician and non-profit leader, Anders Wijkman, to bring his message to a broader audience. Bankrupting Nature: Denying Our Planetary Boundaries is written less for a popular audience than the non-scientist policy-wonk set, with copious references to other significant studies and reports (such as the Millennium Assessment) issued in the past two decades. But the subject is far too important to wait for the graphic novel version to come out. Some local environmentalists Random Lengths spoke to were decidedly pessimistic in their response. “We have heard this repeatedly for decades,” said Jess Morton, founding president of the Palos Verdes/South Bay Audubon Society. “It’s quite simple, really, humanity has the option of solving the climate/population/resource-use conundrum 24 voluntarily or having it solved for us, quite

Johan Rockström

Anders Wijkman

possibly in a manner that excludes homo sapiens from the result.” “They are right to connect various issues in a systems approach, but are certainly late out of the gate with these observations and do not make the links as strongly as they should,” added Tom Politeo, co-chairman of the Sierra Club’s Harbor Vision Task Force. “It is utter folly to think we can work economic, social and environmental problems in isolation from one another.” But if there isn’t a graphic novel version out yet, there is a TED talk (http://tinyurl.com/ bankruptingnature), and in it Rockström is decidedly optimistic about what we can do— though what we will do remains another matter. We’re now in a position to understand the limits we’re up against, he argues, and thus also in a position to create integrated strategies for a future that doesn’t undermine the natural foundations of human society. “There is ample science to indicate that we can do this transformative change, that we have the ability to now move into an innovative, transformative gear far across scales.” The hard part is that “Two hundred countries, across the planet, have to simultaneously start moving in the same direction,” said Rockström. Rockström’s co-author, Anders Wijkman, is an on-again/off-again politician who spent a decade heading Sweden’s Red Cross. A self-

described conservative—who even in the United States make up a sizable minority of environmentalists—he has nonetheless battled with the leadership of not one, but two, Swedish conservative parties in which he’s served as an officeholder. First, in Sweden’s Parliament, then as a representative in the European Parliament. Wijkman’s solo contribution is the chapter, “Politics in Crisis,” which concludes with this frank advice to political parties generally, “make a broad analysis of the world we live in and develop new policy platforms. Otherwise, new political parties will sooner or later emerge and step by step force today’s intransigent parties into the cold.” The needed transformation, Rockström explains in his TED talk, “changes, fundamentally our government and management paradigm, from our current linear, command-and-control thinking, looking at efficiencies and optimization, towards a much more flexible, a much more adaptive approach, where we recognize that redundancy, both in social and in environmental systems is key to being able to deal with the turbulent era of global change.” Especially in the United States. Both conservative Republicans and neo-liberal Democrats look at redundancy and see “inefficiency” and “waste.” But that’s precisely why brittle systems fail—just as our financial system did in 2008. Indeed, our basic economic ideas, forged in the pre-industrial 18th century, are in need of a major overhaul, Bankrupting Nature argues. “We have to invest in persistence, in the ability of social systems and ecological systems,” Rockström continued in his talk. “We have to invest in that transformation capability moving from crisis into innovation and the ability to rise after crisis. And, of course, to adapt in the case of unavoidable change.” As a scientist, Rockström looks out at the world, and sees a 10,000-year period of remarkable stability. The Holocene period in which humans, after nearly 200,000 years on the planet, suddenly developed civilization in various different corners of the globe, is an example. That very stability, the precondition of human civilization, is what we’re imperiling by crossing the planetary boundaries. However, Rockström also looks inward, at how science organizes itself.

“[T]he way we have structured research and organized universities is not consistent with how reality works,” Rockström writes in his solo chapter, “Science’s Role and Responsibility.” Climate science, research into ecosystem services and human development studies cannot be understood in isolation, he argues. “My belief is that interdisciplinary science emerges quite naturally from a focus on problem solving,” Rockström argues. “The problems we face are so complex that they require collaboration across disciplinary boundaries.” While the challenges we face are enormous, Bankrupting Nature argues that plenty of solutions are either already available or else clearly implementable. For example, the chapter on energy cites the 2009 study Wind, Water, and Solar Power for the World, which “made the assessment that renewable energy, with emphasis on wind, solar and hydro-power could completely replace fossil power within 20 years. This would entail building nearly 4 million wind turbines with 5 megawatts average output each—clearly a major undertaking, the authors acknowledge, “but we must not forget that more than 70 million cars are produced annually in the world. So technically it would not be difficult to build 4 million wind turbines in 20 years.” Similarly, in the field of agriculture, the authors note that the keys to dramatic improvements in the past—intensive use of chemical fertilizers and widespread conversion of natural systems to agricultural production—cannot be relied on in the future. In addition, according to one projection, climate change could reduce Africa’s harvests by 20 percent as soon as 2020. But again, there are relatively untapped potentials in new approaches, such as much more efficient use of “green water,” which “consists of the rain that infiltrates soils and forms soil moisture and then flows back to the atmosphere… water that sustains all rain-fed agriculture in the world, practiced on approximately 80 percent of the world’s agricultural land.” Rockström himself participated in earlier research showing that, “For many farming systems in the world, less than 50 percent of total available green water is used productively.” Multiple different strategies need to be integrated together, the authors argue, but the potential exists to substantially increase food production, substantially reducing hunger even as world population continues to rise through 2050, though more slowly than it has in the past. These are only a few examples of the many ideas, drawn from many different sources, woven throughout Bankrupting Nature. It’s not beach reading. It’s reading about how to save the beach—and all the land and sea beyond. For those who see this as part of their life’s work, it is a valuable book to return to again and again. In his comments, Tom Politeo said, “Thomas Jefferson argued that our right to use natural resources was a usufructuary one—we can eat the fruit, but the orchard belongs to the future generations. This constraint needs to be recognized and specifically called out and dealt with.” In the end, that’s exactly what Bankrupting Nature provides guidance for doing.

from p. 6

Food Revolution different, but they could be in Watts, in Boston, Nairobi, or Bangladesh. And, you just create a landscape where no one wants for food because food is everywhere.” What does it mean to do that? The answer is doing what community organizations like Harbor Farms and Make a Green Noise is doing.

“But you have to ask them too, because some stuff is farm raised. It’s not all wild. They have some fantastic Ahi tuna.” After DeWinter and Mendoza spoke of their food conversion experience, Montgomery’s words came to mind: “What a beautiful vision LA could be…

if you’re walking down the street and there’s a plum. If I’m hungry I’ll grab a plum and eat that. Oh look it, there’s some char growing, I’m going to eat that for dinner. That’s the vision of what we could have, basically making people realize that they have the power. As long as we just band together and start doing it. Do it from the grassroots. That’s the way change always happens. The leaders will follow the people when the people lead.” It appears that this battle has just gotten real.

Consumer Revolutionaries

It seems that today’s consumer are the new revolutionaries. San Pedro residents and friends, Michael DeWinter and Christi Mendoza began questioning what was in their food in their college days. They both try to ensure that the beef that they buy is grass fed and hormone-free and that their vegetables are locally sourced as much as possible. “I definitely read labels, even if I’m only buying a can of soup,” DeWinter said. “I read the label to see how much of whatever is in it.” “It took me awhile to figure out where to go,” Mendoza explained, who is a practicing acupuncturist. “So what I do is go to Sprouts, Traders (Joes), but at Trader (Joes) you have to read the label because sometimes they use canola oil in their trail mix. A lot of my patients think that because it’s Traders Joes, they think it’s healthy and it’s not always,” she said. A lifelong resident of San Pedro, Mendoza knows where the locally sourced food areas are. “At Baja Fish, everything is wild caught and antibiotic- and hormone-free,” she said. Mendoza said the shop doesn’t carry beef that certifies that the cow was grass fed, so she gets the grass fed beef from Trader Joes. “Basically, I know that anything I buy from South Shores [Meat Shop] doesn’t have hormones in it,” Mendoza said. For fresh fish, she goes to the fish market at 4 in the morning on Saturdays.

The Local Publication You Actually Read April 19 - May 2, 2013

Tomato gardener James Mitchell at the Harbor Farms market. Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

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April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

LA, LB Ports Fund Clean Air Technology By Zamna Avila, Assistant Editor

hybrid-electric drive system in short haul drayage and terminal container movement operations. “One of the benefits is that it can run while transiting on the ocean,” Wunder said. “It could replace drayage diesel trucks with zero-emission technology.” Much of the grants were awarded to companies that develop filters, which clean or reduce air pollution to as much as 70 percent. Hug Filtersystems got $265,654 for its $531,308 Tier 4 harbor craft retrofit, which is expected to reduce particulate matter emissions by more than 70 percent, as well as nitrogen oxide by more than 80 percent. TAP contributed for the full cost, $216,000, of an emission evaluation of OGV fuel valves. The slide valve better regulates how the fuel stream into the engine. These are currently in use but there is disagreements on the environmental benefits. A report quantifying emission reduction is not ready for publication, Wunder said. The program also paid $150,000 of the $692,356 for the demonstration and evaluation of a filter produced by Johnson Matthey. The diesel particulate filter used as an aftertreatment device on the Union Pacific Railroad Switcher. Once installed, it is anticipated that the system will help the Tier 3 engines meet Tier 4 particulate matter emission standards. The California Air Resources Board verified the RYPOS ActiveDPF/C™ filter, which can reduce particulate matter in the rubber-tired gantry crane application at a 50 percent level (Level 2) verification. For this project, RYPOS is working to achieve Level 3 verification (85 percent) for cargo handling equipment. The program granted $129,336 of the total $322,140 project cost.

“In the future we are looking to replacements for diesel fuel,” Wunder said. “We hope, with a lot of these technologies we continue to reduce diesel; going from low-emission to zero-emission technologies.”

Mike Feuer has Coffee in San Pedro

On April 11, City Attorney candidate Mike Feuer had coffee in a meet-and-greet with local residents at the San Pedro Chamber of Commerce. Feuer has been racking up endorsement from business to labor groups from north to south. Polls indicate that Feuer holds a double-digit lead over his opponent, City Attorney Carmen Trutanich. Photo: Betty Guevara

The Local Publication You Actually Read April 19 - May 2, 2013

Entrepreneurship can help solve some of humanity’s pressing problems That frame of thinking is what led the Port of Los Angeles and the Port of Long Beach to work toward bringing together innovators who vie for grants to bring technology that can help make the air in the Harbor Area cleaner. Each year, through the Technology Advancement Program, the ports jointly award grants to clean-air technology innovators in the Harbor Area. TAP is a significant initiative of the Clean Air Action Plan. The goal is to accelerate the availability of new strategies and clean technologies to significantly reduce pollutants and move toward an emissions-free port, such as a hybrid tugboat that was successful in the past. “In the last six to seven years the amount of pollution has been reduced,” said Lisa Wunder, assistant supervisor for the air quality division of the Port of Los Angeles. “We are looking at technologies to reduce pollutants even more.” TAP seeks to reduce emissions from ocean-going vessels, heavy-duty vehicles, harbor crafts, cargo-handling equipment and railroad locomotives through evaluation and demonstration of emerging technologies, especially zero emission technologies and oceangoing vessels. POLB and POLA, each commit $1.5 million per year to fund the program. To be considered for funding, vendors must submit a proposal with background, technology, time frame and funding information. The proposals undergo an evaluation process. Evaluators look at whether a project has a high probability of achieving significant reductions in diesel particulate matter, nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. They also consider whether applicants are seeking a verified technology status from the California Air Resources Board and whether they present a strong business case for future successful commercialization. Applicants must be willing to fund 50 percent of their project, as well as show that the technology is ready to use. Every six weeks representatives from POLA, POLB, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency get together to review the proposals. “All of our projects are at different stages,” Wunder said. “Some of the results reviewed by the ports’ staff have emission reduction…so far, the results are good. The 2012 results are not in.” Among TAP’s grantees this past year is Bluefield Holding Krystallon, which produced an ocean-going vessel scrubber. The product uses seawater to scrub, or filter, particulate contaminates from the vessel exhaust stream before it is emitted. The $3.39 million project was given $1.65 million to move forward. If the technology proves to be successful it could be used on many ocean-going vessels. “That would be huge,” POLA spokesman Phillip Sanfield said. The ports also joined an existing South Coast Air Quality District Testing Program that conducts in-use emissions testing of Class 8 diesel and liquefied natural gas-fueled trucks, contributing $306,552. The cost of the project is more than $2 million. Vision Motor Corp. received a contribution of $191,250 for its $735,461 project. The project demonstrated a zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell

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April 19 - May 2, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


RLn 04-18-13 Edition