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District Attorney Candidate Jackie Lacey: The Adult in the Room pg. 5 The Hellhounds Bring a Night of Rockabilly and Blues pg. 11 Cherrystone Grill and Grotto: True Fusion Cuisine Amidst Bright Lights pg. 12 Dr. Michael Weitzman: Icon of Service Dies pg. 16

Mother’s Day—An Opportunity to Strengthen Family Bonds Story and photos by Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

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protectors of family relationships. My relationship with my mother came to mind after reading the Times article. I call my parents at least once a month and visit them once or twice a week even though we live in the same city. Unmarried, childless and a 30-something male; my life revolves around work. Even I see that maintaining my family relationships is a year-round effort that requires quality time and regular conversations. My mom’s a chef and she loves to eat out. As a result, eating out has become our thing. Over dinner, she fills me in on the latest news within the family, which relative had a health scare, Mothers: Strengthening Family Bonds/ to p. 7

Mother’s Day Gift Ideas from the Heart

These days, I don’t bother buying Mother’s Day cards, clothes, gadgets or anything of the sort. Not because I’m cheap, but because I found that I’d rather give gifts my mom will treasure without relying on its monetary value. You can never go wrong with photo-based gifts. Family photos are literally captured moments in time that serve as keystones, triggering your fondest memories. Rather than buying disposable greeting cards, I make my own using photos I’ve taken or scans of family photos. Shutterfly.com or Snapfish.com are the most well known companies that can turn your family photos into woven wool blankets, The services and technologies are widely available to create woven wool blankets, bound hard-cover books, coffee mugs, calendars and other photo-based projects using your photos. Just don’t wait until the last week to put in an order. You’ll likely run into severe time delays and headaches

May 4 - 17, 2012

few weeks ago, the Los Angeles Times published a story about a study based on 2 billion cell phone calls in Europe that suggest that the bonds between mothers and daughters surpasses that of wives to their husbands. Researchers say that the findings suggest that “women’s urge to ensure the survival of their genes may be connected with the nature of, and shift in these intimate relationships.” I’m not so sure that the ties that bind mothers and their children are quite as instinctual as that. But after interviewing several women who are daughters, mothers, and grandmothers, this study does reflect the reality that mothers are the main

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Left to right, artist Anne Daub, artist Muriel Olguin and Lanta Salon owner Dwainia Tullis reflect on various stages of motherhood.

Ideas for Mom/ to p. 10 1

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Youth Community Service Award 2012

Each year, the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council recognizes a young person for outstanding community service. The award is $500 and open to anyone between the ages of 17 and 23. The recipient must meet the following requirements: •Have a minimum GPA 2.5 and attending a high school, college or vocational school; •Demonstrated voluntary community service that is not required by schools or other programs between January 2010 and the present; •Performed the service within the boundaries of Northwest San Pedro neighborhood; •Live, work or attend school in the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood boundaries. Applications are due June 1. Details: (310) 832-3056 (Monday or Tuesday only); nwsanpedro.org

Candidates Sought for Northwest San Pedro NC

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

The Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council is now seeking candidates for 10 seats on its governing board. Candidates must be stakeholders. A stakeholder must be 16 years of age or older and live, work, own property or a business in the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood area, or participates in any religious, community, business, or nongovernmental organization active within the boundaries those boundaries Candidates are sought for the following categories of seats: Census Track Seats (must live or own property in the specific census track within the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood), Business Seat (must work or own a business within the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood), Education Seat, NonGovernmental Organization Seat (active in a religious, labor, community, or other organization active within the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood), and at-large seat (any stakeholder may qualify for this seat). Board members are expected to participate at board, committee and community meetings (approximately 10 hours per month); provide oversight of public funds given to the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood; look for ways to improve our community and be able to work with a diverse group of people; presenting their own ideas, as well as listening to the viewpoints of others. Candidate applications are available in the Peck Park lobby and www.nwsanpedro.org. Applications must be received by June 4 to be listed on the ballot. An information meeting for prospective candidates will be take place at 6:30 p.m. on May 22 at Peck Park. Polling will take place from 4 to 8 p.m. June 19 at Peck Park.

May 4 - 17, 2012

Los Angeles Harbor Film Festival Through May 6

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On May 4 at 7:30 p.m., La Prima Cosa Bella [The First Beautiful Thing] will be featured at the Warner Grand. This event is sponsored by Councilman Joe Buscaino 15th District and Italian American Museum Los Angeles. On May 5 at 12 p.m. Reprise of the Journey to the Center of the Earth, admission $5. From 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.—“State of the Red Carpet Gala” will take place in the Arcade Building at 479 W. 6th St. (across from WGT) . Admission is $75 at the door if it’s not sold out. This will include film Announcements/ to p. 4

South Wind Caravan to Occupy L.A.’s General Srike By Kevin Walker, Editorial Intern. Photos by Kevin Walker and Robin Doyno Dubbed the “South Wind” of Occupy Los Angeles’ May Day march, demonstrators and activists lead a caravan, May 1, from the parking lot South Bay Pavillion in Carson to downtown Los Angeles, with rallies and info-sessions along the way. South Wind was one of four separate caravans snaking from Santa Monica to the west, East Los Angeles from the east, and the San Fernando Valley from the north to

converge on Pershing Square, in the afternoon. The group had originally been scheduled to begin their caravan at Cal State Dominguez Hills. However, organizers decided to change venues at the last minute to avoid a confrontation with university police. “We were originally going to meet at CSU Dominguez Hills, but then we found out our plans were compromised,” said Ruth Fowler of Occupy

Los Angeles. “There was going to be heavy police presence …and the area we were going to meet in, Lot 7, was easily cattled in.” The South Wind moved north on Central Avenue through Compton and Watts, stopping at several locations of local significance including the Maxine Waters Employment Preparation Center and the corner of 41st Street at Central Avenue, site of the 1969 shoot-out between the Los Angeles Police Department and the Black Panthers. “This government is supposed to be for the people, but it’s not,” said Isabella, a 16year-old observer who did not want to give her surname. “I think (the demonstrators are) doing a good thing.”

Starting with about 60 people, the caravan more than tripled after 10 miles, and grew even larger by the time it joined the thousands of demonstrators in downtown Los Angeles.

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Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Big Old Hunk of ‘Pedro History Found Amidst New Home Excavation By Arthur R. Vinsel, Contributing Writer

The discovery of a 40-pound slab of fine polished granite engraved with the words, “San Pedro City Hall 1907,” this past March, sparked renewed interest in the history of San Pedro’s seats of government a 100-plus years ago. San Pedro has had three City Hall buildings in its history counting the City Hall Market site, which is still standing, and the two buildings that were built on the current site at 638 Beacon Street. A search of archived records at the San Pedro Historical Society indicates five or six and maybe more Old Town granite placards that have been uncovered in old landfills such as Fayal Valley and Stingaree Gulch in North San Pedro. That’s a good country mile from where the relic dated 1907 was unearthed, near the corner of north Gaffey and Gatun streets in March. According to San Pedro Bay Historical files, entrepreneurs were peddling possible City Hall sites in downtown San Pedro around 1900 and offering to build them cheap. The original City Hall that sat at the 638 S. Beacon Street site was built in 1907, but it would be outgrown by 1927 and demolished. The debris was hauled out to an undeveloped area of North San Pedro and scattered as landfill. Time Oil occupied the site storing the oil it drew from nearby wells from the 1940’s through 1977. Time Oil leased the site for bulk fuel storage by British Petroleum from 1977 through 1980. The land eventually passed into the hands of energy logistics company Kinder Morgan who in turn sold it to JCC Homes.

Steve Butorovich, a retired ironworker and qualified city building inspector, was overseeing the building of the foundations on the site when the old granite 1907 City Hall placard was uncovered this past March. Photo: Arthur R. Vinsel.

The tract will have 70 dwellings advertised at $500,000-plus each, the first of eight phases began with Bobcat trenching for foundation footing and indeed it began with a bang. “We hit a big piece of rock, then we hit a big piece of granite,” says Steve Butorovich, a retired ironworker called in occasionally as a qualified city building inspector on independent contractor basis. The Lomita resident recognized historical treasure and took a wire brush to it. “I’m kind of a rock and mineral guy. That granite sign piece looks almost new after more than 100 years. You know what granite costs these days? It’s worth thousands and thousands of dollars,” Butorovich estimates.

The remaining sites of actual, temporary or proposed old City Hall locations are all a few miles away, in the 6th, 7th and Beacon streets vicinity, except for one at 11th and Palos Verdes streets. That site—today a brick structure housing The City Hall Market, historic Sam’s Alhambra saloon, and upstairs apartments—was the one favored by civic leader Edward Mahar. The city did not have a mayor and council government, but a board of trustees with a president, the de facto mayor. So some folks called them “Mayor” anyway. Board President or Mayor Mahar, favored a city hall at 11th and Palos Verdes streets, since his elegant Craftsman home on 1127 S. Palos Verdes would only be a few doors walk away. Big Hunk of ‘Pedro HIstory/ to p. 6

The Local Publication You Actually Read May 4 - 17, 2012

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Community Announcements:

Harbor Area

from p. 2 screening, souvenir program, and party bag. Sunday, May 6 begins at 12:30 p.m. is DocSunday. Ed Steiner will deliver a presentation. This event is sponsored by Polish Film Festival Los Angeles and TopSail Youth Sailing Program at the Los Angeles Maritime Institute. At 1:15 p.m. Kruzenshtern (Poland 2010, Arkana Studio; 52 min.). At 3 p.m. One Lucky Elephant will be featured.

Public History Intern

Internship applications are due, May 4, for the Movies & Memories project. Intern will schedule and digitally record interviews with long-time members of the community and participate in the development of a pictorial guide to historic San Pedro theaters. Open to all college undergraduates who are enrolled or will graduate in spring 2012. This is a paid position. Details: http://www.grandvision.org/news.asp

Tea & Sonnets Fundraiser for SBTS

Shakespeare by the Sea will celebrate William Shakespeare’s 448th birthday with a Garden Tea Party at MaGriffe Galerie while raising funds to support Shakespeare by the Sea. It starts at 2 p.m. on May 5. Tickets: $40 ($45 at the door). Details: www.shakespearebythesea.org, (310) 217-7596. Venue: MaGriffe Location: 3624 S. Gaffey St. San Pedro

Muller House Museum’s First Sunday Series

May 4 - 17, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

On May 6 at 1 p.m. Muller House Museum’s First Sunday Series features community activist and former president of the ILWU Local 13, Art Almeida in a program on “Early Insights into the Labor Movement.” Some of the material covered is from his recently released book The Wobblies in San Pedro, which will be available for sale. Program begins at 1:30 p.m. Venue: Muller House Location: 1542 S. Beacon St., San Pedro

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Race for D.A.—Jackie Lacey Seventh Street Bridge Reopened

Long Beach—The 7th Street Bridge, into Long Beach, reopened April 28, after a year-long closure. The $2.1 million westbound bridge reconstruction bridge was closed as part of the Orange County Transportation Authority’s West County Connectors project, a $277 million project. When completed, the West County Connectors Project will reconstruct the northbound 405 Freeway and westbound 22 Freeway to connect carpool lanes on the 605 Freeway and the San Diego and Garden Grove freeways. The northbound 405 Freeway and westbound 22 Freeway connector to 7th Street was closed to make way for new carpool lanes on the 405 beneath the bridge. Upgrades to Valley View Street, followed by work on the Seal Beach Boulevard bridge—widening it from two lanes in each direction to three going south and four northbound—are expected to be completed this summer.

CityView Del Lago 57 Breaks Ground

San Pedro—CityView Developers broke ground to construct 57 new townhouse style condominiums this past month on the empty lot at 1450 W. Pacific Coast Highway, near the 110 Freeway. The development will have eight buildings with 140 parking spaces on a 2.63-acre irregular-shaped site. The zoning for the site was changed from a commercial and automobile parking zone to a restricted density multiple dwelling zone. Dubbed as workforce housing for young working professionals, the development has caught many residents by surprise despite the fact the fact the developer has been securing the zoning changes necessary to begin building since 2007. One of the primary concerns about the development is the mitigation of increased traffic. Robert Katherman of Grumpy Old Men consulting firm, said CityView will be meeting with Wilmington Neighborhood Council Land Use Committee, Harbor City South and North in the near future. But a date has not been set for when those meetings will occur. CityView, founded by ex-Housing and Urban Development Secretary, Henry Cisneros founded the company nearly a decade ago to build affordable housing in formally industrial or decayed communities.

Los Angeles—For the second year in a row, Granada Hills Charter High School students have become the U.S. Academic Decathlon champions after beating out 33 other teams that had won in their respective states. Granada Hills Charter High School’s academic decathlon team, representing California, won the competition in Albuquerque, N.M. and collected their trophies, medals and accolades on April 28. The win earned the Los Angeles Unified School District its 13th national title. The nine-member team scored 54,081 points out of 60,000 possible. The score was the highest ever recorded in the history of the U.S. Academic Decathlon. The team also earned first place honors in the “Super Quiz” contest. Granada Hills Charter High School tied for first place with Whitney Young Magnet from Illinois.

Gov. Brown Endorses Trutanich for DA

News Briefs/ to p. 6

A candidate like Deputy District Attorney Jackie Lacey with credentials that include more than 25 years of experience in the District Attorney’s Office, 10 years as second in command and an endorsement from a well liked outgoing district attorney, would make an intimidatingly formidable candidate. But with Los Angeles City Attorney Carmen “Nuch” Trutanich’s million dollar war chest and an endorsement list that looks like a Democratic Who’s Who list, the race looks more like a fight between David and Goliath. Lacey notes that Trutanich has more than just a few chinks in his armor citing County Sheriff Lee Baca’s continued role as honorary chairman of Trutanich’s campaign despite a steady stream of problems dogging the sheriff’s department this year, ranging from deputies allegedly engaging in inappropriate relationships with teenage students in the Explorers’ program, secret cliques that see officer involved shootings as a badge of honor and allegations of routine abuse of inmates in the Los Angeles County Men’s Central Jail. “At the end of 2012, many of the cases that we’ve been reading about will end up in the District Attorney’s Office,” Lacey noted. “No one knows how far up the chain we’ll end up going.” Lacey said she doesn’t suspect anything nefarious going on in the chain of command necessarily, but that based on her experience it will be found that some high ranking people that were in charge of the jail knew what was going on. “I don’t suspect you will find the sheriff himself was told, ‘hey they were beating up on prisoners in mass’ and he said do nothing about it,” she said. In regards to realignment, a statewide change that shifted thousands of nonviolent felons to county jails and supervised probation, she generally agrees but feels it was hastily implemented. “Realignment was a sea change and it occurred very quickly,” Lacey explained. “It was set up so that the probation department can do a lot of monitoring. But probation officers, except for a small elite group, are not armed and probation officers are not trained to monitor this population of inmates.” Lacey rattled off other woes the department has faced, including frequent leadership changes in the last two years, and the lack of money for mental health services even while the county supervisors keep demanding more information about whether parolees are completing the treatment programs. To ensure that the penal system under realignment functions efficiently, Lacey, like District Attorney Steve Cooley, want to add on more serious felony crimes eligible for state prison terms that now only warrant being housed in local jails. “The district attorney has to add back in some of those crimes that were left on what we call the N3 List because some criminals need the threat of state prison,” she said. She also believes there needs to be an expansion of alternative sentencing, rather than just send all offenders to jail. “We need to look for some lower level offenders we can refer out for probationary terms for counseling or drug treatment or mental health counseling.” With the 1992 Los Angeles riots anniversary, leaders from various corners credit the gang truces, the Los Angeles Police Department’s conversion to community policing, or the work of Three Strikes in getting thousands of violent criminals off the street. Lacey noted that no one really knows the exact reason why crime has continued to fall precipitously to historic lows but believes the the DA’s jobs is to

Jackie Lacey

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Jackie graduated from Dorsey High School, and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1979. She graduated from the University of Southern California Law School in 1982.

 Jackie is married to David Lacey, an investigative auditor with the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. The Laceys have two adult children.

Endorsements

U.S. Congressman Howard Berman District Attorney Steve Cooley, Los Angeles County Former State Senator Martha Escutia Former Assembly Member George Nakano Los Angeles City Councilman Bernard Parks Former Los Angeles City Councilman David Cunningham Among others.

Accolades

Jackie won national attention for her successful prosecution of the county’s first race-motivated hate crime. In that case, People v. Rojas, Bryant and Colwell, three Nazi Low Riders beat an older African-American man to death behind an Antelope Valley convenience store to earn their gang tattoos. All three defendants were sentenced to lengthy prison terms. Jackie was recognized by the U.S. Department of Justice in May 2000 for prosecuting this case and for participating on the Law Enforcement Coordinating Committee. Visit www.jackilacey.com for more information.

help maintain that trend. Lacey counts civil rights lawyer and one of the authors of the Rampart Report, Connie Rice as a personal friend. Lacey touts her years of managing the law office and her leadership style, contrasted mostly with Trutanich as testimony of her ability to change attitude toward enforcing the law within the department. She noted that her first management job was as director of central operations. It was there that she decided to take some corporate leadership workshop to bolster her skills in the new position. One of the things she said she learned was the importance as well as the “how to’s” of connecting and inspiring everyone on her team to give their very best. “You have to care about people,” Lacey said. “You can’t be a crash and burn or my way or the highway kind of leader. You can’t or people won’t follow you. They may do the bare minimum of what you tell them to do. “I’m the kind of person that inspires people to do their best.” She cites her success as director of central operations in raising the department’s trial success rates up as well as the implementation of the Los Angeles County Women’s Re-entry Court, Co-Occurring Disorders Court and Veterans Court. In an editorial board meeting with the Daily Breeze, Lacey said she was going to reestablish the environmental crimes division noting that the division shrunk from a high of 40 investigators to one because of dwindling resources. When asked if would able to maintain such a division with existing resources, Lacey said that she could move around some resources with the closing of some court houses. “The key to environmental cases is in the investigation,” Lacey explained. “If you don’t have the investigation you won’t be able to go to court. So with the closure of courts I think it’s quite possible that we can redirect environmental crimes. “It’s ridiculous, here we are in Southern California we have a lot of natural resources and we need to have a presence in this field and we need to have the investigative resources to put on crimes

like that.” Lacey isn’t a fan of medical marijuana, she has no qualm in enforcing state law. Her issue, however, is the regulation of pot dispensaries and their abidance with the spirit of Proposition 215 that decreed that such dispensaries be nonprofit entities that follow zoning rule in terms of place near schools and family and parks. “Without passing judgment on medical marijuana, the dispensaries bring in vagrancy, they brings in crime…it attracts a certain element,” Lacey explained. Lacey grasped at the well-worn cliché “a bull in a China shop” to describe Trutanich management style, citing the time she spent on his transition team when he was first elected Los Angeles’ city attorney. In her campaign materials and her stock answers to interview questions, she notes that she is “the adult in the room.” “When I say I’m the adult in the room, I’m saying I don’t have temper tantrums,” she explains. “I understand that I can go anywhere and meet with any group of people and find common ground. That’s what I mean.” Lacey obliquely references Trutanich noting that, “There are a lot of people running don’t have that experience, who don’t have that seasoning.” Lacey recalled the 1999 shooting spree of white supremacist Buford Furrow of Jewish community centers that wounded five people and killed mail carrier. The case garnered wide publicity, and to hear Lacey tell it, entice the U.S. attorney to file hate crime charges. She suggested there was a good deal of haggling of what, where and how to charge the shooter. Furrow was ultimately charged with murder, six counts of civil rights violations and nine weapons charges. “The deal is you have to come at people on common ground,” she said. “You have to be an adult.”

May 4 - 17, 2012

Los Angeles—Los Angeles City Attorney Carmen Trutanich secured a major endorsement from Gov. Jerry Brown, April 26. “LA County needs a DA who’s battle tested, has fought crime as a frontline prosecutor, but also as a manager, overseeing a large municipal law office with hundreds of attorneys,” said Brown in a released statement. “I know the importance

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Granada Hills Charter High Academic Decathlon Champs

Speaks on Being the Adult in the Room

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Mayor Releases Budget— from p. 5

of having an experienced and a smart leader as District Attorney, and that’s why I’m pleased to endorse Carmen Trutanich for District Attorney of LA County.” Brown’s is the biggest endorsement scored by any of the candidates in the race. Trutanich had already secured the endorsements of Sheriff Lee Baca, Supervisor Don Knabe, former Mayor Richard Riordan and a number of elected officials.

FCC Vote to Require Broadcasters to Post Political Ad Date on Web

May 4 - 17, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

The Federal Communications Commission voted 2-1, April 27, to require broadcasters to post political ad data on the Internet to make it easier for the public to see how television advertising in the billions of dollars will be spent in this election. The information, which detail the times ads aired, how much they cost and whether stations rejected ad buy requests from campaigns, among other things, are currently available only on paper at each station. The rule will first apply to affiliates of the four major networks (ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox) in the top 50 TV markets. All other stations will have until July 2014 to comply. ProPublica invited readers and other journalists around the country to retrieve the paper political ad files and post them online for the general public. Then the issue of what format the files would be available. FCC spokeswoman Janice Wise told ProPublica that the commission is not creating a searchable database of the political advertising files. Broadcasters have fought the new disclosure rules from the start.

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Neighborhood Councils are Skeptical By Kevin Walker, Editorial Intern

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa recently released the proposed 2012-13 city budget that, according to critics, does little more than kick the can down the line in closing a projected $238 million deficit. Villaraigosa’s budget attempts to eliminate the deficit with a combination of pension reforms, revenue increases, layoffs and efficiency boosts. The problem is that it is a structural deficit where long term expenditures outstrip receipts. No matter how many short term cost cuts are made, the structural deficit remains. “No one is willing to step up to the plate and tell us what’s going on,” said Jack Humphreyville, president of the Department of Water and Power Advocacy Committee. “There’s no basic reform here.” At issue is the employee compensation and retirement system, which according to the mayor’s budget proposal, accounts for 51 percent of the deficit. The budget proposes to raise the normal retirement age to 67 and limit the maximum retirement allowance to 75 percent of final earnings. If an employee retired today, he or she could potentially make 100 percent of what he or she made while working. Humphreville and others have pointed out that the reforms won’t apply to current or retired city employees and that the slower rate of hiring will further reduce intended savings to the city. “Raising the retirement age from 55 to 67 is great, except it should’ve been done back when they were actually hiring people.” remarked Doug Epperhart, member of the Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council. Attempts to contact the Mayor’s Office were made but a response was not attained in time for publication. Civic leaders also question the mayor’s proposal to eliminate 669 civilian employee positions from the city’s workforce. They say that the cuts disproportionately affect the Los Angeles Police Department and will take sworn officers off of the streets in order to compensate for the loss of civilian clerks and administrators. “It’s not evenly distributed,” Epperhart said. “Most of those cuts are going to be from the police department…they’re laying off 159 people.” Others doubt that the $26 million the layoffs

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will save is even a legitimate figure given that 438 of the 669 positions to be cut are unfilled. Other organizations have proposed their own solutions to the budget deficit. In March the Neighborhood Council Budget Advocates released a white paper with 21 recommendations to help close the shortfall, the first being a declaration of a fiscal emergency in the city that would allow Villaraigosa to implement a yearlong salary reduction for city employees. The recommendation, which did not make it into the mayor’s proposed budget, is symptom-

atic of those on the neighborhood councils, like Humphreville and Epperhart who want a quick resolution to the budget shortfall. Some have speculated that without drastic reforms, Los Angeles may be forced to file for bankruptcy, however, the idea has yet to catch on among community leaders. “Bankruptcy is not a solution,” said Bob Gelfand, president of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Coalition. “It’s a last and final approach when you can’t do anything else.”

Rancho LPG Safety Drill In Early Planning By Paul Rosenberg Senior Editor

The Rancho LPG facility in San Pedro has begun planning for a drill in coordination with the fire department, Coast Guard and the Environmental Protection Agency, said to EPA Region IX Enforcement Coordinator Mary Wesling, who is in communication with local activists. This, following months of community pressure focusing attention on safety issues at the facility. It was originally rumored that the drill would occur the third week in May, but that is no longer the case. “I am not leading the drill.” Wesling explained. “I have told the facility they must coordinate their emergency response plan with the Fire Department and other emergency responders … I am not an emergency responder. I have provided contact information for the EPA on-scene coordinators (Emergency Responders) to the facility and told the EPA (on-scene coordinators) in LA about the

facility. I asked them to coordinate and invite the responders to the exercise. The (on-scene coordinators) are very experienced and I will ensure they understand our concerns. But I am not conducting the emergency response drill.” This did not come across as an abdication of responsibility, however, but rather as a matter of specific organizational roles and responsibilities. Elsewhere, Wesling also wrote, “I will ensure that they [Rancho] exercise a realistic scenario.” In a response to Wesling, local activist Connie Rutter, a retired oil industry consultant with more than two decades of experience, wrote, “I greatly appreciate your cooperation in our concerns for safety for what you’ve done and I hope will continue to do. Thanks!” Random Lengths will report more extensively on the upcoming drill as more information becomes available.

from p. 3

Big Hunk of ‘Pedro History Some disagreement was registered by the late Bill Olesen, San Pedro poet-historian and rival historian and local author Art Almeida on exactly where the trustees were meeting in 1900. The San Pedro News-Pilot reported in 1900—falsely it turned out—that, “The City Has Plans to Squander $10,000 on The Construction of a New City Hall!” A few local entrepreneurs then offered to build a City Hall, on lots they owned downtown, to rent for anywhere from $10 to $45 a month, but it was 1906 before a $40,000 bond issue was passed to construct the new seat of municipal government. Alas, within a few months the architect revised the $48,900 low bid by builder J.H. Roche upward by $16,000 and the domed edifice took form, penny-pinching townsfolk raised a stink about allegedly shoddy work and inferior building materials. Guided public tours were even took place to prove its quality to the disgruntled citizenry. Human nature being what it is, they complained again, 20 years later, when the 1907 hall was razed for the seven-story tower standing today at 638 S. Beacon St.— claiming the original was a veritable architectural masterpiece, good for another 100 years. The handsome granite sign that marked it is

in the old ground level basement housing a Los Angeles Fire Department Museum and could be joined by more relics from the 1907 debris dump site. Inspector Butorovich says the surface has barely been scratched, with excavation planned for seven more increments. His past construction site surprises include the intact skeletal remains of a huge woolly mammoth in Redondo Beach, now restored at the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History. He also uncovered a subterranean armory in the Wilshire District. City staff did not move into the 1907 City Hall until 1908, then lo and behold, in 1909, Los Angeles “invited” San Pedro to annex to the metropolis. If they chose against that magnanimous offer, locals would be shut out of the Los Angeles municipal water system. Little San Pedro had no budget to build its own waterworks. We would, when billions of tax dollars were finally realized from our port, but Los Angeles wasn’t about to let that happen. So the deal with the devil was struck and the sign out front would say San Pedro City Hall, but the City of Los Angeles would be running the show and banking the growing port’s tax revenues. Some things never seem to change.

Mothers: Strengthening Family Bonds from p. 1

which niece made the honor roll, which cousin asked about me, her latest projects, punctuated with praise or critique of the food in front of us. After reflecting on how I spend time with my mother and how much I honor our relationship, I wondered about other women I’ve interviewed and admired throughout the years since I’ve been with Random Lengths News. San Pedro standard-bearer and artist Muriel Olguin, was at the top of my list. Surrounded and supported by her children and grandchildren, especially since her husband, John “Mr. San Pedro” Olguin, died a little more than a year ago, she literally sees the fruits of her labor. I caught up with Mrs. Olguin at her studio in the Loft Gallery to get her thoughts about the realizations she came to as she transition from daughter, to mother, to grandmother. “Right now my daughter takes care of me instead of me taking care of her because she is living with me,” Mrs. Olguin explained. “She’s very close, very sweet and very helpful. Totally. It changes when you get real old like me, at 88.” In the course of conversation she noted that all family relationships are “blessed relationships.” One son lives in Arizona. She doesn’t see him much, but makes the most of the time when she does. Mrs. Olguin, as a word of advice, implores parents and their children alike, not allow grudges to interfere with their relationships. “Make sure you feel good towards each other,” she said. “Talk about it if something bad is going on so that they can continue having the same good feeling toward you and you toward

them. So if there is something going on talk about it, clear it up. Don’t let grudges stay and get bigger, getting in the way of your relationships.” Lanta Salon proprietor, Dwainia Tullis, reared in a two-parent household with five siblings, grew up with the biblical maxim: “ Honor your father and mother.” This is the first commandment with a promise: If you honor your father and mother, “things will go well for you, and you will have a long life on the earth.” A day doesn’t go by that Tullis doesn’t call her mom. Tullis doesn’t really buy gifts for her anymore, since there are 40 people in her mom’s immediate family giving her gifts all the time. Instead she focuses on the quality of the time and aims to learn everything she can from her mother while she still can. A mother of two, grandmother of six, and great-grandmother to one in her own right, feels intently the weight her position bears. “My mom and her sister are the last so my generation is next,” Tullis explained. “I need to learn as much as I can now, more so, because I have to take the reins.” Tullis feels the responsibility of being prepared to pass on wisdom handed down through the generations as well as her personal revelations from life experience. “I’m still her daughter, no matter how much knowledge I may have. That’s me,” Tullis said. “I call her about every day no matter where I am. I encourage her without overpowering her. It’s just a really special thing.” Local artist, Anne Daub has a similar kind of relationship with her daughter as being her clos-

for parents at that time.” “Her dad and I divorced when she was two and half and then I was a single mom and moved down here to go to school at Otis [Art Institute],” she explained. “So I was doing the best I could for her.” Now her daughter is a artist in her own right and is often the one Daub turns to for advice and encouragement. Local artist and teacher, Candice Gawne, reflected on her transition from a daughter to that of mother. “I realize that at this point that the most precious gift is intimacy that you have with this child and that my mother had with me,” Gawne explained. “A child is vulnerable in the obvious way but I’m in new territory too. We grow together, we grow to know each other, and to read each other in such a intimate way and puts things in priority. “We see that in other people, you see [the] value changes and it changed my relationship with my husband “I don’t know if we choose our famtoo. We become caretakers, of this ily or not when we come here. There entire relationare things to be learned that need to be ship.” learned and understood…” Gawne ex—Candice Gawne plains her gratitude for her closeness and her pride est friend—a relationship made stronger because at her daughter manifest her life and responsibiliher daughter was very young when Daub became ties as a mother. a single parent after a divorce. Somewhere along the line, Gawne came to “The times are certainly different, but I think the epiphany that mothers give the best they have when I had my daughter it was so completely dif- to offer despite the baggage they carry from genferent,” she said. “My mom didn’t work, she had eration to generation. five kids and I was number four. It was kind of “I don’t know if we choose our family or the 50s and 60s. So it was kind of the party time Mothers/ to p. 10

The Local Publication You Actually Read May 4 - 17, 2012

7

The Legacy of Pax Americana

May 4 - 17, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

James Preston Allen, Publisher Since the death of my 98-year-old mother, I’ve been thinking a lot about the generation that came before. You know, that generation born before the great “war­ to end all wars,” who endured the Great Depression and who then fought against fascism to raise their families in the era of Pax Americana after World War II, even though that period was far from peaceful. The success of the civil rights campaigns that confronted and attempted to resolve our long history of racism and then the tragedy of the Vietnam War left an indelible mark on our generation, ­the history of which is still being argued as memories fade with aging Freedom Riders, war veterans and antiwar demonstrators. I am thinking about the legacy of my mother’s generation and their drive to work for what they perceived as “the better good” and paying their fair share of taxes. All of this resulted in better public schools, investments in modern freeways and a safety net that embodied a sense of collective responsibility and the understanding that our futures were intertwined. But in the end, much of our national prominence and our vast public wealth were squandered. The Pax Americana now seems more like a series of wars to maintain our military-industrial complex and establish American dominance over the Soviet Union, our now defunct Cold War rival. My Grandpa Charlie used to quip, “There wouldn’t be any wars if they took the profit out of it.” That seems to put it in a nutshell. Sadly, wars are still profitable for those building the guns and bombs, and those profits come at the expense of our national treasury and diminishing middle class. It’s quite odd how oblivious those employed by the military-industrial complex are to the fact that these corporations’ huge profits are competing with expenditures of the national welfare budget. Social Security and Medicare were the two great accomplishments of my parents’ generation. Can you imagine how our elderly folk would have been treated in this current economic crisis if we didn’t have Social Security and Medicare? I find it hard to believe that those who rail against “big government” don’t understand that “big capitalism” is even worse and, that the Great Depression and the current recession were caused by unregulated speculations of “too big to fail” financial institutions using our deposits for something other than prudent investments. I fault past and current adminis-

8

trations for not just taking over these “too big to fail” banks and running them as publicly-owned corporations for the benefit of the people of this country. “Oh, but that would be socialism,” the critics would say. But that would be no more socialist than our public schools and universities, our libraries and parks, or our harbors and airports. When financial institutions become so essential that it affects the well-being and security of our nation, we the people have a right to protect ourselves from its misuse. And, the federal government, through both the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and perhaps the right of eminent domain, should exercise its power to protect us all. This falls in line with the vision that government’s true role is to do for the people that which they cannot accomplish themselves individually. This vision did not exempt my mother’s generation from performing personal acts of heroism such as the overturning California’s defeat of the Fair Housing Act. Much like Proposition 8’s Marriage Protection Act, the California Supreme Court overturned the electorate. But still there was prejudice that existed in the real estate market. In the late 1960s, there were no black families that lived on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, until one day a realtor friend of my mother’s asked for her help. A young engineer and his family were interested in buying a house in Rolling Hills Estates. They had a down payment but couldn’t qualify for a loan. Not because he didn’t have a good job, but because of the color of his skin. My mother rounded up a group of her liberal friends and made the loan that broke the color barrier on the Hill and the first black family moved in. That realtor was subsequently driven out of business by the shocked and horrified real estate association and the neighbors who were all nervous about the value of their properties going down. But as we’ve seen over the course of the intervening years, nothing of the sort happened. Property values have only escalated exponentially ever since. Not long ago, I met a young man who had recently returned to live on the Hill. As it turned out, he was the very son of this first black family and I told him this story—one his parents never told him. And so it is that for most of us, we are left with a legacy that we may have never been told or really quite understood. It is a legacy of social concerns, hard work and personal sacrifice—traits that are missing on celebrity TV.

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

www.randomlengthsnews.com

By Sherry Lear, Co-Chairwoman of Los Angeles Rally, Unite Against the War on Women, member of UniteWomen.org I am proud to say that I not only watched, but was part, of history being made. Just this past Saturday, April 28, in more than 50 cities and state capitals across our great nation, thousands joined together to march and rally and say, “Enough is enough.” To quote my new and beautiful friend, Zoe Nicholson, this was an extraordinary day: “It was not the old dusty bureaucratic women’s organizations that got lost in some GD meeting with notes and rules and personalities. It was not the

same old faces with the same ole agenda . . . it was NEW women, straight women, women who have had enough, whose limits had not yet been reached.” Like Zoe, my heart is bursting with hope and joy that the oppression of women has finally reached a tipping point where it can no longer be ignored. I know that the women who stood with me (and the men who supported us) on April 28, 2012 will not be ignored or silenced continued on following page

We Are Women rally on April 28 in Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles. Photo by Mary Mullane

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Assoc. Publisher/Production CoGretchen Williams Entrée ordinator Calendar Suzanne Matsumiya 14days@randomlengthsnews.com info@graphictouchdesigns.com Photographers Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks, Slobodan Dimitrov, Terelle Jerricks Diana Lejins editor@randomlengthsnews.com Contributors Assistant Editor Robin Doyno, Sherry Lear, Danny Zamná Ávila Simon, Arthur R. Vinsel reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg Matt Wuerker Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIII : No. 9

New Women’s Movement Takes a Page from History

Advertising Production Mathew Highland, Suzanne Matsumiya Advertising Representatives Mathew Highland, Chad Whitney reads@randomlengthsnews.com adv@randomlengthsnews.com Editorial Intern Kevin Walker Display advertising (310) 519-1442 Classifieds (310) 519-1016 www.randomlengthsnews.com

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #08916627). All contents Copyright 2012 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

Community Alert

Possible New Property Improvement District to be Discussed Join City Councilman Joe Buscaino at a community meeting on May 7 to discuss the possibility of forming a property based business improvement district along Gaffey Street in San Pedro, from Summerland to 18th Street. Meeting starts at 6 p.m. Venue: San Pedro Inn & Suites Location: 111 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

RANDOMLetters Are Fish Wet? Are Angelenos Angry?

Some Angelenos are angry. They feel betrayed. Their Charter is being trampled. Their civil service has been corrupted. Their voice at City Hall has been muffled. Increasingly, they’re treated like mushrooms. Yes, some Angelenos are angry! Angelenos know they’re being ripped off. They’re aware that over half the City budget goes to support an under-utilized workforce. They also know the Mayor and Council mismanage employees— treat them, collectively, as “The

Help.” Indeed, the Mayor and Council are a major part of the problem. They lie about the size of their workforce. The Mayor claims to have a staff of 94 employees, when in fact, the number reported by the Controller’s Office is 180. Similarly, the Council says it hires 108 employees. But the Controller’s number is actually 344. The Mayor and the Council want Angelenos to think they’re doing everything possible to cut costs. They laid-off hundreds of employees and forced thousands to take unpaid furloughs. But they found $15,000,000 to fund

a useless Board of Public Works because, critics say, that provides jobs for 5 campaign contributors. Under City procedures, probationary employees must demonstrate their fitness for the job by the actual performance of their assigned duties and responsibilities. Here’s how that requirement is spelled out in the civil service rules: Sec. 1.26. PROBATIONARY PERIOD means the working test period during which the employees is required to demonstrate his/her fitness by the actual performance of the duties and responsibilities of his/her position and during which he/she may be

terminated without right of appeal… Now, in light of this Rule, why is the LAPD allowed to use the same rating form to evaluate probationary performance in such diverse classes as Clerk, Painter, Delivery Driver, Accountant, Photographer, Storekeeper, Garage Attendant, Welder, Equipment Mechanic, Equine Keeper, Nutritionist, and 100 other job classes in which the Police Department utilizes civilian employees? Angelenos may ask what it is about probationary rating that the Mayor, Council, Police Chief don’t understand. Are they baffled

by Rating Content? Well, ratings are supposed to focus mainly on the probationer’s job performance, including personal traits and work habits essential to their work. Samuel Sperling Monterey Park

Response to DOJ Decision on Kent State Shootings

This letter is in response to the articles covering the Justice Department’s decision not to reopen the probe of the 1970 Kent State shootings. Well, it appears the ghosts of Tin Soldiers and Nixon are coming back to the Kent State More Letters/ to p. 10

from previous page

Women Unite at Rally

A demonstrator at the We Are Women rally on April 28.

May 4 - 17, 2012

insults to women. Under a proposed law changes in Georgia, rape victims would no longer be “victims” but termed “accusers.” Arizona legislatures have advanced a bill which will require women to obtain permission from their employers to have birth control covered by their health insurance; using birth control for a non-medical reason would become a basis for termination. A lawmaker in Indiana refused to sign legislation honoring the 100th Anniversary of the Girl Scouts, claiming that they support abortions and a homosexual agenda. (Funny, I did not see these positions on my last box of Thin Mints.) Our children and schools face devastating budget cuts while Big Oil enjoys billions in tax subsidies. White women still earn 77cents to the dollar for doing the same job as a white male. For Latinas, the earnings are much less, 58 cents, and that’s those whose jobs have not been shipped overseas, while the virtues of the Lilly Ledbetter act are debated by the GOP. Unite Women.org is compiling a comprehensive data base of the thousands of pieces of litigation being proposed and enacted across the United States and will also prepare score cards for legislative voting records on women’s issues. Politicians be forewarned: Women will know and remember in November 2012 (and at every other election) who had stood with them.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

any more. I am so grateful for those two courageous women who decided on February 19, 2012 to post a call on Facebook to “Unite Against the War on Women.” For that humble beginning, more than 30,000 have joined this newly minted and grass roots organization, UniteWomen.org. Our members represent a new wave of feminism, the beginning of the Women’s Spring and, I can only hope and pray for the end of centuries of sex-based oppression. Whether or not you want to use the term, there is a “war” going on in America. Some call it a “War Against Women.” As my friend and colleague Jan B. Tucker has noted, it is really a cultural war in which “control freaks and religious fanatics are trying to turn the clocks back 60 years, if not more.” I, for one, refuse to stand on the sidelines. I have never been an official member of a feminist group, but I have accepted the call to action by UniteWomen.org. We have marched and rallied but there is much more work to be done. Women across the United States are being stripped of their rights and denied equality. In 2011, states enacted 135 new reproductive health laws, 60 percent of these restrict access to abortion services. Personhood amendments have been proposed in a number of states: these laws would criminalize all abortions even those performed to ensure the safety of the mother or to terminate a pregnancy which is the result of rape or incest. These laws would effectively outlaw many forms of contraception and could subject a woman who miscarries to criminal prosecution. All of the major GOP Presidential candidates have signed a personhood pledge. Mitt Romney would defund Planned Parenthood which provides cancer screening and mammograms to poor and uninsured women across the United States. Rick Santorum said he would allow states to “outlaw” contraception. So much for small government. While our military spending grows and the richest citizens enjoy huge tax breaks, small and big towns are making budget decisions which have direct impacts on women. In Topeka, Kan., domestic violence was decriminalized as a costcutting measure. Maryland officials ended all funding for a pre-school program for children from low-income families because they felt the mothers should be at home with their children, not working. Two-thirds of the elderly poor are women and they face serious cuts to programs which provide them with assistance for housing and meals. Rush Limbaugh’s tirade against Sandra Fluke was only one of a series of the recent

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RANDOMLetters from previous page

May 4 - 17, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Campus. First, your most ambitious students are being charged more money because they choose to take more credit hours {without any justification for the increased fees}. Second, the annual out-of-control beer party is put down by a armed SWAT team wearing similar uniforms as the Guardsman did 42 years ago {except that this time the tear gas is far more potent}. Now you have a Justice Department under the leadership of a Democratic President that decides they would rather look anywhere but at KSU or for that matter perhaps Dealey Plaza, the Lorraine Hotel and the Ambassador Hotel. Per the article: “The FBI’s Cleveland office apparently destroyed the original Strubbe tape in 1979, according to the Justice Department.” This begs the question: why wasn’t it given to the Smithsonian Museum as a artifact of history? Why the rush to destroy the tape? Per the article: “Some details of the altercation Allen identified on the recording seem similar to an incident involving Terry Norman, a Kent State law enforcement student who was carrying a concealed .38-caliber pistol during the May 4 protest. Norman was photographing demonstrators for the Kent State University police and the FBI. He claimed he was assaulted by angry crowd members and said he drew his gun to warn them away.” Further: “Several witnesses said they heard a Kent State policeman who inspected Norman’s gun exclaim that it had been fired four times.” And finally: “Some Guardsmen claimed they had fired in reaction to gunshots, possibly from a sniper...” Listening to the audio tape recording of what

10

transpired that fatal day one can fairly easily trace the sequence of events. What prompted the Guardsmen to fire appears to be their hearing of pistol shots coming from the crowd of protesters. Now given the hostile environment (they got themselves surrounded by) any type of nearby gunfire would certainly invite such a retaliatory response. Someone in a officer capacity ordered the Guard to shoot because they believed their troop was in harms way. What a bizarre series of events. All this time, because of a deliberately botched investigation by the FBI {as with the other cases mentioned} we the American People have been duped into thinking the deaths and injuries of thirteen students was the result of Some rogue element within the Ohio National Guard where in fact it turns out that a under-cover spy sent in by the law-enforcement establishment inadvertently (or perhaps purposely} set off this chain of events when he was discovered) by a angry few (who also helped set off the tragedy by their actions). Joe Bialek Anaheim

Correction:

The obituary on page 15 of the April 20 edition of Random Lengths News erroneously stated that Mr. Harold Plople did not have any survivors. He is survived by his sister Sharon Curtis Johnson, a psychiatric nurse at a San Bernardino hospital. Ms. Curtis Johnson, who spent some time with her brother before his death, will be attending a May 10 memorial service at Harbor View House in San Pedro.

Mothers from p. 7

not when we come here. There are things to be learned that need to be learned and understood, be appreciated, and be grateful for,” she said. “In parenting, parent from who you are. So much of it ... they argue nature versus nurture some of that I think we are born the way we are as a person and sometimes we have to accept that.” She noted that people can be quick to blame their parents for how they turned out, but she sincerely believes everyone is doing the best they can. Gawne explained that nothing much about what is can be changed when it comes to people. She noted that people go through painful experiences and situations they couldn’t cope and that

people infect their families with that accumulated pain from one generation to the next. “What I would like to do is stop the chain of pain in my family,” Gawne explained. It was this epiphany that Gawne came into the realization of the depth of her love for her own parents despite her friction with them when she was young. Herein lies the crux of why Mother’s Day is so important: Even if you only connect with your mother three times a year, each opportunity that you do is an opportunity to heal wounds, repair relationships and realize a greater happiness. It doesn’t have to happen on Mothers’ Day or birthdays or Christmas, but it should happen sometime.

from p. 1

Ideas for Mom

using their online editing tools and ordering system. While Mothers’ Day is May 13, you can use any day or any week in May to celebrate and honor your mom. This month there are many events happening that would make for an ideal outings and quality family time spent. Random Lengths News theater reviewer, John Farrell called “Night Mother,” (pictured right)—a moving story about an aging mother and her epileptic daughter, locked in the final night of their relationship.” John notes that this story has been told before, “but you will hardly see a better version than at Little Fish Theatre.” There are a lot of restaurants within a two block radius to take your mom and take in a good play. The Whale & Ale Details: (310) 832-0363; www.whaleandale.com Location: 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro 7th Street Chophouse Details: (310) 684-1753; www.7thstreetchophouse.com Location: 465 W. 7th St., San Pedro

of the Southern California Restaurant Writer’s Association within the past three years. I would suggest parking the car in ICT’s parking lot and hop on the big red bus.

Neils Details: (310) 548-3495; www.neilspasta.com/ Location: 383 W. 5th St., San Pedro

International City Theater Details: (562) 436-4610; ictlongbeach.org Location: 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

In Long Beach, The Fix is being staged at the International City Theater and will be showing through the remainder of this month. A good Mothers’ Day themed production, The Fix is a multi-genre musical that ranges from Vaudeville to rock ’n’ roll centering on the efforts of a widowed mother to guide her son to realize his father’s unrealized dream of becoming the President of the United States. Details: ictlongbeach.org. Nearby, there are several restaurants that have been reviewed and recommended by Random Lengths’ cuisine writer and member

L’Opera Details: (562) 491-0066 Location: 101 Pine Ave., Long Beach The Sky Room Details: (562) 983-2703 Location: 40 S. Locust Ave., Long Beach Parker’s Lighthouse Details: (562) 432-6500 Location: 435 Shoreline Village Drive, Long Beach Fuego at the Hilton’s Hotel Maya Details: (562) 481-3910 Location: 700 Queensway Dr., Long Beach —Terelle Jerricks

Ian Coggeshall, Sean Lane (center), and Mike Murphy are part of the Hellhounds slated to perform May 19 at the Grand Annex in San Pedro.

By B. Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

H

ermosa Beach outside the St. Rocke night club. The wind was chilling to the bone and the rain was coming down hard. Inside it was hot and the band on the stage had the crowd in awe. Everyone was on their feet, moving to the sounds of The Hellhounds. Sean Lane has been a fixture in and around the Harbor for the past few years playing the blues. He inherited his traditional country playing style from Son House and Robert Johnson. He has spent time digging deep into the music’s more electric sounds, like R.L. Burnside. He knows the history of the blues. He has been down to the heart of the Delta and stood at the crossroads.

His blues rock band, The Hellhounds, are on verge of joining the ranks of The Black Keys, Jack White and Gary Clark Jr. as the vanguard of the new blues artists. This young talented outfit brings the blues tradition into a more contemporary setting. This is a power trio with a strong feel for the groove. Their music connects the dots between the past and the present. The opening track of their current EP, “Mississippi Ground,” is a song that grabs you and never lets go with its infectious rhythm. Lane’s a beast on the guitar with brilliant slide work. The secret weapon, however, is the band. Bassist Ian Coggeshall and drummer Mike Murphy lock down the groove creating space for Lane’s guitar work and smooth vocal style. Lane talked about his upcoming show at the Grand Annex at 8 p.m. May 19 as well as the band, while visiting San Pedro.

“This is a show featuring music from the 50s,” Lane said. “This is going to be early rock ‘n’ roll, 50s-era blues, and rockabilly. This is a show to get people dancing and listening to some old songs from that time. But we are playing originals that have 50s feel to it as well. We have Scott of course doing the rockabilly thing.” The band Seatbelt featuring Scott Mclean on guitar and vocals will be opening for the Hellhounds, with Jim “The Kid” Matkovich on the upright bass, and vocals, and John “Lenny” Lenkeit on drums. This is as close as you can get to the rockabilly sound that came out of the South in the mid-50s. “This is something I have always wanted to do,” Lane said. “It’s a chance to play all that music that inspired me. It’s going to be a party atmosphere, but here is an opportunity to pay tribute to those of that time that inspired me.”

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community. Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

A Night of Roots, Rockabilly and the Blues

Hellhounds to page 15.

May 4 – 17, 2012 May 4 – 17, 2012

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Entertainment May 4

Chris Standring Chris Standring performs at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. Details: http://7thstreetchophouse.com Venue: 7th Street Chophouse Location: 465 W. 7th St., San Pedro Punknecks Punknecks perform at 10 p.m. May 4 at the Pike Restaurant and Bar in Long Beach. Details: (562) 437-4453; www.pikelongbeach.com Venue: Pike Bar and Grill Location: 1836 E. 4th St., Long Beach

May 5

Storeytime and Vento Sul Storeytime, an upbeat, versatile quintet vocal group and Vento Sul (South Wind) is an all-star band featuring Brazilian, Latin and American artists will be performing May 5 at Alvas in San Pedro. Storeytime goes on at 7p.m. and Vento Sul at 9p.m. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $8 for students. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Kaye Reznick Kaye Reznick will perform at the Long Beach Rainbow Harbor at 5 p.m. on May 5. Venue: Long Beach Rainbow Harbor Location: 200B Aquarium Way, Long Beach

May 6

Heart Of Gold, Neil Young Tribute The Heart of Gold band’s tribute to Neil Young returns to Alvas Showroom at 4 p.m. on May 6. Tom Sweeney and the Heart of Gold band pay homage to one of the most respected and prolific rock-folk guitarists of the 20th century. Tickets are $20. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

May 11

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Rick Parma & Chitown Soul Singer and saxman Rick Parma & Chitown Soul will be preforming at 8:30 p.m. May 11. Doors open at 7 p.m. May 11. Tickets are $10. Details: http://7thstreetchophouse.com Venue: 7th Street Chophouse Location: 465 W. 7th St., San Pedro

May 12

Caleb Quaye Caleb Quaye, former lead guitarist for Elton John, will be performing at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro K’NAAN K’NAAN will be performing at 12 p.m. May 12 at the Home Depot Center during KIIS FM’s Wango Tango in Carson. Details: http://tinyurl.com/knaanshow Venue: Home Depot Center Location: 18400 S. Avalon Blvd., Carson DMC Los Angeles, DMC USA Team DJ Battles DMC Los Angeles and DMC USA Team DJ Battles perform, at 7 p.m. May 12, at the Rhythm Lounge in Long Beach. Details: (562) 435-4288 Venue: Rhythm Lounge Location: 245 Pine Ave., Long Beach

May 4 – 17, 2012

Maroon 5 Maroon 5 will be performing at 7 p.m. May 12 at this year’s KIIS FM Wango Tango concert in Carson. Details: http://tinyurl.com/Maroon5show Venue: Home Depot Center Location: 18400 S. Avalon Blvd., Carson JJ’s Sunset Syncopators JJ’s Sunset Syncopators return to get you toes tappin’ at 2 p.m. May 12, at the San Pedro Branch Library. This 8-piece jazz ensemble features selections from the Golden Age of American Popular Music. The event is free. Details: (310) 548-7779 Venue: San Pedro Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

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Entertainment Calendar to page 13.

Chilean sea bass steamed in black bean sauce with grilled green onions and a rice ball is a specialty at Cherrystone Grill in Gardena.

Cherrystone: A Jewel of Gardena By Gretchen Williams, Cuisine Writer

L

eonard Kim’s Cherrystone Grill is a gem, a hidden jewel in the shadow of glitzy Hustler Casino. The Cherrystone is just one block south of the intersection of Redondo Beach Boulevard and Vermont Avenue, and yet it could be miles away from Larry Flynt’s atrocious attempt to glamorize Gardena. Kim has brought the cozy feeling of a neighborhood place in Maui or the Big Island to Gardena with Cherrystone. The dining room is comfortable and bright with Japanese accents and art. The casual vibe conveys Island spirit on a swirly blue longboard suspended from the ceiling. Leonard has stocked the karaoke machine with Hawaiian

and Polynesian favorites as well as American classics, so the place rocks with singers later in the evenings. Kim is an accomplished magician and performs at the Magic Castle in Hollywood, so magic tricks could be performed at any time. It is easy to imagine that Cherrystone is someone’s welcoming home, rather than a restaurant. Leonard Kim is a familiar face in the harbor area. He started with take out teriyaki in the early days of Ports O’ Call village, and owned the Harbor Village Inn at 25th and Western in San Pedro. He has owned and operated a variety of restaurants around the port complex. His family has always been a part of his restaurant life, and his sisters

continues to “keep things hopping” he says, at Cherrystone. The true fusion cuisine of the Islands gets free rein at Cherrystone. Traditional “Poke” is the ceviche of Hawaii, gorgeous raw cubes of Ahi tuna seasoned with toasted sesame seed oil and soy, generous enough for two and a real bargain at $9.50. Fried clam strips bring back summer days at the beach, though the tempura treatment here is far superior, sauced with great cocktail sauce and lemon wedges. Do not miss Cherrystone’s award winning chili, made sans frijoles and spectacularly spiced and made with prime rib. This is a deal for $5 a cup, satisfying and wonderful with chopped onion and shredded cheese. New England clam chowder is full of clams, packed with clam flavor. Cajun Seafood Gumbo is thick with seafood, vegetables and rice, just a bit spicy and brimming with flavor. Bento is the traditional box lunch of Japan, brought to Hawaii with great success. The varieties of salads, rice, meat, chicken or fish make every bento box a delicious surprise, like opening a gift. Cherrystone offers a good assortment of entrees for the bento, like teriyaki chicken, juicy kalua pork and cabbage, macadamia nut coated mahi mahi or shrimp with lobster sauce. Each bento includes somen salad, macaroni salad, broccoli medley, steamed rice and fruit. Bento boxes range from $10 to $13. Bento is thought to be lunch fare, but makes an excellent choice at dinner time for the light eater. Cherrystone seems to know exactly what you would like to eat after a tough day. Homemade meatloaf and mashed potatoes is a favorite, made from 100 percent ground chuck, and braised ribs smothered with brown gravy is tender with long cooking. Kalbi is Korean style barbecue ribs, made with beef ribs well aged and grilled. The rib eye steak is legendary and a steal at $18.50 for an aged

Entertainment Calendar from page 12. Roger Apana barbecues chicken and ribs, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, at Cherrystone Grill in Gardena.

May 13

Blue Bayou, Linda Ronstadt Tribute Blue Bayou’s Tribute to Linda Ronstadt returns to Alvas Showroom at 4 p.m. May 13. Tickets are $20. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W 8th St., San Pedro

May 18

Joel Gaines Singer Joel Gaines will perform at 8:30 p.m. May 18. Tickets are $10. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Details: http://7thstreetchophouse.com/ Venue: 7th Street Chophouse Location: 465 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Community/Family May 4

for that fantastic chicken is a steal. “I get quite a few gamblers from the casino,” said Roger. “Mostly the losers buy chicken. The winners go for prime rib.” Venue: Cherrystone Grill and Grotto Location: 15501 S.Vermont Ave., Gardena Details: (310) 329-8200

May 5

First Saturday Hike Join an expert guide to discover habitat, wildlife and more from 1 to 3 p.m. May 5, starting from the George F Canyon Preserve and Nature Center in Rolling Hills Estates. Cost is $5. Details: (310) 547-0862 Venue: George F Canyon Nature Center Location: 27305 Palos Verdes Dr. East, Rolling Hills Estates

• Happy Hour •

Lecture: Victorian Era Medicine & the Civil War The community is invited to the second in a series of Historical Lectures, at 10 a.m. May 5, in the historic carriage barn of the Banning Museum in Wilmington.”Victorian Era Medicine & the Civil War” covers common home remedies as well as patient care during the Civil War. Guests will be allowed to examine the artifacts displayed and will enjoy a Q-and-A session as part of the lecture. Admission to the event is $5. Details: (310) 548-2005; www.thebanningmuseum. org Venue: Banning Museum Location: 401 E. “M” St., Wilmington

May 6

Godmother’s Saloon • Live jazz from Mike Guerrero Trio: 7 p.m. every Wed. (310) 833-1589, 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766 Ports o’ Call • Happy Hour: Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro

Whale & Ale • Happy Hour: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

May 9

Penguins as Sentinels for Climate Change Biologist Wayne Trival piece will link the increasing temperatures and decreasing sea ice cover in the Antarctic Peninsula region to declines in krill and Adelie and Chinstrap penguin populations, from 7 to 9 p.m. May 9, at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach. Details: (562) 590-3100; www.aquariumofpacfic.org Venue: Aquarium of the Pacific Location: 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach

May 12

Forrestal Reserve Walk The 155-acre reserve walk offers some of the best wildflowers viewing in spring, from 9 to 11 a.m. May 12, in Rancho Palos Verdes. Entertainment Calendar to page 15.

May 4 – 17, 2012

San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour: 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 8315663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Early Insights into the Labor Movement Muller House Museum’s First Sunday Series features longtime community activist and former president of the ILWU Local 13 Art Almeida in a program on “Early Insights into the Labor Movement,” from 1 to 3 p.m. May 6 at the Labor Movement Muller House Museum. Some of the material covered is from his recently released book, The Wobblies in San Pedro, which will be available for sale. An assortment of labor memorabilia will be on display throughout the month of May. Details: sanpedrobayhistoricalsociety.org Venue: Labor Movement Muller House Museum Location: 1542 S. Beacon St., San Pedro

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

14-ounce choice cut, served with baked potato and fresh vegetables. Chilean Sea bass steamed with black bean sauce, fresh ginger and green onions is fantastic, perfectly cooked, suited for white rice to soak up the wonderful sauce. Fish and chips seem un-Hawaiian, but the version served at Cherrystone is enough to make Honolulu feel like Harrods. Cherrystone roasts prime rib roast very slowly at low temps, seasoned with Hawaiian salt and select spices. The result is meltingly tender, lovely with fresh horseradish and au jus. Available only on the weekends, Cherrystone’s prime rib is priced right, with a petite 8-ounce cut for $12.50, the 12ounce house cut for $16.50 and the huge 16-ounce Cherrystone cut for $19.50. Succulent and juicy, Cherrystone’s prime rib dinner is so popular that many aficionados order the whole meal to go and enjoy the feast at home. Underground barbecue legend Roger Apana sets up his chicken and ribs operation at the east Cherrystone entrance on Saturdays and Sundays, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. He is well known in the neighborhood and has many regular customers who make the barbecue stop every weekend. Roger’s Huli Huli style is “The best chicken in town” according to a drive-up customer, direct from the Hustler Casino. “My usual, with an extra leg for the granddaughter.” His fedora had a jaunty angle. “I come from Orange County for this chicken,” he said. “I’ve even taken this chicken to my girl in Temecula. Every day is a journey and chicken is my destiny.” Roger’s special chicken and ribs dry rub remains a secret. “I’ll put the recipe in your coffin” he said, chuckling. Diana Salvatierra is the pretty and charming help, making major league barbecue look easy. Roger’s mesquite charcoal is from Mexico, his chicken and ribs grilled over direct heat for maximum flavor and crispy texture. The barbecue turns out rack after rack of tasty ribs, a good deal for $13 for half slabs, $25 for a whole slab. $10

El Camino College to Sponsor Third Annual Guitar Festival The public is invited to attend El Camino College’s Third Annual Guitar Festival, scheduled for May 4 and 5. The festival includes two full days of concerts, clinics and master classes, with representatives from guitar programs from nearly every college and university in the area. All activities and clinics are free and open to the public. The event features volunteer clinicians who will teach master classes on various styles of guitar, including classical, rock or metal, and jazz. Tickets are available for $15. Details: www.CenterfortheArts.org Venue: El Camino College Music Building 134 Location: 16007 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance

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Big Nick’s Pizza Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800

Fancy Melts “Fancy” barely begins to describe it. Our secret recipe old-world bread has been a San Pedro staple since 1975. Now we use it to create the most amazing grilled sandwiches you’ll ever try. Come taste what everyone has been talking about... Delivered right up to your car window if you wish. Fancy Fever... Catch it! Call your order ahead for made–to–order, no–waiting pick-ups! Hours: Tues–Fri 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sat – Sun 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., closed Monday. 2331 Alma St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4331

Boardwalk Grill

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfortable gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766

May 4 – 17, 2012

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

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Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also o f fe r s c l a s s i c Italian dishes and sauces based on triedand-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com The Chowder Barge

L.A. Harbor’s famous floating restaurant, surrounded by boats in Leeward Bay Marina. Dine inside by our fire place, or outside on our deck . This unique spot ser ves great sandwiches, burgers, fish & chips, wings and of course, the BEST clam chowder anywhere! Try our sourdough bread bowl and daily specials. Wine and beer on tap or by the bottle, featuring our 34oz Captains Mug! The new owners have kept the “funkiness” of the old barge, and stepped it up several notches. Watch the games on our big screen TVs, utilize our WiFi and enjoy our XM tunes. THE place for your next party. Hours: Mon, Tues 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Wed, Thurs 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Fri, Sat, Sun 9 a.m.–8 p.m. 611 N. Henry Ford, (at Anaheim) Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington • (310) 830-7937 www.ChowderBarge.com

Iron City Tavern

Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the darling café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash soup and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crepes and pastas. The best indulgence is taking a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com NIKO’S PIZZERIA Downtown San Pedro’s newest restaurant features a full Italian menu, as well as pizza, and a beer and wine bar. We carry a wide selection of beers on tap and by the bottle. Watch sporting events on plasma TV screens throughout the restaurant. Delivery service to all of San Pedro, Port locations, and hotels. 399 W. 6th St., San Pedro (at the corner of Mesa and 6th sts.) • (310) 241-1400 PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING Since 1961 we’ve extended a hear ty welcome to visitors from every corner of the globe. Delight in an awe-inspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor

while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the Award-Winning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www.Portsocalldining.com PRONTO’S FRESH MEXICAN GRILL & PRONTO’S BURGERS

(25th and Western) 2420 S. Western Ave. , San Pedro, (310) 832-4471

Los Angeles 110 W. El Segundo Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 527-7323 Gardena 13890 S. Normadie Ave., Gardena, (310) 327-5615

www.prontosmexgrill.com.

San Pedro Brewing Compnay SPBC has an eclectic menu featuring pastas, steaks, seafood, sandwiches, salads, delicious appetizers, and great BBQ. Handcrafted ales and lagers are made on the premises. A full bar with made-from-scratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 www.sanpedrobrewing.com SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 www.spiritmarine.com Taxco Mexican Restaurant We are proud to serve our community for over 25 years. We offer some of the most unique Mexican dishes around, including the best fajitas in town in a great family atmosphere. Catering for every occasion. Beer, wine and margaritas to your taste. Tony and Vini Moreno welcome you. Hours: 9 a.m. to 10 .m. daily. Major credit cards accepted. 29050 S. Western Ave., San Pedro (at Capitol and Western) • (310) 547-4554 www.sanpedro.com, click on RESTAURANTS

Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfor table dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, English pies, venison, salmon, swordfish & vegan/vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live Music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-0363 www.whaleandale.com

San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure Pick Up Your 2012 Copy Today!

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

RandomNotes

A Night at the House of Blues By B. Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

W

of equipment. I hate to think what happens on nights when metal is performed. Actually, a DJ would fit perfectly on that stage. Despite the noise from below, what happened from 8 p.m. when the group hit the boards to around 10 p.m. when they did their last set was brilliant. The New Blues Revolution took us into some interesting musical territory. The three sets included eight originals and 10 covers. The music fell into four categories of blues, rock, rhythm and blues, and fusion. Let’s be clear, they are not a pure blues band. The songs the group really connected with were their originals. Those songs spoke to the listeners with authenticity. The song “Blue Café” paints a picture of the happening hub that is the Long Beach Blues scene. While the instrumental “Pink 7” comes by way of the Jeff Beck or Joe Satriani school of jazz, rock, blues fusion, the tune “Let Me Go” is one of those kick ass tunes that rock and bite you at every turn. The song harkens back to the southern rock sound of Molly Hatchet. “Big House” has more of a delta feel with Chap Cooper showing off his slide licks. “Sway” is a true tail dragging blues or rock vamp, very wet, and wild, like some swamp beast coming out on the bayou nightfall. The last three songs are on

Continued from page 11.

Lane describes himself as a through-andthrough blues guy, but that in the past 3 to 4 years, he gotten deep into rockabilly. “All artists go through a phase that they learn from ideally,” Lane explained. “I went through my John Lee Hooker phase and R.L. Burnside. When I was kid I was into Led Zeppelin.” “You get into the music intensely and you study that style. So that is happened to me recently with the Rockabilly thing,” Lane explained. “The Rockabilly music is the roots of the music that I grew up listening to. At this show, I have a platform to play this music. This just fun music, everybody likes it.” Lane explained that rockabilly music is the basis for the heavier stuff that blues rock is all about. “It’s one of those things that is all related, every genre of blues are all cousins,” Lane said. This is going to be night of celebration of the old and the new. Lane is bringing some special guests on at 8 p.m. May 19 for this one time only event. Featured during the two sets is Darren “Mojo Slim” Lancaster, who will join the band on Harmonica. Scott Mclean will come on and play a set, and a very special guest Mr. Dave Widow will join in the final set. This could be one of the high points with two men working everyone into a musical frenzy. This also maybe one of the few times we will see the Hellhounds. They are about to embark on a greater journey that is going to take them out of

Hellhounds

When asked who those inspirations were, Lane replied, “Chuck Berry for one. But there are certain songs that are more important than the artists,” he explained with his encyclopedic blues mind. “Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats [with] his song “Rocket 88” is a good example (That was Ike Turner’s band)... This is considered the first rock ‘n’ roll record.” Lane went on to explain that the 1951 song was recorded at Sam Phillips Sun Studios in Memphis, and that on the journey to the recording session, the amp had fallen, creating a very dirty distorted sound. Phillips liked this sound, and the swinging little number that hung about the Oldsmobile, Rocket 88, which had just come out onto the market in 1949. “You see,” Lane explained. “Rock ’n’ roll came out of swing music... Big Joe Turner’s ‘Shake Rattle and Roll’ was more of a swing number. When Elvis came along, he added that country feel which is more straight time.” Lane noted that it was from Elvis rockabilly music sprang emulating him. Lane recounted a little story about Carl “Blue Suede Shoes” Perkins when he first heard Elvis on the radio. Perkins wife said to him, “Come hear this. This boy sounds just like you.” He went to Sun Studios became a part of music history.”

the Harbor or South Bay area. I expect this group to break into the new blues scene as it begins to explode across America and the world. The blues has lately been going through a dormant period. The audience is ready for a purer more driven electric sound. There are few artists who are in a position to jump into this arena. The Hellhounds are on the cutting edge of the new reinvention of the blues. Details: www.reverbnation/thehellhoundsrock Venue: Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Entertainment Calendar from page 13. Details: (310) 541-7613; www.pvlpc.org Venue: Forrestal Reserve Location: 32201 Forrestal Dr., Rancho Palos Verdes May 12 American Indian Pow Wow American Indians from across Southern California will come together in celebration at the 2nd Annual Pow Wow: Honoring the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas hosted by California State University, Dominguez Hills from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. May 12, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. May 13, in the Sculpture Garden. A social and also sacred gathering, pow wows bring together tribes from all over the country. Traditional songs and dances are performed by men and women in colorful and elaborate tribal regalia. The pow wow at CSU Dominguez Hills will feature exhibition and social dancing, singing and drumming. Many vendors will be in attendance selling goods such as Indian jewelry, clothes, music, books, and food including Indian tacos and frybread. Venue: Cal State Dominguez Hills Location: 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson May 17 Aquarium’s First Penguin Exhibit Opens The Aquarium of the Pacific will debut the June Keyes Penguin Habitat, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. May 17, in Long Beach. The exhibit will feature Magellanic penguins, some of which were rescued from Brazil, where they were stranded outside of their native habitat. Cost ranges from $13.95 for young children to $24.95 for adults. Details: (562) 590-3100; www.aquariumofpacfic. org Venue: Aquarium of the Pacific Location: 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach

Theater/Film May 4 Mrs. Smart’s Spectacular Circus Bored with school, her parents, her electronic gadgets and her 2,472 “really close friends” on FacePlace, Priscilla Pagliaccio decides to seek adventure under the Big Top. Come along for the roller coaster ride as she joins up with “Mrs. Smart’s Spectacular Circus!” and learns lessons about love, friendship, and living in the real world, starting at 8 p.m. May 4 through 26, with matinees at 2:30 p.m. May 13, 20 and 27, at The Found Theatre. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and younger. Details: (562) 433-3363; foundtheatre.org Venue: The Found Theatre Location: 599 Long Beach Blvd., Long Beach Spring Awakening Spring Awakening plays at 8 p.m. May 3 through 5, with a 2 p.m. peformance May 6, at Cal State Dominguez Hills’ University Theatre. General admission cost is $15; students and senior citizens pay $12. Originally written in 1891 by Frank Wedekind and adapted into a rock-opera in 2006 by Steven Sater, with music by Duncan Sheik, Spring Awakening is about young adults working through issues of sexuality within the confines of strict school and home environments, all complex subjects that still resonate today. Details: (310) 243-3589; www.csudh.edu/theatre/ tickets.htm Venue: University Theatre Location: 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

e cruised the freeways and byways into West Hollywood on April 28th for an evening of southern styled food, booze and blues. If you’ve never been to the House of Blues, it’s like walking into a New Orleans juke joint with its rural art and French faux designs carved into the dark wooded interior walls. The evening started with blackened salmon entree and healthy libations served in a mason jar. This, by the way, was not the usual Hollywood experience. Everyone was nice, the service was beyond excellent. But the good food and service wasn’t the reason for the long ride into WEHO. We were there to see The New Blues Revolution fronted by singer, songwriter and pianist Bill Grisolia. Guitarist Chap Cooper, drummer Brad Dawson and bassist Hank Van Sickle (formerly of the John Mayall’s Blues Breakers, filling in for regular band member Barry Hayman) on this night. What we witnessed was a band working very hard to play above a cacophonous din rising from the main stage. The group soldiered on through what sounded like Armageddon rumbling through the floorboards. The Crossroads Stage is on the second floor of the 3-story restaurant and performance venue. Its stage is big enough to hold a four piece band and a modest amount

the group’s CD Revolution # 9. Bill Grisolia has the vocal chops that resonate with his darker lyrics like their song “Whiskey Town.” Even the cover of the Al Green classic, “Take Me to the River;” this does not demand the range that Al Green gives this song. What seems to be the Achilles heel is the covers they perform. Some songs like The Beatles, “Come Together” are so iconic that anything other than complete artistic ownership with a song like that always comes off less than stellar. This happened a few times throughout the set when a cover was pulled out; the songs did not ring as true as they could. Beyond that Grisolia is great to watch. He works the stage like a playful tiger. You never know where he is going to take you. The show was a bit loose and the points that really connected did not happen as much as one would want. That being said, overall the group has the chops to get a crowd going and set the tone at any venue. What we have is a band made up of solid players. If they can build up enough original material to fill the gap without having to resort to working covers, they could be on to be something new. They have the ability to go well beyond the boundaries of the greater Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Area. Before leaving the West Hollywood nightspot, the group was informed that they would be a part of a cadre of artists who will represent the House of Blues. The New Blues Revolution is coming to Busters Beach House in the Long Beach Marina from 4 to 8 p.m. on May 6. Details: www.NewBluesRevolution.com

May 9 Panache Panache will show through May 26. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sunday May 13 at 2 p.m. and 5p.m. and Thursday May 24 at 8 p.m. D e t a i l s : ( 310 ) 51 2 - 6 0 3 0 ; h t t p : / / w w w. littlefishtheatre.org Venue: Little Fish Theatre Location: 777 Centre St., San Pedro

May 4 – 17, 2012

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Dr. Michael Weitzman:

Art Spotlight

May 3 Bird is Back The selected works of Jerry Byrd, from 1970 to 2012, will be on display May 3 through July 27, at Gallery 478 in San Pedro. An artist reception is scheduled from 4 to 7 p.m. May 5. The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Details: (310) 732-2150 Venue: Gallery 478 Location: 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro Curious Matters at First Thursday Assemblage works by RLn publisher James Preston Allen and Anne Olsen Daub will be on display at the First Thursday Artwalk from 6 to 9 p.m. Show runs May 3 to June 28. Venue: The Loft Gallery Location: 401 S. Mesa St., San Pedro

May 4 – 17, 2012

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

May 12 8-Bit Tropical: Ghetto Palms in the Mushroom Kingdom Runs from 6 to 11 p.m. through May 12, at Chatismo 101 Studio in Long Beach. 8-Bit Tropical is an art show of pixel art, 8-bit design and vintage video game console artwork inspired by the early arcade and video game consoles of the 1970s and 1980s. Details: (562) 507-2951 Venue: Chatismo 101 Studio Presents Location: 419 E. 6th. St., # 101, Long Beach

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365 W.

Friday, May 25, 2012

S ome

Icon of Caring and Service by: Arthur R. Vinsel

doctors golf He was an optometrist who religiously on Wednesdays and spent his entire professional life some become dehumanized when here, settling after U.S. Navy they make their very names a service. He became a bulwark corporation. But Dr. Michael of San Pedro’s entrenched civic Weitzman believed in people, and social service community. service, patience and love of life He always had time to help as a gift. make it a better place, mentoring There’s probably one like newcomers joining agencies and him in every town in America, organizations he led, or helping someone who raises money for with fundraising acumen. good causes, leads by example, “The way man treats fellow quietly imparts wisdom, values man stirred him,” said fellow Aug. 19, 1929 – April 16, 2012 friendship and shows humility past president of the Lions Club, toward the less-blessed. Wayne Bettis, one of many who Weitzman was a joyful Jewish man steeped in eulogized the beloved eye doctor. the rich heritage of his faith. He was 82 when he Howard Uller, director emeritus of Toberman succumbed to cancer April 16. A grand crowd filled Settlement House and longtime friend of Weitzmann Temple Beth El for his upbeat celebration of life echoed the theme of selflessness and compassion, the Friday after. patience and humility, tempered by great good humor. “Mike’s a very spiritual person,” Uller explained. “We Jews have this biblical dictum: Tzadakeh, which means charity and teaches [that] we must be good to the poor and the stranger. It comes from when the Children of Israel were poor and strangers in Egypt. Mike absolutely lived that principle,” Uller said. Uller called Weitzman a master at charity fundraising and that he put in more time as a volunteer at Toberman than some professionals there. And this was aside from his own career. Uller recalled an instance to illustrate his point: A low-income woman was going blind. She was a medical biller, but could no longer read the computer screen and lost her job. County health Sixth Street, San Pedro, Calif • 310-547-2348 officials wouldn’t provide cataract surgery and she

(Every Fourth Friday of the Month)

Dance Class 7 p.m. • Band Starts at 8 p.m.

Come join Barry Anthony, Sylvia Rodriguez and LA’s hottest swing band, “The Swing Of Things” for SWING PEEDRO, an evening of wonderful music, friends and dancing to your favorite Classic Big Band Swing songs. You’ll hear the songbooks of Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Harry James, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, Nat King Cole and many more while dancing and socializing with friends at the People’s Palace in the heart of San Pedro! New to dancing? Take the free one hour dance lesson with our pro instructor at 7, learn some steps and at 8, the music and the dance begin! Don’t have a partner? Come along and dance with our instructors, guests and suave Peedro staff dancers. Free light refreshments! Advance tickets available for $17, online at www.experiencesp.com and www.peoplesyogahealthdance.com and Swingpeedro.com Tickets at door $20. Call (310) 547-2348 for info and tickets. Get your tickets early!

began to seriously contemplate suicide. “Once Mike found out,” Uller explained, he said he’d do the surgery for free. But the hospital still required several thousand dollars for her care.” Mike found a foundation to cover the cost and everything worked out, Uller recounted. “And that patient is fine and back to work.” Someone once asked behind his back “‘Doesn’t that guy have a life?’ ‘Yes, he has a life,’” I said. “And it is a wonderful, marvelous life.” Uller and Weitzman lunched regularly at Ante’s Restaurant the past 18 months, as the cancer, thought beaten several years ago, recurred and progressed. “It was a way of saying ‘Hi and goodbye,’” said Uller. Ante’s was packed in January as Weitzman and his wife of 52 years, Phyllis, were co-honored with the Lions Club’s Ante Perkov Humanitarian of the Year Award. Educator and civic activist Annette Ciketic recalled his comment that night: “The thing you have to remember about life is to just show up...” She echoed the traditional Jewish byword used as a toast, a greeting and a farewell for centuries. “Mike, l’Chaim,” (To Life.) And he clung to life with gusto in his final months. He visited with friends, continued his voracious lifelong passion for reading and learning and eventually, as he weakened, he dictated letters to myriad friends and associates from his sickbed until the final days. He wanted them to know how he’d appreciated having them in his life. Having spent more than 40 years in his own private practice and more recently with San Pedro Eye Care Associates, Dr. Weitzman was active with Lions Club vision care programs for the lowincome population. He was the jovial fellow in white lab coat who gave school children and adults eye tests and screening for other problems in the Lions Club mobile clinic. “He was a wonderful man and very concerned about good vision for everyone, no matter their circumstances,” said Luis M. Lozano, executive director of Beacon House, the nonprofit alcohol and drug recovery program with 120 men. “He helped an awful lot of our men get their glasses over the past 10 years,” notes Lozano. Residents enroll in academic or trade school in their second year there and many require glasses. Raised in the Midwest, Weitzman received undergraduate schooling at Case Western University and graduated in 1957 from the Ohio State University School of Optometry. Once he settled in San Pedro with a practice in the South Shores District, he joined the San Pedro Peninsula Chamber of Commerce and Lions Club and later newer groups such as the Grand Vision Foundation and First Thursday Art Walk. Besides his wife Phyllis, Weitzman is survived by his sons Gregg and Don, and his daughter, Dr. Dedra Gierut.

478 W. 6th St. • San Pedro 310.548.2493

Tickets & Info: Williams Bookstore, www.WarnerGrand.org & www.WarnerGrandTheater.org

SUSHI BAR Every 1st Thursday Izon Eden,

No Cover, Large Menu, Discounted Specials Celebrate the Arts 327 W. 7th St. • 832-0363 www.whaleandale.com

Japanese Restaurant Sushi Bar 380 W. 6th St. • 832-5585

LA Harbor International Film Festival • May 3 through 6—

Opening Night Friday • May 4 • 7:30 p.m. • POLA premiere of La Prima Cosa Bella {The First Beautiful Thing} (Italy, 2011, 122 min.; drama/comedy, in Italian with sub-titles). The film is not rated and intended for an adult audience (viewer discretion advised; mature themes, language). Saturday •May 5 • 12 p.m. • Old Fashioned Saturday Matinee Journey to the Center of The Earth , The film is being released in Blue Ray DVD on May 8, some “lucky winners” will recieve vouchers for the DVD. General admission is $5 with Read the Book See the Movie participants and their families invited to attend free.

Saturday • May 5 • Evening is the Hollywood Nostalgia Tribute (HNT): Rodgers & Hammerstein’s State Fair (1962; 97 min.) The film program at the WGT begins at 7 p.m. Gala: 5-6:30 p.m. at the elegant Arcade Building precedes the HNT film. Guests will enjoy a menu of all American cuisine and martinis. Tickets are $65 before April 18; $75 at the door space permitting. Included are film program, preferred seating, souvenir program and party bag. General admission for film only is $10. Sunday • Closing Event • May 6 • 12:30 p.m. DocSunday: 15 minute program and lecture presented by Ed Steiner. 1:15 p.m. • POLA premiere of Kruzenshtern (Poland, 2010, 52 min.; Polish with sub-titles). “Q&A” to follow. 3 p.m. POLA premiere of One Lucky Elephant (U.S.A., 2010; 90 min.). “Q&A” will follow. Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community. May 4 – 17, 2012

17

Employment

Sales Random Lengths is looking for an experienced advertising/print salesperson. We are the Los Angeles Harbor Area’s oldest independent newspaper. We are a stable and growing company, open for over 30 years. The candidate should have 2 or more year’s experience in outside sales. Bi-lingual is a plus. Please email resume and cover letter with salary history to james@randomlengths news.com. Monthly base salary and commission. EOE Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub. net (AAN CAN) Actors/Movie Extras needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/ day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800560-8672 A-109 for casting times /locations.

Movie Extras. People needed now to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON 877-824-7260

CLASSIFIED ADS - Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com

Education

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

Educational tutoring by certified & experienced Special Education & Reading teacher. Patient, well-trained, creative & structured. An expert in positive reinforcement. Reasonable rates negotiated. 310-528-1111.

Business Opp

Academic and occupational consulting and guidance assistance with the college admissions process, admission essays, resume revision and job searches. Call for a free consultation! 424-210-5771. For more info: http://guidedachievements. info.

(AAN CAN)

ALL CASH VENDING IN YOUR LOCAL AREA.  Be your own boss-25 machines/ candy all for -$9,995.00.  1-877-915-8222. Vend 3. 880 Grand Blvd, Deer Park, NY. (AAN CAN) Takeover Payments On Existing Loans 20-50% OFF thousands of homes available. No Credit requirements. CALL Today 805-683-8600 Please no section-8 (AAN CAN)

Professional Services MOBILE NOTARY—South Bay. I come to you. Certified to notarize loan documents. Bonded. Paula Bills, commission #1894472. (310) 691-9921.

Career Training EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film

Teach English Abroad! 4-week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries! www.teflworldwideprague. com info@teflworldwideprague.com

Adoption Service PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (AAN CAN)

Psychics

Storage Available

PSYCHIC GLORIA

Storage Containers for rent in San Pedro, at 15th and Centre Streets. 310 544-7400.

Help on all love, money, health problems. Guaranteed results in 3 days. Reunite lovers.

310-470-9046 Yard Sale

Yard Sale, Sat. & Sun., 570 W. 12th St., San Pedro.

Dating Services EroticEncounters. com  Where Hot Girls Share their private fantasies! Instant Connections.   Fast & Easy.   Mutual Satisfaction Guaranteed. Exchange messages, Talk live 24/7, Private 1-on-1. G i v e i n t o Te m p t a t i o n , call now 1-888-700-8511 New! Free to Try! 4 Services! 1-877-660-3887 Instant Live Connections! 1-866-8173308. Hundreds of Local Women! You Choose! 1-877747-8644. Connect With Live (18+) Local Ladies! 1-866530-0180 (AAN CAN)

Pets Adopt a pet from the Harbor Care Center, 957 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro. 888452-7381.

Autos Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. WeCome To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com CAR OWNERS EARN $600/ MONTH Rent out your car safely with RelayRides.com/ Earn. You control the price, times & people for each rental. RelayRides provides all insurance & support. Free to join. Questions? Email Earn@RelayRides.com or call (415)729-4227 (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE Room For Rent $140 PER WEEK! SAN PEDRO SRO Hotel has rooms available. A clean, tranquil setting for the best price. Alex (310) 514-3919.

Reach 63,000 Harbor Area Readers

Ave., SP. Call Francisco, 310872-4831.

Rommates

Commerical Real Estate For Lease

ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listingswith photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

716 Weymouth Ave. 690 sq. ft., newly remodeled. $700/ mo., 1st and security deposit due on move-in. Call 310210-8877 or 310-548-6732. San Pedro – For Lease S.Pacific Ave. office suites & retail space in the “Arts District”. Several choices available. A-Delta Realty 310/831-6670

Real Estate Investor seeks to purchase commercial or multi-unit residential properties in San Pedro. No Agents please. 310-241-6827

Apartment / House For Rent Special—$199 to move in, no deposit! Newly remodeled single unit for $670/mo, 1 bdrm unit $850/mo. Wood & tile flooring, secured property, quiet area, close to bus lines. Gas included. 2040 S. Pacific

May 4 - 17, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Bulletin Board

18

Bread & Hyacinths This is the book that explains why the city of Los

Don Marshall CPA, Inc.

Angeles is the way it is. Bread and Hyacinths: the Rise and Fall of Utopian Los Angeles is the gripping, little-known saga of the great battle between Job Harriman, the West Coast’s leading socialist, and General Harrison Gray Otis, publisher of the Los Angeles Times—a battle for the future of Los Angeles. Written by Lionel Rolfe, Nigey Lennon and Paul Greenstein, Bread and Hyacinths was originally published in 1992 by California Classics Books. It is reprinted by Random Lengths News and available for $15.

Don Marshall, MBA, CPA

Buy it now at Williams Bookstore, Random Lengths News office and The Tobacco Leaf at Western & 25th

(310) 833-8977

Golden West Realty Serving San Pedro and the entire South Bay since 1980

Specializing in small businesses CPA Quality Service at very reasonable rates

www.donmarshallcpa.com

8/12

Please help!

Vintage Auto & Motorcycle Storage 25 indoor & outdoor stalls

• Armed Response Alarm System • Web-based Video Monitoring • Electronic Access Control • 24-Hour Availability • Self-Serve Free Hand Wash • WIFI Hotspot • Free Charging Station (310) 707-2207 www.8thstreetgarage.com

The animals at the Harbor Animal Shelter have ongoing need for used blankets, comforters, pet beds.* Drop off at Harbor Animal Shelter, 957 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro.

888-452-7381, x 143

PLEASE SPAY/NEUTER YOUR PET! *In any condition. We will wash and mend.

DBA filing and publishing $120 (310) 519-1442

NEW LISTING IN WILMINGTON! 

Three bedroom, 13/4 bath home on a large corner lot. Features include a covered patio off the living room, a spacious yard with fruit trees, and a detached 2 car garage. This “1 Owner Home” is conveniently located to shopping, parks, and freeway.

LARGE 4 BEDROOM FAMILY HOME

Large 4 bedroom, 2 bath home so near the channel you can see the ships moving past. It has an island kitchen with a nice dining area. There is a large backyard just behind the 2-car garage. A long driveway is suitable for boat, rv, or any other toys. This home is also large enough and the floorplan is suitable for extended family. Come on down...Reduced to $298,000.

For more information call Golden West Realty

310.548.2881

www.goldenwestsanpedro.com 1 5 1 7 S . G a f f e y S t . • San Pedro, CA 90731

Real Estate Agents Get FREE listing ads in the Classifieds with your display ad. Link your display ad to your website in RLn’s online publication.

310-519-1442 www.randomlengthsnews.com

Legals DBAs Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012032486 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Diaz Painting, 23412 Figueroa, Carson, CA 90745. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Vincent Diaz, , 23412 Figueroa, Carson, CA 90745. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Vincent Diaz, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 28, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it sions Code). Original filing: 03/22/12, 04/05/12, 04/19/12, 05/03/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012042443 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) David’s Yacht Service, 241 Watchorn Walk Ste #1, San Pedro, CA 90731. PO Box 2784, Newport Beach, CA 92659. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Boat City Yachts Inc, 241 Watchorn Walk Ste #1, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all

continued on following page

from previous page information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. David H. Grosse, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 14, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 03/22/12, 04/05/12, 04/19/12, 05/03/12

05/03/12, 05/17/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012046458 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Tony’s Mobile Auto Detail, 678 W. Sepulveda St., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Sandra PenaLopez, 678 W. Sepulveda St., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Sandra PenaLopez, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 20, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this

statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/05/12, 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012046455 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Brotto Company USA, 28649 S. Western Ave., RPV, CA 90274. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Branko Tomasovic, 28649 S. Western Ave., RPV, CA 90274. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above March 5, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Branko Tomasovic, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 20, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/05/12, 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012056170 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Grande Coin Laundry, 1202 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Eric S. Golden, 25241 Nueva Vista, Laguna Niguel, CA 92677. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Eric S. Golden, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 3, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided

in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012056171 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Harbor Day Preschool, 580 W. 6th St., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: C0124596. Registered owner(s): San Pedro United Methodist Church, 580 W. 6th St., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Wayne Lebsack, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 3, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012060465 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Got It Right Entertainment, 3745 Stephen M White Dr., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Michael B Stribling, 3745 Stephen M White Dr., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to

be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Michael B Stribling, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 6, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/19/12, 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12

Fictitious Business Name ‘Statement File No. 2012076043 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Ofeliaí’s Bookkeeping Service, 1350 W. 9th Street, #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Ofelia Familathe , 1350 W. 9th Street., #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above April 18, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who

declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Ofelia Familathe, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 25, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012060859 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) YKM Services, 305 W. Santa Cruz St., #6 San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Raul Madrigal, 305 W. Santa Cruz St., #6 San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above April 18, 2012. I declare that all information in

this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Raul Madrigal e, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12

DBA (Fictitious Business Name) filing and publishing $120

(310) 519-1442

May 4 - 17, 2012

05/03/12, 05/17/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012046456 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Diabetic Medical, 255 W. 5th Street, Suite# 1212, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Rowena Cebian, 255 W. 5th Street, Suite #1212, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Rowena Cebian, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 20, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/05/12, 04/19/12,

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 20120493646 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Champion Autoworks, 760 W. 27th Street #1, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Bleu Box Events, 760 W. 27th Street #1, San Pedro, CA 90731. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1527, San Pedro, CA 90733-1527. This business is conducted by a corporation. Articles of Incorporation #:3320912. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Sandra Koerner, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 23, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 04/05/12, 04/19/12,

LEGAL BUSINESS FILINGS

19

20

May 4 - 17, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


RLn 05-03-12 Edition