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Bike Lanes Upset Local Residents p. 2 Project Fatherhood: Dad’s Role Redefined p. 2 Pine Leaf Boys Headlines the LB Bayou Festival p.11 q

Chef Dustin Trani Rocks Wine Dinner p. 12

Government Entities, Environmentalists Sue to Block SCIG Litigants Challenge Dubious Approval Process—Echoing China Shipping Lawsuit By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

Cuban photographer José A. Figueroa. Photo by Ray Carofano. Above, Figueroa’s “Olga, Havana, 1967,” from the Exile series.

Figueroa on Figueroa/ to p. 16

Cities Sue/ to p. 5

June 14 - 27, 2013

Figueroa Street has drawn world renowned Cuban photographer, José A. Figueroa to Los Angeles. Curious about the street which shares his name, the artist set out to explore the 30 miles of Los Angeles beginning in San Pedro and ending in Eagle Rock. Cuban photo documentarian José A. Figueroa is known for his work presenting everyday life in postrevolutionary Cuba. His work demonstrates the “transitional generation” of Cubans whose customs and styles paralleled western styles and customs. In his 50-year career he has captured every stage of the country’s development. In the 60s and 70s he worked as a photojournalist for Cuba International Magazine, Cuba’s version of Life magazine. As opposed to his mentor Alberto Korda, who shot the famous “Che” photo known around the world, Figueroa spent much of his career photographing the private lives of Cubans. The result is a fascinating documentation of street life in Cuba. His photography is in collections and museums around the world.

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By Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Columnist

For the first time in its history, the South Coast Air Quality Management District has gone to court to block a proposed development project—the Southern California International Gateway [SCIG], an off-dock railyard for BNSF railway, which the Los Angeles City Council approved on May 8. The AQMD is well-known for its principled, but non-confrontational, collegial approach—a practical necessity, given that its responsibilities to meet federal clean air standards far exceed the legal powers it has to fulfill its duties. It has never before even testified against a proposed project at a final approval hearing, as it did on May 8. But the Port of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles’ intransigence, seem to have left the AQMD without any other options. Hence the lawsuit. The Natural Resource Defense Counsel also filed suit to force the port to redo the project’s final environmental impact report. The NRDC is also representing the Coalition for Clean Air and East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice. The City of Long Beach and Long Beach Unified School District have filed suit as well. “Our school district’s primary goal is to provide a safe learning environment,” said LBUSD Superintendent Christopher J. Steinhauser in a story posted to the district’s website. “We cannot support a project that would pose any health risk to our students and staff.” “The EIR masks the true impacts of the project on students, schools and staff,” the story went on to say. “California has developed special standards for evaluating emissions impacts on students, but the Port refused to apply those standards.” The district went on to point out that its

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HARBOR AREA Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Bike Lanes Infuriate Residents By Joseph Baroud, Editorial Intern

About 240 miles of bicycle lanes were added throughout Los Angeles within the past twoand-a-half years, but the ones on Westmont and Capital drives in San Pedro have residents up in arms. So what went wrong? Installing the bicycle lanes on Westmont and Capital has meant the removal of a vehicular lane on each side of the street. Instead of the street maintaining two lanes vehicles that can travel on each side, it’s now reduced to one. This has resulted in an increased amount of traffic congestion during drop-off and pickup hours from Dodson Middle School, atop the street. San Pedro residents attended meetings and were aware of the implementation of the bike lanes. The extent of their awareness is debatable. “They didn’t talk about specific configurations, [at the community meetings held on the topic of the bike lanes] but it was known at the time that a majority of the proposal could result in a loss of lanes,” said Branimir Kvartuc, Councilman Joe Buscaino’s communication director. “Community meetings were held citywide, including San Pedro. Capital and Westmont drives were added to the plan because of the outreach process.” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the Complete Streets Act in 2008. The legislation was enacted as a result of successful lobbying efforts made by the California Bicycle Coalition during the final months of Schwarzenegger’s administration. The Complete Streets Act was designed to

Bike lane on Westmont off of Western Avenue. Photo by Terelle Jerricks

enable safe access for all users. This has given pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders the ability to move along safely. Councilman Buscaino’s office claims the outreach program was designed to inform community members of the project, reaching out to local residents through community workshops and neighborhood council meetings. His office said that the community supported the inclusion of bike lanes. “The outreach [programs] did come to Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council

June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Tom Harless on a park outing with his son. Photo by Terelle Jerricks.

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meetings and did talk about bike lanes,” Kvartuc argued. “I don’t know what the vote was, but a majority of members voted the bike lanes would be a good idea.” Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council members, however, do not recall discussing bicycle lane installations or having ever attended a meeting. Diana Nave, NWSPNC president, said the board doesn’t have an issue with the bicycle lanes, but rather with the confusion and congestion it has caused. She also said they didn’t like the

Department of Transportation making changes to their city without consulting them first. The council passed a resolution on May 15, 2013 regarding the bicycle lanes, resolving that the council be consulted; that there be adequate notice given to the community prior to initiation of any future work; that the council office establish a task force to further examine the impacts at all intersections and develop recommendations within 30 days for possible alleviation of the problems; and direct the Planning Department and Department of Transportation to re-analyze the traffic impacts of the proposed Ponte Vista project. The bike lanes added on Westmont and Capital Drive, are much wider than conventional bike lanes. Further width was added to ensure a heightened feeling of safety for people using the bike lanes and to accommodate people with disabilities. The bike lanes have also added an extra safety measure. The slowing down of traffic has resulted in less traffic collisions within the area and a safer location for children to walk. “What the Los Angeles Police Department likes about the bike lanes, is it’s slowing down traffic on Westmont during the hours that there’s kids out there.” Kvartuc said. Kvartuc said Buscaino is aware some of the residents in the neighborhood are against the bike lanes and would like the street to be back to the way it was. But community streets were designed to accommodate all members of the community. “This act is supposed to be inclusive of everybody using the street,” Kvartuc said. People who are ordinarily bicycle riders can’t find what all the fuss is about. Southern continued on following page

Fatherhood Gets Redefined By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

A year ago, Huggies came out with commercials that put “dads to the test,” depicting how five fathers were incompetent when it came to feeding their children or changing their diapers. The commercials received negative feedback from fathers across the nation because they essentially reinforced age-old stereotypes of how men, by the mere nature of their gender, are unable to properly care for their children. While these stereotypes are based on the reality that many men are not engaged in the lives of their children, the view that the commercials represented simply do not hold true to all men these days. Despite the changing times, fathers often aren’t recognized as being necessary in the parenting process. Anthony Young, lead therapist at the Los Angeles based nonprofit Project Fatherhood believes fathers “have been left out of the equation,” in the modern American family. “When I look every week and I see fathers at the table; these fathers love their children just as much, and some even more, than the mothers,” Young said. “We want to give the fathers an opportunity to show everyone that we are not some of the fathers that people are talking about. “Because we want to be in our children’s lives.” The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Administration for Children and Families in conjunction with private and public entities fund the Project Fatherhood initiative, which works to re-engage fathers in the upbringing of their children. The project created a support system that includes parental education and employment readiness for fathers.

The project’s core service is providing group therapy support led by mental health professionals to promote responsible parenting and address traumatic experiences. “We do not diagnose; we do not label, we do not interpret,” Young said “When we talk about our topics we are not limited. It’s an open ended group that meets 90 minutes a week. It’s not a 12week, 52-week type of program. Each father is here for life.” While the group is in session, children are engaged in concurrent enrichment activities such as arts and crafts, learning games and sports. Plus, counseling also is available for the children, if needed. The diverse group of men also socializes with their children outside of the group for parties and other activities, so that the children have fun. “Because one of our mottos is: ‘If your kids are alright, you’re alright,’” said Thomas Harless, who used to attend those group meetings on a regular basis. “And I think that is a big motto. If my kids weren’t alright, I wouldn’t be alright.”

Tom’s Story

Harless has defied the stereotypical view that men are not caregivers or involved in the upbringing of their children. The 49-year-old became a member of the group after a series of struggles with his life partner, Jeanie Argento. The couple broke up about four years. Drugs and other issues led him to have sole custody of their children after the Department of Children and Father’s Role Redefined/ to p. 4

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Up in Arms Over Bike Lanes California’s beach cities have the perfect landscape for bicycle riding. Many of those cities have paved bicycle pathways to compliment the terrain and the scenery. “We are a California beach city,” said Allyson Vought, a San Pedro resident and professional cyclist. “And we lack any kind of infrastructure to support alternate means of transportation.” While Capital Drive might offer a too much resistance for the casual bicycle rider, Westmont

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area State of the Second District

Join Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal for the State of the Second District, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. June 20, at The Edison Theater in Long Beach. Details: (562) 570-6684 Venue: The Edison Theater Location: 213 E. Broadway, Long Beach

Housing Element

Long Beach residents are encouraged to make their voices heard at the at the Long Beach City Council, June 20, when the City of Long Beach presents its draft housing element. The Planning Commission of Long Beach helps set a path for the city’s 2014-2021 Housing Element. The housing element is a road map that lays out priorities for housing development for years to come. The community has a chance to let the planning commission know what they want in terms of quality, affordable housing in Long Beach. Housing Long Beach and its community partners are promoting four components to be included in the housing element: 1) Mixed Income Housing (a percentage of all future development is affordable) 2) Permanent Local Funding Sources for Affordable Housing 3) A Rent Trust to Improve the Existing Stock of Housing 4) Quality Sites that Develop Affordable Housing in Health-Promoting Areas Details: (714) 661-7199; kpayne@housinglb.org Venue: Long Beach City Hall Location: 333 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach Take advantage of the free used tire recycling collection, June 22, at the Harbor District Yard. Venue: Harbor District Yard Location: 1400 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro

Community Yard Sale

Long Beach District 6 Councilman Dee Andrews will host a big Community Yard Sale, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22, at Martin Luther King Jr. Park in Long Beach. If you would like to sell items the cost is $20 per space. Details: (562) 570-6816 Venue: Martin Luther King Jr. Park Location: 1950 Lemon Ave., Long Beach

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Free Used Tire Recycling Collection

Drive seems to be ideal. “Westmont is a real nice street to ride up to Western.” Vought said. “It’s not steep; it’s manageable.” Some say that city planners could have done a better job with planning. Contexts and situations within proximity and rush hour could have been looked at specifically when designing the layouts. “This shouldn’t be a rubber-stamped project for all of Los Angeles,” said community activist John Mavar. “[San] Pedro is different than other places and that’s how it should’ve been planned.” A heavy complaint and call volume has led the councilman’s office to assume residents believe Buscaino can instantaneously solve the issue. “A lot of people think the Councilman snapped his fingers to put the bike lanes in and can snap his fingers to take them out” Kvartuc said “That isn’t the case.” Though there isn’t an imminent solution to the issue, Buscaino is attempting to make things right. A town hall meeting took place at Peck Park, 6 p.m. June 11. The meeting addressed all the possible solutions to the issues residents are having. The addition of another pickup and drop-

off area at Taper Elementary School, located on the bottom of Westmont Drive and a left-turn lane on Western Avenue and Westmont Drive, were amongst the solutions discussed. No matter the complaints or congestion, the risks and benefits, Mavar reminded the community of one fact that can’t be overlooked. “We’re going to have to live with this.”

San Pedro Democratic Club

The San Pedro Democratic Club will feature a presentation by Councilman Joe Busicano’s office and a discussion of the election results, from 7 to 8:45 p.m. June 24, at The Whale & Ale Restaurant in San Pedro. Venue: The Whale & Ale Restaurant Location: 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro The Long Beach Citizen Police Complaint Commission is seeking new commissioners. The Citizen Police Complaint Commission (CPCC) was established to provide an independent investigative commission to receive, administer and investigate allegations of misconduct against Long Beach Police Officers. Details: www.longbeach.gov/cpcc

June 14 - 27, 2013

Commissioners Wanted

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June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Father’s Role Redefined

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Family Services got involved. “I was at a point where I couldn’t even go to work safely,” said Harless, a longshoreman. “My mind was always thinking about my family.” There was an instance when his children ended up in foster care for a few months. He went to parenting classes and other group therapy groups before joining Project Fatherhood, which was recommended by children’s court. “That’s what’s helped us out a lot,” said Harless, a San Pedro resident. “I was going every week…just hearing other people’s stories made me feel better…knowing things weren’t really my fault. Just gonna try to do the best for our children at that point.” Throughout this time, Harless devoted his life to his children. He would wake up before 5:30 a.m. getting the children fed and dressed to get them to early morning care because he started work at 7 a.m. A sitter would take the children to school and pick them up. Harless would pick his children from the sitter, get them home, cook, eat, get the boys to do their homework and try to have some fun in the process. At one point he had to take time off of work for his children. “That gave me great respect for him, because there are some people that get it backwards,” Young said. “(He chose to say,) ‘I can work all these hours but if my children are not OK, it defeats the purpose.’” Harless said that he is grateful that his job allowed him to make sure his children were safe. “I’m just blessed with my job in the Harbor,” Harless said. “My job also saved me. Of course, my children came first.” Harless said separation of his parents at a young age and the absence of his father from his daily life, influenced his view on manhood, fatherhood and relationships. “Knowing my father was gone like that, I never wanted it to happen to my children,” he said. “Until you have one [a child], you never know what you’ve got. They’re just adorable as heck. I love them.” And the feeling is mutual. “They love daddy,” Harless said. “I get a

hug and a kiss when I come home and that’s all I need.” How men share their emotions goes back to the environment, Young said. “When I say culture, I’m not just talking about African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, because there are cultures within cultures,” Young said. “In many cases we look for the perfect model home…. There is not a perfect. We are all learning as we go. We learn that each child is different. There are adjustments to everybody. Parents grow with each child.” Harless’ partner, Jeanie Argento, went through her own rehabilitation and therapy. The couple, after a few years, are back together. “(The kids) wanted their mom so bad,” Harless said. “We all love her but wanted her to get help. Thank God she did. She is back at home. Things are great. Hopefully they can be like this forever.” Argento, 40, appreciates Harless for his role as partner and parent now, and during her absence. “He did a great job; he was there for them emotionally and physically,” she said. “He is there for me and supports me in every way.” And, things have gotten easier with the help of Argento. “She is doing a lot of the stuff I was doing,” he said. “I still help but having her around helps immensely. Immensely. It really was a rough time without her there.” Through it all, Project Fatherhood helped keep him strong, he said. “Project Fatherhood is just all about your story,” he said. “Listening was what I wanted to do. You hear other people’s stories and you feel like you are not the only one.” Project Fatherhood hosted the Fatherhood Solution Conference, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 14. The event included workshops on parenting, domestic violence, women in the fatherhood movement, coparenting and several other topics. For details about Project Fatherhood call (213) 260-7604 or visit www. projectfatherhood.org.

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Cities Sue

objections had been repeatedly ignored at every stage of the process, beginning with the Notice of Preparation, which dates back to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s first year in office. In its lawsuit, NRDC also looked back to initial opposition. “As early as 2005, neighbors of the proposed project site warned the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners that approval of the SCIG project would be an act of environmental racism,” the NRDC said in its filing, going on to note that the Board of Harbor Commissioners had “admitted in writing that the project’s negative impacts, including dangerous air pollution and associated health impacts, will fall disproportionately on minority residents of Wilmington and neighboring West Long Beach.” NRDC also cited multiple failures of the EIR to comply with California’s Environmental Quality Act. Its lawsuit listed 20 causes of action, three quarters of which involved CEQA violations. These included everything from improperly setting the EIR’s initial parameters (an incorrect project description), to improper overall analysis (failure to analyze growthinducing impacts), to specific analytical failures (flawed health risk analysis, no near-highway analysis) to a multi-faceted failure to require feasible mitigation, to botching the EIR review with a “standardless, arbitrary and capricious” appeals process, further tainted by Councilman Joe Buscaino’s failure to recuse himself, despite prior advocacy for the project. The AQMD lawsuit is structured differently, but makes similar claims:

“Specifically, the EIR failed to describe the whole of the action in the project description, failed to analyze the entire project, which resulted in an underestimation of project impacts, failed to use a proper baseline for analysis, failed to provide the underlying data and modeling information necessary to allow for meaningful public review, improperly based project approval on incorrect calculations and modeling inputs, failed to adequately analyze growth inducing and cumulative impacts, and filed to adequately analyze and adopt feasible mitigation measures, including any measure to mitigate significant NO2 impacts, and project alternatives.” “What’s most important for people to know is that the lawsuit didn’t have to happen,” NRDC senior attorney David Pettit said. “We tried to work with the city and with BNSF to change the project to get rid of the worst aspects of the pollution that it’s going to bring, but that didn’t work out. So we’re in court now.” NRDC has also filed a civil rights complaint with the Department of Transportation. “DOT must ensure that the City and Port of Los Angeles fully comply with their duties under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and DOT’s Title VI implementing regulations,” NRDC wrote in a June 7 letter. “DOT may terminate or refuse to grant federal financial assistance to effecutuate compliance.” The Los Angeles City Council rubberstamped the SCIG project this past month after multiple parties appealed its earlier approval by the Harbor Commission. It bypassed the normal subcommittee review process. It acted so quickly there was no time for council members to actually

read written testimony in a seemingly singleminded rush job. This was eerily reminiscent of how the China Shipping Terminal project was rushed to approval without an EIR, in the waning days of the Riordan Administration in 2001. That, in turn, ultimately paved the way for the China Shipping lawsuit and its settlement, which permanently altered the course of port development. The question now raised by the current set of lawsuits is just how deep and adequate that change of course has been. “I had thought for a numbers of years that the port had learned from China Shipping that they need to be upfront about what the environmental problems are with new projects and it pays to work with the community to resolve them,” Pettit said. “But if they did learn that, they forgot it on the SCIG project.” In the China Shipping case, Pettit noted, “The port took the view that they didn’t need to do an EIR at all. “Here, with SCIG, they recognized that they do, but, in my opinion, they cheated on the EIR to make the number come out the way they wanted them to.” San Pedro activist Janet Gunter, one of the original China Shipping plaintiffs, takes a similar view.

“As we move through time the memory becomes dull and vigilant people begin to relax. The watch dogs go to sleep. This allows subversive actions to slip us back into bad situations,” she said. “There is no institutional memory.... All the new people coming into the arena now weren’t there when we went through that process. Therefore, they diminish the importance of it. “The kind of scrutiny that the China Shipping lawsuit brought forward was time-consuming,” Gunter continued. “The port couldn’t do things as carelessly, recklessly and ‘expeditiously’ anymore. They had to pay attention to detail and make sure that they honored a proper system of review. Clearly, there is a push now to return to the old ways of conducting business.” We’re about to find out if the courts will respond by repeating the China Shipping lesson once again. Pettit said that he expects all the lawsuits to be consolidated into one proceeding before a single judge. He also expects to prevail. “If the matter comes back, if it gets kicked back from court, as I expect it to, it will then be dealing with a new mayor and a new city council, and maybe things will be different,” he said.

Seeking Justice Senate Republicans Have Blocked Obama’s Judicial Appointments and Workers’ Rights Have Been Targeted

unconstitutional. On Jan. 25, in deciding Noel Canning v. NLRB, the same court overturned an even older practice: recess appointments, which the Obama used to fill the NLRB board when Republicans tried to cripple it by refusing to confirm any new board members. The battle to confirm the three justices announced on June 4 is very much a battle to see if Obama will be allowed to govern at all in the years ahead. And not surprisingly, the rights of workers stand squarely in the middle of that fight. This is an excerpt. Read the full story online at randomlengthsnews.com

Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements

The Local Publication You Actually Read June 14 - 27, 2013

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor On June 4, President Barack Obama took the unprecedented step of announcing the simultaneous nomination of three justices to fill vacancies on the Washington D.C. District Court, the second highest court in the land. Obama made the announcement to focus attention on Republican obstructionism devoted to stalling and blocking his judicial appointments. Twenty times during Obama’s first term, Republican filibusters had forced Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to call cloture votes on district court nominees bring them up for confirmation votes. Comparatively, there was just one cloture vote each under Clinton and Bush, according to a January report from the Alliance for Justice. As a result, judicial vacancies had increased 58 percent during Obama’s first term, compared to declines of 51 percent and 13 percent in Clinton and Bush’s first terms, respectively. Senate obstructionism is only part of the story. Activist conservative justices—especially those on the D.C. Circuit Court—have also gotten into the act, at times even performing as a tag team with GOP Senators. Nowhere has this been more evident than when dealing with labor law and the body which enforces it, the National Labor Relations Board. Not only have GOP senators blocked judicial nominations, they’ve blocked numerous executive branch appointments as well. Two recent decisions involving the NLRB are shocking examples. On May 7, in NAM vs. NLRB, the D.C. District Court held that it was unconstitutional for the NLRB to require employers to display a poster reviewing the full range of worker rights. The NLRB has been requiring employers to display various informational notices for decades. Suddenly, it’s

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Gardena-Carson Family YMCA Offer Summer Day Camp There’s Summer Fun Across Generations By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

School’s out for summer—at least for students on a traditional schedule—and the Gardena-Carson Family YMCA is offering summer day camp, sleepover camp and other recreational activities to fill long, lazy, summer days. Participants must be YMCA members and pay an additional fee to attend the camps, but camperships are available on a sliding scale for families seeking financial assistance. “We’re very family-based,” said Lori Drengson, associate director of development. “We have cross-programs with adults, children and seniors.” A weeklong sleepover camp in the San Bernardino Mountains is scheduled for July 20 through 27. Deadline for participants to sign up is July 10. The fee is $425 in addition to any membership fees. Summer day camp sessions began June 10, and run through Aug. 16. The fee for attending day camp is $135 per week. Drengson points out more than a dozen other types of activities for YMCA members are available during the summer and year-around, including aquatics, swim classes for children and adults, healthy lifestyle coaching, yoga, gym, basketball, volleyball, soccer, fitness and exercise (such as zumba). She also singles out the preschool program, a daycare service offered for children two-and-one-half to five years. YMCA memberships are available for anyone who wishes to participate, with different rates offered for families, adults and children. Financial assistance to the extent possible is made available on a sliding scale, on a firstcome, first-serve basis to families in the club’s service area who are concerned about being able to afford the membership fee. Drengson added that one-week trial membership passes are also available. Drengson said that the YMCA is funded primarily through membership fees, donations, and fundraising. There is no state or federal assistance. For several years, however, the City of Carson has provided Community Development Block Grants for various programs. During this fiscal year starting in July, for example, Carson is providing $10,000 towards summer day camp fees. In some previous years, the city has funded classes for diabetic patients. Drengson said to her knowledge the City of Gardena does not provide any similar support. Another source of funding is the Ed Russ Golf Charity Tournament, scheduled for Sept. 30 at the Old Ranch Country Club in Seal Beach. Both sexes and all ages of golfers are welcome to sign up. Details: (310) 523-3470; www.ymcala.org/ gc Venue: Gardena-Carson Family YMCA Location: 1000 W. Artesia Blvd., Gardena 6

Where There’s Will, There are Ways Arts Flourish at Boys and Girls Clubs, Despite Cutbacks at Public Schools By Arthur R. Vinsel, Contributing Writer

Ragamuffin sons of mostly fishermen, who paid 75 cents a year to join the 1937-founded San Pedro Boys Club, would be wonder-struck today at how time, talent and technology have transformed the old hangout where they learned to swing a baseball bat. Another milestone among many, spanning most of a century occurs June 1, after 10 weeks of rehearsal and preparation for their new Arts Academy premiere. A out 300 people attended. The Festival of Music, Fine Arts, Animation and Game Design, plus Dance, at the club’s more spacious facility, 1444 W. Q St., Wilmington, had a playbill of 16 musical numbers mastered since March. As some professional theatrical productions have two troupes, the San Pedro and Wilmington facilities each have a musical unit with separate instructors that performed eight tunes at the June 1 show. The 25 musicians in each branch’s first recital—two will take place each year—were hand-picked for experience and training. Signups for fall session candidates began after the upcoming premiere. Their tastes range from rock and reggae to opera and classical, with most hoping for a musical career and some bound for college and university enrollment in the fall. “We wanted to see if we could teach them to make great music—and in only 10 weeks, we did!” said Tripp, 33, who studied music at Los Angeles Harbor College and Grand Canyon University in Phoenix. “I have to credit Harbor College for the bulk of my music education.” Tripp has other administrative duties, while colleague Edwin Porras is music director at Wilmington, San Pedro and Port of Los Angeles branches of the Boys and Girls Club of the Los Angeles Harbor Area. Tripp says the 16-tune musicfest is roughly conceived as a look at the birth of the blues, which gave rise to rock and roll and more modern musical idioms, but the classics are not ignored. His cadre of paid instructors are all professional musicians aged 24 to 30 and include petite redhead Caitlin Moss, drums; towering bassist Seth Barnes, whose bull

Pictured are young musicians setting up during rehearsal at the Boys and Girls Club. Photo by Art Vinsel

fiddle seems violin-sized; Omar Tassi, guitar; Judell Totong, keyboard, and Angelina JohnsonGamble, vocal coach. Porras has music degrees from Cal State University Long Beach and Los Angeles and has taught at the club for five years. Tripp ahs taught at the club for 11 years. “We’ve been talking about the Arts Academy for about two years,” says Porras, explaining the sessions that cover music theory, history and plenty more in 10 weeks, although some kids have had extensive training. Although they work part-time like many musicians, all of Porras’ club staff have college or university degrees and include Christine Mattera, piano; Aaron Norman, vocal; Manuel Urguelas, guitar; Brad Babinsky, bass; and Paul Stengel, percussion. When the 10-week course is finished, each of the clubs will have five bands of five members each, ready to play whatever music is placed before them. Money is always tight, and indeed, music, art, and other classes, considered more frivolous and less practical than the three R’s, will be cut from the curriculum. After the needs were calculated and the cash counted for allotment by grantmakers who considered the formal proposal, the Ahmanson

Foundation awarded $100,000 for the first year. County Supervisor Don Knabe, who made his living as a bandleader years ago allocated $25,000 in county funds. “Why are you doing this?” asked Bill Ahmanson, president of the nonprofit charitable foundation. The question could be answered in many ways. A passage on the Arts Academy’s Xeroxed leaflet put it best: WHY THE ARTS? Through the Arts Academy, we will strive to develop the individual identity of our members. It is no secret that participation in the arts helps self esteem, raises grades and test scores, enhances critical thinking, helps to develop bonds, shatters stereotypes and biases, allows for self-expression…and the list goes on and on. Yet, in light of all these benefits, the “cost” of the arts has seemed to be its undoing because it’s effects cannot be measured on a scantron test or by an evaluator. No, the effects of the arts can only be felt by those who have experienced them first-hand. The real traits of an arts program are not virtuoso performers, priceless pieces of art, or prima ballerinas. The real value is how the experience feeds the soul, thus creating a well rounded and complete human person.

NSA Leak Reveals Massive Data Mining Program

A new leak exposed that the National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into phone lines and the central servers in nine of the leading Internet companies. The leaked files show the NSA and FBI extracting audio and video chats, emails and connection logs from users of the internet companies. The files were leaked by 29-yearold National Security Agency contractor, Edward Snowden. Snowden revealed his identity openly through the media. “I have no intention of hiding who I am because I know I have done nothing wrong,” Snowden said. “My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them. I can’t in good conscience allow the U.S.

government to destroy privacy, Internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they’re secretly building.” Snowden has been working at the National Security Agency for 4 years as an employee of outside contractors. He is also a former CIA technical assistant. The leaked program, code-named PRISM, revealed that the NSA was directly tapping into the central servers of Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, AOL, Skype, YouTube and Apple. Since then, several senior tech executives insisted that they had no knowledge of Prism. “Facebook is not a part of any program to give the U.S. direct access to our servers,” said Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook.

“We have never received a court order from any government agency asking for information in bulk.... And if we did, we would fight it aggressively.” Senate intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein accused Snowden of treason. The Justice Department is investigating the case and contemplating criminal charges. Daniel Ellsberg, Ron Paul and Julian Assange have since hailed Snowden as a hero. “We are going to have a lot more significant revelations that have not yet been heard over the next several weeks and months,” said Glen Greenwald, the journalist who first reported the story. Snowden has since checked out of his Hong Kong hotel room and may now seek asylum abroad.

An Easy 100 Local Resident Reflects on Living in San Pedro for a Century

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

The Local Publication You Actually Read June 14 - 27, 2013

On June 7, Harry Hall became San Pedro’s newest centenarian. Born three months after San Pedro’s Angels Gate Lighthouse became operational in 1913, Harry, like the lighthouse, is a beacon that symbolizes calm waters and a safe harbor. A generally unassuming figure, spry and bright in his advanced age, no one would have guessed that he was the oldest person in the room when he was honored at the San Pedro’s Legends dinner this past March, celebrating the 150th anniversary of San Pedro’s founding. It took the emcee’s mentioning of his birth date to elicit the ooh’s and aah’s appropriate for the occasion. A violinist, Harry can be found at The Whale & Ale Friday night, schmoozing with friends, admirers and fans as he plays a few sets with the pub’s Harry Hall performed a few tunes on a June 7 at The Whale & Ale in pianist. San Pedro. He celebrated his 100 birthday on June 6. Photo by Terelle Harry remembers the San Jerricks. Pedro of his youth as clearly as if it were yesterday. That’s not so unusual unless military bases to paving thousands of miles of you’re 100 years old. roadways and airstrips. Downtown San Pedro’s Sixth and Seventh But Harry never remained far from his streets stick out in his mind. music. During the war, he had been transferred “Those streets are still important,” Harry said. to the admiral’s orchestra and was put in charge “All the businesses went west to Western. There of organizing concerts and parties to boost and was A-1 Photoshop on 13th and Pacific. There maintain troop morale. was the Piggly Wiggly store on 6th and Grand, When the war ended, he became a teacher. He and then there’s the Dunlap Department store,” was so good that he was put in charge of teaching Harry rattled off in a display of mental acuity. and training other music teachers. Harry is a second-generation SwedishHarry, like the Lionel Richie hit, is easy like American whose family moved to St. Paul, Minn. Sunday morning. His niece Teddy Lou Hale after a famine in the late 1860s—the result of described her uncle as being easy-going and three successive years of massive crop failures. loving of the people around him. Harry’s parents moved to San Pedro in 1905. Family, friends and ostensibly former Harry was the youngest of eight children. students say Harry was always a popular guy. Harry’s first and most enduring love affair The same qualities that led the student body of was with music. A violin salesmen approached San Pedro High School to elect him student body Harry at the age of nine with the offer of a free president, were the same qualities that led an violin if Harry’s parents, who were music lovers admiral to link on to Harry in the war and lead anyway, agreed to pay for violin lessons for a the admirals orchestra. year. Harry took lessons for an entire year and Harry is not one to rush or sweat the small was hooked. stuff. One piece of advice he had: Years later, Harry would get to play and lead “Don’t be so anxious to get married.” 100 member orchestras at the Hollywood Bowl. It takes time to find the right one. Harry was But Harry’s talents wasn’t just limited to playing 37 before he married his first wife. But he has music. He could write too. lived long enough to find a great love twice in In the 1930s he wrote a song, “I’ll be with his lifetime. you until I find someone new.” He doesn’t have any children of his own. The song was so catchy that an arranger at Affectionately called Uncle Harry, he has a NBC wanted the the rights to the song. multitude of nieces, nephews and grand nieces Harry also recorded a song called, “Breeze and nephews and an even greater horde of people In, Breeze Out,” in the 1940s that was intended to which he has taught music during his long to be an uplifting war-time song that also warned life. against abusing drugs and other vices. When asked what his secret was to longevity, In 1942, Harry was drafted into the Navy he replied, “Be nice, try not to set the old hate during World War II. While there, he was button and pray every once in awhile.” assigned to the newly formed U.S. Navy But that sounded just a little too easy. Construction Battalion that accomplished a myriad of construction projects ranging from

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Overseas Report

The Ceiling of the Opéra National de Paris James Preston Allen, Publisher

June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

As I stood in one of the grand halls at the National Opera House of Paris, I stared up at the opulence of the Le Palais Garnier­ceiling. Almost everything in Paris is called a “palace”—a word that doesn’t seem to have the same meaning in English as it does in French. Le Palais Garnier­ was named after the 35 year old French architect Charles Garnier. Completed in 1875 after 15 years of construction, which was interrupted by war, the fall of Napoleon III and the Paris Commune. I was quite frankly stunned by the ornate gilding, the quantity of gold and crystal chandeliers, the fresco paintings and everything else down to the parquet floors. I can’t even imagine what it cost at the time it was built. To say that it is astoundingly opulent is an understatement—even for the period in which it was constructed. It was, however, conceived of during the period of the great reconstruction of Paris when Napoleon III engaged Baron Haussmann to redesign the city. If you have been or even looked at pictures of the “grands boulevards” of Paris with all of its confusing traffic circles and iconic architecture at these intersections that are stylistically identical. Blame Haussmann. He gets all the credit. This did make me think both about great power and the impact of empire on the civic landscape. Napoleon III didn’t last in power long enough to see the completion of the Paris Opera House. However, from its design, it is clear that Napoleon III understood that people rising up against great power are to be feared–hence the grand boulevards that were built both for grandeur and as well as quick access for great armies to quell political uprisings. The narrow streets of old Paris were perfect for insurrection, which the Parisians seemed to think was their birthright. The boulevards did not arrive in time to save the emperor. Unlike France, we here in the “land of the free” have not had more than one official revolution. We have, however, spilt enough blood of our own in our history, which includes the Civil War, various tax rebellions and riots, bloody labor uprisings, and the domestic conflicts during the Civil Rights and anti-war movement during the Vietnam War. All of them were political rebellions. What a tourist to Paris can take away from all of the great culture there is manifold. First is that great power so often makes great mistakes, which the French did repeatedly with great arrogance. Their monument to

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their Vietnam War is their own silent denial of this mistake of colonial rule. Another is that the cultural arts—the treasure troves of misappropriated antiquities from Egypt, Athens and Rome alongside their own vast collections of paintings from the Renaissance to Impressionism. Those collections continue to reap a financial reward far beyond the original purchase price, even with the loss of their colonies in Africa, Asia and India. Anyone who tells you that art or culture doesn’t make money hasn’t been to Paris. These are lessons that should not be lost on the American tourist as we too overreach with our own concept of freedom and liberty. Particularly when we pretend we are making the world “safe for democracy,” just as the French once believed that liberté, egalité, fraternité was their mission and gift to the uncivilized world. You see these words on every government building in France. What can be seen through the lens of the French empire is that dominance as a world power can be fragile, if not fleeting, on the world stage. Nothing lasts forever. The 20th Century witnessed the fall from grace of all the great European colonial powers and the subsequent rise of the American empire. One not based on old-fashioned colonial rule, but of commerce, capital and military preeminence. We will see over the course of the 21st Century just how long this lasts and just what kind of opulence and arrogance we are capable of achieving. Whatever one thinks about the fall of French dominance, politically or culturally, France now competes with California for fifth or sixth place in gross domestic product rankings. I can’t help but think of the iconic Eiffel Tower as a giant exclamation point and apex of French Empire in architecture, engineering and art. Perhaps, it was at this summit of their cultural expression that arrogantly led them to lose their next generation of best and most talented in the trenches of World War I, and subsequently the loss of their national sovereignty during the Nazi occupation of World War II. It was only a matter of time and the consequences of World War II that France and the rest of the European powers lost their third \ world colonies to the “uncivilized” peoples who lived there. Somehow they had gotten the idea that “liberty, equality and independence” wasn’t just for Frenchmen. I was thinking about all of this while staring at the ceiling of the Paris Opera House and wondering what kind of aria should be sung in a palais like this? Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 12

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communi- Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila ties of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

www.randomlengthsnews.com

San Onofre is Dead, So is Nuclear Power By Harvey Wasserman

From his California beach house at San Clemente, Richard Nixon once watched three reactors rise at nearby San Onofre. As of June 7, 2013, all three are permanently shut. It’s a monumental victory for grassroots activism. it marks an epic transition in how we get our energy. In the thick of the 1970s Arab oil embargo, Nixon said there’d be 1,000 such reactors in the U.S. by the year 2000. As of today, there are 100. Four have shut here this year. Citizen activism has put the “nuclear renaissance” into full retreat. Just two of 54 reactors now operate in Japan, where Fukushima has joined Chernobyl and Three Mile Island in permanently scarring us all. Germany is shutting its entire fleet and switching to renewables. France, once the poster child for the global reactor industry, is following suit. South Korea has just shut three due to fraudulent safety procedures. Massive demonstrations rage against reactors being built in India. Only the Koreans, Chinese and Russians remain at all serious about pushing ahead with this tragic technology. Cheap gas has undercut the short-term market for expensive electricity generated by obsolete coal and nuke burners. But the vision of Solartopia—a totally green-powered Earth—is now our tangible long-term reality. With falling prices and soaring efficiency, every moving electron our species consumes will be generated by a solar panel, wind turbine, bio-

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Gretchen Williams Entrée Andrea Serna Arts Writer Malina Paris Culture Writer Kevin Walker Community News Calendar 14days@randomlengthsnews.com

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Display advertising Contributors (310) 519-1442 Danny Simon, Harvey Wasserman, Classifieds (310) 519-1016 www.randomlengthsnews.com Arthur R. Vinsel

fueled or geothermal generator, wave machine and their green siblings. As of early this year, Southern California Edison’s path to a re-start at San Onofre seemed as clear as any to be expected by a traditional atomic tyrannosaur. But with help from Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and Senator-to-be Ed Markey (D-MA), a powerful citizen uprising stopped it dead. So did the terrifying incompetence and greed that has defined the nuclear industry from the days of Nixon and before. San Onofre Unit One shut in the 1990s due largely to steam generator problems. In the early 2000s, Units 2 & 3 needed new steam generators of their own. In the usual grasp for more profits, Edison chose untested, unlicensed new designs. But they failed. And the whole world was watching. In the wake of Fukushima, two more leaky tsunami-zone reactors surrounded by earthquake faults were massively unwelcome. So a well-organized non-violent core of local, state and national activists and organizations rose up to stop the madness. At Vermont Yankee, Indian Point, Seabrook, Davis-Besse and dozens of other reactors around the United States and world, parallel opposition is escalating. Make no mistake—this double victory at San Onofre is a falling domino. Had the public not fought back, those reactors would have been continued on following page

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

RANDOMLetters Protection Against Media Predators

I would like to propose Legislation to protect the individual in public places from the invasion of privacy by media predators. I was filmed by TMZ photographer Joshua Hoover, and even though I told him who I was, TMZ still used the pictures and video he took of me while I was in the Airport. The photography was then used for a story they covered on R & B artist Keith Sweat concerning foreclosures on his homes. This story ran on several internet sites including the TMZ site. Currently there is no protection for me under the law? This is not a case of mistaken identity. This is not the first story that they have covered concerning Keith Sweat—so they have stock footage of him. Keith Sweat has sold over 20 million records during his career. It is not difficult to find a photo of him. Harvey Levin knows who the hell Keith Sweat is, and what he looks like. It was deliberate - willful misappropriation of my image. They put my picture on his negative story and it is still on the internet. http://scoops.co/4Z7NcL5S I believe there has to be a “catching up” as it relates to legislation that can address the reckless and irresponsible conduct of media predators who seem to have little or no regard for the individual who should be entitled to a reasonable degree of privacy while in public. When media predators (paparazzi style reporting) are gathering or capturing images only to create. The media shouldn’t have the right to collect or capture an individuals’ image or likeness to create a story versus an incidental capturing while gathering a legitimate story that is unfolding in public. I reside in the film capital of the world, where even Extras get paid for the commercial use of their image or likeness. Why should TMZ or any entity have the right to capture my image and use it as they see fit. Johnnie C. Jenkins Jr. Senior Media Studies Major Marymount California University Dear Johnnie C. Jenkins Jr, Not sure that I agree with this perspective but it is interesting how TMZ could get this wrong. I suspect that the assumption of privacy, of anyone in a public place in this era, is a fiction but the issue of misappropriation of individuals’ identities, or worse mis-identification is a legal issue that will only be belatedly settled in a court of law in our dysfunctional superior courts. Try suing the bastards! James Preston Allen, Publisher

I’m not a Reagan fan I’m not an Obama fan. Look at our government today, scandals and ineptitude and thus has it always been. Are you implying that more of this is what we need? Ayn Rand was right the government takes our money at the point of the gun, but that doesn’t mean I can’t be generous voluntarily does it? You want the President to create jobs? He can only do that by hiring more government workers, oops more taxes! We need less government but we need a local government with a broader view than just our local selfishness. Mark Larson Ship keeper SS Lane Victory San Pedro Dear Mr. Larson, All systems of government and commerce are only as good as the people who run them. Just as we have seen corruption and scandal in the public sector so have we seen it in the private (capital) sector, and usually on a much larger scale. Look at the cause of the sub-prime mortgage crisis. Yes, there was a failure of government oversight, but more significantly there was a corruption of the market place that even former Federal Reserve chairman, a free-market devotee and Ayn Rand loyalist, found “uncomprehensible and shocking.” Also, contrary to popular belief, Reagan didn’t actually shrink the government. He talked a good game by taking on the air traffic controllers but expanded the military industrial complex budget some tenfold and, as you’ll remember, the first banking crisis happened under his “lax control” of the saving and loan industry. So shrinking government oversight isn’t really the answer. So what to do in a country that is breastfed on the “we the people” principle of governance? You can’t run the country like it was 100 years ago. There are more people and more problems. What can happen is what Thomas Jefferson once said, “the cure for bad government is not more laws but more democracy.” Government, no matter how big or expensive, has to be closer to people it serves, which only means more people like you need to be involved and vocal. Have you been to your local neighborhood council meeting or protested at the Board of Harbor Commissioners meeting lately? James Preston Allen, Publisher

them is in office anymore, and one of them is dead. Conservatives in general do not post up previous presidents as a pin-up, anyway, unlike liberals who fawn over President Obama as “The One” – although many said the same thing about Richard “War on Drugs” Nixon, a President with a scandalously similar legacy to our current president. Of course, I am not the first one to disparage “Reaganmania.” Ronald Reagan is dead, and he did some good and some bad. He cut taxes without cutting the spending. He betrayed his fiscally conservative Republicans by asking them to raise the debt ceiling in 1981, then never looked back as the spending spree spiraled up. He supported a progressive tax and an assault weapons ban, which is just liberal folly in the face of evil (A good guy with a gun is the best defense against a bad guy with a gun, every time). Allen also forgot to mention Reagan’s abortive Simpson-Mizzoli immigration “compromise” (in reality, a blanket amnesty), which set the precedent for allowing illegal immigrants to the United States to become legal citizens. So much for the rule of law.

No, Reagan did not single-handedly bring down the Soviet Union, but his moral certitude against the USSR, commanded enough resolve to push that failed socialist state into insolvency, even as it lingered on the brink. Reagan communicated a message that this country was better than its government, a notion much needed today, as we witness an unprecedented number of people dependent on the state (food stamps, unemployment insurance) yet at the same time disappointed by it (failing public schools, government overreach into healthcare). For the record, Ronald Reagan did not enact Prop 13, nor was he an anti-New Deal corporate prop. In fact, he was a big hit with Hollywood and a rainbow coalition of voters, enough to win 49 states in 1984. Arthur C. Schaper Torrance Dear Mr. Schaper, Finally a conservative that doesn’t think Reagan was the next best thing to sliced bread and God! And you think that the world isn’t changing. James Preston Allen, Publisher

Lambasting Bush and Reagan

Just as liberals love to lambaste George W. Bush, so too they love to rage at Ronald Reagan. Like many of them, Random Lengths News Editor James Preston Allen has neglected one salient reality: neither one of

A Laughable Problem

from previous page

So Dead

Harvey Wasserman edits www.nukefree.org. SOLARTOPIA! Our Green-Powered Earth is at www.solartopia.org, along with Harvey Wasserman’s History of the US.

June 14 - 27, 2013

“fixed” at public expense. Today, they are dead. Worldwide, there are some 400 to go. Each of them—including the 100 remaining in the US— could do apocalyptic damage. We still have our work cut out for us. But a huge double-step has been taken up the road to Solartopia. There will be no Fukushimas at San Onofre. A green-powered Earth is that much closer. And we have yet another proof that citizen action makes all the difference in our world. So seize the day and celebrate!

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Your latest editorial (RLn May 30-Jun 12. 2013) gave me a good laugh, it was the “that government is not the solution to the problems, it is the problem” quote that you seem to disparage and then you list all the ills that government has created, as if somehow we got less government under Reagan is a fact. Our local problems with the port, aren’t they government problems? The lack of interest from downtown isn’t that a government problem? Government is our problem.

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In Memoriam of John Ljubenkov By Gretchen Williams, Contributing Writer

John Ljubenkov, a labor organizer and beloved Cabrillo Marine Aquarium staffer, died March 25, 2013 from a blood disorder. He was survived by his wife Julie Schneider-Ljubenkov, and his son Peter.

June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Hurricane Gulch was gusting 20 knots at Cabrillo Beach. I headed up the hill, using the stairs at the foot of 39th Street to hoof it to Pacific Avenue. I did not know that I was about to encounter another hurricane, in human form. It was the summer of 1968 and I was 13, a volunteer at Cabrillo Beach Museum. John Ljubenkov was a one-man picket line in front of tiny Point Fermin Market, representing

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Caesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers union demonstrating against scab table grapes and lettuce. John was studying biology and zoology at Long Beach State but his natural exuberance and insatiable curiosity made classes his own forum for discussion, as he had absorbed the information long before. He was interested in everything, including politics and was known throughout his lifetime for his outspoken opinions. He supported the farm workers drive to organize the UFW, and wanted his neighbors to support them as well. Strong union support in San Pedro gave the effort the boost it needed. Point Fermin was a small but vital part of the grape strike effort.

John was always casually dressed and sported a full walrus mustache and flowing hair. He had a part-time job at the Cabrillo Beach Museum providing administrative support for the corps

of volunteers and crowd control for the hoards of visitors that descended on the museum in the summertime. It was his job to lead field trips for the volunteers. The low tide was to be at 3 a.m. when the mud flats on the inside of Cabrillo Beach should be fully exposed. John led the group of middle school volunteers out onto the mudflats; all slurping and sticking in the mud, smelling like low tide. John said, “Okay, turn on your flashlights and look at these worms.� Dark silence followed because no one, not even John had remembered to bring a flashlight. Ljubenkov responded to the crisis by instantly changing the lesson to bioluminescence. He then trooped the whole group out to the tide pools to taste sea urchin roe and touched sea anemones with our tongues. No one could resist learning when John was the teacher. He was a graduate of John Ljubenkov/ to p. 19

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oming June 22, Rainbow Lagoon is going to be dancing to Cajun accordion music at Long Beach’s annual Bayou Festival. This year’s star studded line up includes the Pine Leaf Boys, a superstar among stars in Cajun music. Comprising this band are Wilson Savoy, Cajun accordion and vocals;  Courtney Granger, fiddle and vocals; Jon Bertrand, guitars; Drew Simon, drums and vocals; and Thomas David, bass. Wilson Savoy is the leader of the band and a music educator. As he mentioned in a telephone interview from his Louisiana home, Cajun music is experiencing a jump in popularity with the younger generation. “It’s dance music and that’s why it survives,” Savoy said There is no doubt the four-time Grammy-nominated Pine

Leaf Boys have much to do with the genre’s recurrent popularity. Blending original Cajun sound with youthful exuberance is the recipe that the Pine Leaf Boys follow in their music. They have reinvigorated this traditional sound and translated it to a wider audience with passion. They make it thrive and come alive for people on or off the dance floor. Savoy comes from a family of Cajun music historians. His father, Marc, is an accordion builder and musician. His mother, Ann, is an author and music producer. Both parents are well-known ambassadors of Cajun culture. Savoy’s brother Joel plays the fiddle and together the family also makes up the Savoy Family Band. Coming from a home like his, it was just natural for him to play this music. Cajun music was the language they spoke in their home. The Pine Leaf Boys typically sing in French.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment ACE • Art, Cuisine, & Entertainment

By Melina Paris, Music Columnist

“You will naturally grow up speaking that language,” Savoy said. While going to school in Baton Rouge, Savoy got into playing Cajun music on the accordion. Explaining he became kind of homesick, he decided to pick up the accordion he brought from home, almost as sort of an ornament. Once he started playing he says he became completely addicted to it. He stopped attending class and studying. He just wanted to play music and still today it hasn’t changed. The Pine Leaf Boys have a great energy and an engaging sound. A synergy exists between audience and musicians. They have mastered the charm of traditional Cajun music with a progressive sensibility of music to which younger generations can relate. They are fun to listen, watch and dance to. It’s as if they were playing from a party in their own living room and you are their guest. “We do gigs every now and then with just a small amount of people there and it’s just as fun to us as it is to be in front of 20,000 people,” Savoy said. “We feed off the audience too, which makes it even more fun.... We experiment, rather than playing the same things to keep it fresh and exciting.” The band also plays what is called “New Orleans” type of music. In those instances, Savoy plays piano and they sing in English. They also perform a 1950s, slow dance kind of music that is very popular in Louisiana. Reaching to the distant past, Savoy found his inspiration from Cajun accordion players, Amede Ardoin from the 1920s and Iry LeJeune from the 1950s. Ardoin was one of the first recorded Cajun musicians noted for his soulful, high singing voice and accordion virtuosity. He was recognized for laying the foundation for Cajun music in the early 20th century. LeJeune was credited with the return of the accordion to prominence in Cajun music in the 1940s to 1950s. This event was referred to as a Cajun music renaissance, bringing a return to its roots and resurgence of Cajun pride in their traditional music. “Both those guys were the grandfathers of Cajun Music that standardized it,” Savoy added. “All the tunes they played are what we consider standards today.” When it comes to writing songs, Savoy says, everybody has a part. Adding his own twist, he likes to put a lot of chords in music. Cajun music is known for only having two or three chords. “Lately, I have been inspired to write a lot,” he said. “I like to make it more interesting, having more Wilson Savoy Continued on page 15.

June 14 – 27, 2013 June 14 –27, 2013

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CHEF DUSTIN TRANI ROCKS THE HOUSE Photo & Column By Lori Lynn Hirsch Stokoe, Dining Columnist

June 14 – 27, 2013

Independent And Free.

Executive Chef Dustin Trani.

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n June 6, J.Trani’s Ristorante’s General Manager Scott DiDomenico hosted the restaurant’s first wine dinner - a gregarious affair where the food quality and level of service were second to none. DiDomenico staffed the event with an abundance of his best waiters, to ensure that every guest received top-notch attention. After almost three decades of dining in San Pedro, I can confidently declare that this meal was the best served in our town — ever! Executive Chef Dustin J. Trani paired a five course menu with wines from Napa Valley’s Franciscan Estates. Every element of every dish had a purpose, each in perfect balance. He deftly orchestrated a symphony of wine and food. It was an absolute pleasure to experience the chef’s passion and commitment to perfection first hand. Although Chef Trani spends most of his time at DOMA in Beverly Hills, his signature is on every dish served in the dining room at J. Trani’s Ristorante. Earlier this year, Chef Trani was named as one of the Top 5 Rising Chefs in the United States by Gayot Magazine. Fifty-three guests enjoyed the casual, yet sophisticated ambiance, of the upstairs banquet room, softly lit and dressed in white linens. A mix of about 70 percent loyal customers plus 30 percent new guests mingled over the 2011 Sauvignon Blanc with its lively aromas of lime zest and lemon grass, and balanced citrusy flavors. The chef paired this wine with his first course, a Dungeness crab cake over burrata (a creamy mozzarella) with a roasted pepper emulsion. At this point, we already knew we were in for a treat. Chef Trani’s second course was a delightful presentation of smoked duck carpaccio adorned with petite frisee, pistachio, feta and a divine blackberry vinaigrette. The team expertly paired the Franciscan Chardonnay 2011 with this dish. Scott Young, luxury wine specialist representing Franciscan Estates described the wines, history and winemaking techniques employed by winemaker Janet Myers. The Chardonnay’s apple, vanilla, and spice notes harmonized perfectly with the smoked duck course. In addition to superb food and wine the evening was fun. Tables were set for eight people, so guests were able to get to know their tablemates throughout the evening. Needless to say it was a vivacious affair. Between courses, the chef and the wine specialist would have to quiet the room to share highlights of the upcoming courses. Supple and layered, with flavors of ripe berries, bing cherries, cocoa and sweet vanilla, the Merlot 2009 paired elegantly with the third course, a truffle-scented mascarpone tortellini dressed with Continued on next page.

from previous page.

a rich veal reduction, beech mushrooms, and crispy sage. This course was powerful in its simplicity. When the wine enhances the flavors of the food and the food, simultaneously enhances the characteristics of the wine, the result is a stellar match, and an exceptional wine pairing. This was completely evident in the fourth course, grilled Colorado lamb chop with vanilla poached butternut squash. Melt-in-the-mouth lamb cracklings, micro arugula and a lamb reduction completed the dish. Franciscan Estates Magnificat 2007, a seamless red Bordeaux blend, named after Johann Sebastian Bach’s 1723 musical masterpiece, was the highlight. With complex flavors of dark berries, mocha, and sage and a long luxurious finish, Franciscan’s Magnificat and Trani’s lamb made for a brilliant composition. The finale was heavenly - imported Italian gorgonzola dolce (a sweeter creamy Italian blue cheese) topped with moscato poached pear. Artistically adorned with petite midnight basil, bacon and amaretti cookie dust, pear and moscato reduction. Dessert was served with Inniskillin ice wine from Canada. The Vidal grape hybrid yields intense flavors from the frozen-on-the-

Entertainment June 14

Fullonthropy Fullonthropy consists of five members bringing you the sounds of fusion drumming, guitar, guitar synth, bass and keyboards. There will be two shows, one at 8 p.m. and one at 9:30 p.m. Admission for one show is $20 or $30 for both shows. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Steady 45’s Steady 45’s is playing reggae music at the San Pedro Brewing Company, 10 p.m., to 1 a.m. June 14. The cover charge will be $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing. com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Whiskey Flats Whiskey Flats will perform 9 to 10 p.m. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

vine process resulting in a nectar reminiscent of marmalade with bacon sugar. The meal could not have ended on a sweeter note. Bravo Chef! Many of the guests are now begging the restaurant to host another wine dinner soon. When the date is announced, make sure your reservations are in early, it is sure to sell out quickly. Lori Lynn Hirsch Stokoe blogs about food, wine, and entertaining at Taste With The Eyes www.tastewiththeeyes.com and tweets as Tasteblog at https://twitter.com/tasteblog

Harlow Gold Show The Harlow Gold Show will be at Harvelle’s in Long Beach, at 10 p.m. General admission will be $15. Premium front row seats will be $30. Details: (562) 239-3700; www.longbeach.harvelles. com Venue: Harvelle’s Long Beach Location: 201 E. Broadway, Long Beach

June 15

Charged Particles Alva’s Showroom is hosting the Charged Particles, 8 p.m., June 15. The Bay Area-based band features three electric jazz players. Charged Particles is celebrating their 20th anniversary and this performance at Alva’s will be part of their third Calendar continued on page 15.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Paul Aghilipour –Manager

Salad & Soup Farmer’s Market Omelet Chicken Caesar Wrap Sandwich du Jour Beef Koobideh Chicken Koobideh Filet Mignon Pita Gheimeh Stew Ghormeh Sabzi Stew Angel Hair Scampi Linguini and Clams Rigatoni

Spaghetti Bolognaise Chicken Curry Chicken Marsala Pesto Primavera Spaghetti Provençale Beef Koobideh Chicken Koobideh Blue Grotto Burger (Must See It To Believe It) Grilled Salmon Flame Grilled Breast of Chicken Fish & Chips Steak Frites

June 14 – 27, 2013

Blue Grotto Salad Caesar Salad Endives Salad Wild Mushroom Risotto Caprese Heirloom Chop Chop Salad Pate and Charcuterie Cheese Platter Mediterranean Steak Salad Fresh Spinach Shrimp Salad Calamari Salad Grilled Chicken Salad

Frank Ravalli –Proprietor

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Big Nick’s Pizza

Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

June 14 – 27, 2013

Independent And Free.

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

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Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also offers classic Italian dishes and sauces based on tried-and-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com Catalina Bistro & Express Grill With the soaring span of the Vincent T h o m a s Bridge above and bustling vessel traffic on the Main Channel alongside, the Catalina Bistro and Express Grill in the new Catalina Express terminal is the most exciting place to dine in the Harbor. The Grill is a wonderful surprise for a quick bite or coffee for locals and travelers. The Bistro and adjacent bar make the new Catalina Terminal the place to go for casual dining and drinks on the heated patio. From 1/3lb angus burgers, homemade soups and clam chowder on Fridays you can’t go wrong. Join us for breakfast and lunch daily and dinners on Friday & Saturday nights. Catalina Sea & Air Terminal, Berth 95, San Pedro 310-707-2440

Iron City Tavern

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfor table gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766 Lighthouse Cafe

The favorite local cafe for the point Fermin area of San Pedro great breakfasts, lunches and even dinner. Serving traditional offering for breakfast along with specialty omelets, espresso and cappuccino. Lunches include a delicious selection of soups, salads, burgers and sandwiches with hearty portions as well as Chef’s Creations. Dinners feature Top Sirloin Steak or Prime Rib as well as a kids menu. Beer and wine are served. Free Wifi and is pet friendly on the patio. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. close to Cabrillo Beach and the Korean Bell, Point Fermin area- 508 West 39th St., San Pedro. 310- 548- 3354 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash, soups and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crépes and pastas. Take a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com Nazelie’s Lebanese Cuisine

Nazelie’s Lebanese Cuisine is a favorite of the neighborhood for the terrific kabobs, beef or chicken shawarma, lamb dishes and falafel. Nazelie’s chicken and rice soup with lemon is like a warm embrace—it takes chicken soup to a whole new level. Nazelie uses a recipe handed down in her family for generations, starting with homemade chicken broth, and adding a refreshing touch of lemon for taste and nutrients. Nazelie’s Lebanese Café, 1919 S.Pacific Avenue, San Pedro. (310) 519-9122.

PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING Since 1961 we’ve extended a hearty welcome to visitors from ever y corner of the globe. Delight in an aweinspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the AwardWinning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www. Portsocalldining.com San Pedro Brewing Company A microbrewery and American grill, SPBC features hand-crafted award-winning ales and lagers served with creative pastas, bbq, sandwiches, salads and burgers. A full bar with made-fromscratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Live music on Saturdays. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 • www.sanpedrobrewing.com SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 • www.spiritmarine.com Think Café Think Café is giving downtown San Pedro a taste of sophistication for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Located in the heart of downtown on 5th Street, Think Café is a magnet for locals and business types alike. Enjoy patio dining for a latté in the morning, soup and salad at midday, or a wonderful rendezvous in the evening, perfect for enjoying a selection from the wine list. The Café also boasts a selection of imported beers. Breakfast at the Café offers everthing from bacon and eggs to eggs Benedict, with a wide variety of dishes to awaken your taste buds. 302 W. 5th St. Suite 105, San Pedro • (310) 519-3662

Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfor table dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, meat pies, salmon, swordfish & vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-0363 • www. whaleandale.com San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure

2013 Edition

Coming Soon!

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

Continued from page 11.

Wilson Savoy

Calendar continued from page 13. Southern California tour. Admission is $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alva’s Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

June 18

Ryan Reaves Comedy Night Godmother’s Saloon is hosting the Ryan Reaves Comedy Night, 9 to 10 p.m. June 18. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

June 19

Sean Lane Sean Lane is performing from 8 to 9 p.m. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmother’s Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Philippa Blair’s Labyrinth and Lines are at the Warschaw Gallery. Photo by Rebecca Garibay.

Labyrinth of Lines– Philippa Blair By Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Columnist

Geography is important to Philippa Blair’s

Paseo Paseo will be performing 10 p.m., to 1 a.m. June 21. The cover charge will be $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing. com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Rob on the Piano The Whale & Ale presents Rob on the Piano, 7 to 9:30 p.m. June 21. Enjoy good food and entertainment with no cover charge. Rob and guests will be playing every Friday of the month. Details: (310) 832-0363; www.whaleandale.com Venue: Whale & Ale Location: 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro

June 22

Last Laugh Saturday Get the Last Laugh, at 8 p.m. June 22, with improv comedy at Hot Java in Long Beach. Details: held2gether.com Venue: Hot Java Location: 2101 E. Broadway, Long Beach

June 23

4 Way Street CSN and Y Tribute Alva’s Showroom will host the 4 Way Street CSN and Y Tribute at 4 p.m.. The tribute features five band-members, bringing you sounds from the guitar, keyboard percussion and bass. $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alva’s Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

Community/Family June 15

Ultimate Teen Celebration Thousands of teenagers and their families are once again expected to attend the Ultimate Teen Celebration, from 12 to 5 p.m. June 15, at “The Dome” Queen Mary Long Beach. The event will include music, beauty and fashion for teens and parents in preparation for their Quinceañera, Sweet 16, Cotillion, Filipino Debut, Bar/Bat Mitzvah and High School Prom. Tickets are $10. Details: www.TeenPartyExpo.com Venue: Queen Mary Location: 1126 Queens Hwy, Long Beach Calendar continued on page 16.

June 14 – 27, 2013

distinctive chords adds a lot of potential. When I compose I start on piano and figure it out later on accordion and teach it to the guys like that.” Cajun music is inherently hybrid. Savoy said that it’s almost impossible to not have cross pollination with so much available in modern music. Most musicians play by ear, “so whatever we hear is in our head, we are like sponges,” he said. Savoy listens to a lot of rock ’n’ roll music from the 50s, a lot of blues and Ray Charles. Much of his singing comes from those styles. “I don’t even want to call what we do Cajun music anymore,” he recently told a friend. “I want to call it Louisiana music.” Like his parents, Savoy is also a music educator, teaching Cajun Music Ensemble at the University of Louisiana. He also made an instructional video to help people learn the rhythm of Cajun music. In the past few years, Cajun music has become more popular with young people. “The more young people that come out, see the music live, dance and get involved, that’s the future, as long as people aren’t too shy to let it breathe and evolve,” he said. There are some very traditional people around Louisiana who think if the music is not played the way it was in the 50s, then it’s not traditional and they want no part of it. Savoy said he has always been against trying to hinder or stifle the music. “I say just do your thing,” he said. “Play Cajun music. If you want to introduce rock ’n’ roll, or if you like country and you want to mix it in, it’s a big pot around here. A lot of Zydeco bands are putting in more rap.” “There is a great quote that I’ve heard, I may not like what they’re doing but I like that they’re doing it.” “I do like the fact that they are including it, however, and exposing it to the people.” The Pine Leaf Boys have a brand new CD that came out Memorial Day Weekend called Danser on Wilson’s brother Joel Savoy’s record label Valcour. Details: http://pineleafboys. com

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

work. The influence of her New Zealand homeland seeps throughout the series showing at Warschaw Gallery. To our good luck, Blair has joined the colony of artists living in San Pedro and, our port community, is finding its way into her work. Her vertical studio on a hill in San Pedro takes up the majority of her home. Buried beneath the floor of the home, in her basement, is what she calls the “engine” of her creative energy. Ideas are incubated through models and sketches and works on paper. Years of scribbles are created and saved, gestating for a birth that will take place at a determined time. This basement is the first trimester of the development process. “I’m interested in the memory of DNA,” she said. “Not just telling the story of a painting, but uncovering certain mysteries. I feel it is a journey and this labyrinth of choices is the way I approach painting. Often something will happen. I will make a deliberate mark, and then the accident happens [that leads to the end result].” Blair and her architect husband have built a two-story studio behind the house. As her projects transition to a second stage on the ground floor of the back studio, much of the history and memory of her work is stored within. Blair began her U.S. career in New York, exhibiting as a young artist at the Shipsee Gallery in a group show of New Zealand artists. Her Kandinsky-inspired, abstract-expressionist work was paired alongside with Maori indigenous art. It is no surprise, as indigenous references are woven throughout her work, referencing the same natural influences that the aboriginals replicated in their prehistoric works. The colors of the lush landscape of New Zealand, as well as the crystal blue of the surrounding Pacific Ocean, can be found here. The country is known for its breathtaking landscape of volcanoes, jungles and coastline. All of that seems to be immersed in

her painting. Today, she brings an improvisational dynamism that reflects the surrounding geography of Southern California. As we ascend to the second story we reach the view that informs much of her current work. The cranes in the Harbor, the snow on the mountains, are seen from the balcony of the place where much of her work is eventually brought to life. Blair paints flat on the floor of her upstairs studio. The lines in her painting reflect the labyrinth of the topography of her saga. Her work remains intensely personal. Over the years this has led to a self-discovery. “I look on the work as journeys, and finding a way out of the labyrinth,” she said. As a child her mother taught her the piano and the influence of music is felt throughout her paintings. Vibrations pulse through the lines and strokes of her brilliantly colored brush. “Unself-conscious, spontaneous, and organic, Blair’s painting is recognized for achieving a delicate balance between gesture and structure, intuition and preconception,” Curator Ron Linden writes. “Vivid, color-saturated brushstrokes and squeegee traces swerve and dodge, collide and coalesce, to re-create both the recalled landscape and the frame of mind she was in originally. Memory, as a storehouse of indelible images, becomes her creative domain.” The title of this exhibition is drawn from the writings of Jorge Luis Borges. “A man set himself the task of portraying the world. Through the years he peoples a space with images of mountains, kingdoms, ships, islands, stars horses and people. Shortly before his death he discovers that the patient labyrinth of lines traces the image of his face.” Philippa Blair has traced her life throughout the works exhibited in Labyrinth of Lines. The exhibit runs through Aug. 10. Details: (310) 600-4873 Venue: Warschaw Gallery Location: 600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

June 21

Fred Schreuders Group Fred Schreuders Group will be at Alva’s showroom at 8 p.m. Admission is $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alva’s Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

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Calendar from page 14.

June 15

San Pedro Juneteenth Celebration Celebrate Juneteenth at Peck Park. Juneteenth is an annual observance of the day the remaining slaves in Texas were liberated well after the Civil War. There will be jumpers face painting and games for kids and plenty of barbecue to go around. Chivas USA soccer team will be in attendance handing out free gifts and prizes. The event is free. Venue: Peck Park Location: 560 N. Western Ave., San Pedro

Continued from page 1.

José Figueroa

Long Beach Juneteenth Celebration Celebrate Juneteenth, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Martin Luther King Jr. Park in Long Beach. Juneteenth is an annual observance of June 19, which celebrates the freedom of all remaining slaves in Texas. The celebration will showcase performances by local choirs, dance troops and other local entertainers. There will also be a good ole fashion community barbecue of hamburgers and hot dogs, as well as, the annual domino tournament, softball game and Zumba dancing. St. Mary Medical Center will be hosting a Health Pavilion, which includes a number of free health screenings. Children will enjoy a spectacular children’s area with plenty of games, jumpers, and arts and crafts. Details: (562) 570-6816 Venue: Martin Luther King Jr. Park Location: 1950 Lemon Ave., Long Beach Saturday Tour San Pedro Bay Historical Society’s “Saturday Tour” will feature Vinegar Hill, starting at 10 a.m. June 15, on 9th Street at Pacific Avenue in San Pedro. Sites will include the old DiCarlo’s Bakery, the historic YWCA and historic homes. Suggested donation is $5. Details: sanpedrohistory@gmail.com

June 21

Third Fridays Twilight Walk Explore the resurgence of Pine Avenue North of Third Street, from 7 to 10 p.m. June 21, in Long Beach. See art, hear music and taste wine. Venue: Pine Avenue Location: 3rd to 8th Street

June 22

Independent And Free.

LB Bayou, Blues Festival Celebrate the 27th year of the Long Beach Bayou & Blues Festival, June 22 and 23, at Rainbow Lagoon Park in Long Beach. See page 11. Details: (310) 217-4196; longbeachbayoufest. com Venue: Rainbow Lagoon Park Location: E. Shorline Dr., Long Beach Pine Ave Pour The Pour will feature craft beers, great food as well as some of local musicians playing great music, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 22, in downtown Long Beach. The idea is to bring the tastes of the community together in family friendly environment. Venue: Downtown Long Beach Location: 643 7th St., Long Beach

June 14 – 27, 2013

Layers of the Past Please join Friends of Banning Museum for a special lecture by Museum Director Michael Sanborn, at 10 a.m. June 22, at the Carriage Barn of the Banning Museum in Wilmington. Phineas Banning built the Banning mansion in 1864. The 23-room Victorian residence remains the finest example of domestic Greek Revival architecture in Southern California. The home’s construction symbolized Phineas Banning’s confidence in the future of his community. The lecture will focus on the evolution of the Banning residence and will include the current painting and restoration project that the residence is undergoing. There will be a Q-and-A session after the lecture. Admission is free for Friends of Banning members and $5 general admission. Details: (310) 548-2005 Venue: Banning Museum Location: 401 E. “M” St., Wilmington

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Speaker Series The next installment of the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum “Speaker Series” will take place, at 1 p.m. June 22, featuring Tom Sitton, who will be talking about Phineas Banning’s role in the development of Southern California, refreshments and a book signing. Venue: Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum Location: 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez Calendar continues on page 17.

Photojournalist José Figueroa’s (Above) Juan Carlos Halley and Bertica Rivas, Havana, c. 1967. (Below) Salon de Capri, Havana, 1966-67.

Figueroa was recently invited to California by Stuart Ashman, the director of the Museum of Latin American Art, to work on a long planned photo project. Not coincidentally, Ashman was raised in Cuba. His father worked for Kodak photography and Ashman has his own history in the field of photography. When Ashman was 12 years old, his family immigrated to the United States. We caught up with both men at the San Pedro home of his host, Al Nodal of Cuba Tours and Travel. Figueroa’s trip was made possible through the invitation of MoLAA and the generous hospitality of the Nodal family. Figueroa and Ashman sat down to discuss Cuba and Cuban photography. RLn: What brings you to Los Angeles? Figueroa: My family name is Figueroa and in the 90s I learned about Figueroa Street in Los Angeles. I had an idea: Why not shoot a series “Figueroa on Figueroa?” When I received the invitation from the museum I also received sponsorship from the travel agency. This is the main reason I am here to finally begin this project after many years of planning. The street is 29.7 miles long. It happens that in Havana we also have a Figueroa Street, only one mile long. I began my work on the street in Havana. Ashman: My family lived on Figueroa Street in Havana for four years when I was a child. I wanted to bring Figueroa to Los Angeles because he is so well known in Cuba. He is a trained photojournalist in what is really a dying breed because nobody works in silver anymore. We wanted to build a relationship with him, maybe at some point do a talk at the museum. RLn: MoLAA has always been focused on painting and sculpture. Does this mean MoLAA is interested in showing more photography? Ashman: There were some photography shows before I came. “Mexico Unexpected” was

curated by Idurre Alonzo. In a way photography is a classical form, there is no reason not to include it. Particularly when you are talking about silver or platinum photography, which is a craft as well. You have to learn chemistry, you have to learn to use light and work in a dark room, which sanctifies it even more. Right now, we have an exhibit called Fourteen Travelers in Mexico, which is exactly the kind of photography Figueroa is doing today. RLn: Exactly the same in the technique or in the approach? Figueroa: In the approach. In the feeling, in the way you approach your subject. Ashman: He (Figueroa) is very close to the traditional photojournalists. Danny Leon is in the show [at MoLAA], and he is very close to José. Street photography is basically capturing a moment, being a witness. RLn: Can you tell me what you see as the Cuban esthetic in photography? Figueroa: I think photography has been very important because it was the best way to show the

world what was happening in Cuba. Raúl Corrales said something I think was very important. He said that at the beginning of the revolution, 40 percent of the Cuban population was illiterate. Corrales said, “When you say there are one million people in the square, many people cannot comprehend [that number], but when you show a photo of one million people in the Revolutionary Square, everyone can understand.” That created an esthetic of “epic photography.” I am not fond of that term. At the same time there was another kind of photography going on. In my archive, my wife discovered the other side of the coin. She discovered during this time I was photographing my friends in a private more interior view. I discovered my compatriots in these old photos from the 60s. RLn: This became a show at the Coutuier Gallery? Figueroa: Yes. I was turning 60 and the photos were from the 60s. We called it, “Mis 60s” or “My 60s.” Next year, I am going on 50 years in this field. I began to look at my work from the 70s through the 90s. So I started to put together all these images [in] a series. Havana in the 90s was known as a “special period” for Cuban art. It was very difficult. We were hungry, we were without lights. Ashman: Cuban photography paralleled photography that was happening elsewhere. Cuban photography started in 1840. By the beginning of the 20th century Cuba had as many photographic studios as Paris. So there are major figures in Cuban photography in every decade of the 20th century. I separate it into three categories. One is 1840 to 1920, 1920 to 1960 and 1960 to the present. From 1920 to 1960 it was very political. It was all documentation of the political upheavals that were going on in Cuba. Then in 1960, right after the revolution it re-synched itself with the rest of the world. Now you have surrealist photographers like Juan Carlos Alóm. These guys could be European photographers. Some of the images obviously relate to symbolism from Cuba, but to the uninformed, they could just be artistic statements. Figueroa: The result is the local point of view became the universal point of view. Ashman: What he points the camera at happens to be in Cuba, because that is where he lives, but the emotions in his photography could happen anywhere, in any part of the world. Continued on page 17.

Continued from page 16.

When I look at the photos of Figueroa Street in Havana, I think it looks like Figueroa Street in Los Angeles. Here is a guy who has lived in an isolated country and he knows everything about world photography. You can name a Scandinavian photographer and he knows who it is. Figueroa: I was here in 2001 for the show “Shifting Tides” at LACMA and I was interviewed on the radio. The interviewer asked me “How do you Cubans [function in the arts], you are so isolated? You can’t do this kind of work.” I said “ I think the people who are isolated are you here in the U.S., because we are open to all the world in Cuba” When I return to Cuba after this trip, everyone will ask me “What’s new? What did you bring back for us to see?” Details: (562) 437.1689; www.molaa.org Venue: Museum of Latin American Art, Location: 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

• Happy Hour • Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • Happy Hour, $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 5198200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour, 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766 Ports o’ Call • Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. Jazz it Up Wednesdays at 7 p.m. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour, 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 831-5663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

Calendar continued from page 13.

June 22

Catalina Above, Below Cabrillo Marine Aquarium will sponsor a scientific observation and collecting expedition to Catalina Island, at 6 a.m. June 22, Los Angeles Harbor Sportsfishing Landing in Ports O’ Call Village in San Pedro. “Catalina Above And Below” is one of the Aquarium’s most popular boat trips. Not only will you have a first-hand experience to see many of the methods used by our staff to capture our marine specimens, but also to learn about these wonderful and fascinating creatures. The boat returns at 6 p.m. Cost for the trip is $95 per person ($85 Friends member). Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Los Angeles Harbor Sportsfishing Landing Location: 1150 Berth, San Pedro

June 23

Queer Anti-Prom, Sleepover Mentoring Youth Through Empowerment will host an anti-prom and sleepover, starting at 8 p.m. June 23, at The Center Long Beach. Formal wear and/ or costumes are mandatory. Youth do not have to stay for the sleepover, however if a minor stays the night, they must have parental permission. Participants attending the dance only will be asked to leave The Center at 10:30 p.m. The sleepover will continue until 10 a.m. June 24. Details: (562) 434-4455; centerlb.org Venue: The Center Long Beach Location: 2017 E. 4th St., Long Beach

Theater/Film June 16

Donner Party: The Musical Finally, a musical with heart ... and other organs, Donner Party: The Musical, at 2:30 p.m. June 16, 23, 30, at the Found Theatre in Long Beach. Great American tragedy meets good old American musical comedy ... and the result is indigestible. Tickets are $15. Details: (562) 433-3363; foundtheatre.org Venue: Found Theatre Location: 599 Long Beach Blvd., Long Beach

June 21

Art NWS: 2013 All-Member Exhibition Ninety international artists exhibit in this annual display presented by the San Pedro-based National Watercolor Society. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays, Details: http://nationalwatercolorsociety. wildapricot.org Venue: NWS Gallery Location: 915 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Memesy Beat Theatre sixth edition is a surreal animation double feature with Ashtre Jinkins, Eludem, Zikomo, Nice GuyxVinny and resident Memesy, from 7 to 10 p.m. Cover is $5. Details: www.beattheatre.blogspot.com Venue: CALB’s Screening Room Location: 727 Pine Ave., Long Beach

June 14 – 27, 2013

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CLASSIFIED ADS Reach 63,000 Harbor Area Readers

Employment

Sales Random Lengths is looking for an experienced advertising/print salesperson. We are the Los Angeles Harbor Area’s oldest independent newspaper. We are a stable and growing company, open for over 30 years. The candidate should have 2 or more year’s experience in outside sales. Bi-lingual is a plus. Please email resume and cover letter with salary history to james@randomlengths news.com. Monthly base salary and commission. EOE Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN) ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-560-8672 for casting times /locations. (AAN CAN) Movie Extras, Actors Models Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866339-0331 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD

cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

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A REWARDING CAREER that lets you earn money while helping others! Want to be your own boss, set your own hours? Independent Consultants needed for Restaurant.com. Unlimited Earning Potential. No previous sales experience req’d. Tools & full training provided. Learn more at http://sales. restaurant.com/nan. AD COPY: Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

Career Training EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AIRLINE CAREERS—Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

Business Opp Wish Your Car Could Pay You Back? Get paid to help us advertise by helping others do the same. Make up to $4,600 monthly + bonuses. Call Kim 831-238-6448 (AAN CAN)

Bulletin Board

FINANCIAL

EARN CASH NOW! Call Rowena

310-684-3544 Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ ads (AAN CAN) Live like a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-7772091 (AAN CAN) Discover the “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1 (800) 470-7545. (AAN CAN)

The Think And Grow Rich of the 21st Century! Revolutionary breakthrough for success being released! For a FREE CD, please call 1-800-3858470. (AAN CAN)

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice* *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN)

CREDIT CARD DEBT? Financially Stressed Out? Stop the harassment! Make one monthly payment YOU can AFFORD! Get Help Now and Save! Call Toll Free 1-866415-5400 (AAN CAN)

personals

MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Friendship, 1-888-777-2235. Love, 1-877-333-2863. 18+

Pets Adopt a pet from the Harbor Care Center, 957 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro. 888452-7381.

HEALTH

Drug & Alcohol Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-577-1172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable SelfPay/Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN) NEED VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices…VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Call Power Pill. 1-800-374-2619 (AAN CAN) )

DBA Filings

$120

all inclusive— filing and publishing

Call 310-519-1442 for details

(310) 833-8977

June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Don Marshall, MBA, CPA

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10/12

• Payroll • Income Tax

Bread & Hyacinths This is the book that explains why the city of Los

Buy it now at Williams Bookstore, Random Lengths News office and The Tobacco Leaf at Western & 25th

Just Relax Tax Service

870 W. 9th St., Ste. 100A, San Pedro

310.221.0034

Please help!

25 indoor & outdoor stalls

• Armed Response Alarm System • Web-based Video Monitoring • Electronic Access Control • 24-Hour Availability • Self-Serve Free Hand Wash • WIFI Hotspot • Free Charging Station (310) 707-2207 www.8thstreetgarage.com

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

(AAN CAN)

Automotive CASH FOR CARS: Any C a r / Tr u c k . R u n n i n g o r Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

RoOmmates ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listingswith photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Real Estate For Lease/Sale

SAN PEDRO

Two on A Lot

The animals at the Harbor Animal Shelter have ongoing need for used blankets, comforters, pet beds.* Drop off at Harbor Animal Shelter, 957 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro. 888-452-7381, x 143 PLEASE SPAY/NEUTER YOUR PET! *In any condition. We will wash and mend.

Real Estate Investor seeks to purchase commercial or multi-unit residential properties in San Pedro. No Agents please. 310-241-6827

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013089373 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Kraakevik Patti Receiver/Conservator, (2) Kraakevik Patti Calif. Probate Referee.15915 Ventura Blvd., Encino, CA, 91436. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura Blvd., Encino, CA, 91436. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 1986. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares

continued on following page

Newly Remodeled You'll enjoy gracious living in this 3 bedroom, 2 bath remodeled home. It offers hardwood floors, extensive use of granite, new appliances, a den and a 2 car garage. Large 7,500 sq. ft. lot.

2300 sqf - $1300 mo. 803 Palos Verde St., San Pedro (310) 707-2207

05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Golden West Realty

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Commercial Bldg. for Rent

than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

Serving San Pedro and the entire South Bay since 1980

310/831-6670

Local Notary Service

Vintage Auto & Motorcycle Storage

Adoption

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013092453 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: San Pedro Elks #966, 1748 Cumbre Drive, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): 966 Corporation, 1748 Cumbre Drive, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in 1963. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Caspar DeJong, Trustee. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other

“Arts District” Gallery/Artist Studios - Offices & Suites A-DELTA REALTY

Specializing in small businesses CPA Quality Service at very reasonable rates

Angeles is the way it is. Bread and Hyacinths: the Rise and Fall of Utopian Los Angeles is the gripping, little-known saga of the great battle between Job Harriman, the West Coast’s leading socialist, and General Harrison Gray Otis, publisher of the Los Angeles Times—a battle for the future of Los Angeles. Written by Lionel Rolfe, Nigey Lennon and Paul Greenstein, Bread and Hyacinths was originally published in 1992 by California Classics Books. It is reprinted by Random Lengths News and available for $15.

NEW inventions and Product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-4285116 Today. Fee-based service.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS

This well maintained duplex consists of a 2 bedroom house with a single car garage and a 3 bedroom 2 bath house built in 2003 with an attached 2 car garage.

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www.goldenwestsanpedro.com 1 5 1 7 S . G a f f e y S t . • San Pedro, CA 90731

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Patti Kraakevik, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 1, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013094424 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) Godmothers 302 SRK, (2) Godmother’s Saloon, 302 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Godmothers 302 SRK, 302 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above Feb. 26, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Sandra C. Marchioli, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 8, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other

than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013094489 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) Abryus Nursing Services, 146 W. 232nd Place, Carson, CA 90745. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Teresita R. Sanchez, 146 W. 232nd Place, Carson, CA 90745. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Teresita R. Sanchez, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 8, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or com-

mon law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013089375 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) CPR a Breath of Life, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA, 90047. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Veronica Valazquez, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA, 90047. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Veronica Valazquez, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 1, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013092642 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: San Pedro

Vapes, 447 W. 6th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Mailing Address: 22806 Sierra Dr., Carson, CA 90746. Registered owner(s): Anthony Camu, 1331 ½ Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. Daniel Sandoval, 22806 Sierra Dr., Carson, CA 90746. This business is conducted by a general partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Anthony Camu, Partner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 06/13/13, 06/27/13, 07/11/13, 07/25/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013107913 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  gabbag. com, 8406 W 3rd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90048. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Jack Kupelian, 4722 W. 163 Street, Lawndale CA 90260. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

By Cory Hooker, Editorial Intern Bob Beck, former managing editor to the late San Pedro News-Pilot, died May 4 at the age of 84. Beck was the familiar face of local journalism in the San Pedro Harbor Area for more than 30 years. Beck was born on Aug. 13, 1924 in Centralia, Ill. After graduating high school, he worked on the railroad, later joining to Navy to receive a better education. He became interested in journalism through his family. He attended San Diego State University and acquired a journalism degree. After an 8-month internship, Beck was asked to relocate to San Pedro to work on the News-Pilot. “I think he took great pride in making the newspaper accessible to the community,” said Doris Theriault, Bob’s wife. “He was really happy people could come to him with little articles about somebody’s winning. He got a lot of awards for humanitarian of the year and all kinds of things like that. But I think it was just really serving the community that made him feel the best.” After retiring from the News-Pilot in 1991, he moved back to his hometown, where he took care of his mother for four years. After her death, Beck and Theriault moved to Prescott, Ariz., where he delved into researching the Native American culture there. Beck participated in many archeological digs, later becoming a Native American pottery expert. Beck is survived by his wife, two sons and three grandchildren. “Bob was a very humorous fellow,” Theriault said. “[He] loved life; loved to laugh; loved to make people laugh.... He loved San Pedro. We had been away for 20 years and we came back for the last three years. He just delighted to be back here. This was home to him.” from p. 10

John Ljubenkov

the “John Olguin School of Public Speaking” where the first rule was to make your audience (students) laugh and engage their interest. John Ljubenkov was the firstborn son of Peter from Kastel Gomilica, and Lucille from Brac, an island that would become apart of what is today Croatia. Peter was actually born in Chicago then returned to Croatia as a small boy. He came back to the US in the 1930s. His powerful opinions on labor and politics helped to shape his son’s consciousness about the world. John was also a true aficionado of classical music and baroque music in particular. It was tough to attend concerts with John. His physical enthusiasm for music would cause the entire section of seats to sway as he conducted. He will be missed.

June 14 - 27, 2013

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013093221 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Wheaton’s Eatins, 2017 Lomita Blvd #2025, Lomita, CA, 90717. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Donald R. Wheaton, 25409 Eshelman Ave, Lomita, CA 90717. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 1993. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Donald R. Wheaton, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 7, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement

05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

06/13/13, 06/27/13, 07/11/13, 07/25/13

Former Editor of San Pedro News-Pilot Dies at 84

05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013094423 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  WorkInnLA, 455 B. West 6th Street, San Pedro, C 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Managed Career Solution Inc., 3333 Wilshire Blvd., #405, Los Angeles, CA, 90010. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above Feb. 28, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Philip Starr, Executive Director. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 8, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013089290 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) A-Delta Realty, (2) Properties West Investment Real Estate.15915 Ventura Blvd. #303, Encino, CA, 91436. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura Blvd., Encino, CA, 91436. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 1. 2003, 2. 1977. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Patti Kraakevik, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 1, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Jack Kupelian, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 24, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires

generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing):

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June 14 - 27, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


RLn 06-13-13 Edition