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W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2014

VOLUME 106, ISSUE 3

Jose Mestre/Asst. Photography Editor

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Molly Callanan crowned Miss WCU 2014

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News

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Clare Haggerty News Editor

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he line to get into Miss WCU on Saturday night was out the door at 6:30 p.m., winding around the entire lobby of the Asplundh concert hall and through the tunnel of the castle. As people waited anxiously to get into the building, there was a lot of chatter about the next potential Miss WCU 2014. The audience kept growing until the concert hall had a full house. When the lights went down at 7:30 p.m., a cheer erupted from the excited crowd as Courtney Daniels took the stage to sing a beautiful rendition of the National Anthem. The contestants then took the stage with Miss WCU 2013, Emily Sharp, for the opening production number, a high-energy dance number that allowed the audience to take a look at all of the contestants. The opening number was followed by a video introduction of each contestant. Each of the 19 lovely ladies had an opportunity to introduce herself and her platform from several different well-known locations around campus. “The support from the other women is astounding,” said contestant Elana Benitez. “Through the whole process, from our first rehearsal the crowning, we always wanted to lift each other up. Miss WCU was an incredible experience and I would do it a million times over again if I could.” The emcee of the night, Mayor Carolyn Committa, then took the stage. Mayor Committa warmly

welcomed the audience and formally introduced Miss WCU 2013, Emily Sharp. The mayor also explained how the judges’ scores were broken down: 40 percent was based on an interview each contestant had with the judges before the show, and the remaining 60 percent was dependent upon their performance onstage. The next part of the program was a video to introduce the five judges. The head judge was Vincenza Carrieri-Russo, Miss Delaware 2008. The rest of the judging panel was comprised of Jen Nestor, a fitness instructor at the West Chester YMCA; Brenda Goldsmith, a veteran in the events/entertainment industry; Andrea

THE QUAD NEWS

Molly Callanan crowned Miss WCU 2014 Once the 19th contestant left the stage, Emily Sharp graced the stage to serenade the audience with “On My Own” from Les Miserables as the contestants prepared their respective talents. The talent portion was worth 25 percent of their overall total, and with good reason; the contestants clearly worked very hard at a multitude of different talents, including an acrobatic routine, singing, alternative percussion, dancing, a color guard routine, and one contestant who signed the lyrics in time with a song. The end of the talent portion signified the end of act one. After a 10-minute intermission, Mayor Committa took the stage to introduce each contestant during the evening gown and onstage question competition. Miss WCU 1999 Michelle

Jose Mestre/Asst. Photography Editor

Hoeflich, the Mid-Atlantic Merchandise Coordinator for EILEEN FISHER, Inc.; and Clayton Stacey, a seasoned performer and makeup artist. Casual Wear followed, which gave contestants the opportunity to model their casual wear outfits while photos of their friends, family, and oncampus involvement were projected on the screen behind them. The casual wear portion was worth 15 percent of the overall total.

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Filling-Brown, the first to hold the title, asked each contestant a different question. The questions included “What is the greatest struggle women face today?”, “If you were a Disney character, who would you be?”, and “What prompted you to join the Miss WCU competition?” As the judges deliberated, the Garnet Valley High School dance team performed an upbeat number to “A Little Party Never Killed Nobody,” and

Jose Mestre/Asst. Photography Editor

former Miss WCU titleholders who were in the audience had an opportunity to take the stage, including the titleholders from 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2011, and 2012. Emily Sharp joined the mayor onstage during her farewell presentation, a video that gave her the opportunity to tell the audience everything she accomplished as Miss WCU 2013 and to thank her friends, family, and the other people who supported her. Mayor Committa also used that time to honor Sharp for all of the service she has done for the West Chester community by giving her a key to the city. “Having had the most memorable year of my life, it was truly magical to be a part of such a life changing moment for another young woman,” Sharp said. WCU’s dance team, who recently placed fifth at dance team nationals, performed their awardwinning number for the audience as the judges made their decisions. It was time to narrow the field from 19 to the top five. The top five contestants, announced in no particular order, were Jenna Romansky, Molly Callanan, Tiffany Hundley, Olivia Miller, and Deanna Holzer. Each of the top five contestants answered one final question, including “What are your plans after

graduation?” and “What would you say to an incoming freshman or transfer student?” Michael Hartman, founder of Miss WCU back in 1999, took the stage to give two awards: Miss WCU Fan of the Year to videographer and graphic artist Nick Lavelle, and Miss WCU Sponsor of the Year to Mayor Carolyn Committa, who even got her own Miss WCU crown. Mayor Committa then reciprocated and gave Hartman his very own key to the city for everything he has done the West Chester community over the last 16 years. Emily Sharp graced the stage one last time for the closing production number. Sharp sang “For Good,” accompanied on piano and vocally by her brother Anthony, as the contestants rejoined her onstage. The awards portion of the program had finally arrived. The awards list is as follows: Congeniality Award: Jenna Romansky; Fan Club Award: Molly Callanan; People’s Choice Award: Courtney Benner; Photogenic Award: Elana Benitez; Leadership Award: Lydia White; Academic Award: Jenny Korb; WCU First Year Student Award: Deanna Holzer; Spirit Award: Heidi Brooks; Platform Development Award: Ashley McCorkle; Non-Final-

ist Casual Wear Award: Jenny Korb; Community Service Award: Samantha Gogets; Poise and Presence Award: Molly Callanan; Non-Finalist Talent Award: Margo Loggia; and Non-Finalist Interview Award: Courtney Benner. All of the contestants received a prize package simply for participating, so everyone went home with something. The runners up were announced next. The fourth runner up was Jenna Romansky; third runner up was Olivia Miller; second runner up was Tiffany Hundley; and first runner up was Deanna Holzer. That left Molly Callanan to be crowned Miss West Chester University 2014 by Emily Sharp. “Passing the crown was by far my favorite moment as Miss WCU,” Sharp said. “Molly is an amazing woman; she is radiant, beautiful, brilliant, passionate, inspirational, and so incredibly kind-hearted. Welcoming her to the sisterhood was a dream come true for me as well as I’m sure it was for her.” “It was seriously a dream come true,” Callanan agreed. “This is something I have been working towards for a few years now, and it was such an honor to be given this opportunity.” Clare Haggerty is a second-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@wcupa.edu.

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FEBRUARY 10, 2014

THE QUAD NEWS

Powerful ice storm Nika leaves much of Chester County powerless

014 Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

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powerful ice storm ripped through eastern Pennsylvania and the surrounding areas last Tuesday night, leaving hundreds of thousands of homes without power and causing extensive damage and travel complications. The storm, which was called winter storm Nika, dumped between a quarter and a half-inch of ice on Philadelphia and its suburbs, making it the hardest hit area affected by the storm. Chester County very well may have gotten it the worst. Just about 166,000 PECO customers—more

than 80 percent of Chester County—reported power outages in the hours immediately following the storm, and that number remained as high as 38,000 on Sunday morning. The devastation was evident in West Chester, as many local business and residential areas spent days without power. The West Chester Commons, a large student apartment complex on Matlack Street, lost power in the overnight hours between Tuesday and Wednesday and did not regain it until Friday afternoon. Students living there were urged to go home, or otherwise seek shelter from the frigid temperatures. “[My friends and I] spent the last few days driving to each other’s parents’ houses to spend the night waiting

for the power to come back on,” said Meg Callanan, a West Chester student and resident of the Commons. “We lost all of our new groceries in the fridge to the power outage, which is horrible for a bunch of college kids without a lot of money.” The storm brought more than just power outages, however. According to The Weather Channel, a halfinch of ice can increase the weight of trees 30 times, causing everything from small branches to full size trees to come toppling down. In West Chester, there were several incidences of trees falling on cars and fallen limbs and wires obstructing roadways. “I woke up and was surprised to find out I had no power, and even more surprised to find my car buried

Circle K to host annual charity volleyball tournament

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n Saturday, Feb. 22, WCU’s Circle K will host their annual charity Volleyball Tournament in Hollinger Field House starting at 2 p.m. Teams can have between six to eight people. These members do not necessarily need to attend West Chester University. Teams will need to register by Feb. 18. Teams can register at the registration tables on campus. There will be a registration table in Lawrence Dining Hall on Thursday, Feb. 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and on Monday, Feb. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There also will be a table in Merion Science Center on Tuesday, Feb. 18 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (This table will also have the Circle K’s bake sale.) Team formation will be first come, first served,

based on who pays their registration money first. There will be up to 24 teams. The tournament will be $5 per person (equaling $30-$40 per team). This fee will also earn the participant a Tshirt. The volleyball tournament will also have inhouse community service projects and activities, entertainment, and refreshments. Participants are also encouraged to donate to the canned food drive. If you bring in a canned food item, you’ll receive a raffle ticket to win a prize. All of the money raised from the Volleyball Tournament will benefit the Eliminate Project. The Eliminate Project strives to end maternal and neonatal tetanus, as 60,000 mothers and infants die from the painful, convulsion-causing disease every year. For $1.80, mothers can be vaccinated against MNT.

UNICEF, Kiwanis, and Circle K are raising money for this project. More than $100 million will need to be raised to successfully eliminate MNT. Already, the Eliminate Project has succeeded in eliminating the disease in dozens of countries around the world. Last year, Circle K’s Volleyball Tournament raised around $1,000 for the Eliminate Project. The club hopes to be equally successful this year! Anyone who needs a registration form or who has questions can contact Noelle DiBlasi at ND765590@ wcupa.edu or Katie Rincavage at KR786710@ wcupa.edu. The WCU Circle K Volleyball Tournament’s Facebook event page can be found here: http:// www.facebook.com/ events/183082765236217.

under a tree,” said WCU starting over. We’ll adjust Center to help set up an student Amanda Slook. our syllabi, but it’s a game of emergency regional shelter Due to the wide-spread catch-up for the next three for those in need in the compower outages and hazard- weeks.” munity. In just an hour’s ous conditions, West ChesBut despite the horrid time hundreds of cots with ter University was forced conditions, many students sheets, blankets and pillows to cancel classes Wednes- and faculty did find a way had been set up, and food day and Thursday, after to spend their days off, and was being sorted and stored. already having a snow More than 200 people day Monday from a Photo by Amanda Slook were able to use the previous storm. In the shelter—which was first 14 days of classes, run by American Red there have already Cross—for a meal and been five days cana warm place to sleep. celled due to inclement “Having the opporweather. The canceltunity to get to work lations are wreaking alongside so many havoc on both students West Chester Universiand professors, both of ty student was simply whom are feeling the amazing,” said Justin effects of not being able Sochovka, who volunto have class. teered at the shelter “I didn’t expect the Wednesday night. ice storm to cause that “There was a point in much damage,” said time when I paused, Tori Holt, a junior at looked around the the university. “At first room and watched as I didn’t mind the snow fellow students worked days, but last week WCU student Amanda Slook awoke at her pow- vigorously to make was crazy. I’ve barely erless Matlack Sreet residence Wednesday to sure that the shelter done any work in my also find her car underneath a fallen tree. was in tip-top shape for classes.” our fellow community “It’s tough enough members. I couldn’t early in the term to get stu- brought some much needed help but smile knowing that dents on track and focused good to a tough situation.” when our community needs on their coursework,” added On Wednesday night, and us, WCU students are alcommunication studies pro- with short notice, more than ways reliable.” fessor Ed Lordan. “Throw in 100 student and faculty vol- Kenny Ayres is a fourth-year student some snow days and no elec- unteers trekked down to the majoring in communication studies. tricity and it’s almost like Sturzbecker Health Science He can be reached at KA739433@

By Theresa Kelly Staff Writer

Theresa Kelly is a second year student majoring in English literary secondary education. She can be reached at TK780615@wcupa.edu.

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wcupa.edu.

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man from Florida told deputies recently that intruders had abducted his wife with the assistance of “holograms.” Apparently he was “extremely agitated” and wielding a baseball bat when police arrived on the scene. He told them that “the men” abducted his wife and that “they used holograms to project signals on the walls to get him to do what they wanted and to communicate with each other,” The police located the woman in question, who was at a nearby mobile home with the man’s aunt. The aunt told investigators that the woman was drunk, and that no one had chased her.

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ostal workers in Nashville, Tenn. received several calls early this week from a suspect who was impatient about a package. When they finally found the package, it reeked of marijuana, so they called police. Officers were waiting for the culprit at the post office when he came to pick up the package and, upon discovering 10 pounds of sealed weed, arrested the suspect.

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Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Kenny Ayres

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

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Love is in the air

hat special time of year is right around the corner, and I’m not talking about Christmas. Yes, Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. To some, this is the day where arrows get stuck in the hearts of hopeless romantics. To others, this is the day where singles and the heartbroken alike celebrate, albeit with jealous energy. Whatever the case may be, I feel that many of us miss the primary idea behind Cupid’s special holiday. For me, this day is simply about having fun. And in order to have fun, all anyone needs is a person, or a group of people to enjoy time with. Buying into what is “culturally ordained” as the proper way to celebrate Valentine’s Day is a poor way to go about festivites. It’s all about the heart, all about the surrounding people. No one needs money to have a good time, no one needs money to have fun. Personally speaking, the best experiences are ones that come from people I enjoy being around. Whenever I walk into Giant, or any kind of grocery store. There is always a large display set up pertaining to whatever holiday is right around the corner. This past weekend was, you guessed it, a Valentine’s display. No doubt the material aspect of Valentine’s Day is appealing to some degree, but what I feel is important is the connection being built between couples, or a group of friends hanging out, as the case may be. Connections and bonds will last long after flowers wilt and chocolate expires. The main idea I want to convey, is no matter who you are or what kind of situation you are in, this holiday is all about building connections with whomever you want. The day is not supposed to be about the most extravagant night out, nor righteous single fury. The day is supposed to be used to create lifetime bonds. Something that Giant, nor any store, can sell.

Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor, The Quad

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor Laura Wayne Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor Ilana Berger Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Drew Schmitz Business Manager Andrew Miller Advertising Manager

EDITORIAL STAFF Jose Mestre Asst. Photography Editor Ryan Calpin Asst. Sports Editor

COPY EDITORS Stephanie Loeh Drew Drevyanko Jeffrey Holmes

DISTRIBUTION Drew Schmitz Andrew Miller ONLINE EDITION Chris Wilwol FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright ©2014 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.

By Tom Speci

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

THE QUAD OP-ED

It’s okay to be different, especially politically

By Tom Mandracchia Special to The Quad

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rom a very young age, we have all heard the phrase, “It’s okay to be different!” My peers at West Chester University rightfully embrace this individual-loving philosophy. For example, our majors cover an array of topics such as education, biology, history, economics, and music. Our campus offers clubs ranging from the grit of rugby to the art of a capella groups. Truly, we encounter opportunities every day to showcase why “different” can be a good thing…except in one area: politics. A two-party political system has long dominated the United States. Anyone who does not define themselves as a conservative or liberal does not fit the norm. While the young people of West Chester agree that encouraging unique thought and traits is a positive, many of us still feel trapped in the two-party paradigm. Coming from a conservative background, freshman year was a confusing time. I firmly believed in

government allowing free trade, upholding traditional values, and securing our nation through foreign intervention and closed borders. My freshman year’s classes, however, exposed a side of the world I seldom thought about. Gay marriage seemed more and more like a civil rights issue. Keeping marijuana illegal seemed expensive and frivolous. Demonizing illegal immigrants seemed inhumane. Invading other countries in the name of self-defense seemed illogical and counterproductive. As mounting evidence and empathy converted me to the side of social freedom and non-interventionism, I felt politically homeless. On the one hand, how could conservatives advocate small government in our economic lives while simultaneously advocating big government in our social lives and international relations? On the other hand, how could liberals advocate social freedoms while simultaneously seeing it fit for the government to control the economy as it pleases? No professors, media, or peers

acknowledged that any political philosophy other than conservatism or liberalism could exist. Yet, both philosophies were overtly contradictory. During the second semester of my freshman year, I encountered representative Ron Paul (TX) during a Republican Presidential Primary debate. Ron Paul did not fit my political view perfectly by any means, but he caught my attention in that he did not buy into the conservative belief that government should throw us in a cage for marijuana or tap our phones in the name of “freedom.” While not everything Ron Paul said appealed to me, he was the first mainstream politician I and many other youth discovered who spoke his own truth, as opposed to the “truth” that would get him conservative votes. Finally, through some Internet searching, I realized there were many people like me. These people who do not fit the conservative or liberal models are “libertarians.” While libertarian views vary, at heart they believe govern-

ment has a track record of failure and has neither the right nor the wisdom to control our social or economic lives. They include celebrities such as Drew Carey, Vince Vaughn, Penn Jillette, Big Boi, Kurt Russell, Trey Parker, and Angelina Jolie. They host TV shows such as “The Independents” and “Stossel” on Fox Business. They dare to be different. Sophomore year, I decided to embrace my unique views and join Students for Liberty on campus. Presently, as a junior, I am the president of a Students for Liberty organization that continues to grow significantly. This growth should come with little surprise. Conservatives no longer appeal to most young people, as evident by the last Presidential election in which 60 percent of young voters chose Barack Obama. This is expected considering conservatives disagree with students on many of the issues we consider most important: gay rights, the failed Drug War, and continuing war overseas. Only 32 percent of youth voted for Mitt Romney.

President Obama in his second term, however, offers little of the hope he offered in 2008. With numerous promises broken, it is evident President Obama is more of the same. Taxes have been raised on the middle-class, the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) leaves much to be desired, Al-Qaeda does not appear any weaker, Guantanamo Bay remains open, our debt is mounting, and the NSA scandal demonstrates an even more intrusive policy than President George W. Bush’s Patriot Act. Furthermore, pending insolvency of government benefits bodes poorly for us students. While both political parties blame each other for our current and future problems, both have been in power for over a century. Both are to blame. Hopelessness may be the immediate reaction, but change never derives from apathy and despair. If you believe, as many of your peers do, that we have too much debt, our Drug War is failing, gays should share in equal rights, our presence in the Middle

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East is counterproductive, our college debt is unsustainable, the goal of politicians on both sides of the aisle is votes, bankers should not get bailouts, the government should not tap our phone calls, or government should just leave people alone in general, consider the liberty movement. Many students on campus are already exploring the cause of liberty. Many students are joining Students for Liberty or Students for a Sensible Drug Policy which calls attention to America’s failing Drug War. Some students are even attempting to start a Young Americans for Liberty chapter on campus. The liberty movement is alive and well. Contrary to what society has taught us since a young age, it is okay to look into different political philosophies. It is okay to break the two-party paradigm. It is okay to say, “I am my own person. No politician in Washington DC owns me.” It is okay to be different. Tom Mandracchia is a third-year student majoring in history and secondary education. He can be reached at TM760425@wcupa.edu.

Chris Christie faces roadblocks in trek for presidential bid

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By Evan Smith Staff Writer

hris Christie’s chances of becoming the Republican nominee for the 2016 election have taken a drastic hit amid the bridge scandal. According to a recent poll which was taken by CNN/ORC International survey, Christie is now trailing to Hillary Clinton. The numbers indicate that Christie is trailing 55 percent to 39 percent to Clinton, which is a drop before the bridge allegations where Christie was leading 49-46 percent. But will the numbers stay this way as we inch closer to election

season? Knowing the nature of U.S. citizens, issues such as these tend to blow over. We as a country have this sort of political amnesia where we forget something rather quickly. But is this too big of a scandal to overcome? Not necessarily. It will however, be a talking point on the primary level, and certainly on the national stage if Christie is to win the bid. Clinton is the likely candidate for the Democratic nomination, barring a random candidate winning the nomination out of nowhere again, as seen with Barack Obama. If she is to win, the Republican

Party will almost certainly be sure to bring up Benghazi, an issue they have become infatuated with. With both these issues looming over the candidates, will it balance the field? Chances are voters will remain loyal to their partisanship. For example, South Carolina’s first district, a heavily Republican one, voted Mark Sanford back into power wikipedia.com

despite a highly publicized scandal of an extramarital affair. However, it is the independent voters that will be the biggest concern, and how much they still care about these “scandals.” A worrisome sign is the fact that Christie’s numbers among Independents have taken a tumble from 59 percent to 39 percent. It will be dependent on how Christie and his administration deal with the swoon of allegations that will arise in the upcoming weeks. During the NSA leaks, the Obama administration also used the excuse that they had no prior knowledge. Ultimate-

ly, his poll numbers took a massive hit, which still have not fully recovered. It is hard to believe that politicians who wield immense power, such as Christie and Obama, had no information on these two issues. Will Christie deny that he had prior knowledge, or will he admit he knew something about the bridge closing? Christie has seemingly earned the reputation that he is a bully of sorts, which may give some observers the idea that he did indeed close the George Washington Bridge as political retribution. In a field packed with strong Republican

candidates, ranging from moderates to far right wing tea partiers, there is a lot of competition. Some Republican voters may feel that Christie was not conservative enough to begin with, while others believe that he is a proven leader who can end gridlock and begin a surge to a bipartisanship effort to productivity. If this scandal does persist up until the Republican primaries, then the lanes may be closed for Christie’s bridge to the White House. Evan Smith is a fourth-year student majoring in political science and minoring in communications. He can be reached at ES777403@wcupa.edu.

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By Drew Mattiola Staff Writer

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isionary hip-hop producer J Dilla never found mainstream success during his brief lifetime. But in the eight years since his death, Dilla — who would have turned 40 today — has come to represent a major influence point on hip-hop's evolutionary tree. At his peak in the late 1990s and early 2000s, he suggested syntheses that hadn't seemed possible. He played fresh games with texture and tone. He recast the sample as a malleable component, rather than the monochromatic backbone it had seemed to be. And he injected a softened, swaggering humanity into the rigid slap of classic hip-hop drumbeats. His magnum opus, Donuts, was reissued on vinyl last month, and the posthumous Music From the Lost Scrolls Vol. 1 came out on Tuesday — the first in a series of previously unreleased recordings. In Detroit on Saturday, the rapper Talib Kweli, violinist and arranger Miguel Atwood-Ferguson, and a handful of other artists will perform at the third annual Dilla Day, a concert celebrating Dilla's career. Dilla's reach stretches way beyond hip-hop: For one, he's recently cast a long shadow over contemporary jazz. He never belonged to jazz's inner circle, but since his death in 2006 from a rare blood disease, his legacy has helped pull the genre back into kissing contact with modern popular music. "He's so important," says jazz drummer Karriem Riggins, who collaborated extensively with Dilla and is himself a hip-hop producer. "Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams and Miles Davis: he's in the same category to me.”

THE QUAD OP-ED

The legacy of J Dilla continues The jazz world today finds itself swamped with young talent eager for reinvestment in the discourse of contemporary culture. The shift has roots that run in a lot of directions. It's a reaction to the neotraditional revivalism that capped the last century, and to jazz's withered commercial infrastructure in the wake of the 1990s CD

records, many of them jazz, into specific sections and kept them alphabetized so that he could dig up the right sample as soon as inspiration arrived. He didn't just rely on his collection, either. He was always ready to pick up a guitar or a bass, or saddle up behind the drum kit, or hammer out chords on the keyboard.

drum-machine sounds into positions within a measure. From there, the pattern can repeat indefinitely as a loop. Dilla preferred to play beats on a drum machine by hand in real time. That allowed him to color his creations with a signature rhythmic sway: languorous, leaned back, landing just behind the beat. In some ways, it was a new

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bubble. Add to that the simple fact that millennial jazz musicians grew up listening mostly to hip-hop, R&B and rock. The crush of these influences on jazz was a matter of when, not if. But no movement takes hold without a hero, and J Dilla has filled that role. "Pretty much anybody else in hiphop — from Jay-Z to Kanye [West] — you can tell a musician you don't like them and it'll be like, 'Okay, cool,'" says Kenneth Whalum III, a jazz saxophonist who tours with the R&B singer Maxwell. "If you go into that same setting saying you don't like Dilla, it's not okay for you to be there anymore." He's kidding, but only by half. So what set Dilla apart? Why has his brand of virtuosity proved so captivating to the jazz crowd? For one, Dilla was a sort of human musical encyclopedia. In his studio, he sorted thousands of vinyl

Dilla would happily wrangle split-second clips from albums just for the timbre of a single note, or the texture of vinyl, or the clack of a snare drum hit. "Every track he did, he had different drum sounds," says Damion Reid, a jazz drummer who grew up listening to hip-hop in the 1990s. "Most producers around that time — like DJ Premier and Diamond D and guys like that — they kind of had a sound. When you heard a beat, you knew it was them because of the drums. [In Dilla's music], I would hear that every sample, every drum, every nuance, every atmospheric sound was strategically placed. Jay Dee embodied, to me, the culmination of all those things." Then, there was Dilla's approach to crafting the rhythms of those drumbeats. Many beatmakers use a method known as quantizing, which lets you perfectly subdivide electric

paradigm for the swing rhythm that had been born in West Africa and grew up with jazz. James Dewitt Yancey was born Feb. 7, 1974, and grew up as the oldest of four children in a household on the east side of Detroit. Both his parents were musicians, and he showed natural prowess early. In high school, he started making hip-hop beats and rapping alongside two classmates, with whom he would go on to form the trio Slum Village. By the mid-1990s, word was traveling about his production chops, and he was collaborating with artists in New York and Los Angeles: The Pharcyde, A Tribe Called Quest, Busta Rhymes. In 2000, Slum Village released its breakthrough album, Fantastic, Vol. 2. But the year was more notable for the release of two other CDs, both by singers, that Dilla had helped produce: Mama's Gun by Erykah

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Badu and Voodoo by D'Angelo. Marked by the unhurried, swirling fantasias that were becoming Dilla's stock in trade, these records helped confirm the arrival of a new subgenre. It was vamp-driven, insouciantly seductive, happily lodged between the live sock of classic Motown and the tinkering studio savvy of hip-hop. The music was called neo-soul. Later in the decade, Dilla would release a string of solo albums that stretched his hazy canvases to their fullest breadth — soul vocals and jazz harmony and rattling funk beats sprawled out together in a warm bath. These records, including the classics Welcome 2 Detroit (2001) and Donuts (2006), didn't grab the spotlight, but they laid themselves out for posterity, and upped the ante for all vigilant producers. "His music had that soulful jazz thing, but it also had a bounce to it," says the rapper Common, a collaborator and close friend. "Somebody could dance to it. I think those records had a huge impact on the way producers thought about music." Just as he helped solidify neo-soul more than a decade ago, Dilla seems to be freeing jazz-trained musicians today to reconsider how their music might sound, and what defines it. Listening to the generation that's come under his influence, you realize that some of jazz's supposed fundamentals interest them deeply. Others, not so much. The combustion of group interplay, and improvisation that can seem to tug on the boundaries of a band or a song: These elements remain exciting. But long, exhaustion-seeking solos pointed at some final emotional summit? Swing rhythm that clangs contentedly on the ride cym-

bal? Not necessarily. You can also feel Dilla's impact in the work of ERIMAJ, a band led by drummer and producer Jamire Williams. The influence reaches beyond the laidback, clunking physique of Williams' drum attack. It's also in his ideal of a pastiche: strings and Rhodes and acoustic bass, and an electric guitar that might have been chopped from a Radiohead track. The band's first album, Conflict of a Man, even includes a cover of Dilla's "Nothing Like This." Saxophonist Greg Osby was on the front lines of attempting to fuse jazz with hip-hop in the early 1990s, when the idea was still green enough for incredulity and ridicule. Today, jazz musicians don't seek a conscientious merger of genres so much as they use jazz concepts to reassemble the parts that have made hip-hop, R&B and neo-soul so contagious. Jazz training is starting to look like a competitive advantage more than a career roadmap. In J Dilla — the musical archivist, the sonic poet, the bass knocker — Osby sees someone who has helped young jazz musicians square their belief in instrumental expressionism with their love for the modern blues music that is hip-hop. "Dilla, he recognized this," Osby says. "He's kind of like a folk musician, almost like a pied piper, and he's drawing in a lot of people with his assessment of a wider variety of material. Dilla will be like one of those Coltrane figures, where people will be talking about him in a legendary or phantom-like status forever. He was that experimental." Drew Mattiola is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RM814408@ wcupa.edu.

By Ash Speci

By Ma Speci

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

THE QUAD OP-ED

Budweiser Clydesdale’s steal the Super Bowl

By Ashley Cantasano Special to The Quad

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ne of the most anticipated commercials of the Super Bowl each year features the Budweiser Clydesdale; pulling their red, white, and gold beer wagon. The origin of the Budweiser Clydesdales dates back to April 7, 1933; brewery owner August Anheuser Busch, Sr. received them as a gift from his son, August A. Busch, Jr. The wagon pulled by the horses contained the first case of post- Prohibition beer from their St. Louis brewery. The tradition of featuring the Clydesdales in their

(Anheuser-Busch) commercials began in 1986, during Super Bowl XX. If you ever find yourself searching YouTube for random things to watch, make sure to type "Budweiser Clydesdales, Super Bowl" into your search bar. It is interesting to watch how they have evolved over the years. For example, the first commercial that aired featured a group of Clydesdales simply playing football, with two cowboys looking on and making comments - basically just advertising the beer. The next year featured two Dalmatian puppies separated at birth, a story that tugged at your heartstrings. One puppy grows up to become a fire station dog and the other the Budweiser Dalmatian. As they warholian.com pass each other

on the road three years later, (the fire dog on top a fire truck and the Budweiser dog atop the red and gold wagon), the Dalmatian atop the wagon sticks his tongue out at the other dog, insinuating that he got the short end of the stick being picked by the firefighters. The commercial's ending is comical, and plays on our emotions. We were sad in the beginning as the puppies were separated, but happy in the end when we see each ends up alright. When Sept. 11, 2001 hit, we viewers saw a more serious side to the commercials. The team is out riding through the streets, obviously determined to get somewhere. Suddenly, the New York City skyline comes into view, and the team comes to a halt, looking at the space where the Twin Towers should be. The first two Clydesdales kneel to show their respect

for those lost, and the rest of the team follows. Real life game day scenarios are applied to their commercials as well. In 2003, we see a hoof planting slightly in bounds (or out of bounds, it isn't determined), again and again as it is replayed over and over. The camera zooms out, and you see a zebra with his head under the hood, checking to see whether the hoof is in or out. This is something you often times see at games, something taken really seriously. It is funny to see the company make a light hearted joke out of the whole situation. Friendship is a big theme being displayed in the commercials. Last year's featured a young Clydesdale and his trainer. The colt goes on to become a Budweiser Clydesdale, and three years later recognizes his trainer at a parade. The camera zooms out on

the trainer embracing the gentle giant, an extremely heartwarming conclusion. The company uses genius marketing techniques, as they invite the viewers to help name the baby Clydesdale seen in the commercial by tweeting at them. One of this year’s two commercials features the same trainer. Next to his farm a woman is giving out puppies for adoption, and one happens to make its way over to the horse's stable. The horse and puppy stare at each other, and an instant friendship is made. The trainer takes the puppy home, and over and over he escapes to see his new friend. Eventually, the day comes that the puppy is adopted. As he is being driven away by his new owner, the driver slams on the brakes, as his car is surrounded by multiple "gentle" giants. The commercial ends with the group trotting home,

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their little friend galloping ahead, made perfectly clear that his home is where they are. The second commercial this year featured a soldier coming home from war. Personal video is used of him coming home from the airport and meeting his significant other, a heartwarming detail. As they get closer to home, there are signs everywhere, "Welcome home soldier!" and a parade in his honor, where his mother is at the end. Again, the company dwelt on real life events to create this year’s commercial. Over the years, the Budweiser Clydesdales have evolved from just a simple advertising campaign to the most anticipated commercial of the Super Bowl. I look forward to what next year will bring! Ashley Cantasano is a second-year student majoring in marketing. She can be reached at AC784683@wcupa. edu.

Saudi Arabia’s new anti-terror law a ploy

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By Marisa Claggett Special to The Quad

audi Arabia, a unitary absolute monarchy, is an Islamic country covering most of the Arabian Peninsula. Considered by many western countries as a state sponsor of terrorism and the jihadist culture, foreign relations have been strained with western powers despite western dependence on Saudi Arabia’s oil exports. Recently, King Abdullah’s cabinet passed a new anti-terror law that “criminalizes acts that disturb public order, defame the reputation of the state or threaten the kingdom’s unity.” The law “also grants security services broad powers to raid homes and track phone calls and internet activity.” The latter powers allowed through the law are

all too reminiscent of the United States’ National Security Agency and their fight against terrorism through the collection of phone call metadata. However, I trust that the U.S. war on terror does not sufficiently inhibit our human rights and political freedom. Although it may seem as though Saudi Arabia’s monarch has made strides in response to growing terrorism in the Middle East, I do not believe that King Abdullah’s actions are entirely altruistic. The new law is a ploy in order to crush any kind of dissent and acts as a cover in order to continue its secret contribution to terrorism in other Middle Eastern countries and the West. In response to the Arab spring, in which four governments were overthrown and countless others are being protested,

King Abdullah knows that any kind of radical dissent in the kingdom would undermine his power and potentially end his reign. Now, anyone who calls for governmental reform could be tried as a “terrorist.” For example, 12 members from the Saudi Association for Civil and Political Rights were arrested for their public disapproval of the monarchy and for calling for a constitution. Defending his title is likely one of his motives behind this new law. The human rights of Saudis are in danger due to the broadness of the law. For example, when a wave of Saudi women decided to drive for themselves, an act banned in the kingdom, they were accused of disturbing the public order, which means they could theoretically be tried under the anti-terror

law as a threat to the coun- cruits for extremist groups, the new law allows the king try. to tolerH u m a n ate jihadrights in Saudi ists while Arabia are also repressseverely liming any ited; women thoughts lack political of a reand social freebellion. doms, religious Donors discrimination, in Saudi and the moniArabia toring and will conrepression of tinue to public speech. cplhealthcare.com finance exThe Kingdom is also, unsurprisingly, tremists as long as Kind one of very few countries Abdullah is in power and that have still refused to allowing them to do so. I sign the UN Declaration am not convinced that the of Human Rights. King new anti-terror law will Abdullah justifies criticism prevent any religious miliby citing that the Islamic tants from terrorizing and character of the country re- inciting violence. However, quires a different political the law may prevent internal insurgents from seizing order. Because Saudi Arabia the king’s power. With President Barack still remains a large base for financial support and re- Obama set to visit Saudi

Arabia in March, the time to act against this repressive law is now rather than later. Obama, who aims to re-strengthen ties with the kingdom, also hopes to discuss Saudi Arabia’s relations with Iran and its weaponry support for rebel fighters in Syria. However, the new anti-terrorism law shrouds the fact that Saudi Arabia, supposedly one of the United States’ main allies in the region, remains devoid of protections of human rights and is still one of the foremost benefactors towards militant religious groups. Perhaps our president will have his eyes opened when he visits the nation. Only time will decide whether the law will positively or negatively affect the Saudi people. Marisa Claggett is a first-year student majoring in political science and minoring in Arabic. She can be reached at MC808919@wcupa.edu

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Features

THE QUAD FEATURES

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

West Chester’s sexual misconduct policy explained

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By Bonnie M. Gray Special to the Quad

exual misconduct is an increasingly important issue on West Chester’s campus. Students and employees of this university should be aware of what “sexual misconduct” is and what actions should be taken if they or someone they know experiences sexual misconduct. Students and employees both receive the emails that try to inform us about sexual misconduct that happens on campus, including information on how to prevent and avoid sexual misconduct. There are a variety of resources and services that can help students navigate situations that could become unsafe. For example, Paradise Transit (www.paradisetransit. com), which safely shuttles students from campus to downtown West Chester and back for a very reasonable charge, as well as West Chester’s Public Safety officers, are two of several resources to be informed about. Sexual misconduct can occur anywhere and unfortunately does occur a couple dozen times on our very own campus each year. The next steps are to find out more about what sexual misconduct is, and what are the ways for all employees and students to educate themselves on prevention and their role in improving our campus climate. So what exactly is sexu-

al misconduct? According to West Chester University’s “Sexual Misconduct Handbook,” sexual misconduct is: -Sexual Harassment: unwelcome sexual advances (intentional or not) -Sexual Assault: any sexual conduct or contact without consent -Sexual Exploitation: nonconsented/unjust sexual advantage for one’s own benefit -Stalking: conduct directed at a specific person that instills fear/causes emotional distress in said person -Dating Violence: violence committed by a person in a romantic/intimate relationship to a victim -Domestic Violence: violence committed by a current/former spouse to a victim If you are engaging in either a casual or ongoing relationship, both partners need to make sure that there is good communication. Both parties should consent to each level of intimacy. Although sexual misconduct should never happen, be sure to vocalize your nonconsent if you are not comfortable in a situation. Consent is key. Addressing and reporting an incident of sexual misconduct is very important for both the victim and the university. West Chester University wants students and employees to feel secure on campus and it is important for the university to become aware if someone is threatened or

attacked. For this reason, if any university employee becomes aware of an act of sexual misconduct, the employee is obligated to report the incident. If the alleged perpetrator is a student or an employee of the university, West Chester will take appropriate action. If sexual misconduct occurs, the victim has many options and support systems to turn to. On-campus sources include but are not limited to: -Resident Assistants -Public Safety (610-4363311) -Professors -The Office of Social Equity (610-436-2433) -The Title XI Coordinator (Barbara Schneller: 610436-2433) -The Women’s Center (610-436-2122) -The Health Center (610436-2509) -Counseling Center (610436-2302) -Judicial Affairs (610-4363511) -Residential Living (610436-3307) Off-Campus resources include but are not limited to: -Crime Victims of Chester County (610-692-7273) -Domestic Violence Center of Chester County (1888-711-6270) -Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (1-800656-4673) All of the above sources will be able to help the victim with whatever they need. Some offices can help find counseling, others help a person file a

sexual misconduct report, or, in the case of Public Safety, finding the victim transportation to a local hospital. You can report the incident online at the West Chester Sexual Misconduct Policy page (www. wcupa.edu/sexualmisconduct). Although the university encourages the victim to identify both themselves and the alleged perpetrator, the option of being anonymous is available on the online report. The victim can also file a sexual misconduct report through Public Safety. It is essential for students to be aware that if there is alcohol involved in an incident that they would not be charged with an alcohol violation. Public Safety is here as a resource for students to feel safe and comfortable and students should not hesitate to use them in such a situation. Students and employees should also be aware that going to Public Safety with such an incident would not lead to criminal charges or action without the consent or knowledge of the victim. If such a situation of sexual misconduct were to occur, the victim’s name will only be shared with West Chester’s Title XI’s director, Barbara Schneller, who will protect the privacy of the victim while meeting the University’s legal obligation to investigate. For more information on either the sexual misconduct policy or to talk to Barbara Schneller, please visit West Chester’s Office of Social Equity located at 13/15 University Avenue, call the office at (610)-4362433, or attend one of the “Sexual Misconduct Open Forums” being held in Sykes 225 at 12:30p.m. on either Feb. 13 or Apr. 10. Bonnie Gray is a fourth-year student majoring in English and minoring in technical writing. She can be reached at bg 732881@ wcupa.edu.

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Burlap & Bean exceeds expectations Laura Wayne Features Editor

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ewtown Square, just outside the city of West Chester, is home to the coffee shop Burlap & Bean; however, to call this place a coffee shop simply does not do it justice. As the stereotypical English major, one of my favorite things to do is to read with a cup or tea or coffee, preferably in a coffee shop as quaint as Burlap & Bean. One of my good friends and a fellow English major, Ryan Dean, and I had heard great things about the shop and decided to give it a shot. Just a few miles off of West Chester Pike, Burlap & Bean is located in a shopping center that seems to come o u t of nowhere. T h e drive leading up to the shopp i n g com c e n t e r mainlinediner.blogspot. greets potential customers as they emerge from the cover of trees and a small incline in the road. The shopping center can be seen at the crescent of the incline, between two large patches of trees. Tucked in the far right corner of the shopping center, the Burlap & Bean’s quaint appeal can be easily overlooked amidst the

surrounding commercialization of the entire center. The shop advertises itself as a company that roasts coffee, but brews harmony, and this could not be closer to the truth. A sign outside the door reads: “Waffles are available all day” and displays a picture of a golden brown waffle topped with whipped cream and strawberries. Ryan and I looked at each other, and smiled; we knew exactly what we would be ordering. The shop was already exceeding our expectations, and we hadn’t even entered the door yet. The shop could only get better from here! Upon entering Burlap & Bean, one is immediately greeted with the aroma of freshly ground coffee, which is roasted onsite. Although the shop is located in a shopping center, there is nothing

commercial about it. The shop is relatively large, but its couches, deep brown wooden chairs and matching tables allowed for a homey feel. The shop also had an elevated corner section by the window lined with stools that resem-

See COFFEE SHOP page 9

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FEBRUARY 10, 2014 Coffee shop from page 8 bled a stage. I would later learn that this section of the shop was turned into a stage and a music venue during certain nights of the week. The cashier, while busy preparing a cup of green tea for the customer before us, greeted my friend and me with a smile and a warm welcome that easily showed he valued his job for more than for just the money. “I’ll be with you in just one minute,” he assured while multitasking. He was just slightly raising and lowering a mug allowing hot water to pour into it from the spout of the shop’s large brewing machine. The mug was filled with something freshly brewed, steaming and green. He performed these movements with the comfortable rhythm of habit. He then delivered the mug to the pickup counter with a flourish and yet another warm smile that indicated he knew the customer. He then immediately turned his body towards us with enthusiasm. “So, what’ll it be?” he said in a way that indicated he was in absolutely no hurry. Although he was busy, he seemed to have a way of making us feel he had all the time in the world to talk with us about our order. This was our first time in the shop, but we felt like nothing short of patron customers, valued for our presence more than our money. I felt that I wasn’t actually visiting a coffee shop, but rather, as though I had stepped into someone’s home and was surrounded by mutual friends, giving my order to a gracious host. I responded, “I’d love some green tea. Do you have any suggestions?” to which he instantly sidestepped towards where

THE QUAD FEATURES

all of their teas lined the countertop and began picking up each green tea jar and opening it for me to smell while he explained the significance of each flavor. “This is the one I just finished brewing,” he explained. “It’s called Match Chai. It’s a ground tea rather than loose leaf, which allows the flavor to be even more pungent. It has a strong taste, but is not strongly caffeinated.” After that, I was sold. He continued

the coffee shop, everyone seemed relaxed and at ease. When the cashier had asked me, “Is this for here, or to go?” I held back a laugh in my smile as I replied, “Definitely for here.” This is the kind of place you come to sit, relax, and enjoy, and that is exactly what we did. Burlap & Bean is a family-owned company that opened in 2006. The company is a proud provider of Fair Trade coffee. They have also partnered with TransFair,

smallfood.us

describing the other teas, but I had already decided what I wanted. I also ordered one of their waffles which were available as both regular and vegan. I decided to try the vegan waffle and was beyond pleasantly surprised. After we ordered, Ryan and I found two seats in the middle of the shop and finally began to take in our surroundings. The shop catered to a diverse set of customers. Next to us, two seemingly distant friends in their mid-thirties shared a cup of tea, each with a computer in front of them. On the opposite side of us, a group of young girls were seated on a circle of couches and appeared to have just finished opening someone’s birthday gifts. By the windows were a few people sitting alone either reading a book or typing on their computers. Directly behind us, a group of four people were in the midst of an intense game of poker. Matching the atmosphere of

a United States based company that ensures sustainable development and trade between suppliers and buyers, to ensure the farmers of their coffee are compensated fairly. Burlap & Bean hosts Thursday night Open Mic Nights from 7-10pm. Friday and Saturday nights bring live performances from local as well as national acoustic artists, transforming the coffee shop into an intimate music venue. Burlap & Bean is located at The Shops at Springton Pointe 204 South Newtown Street Rd, Newtown Square, PA 19073. For more information about the company or to view the shop’s menu, visit their website: <http://www.burlapandbean.com> Laura is a fourth-year student majoring in English with minors in international buisness and technical writing. She can be reached at lw738484@wcupa. edu.

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Valentine’s Day loses luster among college students

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By Jill Heagerty Practicum Writer

ince the days of courtly love in the Middle Ages during Geoffrey Chaucer’s time, Valentine’s Day has been associated with romantic love. In the 18th century it evolved into the stereotypes we hold today: flowers, candy, cards, and other gifts to show affection. While the traditions of the day still hold value for both adults and younger school children handing out Valentines in class, is the day still a relevant holiday for college students? Valentine’s Day is associated with traditional courting, but traditional dating in America has stagnated in comparison to year’s past. The former “going steady” convention used to be people dating around and then committing to a monogamous relationship with one person. Though exclusive long-term relationships still exist, others feel the pressure to get serious without admitting they want to date around first. This leads to a jolietdowntown.com

“hook-up culture” where people prefer short-term romantic attachments, moving from partner to partner at a much faster rate. College-aged students, usually more than other age groups, participate in this hook-up culture, shying away from traditional expressions of affection. Many have exchanged the old-fashioned dinner and

movie date for texting and casually hanging out, taking romance off the table. Some barely bother with any involvement at all, dedicating their college years to figuring out who they are, what they like, and what they want out of life. The culture shift in the dating scene leaves less room for the traditions of Valentine’s Day. Popular culture now embraces celebrating friendships or being single, alternatively coining the holiday as Galentine’s Day (celebrating the day with lady friends) or Singles Awareness Day. Many students on West Chester’s campus celebrate the day as such and prefer having fun with friends instead of a significant other. Sophomore, Abbie Lookingbill, spent last Valentine’s Day with her friends seeing a movie at Regal and bowling at the Palace in Downingtown. She elaborates, “I feel like my friends and I were having more fun celebrating Singles Awareness Day than the couples on actual dates.” Some students either hate or completely ignore the holiday and choose to keep to their normal schedules. Maura Kelly, sophomore, treats the day like any other. She focuses on her schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and then grabs dinner and studies with her friends. While straying from tradition is popular on campus, courting rituals from Chaucer’s day and the 18th century still hold significance for others. Many couples find time for a conventional date, whether it’s some-

thing low-key like pizza from Chris’s, or splurging for dinner at Limoncello. Flowers remain a staple www.columbussocialite.com

gift as well, boosting the sales of West Chester flower shops. Christine Wildauer from Lorgus Flowers notes that about 20 percent of its sales on Valentine’s Day come from college students year to year. Judy from Flowers by the Greenery saw more than 120 walk-in orders last year, noting that “a good number of younger people celebrate the holiday, so it’s not outdated.” Many students still see candy and chocolate as staples as well, but cards seem to be fading out of style in a digital age for favor of the e-card. In place of Hallmark cards, younger adults on a budget take refuge in the free e-cards they can find online. Messages can range between sweet, hilarious, and slightly inappropriate, making them an appealing gift for anyone’s taste. Valentine’s Day may not be as traditional in our modern age and the ways to celebrate it have expanded greatly, even if that includes actively hating it for some. Whether the day is spent with a significant other, friends, or by one’s self, the holiday is far from irrelevant for most. Jill Heagerty is a third-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at JH760370@wcupa.edu. She can be reached at jh760370@wcupa.edu.

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THE QUAD

Photo by Caitlin O’Connor

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Photo by Caitlin O’Connor

Ilana Berge

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Students volunteer at Red Cross shelter Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Ilana Berger

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

THE QUAD

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

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Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

Miss West Chester University 2014 Scholarship Pageant Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Entertainment

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Follow the Quad on Twitter! @TheQuadWCU QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU Adam McKay opens up to WCU students about comedy, Will Ferrell, and upcoming projects

Drew Drevyanko Copy Editor

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omedy is a genre of film that is hard to perfect because what some think is knee slapping, laugh out loud material, others think is too low brow, weird, or just stupid. One man that has come pretty close to making an overall universal sense of humor, bringing everyone of all ages to a vast amount of laughter, is Philadelphia’s own Adam McKay. While many ask the question, “Who is Adam McKay?” they all know once his enormous track record of comedy films is listed. McKay is the brains of many of the classic Will Ferrell movies we all know and love, as he has written and directed, “Anchorman,” “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby,” “The Other Guys,” and “Step Brothers.” McKay met Ferrell when they both worked at Saturday Night Live together starting in the mid 90s, where McKay served as head writer for three seasons. The two of them became writing partners, with Ferrell as the on-screen star and McKay controlling the behind-the-scenes action, creating some of the funniest films of our generation. I, along with the sports editor of The Quad, Oliver Suskin-Santarelli,

recently had the utmost pleasure to sit down and talk with McKay about his time at Second City in Chicago, Saturday Night Live, upcoming endeavors, and his newly released, “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues.” DD: When you were on SNL, who were your favorite cast members to write for? AM: Everyone loved writing for Will, it was actually a bit of a problem. We’d do read-throughs with, like, 42 sketches and he’d be in every single one of them. He could do everything. He was a great straight man, he could play an odd character, he would do supporting, he could do anything you wanted. I used Darrell Hammond a lot too cause I used to write a lot of the cold opens, the Bill Clinton ones. I love Molly Shannon; she’s really fun. She’s a little hard to write for though, she’s so unique and original. I would write for her sometimes. I would dial into her characters and I would have a hard time with it. She was best when she cowrote what she did. Ana Gasteyer I wrote a lot for; she’s really great too. She can do a thousand different things. OSS: With Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Steve Carrell, and David Koechner all being extremely busy, how do you work around all their schedules? AM: Well fortunately

these guys are good guys. If they were just people who wanted a payday and didn’t give a crap, we never would have been able to do it. The second we told them about the idea of the sequel, they were all just like, “Yes, yes, yes!” That being said, the schedule was still tricky. Steve was doing a lot of movies at the time. Paul did three movies in a row, a l o n g with a p l a y . Koechner does stand-up now so he was touring the country and doing a couple of other things. (Christina) Applegate had a T.V. show on NBC, so everyone was busy. What we did was we just gave enough notice. We’d say, “Map out these four months, a year and a half from now.” Then, when we got the movie green lit, we were able to map it all out. DD: How has your improv background in Chicgao helped you as a director? AM: I think it’s everything; I think that is the key. Really what improv is, when they’re teaching it right, is they’re teach-

ing you how to write. All the rules to writing a good scene is what improv is. I didn’t really notice it ‘til after I left (Second-City) and went to SNL. It was so easy for me to write scenes, and all it is, is the rules of improv: say yes, heighten, play at the top of your intelligence. I think watching hundreds of thousands of movies helped me a lot with directing, but as far as the writing, no doubt, improv is the basis of it. The way I direct now is all improvisational. That’s all we do. OSS: Do you have people in mind for cerroles thewrap.com tain when writing scripts? AM: Yeah definitely. In the case of Mack Tannen in this movie, we wanted it to be Harrison Ford from the beginning. So when Ferrell and I were writing it, I was doing an impression of Harrison Ford, cause you want that cadence to be exactly right. We just wrote a script that didn’t get made, and the whole premise of the script is that Ferrell was a stepdad who was the greatest stepdad ever. He makes sure the kids get straight As, the house is clean, the

wife goes back to get her degree, and then the real dad shows up and he’s just a nightmare, and we wanted it to be Matthew McConaughey. We wrote the whole script in McConaughey’s voice…and then he said he wasn’t going to do it, and we were just confused by it. So you have to be a little careful with that sometimes. If you use it as a guideline it can be helpful. DD: What has been your favorite movie that you’ve done? AM: Each one I love in a different way. I’ll just name the one that anytime it’s on T.V. I end up watching at least 20 minutes of and still laugh, which is kind of pathetic cause I’ve seen it a thousand times: “Step Brothers.” To this day, “Step Brothers” makes me laugh really hard. And I love “Anchorman,” and I love “Talladega Nights.” “Talladega Nights” could be the best movie we’ve made as far as structure, story, and the look. But I don’t know what it is about “Step Brothers.” It’s so unhinged. There’s so little responsibility paid towards making it a legit movie. It’s grown men watching Shark Week with samurai swords. It’s just everything we love distilled into one movie. It’s also the one movie that is most polarizing. I’ve met people that hate that movie and people that love it, so it makes

sense that it would still make me laugh. OSS: With all of your films having been hit comedies so far, do you ever see yourself moving into a more dramatic field at some point? AM: Yeah, I mean we’ve kicked around the idea. There’s this script I’ve been playing with about Lee Atwater, the famous political operative from the late 70s-80s. He invented a lot of the dirty tricks, political plays that you see nowadays. Crazy story. If you’ve ever got 10 minutes to kill, read his Wikipedia description—it’s an insane story. But it is a little bit funny. That’s one I really want to do, and wouldn’t call that a strict comedy. It’s more like David O’Russell funny, where it’s got funny elements. Eventually I’ve got to make that movie. It’s just a hard one to get financing for cause it’s not a big, splashy idea, but I think it could be cool. I’d love to do a horror movie some day. I think horror and comedy are very close to each other, as far as timing and expectation. It’s about setting up straight lines of comfort and breaking them. It’s a lot of the same kind of, architectural girders…I lost that metaphor, but you know what I mean. Drew Drevyanko is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at AD739888@wcupa.edu.

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

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Rob Gabe Staff Writer

n February 2, Super Bowl Sunday, Denver Broncos fans wept at their team’s beat down by the Seattle Seahawks. Amid the mourning of the big game, Oscar awarded actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was tragically found dead in his rented Greenwich Village, New York City office. The cause of the death was considered to be a heroin overdose, made apparent from the syringe stuck in Hoffman’s arm at the scene. Police also found more than 70 bags of heroin stamped with the words “Ace of Spades,” a street name for batches that had gone off the radar since 2012, and a vast variety of prescription drugs. Police commissioner Bill Bratton informed the press, “We’re dealing with a death. It is, I would emphasize, not a narcotics investigation, but rather the investigation of a death.” Discovered by his personal assistant Isabella Wing-Davey and David Katz, a screenwriter Hoffman had been collaborating with, Hoffman was pronounced dead on the scene. Hoffman had reportedly been clean from a battle with heroin addiction which he stated he kicked 20-some years ago, but up until recently, relapsed. There have been many deaths among celebrity entertainers in the past few months (James Gandolfini “The Sopranos,” Paul Walker “The Fast and The Furious”). These deaths are all equally tragic, but none have hit me as hard as Mr. Hoffman’s. I became keenly attentive towards film in 2007, and since then it has

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Phillip Seymour Hoffman (1967-2014) loses battle with drug addiction

become a recreational special interest of mine that I have not given up. It had not occurred to me until news broke of Hoffman’s death, but his role in 2007’s “Doubt,” in which he played a priest accused of sexual misconduct with an altar boy, was one of the first performances that made me step back and appreciate an entertainer’s commitment to craft. Subsequently, every movie that had his name under the billing was an easy 10 bucks out of my pocket. Fortunately for Hoffman, he left behind such an incredible catalogue of films in his legacy—unlike an actor such as Heath Ledger who established his marvelous talent after his death. On top of winning an Oscar for his portrayal of the real life author, Truman Capote (“Capote” 2005), who penned the classic novel “In Cold Blood,” Hoffman has an endless list of highly regarded films to prove what a phenomenal actor he was. He was cast in nearly all of Paul Thomas Anderson’s films: the 1997’s rags-to-riches, porno-biz saga, “Boogie Nights,” as the awkward boom operator, “Magnolia,” (1999) an interrelated character tale set in Los Angeles, where he played a devoted visiting nurse striving to reconnect a dying father with his distant son, “PunchDrunk Love” (2000) as the corrupt, foul mouthed Mattress Man, and concluding with “The Master” (2012). His performance in “The Master,” where he played a religious leader in a bizarre movement who comes into contact with a damaged veteran in post WWII America, was one of his final roles.

Prior to these huge Paul Thomas Anderson films, Hoffman made his name playing unsympathetic individuals on the fringes of society—generally sleaze balls and deviants. He disturbed me to no end in films like Todd Shutlz’s “Happiness,” (1998) pervertedly moping around his darkened apartment yearning for next-door resident, and in Sidney Lumet’s “Before The Devil Knows You’re Dead” (2007) as a betraying son who robs his parents’ “mom & pop” store to support his drug habit—coincidentally heroin. Both performances are absolutely grueling to sit through; the latter even more so considering how the truth was even stranger than fiction in relation to Hoffman’s addiction. “Synecdoche, New York,” (2007) Charlie Kaufman’s wonderfully incoherent, Fellini-esque box-office bomb, is certainly his most overlooked work. Hoffman plays a deteriorating playwright who sets out to make a colossal theatrical project that encompasses his entire life span. Over time, I feel the film will hold merit for Camus’s ideologies and thematic arcs towards the purpose of being. Roger Ebert, another hero in the eyes of cinema lovers, championed it as the greatest film of the last decade. Other Hoffman fan-favorites include oddly calm bad guy Owen Davian, in “Mission Impossible 3” (2006), Brandt the butler in “The Big Lebowski” (1998), music journalist Lester Bangs in “Almost Famous” (2000), and of course, Dusty the tornado-hunting storm chaser in “Twister” (1996). Never would I become

overly sentimental or pass judgment on Hoffman concerning his cause of death. I can say this: the man was a fantastic entertainer and it is extremely regrettable that we will be without his acting artistry for the years to come. The good news is that Hoffman still has three completed

films slated for a 2014 release date: John Slattery’s Sundance debut, “God’s Pocket,” Anton Corbijn’s drug-war thriller, “A Most Wanted Man,” and lastly, the two-part adaptation of “The Hunger Games” novels entitled “The Hunger Games: Mocking Jay – Parts 1 & 2.”

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Rest in Peace, Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Your contribution and dedication to the craft of film will forever be admired and revisited. Rob Gabe is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RG770214@ wcupa.edu.

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PAGE 14

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Film Q&A celebrates Eating Disorders Awareness Month

Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor

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ebruary, the month of Valentine’s Day, is a time many spend focusing their love on others. Sales of chocolate, flowers, and stuffed animals skyrocket, and love stories featuring Colin Farrell hit theaters (hello, “Winter’s Tale,” I’m coming for you). But there’s an aspect of love that all of this Valentine’s madness never mentions: loving yourself. That is why members of the WCU community have dubbed February “Eating Disorders Awareness Month” and have planned events around the theme “Red White and BeYOUtiful” so that people learn to love themselves for exactly who they are. Ilana Berger, a senior Psychology major and Vice President of the Sister to Sister Peer Mentors program, explains, “We had a wonderful turn out last year with just a week [of eating disorders awareness] and so we decided to take on the challenge to make it a whole month.” One of the first events on the schedule is a showing of “America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessed with Beauty?” on Feb. 11 from 5:30-10:30 p.m. in Main Hall 168. The movie explores the harmful beauty standards portrayed by the media and how they affect Americans. Young women are targeted specifically by these unattainable messages and are the most likely to develop low selfesteem and body dysmorphic disorder—and the eating disorders that go along with them.

“Our culture does not acknowledge the seriousness of these disorders, so we hope to start the conversation to remove stigmas, bring more awareness about how serious these mental disorders are, and help to create an environment for people who struggle to have the strength to speak up about their problems and reach out for help,” Berger says. Assisting with this worthy goal will be Darryl Roberts, the writer, producer, and director of “America the Beautiful.” He will be present at the screening on the 11th and will be partaking in a Q&A session following the film. Roberts is the president of Sensory Overload Entertainment and has been delving deep into our nation’s most prevalent phenomena and deepest obsessions since the beginning of his career. His first local cable show in Chicago, entitled “Backstage with Darryl Roberts,” gave viewers an inside look into the entertainment industry. Later in his career, his film “How U Like Me Now” explored the balance between relationships and careers in the 90s. Now, Roberts’ knack for exposing the truth about our society will help the WCU community open up a dialogue about body image. He spent two years gathering footage for his project, interviewing celebrities in Hollywood, young girls in the modeling industry, and everyday people. The result is a revealing portrait of America and its unhealthy obsession with beauty. Eating Disorder Aware-

ness Month will continue with informative and exciting events sponsored by the Sister to Sister Peer Mentors, BODY Peace, The Women’s Center, The Wellness Center, Delta Phi Epsilon, and Men In Action. Events include the following: The Love Your Body Fair on Feb. 19 from 111:30 p.m. in the Sykes Ballrooms Scale Bashing on Feb. 19 from 7:30-10:00 p.m. in the Sykes Ballrooms Poetry slam on Feb. 20 from 7-9 p.m. in Sykes Ballroom C Book discussion of “Fat Shame: Stigma and the Fat Body in American Culture” on Feb. 25 from 7:30-8:30 p.m. in Sykes 209, ANAD Candlelight Vigil on Feb. 26 from 7-8 p.m. in Sykes Ballroom B Eating Disorder Panel Discussion on Feb. 26 from 8-10 p.m. in Sykes Theatre Trash Your Insecurities Bake Sale on Feb. 27 from 11-3 p.m. in Sykes Body Image & Disabilities Discussion on Feb. 27 from 7-8 p.m. in Sykes Ballroom B Dude, Get Your Weight Up! On Feb. 28 from 3-4 p.m. in the Women’s Center ANAD Chipotle Fundraiser on Feb. 28 from 4-8 p.m. Berger says, “most of these events are occurring for the first time, so we wish for a big turn out to help make each of these events a success.” Be sure to join the discussion and add to the positive selflove vibes this Valentine’s season! Molly Herbison is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MH757997@wcupa.edu.

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Have a Nice Life releases new album

Jeffrey Holmes Copy Editor

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ack in 2008, Dan Barrett’s name became synonymous with viral marketing as his absurd levels of selfpromotion had finally convinced the dwellers of 4chan and Reddit to listen to his band Have a Nice Life’s debut album Deathconsciousness. To the surprise of many, Barrett was not just another voice pleading for attention and fifteen minutes of Internet fame through listens on a SoundCloud account. Deathconsciousness went on to impress the likes of Sputnik Music and independent critic Piero Scarufi, who hailed the dark aesthetics and hopeless of atmosphere of a record that went on to become a cult classic. Since then, Have a Nice Life became relatively dormant with its two key members pursuing plenty of other projects, such as Dan Barrett’s well-received and predominantly acoustic LP recorded under the stage name Giles Corey. The cult following had seemingly diminished, with mentions of the original Have a Nice Life album appearing sparsely on critics’ best-of-the-2000s lists and so on. However, 2014 brings fans a followup to Deathconsciousness in Have a Nice Life’s latest effort, the Unnatural World. Arguably the best facet of this record, as well as the band in general, is the listener’s inability to pin them to a single

genre. The thick and churning bass riffs mingled with the static and blaring noise of the track “Defenestration Song” would not find itself too out of place on a Nine Inch Nails record, whereas the slow-moving walls of guitar sound on “Music Will Untune the Sky” initially suggest Sunn O))), only to layer it with a number of harmonized vocal tracks that would make Justin Vernon of Bon Iver proud. “Cropsey” starts with a sample of a child being interviewed about his life at school over a melancholy piano melody, and then crescendos into a triple forte explosion keeping the same piano motif intact, but features both Barrett’s somber baritone mixing itself into walls of static and noise, like a demonized version of post-rock giants Godspeed You! Black Emperor or Tortoise. The Unnatural World finds Have a Nice Life progressing from the band’s obsession with misery found on Deathconsciousness and focusing more on obtaining a strict command of noise. While the Joy Divisionesque bass riffs that appear on “Defenestration Song” and “Unholy Life” are an excellent ode to Have a Nife Life’s influences, the majority of the album has an incredible degree of precision in how the tones of static and walls of noise are implemented. The keyboard bleeps and static fuzzes that occur a little more than halfway through “Dan and Tim, Reunited by Fate” give the impression that arranging just

when they would start and end was done meticulously to enforce a climax in the song’s barebones post-punk structure. This idea is then added onto with reverbdrenched guitars that are reminiscent of My Bloody Valentine or Saturday Night Wrist-era Deftones, proving that a goal of mastering noise has been achieved, the song ending with shoegaze meeting noise rock. “Emptiness Will Eat the Witch,” the album’s mellow closer, utilizes a keyboard drone and clean guitar to invoke feelings of tranquility before a sea of voices swallows the listener in a gorgeously executed harmony. The voices fade, taking the listener back to the initial drone the song started on. With this new record, Have a Nice Life have proved themselves as talented musicians capable of blending an extremely wide array of sounds into one uniquely their own. Plenty of other recent cross-genre acts, such as the Deftones and Alcest have a penchant for mixing genres such as punk and shoegaze together, but what initially separated Have a Nice Life was their ability to make their cross-genre experiments sonically unique. What will keep this band going strong is their ability to move forward, with their despondent aura evolving as Dan Barrett and Tim Macuga continually evolve as musicians and arrangers. Rating: 8/10 Jeffrey Holmes is a second-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at JH791223@wcupa.edu.

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

The Quad Crossword

THE QUAD

PAGE 15

Classifieds

VISIT WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE MISCELLANEOUS P/T AND/OR F/T JAZZ PIANO AND JOB OPPORTUNITY JAZZ ACCORDION We are looking for depend-

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The Quad SuDoKu

Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers 1 - 9 appears once and only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square.

Solution to last week’s Quad SuDoKu

57 Curve 58 “Woe __!” 59 “Gracias” reply 60 Spanish American grassland 62 Family relations, and what the first words of the answers to starred clues can have 64 Frequent Mastroianni co-star 65 Edger’s target 66 Spacewalks, for short 67 Range with chinchillas 68 Former partners 69 Take out

To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www. wcuquad.com, and click on the link for “classifieds.” Then enter the wording of your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and pay for your ad on our secure server with any major credit 6 card. 2 Your 8 ad5will ap4 pear on our website, as well as be published in both our 4 product 5 and 1 our6mobile 3 print phone/tablet edition on the 9 you 7 select. 3 The8 rate1is dates 30 cents per word, minimum 6 2($6 minimum 1 8 of7 20 words charge). Deadline for placing classifieds 5 1 is 411 a.m.9 on the 7 Sunday before publication. Solution to last week’s Quad Crossword

Across 1 __-loading: endurance strategy 5 Chance 9 Shocking weapon 14 Worker protection org. 15 Singer from County Donegal 16 Sky hue 17 *Marlin, for one 19 Prepare to make an electronic payment, say 20 Halves of fifths 21 Breaking wave feature 23 Drink for a hot day 24 Nasty expression 25 *Source of endless funds 27 “You’re dreaming” 29 Hate 30 *Common Milky Way star 34 Gallery baddies 37 Yoko of Tokyo 38 Rodeo rope 40 __-cone 41 Mount McKinley’s national park 44 *Billiards maneuver 47 Where the floor is always wet 49 Banking regulatory agcy. 50 *Part of a uniform 53 Latish wake-up time

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THE QUAD SPORTS

Sports

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Lady Rams win streak up to five games By AJ Arcaini Staff Writer

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he Lady Rams can’t be stopped. West Chester’s first contest of the week was scheduled to be played on Wednesday at home against Millersville University, but due to the ice storm causing power outages all over Chester County, the game was moved to Thursday evening. This was the second game between the Rams and Marauders, the first resulting in a 91-83 win at Millersville. A good Millersville team would prove to be strong competition for the surging Rams after two easy blowout wins last week against Cheyney University and Mansfield University. Throughout the first half, the lead continued to change in a battle to be on top. Sophomore Anna Kuntz dominated the paint through the first half, recording another double double with 10 points and 12 rebounds in the first 20 minutes. Despite the great play of Kuntz, the Marauders led WCU at the half 44-38. Millersville came out hot to start the second half, extending their lead to 18 within the first five minutes of play. Suddenly, the Rams began to climb back like they have all season. Relentless defense gave the Rams a few scores off of turnovers along with great work on the offensive boards from the whole West Chester squad. With

3:49 left, sophomore Jasmen Clark hit a layup to tie the game up at 73. WCU gained the lead but with 1:45 to play, Millersville nailed two free throws to tie the game yet again at 77. Clark was then fouled and nailed two free throws giving the Rams a two-point lead. After a defensive rebound from Clark, sophomore Dallas Ely stepped up and nailed a huge three pointer to give the Rams a five-point lead and ultimately a win at a final score of 85-82. Four starters finished in double figures for WCU along with junior captain Serifat Junaid, who scored 14 points. Kuntz recorded her fourth consecutive double-double with 15 points and 14 rebounds and sophomore captain Brittany Sicinski continued her great play with 14 points and five steals. The comeback win for West Chester was yet another momentum booster in this excellent season. The Lady Rams were right back at it just two days later, with a showdown against Kutztown on Saturday afternoon at home. In their last meeting, WCU held onto an 8280 win against Kutztown. Eight different players contributed with points in the first half, with Sicinski leading the way with seven. The Rams held a 37- 32 lead as time expired in the first half. The Rams’ second half play was a great sight to see. Clark, who had been in somewhat of a shooting funk recently, exploded

with 12 huge second-half points, all coming from behind the arch. Clark shot four-for-six from three in the second half, helping the Rams pull away. At the end of regulation, West Chester’s dominance prevailed yet again in an 8165 win. Clark finished the game 6-11 from the field and fivefor-eight from three with 17 points. She also added six assists and six steals. Kuntz recorded 13 points along with eight rebounds. Sicinski grabbed eight rebounds to compliment her 14 points and although Ely did not have her best night shooting, she certainly was not quiet, grabbing doubledigit rebounds with 11. The balanced attack of the Rams lead them to their fifth straight victory, along with still sitting alone atop the PSAC east. This upcoming week faces two more challenges for West Chester. Wednesday, the Rams will take on Lock Haven University away at 5:30. Saturday’s showdown against the tough Shippensburg Raiders will be played at 1 p.m. Saturday’s game also marks a West Chester tradition, being the Play4Kay game in support of the fight against Breast Cance. The contest between the two teams will for sure be a treat, be sure to make your way out to Hollinger Field House on Saturday afternoon. AJ Arcaini is a second-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AA788494@wcupa. edu

WCU to host annual “Play 4 Kay” day

Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

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FEBRUARY 10, 2014

n Feb. 15, the West Chester women’s basketball team will be holding their annual Pink Zone game to benefit the Kay Yow Fund and the fight against breast cancer. The game will be played at 1 p.m. in the Hollinger Field House, which will also be home to many great festivities and prize giveaways, all benefiting the fund. Over the past several years, the Pink Zone game has really taken off, becoming more of a campus-wide, and even town-wide effort. “What makes West Chester’s version so unique is that it is a collaborative effort on campus and off,” said women’s basketball head coach Deidre Kane. This year, the collaboration of SGA, Service Learning, SSI, Aramark, Zeta Tau, the Pan Hellenic Council, Colleges Against Cancer, the Women’s Center, the College of Health Sciences and the basketball pep band has made the Pink Zone game possible. “It’s real meaningful to me to see the whole campus jump on board for a good cause,” Kane said. “Every year somebody new jumps on board.” Two grants were also provided to help defray costs and ensure that volunteers are fed, leaving more money to be donated to the cause. There has also

been support from local businesses. Barnaby’s of West Chester will be having a social on the evening of the Pink Zone game from 6-9 p.m., with all profits going to the Kay Yow Fund. At noon that day, the “Pink Zone” will open behind the bleachers that are behind the team benches. There will activities for kids, lots of different food for sale and some chances to win great prizes. “We have an auction with really great baskets to be won,” Kane said. “The Phillies donated an awesome basket as did [other] various clubs, organizations and athletic teams. Comcast SportsNet donated a nice basket with Sixers tickets too.” Prior to the game there, will be a ceremonial tip off hosted by honorary chairman Vince Melogranna. Melogranna, who is the radio commentator for both the West Chester men’s and women’s teams on WCHE, lost his wife last year after a battle with breast cancer.

“He is always there and supportive,” Kane said. “It was very sad last year when he lost his wife. He has been on the Pink Zone committee, even before he lost his wife, so having him was a no brainer.” The charitable endeavors do not end on Feb. 15. New this year will be a Play 4 Kay March Madness tournament hosted by Recreational Services. All intramural basketball teams, regardless of the level, are invited to participate in the one day, three-game tournament that will take place on Feb. 23. All participants will receive a T-shirt and will have a chance to win Barnaby’s gift cards. The cost is $15 per player, and registration can be completed on the Rec Services website. If you would like to help the Golden Rams’ fundraising efforts, please visit www. play4kay.org/goldenrams and donate to their “Play 4 Kay” team. Kenny Ayres is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at KA739433@wcupa.edu.

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Oliver Suskin S

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 17

Philadelphia Eagles look to improve upon successful season Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor

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ith the NFL season officially behind us, and the Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl champions, it’s time to reflect on the good and bad that came from the season, specifically with the Philadelphia Eagles. Chip Kelly, replacing long time head coach Andy Reid this past season, deserves a ton of credit for turning this team around from one of the weaker teams in the NFL to eventual NFC East division champions. It’s not too often that a head coach can turn a bottom-of-the-barrel team into a playoff contender in one whole season, but Kelly managed to do it in his first. Of course, Kelly could not have possibly made that happen without the play of the Eagles’ new franchise quarterback: Nick Foles. Stepping into the starting spot in week five after oft-injured quarterback Michael Vick hurt his hamstring, Foles grabbed the starting spot and never let go. Foles broke multiple Eagles and NFL records and went on to not only be selected in the Pro Bowl, but be named its MVP as well. This is quite an accomplishment for a guy no one even considered at the beginning of the season. Elsewhere on offense, running back LeSean McCoy had one of the best seasons of his career under the tutelage of Kelly. Rushing for 1,607 yards and scoring nine rushing touchdowns, McCoy led the league in running this year after coming off a somewhat

disappointing season prior. The scariest part? McCoy is only 25 years old. If he continues at this pace, the star running back will likely go down as one of the best to ever play the position. Wide receiver DeSean Jackson also enjoyed the best season of his career, as well. The brash wide receiver closed out the season with 82 receptions for 1,332 yards and nine touchdowns, setting

themselves. One notable player was cornerback Brandon Boykin, who finished the season with six interceptions, one of which was brought back for a touchdown. Even after the Eagles signed two cornerbacks in the offseason to compete for the starting jobs, it was Boykin who ultimately played the best for the defensive backfield. He will be a building block for this young Eagles

field speaks for itself. So, where do the Eagles go from here? One of the first positions the Eagles will have to address in the offseason is wide receiver. Yes, Jackson had a career year, but this wide receiver cannot possibly do it all by himself. Riley Cooper stepped up in the absence of an injured Jeremy Maclin, and had a superb season himself following a preseason of http://www.fantasyfootballsideline.com

Quarterback Nick Foles was one of the key components to the Philadelphia Eagles making it to the postseason. Foles ended his season with a Pro Bowl selection, winning the MVP award for that game.

new highs in all categories on his career. Jackson also was selected to the Pro Bowl, making some spectacular catches in the All-Star event. Foles’ and Jackson’s rapport has earned them a number of accolades, and they will look to expand on that in 2014. On the defensive side of the ball, the Eagles had a few players rise to the occasion and truly make a name for

team for years to come. The linebacker duo of DeMeco Ryans and Mychal Kendricks was another stellar part of this talented defense. Ryans and Kendricks finished with 127 and 106 tackles respectively, as well as both finishing with four sacks on the season. Ryans’ mentoring of Kendricks over the past two seasons has proven exceptional, and the tandem’s play on the

controversy. However, Cooper, as well as Maclin, is a free agent, and might look to land more money than he can make with the Eagles. If one or both receivers leave for new teams, the Eagles will have a gaping hole across from Jackson. Luckily for the Eagles, the annual NFL Draft will provide the team with multiple chances at selecting a new starting wide reciever for the

team. This year’s draft class is also completely full of wide receivers, including Marquise Lee (USC), Sammy Watkins (Clemson), and Mike Evans (Texas A&M). If the Eagles decide to choose a wide receiver in the first round, they will likely target one of these prospects, and chances are they will be happy they made their decision. All three of these athletes have star-making potential in the NFL. Safety is one of the bigger positions the Eagles will have to cover too. In last year’s offseason, the Eagles signed Patrick Chung to try and help improve the position, but Chung’s signing was a colossal bust, as he failed to live up to his own prior play that fans had expected. Nate Allen returned to help the safety position, but even with a high number of tackles (82) and a pick, Allen could not be counted on to help shore up the safety position. By the end of the season, it was arguably the Eagles’ weakest position. The NFL Draft has plenty of options for the Eagles to choose from. One notable player is HaHa Clinton-Dix from Alabama. The man might have an obscure name, but after seeing him play, his tackling is anything but a laughing matter. Clinton-Dix hits like a ram, and his coverage skills are spectacular, which is what the Eagles will really be looking for. If he is available in the first round when it’s time for the Eagles to select, the pick is a no-brainer. Another interesting route the Eagles can take is going to free agency this offseason to get a new safety. Though

the Chung signing did not work out like the Eagles wanted it to, there are a couple of safeties on the market this offseason who will almost certainly work out fine: Jairus Byrd and TJ Ward. Both players are some of the top safeties in the league, with many analysts and fans agreeing that Byrd may be the best in the NFL right now. Signing either one of them to Philadelphia would certainly improve a defense that has been lacking a star safety since the days of Brian Dawkins. If the Eagles don’t go with a wide reciever or safety in the early part of the draft, expect them to still address their defense. Cornerback is still a rather large need for this team, as Boykin is the only corner to have played exceptional this season. If not a cornerback, the team could always look to improve their pass-rush by drafting a new outside linebacker. Trent Cole led the team with eight sacks, but is also getting up their in age. A new, young linebacker to groom under Cole could help this team’s future immensely. The Eagles have the 22nd selection in this year’s NFL Draft. Expect the rapidly-improving team to make some quality choices under Kelly and cement themselves as the top team in the NFC East. If the Eagles continue making the same strides they’ve been making in the past year, soon enough, we may be looking at the next team to represent the NFC in the Super Bowl. Oliver Suskin-Santarelli is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at OS753461@wcupa. edu.

PAGE 18

THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Golden Rams struggle in a home loss to the Golden Bears Gol Ryan Calpin

Asst. Sports Editor

W

est Chester’s men’s basketball team goes 1-1 during the week after a postponed comeback win against Millersville, and a disappointing loss at home against Kutztown on Saturday. Both of the games this past week were home for the basketball team, as they first had a game on Wednesday against Millersville, that was postponed until Thursday evening. West Chester was on a nice two game winning streak going into the game, but they knew that the game would be a fight, and a fight is exactly what they got. Millersville (9-11), already beat West Chester earlier in the season when West Chester traveled to Millersville on Dec. 4. The Marauders won on a layup with two seconds left by Brandon Brown that gave Millersville a one-point lead, and then Shannon Givens missed the potential game winning three pointer as time expired. So this time around, the Golden Rams were looking for revenge. In a very fast-paced first half, Millersville looked like the better team as they took a two point lead into halftime. They were out rebounding and taking care of the ball better than West Chester. As the second half began, both teams went back and forth for the first six minutes, until West Chester took a four point lead on a layup by Ben Mingledough and never looked back. Because of Mingle-

dough and Cory Blake, stopped playing their by one. After a missed the Golden Rams built game, and Kutztown layup by Hockaday and up their lead to double took over. West Chester two more free throws by digits by the time the was outscored by 11 in Dukes the Golden Bears midway point of the sec- the second half and sur- were up by three with ond half rolled around. rendered the lead for the less than a minute left. After going back and From that point on, it first time on an 11-3 run was all West Chester, as capped by a three point- forth for the final minute they cruised in the later er by Fred Dukes IV with and after Ryan Connnolpart of the second half to an 86-74 victory, their third straight win. Shannon Givens had 22 points and nine rebounds to lead the Golden Rams, and Mingledough chipped in with a career high 20 points. Troy Hockaday also had 18 points and eight rebounds. Millersville’s Kelvin Parker and Tyree Smith each had game highs of 24 points for the Marauders in the losing effort. Next up for West Chester was a home matchup against a sub-par Kutztown team, in a game that they needed to win to stay tied with Bloomsburg for second in the PSAC. Earlier in the season, West Chester went into Kutztown in a game that the Rams controlled and won easily 8571, as Givens had 22 points, and Matt Wiseley grabbed 15 rebounds off the Photo by Shannon Filippelli bench in the win, and they were lookGolden Ram R.J. Griffin is at the line in a game against Kutztown. West ing to do more of the Chester fell to the Golden Bears in a close matchup, 73-70. same on Saturday. However, Kutztown had different plans. In the beginning of the game, West less than a minute and ly for Kutztown went Chester looked strong a half left in the game. six for six from the line as they built their lead Wiseley came back on in the final 15 seconds, to 16 with five minutes the other end of the court West Chester was down left in the first half. Af- and sunk two free throws three with three seconds ter that, West Chester to give the Rams a lead left and no timeouts.

Givens was inbounding the ball, and threw a perfect baseball pass the length of the court, over the outstretched arms of freshman Austin Beidelman and into the hands of R.J. Griffin and he had a perfect shot from the left corner. However, it rimmed out and West Chester fell to Kutztown 73-70, also falling to third in the PSAC standings behind East Stroudsburg and Bloomsburg. Connolly for the Golden Bears had a game high 19 points, and Dukes chipped in with 18 points as well. For the Golden Rams it was a poor shooting day, as they only shot 43 percent from the field. Hockaday led them with 16 points. The key element in the loss for West Chester is that they had 28 fouls, which led to 37 free throw attempts for Kutztown, of which they made 30. West Chester will look to bounce back on Wednesday in a game at Lock Haven. The leaders for the Golden Rams are Troy Hockaday, averaging 16.9 points per game, Matt Wiseley with 6.5 rebounds per game, and Shannon Givens with 2.7 assits per game. West Chester has played Lock Haven earlier in the season at home, in which they won by four in an overtime thriller. Lock Haven sits in fourth place in the PSAC, only a half a game behind West Chester, so this is a pivotal game for both teams. Lock Haven is on quite a tear lately, winning six of seven games, including a two point victory over nationally ranked East Stroudsburg, while ESU was still undefeat-

ed. Their only loss in this stretch was against Bloomsburg by one point, so the Golden Rams know they have their work cut out for them. West Chester has four regular season games left, with three of them against Lock Haven, Bloomsburg, and East Stroudsburg, so it is very important that the Rams finish the season strong. Lock Haven, East Stroudsburg,and Bloomsburg have a combined record of 48-16 this season, and West Chester is 1-2 against these two teams. West Chester’s final game of the season is against East Stroudsburg, who has already clinched a PSAC playoff berth, are nationally ranked and have one loss. West Chester will look to exact revenge against the Warriors, and show the world that they are as good, if not better, of a team than East Stroudsburg. In the game earlier in the season the Rams lost 107-94. However, it was a much closer game than the score dictated. West Chester was actually up by five at one point in the game, until the Warriors went on a 21-3 run to close out the game. Possibly the Rams got tired, but they know that they are capable of winning the final four games, and most importantly the final game of the season. West Chester has one home game remaining on their schedule which is Feb. 15 against Shippensburg, so make sure you come out and support your fellow Golden Rams. Ryan Calpin is a second-year student majoring in communications with a minor in journalisim. He can be reached at RC784188@wcupa.edu.

By Mi S

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 19

Golden Rams win emotional senior night game against Lehigh By Michael Murphy Staff Writer

I

Chester would tack on three more goals this period. Two of them came from Ball. Ball’s first goal was a sniper shot from the blue line that left the crowed applauding for minutes. No more than a minute after Ball’s cannon shot, junior Ryan Evans added his first goal of the night, an unassisted goal in which he just flicked the puck right over the Lehigh goalie’s glove. West Chester’s commanding lead would only get bigger on the Lehigh power play. West Chester cleared the puck down to the Lehigh zone, with Ball being in the right place at the right time. He flicked it in through three Lehigh defenders to extend the lead. With 13 seconds left in the period, Japchen allowed his first goal of the night. He finished the night only allowing one score in 37 shot attempts by the Lehigh offense. Before the goal, Japchen was hurt on a play. “Although it hurt and it was unexpected it’s one of those things that comes with the territory of being a goalie. The goal was just one of those where it just bounced to the kid in the slot and he got the goal,” Japchen said. Luckily this would be the only goal Japchen let up in his stellar defensive game in goal. The third period had potential to slip away from the squad as the Rams got into some penalty trouble. Before the penalty spree West Chester added its sixth and final goal to the game. Seconds into the final period, freshman Connor Walsh, got on a fast break and wristed a

nifty shot on Leigh’s goal tender. This just added to the already firm cushion the Rams had in the game. The rest of the period the Rams would spend short-handed as they had three penalties which resulted in six minutes worth of power plays. Japchen’s injury did not seem to affect him as he had three stellar saves. Japchen’s replacement, freshman Michael Rice kept composure as he shut out Lehigh for the last seven minutes. The third period was all about West Chester’s play when short-handed. “The one area that has been the best for us all year is the way we play when we are short-handed. We have had a lot of younger guys step up, especially during transitions on and off the ice”, said coach Sands on his teams short-handed play. If anything could be said about this game, it is that the seniors dominated in their last home

game ever. Ball had two great goals. Kozza, Dugan, and Munice were forces to be reckoned with defensively. Sklodowski contributed with a goal, and Japchen played incredible defense in goal. “You know there are a lot of great memories that we have at that rink and when it’s senior night it’s usually the last time you get to play at home and emotions are high. As a senior you absolutely want go out on a high note and leave everything out there and I’m glad we were able to get the win as a team,” Japchen said. A game defined by offense, but more importantly hard-nosed play. Every player seemed to be out there with one goal, to manhandle Lehigh. The gritty performance really does attest to the character of each man on the team. Solid short-handed play, gritty defense, and control of the puck were what West Chester used to create this win.

“Yes, mainly for the seniors on the team. Each played better than they have most of the season. Jeff [Dugan] played well even though he has lagged a lot of ice time this season and it seems to be catching up to him,” said coach Sands. The Rams will try to build on the impressive 6-0 victory against Lehigh, as they will prepare for a weekend double header against Stony Brook. The Rams will travel to Stony Brook for an 8:10 p.m start on Saturday, and they will then have less than 18 hours to rest up and be ready for the game on Sunday as they will rematch Stony Brook in a game that will start at 3:10 p.m. The Rams will try to build on a sub-par 10-17 record, and get revenge against Stony Brook for two losses earliers in the season. Michael student nication reached edu

Murphy is a first-year majoring in commustudies. He can be at MM802071@wcupa.

Athlete of the Week: Jasmen Clark wcupagoldenrams.com

t is unclear whether there were goose bumps from the opening senior night ceremony or the chilling temperatures inside of Ice Line arena. Regardless of how old a person is, when one reaches the point where he or she can no longer play an organized sport, the feeling is daunting. Even more surreal is the night you have your last home game. Emotion was in the air as the seniors for the WCU men’s hockey team were honored before Saturday night’s match-up with Lehigh. Each player was called out to the center ice to take a picture with his family. As this happened each senior’s accomplishments were announced over the p.a. system. The seniors who were honored were: Matt Sklodowski, Randy Japchen, Adam Ball, James Munice, Jeff Dugan, and Mike Kozza. With the blow of the whistle and the drop of the puck, West Chester started off running. The game had not gone on for more than two minutes when West Chester scored their first goal. Sophomore Justin Finnerty was credited with the tally. His wrist shot to the top corner of the net would set the pace for the Golden Rams. Not long after this goal, sophomore Kevin Lewis was pummeled into WCU’s bench and was down for an extended period of time. The Lehigh player who had checked Lewis was assessed a five minute penalty and later ejected

for player mis-conduct after having certain words with the official. WCU would control the puck for the majority of the period. With the period winding down, West Chester was feverishly fending off fast breaks from Lehigh. Finally, while on the power play, Finnerty got on a fast break and dished it off to Sklodowski for the second goal of the period. “It’s extremely important to start a game with a lead because you have to start off confident. It really helps with getting the momentum going,” said head coach Wayne Sands. This period really fore-shadowed the dominance West Chester would have over Lehigh the rest of the contest. To begin the second period, West Chester won face the face-off and looked to build upon its lead. The Rams, once again, dominated Lehigh’s zone to start the half with an onslaught of shots on goal. Finnerty stayed right in the middle of the action as he continued to crash the boards and be a cog in the offensive machine. Along with Finnerty, Dugan was also a force the whole game, crashing boards and wreaking defensive havoc in the middle of the ice. “We played dirty. We tried to play hard by throwing bodies at them and just really trying to attack them” said freshman Ryan McMahon. Fire was lit under each team as there would be multiple brawls this period. Not only did the second period have the most brawls, it had the most scoring as well. West

This week’s athlete of the week is women’s basketball player Jasmen Clark. Clark was pivotal in the two wins this week for the Lady Rams. She averaged 16.5 points and 4.5 steals over the two games.

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Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball prepares for upcoming Play 4 Kay event- Page 16 Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor


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