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The Punxsutawney Spirit

Way Back When

Reprints from the original pages of Š2012 The Punxsutawney Spirit

The Punxsutawney Spirit April 15, 1896 to October 7, 1896

Way Back When Reprints from the original pages of The Punxsutawney Spirit April 15, 1896 to Oct. 7, 1896

compiled and edited by Terry A. Fye, Dan Long, Andrew Love and Destiny Pifer Copyright© November 2012 by The Punxsutawney Spirit. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of The Punxsutawney Spirit.

(April 15, 1896) Notice Every one who has bought a lot or lots in Circle Hill cemetery with the intention of moving friends from the old grave yard should do so now, for sodding and repairing graves should be done this month. Also, everyone who has been thinking of buying lots and moving friends, may call at my office where I will be glad to give prices on lots, and lowest price for moving bodies. Yours truly, J. A. Knarr ••• To Save Memorial Home The Memorial Home at Brookville is likely soon to be sold to satisfy a mortgage lien, unless something can be done to save it. The debt is between seven and eight thousand dollars, and the Women’s Relief Corps is anxious to pay it and get the title in its name. The property cost $30,00, but unless a sufficient sum can be raised to pay the debt, its thirtyfive inmates will be deprived of a home, and its further usefulness as a charitable institution will be seriously impaired, if not destroyed. J. P. Roscoe, of DuBois,

has a plan which, if properly encouraged, would produce sufficient funds to pay the debt. He had engraved a very fine portrait of John Howard Payne, author of “Home, Sweet Home,” which the Women’s Relief Corps and the different churches and Sunday schools are selling at ten cents each. If all would take an interest in the matter, and sell as many of the portraits as possible, a sufficient sum could be raised to pay this debt, and preserve a noble institution in a noble society. ••• Better Telephone Service The Summerville Telephone company is extending its lines so as to connect all the outlying towns and villages, and in a few days a force of workmen will be employed setting poles and stringing wires from Worthville via Sprankle’s Mills, Grange, Perrysville, Whitesville, Fordham and Horatio to Punxsutawney, altogether forming a circuit that will connect an extensive population and be of great service to expanding business. — Brookville Republican ••• Mrs. C. F. Jones, of Adrian,

lost a purse the other day containing $4.98. The finder will please return it to the owner. ••• (April 15, 1896) A FAMILY OF JUMPERS An Amusing Incident Which Happened While at Dinner There is a peculiar nervous malady which afflicts a few individuals, who, from their habit of jumping and striking convulsively when startled, are called “jumpers.” There is a jumper in this community. When his nervous system receives a sudden jar, as from an unexpected noise, he will jump and strike violently, and the person who is near him is likely to get hurt. The man’s father was a jumper, and all of his children were singularly afflicted. He told an amusing story the other day of an incident which happened when the six boys and two girls were all at home together. They were all sitting at the table eating, when a dishpan was dropped on the floor. They all jumped and struck, hitting each other and knocking some dishes off the table. The crash of the dishes made them jump again, and the same perfor-

mance was repeated. This, he said, was kept up until every dish on the table was knocked off, the table and chairs upset, and nearly all the dishes broken. It was rather a serious thing, but when there was no longer any more noises to excite their nerves, and the humor of the situation dawned upon the family, they laughed heartily. ••• H. J. Lambert set his valise down in the B. R. & P. depot the other day and became engaged in a conversation with some parties. When he had finished, and looked around for his valise, it was no longer there. It had been removed. And he has not heard of it since. ••• James H. Swisher has concluded that there is no great and crying need for a restaurant and grocery store in the building opposite the street railway powerhouse and will not open one there, as he had intended. “If you want to do business,” he says, “you must go where business is.” ••• There is no doubt about it. Spring is the most beautiful season of the year. It makes a man feel young and buoyant

and he congratulates himself heartily on the fact that he is alive. “For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over, the flowers appear on the earth, the time of singing birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in the land.” ••• (April 22, 1896) A strange bicycle rider ran into Morris Weber, little son of J. A. Weber, yesterday, and hurt him considereably, though not dangerously. His head and face were badly cut and bruised, and the boy looked as though he had attended a Donnebrook fair. ••• A “Pie Social” under the management of M. L. society of the Lutheran church will be held Thursday evening at the home of Mrs. Lanzendorfer. All are cordially invited. Each lady brings a pie and the gentlemen come to help eat them. ••• If all of the inhabitants of Church avenue would plant trees in front of their properties it would be but a few years until that street would be arched over, and would be the prettiest little street in town. It would also very much enhance the value of all the property

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Tracy Smith, Publisher, c/o The Punxsutawney Spirit, P.O. Box 444 Punxsutawney, PA 15767 • Telephone: (814) 938-8740

Community First Bank Established 1893

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• Reynoldsville • Punxsutawney • Sykesville • Clarion www.cf-bank.com

Member FDIC

young baseball player in this part of the country. As an infielder and batter he is phenomenal. He is in the twentieth year of his age, rather short, but solidly built, and a natural born baseballist. With some good practice Frank is certain to prove a first-class player. He will prove a prize for any club that gets him, and if he continues to play ball for a year or two under favorable conditions, we confidently believe that he will prove one of the very best ball players that this part of the State has produced, and it has turned out some good ones. ••• Must Pass Elementary Examinations The State medical council has ordered that hereafter physicians will have to pass an examination in arithmetic, geography, grammar, orthography, American history and English composition prior to their examination for license to practice medicine and surgery. Those who hold college, high school and normal school diplomas are exempt. The examinations will be conducted by the school superintendents of Pittsburg, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Reading, Scranton, Allentown, Easton, Williamsport and Erie on August 21 in the above cities. The superintendents will receive $10 in remuneration, the work lasting not more than one day. June 16 to 19 the regular semi-annual examination by the medical boards will be held in Harrisburg and Philadelphia. ••• Expensive Profanity John Wallace, of Center township, appears to be a man given to much profanity. He was brought before J. T. Donahey, a Justice of the Peace in Mechanicsburg, charged with profanity. It was proven that he had used 116 profane oaths, for which the Justice fined him $77.72. In default of payment he was sentenced to the county jail for a term of 116 days. It appears the prisoner had some difficulty with William McDonald, and not only stoned Mr. McDonald’s house, but indulged in an assortment of cuss words contrary to the act of assembly. The penalty is 62 and1/2 cents for each oath. — Indiana Messenger. ••• J. A. Weber, the popular clothier, is having the room recently occupied by Grier and Osterhout’s hardware store, overhauled and fitted up for a clothing room. It will then

have the largest clothing store in this part of the State. The rumor that he was going to tear down the old “checkered front” building and erect a fine four-story brick on that corner, proves to be incorrect. The corner is too valuable to be occupied by a two-story building, and Mr. Weber knows it, but he will not build before next spring any how. ••• During the late unpleasantness, by which we mean the little difficulty between the Northern and Southern states which took place from ‘61 to ‘62, Mr. J. Dinsmore of this place collected and saved all the military pictures of the time that he could procure. He has them yet, and they form a very interesting collection. He has been offered considerable sums of money for some of them, but he has made up his mind to present the whole collection to the G. A. R. post of this tow. ••• (April 22, 1896) Clayville School Commencement The first annual commencement of the Clayville public school will be held in the Welsh Baptist Church, Friday evening April 24th at 8 o’clock. The names of the graduates are: Martha Leila Simpson, Wilda Belle Blose, Leila Edna Sutter, Edna Jean Long, Cora Louise Thomas, Siddney Amanda Porter, Edith Blanche Parsons, Carrie Eldora Redding, Martha Belle Means, William Henry Blose, Frank Vernon Stiver, Waldemar DeGontard Parsons. An admission fee of 15 cents, or 25 cents per couple, and 10 cents for children, will be charged, in order to defray the necessary expenses attending commencement exercises. The class will be pleased to have their friends and all others present. ••• He Had Been Worrying About It Frank J. Black, proprietor of the McConnell House, Reynoldsville, was in town last Friday. He said, “I came over to see whether your brother Sid ever gave you that cent that the late Archie Campbell allowed you out of the three cents he paid for cleaning out his stable that time.” We assured him that not only the cent, but the whole, entire three cent shinplaster, had been generously handed over to us, brother Sid having rejected it with lofty disdain. This information seemed to afford Mr. Black great relief,

for heaving a sigh that indicated that a great burden had been lifted from his mind, he rushed down stairs, vaulted into the saddle like a Knight Templar setting out for the Crusades, and was soon well on his way homeward. ••• David Trainor’s Specialty David Trainor, who has been heard from again. We had occasion to speak of him in these columns a few months ago, but it is now quite probably that he will retire to Riveside and give us a rest. Last winter when Frank Laughlin of Leatherwood lost a horse buggy and a neighbor lost his wife, it was at once concluded that Trainor was the lad who had taken them away. Just what disposition he made of the property is not yet known, the supposition is the Trainor probably realized a little more than first cost to him. Trainor’s mania runs to horse and buggies, but it said a good ox is not despised by him. He is a slick one and no end of charges are made against him, most of them rightfully and probably some without much foundation. For the present, he sits in his cell at Brookville and thinks of good time in the past and the dark days ahead. — Clarion Jacksonian. ••• (April 22, 1896) MARKED ROBBERS Bind Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bruner And Ransack the House Last Friday night about dark four masked men went to the house of Henry Bruner, a farmer near Flora, Indiana county, and ransacked and robbed it. They approached the house through the fields, and as Mrs. Burner supposed them to be neighbors she went out to see who they were. They seized and bound Mrs. Bruner hand and foot, and tried to force her to tell where the money was concealed. They then went to the house and knocked Mr. Bruner down and tied his hands and feet. While they were tying him he threw his pocket book into a corner, but when they ransacked the house, they found it. The pocketbook contained $70, which was all the money they got, but they also took Mr. Bruner’s watch and revolver. When the robbers first entered the house, one of them took Bruner’s rifle and stood guard outside. From their talk the robbers thought there was $600 in the house. There were two large and two medium-sized men in

the gang, all of whom were unknown to M. Bruner, who has no idea who the villains were. Before leaving they unbound their victims. As they started away, Mr. Bruner asked them if they were going to take his gun. “No,” replied the man who had it. And he shot the load out and placed it against a tree. ••• A RAILROAD SURE The Money Raised to Build It From Butler to Pittsburg A telegram from New York, dated April 17, says that the money for trhe building of the Pittsburg and Butler railroad, $3,000,000, has all been subscribed. Of this amount of stock Andrew Carnegie took $2,500,000. This means the completion of the Pittsburg, Shenango, and Lake Erie Railroad to Pittsburg. The railroad will be completed within a year, and will involve the expenditure of $3,000,000, in that time. It will also, it is said, insure the opening of communications between the east and west with Colonel Brice’s new line and with the Rochester and Pittsburg railroad from Punxsutawney through to Kittanning and Butler. The Butler end of the road is an assured fact now, and what we want is the extension of the B.,R. & P. which must eventually follow. ••• (April 22, 1896) FIRST TO ENTER… The 206 Regiment Enjoys Its Distinction The Philadelphia Inquirer is republishing its war correspondence, and a recent issue of that paper contained a dispatch from Richmond, Va., dated April 17, 1865, from which it appears that the 206th Regiment, largely recruited in Jefferson and Indiana counties, was the first body of union soldiers to enter the rebel capital. The dispatch says: “It is a circumstance beyond cavil or dispute that to Pennsylvania belongs the honor of having the first column of troops to enter the rebel capital, and the immediate credit is due to the 206th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Col. H. J. Brady. The stars and stripes were seen waving in triumph by the astonished denizens of this place for the first time in four years in the hands of the 206th, and their battle flag was the first one seen in the streets of Richmond, after its evacuation. The 206th led Ripley’s brigade of the Third

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on that thoroughfare. Such things should not be delayed, because time continues to proceed onward with inexorable regularity, and it is only a matter of a little time until we will be no longer in evidence. ••• Read the advertisement of S. J. Hughes & Son, dentists, in another column. They will pay railroad fair both ways for any one within a radius of 25 miles who gets over $12 worth of work. ••• “If this sort of weather continues,” said ‘Squire Joe Wilson reflectively, as he lighted a Pollock toby, “Amos will soon be around again.” “Amos who?” inquired Jesse Foltz. “Why, a mosquito,” replied the dispenser of justice. ••• Now that the jay bird, with his gay plumage, has made his appearance, and the daisy will soon deck the green sward, it is fitting and proper that you should go to Swartz, the tailor, and order a nice spring suit. Swartz can fit you exactly and make you feel glad that you are alive. ••• The hardest brick in America, perhaps are those made by O.H. Nordstrom in this city. They are burned with natural gas, a very good quality of clay is used, and they are almost like flint in texture. Persons who want brick that will last until doomsday can get them from Mr. Nordstrom. ••• (April 22, 1896) Setting a Good Example Henry Wingert, of Marchand, is having built at Sutter Bros. wagon shop in Clayville the first wide-tired wagon that will be seen in this community, and will receive the reduction in road taxes allowed by law to all those using such wagons. The tires will be four inches wide, and the wagon will be heavy in proportion, although this does not necessarily follow. Mr. Wingert wanted an extra heavy wagon. With tires four inches wide, and the front tracks six or eight inches narrower than the hind ones, this wagon will smooth off eight inches of road on each side as it passes along, instead of cutting it up, as the present narrow-tired wagons do. Mr. Wingert says he is going to set the example for his neighbors, and if they do not follow it, and thus help to make better roads, it will not be his fault. ••• Frank Campbell, of this place, is the most promising

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division, 24th Army Corps, to which they are temporarily attached, during the march on the city, and were only preceded in the town itself by a small skirmishing party. As soon as the Two-hundred and sixth reached Capitol Hill, they were at one dispatched to guard and hold the roads leading to the city from the north. Two companies were sent to the Mechanicsville road, three companies to the Meta bridge road, one company to the Broad street road and one company was detached to occupy the forts captured and to guard the prisoners taken. When Colonel Brady reached the Military Institute, a very large new brick building, originally intended for a poor house, and situated near what is called the “Old Fields,” northeast of the city, he was informed by some citizens that an attempt would be made to fire it. A guard was at once dispatched to secure it, and its destruction at the hands of the very people who reared the stately pile was thus prevented. The regiment was mustered out at Pittsburg in July, 1865. In his farewell order, General Daudy, in command of the brigade, said, “Under your gallant commander, Colonel Hugh J. Brady, you were the first to enter Richmond and to display in the capital of traitors, the stars and stripes of your own country. Carry home with you and bequeath it to your children, the red heart, the badge of the First Division. It is the symbol of deeds that will live when this present and many succeeding generations have passed away.” Many veterans of the old 206th are still living in this community, who will remember when that gallant regiment marched into Richmond. They were brave and vigorous youths then. They are now descending the sunny slope towards life’s autumn, but are still honored and respected citizens. ••• (April 22, 1896) PERSISTENT ROBBERS W. J. Morrison’s Store at Oliveburg Again Burglarized The store of W. J. Morrison at Oliveburg, was again broken into last Thursday night by a gang of robbers. It was completely ransacked, and a large quantity of goods stolen. It was robbed three months ago, and was broken into and almost gutted about a year previous to that, making three times within a period of a little over a year.

The robbers gained an entrance by prying open the back door with a pick and other tools taken from the blacksmith shop nearby. A large quantity of goods was stolen, but just how many Mr. Morrison is unable to tell. Some sacks containing clover seed were emptied onto the floor, and the sacks used to carry away the booty. A flour sack containing a lot of jewelry and other things which had been prepared to carry away was left standing under the counter. Among other things stolen were eleven pairs of shoes. This is just one pair less than they took before, and Mr. Morrison thinks that is an indication that they are going to quit after awhile, but want to taper off gradually. The fact that Mr. Morrison’s store is robbed so often is evidence that he keeps good goods, and that the thieves are perfectly satisfied with them, else they would not come back, but it is certainly very aggravating to Mr. Morrison, who has been robbed so often that he is not much surprised to enter his store in the morning and find it had been ransacked and robbed during the night. It has evidently been robbed by the same parties each time, as the same methods are used. Mr. Morrison has an idea who the parties are, but will not say. One thing, however, is pretty morally certain, that they will sooner or later by caught and sojourn for a time at Allegheny. ••• (April 29, 1896) A McKinley Pole Hunter Smitten, of Marchand, is an enthusiastic McKinley man, and he has gone to some trouble to demonstrate that fact. The other day he hoisted a flag pole a hundred feet high with a flag 12 by 20 feet on top with instructions that it should wave exclusively for McKinley. Hoising flag poles used to be quite common during Presidential campaigns, but it is rarely done in these degenerate days. ••• Playing Horse With Snakes It is astonishing to what strange occupations small boys, who are full of energy, will resort to fill up the gap of time. The other day a number of boys ranging in ages from ten to fifteen years, caught, by the use of a forked stick, ten snakes. Then they took strings and tied the snakes together, the tail of one to the neck of another. Then, having the head snake secured by a

string around the neck, the boys switched up their reptile procession and gave the order of march. The snakes squirmed and wriggled, and made frantic efforts to get away, shooting out their red tongues in a most angry and menacing way, but to no purpose. It was excitement for the boys, but a disagreeable experience for the snakes. For several hours the boys indulged in this amusement, and then, when tired of it, the little savages killed the snakes. ••• George Condron Back George Condron, who has been at the Medico-Surgical Hospital, Philadelphia, for the past two months receiving treatment for nervousness and distorted limbs, came home last week. Besides having an osseous formation which pressed upon the brain removed, he had braces put upon his legs. Before he left, the physician told him he could remove the braces in two years, and that in five years he would be able to walk as well as anybody, and that no one would know that there had ever been anything the matter with him. ••• A Gang of Robbers A gang of thieves and robbers is energetically at work in Oliver township. The real object of the organization seems to be to rob Morrison’s store, but while Mr. Morrison is replenishing his stock and getting things in shape again, other things are stolen as a sort of diversion. Last Thursday night a commercial traveler named Spencer, who was stopping at Rea’s Hotel in Cool Spring, was robbed of about $50 worth of his samples. The gang also called upon Uriah Abers, of Cool Spring, and stole all his meat. And a few nights since 25 bushels of oats were stolen from James Hawhorne. This gang of thieves ought to be broken up, and that quickly. It would not require very shrewd detective work to locate its members, because there seems to be a well grounded suspicion concerning their identity. ••• (April 29, 1896) Stahle Took the Property John Stahle bought the other day, for his wife, the Ben Carter property, near the Mager House, in Young township, for a consideration of $450. The property belongs to Thomas Edmonson, of Adrian, and there was a little case

before the justice of the peace in which Mr. Stahle was called as a witness to prove the value of the property. He said it was worth $700. “You would not give $500,” said the attorney who represented the other side — “you can have it for $450.” “Draw up your papers,” said John. “I’ll take it.” And it was accordingly so done. Mr. Stahle says there are three acres of nice ground, and a fairly good house on it, and he wouldn’t take $800 for the property. ••• Another gas well has been started on the reservation where the fluid is found that supplies this town. This will be well No. 16. A number of the holes which have been pounded into the earth in that neighborhood were nonproductive. One was drilled last fall to a depth of three thousand feet without finding any sand at all. There was not even salt water. Mr. Townsend has spent a great deal of money puncturing the earth out there, and he will keep pounding away as long as the holes give forth any gas. ••• Attention Company J. J. Young, commander of the Custer Cavalry Troop, desires every member to be present in Punxsutawney by 10 o’clock, a.m., May 30, to participate in the services of Decoration Day. It is the desire of the old soldiers of this community to pay a fitting tribute to the memory of their departed comrades on the day designated for that purpose, and Custer Cavalry Troop is requested to do its part. ••• These are the times to plant your onions. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot may waver in the attempt, but those who wade right in, spade up the soil regardless of blistered hands and mangled

angle-worms, will have new onions from his own garden while the weary and fainthearted will continue to dine on the products of Spain and Bermuda. ••• (April 29, 1896) THE REDS AND THE BLUES A Contest To Increase The Membership of The Y.M.C.A. About four weeks ago, Secretary Willis, of the Y.M.C.A., suggested a plan to increase the membership and the general interest in the Young Men’s Christian Association of this place. The plan was this: That the association divide itself into two factions, to be known as the Reds and the Blues, that a captain be appointed on each side, and that each faction go to work earnestly and see how many new members it could secure by April 26. The evening on which the contest closed, a supper was to be given. The side securing the most members was to have the best supper that could be prepared, while the losing side was to sit at a table in the same room with nothing but crackers and water as their bill of fair. Boyd Allison was chosen captain of the Reds

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early life he became locally distinguished as an orator, artist, editor, and poet. His son John, although making no pretensions to eloquence or art, possessed a mind of more than ordinary strength and acuteness. Modest and unassuming, he pursued the even tenor or his way, having no other ambition than to be a good printer, and to lead a quiet, modest life. In this he was successful, being a thorough master of the art of printing, competent and trustworthy in every department of the newspaper business. He was an excellent job printer and a clear and concise writer. He was for a time editor of the St. Mary’s Gazette, and on several occasions, for brief periods, edited the Spirit. He learned his trade on the Mahoning Argus, a paper published by his father, and worked for a time in Reynoldsville and in Pittsburg. He was careful, painstaking, and faithful, and was recognized amongst the craft as a superior workman. John Coxson was a man of sterling qualities. He was true to his convictions and consciencious in all his dealing with his fellow men. His nature was frank and absolutely without guile. He never did anything for the sake of policy. It is right, and is it true was all he desired to know before reaching a conclusion. He was honest, not only in his relations with others, but with himself. He was conscious of the rectitude of his intentions, and was willing to open his bosom for the inspection of the world. Straightforward and simple in his own integrity, he had the heartiest contempt for hypocracy and duplicity in others. He was essentially religious in his nature, but his ideal of what a disciple of Christ should be was so high that he hesitated to enlist under His banner in a conspicuous way for fear he could not approach his own standard of what a Christian should be. ••• (April 29, 1896) Coming to Punxsutawney Mention has been made in these columns of the effort being made to induce Prof. W. Irving Colby, the noted teacher and author, to give a five weeks’ course in German here. The number of names required to insure his coming have been secured, and the following letter from Prof. Colby explains itself: Editor Spirit — Through the efforts of some of your

citizens I have been induced to give a course in German in Punxsutawney and shall open with free lectures in the Methodist church on Friday, May 15, at 4:30 and 8 p.m. I do not claim to teach the whole German language in five weeks, but a sufficient amount of it to enable one to speak and read it well enough for all practical purposes. I am fully prepared to substantiate the statement to the entire satisfaction of all attending. I merely ask that all skeptics will attend one of my opening lectures and investigate before passing judgment. Very truly, W. Irving Colby ••• Tailor Robison’s Spring Poetry You need a spring suit in which there is no ghial. And we are here to make it in the very latest sthial. We will guarantee you fits, and also very low-cut prices, Which we have reduced to suit the present financial crisis. We can suit you in material and workmanship. Give us a thrial. The spelling in this may be phial, we admit, and cause you to samhial whial you read it — but the suits — are all right. Tailor Robison ••• A Bad Start A Newely married couple made an exhibition of themselves in our streets one day last week. After they had secured their license and had the words that made them man and wife pronounced by a justice, the groom proceeded to a barroom and got a fairly good-sized jag on. He then proceeded to view the town. They stopped at one of our hotels and both got out, went into the barroom and quenched their thirst with a beer or two. To the credit of the lady she hesitated to go into the hotel and only consented after much urging on the part of her husband. The young couple are making a bad start, and the sooner they reform the better for their further happiness. — Indiana Messenger ••• (April 29, 1896) A BLIND MAN SUICIDES J.B. McCullough, of Beechwoods, Hangs Himself The body of James B. McCullough, of Beechwoods, was found suspended from a tree near Coal Glen, on Saturday morning last by A. H. Smith, of the latter place. Mr. McCullough was 44 years of age, he had been blind for the last 23 years, and a

cousin of Hugh and Boyd McCullough of this place, with whom he spent a summer here a few years since. He resided with another cousin, James S. , of the Beechwoods area. He went out of the house about 8 o’clock Friday evening but was not missed until breakfast time the following morning. He had secured a short strap from a limb and with that he ended his life. Mr. McCullough’s mind has not been in its proper condition for some years and it is thought this last act is due to that fact. A letter was found in one of his pockets which stated that he entertained the plan of taking his life, prior to leaving his home. The funeral will be held at the late residence at 1 p.m. today and interment will be made in the Beechwoods cemetery. – DuBois Courier. ••• (May 6, 1896) More German Hares Ira Carrier and Mike O’Connor, both of whom are interested in the stocking of our forests and streams with game and fish, put out about fifty more German hares last week. They are raising them in kennels, and have since last fall, placed in the cirumjacent woods over a hundred of these big rodents some of which attain a weight of sixteen pounds. They are quite tame when first put down in the woods, and show a disposition to stay with their old friends, rather than to face the unknown terrors of the forests. These hares multiply rapidly, and if they thrive here it will be a matter of a year or so until the woods are full of them. ••• Old Folks Concert The Baptist Young People’s Union will give an Old Folks Concert in the Baptist Church on Monday evening May 11. Everybody will dress in the quaintest old costumes they can find, and sing the oldest song that they can remember. It will be a revival of ye olden times, and will excite pleasant recollections in the old, and provide instruction and amusement for the young. Admission, 15 cents; children, 10 cents. ••• (May 6, 1896) DIED OF HIS INJURIES On the night of April 25 while three Italians residing in DuBois were returning home, they were met by three toughs, presumably Mike Hart, Joseph Cary, and James Delany, who brutally assaulted them. It appears that one of these men asked the Italians, whose names were Victor, Ardre and

Dominick Corretti, for a chew of tobacco. Upon being refused, they set upon them with knives and stones, and inflicted injuries upon Victor Corretti, from which he died on Sunday last, and very seriously injured his son Dominick. Delany is now in confinement waiting trial, and a reward has been offered for the other two. It appears from the evidence before Squire Woodring, as given in the DuBois Courier, that the attack was cowardly and wanton, and that the perpetrators deserve the full penalty of the law. ••• (April 29, 1896) John K. Coxson John K. Coxson, for more than fifteen years, an employee of this office, died last Sunday in the fortieth year of his life. For the past two years he had been in ill health, but he remained at his post of duty as foreman of the Spirit office until about two months ago. By that time he had developed unmistakable symptoms of tuberculosis, and grew gradually worse until he died. ….A wife and three children, his mother, three sisters and a brother, survive him. A home and an insurance of $3,000 in the Royal Arcanum, places his wife and children above the immediate reach of want. The deceased was a son of the late John K. Coxson, who is remembered by our older inhabitants as a man of remarkable talents. Although possessing no advantages in early life he became locally distinguished as an orator, artist, editor, and poet. His son John, although making no pretensions to eloquence or art, possessed a mind of more than ordinary strength and acuteness. Modest and unassuming, he pursued the even tenor or his way, having no other ambition than to be a good printer, and to lead a quiet, modest life. In this he was successful, being a thorough master of the art of printing, competent and trustworthy in every department of the newspaper business. He was an excellent job printer and a clear and concise writer. He was for a time editor of the St. Mary’s Gazette, and on several occasions, for brief periods, edited the Spirit. He learned his trade on the Mahoning Argus, a paper published by his father, and worked for a time in Reynoldsville and in Pittsburg. He was careful, painstaking, and faithful, and was recognized amongst the c\raft as a

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and James Evans of the Blues, and the contest began. The two factions, with their recruits, met at the association rooms at 7:45 o’clock last night, gorgeously decked in their colors, and marched to Odd Fellows Hall, where the supper was in waiting. They carried Red and Blue banners and various expressive devices, and cheered lustily on their way. Prominent business men and staid citizens took part, and were imbued with the enthusiasm of youth. When they arrived in the banquet hall Secretary Willis announced the results of the contest. He said that 114 new members had been secured, 64 by the Reds and 50 by the Blues. This was a signal for cheers on the part of the Reds who rushed to the tables ladened with luxuries, while the Blues calmly took their places at the tables provided with crackers, water and toothpicks. The greatest hilarity prevailed. Spirits were bent up to their full height, and the edibles were disposed of amid the utmost good cheer. Toasts were then given…. Horace Miller spoke of the Reds and the Blues, and said that all the members should keep their souls white with virtue and purity of conduct, and they would have all the colors of the glorious banner of our Republic — red, white, and blue. The contest was a great success, and did much to strengthen the association, both in enthusiasm and numbers at this place. ••• (April 29, 1896) John K. Coxson John K. Coxson, for more than fifteen years, an employee of this office, died last Sunday in the fortieth year of his life. For the past two years he had been in ill health, but he remained at his post of duty as foreman of the Spirit office until about two months ago. By that time he had developed unmistakable symptoms of tuberculosis, and grew gradually worse until he died. ….A wife and three children, his mother, three sisters and a brother, survive him. A home and an insurance of $3,000 in the Royal Arcanum, places his wife and children above the immediate reach of want. The deceased was a son of the late John K. Coxson, who is remembered by our older inhabitants as a man of remarkable talents. Although possessing no advantages in

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John Coxson was a man of sterling qualities. He was true to his convictions and consciencious in all his dealing with his fellow men. His nature was frank and absolutely without guile. He never did anything for the sake of policy. It is right, and is it true was all he desired to know before reaching a conclusion. He was honest, not only in his relations with others, but with himself. He was conscious of the rectitude of his intentions, and was willing to open his bosom for the inspection of the world. Straightforward and simple in his own integrity, he had the heartiest contempt for hypocracy and duplicity in others. He was essentially religious in his nature, but his ideal of what a disciple of Christ should be was so high that he hesitated to enlist under His banner in a conspicuous way for fear he could not approach his own standard of what a Christian should be. ••• (April 29, 1896) Coming to Punxsutawney Mention has been made in these columns of the effort being made to induce Prof. W. Irving Colby, the noted teacher and author, to give a five weeks’ course in German here. The number of names required to insure his coming have been secured, and the following letter from Prof. Colby explains itself: Editor Spirit — Through the efforts of some of your citizens I have been induced to give a course in German in Punxsutawney and shall open with free lectures in the Methodist church on Friday, May 15, at 4:30 and 8 p.m. I do not claim to teach the whole German language in five weeks, but a sufficient amount of it to enable one to speak and read it well enough for all practical purposes. I am fully prepared to substantiate the statement to the entire satisfaction of all attending. I merely ask that all skeptics will attend one of my opening lectures and investigate before passing judgment. Very truly, W. Irving Colby ••• Tailor Robison’s Spring Poetry You need a spring suit in which there is no ghial. And we are here to make it in the very latest sthial. We will guarantee you fits, and also very low-cut prices, Which we have reduced

to suit the present financial crisis. We can suit you in material and workmanship. Give us a thrial. The spelling in this may be phial, we admit, and cause you to samhial whial you read it — but the suits — are all right. Tailor Robison ••• A Bad Start A Newely married couple made an exhibition of themselves in our streets one day last week. After they had secured their license and had the words that made them man and wife pronounced by a justice, the groom proceeded to a barroom and got a fairly good-sized jag on. He then proceeded to view the town. They stopped at one of our hotels and both got out, went into the barroom and quenched their thirst with a beer or two. To the credit of the lady she hesitated to go into the hotel and only consented after much urging on the part of her husband. The young couple are making a bad start, and the sooner they reform the better for their further happiness. — Indiana Messenger ••• (April 29, 1896) A BLIND MAN SUICIDES J.B. McCullough, of Beechwoods, Hangs Himself The body of James B. McCullough, of Beechwoods, was found suspended from a tree near Coal Glen, on Saturday morning last by A. H. Smith, of the latter place. Mr. McCullough was 44 years of age, he had been blind for the last 23 years, and a cousin of Hugh and Boyd McCullough of this place, with whom he spent a summer here a few years since. He resided with another cousin, James S. , of the Beechwoods area. He went out of the house about 8 o’clock Friday evening but was not missed until breakfast time the following morning. He had secured a short strap from a limb and with that he ended his life. Mr. McCullough’s mind has not been in its proper condition for some years and it is thought this last act is due to that fact. A letter was found in one of his pockets which stated that he entertained the plan of taking his life, prior to leaving his home. The funeral will be held at the late residence at 1 p.m. today and interment will be made in the Beechwoods cemetery. – DuBois Courier. •••

(May 6, 1896) More German Hares Ira Carrier and Mike O’Connor, both of whom are interested in the stocking of our forests and streams with game and fish, put out about fifty more German hares last week. They are raising them in kennels, and have since last fall, placed in the cirumjacent woods over a hundred of these big rodents some of which attain a weight of sixteen pounds. They are quite tame when first put down in the woods, and show a disposition to stay with their old friends, rather than to face the unknown terrors of the forests. These hares multiply rapidly, and if they thrive here it ••• Sharp Drummond, of this town, a cunning worker in iron, has invented a chainless bicycle, which, it is thought by experts, will be an improvement on anything heretofore constructed. Instead of a chain, friction balls, inside of a tube, are used. He has the device patented, and has gone to Buffalo this week, accompanied by his wife, to have a wheel made after this plan. ••• The Punxsutawney Rod and Gun Club is stocking all the streams hereabouts, and will shortly place a large quantity of bass, from seven to ten inches long in Mahoning Creek. A lot of small ones were placed their last year. Now it is important that these bass be left undisturbed until they have a chance to increase and replenish the waters, and anyone know to catch a bass and not return it immedately to the waters, will be dealt with according to law. ••• A Queer Freak of Nature William Long, of this place, is eighty years of age. Two years ago, he was one of the baldest of the bald, having a mere suggestion of white hair around the lower part of his head about on a level with his ears. Since that time a growth of fine, black hair has been vegetating on his head, which is now covered with it. It is as fine as the hair of an infant, and just as free from the appearance of age. So far as hair is concerned Mr. Long has certainly renewed his youth. • • • Our First Trolly Accident The trolly cars made their advent in this town three years ago, and the first accident occured yesterday evening. A little son of Charles de Ferrari, aged about five years,

was returning from school at Clayville, and when the car slowed up at the railroad crossing attempted to get on, when its foot was caught under a wheel and crushed from the instep diagonally across the great toe. Dr. Grube, who dressed the wound, says he fears that amputation may be necessary. ••• (May 6, 1896) JOSEPH CAREY CAPTURED (A follow-up to “Died of His Injuries” from last week.) Policeman Palmer arrested Joseph Carey, accused of complicity in the brutal assault upon Victor Corretti, at DuBois, which resulted in his death. Carey was on a coal train with a companion named Thomas Garthaway when Palmer heard of it. He had the train stopped, and arrested both of them and took them to the lock-up for safekeeping. Carey is only eighteen years old, and seemed much surprised to hear that Corretti was dead. He said he had taken no part in the affair excepting to defend himself. ••• A Funny Joke Last Friday evening Henry North, constable of McCalmont township, took a prisoner into ‘Squire Morrison’s office at Cortes. Presently, in a nonchalant way, Mr. North took a pair of handcuffs out of his pocket, and was toying with them, when Harry Braughler, a youth who was present, asked to see how they worked. In order to illustrate the manner of their manipulation he placed them on the young man’s wrists. They locked with a spring, and his hands were securely fastened together. Suddenly Henry exclaimed: “By George! I haven’t the the key with me.” The others thought he was joking in order to frighten the boy. But the constable was serious. And the worst of it was he didn’t know where the key was. The situation was laughable for the onlookers, but very trying for the young man. It was doubtful if the key could be obtained that night. It was either at Eleanora or Punxsutawney, and at best it would be three to four hours before any one could go and get it. The young man wore the cuffs about an hour and a half ... And then, with the aid of a hammer and coal chisel, the cuffs were cut off, much to the young man’s relief, who

is now sufficiently informed as to the workings of hand cuffs. ••• (May 13, 1896) AN EXCITING RUNAWAY A frightful looking runaway occurred here last Saturday night. It was between 8 and 9 o’clock, when the streets and alleys were crowded, that a horse belonging to Thomas Johns, of Walston, attached to a buggy, dashed up the street without a driver. It ran much of the way on the sidewalk, threatening every minute to crash through a show window. Women screamed and men stood aghast. After making a dive as though to enter the First National Bank, the horse ran across the street, collided with a buggy in which Adam Stenger and his wife were seated, overturned it and spilled the occupants out. It then rushed onto the pavement in front of the Hotel Pantall, causing a crowd of ladies to fly into the barroom for refuge, knocked Ben Record down and continued its mad flight to the upper end of town, where it was caught. Nobody was much hurt, and little real damage was done, but it caused more excitement than has been seen here since Calico Jack’s bull dog went through town with a tin can tied to his tail. ••• A Barbarous Amusement Considerable complaint reaches us from the good citizens of Adrian to the effect that there are a number of young men in that vicinity whose ordinary Sunday amusement is cock-fighting. The fowls are in some instances even fitted up with steel spurs, and the battles are cruel and bloody. Cock-fighting is an amusement that belongs to the Dark Ages, and should be classed in the same category with bear-bating and other barbarous amusements. By artificial selection a fighting fowl has been bred known as the game-cock, which may be said to be the direct result of man’s depravity. The game fowl is full of the spirit of pugnacity, and when two of them are placed together they will fight until one of them is removed for the scenes of active life. What pleasure any man can find in watching two feathered animals lacerating each other until they become a blind and bleeding piece of feathered fury, is difficult to figure out. There are certainly more edifying amusements.

(May 27, 1896) A STRANGE ACCIDENT About one year ago Mrs. Eviline Means, widow of the late S.T. Means, who lives with her daughter, Mrs. Wm. Hickox, of Frostburg, had her leg broken by one of her grandchildren falling over it. She is afflicted with rheumatism, and is thus rendered almost helpless. On account of her age it required a long time for the fracture to unite. The peculiar part of it is that, last week, the same child fell over the other leg, and broke it also. ••• Excursion For K. of P. reunion at Clearfield this year, which by the way will be grander than ever before, the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroad company will run a grand special excursion train leaving Punxsutawney at 8:30 a.m., June 11th, 1896, stopping at all intermediate stations, arriving at Clearfield at 10:30 a.m. Returning train will leave Clearfield at 10:30 p.m. Fare for round trip will be $1.00. Tickets good only on day of sale. ••• A Fresh Joke A number of students went out one day to hunt rabbits. They took with them a youth who had never been hunting before, but who was a good scholar. They charged him that when he saw any rabbits he should keep quiet. Presently he saw a large number of them, when he exclaimed: “Ecce multi cuniculi!” (Behold many rabbits.) Whereupon the rabbits all scampered away. Upon being reproached by the others for not obeying instructions he replied: “Who the devil would have thought that those pesky rabbits understood Latin?” This story was often repeated by Sir Walter Raleigh at the expense of Sir Edward Coke. And the Lord Chief Justice used to remark of it then that it was like the origin of the common law, dating back so far that the “memory of man runneth not to the contrary.” ••• They are having a high old time over at the Indiana Normal. There is a feud between the Juniors and Seniors, and each side goes armed. Much feeling has developed, and the kids are going around with blood in their eyes and revolvers in their hip pockets. ••• (May 27, 1896) REVENGEFUL ROBINS They Persecute a Cat That Destroyed Their Nest

About two weeks ago a black and white spotted cat belonging to Harry Hastings robbed a robin’s nest. The parent birds witnessed the destruction of their home, and made a great ado about it, but the cat was abdurate, and proceeded quietly to feast upon the birdlings. But since that time that cat’s life has been a burden. She cannot show herself in the open air without being savagely attacked by half a dozen robins that seem to be watching for her. They chirp loudly, ruffle up their feathers, and fly at the cat with vicious fury. At first the cat attempted to defend herself, but her enemies were too active. They could give her a savage peck and be out of the way before she could spring or strike with her paw. Now she goes around like one who has nothing to live for. If she ventures out for a moment, and hears the savage chirp of a robbin, she will make a dive for her favorite hiding place under the barn. Other cats are not molested by the robins. But they seem to have made up their minds to have revenge on this one, and it is probable that she will never molest another robin’s nest. ••• We Need a High School We do not know how the school directors feel about the matter of establishing a high school in Punxsutawney, but trust there will be a unanimous vote in favor of the proposition. We are now turning out graduates 15 years old, just about the age a boy or girl begins to grasp the meaning of the word education. The advantage of giving our children a course of study that would occupy their time and cultivate their intellects for an additional three years after they have gone through the course now provided for, is too apparent to require any argument. As to cost, one genius that might result, who would otherwise be lost, would be worth more than the expense would amount to for a thousand years. Expense is not to be weighed against great men and women at all, Their price is above rubies. ••• There is a great factional contest going on at the Pittsburg convention between the straight Prohibitionists and those who favor a regular drag-net platform composed of everything that might catch a vote. ••• (June 3, 1896) LEG AMPUTATED John Wallace, a recent proprietor of the Palace restau-

rant, on Findley street had his left leg amputated above the knee at the Adrian hospital yesterday. Wallace left this town about two months ago and went to DuBois, where he was employed in a restaurant. He has been troubled for a long time with a sore foot, and the trouble growing worse, he was taken to the hospital a few days ago. Blood poisoning developed and the hospital physicians decided to amputate his leg as the only means of saving his life. The operation was accordingly performed, but owing to the condition of the patient, and the fact that he is about fifty years of age, his recovery is doubtful. ••• Frightened the Women Last Saturday night about 9 o’clock, an unknown man, who was perhaps under the influence of liquor, entered the house of Mrs. John T. Bell, and proceeded to walk through it. The woman were frightened and called for the police. Officer Palmer responded, but by that time the man had gotten away. He caught him, however, and took him before Burgess Mundorff, who fined him $12.50. ••• Got His Pension J.H. Rager, of Flora, was recently granted a pension of $6 per month. Mr. Rager served four years in the war, and saw hardships. He was thirteen months in Andersonville, Florence and Libby prisons, and was wounded in the head at Plymoth, North Carolina. He escaped from prison once, and was recaptured with blood hounds and taken back. Mr. Rager was a good soldier, and has many friends who will be glad to know that he has received a pension. ••• Fast Freight Service The Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg railroad has just inaugurated in connection with the Philadelphia & Reading, a fast freight service between New York and Philadelphia and this place. The run from the former city will be made in three days and that from the latter city in two days. Solid cars will be made up each day for this place at Wiley street, and all freight for Punxsutawney, Brockwayville, and other adjacent points will be distributed from DuBois after the arrival of the car which will come to this point unbroken. This service will be a great convenience to shippers to whom expedition counts. It is in line with the usual custom of the B. R. & P. to give its patrons

the best service possible. — DuBois Courier ••• (June 24, 1896) WE HAVE A HIGH SCHOOL Tax Rate Reduced and the Schools to be Improved Last night the school board held a regular meeting for the election of teachers for the coming term and for the transaction of other important business. Twelve teachers, including the principal, were elected as follows Prof. J. L. Allison, principal, salary, $95 per month E. H. McHenry, room 11, salary, $45 H. D. Condron, room 10, salary, $40 Hope Lewis, room 9, salary, $40 Mollie McDowell, room 8, salary, $40 Maud Adams, room 7, salary, $40 Olive Jenks, room 6, salary, $40 Wm. Streamer, room 5, salary, $40 Carrie Williams, room 4, salary, $40 May Rodgers, room 3, salary, $40 Laura Bruce, room 2, salary, $40 Mary Wilson, room 1, salary, $40 Scott Adams, janitor H. D. Condron, Hope Lewis, and Miss Mollie McDowell are new teachers in Punxsutawney. All the others taught in the schools here the past term. The most important business transacted was the unanimous decision of the board to establish a high school for the coming term, and it was decided to receive applications from teachers for the position at the next regular meeting to be held July 14, the salary to be $70 per month. The tax levy for 1896 will be 5 mills, 1 mill less than for 1895. The establishment of a high school and the reduction in school taxation, both at the same time, is two moves that will doubtless be heartily endorsed by every person. ••• A Fatal Mistake Last Friday night Mrs. P. E. Greisner of DuBois, gave her little daughter aged two years and five months, a dose of carbolic acid in mistake for cough medicine. It was sometime before the mistake was discovered, and medical aid summoned, but it was too late. The child died before midnight. The mother of the child is now crazed with grief, and was unconscious all the

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••• (May 13, 1896) PLENTY OF POTATOES A recent press dispatch from Bellfonte says: “Center county farmers have on their hands thousands of bushels of potatoes, which now are such a drug on the market that they cannot dispose of them at any price. They are offering them for 10 cents per bushel, but find sale slow. The acreage in this county last year was the largest ever known, and owing to the low price in the fall and winter many farmers held their crop for higher prices. The rise in the market did not come, and now they are suffering the loss of entire crops. Harrison Kline, living near here, has 500 bushels which he will give away to anyone who will go and get them, while others are feeding the tubers to their stock as the best means of getting them out of the way.” ••• (May 20, 1896) Circus Day This is circus day. John Robinson and Franklin Bros. combined circuses and menageries are here to-day in all their gorgeousness. It is a big show, and is conducted by gentlemen who are genial and accommodating. Boys who carry water for the elephant to obtain admission will not be turned coldly away with the crushing words, “I know you not,” but will be greeted with the comforting words, “Well done, good and faithful servant — enter in and see the monkeys.” ••• Fooling a Gypsy “I believe,” remarked Jimmy St. Clair in a matter of fact tone, “that I will slip up to the Gypsy camp with an old plug of a horse and cheat the eyes out of them in a swap. I have a horse that looks — good an excellent horse to foola gypsy.” He went and submitted his horse. A lank gypsy man gave the horse a searching look — a “penetrating glance,” as we say in romance. Then he told James more about his horse than he ever knew himself. Then Mr. St. Clair, said he didn’t care to trade, and came away. “Did you make a trade?” asked a friend when he returned. “No” he replied reflectively. “You see that fellow looks through your horse with the X rays, and a man who hasn’t the new light is at a disadvantage.” •••

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following day. This is certainly a sad affair, and should be a solemn warning to others to exercise great care in administering medicines. ••• (June 24, 1896) A BROAD GRIN Up in DuBois a few days ago a locomotive whistle started to blow and the engineer couldn’t get it stopped. The thing wouldn’t work. In fifteen minutes the entire fire department, hook and ladder companies, and about four thousand people, rushed down to the round-house inquiring where the fire was. When they discovered it was only a locomotive whistle out of gear, they all marched back grinning enormously. It was estimated by Charley Burnham that if all those grins had been concentrated into one capacious mouth, it would have reached from DuBois to Reynoldsville. ••• (July 1, 1896) When it is considered that the SPIRIT is read by perhaps 15,000 people weekly, most of whom are in this immediate community, the merchant who does not take advantage of its columns to invite trade, get acquainted with the people, and interest them in his stock and prices, is certainly not fully alive in his business. ••• Renaissance of the Black Potato Bug The old style black potatobug is fashionable again this season. Some of the best potato patches in town are using them. The red variety is still preferred by some on account of its genial temperament. It does not try to get away when you want to mash it, but kneels over in an innocent sort of way which greatly facilitates its destruction. The red potatobug rather enjoys being killed. But the black ones fly away in a provoking manner, and return promptly when the danger is past. Another point against the black bug is its unreliability. It cannot always be depended upon. It is migratory in its habits, coming in droves, and will some times leave your potatoes before it has them half eaten up. The reg bug, while perhaps less competent as a devastator, never disappoints you. He comes in the spring before your potatoes are planted and waits patiently and uncomplainingly until they are up, when he immediately begins business, and stays right with you to the end. It is his untiring energy and perseverance that counts. He is more phlegmatic and stoical than his

black rival, and regarding the two styles from a stand-point of absolute merit, uninfluenced by prejudice or other unworthy considerations, we believe the red ones have all the good traits of the black ones with some points of superiority that they do not possess. ••• (July 8, 1896) FIRE IN BIG RUN A House Belonging to Henry Brown Destroyed Yesterday afternoon about 1 o’clock fire broke out in a house in Big Run, occupied by Eli Lines and owned by Henry Brown, of Bell’s Mills. It was a good frame house, worth from $1,800 to $2,000, and the bucket brigade turned out in full force to try to save it. Houses belonging to Fred Kuntz and Doctor Cox were in close proximity on either side, and for a time it was believed impossible to save any of the three. But by the untiring and energetic efforts of the bucket brigade the two adjoining properties were saved. The other was burned to the ground, but nearly all of its contents was rescued from destruction. It was insured for $1,500. The fire originated from a defective flue. The Big Run fire department, which consists of wooden buckets; pumps and willing hands, has been doing good work this summer, several destructive fires having been prevented by its energy. ••• A “What Is It” An itinerant showman with a large wagon, in which is a peculiar animal, struck town a few days ago. The animal is a little smaller than an ordinary hog, with the head and teeth of a squirrel, and legs and feet a good deal like those of an otter. The man who exhibits it says it was captured in a cave in Mercer county, Kentucky, three years ago, and tries to create the impression that it is some sort of freak or hybred, possibly a cross between a hog and a coon. It is certainly a remarkable looking animal, and one seldom if ever seen in the zoos or menageries of this country. Looking up its pedigree in the cyclopedia we find that it is called the Capybara, and is the largest species of rodent being something akin to the guinea pig, the squirrel, the rabbit, and the otter, in that it has webbed toes and is acquatic in its habits. The illustration given in the cyclopedia is an exact representation of the animal so that there cannot be any mistake about it. •••

(July 8, 1896) DIDN’T KNOW IT WAS LOADED A Hen Swallows a Fire Cracker Which Explodes and Kills Her. Last Saturday being the 4th of July, Mrs. J. A. Weber was lighting small fire crackers to amuse the children. In order to frighten the chickens, she lighted one and threw it into the chicken park. Before it had time to explode the chickens made a rush for it, thinking it was something good to eat, and a large Plymouth Rock hen greedily gulped it down. She walked off proudly and disdainfully, as if to say to the other members of the flock, “You got left that time.” But her triumph was short lived. She had not taken half a dozen steps until the cracker exploded, and the hen lay prostrate on the ground, dead. Her craw was burst and her neck broken. She died instantly. And the other chickens, which but a moment before had looked crestfallen and dejected, in failing to secure what they believed to be a choice morsel of food, congratulated themselves upon their good fortune. This contains a moral lesson for mankind. It teaches us that we should not be too eager and quick to grasp every new thing, without careful inquiry as to its merits. From it we may also learn that what we regard as misfortunes are often our salvation. ••• The Army Worm He is Here in Great Numbers and Means Business The army worm is here. You can see him in squads, regiments and battallions on the public square. The grass is covered with them, and they are using the sidewalks like ordinary pedestrians on the 4th of July. This worm is the larva of a moth that flies about at night. These on the public square were evidently bred right there. They are apparently of all sizes and ages, and could not have journeyed far. They are great climbers, however. In starting westward from the public square the first obstacle they meet is the Hotel Pantall. They do not attempt to go around it, but proceed to climb over it. These worms are very destructive to vegetation, and seem to be especially fond of grass. The usual way to kill them, when they begin their march across a field, is to plow a double furrow around the field, and then set fire to straw and burn them as they cross the furrow. Pigs and fowls, if let

loose on the army worm will make great devastation on its ranks. ••• (July 15, 1896) FIRE IN CLAYVILLE The House Occupied by the Sisters Totally Destroyed About 12 o’clock last Friday night the new brick house between the parochial school and the Catholic church in Clayville, occupied by the sisters, was discovered to be on fire. It had already gained alarming headway, and the occupants had barely time to escape with their lives. The piano and a few other articles of furniture were all that was saved. The J.A. Weber hose company responded to the alarm, but it was too late to save the building. The loss of building and contents was about $2,500, upon which there was $1,500 insurance. ••• Henry Morey’s Big Bee Hive Mr. H. A. Morey, of Warsaw tonwship, has quite a novelty set up on his premises. It is a section of a large tree in which is located a colony of bees. The tree was found in the woods where the bees had made their home, their location being discovered through the fondness of these busy workers for the honey of a colony in Mr. Morey’s yard, which they had robbed and killed. The tree was carefully cut down and the section in which the bees were located, about 13 feet in length, cut out and hauled to Mr. Morey’s home, where with the assistance of rope and tackle, it was set on end, and where it now stands, its numerous inhabitants setting to work at once in their new and strange location. The tree was about three feet in diamiter, and its weight indicates that the bees have occupied it for some time and have accumulated a large amount of honey. — Brookville Republican ••• The Indiana Normal The fall term of the Indiana normal school of Pennsylvania will open Tuesday, September 1, 1896. A beautiful spot in a salubrious region. A strong corps of twentyfour teachers. Careful drill in small classes a specialty. All candidates presented to the State Examiners were approved. The thorough preparation of graduates has been recently commended by three colleges. Rates popular. Students may

board in clubs. Send for catalogue. D. J. Waller, Jr., Principal ••• (July 22, 1896) ROBERT CLARKE DEAD Robert, son of Prothonotary W. D. Clarke, of Brookville, died this morning of typhoid fever, after an illness of two weeks, aged about twenty years. The deceased was a very promising young man. Possessing genial manners, courteous and obliging, he was popular with everybody with whom he came in contact. He had been acting as clerk in his father’s office, where he exhibited a high degree of competency. The loss of their only son will be severe blow to Mr. and Mrs. Clarke. ••• The Iron Works The Construction of the Plant is Progressing Rapidly During the past week workingmen at the iron plant have been erecting boilers. There are thirty-six of them, and they are being placed on iron framework, some of them high in the air. Most of the stonework is already completed, and in a short time the construction of the framework will begin. This plant, when completed, will be one of the largest, as well as the most modern, in the world. Nowhere will there be an iron plant more perfectly equipped with all the improved facilities for the manufacture of pig iron. Indeed it is doubtful if it will have an equal on earth in this regard. With a capacity of 250 tons of iron a day, it will employ over two hundred men and that cannot help but add materially to the prosperity of the town. And it may be put down as almost an assured fact that it will be the cause of bringing other industries, for whose product iron is the principal raw material, to this town. ••• “Whirlwind” Williams In its account of a game of baseball between Bradford and Oil City yesterday, to-day’s Bradford Era said: “When the Bradford team went to bat in the ninth inning, they found that Berry had been removed from the box and a young man with raven locks and a piercing eye had taken his place. The new man was Williams, the star twirler of the Oil City aggregation. After calmly sizing up the situation, Williams ground the ball into his hip, sawed the air wildly with his arms and then let go.

on up street, turned out to the left to let him pass. They came together. Both bicycles were more or less damaged, and the Reynoldsville man was damaged considerably himself, although not seriously. He struck the earth, however, with great poteney, and for a time wore a very woeful expression. ••• (July 29, 1896) A TERRIFIC STORM Western Pennsslvania Swept by Flood and Wind One of the most furious storms within the memory of the oldest inhabitant swept over Western Pennsylvania last Monday. The greatest damage was done in Pittsburg and vicinity, where houses were unroofed, telephone and telegraph poles blown down and many people injured. The rain came down in water spouts, swelling small streams to torrents in a few moments. At Cecil, a mining village just over the Washington county line, a boarding house was swept away and eight miners were drowned. Great damage was done to property all along the Ohio and Allegheny rivers. In Allegheny twelve people were struck by lightning and are in a critical condition. At Sugar Grove John Figus was killed by a falling tree. On Greenfield Avenue, Joseph Ashfolder was killed by a sign striking him on the head. In Sharpsburg W. Norr was killed by the falling of the roof of a house. Besides many people were injured, some of whom will die. ••• Slept Twenty-Four Years The New York World of last Sunday gives a long account of the peculiar life of Abe McClelland of Graysville, twelve miles from Tyrone, who became dead to the world when Grant was President from the effects of a bullet wound in the head, and only became conscience a few days ago. He received a pension, and this paid for the service of a housekeeper who fed and nursed him during his long sleep. The old man was very curious to know what had happened during his slumber, and when he got all the information he wanted on that point he said the world was really a pretty monotonous place, and intimated that he hadn’t missed much, although there has been five Presidential elections during his little nap. ••• A Narrow Escape Judge — “Prisoner, stand up. You are charged with taking a fence rail to this plaintiff and

beating him over the head. You see the plight the man is in. One of his eyes is gone, his teeth are all missing, his nose looks as if it a trolley car had run over it, one ear looks as if it had been used for a door mat, three of his ribs are broken, his voice is cracked and it is feared that he has serious internal injuries. What have you to say in justification of your conduct?” The Prisoner — “Not much, Your Honor. He was scorching, and I —” Judge — “That will do. I’ll discharge this time, but if you ever come before me again in a case of this kind and don’t have a good reason for not having killed your man I’ll fine you to the limit.” — Cleveland Leader ••• (July 29, 1896) A VERITABLE PICTURE GALLERY One feature of the new one dollar silver certificate which will cause a great deal of curious surmise on the part of its more reflective (as well as happy) possessors is its nearly encircling border of honored names in wreaths of laurel. Why have twenty three names been thus laureated? Perhaps on account of the space available. But analysis of the twenty-three names chosen shows that ten are those of statesmen, Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, Jackson, Clay, Calhoun, Webster, and Lincoln; one is that of the great Chief Justice, Marshall; two are those of soldiers, Grant and Sherman; two admirals, Perry and Farragut; two inventors, Morse and Fulton; and six men of letters, Bancroft, Cooper, Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne and Longfellow. Considering its limited scope, this showing is fairly representative, despite its omission of Lee among the Generals and Poe among the Poets. — Philadelphia Record ••• (August 5, 1896) A Pair of Big Shoes The largest pair of shoes that we have ever seen are at Philip Margo’s shoe shop. They are No. 16 1/2, and were made from a last manufactured to order for a man living at Adrain. They are not only very long, but also very wide. An ordinary No. 10 shoe looks delicate and spirituelle beside them. These Brobdingnaggian pedel garments are gazed upon with wonder by the passers-by, who try to imagine what sort of giant can wear them. The man who wears them, however, is only six feet six inches and

does not weigh over three hundred. ••• Improvements at Walston Four new boilers have been recently added to the battery at Walston mines, making eight in all. The old wooden boiler house has been torn down, and an iron structure will be erected. Large air compressors are also being put in at Walston and numerous other improvements are being made. This would indicate that there is still coal enough under the Walston hills to keep the mines running there for a good many years. ••• A Brutal Fight A brutal fight occurred at the iron works last Sunday morning. Two men who were formerly employed about the works attacked a man who is now employed there, and who was under the influence of liquor, trampled him into the mud and kicked him in the face, breaking his nose. Had it not been for the interference of some men who happened to be near, the victim might have been smothered to death in the mud. Those who witnessed it say it was a disgustingly brutal affair. ••• (August 5, 1896) BOROUGH INDEBTEDNESS Good Streets Cheaper to Tax-Payers Than Poor Ones According to a statement furnished by the Burgess and Clerk of the Town Council, the total indebtedness of Punxsutawney borough at this time is $21,422.85. Deducting the amount of uncollected taxes for 1894 and ‘95, which amounts to $3,458.51, and the sinking fund on hand and levied for 1896, $763.24, leaves the total bonded indebtedness of the borough, unprovided for, $17,201.10. The total valuation for this year is $1,410,155. On this valuation bonds may be issued to the amount of 2 per cent, which would be $28,203.10. The present indebtedness, including bonds recently authorized, will make the indebtedness $25,201.10, leaving us $2,002 below the limit. By Bonding the borough in a sufficient sum to pave all the streets with some permanent material we might reduce our street taxes by $2,000 a year, and at the same time have beautiful streets. After the streets are properly paved there is practically no expense in keeping them up, and it has been the experience of every

city and town that good streets, obtained in this way, are much less expensive to the taxpayers than the almost useless expense annually put upon unpaved streets, and which, at best, renders them hardily worthy of the name of streets. This is a matter worthy the serious consideration of our people, and the sooner it is acted upon, the better it will be for all concerned. ••• Coke Plant Closed Down A press dispatch from Dunbar under date of August 4, says: “A sensation has been caused among coal operators by the W. J. Rainey company being forced to close down their coke works. This week 200 ovens are being blown out and it is reported that others will follow soon. Rainey has been selling his coke at $1.65 to $1.75, while all the other operators have been selling it since January at $2.00, and consequently has been scalping the market. The past week showed only 35 per cent of the ovens in the region in operation and of the 35 per cent. Rainey had every oven in blast. This company is erecting hundreds of new ovens at Mt. Braddock and Elm Grove, and it was reported that 500 new ovens would soon be placed in operation.” ••• (August 5, 1896) COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS Mahoning Street to be Paved With Brick this Fall At the regular meeting of town council, held Monday night, all the members were present. Several property owners were present and were heard in matter of curbing West Mahoning street. The law was read and explained to them by the borough attorney, and they were satisfied that the council had the authority to require them to put in curbing in front of their properties, but were not satisfied as to the justness of it. A motion was put and carried requiring the plank in front of the Zeitler block to be placed on the proper grade within ten days, and all the property within ten days, and all the property owners from the Johnson building to the Zeitler block were notified to place their pavement on proper grade at once. The B. R. & P. railway was directed to open the ditch on the south side of their track from Pine street to the borough line. A committee was appointed to

10 - Way Back When, The Punxsutawney Spirit, November 2012

Nobody saw the ball again until Catcher Nelson threw it back to the pitcher. Williams continued to bombard the home plate with balls that flew through space with the speed of a rifle projectile, until three men were struck out, and the Bradford club retired.” ••• (July 22, 1896) HANGED HIMSELF An Aged Man Ends His Life Through Sickness and Despondency James Buckley, a coal miner at Shawmut, committed suicide by hanging on Sunday morning. He had been in poor health for a year or more, and it is thought became despondent over his condition and while in that frame of mind ended his life. The deed was committed sometime between the hours of 1 and 5 o’clock in the morning. Buckley who was afflicted with asthma, was in the habit of getting up in the night to smoke when unable to sleep. Some of the family heard him about 1 o’clock, but thought nothing of it. At 5 o’clock one of the boarders got up and went to the kitchen, and in the dim light ran against the body of Mr. Buckley, who was hanging suspended from a joist above. The unfortunate man was immediately attended to, but life was extinct. — Brockwayville Record ••• A Large Timber Deal Alfred Graham and W. A. Porter, of this place, closed a deal last Saturday with Robert S. Stewart, of Surveyor Run, Girard Township, whereby they became the owners of 3,000 acres of land the consideration being $40,000. The tract is underlaid with coal, and besides the improvements, consisting of a large saw mill and other out buildings, there is a large lot of sawed lumber. On the piece there is 12,000,000 feet of hemlock, 6,000,000 of white pine, 2,000,000 of white oak, 1,000,000 of red oak, besides some 70,000 railroad ties. Messrs. Graham and Porter are both experienced lumbermen and they no doubt have a fortune in this deal. The timber will nearly all be run to Williamsport. — Clearfield Republican ••• They Collided Two bicycle riders met on the corner of Mahoning and Findlay streets last Sunday. Robert McCreary was one and the other was a Reynoldsville man. McCreary turned the corner, and the Reynoldsville man, thinking he was going

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confer with Clayville Council in regard to putting in a sewer at borough line. The street committee and street commissioner were instructed to examine all streets and sidewalks in the borough and where repairs are needed of sidewalks are not on proper grade to notify owners to make necessary alterations or repairs. An ordinance directing the property owners along West Mahoning street, from the West  end of the present plank street to the borough line, to each fronting their respective properties, was passed. An ordinance was also passed requiring the Punxsutawney Street Passenger Railway Company to pave their portion of the street. The burgess was authorized by ordinance to negotiate a loan of $2,000 by means of thirty year bonds at 4 per cent, free of state tax for this purpose. Interest payable at the option of the borough after eight years. A tax of one-half mill was laid for the purpose of paying interest and redeeming bonds at the end of the term. The paving will be done as rapidly as the law will permit the council to act. Burgess reports for fines $44.50. Bills were paid aggregating about $1,000 the principal items of which were $715 for street lights, $133.50 costs on contested election, surveying $43, and police $53.75. ••• (August 12, 1896) BEATEN AND ROBBED A Very Queer Proceeding on the Part of Two Hungarians Last Monday night Franklin K. P. Hall, of Adrian, was in town with his horse and wagon, and two Hungarians named Frank Momps and Joe Fogle, employed by Clark, Kizer & Kipp at Anita, engaged Mr. Hall to take them home. Something happened. An hour or two later Mr. Hall came back to town. His face was scratched and bruised and covered with blood. His watch was gone and if he had possessed anything else that was valuable, that too would have been gone. He said that when he reached the Adrian coke ovens, the Hungarians attacked him, beat him, took his watch, let his horse loose from the wagon by cutting the tugs and left him lying in the road. A warrant was sworn out, and yesterday Constable Record arrested Fogle and Momps. He gave Fogle in charge of another party and he got away, while Momps gave

bail for a hearing. ••• For Breaking the Sabbath It has been the practice for a long time for some of the Hungarians of Adrian to annoy the people of the community by accumulating a few kegs of beer on Sunday, taking them to a shady nook, and playing while they put themselves on the exterior of beer. The good people protested, and the owners of the land threatened, but it did no good. Finally more stringent measures were adopted. And nine of them were arrested. One stood trial, and was fined $4 aud costs. Six plead guilty, and were given a like sentence, and two will have hearings to-day. The charge against them was “breech of the Lord’s Day.” Louis Bokdon, the last one arrested, insisted upon having a hearing, maintaining that he was not guilty, and was placed in the lock-up for safe keeping over night. ••• He Tackeled Will Tyson A gentleman named H. M. Pomeroy, from Ann Arbor, Michigan, dropped into Big Run last Thursday evening and inquired for Will Tyson. Mr. Pomery is a professional checker player, and claims to have defeated some of the best players in the country by very one-sided scores. He found Mr. Tyson, who had not played any checkers for a year, and arranged to play ten games the next day. The result was that Tyson won 7, lost 1, and 2 were draws. Mr. Pomeroy concluded that it was not his day for playing checkers. ••• (August 12, 1896) AN IMPUDENT HAWK Yesterday morning, Prof. E. H. McHenry, of East End, heard a commotion on the front porch, and went out to see what was the matter. A canary bird hung there in a cage. A large chicken hawk had come down to earth, and was making an energetic effort to get hold of the bird. In thrusting its beak and claws through the wires it had succeeded in pulling the tail feathers out of the canary and frightening it almost to death. When Mr. McHenry went out the hawk sailed off down street, flying low, and looking for more birds. The canary has not been trilling its usual merry tunes since that time. It seems to be demure and sad, and is haunted by visions of beak and claw. ••• New Telephone Line A new telephone line is being constructed by the

Central District Telegraph and Telephone company from Punxsutawney to Indiana. Sixteen men are at work on it now, stringing the wires. It is to be a metalic circuit, and will give us a very much improved service between Punxsutawney and Indiana. ••• Dow Barrett’s Hard Luck Dow Barrett, of the Loop, came to Punxsutawney in a buggy yesterday morning with a young man named Frank Fair. As they were passing No. 6, Mine below Clayville, and just as they neared the bridge which crosses Polecat Run, the horse took fright at the fan used to ventilate the mines, and ran off the approach to the bridge, upsetting the buggy over the bank. The buggy was broken to pieces and both Mr. Barrett and Mr. Fair, were considerably hurt. Barrett was injured on the left leg, and received a severe bruise on the forehead. The young man injured his leg. Mr. Barrett thinks there should have been a railing to prevent vehicles from running over this embankment, and threatens to sue the township for damages. ••• Toby Valley Mines Operations at the Northwest and Shawmut mines have been slacking up somewhat during the past ten days, and less work is expected during the next few weeks. This is only a natural consequence, as the consumption of coal at this period is less than any time during the year. Up to the beginning of the month the Toby valley mines have run steadier since last fall than any other section in the district. — Brockwayville Record ••• (August 19, 1896) ASSAULTED WITH A COKE FORK Yesterday evening Andrew Nichol, coal and iron police at Adrian, was called to a Hungarian boarding house to suppress a row. It appears that Andrew Waskvaish was making things lively about the premises by brandishing a coke fork, and when Nichol approached he attacked him with that implement, jabbing him in the finger. They grappled, and Waskavish sunk his teeth into Nichol’s arm. Nichol then pounded his assailant in the face with his fist until he let go, and then brought him to town. Woskavish’s nose and lips were badly swolen and he was covered with blood. Nichol had his finger bandaged, and the blood was seeping trough his coat-sleeve, where he had been bitten. Nichol made

information against Waskavish for assault and battery, and in default of $200 bail he was committed to the lock-up to await a hearing to-day. ••• The Fatal Oil Can An attempt to start a fire quickly resulted in the same old way over in West Wheatfield township on Sunday. The victim this time was a young girl named Mary Lute, daughter of David Lute, and the accident cost her life. The family lived near the little village of India and on Sunday at noon no one was at home except the girl and her little brother Tom, aged 11 years. At noon the girl started the fire preparatory to getting dinner. The fire burned slowly and in order to hurry it up the girl foolishly held a gallon can of oil over the flames and poured the fluid on the fire. An explosion quickly followed and the burning oil was scattered over the girl and through the room. The girl was enveloped in flames and her clothing burned from her body. Her cries brought some of the neighbors to the house where they found the injured girl standing at the pump and her brother throwing water on her body which had been burned to a crisp in places. Every vestage of clothing was burned from the poor girl’s body except the collar of the dress. She lived only a few minutes when death ended her sufferings. Her little brother, who had bravely fought the flames which brought death to his sister, was badly burned about the hands and face, but he will recover. — Indiana Progress ••• (August 19, 1896) SCHOOL BEGINS AUGUST 31 The Punxsutawney schools will open on Monday, August 31st. The average small boy will be delighted to know that his long vacation, during which he has added little to his intellectual growth, is about over, and that he can begin again the assiduous process of cultivating his brain. Nothing grieves the average boy so much as to realize that he is wasting the precious hours of youth that should be devoted to the preparation for the battle of life. ••• (August 26,1896) The Hobos Have a Picnic On Monday afternoon ten tramps were encamped on the South Side. They were having a feast. An old powder can had been used for a kettle, in which they had made vegetable soup. They each had an old tomato

can which they used for a soup bowl, dipping it into the powder can to replenish the supply. Besides this they had two kegs of beer, to which they gave the strictest attention. After they had finished their repast Policeman Palmer gave them ten minutes to leave town. Which invitation was accepted. Another gang of ten hobos landed here the night previous, and were given their choice between leaving town without any ceremony or sleeping in the lock-up. They left. ••• For Felonious Assault A warrant has been issued for the arrest of Grant Condron of Smicksburg, upon information made by Chief of Police Palmer charging him with felonious assault. It appears that, on Wednesday morning about one o’ clock, restaurant keeper Dunn, of Findley street, told Palmer that Condron, who had just left his restaurant, had put a salt box in his pocket. Palmer walked after him to tell him to disgourge. Just as he was going by Grier & Osterhout’s hardware store on Mahoning street, Palmer told Condron to stop, and reached for him. Condron dodged into the alley and struck viciously at Palmer twice, with a long knife, first at his neck and then at his body. He then started to run, and Palmer shot at him. The policeman then chased Condron for some distance but failed to catch him. Only a little while before, Condron told Policeman Stockdale that he was going to “fix” Palmer. ••• (September 2, 1896) A ROW AT WALSTON Two Italians Received a Dose of Lead from Constable Cook Last Sunday Gostinio and Michael Carino, two brothers residing at Walston, were disputing about a line fence, and fearing that trouble might ensue, Constable Isaac Cook was sent for. He went to the scene of the trouble, and according to reports, both of them attacked the constable, threw him down, and were proceeding to belabor him when Mr. Cook’s son came to the rescue and struck one of his father’s assailants over the head with a board. Mr. Cook thenregained his feet, and the Italians started to run. The Constable got hold of his revolver, which he had lost in the scuffle, and ordered the men to stop. They refused to do so, and he fired at them, striking one of them in the leg and the other

Winslow township, they found five twenty-dollar gold pieces. They were all clean and bright. When Mr. Pifer was informed of the fact he explained how it happened. In 1887 he sold a team of fine horses receiving $520 for it. Part of the money, $160, was in gold, and the rest in paper. He placed it all in a little tin bucket and hid it in the cave. He afterwards took the paper money out and left the gold there. In 1889 the cave burned down, and Mr. Pifer had forgotten all about his gold, and never had thought of it until yesterday when the finding of the five twenties recalled the circumstances to his mind. The gold was found amongst the ashes and debris of the old cave, and a thorough search is being made for the other $60, which is supposed to be there also. ••• Louis Helman’s Funeral He is Buried in Accordance With the Rites of the Orthodox Jews Louis Helman, the Jewish peddler who was murdered near Brockwayville last Wednesday, was buried in the Jewish cemetery near Punxsutawney on Thursday. He belonged to the sect of orthodox Jews, and was buried in strict accordance with the laws and customs amongst the ancient Jews. This law prescribes that, in case of death by violence, none of the blood shall be washed off, and none of the bloody garments removed, but that the victim shall be buried as he was when death came. This custom was strictly observed at Helman’s funeral. He was laid in the grave without a coffin, his head resting upon a sack of earth. A small flat stone was placed over each eye, and over his mouth, and a green twig in each hand. Boards were placed at each side of the corps, and above it, and then the grave was filled up. This custom is not observed by the Jews generally, but obtains amongst the orthodox, and as Helman belonged to this sect he was buried in accordance with the funeral rites of that ancient faith. ••• (September 9, 1896) SUPPOSED MURDERERS CAUGHT Frank and William Dodson Arrested for the Murder of Louis Helman William and Frank Dodson, the supposed murderers of Louis Helman, were arrested last Saturday morning by S.R. Van Horn, of Brockwayville, Deputy Sherriff McMakin and Chief of Police Robert

McFarland, of Ridgeway. These gentleman, with a number of others, surrounded their residence in Spring Creek, Elk county, on Friday night. At 11 o’clock one of the Dodson brothers came home, gave three distinct raps on the door and was admitted. At 5 o’clock in the morning the other brother arrived. McMakin and VanHorn then went to the door and demanded admittance, saying they wanted to see the Dodson brothers. Mrs. Dodson denied their presence, but upon being informed that they had been seen entering the house, and that the house was surrounded, both men came out and revealed themselves. They were taken to the Ridgeway jail, and H. Shakespeare, who had been telegraphed for, arrived on the next train and identified them as the men who committed the murder. Although they wore different clothes, and one of them had shaved since he saw them at the house of Thomas Hutchinson and afterwards upon the highway when they made the assault, he said he was positive they were the same men, and was willing to be qualified to it. The prisoners were removed to Brookville jail, and as the offense was committed in this county, will be tried in Brookville. ••• A FINE SCHOOL BUILDING Reynoldsville had a great day last Thursday, notwithstanding the fact that the Governor did not arrive, which was plainly no fault of theirs. It was pretty generally considered that Judge Reed made just as good, and perhaps a better speech than the Governor could have made. But the school house is there to speak for itself, and is a more eloquent testimonial to the patriotism, public spirit and energy of the people of Reynoldsville than any combination of words could be. Everybody concedes that Reynoldsville has the finest public school building in Western Pennsylvania, and that is enough. ••• (September 16, 1896) SUDDEN DEATH OF JACKSON PIFER Jackson Pifer, a well known citizen of Clayville, died very suddenly last Monday evening. He was in his usual health, and had brought a load of coal to G.W. Porter’s machine shops. Remarking to a young man who stood by that he was feeling

tired, he sat down on the edge of the sidewalk, and in a moment fell over dead. Mr. Pifer was about seventy years of age, and was an industrious man and a good citizen. He leaves a wife and family of grown children. The funeral took place in Clayville yesterday afternoon at 9 o’clock. ••• THE MAN WHO DIDN’T LIKE IT While on our way to Smicksburg last Saturday with H.C. Campbell Esq., we caught up to and drove by a man in a one-horse rig. He kept after us for about two miles, and caught up to us going up a hill, when he yelled out in an angry voice. “Hey you fellows! If you are in such a hurry drive on faster and keep out of my way.” We drove on, and our friend with the bad temper gradually dropped out of sight, and was soon lost in the hazy distance. As men do not like to be passed on life’s highway, so it seems also that some men do not like to be passed on the road to Smicksburg. ••• A FINE LECTURE COURSE F.E. Willis, of this place, has organized a lecture course for Punxsutawney for the coming season. He has secured the finest talent obtainable, and the entertainments will be of the highest class. Gen. John B. Gordon, Senator for Georgia, who lectures on the “Last Days of Confederacy” the Franz Wilzek Concert Company, John R. Clarke of Chicago, and Miss Anna Louise White, is the galaxy of talent secured. ••• (September 23, 1896) OWL ATTACKS A CHILD Last Sunday morning about 3 o’clock a large owl flew through the open window of the room in which Mr. and Mars. Samuel Hllands and their little babe were sleeping. The babe sleeps in a crib near the bed of its parents. The owl in its prowlings about during the night evidently had seen the babe through the open window and dashed through the window at it. The racket made awakened Mr. Hllands who jumped up and closed the window, then threw a quit over the owl and smothered it to death. It was a big one and had it succeeded in getting at the child would doubtless have injured it severely. ••• (September 23, 1896) A GREAT MEETING AT BIG RUN Big Run will have a

Republican meeting on Friday evening, October 2, that promises to eclipse anything yet held in this county by a majority as great as that recently given by Maine. The following array of excellent speakers will be present: Hon. John F. Cox of Pittsburgh: W.C. Farnsworth, of Harrisburg: W.I. Swoop, of Clearfield, and Hon. E. E. Robbins, of Greensburg. There will be brass bands, red fire and plenty of enthusiasm. Excursions will be arranged, if possible, from Punxsutawney, DuBois, and Eleanora. ••• NOT DROPSY, BUT A TUMOR Miss Hettie Bair, of this place, who was supposed to be suffering from dropsy, and who has been treated for that disease for several years, went to Philadelphia last week and had an operation performed. She did not have dropsy at all, but a tumor, and when Prof. Montgomery was here a few weeks ago he looked at her and told her parents what was the matter. They decided to send her to Philidelphia to have the tumor removed, and the operation was performed last Thursday. Dr. J.F. Grube had thought all along that the girl’s trouble was not dropsy, and it was at his suggestion that Prof. Montgomery made the examination. ••• AN EPIDEMIC OF DIPTHERIA Homer City is passing through the wost epidemic of diptheria in her history. Since the first appearance of the disease there has probably been 40 cases in the town, and at this time the physicians have about 30 cases to battle with. Up to date there have been but three deaths, two children of John Kerr, aged 10 and 7 years, and one of Benjaman Glass, aged four years. New cases are occuring daily. The town council is lending noble assistance to the physicians in fighting this plague. Strict sanitary regulations are being enforced, and the churches have been closed until the spread of disease is checked. The public schools have not yet opened, nor will they until it is absolutely safe to do so. — Indiana Gazette ••• (September 9, 1896) ELDERS’ AND DEACONS’ CONVENTION An Elders’ and Deacons’ Convention was held at Pleasant Grove on Thursday, September 2. The convention

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in the back. They were taken to the hospital where it was ascertained that one had received a flesh wound which was not at all serious, and the other, who was hit just above the hip, had not been wounded in a vital place, and would likely recover without much difficulty. Mr. Cook came to town on Monday and made information against both of them for assault and battery. ••• The Big Mill Shut Down Monday’s DuBois Courier conveys the information that the big saw mill of John E. DuBois at that place, had indefinitely closed down. It said: “On Saturday evening a report was circulated about town that the jobbers of John E. DuBois had been notified to cease work for the season, that the fires under the boilers at the big mill had been drawn, the mills closed and that the industries which have for years given employment to hundreds of men and support to their families were to be closed down indefinitely and caused misgivings, fear and destrot in the breasts of many other than the above employes of Mr. DuBois. To ascertain the truthfulness of the above report a Courier representative saw Mr. DuBois yesterday and asked him as to their accuracy. He was told that the report was substantially correct. He had suspended work in the woods, the mill had been closed down indefinitely and that not another log would be cut this winter, and that he could see no reason why he should go on preparing his product for a market, while, because of existing conditions, no market existed.” ••• (September 2, 1896) AN INDIANA COUNTY FARMER SUICIDE A dispatch to the Pittsburg Times, dated Saltsburg, September 1, says: “Martin Matson, a young farmer of Conemaugh township, committed suicide yesterday by hanging himself in a hay mow. He had lost his crops in the heavy storms, and had made several unfortunate investments. Matson has been married only a few months.” ••• (September 9,1896) A Nest of Gold Found in an Old Cave Wall of Thomas Pifer Yesterday while George and John Rudolph and William Pifer were engaged in repairing the wall of a cave on the farm of Thomas Pifer, of

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was called to order by Rev. Hartman, of Punxsutawney, and Rev. H. G. Teagarden, of Oliveburg, was elected chariman, and T. M. Sadler, secretary. Devotional exercises were conducted by Rev. Hartman, after which the regular program was taken up and discussed. The “Best Method of Raising Church Funds” was discussed by Rev. Vanhorn, after which the meeting adjourned until 1:30 o’clock. The “Relation of Giving to the Spiritual Life” was discussed by Rev. Teagarden. Rev. Hartman talked on the “Duty of Church Officials Inside the Church.” “How to Secure New Membership to the Church” was opened by Mr. Hineman, followed by Rev. Teagarden. “The Ideal Sunday School and How to Make It,” was opened by T.M. Sadler, followed by H.S. Carr. Rev. Van Horn, Mr. Cotwell, Robert Hunter, John Huschinson and Rev. Teagarden. “The Duties of the Deacons to the Poor” was discussed by Robert Hunter, of Anita. “General Benefits of the Prayer Meeting” by H.S. Carr and Mr. Caldwell. “The Elders’ Duty in the Entire Church” was discussed by Mr. John Evans. “What do to with members who will neither pay, pray nor repent,” was discussed by Mr. John Hutchinson. The convention closed with some interesting remarks by Rev. Van Horn on “How to secure attendance at all of the Church services.” No place was definitely settled upon for the next meeting. T.M. SADLER, Sec. ••• INDIANA MARKETS There is but little change in our markets from last week. The millers are paying 60 cents for good wheat and 20 for oats. They are not buying rye and are selling corn at 40 cents. They sell brand at $12 the ton and corn and oats chop at and dollar a hundred. The grocers are paying 14 cents for butter and 10 for eggs. For potatoes they are willing to pay 20 cents a bushel, but don’t want apples at any price. They will pay 50 cents for onions and 2 cents a pound for good solid cabbage. Delaware peaches are retailing from stores at 50 cents a pock and Jersey sweet potatoes at 35 cents and southern at 25 cents. Roasting ears were bought from wagons yesterday at 8 cents a dozen. — Messenger ••• (September 9, 1896)

Arrested for Malicious Mischief Dr. Beyer and Dr. Shields have a dispute about a line on North Findley street, both claiming an alley. Last Saturday Des Freas and Ferl Long were having some coal hauled. They could not get to their coal houses without going through land claimed by Drs Shields and Beyer, and which had been fenced in by Dr. Shields. Mr. Freas complained to Dr. Beyer about it and the Doctor told him to let down the fence and go through and he would take any consequences that might result. So Des let down the fence. Dr. Shields had them both arrested for malicious mischeif. They were given a hearing before Squire Lowry and held for court. ••• (September 23, 1896) A SOMEWHAT DRAMATIC COURT SCENE The trial of Irvin Bussler on a charge of stealing $83 from George Heigney, of this place, was concluded in a somewhat dramatic manner. The evidence tended to show that Constable Record, in attempting to recover the money, had lead the young man to believe that, if he would tell where it was, nothing would be done about it. As a confession made to an officer under a promise of that kind cannot be used as evidence against him, and there was no doubt of his guilt. He believed him guilty and the jury believed him guilty, but under this technicality of law, he would not be convicted. “If however,” said the Judge, “you have and sense of honor about you, you will go immediately, and use the first money you earn to pay back to these old people what you have taken from them.” It is said that the Bussler’s attorney has some trouble in preventing him from pleading guilty, in which case he would certainly have been sent down the river. ••• (September 23, 1896) HORRIBLE EXAMPLES OVERWORKED “Rome, Babylon, Carthage where are they? What caused their downfall? Why have they been wiped off the map of the world?” howled the free silver orator. And the men of various political and social ideas in the audience answered in various ways. “They went back to barbarism because they had no public schools, no system of popular education,” said the

school teacher. “They were blotted out because they maintained the institution of slavery,” said a philanthropic man. “Intemperance ruined them,” said a Prohibitionist “A concentration of wealth in the hands of the few caused the trouble,” said the socialist. “Vice and corruption brought them low,” said the religious man. “They were wiped out by tyranny and the bloody spirit of war and conquest.” said the peaceful man. “No sir!” said the orator. “You are all wrong! Rome, Carthage, Babylon and all other nations that have perished have gone to oblivion, my fellow citizens, because of the gold standard, and don’t you forget it.!” ••• CARTER FOUND GUILTY George Carter, of this place, charged with tampering with the ballot, was tried in Brookville last week, and convicted on the charges of perjury and making false return of the votes cast. Judge White did not have time to hear the arguments he set November 14 for that purpose and ordered Carter to enter bail for his appearance at that time. In the meantime sentence was suspended. The impression prevails that Carter is not the only one implicated in the matter, but up to this time, he has not intimated that he had any accomplices. ••• (September 23, 1896) OBITUARY — J.P. MURRAY It is with much pain that we express our bereavement over the loss of our friend, J.P. Murray, who died last Monday with diphtheria, after an illness of about ten days. Deceased was about thirty years of age, was born and educated in Bradford county, Pa, and until recently has always lived there, and in Sullivan county. In his early manhood he taught school. Seven years ago he entered the employ of Clark Bros., Lopez, Sullivan county, as clerk in the general store. After about three years in this capacity, he was given full charge of their store at that place which position he held when he removed to this county, and took sole charge as buyer and manager of Clark, Kizor & Kipp’s general mercantile business at this place. Mr Murray, by his honorable course and bearing won the esteem and confidence of all those with whom he associated. He had been married just eleven months,

and leaves a young wife, Miss Ida B. Schock, his parents, and a number of brothers and sisters, to mourn his loss. A FRIEND. Cortez, Pa., September 19, 1896. ••• (November 7, 1896) TWO BLACK BEARS Israel Spencer, of Elbel, and William Barnett, of this town, are hunting in the mountains of Clearfield county. Last Saturday they sent home two black bears which they succeeded in killings. One was a big fellow, and the other was rather small. They were sent to Philliber’s meat market with the intention of supplying the people with bear steak, but the warm weather has played havoc with them. They were no longer fresh, and the meat was not in a condition to offer to the public. The hides were taken off, however, and when properly tanned will make a very nice “buffalo” robe. ••• A FALSE REPORT Somebody who was feeling ugly started the report that on the day following the election, wages were reduced at the Walston mines and on the B. R. & P. Railway. We have inquired diligently of persons who ought to know, and they say there is nothing in the report. ••• (September 23, 1896) A Somewhat Dramatic Court Scene The Trial of Irvin Bussler on a charge of stealing $83 from George Heigney, of this place was concluded in a somewhat dramatic manner.

The evidence tended to show that Constable Record, in attempting to recover the money had lead the young man to believe that if he would tell where it was nothing would be done about it. As a confession made to an officer under a promise of that kind cannot be used as evidence against him and there was no other proof of his guilt. Judge Reed took the case from the jury and discharged the defendant. The judge told the young man in discharging him that there was no doubt of his guilt. He believed him guilty and the jury believed him guilty but under this technicality of law he could not be convicted. “If however” said the Judge” you have any sense of honor about you, you will go to work immediately and use the first money you earn to pay back to these old people what you have taken from them.” It is said that Bussler’s attorney had some trouble in preventing him from pleading guilty in which case he would certainly have been sent down the river. ••• A Time for Caution There are a number of cases of diphtheria in Clayville and there are a good many cases in the surrounding community. The greatest precaution should be exercised to keep the disease out of Punxsutawney and to prevent its spread if it should appear. This is one of the cases where an active and competent board of health can be of invaluable service to the people in saving lives.

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••• (September 19, 1896) A Big Crane The big unloading crane for the Punxsutawney Iron Company is on the grounds and in a few weeks will be ready to operate. This crane the reach of which is 370 feet was built by the Brown Hoisting Company to do the excavating for the World’s Fair at Chicago, and was used there for two years. The man who operated it is there as is also the man who kept the enormous machine properly lubricated. The latter is a sailer by profession and climbs about over spars and masts in a way that would make a landsman quite nervous. ••• Two Hundred New Ovens Work was begun this morning on two hundred new coke ovens at Eleanora Mines. Two hundred ovens added to the already enormous coke plant of R. & P. Company which now has close to two thousand ovens will add considerably to the importance of this community as a coke producing centre. ••• Back From Cook’s Inlet Henry Roahn, of this place, who went to the Cook’s Inlet

gold country last May, returned home last Friday. Mr. Roahn’s reports of the country are not likely to cause a stampede in that direction. The mining is all of the placer kind, and a few good claims have been located, but the ice and water interfere seriously with their workings. Over three thousand people went to that country last spring, and the majority of them will come away wiser, but not wealthier. Even opportunities to work are very scarce there at wages ranging from $2 to $2.50 a day. W.H. Hile, who accomplished Mr. Roahn will be home in a few days. ••• To Introduce Meters R. A. Townsend, owner of the Punxsutawney gas plant, will introduce the meter system as rapidly as possible. He is now ordering meters to be places in churches, public halls, and such places are not occupied by families. It appears that the meter system gives much better satisfaction where it is used than the monthly rate. The gas bills are uniformly smaller, and the gas is more abundant, because it is to the interest of the people to make their gas bills as light

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as possible, and in so doing they save gas for the company. The first impulse of the people is to kick against the introduction of meters, but they soon get over that and wonder why they were ever foolish enough to be without one. ••• (September 23, 1896) An Armstrong County Girl A dispatch from Laporte, Indiana of recent date says, “Edith E. Rylatt, of Armstrong county, PA, answered the matrimonial want notice of Alexander Rhines, of Fulton county and has become his lawful wife. Rhines enjoys the rare distinction of having lived with 11 wives, all of whom in his mania to make further conquests he has divorced within a period of 20 years. He married his first wife in 1870, and now at the age of 75 has taken unto himself wife number 12.” ••• Excursion to DuBois Barnum and Bailey’s greatest show on earth will exhibit at DuBois on Monday, September 28, afternoon and evening. The B. R. & P. railway will sell excursion tickets, including admission to the show, at the following prices; Lindsey $1.25; Punxsutawney $1.25; Big Run $1.00; Sykes 80 cents. Returning train will leave DuBois at 4:37 p.m. Tickets will be good returning in regular trains the following day. ••• Barn Struck by Lightning The large barn of A.J. States, of Canoe Township was struck by lightning last Saturday morning and destroyed by fire. The barn was 50 by 50 feet and contained considerably grain and hay, besides farming machinery, hacks and buggies. Nothing was saved except a hack and wagon. There was $500 insurance on the barn and $300 on the contents. The loss would aggregate over $1,200. ••• The Dayton Fair The Dayton Fair, which takes place on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of next week, promises to be the best ever held in Dayton; already famous for its great fairs. There will be good races, a balloon asceusion on each of the three last days, and a fine exhibition of stock and agricultural products. A large number of people from Punxsutawney and the vicinity will attend. ••• Carter Found Guilty George Carter, of this place, charged with tampering with the ballot, was tried in Brookville last week, and convicted on the charges of perjury and

making false return of the votes cast. Judge White, of Indiana, presided at the trial. A motion was made for a new trial, and Judge White did not have time to hear the arguments; he set November 11 for that purpose and ordered Carter to enter bail for his appearance at that time. In the meantime sentence was suspended. The impression prevails that Carter is not the only one implicated in the matter, but up to this time he has not intimated that he had any accomplices. ••• (September 30, 1896) The Business Men’s Picnic Tomorrow at Mariposa Park a business men’s picnic will be held. John Wannamaker, the great Philadelphia merchant and Ex-Postmaster General of the United States will be present and deliver an address. Large delegations from Clearfield, Curwensville, DuBois, Punxsutawney and elsewhere are expected to attend. ••• An Old Resident Gone Solomon Shetterly, of Henderson township, died at the residence of his nephew Jacob Rudolph, on Monday, September 21, aged about seventy-eight years. The remains were interred in the Rhoads cemetery in McCalmont township last Wednesday. The deceased was one of the oldest settlers of that community and was well known and highly respected. ••• The Brookville Fair The Brookville Fair was quite a success as fairs go in this country. There was a large crowd on the grounds on Thursday, and the races were close and exciting. The exhibits of agricultural products and stock were very creditable; and to a person who takes delight in looking at fine specimens of fruits, vegetables, cattle and swine, there would be much that was interesting. The game of baseball between DuBois and Brookville on Thursday forenoon was exceedingly interesting. It was a well played game on both sides and resulted in a score of 10 to 8 in favor of DuBois. Frank Campbell, of this place covered himself with glory, making a home run, a two bagger and a single, and playing an excellent fielding game. On Friday the Punxsutawney club played a game of ball there and was defeated by a score of 8 to 6. It was also a nice game. Orin Williams who has just returned home from Oil City and Pittsburg was in the box for Punxsutawney and pitched a fine game, as he always does. •••

It Was Not Diphtheria The cases of James Murray and Lottie Wingert, who died recently of what was reported at the time to be diphtheria, was not, it appears, diphtheria at all. A portion of the membrane taken from Mr. Murray’s throat was sent to the pathological laboratory of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, and submitted to a microscopical examination. No Klebs-Loeffler bacillus, which is always present in diphtheria was discoverable, and cultures on fresh blood serum remained sterile. We are informed that Mr. Murray died of acute laryngitis and Miss Wingert of acute capillary bronchitis. ••• (October 7, 1896) Clayville Free Silver Club A meeting was held in Clayville last Friday night to organize a free coinage club. A fair audience listened to speeches by W. M. Fairman, W.M. Gillespie and J. B. Consor. The “crime of ‘73,” that bugaboo story invented by the silver kings of the West to frighten the unsophisticated into voting for their interests, was gravely related as a fact. The credulity of that audience was taxed to the point of rupture. To the credit of Clayville be it said that a very small percent of it people can be led off into the false theories of fiatisia, or will permit prejudice to usurp the place where reason should bear away. The people of Clayville, like the rest of us, have had troubles of their own. They know when they have enough, and will hesitate a good deal before they will be led to support quack theories which will aggravate a thousand times the evils from which we are suffering. ••• Lutheran Synod The fifty-fourth convention of the Pittsburgh Lutheran Synod will be held in the First English Evangelical Lutheran church of Punxsutawney, October 14 to 20. About sixty ministers and forty lay delegates will be in attendance and will be entertained in the homes of the people. The opening sermon will be preached next Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. by the president, Rev. M.L. Culler, of Apollo, and this will be followed by the Synodical Communion. Business sessions will be held each day at 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 2 to 4:30 p.m. and there will be sermons or addresses each evening. All the meetings are open to the public and every person who may attend will be welcome to come in or to go out at any hour.

(From left to right) Lisa J. Waldron, Funeral Director; Brian P. McCabe, Funeral Director; and John D. McCabe, Funeral Director/Owner McCabe Funeral Home of Punxsutawney opened in September of 1999. John McCabe had a vision for a full funeral facility that was built solely to be a funeral home. He was the first to build a full funeral home facility in Punxsutawney. Since 1999, many changes have taken place in the funeral industry in Punxsutawney such as a long-time funeral home was closed, another was rebuilt and others have changed owners.

What has not changed is the McCabe Funeral Home of Punxsutawney.

McCabe offers professional compassionate services with sincere, friendly people and fair prices in a beautiful facility. At McCabe Funeral Home, your business will be kept confidential and private! Not all funeral homes are the same in service or in pricing. We urge you to compare costs, services and facilities. We want to personally thank the area residents for all of the support and friendliness you have shown to us over the past thirteen years.

Answers to some of the most asked questions about our funeral costs: • Traditional funeral service cost at McCabe Funeral Home starting at $4,769.00, cemetery expense, newspaper notice and death certificates additional. • Our Community Package Plan at McCabe Funeral Home: $2,900.00 - 2 hour viewing and service. Outside container, cemetery expense, paper notices and death certificates additional. • Viewing and cremation service cost at McCabe Funeral Home: starting at $3,800.00, paper notices and death certificates additional. • Direct cremation cost at McCabe Funeral Home: $1,825.00 plus death certificates, urn if wanted, and paper notices “You don’t have to pay inflated prices for quality merchandise and professional service.” Thank you for considering McCabe Funeral Home.   (We accept credit cards, insurance assignments and direct payment. You may be asked for a down payment if none of the payment  options listed above pertain to you.)

McCabe

Funeral Home (814) 938-0400

114 Maple Ave. • Punxsutawney

16 - Way Back When, The Punxsutawney Spirit, November 2012

Our funeral home and services speak for themselves


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