Issuu on Google+

GLOBE THE MARYSVILLE

SPORTS: Chargers volleyball — set for success. Page 10

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2013  WWW.MARYSVILLEGLOBE.COM  75¢

District prepares for new school year BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

COMMUNITY:

Scout brightens up Liberty Elementary playground . Page 8

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Cedarcrest Middle School seventh-grade social studies teacher Diana Ellerman, left, and sixth-grade math teacher Arlana Juarez review the Advancement Via Individual Determination college-readiness system on Aug. 29.

train hard for soccer season. Page 10

Qwuloolt Estuary Restoration project underway BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

INDEX CLASSIFIED ADS 15-19 LEGAL NOTICES

7

OPINION

4

SPORTS

10

WORSHIP

14

Vol. 120, No. 17

SEE DISTRICT, PAGE 2

MARYSVILLE — A 45-minute walk into the wetlands just south of Marysville culminated in the ceremonial turning of shovelfuls of earth on the morning of Tuesday, Aug. 27, to mark that the Qwuloolt Estuary Restoration Project is officially underway. Dozens of area dignitaries — including state senators Steve Hobbs and Mike Sells, Snohomish County Executive John Lovick and former Marysville Mayor Dennis Kendall — were escorted through the site by Kurt Nelson, environmental division manager for the Tulalip Tribes, who explained that the Tribes partnered with a number of city, state and federal agencies to restore tidal access to approximately 360 acres of historic floodplain. “Since 1994, we’ve had 22 sources of

funds,” said Nelson, who estimated the total project cost will come in at roughly $9 million, and estimated that the channel work and ditch filling that began in 2007 will finally wrap up this year, and that the replanting of native vegetation that began in 2011 would be completed in 2014. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers awarded a contract to the Auburn-based Sealaska for a $3.73 million portion of the project which will be carried out in two phases. Construction began Monday, Aug. 19, on phase one which will carve out a 4,000-foot setback levee to protect Brashler Industrial Park, the Marysville Wastewater Treatment Plant and the surrounding areas’ residents. According to Nelson, next year will kick off phase two which will lower 1,400 feet of the Ebey Slough dike, then SEE ESTUARY, PAGE 19

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

From left, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, Tulalip Tribal Chair Mel Sheldon Jr. and Olton Swanson, deputy district engineer for programs and project management with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, meet at the Qwuloolt Estuary on Aug. 27.

862391

SPORTS: Tomahawks

MARYSVILLE — The first day of school for students started Wednesday, Sept. 4, but Marysville School District faculty and staff have been returning to their schools since at least Thursday, Aug. 29, and many of them began getting ready well before then. At Cedarcrest Middle School on Aug. 29, while paraprofessional staff gathered in the auditorium to discuss such subjects as the legal procedures of harassment, intimidation and bullying reporting, the school’s educators went over both the new Common Core State Standards of Washington and the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) collegereadiness system which has been adopted by 47 states, including Washington. “Common Core focuses on student learning and growth over time,” said Dr. Sheila Gerrish, principal of Cedarcrest Middle School. “If they’re not learning, the question becomes, what do we do to adjust the instruction to meet their


Marysville Globe, September 04, 2013