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Bark for Life raises money for ACS BY LAUREN SALCEDO lsalcedo@arlingtontimes.com

SPORTS: Lady Eagles win District 1 title, head to state. Page 8

SPORTS: Cougars

win big at Bi-Districts. Page 8

ARLINGTON — More than 50 dogs and their twolegged friends gathered at the Haller Middle School Stadium on Saturday, May 18, for Arlington’s first ever Bark for Life fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. “Donations are still coming in but as of now the first annual Bark for Life has raised over $2,300,” said Caryn Brown, one of the event organizers. Forty-nine “civilian dogs” visited the event, which hosted raffles, live music from the band Kaleidescope and Arlington High School senior William Hoover, nail trims for dogs with a suggested donation of $5, canine treats and accessories, demonstrations from several working dogs, pur-

ple nail painting and more. “I would like to give credit to Team Gourdheads — the Cantrell family — who formed a team to walk in support of their grandfather who has passed away recently from cancer. They have raised $1,630 in memory of Ottis Cantrell,” said Brown. “They attended Ottis’ memorial service right after participating in the walk.” Bark for Life is a fundraising event that is part of Arlington’s annual Relay for Life, and began as a way to honor canine caregivers. According to the ACS, canine companions demonstrate unconditional love, joy, security, compassion and no judgments of cancer survivors’ abilities or appearances. SEE BARK, PAGE 2

Lauren Salcedo/Staff Photo

Emerson Clark, 2, leads Roman, 5, at the first Arlington Bark for Life at Haller Stadium on Saturday, May 18.

VCS celebrates past, looks to future BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

INDEX CLASSIFIED ADS 12-15 7 LEGAL NOTICES 4 OPINION 9 OBITUARY 8 SPORTS 11 WORSHIP

Vol. 123, No. 44 Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

The long-running Voices of the Village band, seen here performing at the Medallion Hotel on May 18, is a program that Village Community Services provides to allow adults with disabilities a creative and social outlet.

SMOKEY POINT — Art Hutton still remembers when Village Community Services was just getting started nearly 50 years ago. “It was established in 1964 as Victoria Village,” said Hutton, president of the VCS Board, during the VCS “A Picnic in the Country” gala fundraiser at the Medallion Hotel on Saturday, May 18. “We now own the building where our offices are located, and it’s named the Royal Pacific Building after [longtime VCS Board member] Royal Penewell. I miss Royal a lot.” Even as the members of VCS reflected on the nonprofit organization’s past, they also looked forward

to a future of continuing to provide vocational and residential services to people with disabilities, as they’ve done since they were Victoria Village. “People like to define our folks by their disabilities,” said Hutton, who explained that VCS aims to aid its clients develop the skills to succeed at work, at home and in the community. “We like to define them by their abilities, so they can live the best lives possible. My son has been involved in VCS for a long time, and it’s enriched his life tenfold.” Hutton explained that VCS provides long-term residential support and life skills training to afford their clients safe independence, in addition SEE VCS, PAGE 2

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Arlington Times, May 22, 2013