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World War II and Doolittle: Part I

E

By Daniel Nash Staff Writer

d Saylor is a member of a fast diminishing group. Originally 80 strong, conflict, illness and age have since dwindled their numbers to four. A fifth, Major Thomas C. Griffin, only recently died at the age of 96. At one time, they all agreed the last two survivors would share an aged bottle of bourbon. Now, none of them drink. The bottle will likely be donated to a museum, Saylor recently told a congregation of Enumclaw Rotarians. What’s the historical significance of this particular bottle of Kentucky whiskey? Its owners were the return-

ing airmen of World War II’s Doolittle Tokyo Raid, a retaliatory bombing mission to boost American morale after Pearl Harbor and scatter Japanese forces. In planning, the operation called for a temporary squadron of volunteers to launch modified B-25 bombers — aircraft normally unsuitable for carrier transport — from the USS Hornet 400 miles off the Japanese coast, hit 10 military and industrial targets, and push forward to an airfield in Zhejiang, China for eventual extraction from Chongqing. But in practice, the raiders and their mission were plagued by bad luck. A

See DOoLITTLE, Page 3

The crew of plane No. 15, “TNT.,” from left, pilot Lt. Donald Smith, co-pilot Lt. Griffith Williams, bombardier Lt. Howard Sessler, flight surgeon Lt. Thomas White and flight engineer Sgt. Edward Saylor. Courtesy photo.

King County Council approves land measure

Check out the Emerald Downs special section Page 13

Weather

By Dennis Box

The forecast for today, Wednesday, is mostly cloudy with calm winds, a high of 51 and a low of 42. Thursday will bring a 40 percent chance of rain. The weekend is likely to be rainy, with highs in the mid to upper 50s and lows near 43.

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Daffodil Magic

Daffodil Princess Jessie Gamble, a senior at White River High, enjoys herself at the parade Saturday in Sumner. The rain was heavy at times during the day, but stopped long enough for the float to pass. Photo by Dennis Box

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CENTENNIAL EDITIONS 4th Week of Each Month!

The King County Council voted unanimously April 8, adopting legislation to protect approximately 43,000 acres of forestland near Enumclaw from development. The land, referred to by the county council as the White River Forest, is owned by Hancock Timber Resource Group. The land is located along state Route 410. According to a press release from the county council, “The legislation adopted by the council approves a proposal from County Executive Dow Constantine to authorize $8.1 million in existing funding from the county’s dedicated open space fund known as the Conservation Futures Fund. The Council

last fall approved $3 million from Conservation Futures and from the King County Parks levy toward the total $11.1 million price…. The adopted ordinance ensures that the land would remain in private ownership with the right to harvest timber sustainably.” Councilman Reagan Dunn, who represents the district, stated in the release, “Preserving this land keeps this area a working forest, protects local jobs and guarantees that generations to come will benefit from this purchase. This conservation easement also helps to preserve land that is used by many county residents for a variety of recreational activities.” Members of the Enumclaw

See LAND, Page 3

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Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 17, 2013