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SAGA 1979

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VOL. 49

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Openmg 5.;uurd;Jy �venln8� P.��

GoIdbook LUles IIlum�11!'d people News ind Dorm Report The ClllbhOW"

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�·SAGA 79

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Thirty-one flavors of ice cream

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Finding your own way

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ANTI-NU PR

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Sat u rday •

evenings

past Sights, sounds, emotions tensed; reslless anticipation-it's Saturday Nighll The op­ lions are open for anything. Is it a disco or a quiet evening with friends tonight? Is it an evening at home in fronl of Ihe boob tube? Or is iI to the Midnight Movie at lakewood for a buck? "We could always go to that lecture, or the play." "Hey, what about night skiing at Crystan" "I haven't got Ihe bucks; there's a hypno­ tist down in the CAVE." "What about the concenllt's free with a PlU ID." Decisions, decisions. Whatever you do, before you know it, the weekend is over. Those you saw acting silly Saturday night are all hard-core Monday morning. Incredible.

1. NorwC81�n �ll.Jdents, Beril Bjelcke ,}Ild Ole KjQrref. jord gel )nlO ....meriun Disco. 2. Panid�nls in Ihe �n· nUJI Dog POlich Olympic�.

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WE'R E BAC K! For some it was one year closer to graduation It was the same-moving in boxes, stacks of clothes, bunkbeds, carpels, chairs; cars lined the street, an air of general hysteria was everywhere. Just a week before, the parking lot had been empty; the sidewalk and stairwell silent like the calm before a storm. "This place has potcnlial," a new student had commented while walk­ ing around the grounds. Mainten­ ance was doing whatever mainten­ ance does in preparation for the on­ slaught of students. like a rubber­ band ready to bust, the week went by. It was different -new faces, new feelings; for some it was one year closer to graduation, for others it was the year. Among the new some­ thing was missing. Some old friends were gone -transferred or gradual­ ed. BUl lhings happened so fast. I t was all 100 easy 10 slip into a routine of studies and breaks, of activities and procrastination. All too soon came midterms, Thanksgiving and finals; we were home again and back for Spring. II was the same, only different.

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Alumni top­ off first week

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Cultures explored on ISO day

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LET'S DANCE!

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1. Rilcing wili! Ill(' Cirxk wilh no! J [1linUl� 10 waste, b Ihe ass<.'mbly line of the Sleep­ Pajama FJ("tory.

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2. Behind ,hc curtains, much tim(' and dfort was put inlo the PJj.JmJ wille. Debbie DeGmss and Pc!('( Bennet apply ffi.Jkcup belon' the dress rchcr!w1t, 10 make their faeial iCJtu((S ' vi�iblc to lh(' audiencc, 3. Employcl.'S of the Sleep-lite F.Jc!Ory model Ill(' 1.11('" in pajama fashions. le.lding pl-lycrs Me MJrk Pederson, Pally Ben Pi'tcr�on, KJlen Ch�!Iluerlin, ann Rand Droll­ m�n.

4. lyes twinkle .lnd hcans Ilut1e, in the romanet' between the leold pIJYc-rs. Mark Pederson Jnd P;,Uy Bt�n PetCfson. S. Seven and 3 h�lf Cl'nlS Joesn', buy a helluva IOl;bul for wikinK workcls it's wonh a lough fight.

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PI Game: for $$ and love

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What is fall? With a little research we found out

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graveyard smash The spook� were let out of their cas­ tles, and students let loose from their studies at the third annual "Munster Mash," Costumes ranged from the bi­ zarre twisted Hunchback and the cold Dracula, to Raggedy Ann <md Andy. Apple bobbing, pumpkin carving, mummy wrapping, and costume con­ tests allowed students to forget their inhibitions and join in the fun. Prize!> were awarded for the weir­ dest, scariest, best storybook character, and best futuristic costumes. The award for best all-around costume went to playboy bunnies, Deb Ruehl, lisa Bloch and Suzanne Bloch. The grand prize was a pumpkin carved in the likeness of King Tut. Along with the costume disco, there was a campus-wide scavenger hunt and Pflueger's haunted house. The All Saints Day event co-spon­ sored by ASPlU Special Events Com­ mittee and RHC, was a monstrous suc­ cess with students. 1. "Beauty lies in the eyes 01 th(' behulder," for Wendy Hovland and "date." 2. Grand prize winner�, Deb Ruehl, lisa Bloch and Su�anne Bloch posed to male cheers. 3. Students competed in �n apple bobbing con­ lest. 4. Rdiving childhood days, students carved pumpkins into jack·o-Iantern�. _

MUNSTER MASH

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Tf<fdilionJ ilfe Cilrried on

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Tradition, tradition, tradition! Homecoming 1978 oozed with tra­ dition. What would Songfest and Homecoming be without lauralee Hagen crowning the queen? What would it be without the Non l's, or Jim Funfar and Don Mueller as MC'sl It could just be the 1977 Homecoming festivities warmed over. It wasn't "BIG BIRD" from the li­ brary, as Homecoming King, but the bust from Eastvold-ah, a bigger and better steal. Not only did the Non l's sing, but a new group, the Pioneer Squares, hummed a few bars. Alas, the skits ranged over the years again, each dorm dealing with a time period of PlU's past presi­ dents. Despite this, some interesting themes were created. The overall winner in Homecom­ ing competition, Cascade, combined hs talents with Pflueger in a skit re­ volving around "Billy" Ricke in his younger college days. The winning skit climaxed Songfest. Earlier in the evening Janie Ro­ leder, from Pflueger, was crowned queen. The next day the Lutes beat Pacific 23-0 in the Homecoming game. Spurs again sold "mums" for the game. The weekend was topped by the annual Homecoming ball held at the Washington Plaza Hotel i n Seattle. A capacity crowd of around 850 peo­ ple attended; the dancing to Epicen­ ter ended on the table tops. All in aU, the 1978 Homecoming theme could not have been more appropriate- The Way We Were.

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"Christmas already? Thanksgiving hasn't even arrived yetl" Despite this the Faculty Wives Club sponsored the annual Yule Boutique for the benefit of early Christmas shoppers. Food, gifts, art exhibits and evergreen swags were just a part of the oay's displays. All proceeds were donated to the general university Scholarship Fund for PLU students. "0 Sanctissima," the traditional Latin hymn, floated through the air as the annual Christmas concer! opened in Eastvold Auditorium NQ足 vember 30. Capacity crowds of students, par足 ents, and people from all over the community altended the Christmas Festival Concerts performed by Choir of the West, University Cho足 rale, and the University Symphony Orchestra. Selection) included traditional carols, "Joy to the World, Away in the Manger, Fum, Fum, Fum, and R. Vau g han Williams' Christmas cantata, Hodie.

The host of voices and talents combined in a spectacular ni ght of rejoicing, and sent the au dience home inspired with a message of hope, peace and renewal. The concert was also performed at the Seattle Opera House and the Ponland Civic Auditorium.

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1. These women prep.lred "ebli�kiver for rhe hunt\ry brow�r �r rhe Yule BOUlique. 2. Poncry, pillow� ilOd pOpCOffl billl� were just somc 01 Ihe home­ m.!!je thJng� ,lvililablc 10f" shopp('r�. J. Tenor, Wayne lofckmiln. was a (e�1Ured �oloisl Juring the Choir 01 the WC10t Chd\lm,u pcrformJ:nc�. 4. MClOben 01 the Choir of the WCM in the Chri$tnl;J� concert. S. Concentration,,l p,lIt of Ihc succcuful conccrt. was shown b y rhe University Orchestra.

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Acto rs, s pea ke rs, a n d m usIcia ns

Mark Mclnrireentered the stage while a film clip of Marilyn Monroe singing "Happy Birth· day Dear President" played, in his portrayal of John F. Kennedy September 19 in Eastvold Auditorium. His presentation began at the press confer­ ence that opened Kennedy's campaign and ended with a conference with aides prior to the Dallas parade. The mood of the play changed rapidly. One moment the audience clapped with Mcintire; the next they were in hushed silence as he ponrayed Kennedy lucking his daughter Caro­ line into bed. In Ihe final scene a paradoxical climax was reached as Kennedy comforts his wife over the lelephone. assuring her thai Ihe reported threats on his life from Dallas newspa­ pers are unfounded. Audience response to the solo act was mixed. One viewer remarked that "he could have been the man himself." Some felt his por­ tr.lit of J.F.K. was an economic exploitation of people's emotions toward the assassinated president. Others found the play enjoyable when they avoided a dose comparison of Ken­ nedy and Mcintire's characterization of Ken­ nedy. An evening of Mozart, Beethoven, and Cho­ pin attracted a crowd to hear pianist and pro­ fessor, Richard Farner, in a benefit concert for the lila Moe Scholarship fund. Mrs. Moe, wife of Dr. Richard Moe, dean of the School of Fine Arts, was slain in her home December 1977. Her great interest in the fine arts led to the establishmenl of the scholarship· fund for fine an students. •

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Entertaining and challenging

Stonehill and Norman Tension and energy-that is what gives a rock concert lifc. Could this energy be found in Christian music? On November 9, Randy Stonchill and larry Norman proved that a Christian concert can be more than a gospel message set 10 gospel music. The show was both entertaining and challenging; and Ihe music was defi­ nitely rock and roll. BOlh performers displayed in­ credible stage presence. Randy Stanehill began the concert by play­ ing a number of songs from his We/­ come to Paradise album, and by tell­ ing a few stories. He had an easy go­ ing, friendly style thai immediately gained the suppor! of his audience. Randy ended his sel with a song. called Good News, thaI had the au-

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dicnce screaming for more. With his long hair and tongue·in­ cheek manner, larry Norman took the audience by surprise when he stepped on stage. But before long he captured the audience with his hon­ esty and love for people. It was obvious that he enjoyed be­ ing on stage; and by intermission it was obvious the crowd enjoyed him on stage. When he returned he slowed the pace by talking about his life, his music and his God. larry's final song I Wish We'd All Been Ready, em­ bodied the feelings of the concert. Its intensity left the crowd vulner­ able; and when larry Norman left the stage it could have been knocked over by a feather.

TOWER OF POWER PlU was "bump city" when Tower of Power "funkifized" an estimated 1,500 typically mellow PlU concert gocrs, November 29, in Olson Audi­ torium. Pre-Power excitement was height­ ened by jeers and mock-enthusiasm for onh Wind, the opening band; disc jockeue "Slim" from Q97-FM received the most applause to that poin!, when she arrived to introduce Tower of Power. The audience rose to its feet for Tower's first number, but look its scalS and remained seated for most of the performance. Down 10 the Night Club brought people 10 their feel and the crowd swooned appropriately for You're Still J Young Man.

Tenor saxis!, lenny Pickett slole the stage with his characteristic high-stepping fancy-dancing, and his mirrored lapels reflecting like a disco ball on the ceiling. lead singer Michael Jeffries kept the females of the audience glued to their chairs with his carefully chor­ eographed superstrutting and daring but deliberate microphone twirling. In addition to a cut from their new We Came to Play album, Tower played some of the old favorites­ Squibb Cakes, You Ought to be Ha­ vin' Fun, and You've got to Funki­ fize.

All 750 student tickets were sold before the concert. The limited number of the specially priced tick­ ets was part of the contract negotiat­ ed with Tower, according to Tim Wulf, entertainment committee chairman. Wulf said he felt the special rate was effective in attracting more stu­ dents to the concert than might have attended if there had been on I)" one ratc. -Kathleen Hosfeld

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Music: the ultimate entertainer

It's.tn integral part of Our lives

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From Peking to Lichtenstein

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The Artist Series

Go l dboo k Plalo. Socr,He!> and Jesus Christ; all h..ld fol­ lowers motivated by intellectual curiosity and devotion. Such an assumption may be made if one observed the crowded library midterms and finals weeks. And such moti­ vation most faculty members would like to see from their students. 8uI alas, this motivalion is true only in parI. Not only is there the pressure of exams and the desire to gel II degree, bUI also the desire for a good social life. It is Ihis combination that creates the role of a student-one pursuing higher goals. One's passport through PlU is the Gold­ book; thai evcr elusive, slim document­ never to be found when needed. When it is all filled OUI and the papers are signE"d; whf'n that degree is had and new goals are born, it is easy to look back and see why Plato had his followers, Kanl his devo­ tion to duty, and life ils up!> and downs.

1. l�b in�IfUllOt, Dixit' MdUhlirS. poimL'd 01.11 p;:IrI\ O. th(' hum,," .J..ull 10 ;In,uomy �Iudenl'" 2. Ce,,,min. (.In be " typ.. 01 thef71p� I)('bbi{' Ad,inl� (Onn'nH�I\·d O�1'f " Ilimp 01 day.

Shi rl ey Aikm. Nursing Charles "ndetSon. ChellllsHy

Ed "nd efwn. P.E.

Elnesl "nkrim. £ronorni(S

Gcorge Arbdugh, Philosophy Sluart BJncwil, Bu�inl.."SS Admini�1fation

1. In Chern 11S, studenlS must idenlify unknown metals, liquids, ')nd solids through Y.lrious I�t� such .IS melling poinl5, specific he.lI, and inlured spectrometry. 2. "" nursing �!Udefm mu�t lake the year.lonK "n.ltomy and Physiology dan which iflCludcd a lab. BCf:lcy B.lbington and her lab �nnf!r le.ilrn Ihe bone� of the hUm.ln body wilh the help of a consenli:ltl sk�leton. 3.ln .lny lab, IhecxpcflmenlCf mUSll;lkc dca. ')ntl ("onrire data to insure accurate inlerpret.tion) of thc ('xpcrimcn!.

On experimenrs

Ome n III Deep within the bowels of Ram­ stad slave many science students who are treated weekly with lime consumption itself, a lab. From free­ fall to formaldehyded cats, from chromatography to chemical unk­ nowns, from mitosis (or it that meio­ sis?) 10 Myxomycetes; these periods of following the scientific method are either (a) unmerciful lime gob­ blers (b) long on bungting and short on learning (c) seethe with pitfalls, incomprehension, and long follow­ up reporls (d) typical reward: zero credits (el all of the above and more. Since those answering (el are prob­ ably upper-diss science majors, it may not be 100 laIc to rip the rose­ hued glasses from an unknowing business or music major about to take his first science course. But in the name of science you say, what about those rewarding glimps­ es at the inside of FriTZ the cat, the thrill of using a Metler, or the joy of filtering a collOidal mixture? Doesn't

spending a sunny Friday till 8 O'clock on an Organic lab send thrills of expectation coursing through your veins? Yel, gratification is sometimes at­ tainable. For instance. when a lab ac­ tually works. Or when the lab sheds light on lecture topics. Or when the material has a close relation to ob­ servable phenomena, or known en­ tities. To some, it is enjoyable to watch crystals grow in a pankular manner, dissect the different paris of a flower, or take strobe pictures of a moving puck. Then again, by such are the limits of normalcy defined. Thus, if four hundred dollars are burning a hole in your pocket, and a desire for inflicting self-punishment has consummed oneself, be bold and take a science course. There in Ramstad one can gulp foul fumes, stare at pink precipitates, and be dazzled by ones ineptness. You have been warned ... -Dave Krueger

Thad 8arnow\!, Bu�. Admin. Myr" B.uKhman, [ducatiOIl Willi"m Becvar; Comm. Arts

luther Rekermeier, V.P. of Dev.

Chilrles Bergman. English Kathleen 8lumhagen, Sociology

Esther 8radford, Nur�ing Katherine BriM, SO(iology lamc� Brink, Math

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On discovery

Exploring

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new frontier Fljpper�, snorkles, goggles and oxygen tanks became the life·suppon mech an isms for some twenty students enrolled in Phys· ieal Education 237-Skin and Scuba Diving during Interim. SIUdenl5 taking this course learned about the fundamentals of this aquatic sport through leclUres OInd actual ex­ periences in the swimming pool. Those stu­ dents who p aid a $30.00 fee gOl the NASDS certification and their "ticket" for diving in the rcal waters.

1. Ordal's Karen Bark!;r learns JOOul the oxygen lank underwater. 2. The scuba class prepares to uke an und1.'rwatcf swim. 3. Members of the �ub.J d;m gal her in the deep-cnd for a demonstration.

William 8rochnup, Edue'llion

CI,,;'1 Browning. History

StJnley BlUe, Economics Chairman Omles Brunner. Bu�. Admin. Samuel Carlelon, Languages

Maryiva Carpenter, Nur�ing Clar;) Carper. Nunlng Barb Caller, Nur�n8 Dave Cillvey, Bus. Admin, Gary Cm.se, P.E.

K....n ChriSlophcrson, Religion Dorolhy Cone, Nur�ing Denni� COx, All linda Cox, Education Michael Cuyton, Biology

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On travels

" What's on

Lo n d o n"

In london it doesn't seem to mal­ ter if you are booking it or nOI, for everywhere" you go there is some­ thing to learn. If it isn't the birth­ place of William Slake that you just happen upon when trying to fjnd a camera shop, it is an unusual accent, or someone handing oul "down with the Shah" literature. Such was the experience of seven PlU students who attended the In­ dependent liberal Arts College Abroad (llACA) program during the fall. ILACA is a cooperative between five small private universities in thc Northwest: Willa melle. Whitman. Gonzaga. UPS and PlU. Aliogelher about 50 students par­ ticipated in Ihc program at Ihe Uni­ versity of London. American and British professors were hired by Ihe program. Sam Carlton, from PlU's Classical and Modern language de­ partment, was one of the American professors. Students had the oppor­ tunity to further their cultural exper-

Allison Dahl P.E.

David Dahl, Music Cafrol OeBower, Education

Judd DouShry,

Oil. of �adio and T.V. Scrvites

Emmet Eklund, Religion Don Farmer. Political Science

Richard F,lrner, Mu�lc louiH� Faye, languages Oecky Hedler,

Psychology

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ience by staying with British families. Not only did students study, but they also travelled. With the group it was off to the theatre ten times, and countless other limes on their own. Two weekend holidays were spent together travelling, while most also took off for a week in October. Some hitchhiked to Scotland, others rented a car and went to Wales, and others jaunted over to the continent for the Oktoberfest in Germany. When asked about their England experiences participants just say "Super!" and dream of double­ decker buses. 1. One excursion w�s to the ruiM of Glaston­ bury Abbey, where �tudenu sought the teg­ endary Holy Grail. 2. Hotel Russell dominares Russell Square neal Univelsity of london w here Ihe students st udied. The hotel is noted for its unusual combination of architec­ tural styles.

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william Giddings, Chemistry Bill Gilberrwn, Chemi�lry Gordon Gilbertson, Music

Palricia Gillett, Nursing Stewart Govig, Religion Dave Hansen, Biology

Madi� Hanson, Educ�tion Donald Haudsen, Physics luella Hefty, Nur�ing

Perry Hendrkks, V.P. fOI Fin. and Operalion� john HerlOg, Chairman 01 Natural Sciences John Heussman, Oir. of library

David Hoffman, Music Paul Hoseth, Health/Physical Education Thelma Hostetler, Nursing

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chouse foreman, Florcncio B<lrbadillo, discusses mailers with a coll e ague.

laurence HUC5tis, Chemistry Paul Ingram, Religion lois Jacob>on, Nursing

Roben /('nsen, Economics Don Jer�e. Al;linl) Vice President ior SWdcnt We Rich.ud Jobst, Sociology Ch�irman

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On being human Oespite Ihc Colp� and J:!:owm of convocation, Ih*! !acuhy office identification plaques ilnd an obvious etlul.<llion gap. PlU profs do ICI 'heir hair down. ,., friendly respect C)lIst� between students and professors; many profe�solS pre­ fer to be called by Iheir (j(\1 namcs. 1. During 'ntegrated Stud,elo, professor Curtis Huber wu conducting an experiment. He 111· lowed his students to do "whatever rhcy wanted for 10 minutes... Followin!! Ihe ex­ periment, Huber asked-since th� urge to procrCiite is thc second stronlicsl driVl' in hu· man beings, why weren', they protrc;ning! 1. Philosophy professor Paul Mcnlct hJd his Interim class give a skit .:u rhe Marketplace Fair; Menld played In" part of the US H�ndi· opper General in the SoiI.ire ). English professors Paul Benlon ilnd Rick Jone<> conllersed ill Ihe filII filcully coofNcnce. 4. A filmiliilr sight on campus was religion pro­ fessor, Slewa" Gollig. ilnd his dog Hippy. Bippy would wail paliently f� Dr. Gollig oul­ side of Ihe Hiluge Administrallon Huilding. S. hI Eastern Studies professor, Mordechai Rozanski, taught Chinese Cillisrilphy, Cuisine and Conllersation during Interim, and dis­ played hi1 gourmet skills ill the MarkctplKC hir.

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.

lucille Johnson; English lars Kittleson; Art Calvin Knapp; Mu�ic John lar�gaard; Psychology

Tony laver; BusinC$S Admin. Jerrold Lerum; Biology Dixie Matthi�>; Biology Paul Mcn�cl; Philosophy

Gary Minelli; DireClO1 lor Coun�cling Richard McGinnis; Biology Richard Moe; Dean of Graduate Studies; Dir. of School 01 Fine Arts Gunnull Myrbo; Philowphy

56

011 Or��

Kid stuff

--� .... -.. ... -_.... _t� ... Col

.... -....... ' " ----. ", - -..... """"

...... o.,c-._

....._"" .. ., .

On studies

The final panic

Frank Olson, Edut-alion Linda Olson, Nursing

Coffee, tea or No Doz. Denny's. Ihc Wagon Wheel or the dorm lounge. AII-nighlcrs, latc-nighters or lale­ late-nightcrs. Of such is cramming made. Although cramrning (intensive last-minute studying) is characteris­ tic of mid-terms and finals week, it is a habitual ritual for all student pro­ crastinators. How does the average slUdenl cram? Most students stay up late or all night alone, pouring over notes, study guides and the underlined sections of textbooks. According to one senior, informa­ tion retention is betieT when study­ ing is done before going to sleep. Does cramming really helpl Most students say yes, but the an­ swer is accompanied by a shrug. One slUdent said, "It's the only way I've gotlen as far as I have." Some say thai cramming doesn't help. "I always find that I studied the wrong thing," said one student. Why do it then? "It makes me feci like I tried." -Kathy Hosfeld

Phyllis Page, Nursing 8i1l P').kt'f, Comm_ Am

BC\lerly Payne, langW8CS

1. A dofm IounRc, Ji bbnkel and Ihou-wh�1 oThe. w..y k thcl 10 �lUdyl 2. t"le-ble-niRhlc(l someTimes bt."C')mc Sitek· OUI sn�on�. "

On coaching

Poi n t i n g

Arne PcdN!oOn, Education lohn Petersen, Religion Cdr)' PCI('rson, Math Waller Pilgrim Religion

}arne!> Predmore, languages J�nCI RJ�mu.�cn, LantluJ!)cs enoly" Schuh/, NursinH Q,]Vid Sc�l, English

60

t h e r i g ht d i rect i o n

/

�-

... ---. .......... ....­ _._-

..

On Creativity

Ma rket p lace gat h e r i n g The UC became a marketplace fair when the Interim classes displayed handcrafted wares, class projects and newly-acquired skitls. Classes like Beginning Band, and Dance Technique held performances in the CK, along with the Mayfesl Dancers and Juggling Fools. The Philosophy 324 class performed a skit "The Handicapper General." Bread for the World, the nursing class on Death and Dying and the social welfare class Human Services presented displays on their various

"

topics. Stained glass, chinese cook­ ing. photography and sculptures were exhibited. The fair was 311ended nOI only by swdenls but people from the com­ munity as well. The entire fair was concluded with a bluegrass concert by Tall Pines which had the packed CK stomping and cheering. 1. Wayne Simon 01 W.lyn(' Simon's DixylJod BJod ICI loo�c on the truml>ct for vicwel�. 2. Th�· Claf1� clas� made st,linen glass work$ during Interim which wert! displayed at the Marketplace FJir.

-

.. - " . "

.. _ . ,_ ..... . . -_ ..._ .. _ .. �- ... ..-..--�-.­ - .. ".

,,,"_ ... _ ..

On rerurninlf

Teacher, Grandmother and humanitarian

-10<17"_"

--

-

- -.

--

Marvin Swenson, . Director University Center Rodney Swen�n, Foreign Languages

Kwong·Tin Tang, Physics WAit Tomsic, An

Tom Torrens, Artist in Residcnct" Ann T renuine, Music Paul Ulbricht, Polilic"al Science James Van Beek, DirIX:lOr of Admissions.

George Waller, Anthropology Paul Webster, German Rick \ ....ells, Communica1ion Am Margaret Willis, Sociology

Gary Wilson, CommuniC.lIion Arts Chang.u Yiu, Malh Marilyn Zieralh, Nursing Dwight Zulauf, Business

"

Lutes Il l u st rated The batter slides into home plate, the quarterback bombs past his opponents to score a touchdown, the gunshot stans off a pounding herd of feet on the ,rack; the SOC� cer ball shools past the goalie-and the bleachers are jumping with screams and cheers. For spectators and players alike, the mo­ ment a goal, touchdown or basket wins the game makes all the preceding suspense worthwhile. FOr both the emertainer and the enlerlained a sense of accomplishment and commonality is felt. There are many reasons for running, leap­ ing and kicking; exercise, fresh air and a chance to show off athletic prowess. And those who a!tend events might go 10 cheer on friends, yell to their hearts content, or 10 socialize. Winning is a fringe benefit. Bur win or lose, the way the game is played is what makes it come alive for those in the stands; for those on the team the support provided can bolster morale indefinitely. The player and the spectator need each other,

---'.

. .

-

. ..

.

-----

, ,

.

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1. Energy, Tension, sweaT and a basketball all come TO­ geTher d.li Ric CIJrk makes a pass. The LUTes neJrly made il 10 NatIonals in Kdnsas City, but were defeilled by Cenlla! in The Championship. 2, Swhnmates ilnd com­ pelitorr; hug Jlter a '.lice

U PS a n d PLU d o m e d ow ns TOO BIG TO PLAY AT HOME. SO IT'S BACK TO THE DOME . . . was the slogan used for the 56th renewal of the PlU-UPS crosstown rivalry. For the second consecutive year the game was played in the Kingdome. Although the crowd was down from the previous year, excitement was not. The last time the Lutes had beaten UPS was in 1974 and the time was ripe for a PLU victory. A crowd of 8,329 saw UPS put the first points on the board with a 34 yard field goal. PLU marched back and took a 7-3 lead on a 13 yard pass

..

from Brad Westering to Scott Wes­ lering. UPS put up another field goal be­ fore the first half ended to pull with­ in onc at the half 7-6. Past PlU-UPS games had been of­ fensive show, but this game was a defensive struggle, Momentum shjfted rapidly to UPS early in the second half. The Log gers Brent Wagner took the secon d half kickoff on the two and 16 seconds later UPS went into the lead for good on a 96 yard kickoff return. By the end of the third quarter

both teams added another touch­ down. but in the fourth quarter UPS scored again to defeat PlU 27-14. Coach Westering summed it up by saying, "the big time is where you arc."

1. Tne spacious Kingdome was tnc site ol tne UPS loggen 27-14 win over PlU.

2. Coacn Frosty Westering gathers the offense to plan a new slfatcgy against UPS. 3. There is daylight up the middle lor Run­ ninghack Jeff Cornish, wno is taking tne han­ doff from Brad Westering. 4. Roy Chapman i� helped off the field by trainers Mike Bishop and Ed Anderwn after having his "bell rung."

"

Once is not enough •

Lutes W i n d ist r ict c rown aga i n •

70

The 1978 Pacific Lutheran football season was characterized by the win one, lose one approach. The lutes did win I heir final three games of the season, and for the second year in a row claimed the NAIA Dimici I lille. The lutes kicked off the season by overpowering the Alumni in the an­ nual bailie al Franklin Pierce Stadium 35-16 and then moved up 10 Bel­ lingham 10 trounce Western Wash­ ington University 45-3. Trouble struck against crosstown rivals University of Pugel Sound. The game, hosted by PlU was in the Kingdomc for The second consecu­ tive year. The game slayed dose for the belief pari of three quaners be­ fore UPS pulled away for a 27 -14 vic­ tory. The following week the lutes pulled out a 14-13, squeaker over Whitworth. Whitworlh gambled and lost on a two pain! conversion play wit 2:16 remaining in the game. PlU took to the road for the next two weeks losing to the Linfield Wildcats, who were the number one leam in the nation in the NAIA. Al­ though the lutes held a 17-6 lead in the first half of the defensive strug­ gle, Linfield proved that they were the topped ranked team by scoring 18 points in the second half.

The following week, the team out scored lewis and Clark 31-6, and re­ leased their frustration of the one point loss 10 linfield. The lutes dominated every phase of the game, controlling the ball for 20 of the 30 minutes in the first half. For the game, they ran off 101 plays and gained 592 yards of total offense. Good turned to bad when Willa­ melle entered Frank[in Pierce Stadi· um'on October 21. Willamelle was in last place in the orthwest Con­ ference with a 0-5 record. Coach Frosty Westering summed it up, "In my seven years at PlU there was only one other game in which we were dominated so badly.", PlU was able to generate just 16 yards rushing, and 164 in total offense, 225 below its season average in a 23-6 loss. Having lost the chance to win the NOrlhwest Conference Title, the lutes beat the Pacific Boxers on Homecoming 23·0, and then came back the next week to beat Eastern Oregon 37-7. The lutes final game of the season was played in pouring rain and on a muddy field. It took two trick plays and quarterback Brad Westcring to catch a touchdown pass for the lutes to get by Eastern Washington Un i-

versity and lay claim to the District crown. When the awards were given out PlU was around to grab their share. Five lutes claimed dual honors being named to the first team All-District squad as well as The Nonhwest Con­ ference team. Honors were given to senior linebacker John Zambedin; two junior defensive ends Roy Chapman and Steve Kienbergaer; senior cornerback Brian Anderson and sophomore tight end SCali Wes­ tering, who hauled in 39 passes and scored five touchdowns. Junior quarterback, Brad Westering earned first team recognition a1 the district level and honorable mention in the Conference. Westering passed for 960 yards and len touchdowns, while throwing 214 times for a PlU record. Westering also lied the PlU career interception record of 39. 1. The defensive unil lakes a resl JI �U'lime while li�lening 10 Defensive COOldinalol'\, Paui lloselh and Ken n�jole. 2. Hurdting over Cen((�r John Xhultl is Run· ningbKk Mike Weslmiller againsl lh{' AlunlOi. ) ScOIl Wesledng jumps high In Ihe air 10 grab a Brad Westering pilSS.

.

Little AI/-America For Ine fir�1 time in 13 YCilf5, Pilcifi( luth­ University tayed claim 10 lin A .. �ocialcd Ple�\ first Ic,un Little AII-AmNi(i1 loCltbdli player. Senior middle Ilrll�b�df.:1 John Zam­ berlin aTtracted �(OUI� from 1) National FooI­ b.ill LedgU!! rlub� 10 the PLU campus. The Liltle AH-�rn(!/icJ de�igndlion covered alhlcl('� from NCAA division I-A", 11, and III, plU5 NAtA Division t �nd II st:hoob. lambe/lin wa� rhe only lirst redm AP sdection from rhe Northwest. A 6-2, 2JS pound product oi Wit.on High SdwoJ, he li.,1 cauKhr the JHcnlion of pro S<OUli as a Junitlr. Among his feats, bmberlin inlerceprcd 11 paS51.'� from hi� miJdfo,lo line­ bdckcr p051. With 4.8 speed in till' 40 yard dash amJ 440 pound hoi.ting p(')wcr olf the bench pre,s, Zamberlin was in on 96 tackles a� J �cnior. ahhough he played in only �i� tull gJme� 1;(>­ (;au�e of ,In abd(>miT)JI muscle injury. Oden�iye (ooruinamr PilUl Ho�eth. (alJ� Zamberlin "probably rhc finest athlere I'H' worked wirh on rhe d('f(,!n�iyc side 01 rhe game." ('r.m

John Zamberlin

71

71

Score ca r d PLU PLU PLU PLU PLU PLU PLU PLU PL U

45 14 14

17 31 8 23 37 13

Western UPS Whitworth Linfield Lewis & Clark Willamette Pacific E. Oregon E. Washington

3 27 13 18 6 23 o

7 6

Season: 6 wins 3 losses

1. Some membcr$ of the defensive unit give Todd

Spencer a pat on th c backaiter recovering � fumble. 2. The lutes get ready to t�ke on the Alumni. 3. MarkAccimus find� thill being a Runningback isn't all that iI'� cracked up to be. 4. ThinllS get hectic inside as the ball pops aWJY flom the lutes.

The 1978 PlU Football Team: NAJA District I Champions. First Row: B.l1I Boy-Chris lucky, Todd Spencer, Randy Ayers, Mike Catron, BIliln Anderson, HowJrd Kreps, John Zamberlin, Mark Acd· mus, Steve Douceue, Tom Ale�ander, Scott Gervais, MgI. Eric Wal­ bolt. Second Row: Scali Ray, Guy Ellison, Mike West miller, Eric Carlson, Brad Westering, Jeff Bacr, Jeff Cornish, Tom Wahl, John Bley, tohn SchullZ, Cory McCulloch, Scoll Weuering. Third Row: tohn Wallace, Eric Monson, Steve Schindele, Steve Kienbt.'rger, Seo\! McKay, Rri�n Troost, Mike Durrett. Roy Chapman, Phil Earley, Steve Broeker, Steve Kirk, Rocky Ruddy, SCO\{ Davis, Steve Pinning. fourth

Row: Joe Bass, Paul Berghuis, Neal OliO, Bob Dolhanyk, Jim Erickson, Keith Wiemerslage, B3lry Spomer, Dan McCracken, Matt Solum, Greg Rohr, Mike Peterson. Fillh Row: larry Knudson, Tim Cole, Phil Jerde, Matt Daniels, Ralph Andreson, Gordy lindstrom, Jeff Walton, Jeff Brus, Mark lester, Dennis McDonough, Stev<! lynch, Jeff Roy, Jay Halle. Si�th Row: Jim Dolhanyk, Mark Bartel�n, Chris Fritsch, Garth Warren, Kris Morris, Chris Milier, Coach Mike Dunbar, C(),leh Ken .Flajole, Coach Paul Hoseth, Coach Don Long, Coach frosty Weiler­ ing.

7J

I n t ra m u ra l S ports: N ot for t h e lette r Who are those sportive creatures playing in those rain soaked fields and excellent Olson facilities? They aren't always members of varsity teams sharpening their athletic skills, but they are regular PLU students engaged in their own small war-the Intramural Sports Program. Organize d and sponsored by the School of Physical Education, the program is divided into fourteen dis­ tricts: the twelve dorms plus facuhy and off-campus. Each district fields participants in each activity and is re­ presented on the Intramural Sports Council. Fall Intramural activities included:

Flag Football, Turkey Trol, and Vol­ leyball. Kreidler, coached by Roy Chapman captured the women women's league title. Captains Dave Lashua and John Vaswig, led Speed to Burn (Rainier) to win Men's A. Ev­ ergreen captained By Blane Berry took Men's B. Victorously trotting, Cisca Wery and Paul Dong won the Turkey Trot division. At the volleyball end, Jodi Simmons' Awesome Angels won Women's A while Wendi Christen­ sen's Pflueger I captured Women's B. Bruce Johnson's Evergreen won in "six and over" and Aaron Couch's Cascade won in "six and under."

Guys and Dolls captained by Mar­ shall Pihl, won the coed league title. During Interim, Intramurals spon­ sored a three on three basketball tournament. "Bessette's Team" coached by AI Bessette won this tournament. Spring Intramural activities includ­ ed men's and women's basketball, men's and women's soccer, and men's and women's softball. Tourna­ ments in racquetball, squash, bad­ minton, mixed doubles tennis, swimming, and track and field were also held.

1. Intramural girls from C.1iSude huddle their enthusiasm. 2. Todd Spencer shoots for Alpine. 1. 1nHamuni Coordinator for footblll, lau,cl Batungbacal kept time at the games. 4. CaK,1de lakes on Rainier .u Fou Field, in their first loss of the scason.

)

75

Alone

4th Univ. of Ponland Inv. 6th Simon Fraser Inv. 5th Western Wash. Inv. 4th PlU Inv. 3rd Northwest Cont. Meet 6th NAJA Disi. I Meet

"

the crowd

With pain and pleasure Althou g h hampered by injuries for most of the season, the men's cross coumf Y team ran well enough 10 place third in the Northwest Confer· eoce meet hosted by PlU. led early in the season by 'unior Steve Kaslama, PlU fi nished ounh in the nine Icam field at the Univer­ sity of Ponland Invitalional. Kastama finished 10th in the 88 man field. As the season continued, junior Mick Ziegler, picked up the pace and finisned 15th at the Western Washington Invitational to help PlU finish in fifth. PlU staged their own Invitational but did not fare well, finishing fourth in the five team field. Good perfor­ mances were turned in during the season by senior Howie Carlson, ju­ nior Kai BOllomley, sophomore Rusty Crim, and freshman Randy Yoakum. Coach Jon Thieman's runners took sixth at the NAIA District I meet at Walla Walla, to end the season.

I

Women try harder­ are number 2 in smaller schools Improving over last year, the women's cross country team fin­ ished in the top len at Regionals and had many first, second and third place finishes at InvitationaJs. Big meets were pressure meets, especiaJ l y RegionaJs. Heather Schiltz, out for two weeks with a back injury, bauled a Viking runner throughout the race to keep PlU ahead of Western Washington in scoring. Not all individual goals were mel, but team members ran at a consis­ lent level. lack of bunching or grou p ing was the season's biggesl problem. I t was overcome, however, as PlU took firSlS near the end of the season at a home meet and al the Central Washington Invitational. Diane Johnson, the number one runner, was mentally tough when it counted at the PlU Invitational. Dur­ in g the second mile she developed a side ache that gave her two alterna­ tives-either quit or tough it out, as she did. PlU will lose three seniors; num­ bers 2 and 3 runners, Beth and Bon­ nie Coughlin, and number 6 runner Kathy Groal. 1. lute runners Mick Ziegler, Steve Kastama, Rusty Crim, and Mike Haglund stay together in a race at ft. Steilicoom. 2. One of the Coughlin twin� keep� pace in a home meet. J. Runners p.lS5cd Wathop Lake in thc PLU Invi­ tational held near ft. Steilicoom Community College. 4. 1\ lady lute kept abreast in the hom(> ltrctch.

77

Soccer Team B l ues A tie initialed the soccer season and was followed by a 10lal of sevcn wins and another tic. The soccer pro­ gram, which is a club sport and is still building every year, showed momcryls of exceptional play. The lutes won their own six-team invitational, and beat Oregon State 1-0. Although the soccer team did display the capability to play with anyone, major lapses did occur. The Uni­ versity of Washington proved to be a formidable oppo­ nent as they trounced the lutes badly 12-0. At one point the lutes losl five games in a row and were only able to score two goals in that span. During that time PlU found the going rough as they came up on the losing end against Seattle Pacifk 7-0. The victory draught was broken with a 3-1 win over Western Washington University. That win helped the lutes regain their confidence and finished the season 7-11-3.

Putting in solid performances every week were sen­ iors Terry Fletcher and Steve Rychard, along with ju­ nior Karl Granlund. Coach Dave Asher said it was a productive and build­ ing season. The lutes finished with a '-7-1 record in the Northwest Collegiate Soccer Conference. A major plight of the team is financial support and recognition as a team spor!. Until this can be changed the opportunity for a substantial soc<;er learn will be lacking.

78

PLU 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 PlU 1 PLU 1 PLU 0 PLU PLU PLU PLU PLU PLU

PLU J PLU 1

PLU 1 PlU 2 PlU 1 PlU 1 PlU , PLU 1 PlU 1

los Angeles s..plisl WhitlNn l�wis and Clark Whitman Eut�rn Oregon Momana University of WashinHtOo Seattle

Pugct Sound Seallie Pacific Western Wuhington Oregon 51. Univer)ity of Oregon Whi!lNn Willaimene lewis ilnd Clark Western WilShington Portliloo University Puget Sound

J

• • 2 • , 12

5

J

7 1 • , 1 1

• , 1

5

,. Shielding the billJ with iI thigh trap, Ilo �enior T�rry flt:tch�r. 2. Center-Hillfback Halold Kuu conlfoh the bilil .gain�1 Whi!m�n. 1. Captain Dave Wt!5tberg, iljjils " SellY legs" plepares fOI iI heildel. <4. Sophomore Joel ToUcison ple�res for takeoff 10 insure contact with the hall. S. Colliding for the ball is TellY fletcher.

"

Wrestling: First Row: Greg Julin, Paul Giovannini, Kevin Traff, Hoby Shelton, Dave H�nSQn, Mike Crispe, Karl Dunllip. Second Row; Coach Don Hen�·

ley. M�rk Stafford, John Dunlap, Tom Wahl, Keith Wiemerslase, Greg Rohr, Tim Judkins, Assim.m Coach Dave Dahl.

Mat m e n p i n to win

,",

For the second !itraight year PlU took second place at the Nort hwest Confer­ ence Wrestling Tournament, but emerged with eight wrestlers with win­ ning records, and two as individual cham­ pions. Dan Hensley's rnatmen finished with 65 points, trailing Pacific who came up with 103·0/. points and its eleventh consecutive title. Paul Giovannini went undefeated with a 22-0-1 record to take the 134 pound title. The Puyallup sophomore, was runnerup in 1976 but took the title match 5-1. Ju­ nior Tim Judkins, took the 190 pound title with a 6-5 decision over two-time de­ fending champion Mike Wilsey of Pacific. Three lute sophomores, Kevin TraU, 142, Tom Wahl, 177 and Dan McCracken, heavyweight, bettered their last year fin­ ishes to be respectable runnerups. PlU's only defending champion, Karl Dunlap, placed third in the 156 pound class but was p lagued by a shoulder injury throu g hout t he season. Wh il e wrestlers Giovannini, Wahl, and Judkins were victims at the NAIA National Wrestling Tournament in Wheeling, West Vir g inia, Coach Hensley was q uite pleased with the improvement all th e wrestlers had made during the course of the sea­ son. 1. Kevin Traff' armlock� his opponent. 2. Going for (he winning pin is M<Jrk S(<Jfford. 3. Plollinll (he lutes stritegy Is Coach Don Hcn�ey �nd malman Tom Wahl. 4. PUling aU his efforl inlO turning over his opponem for the pin is Paul Giovannini.

61

T h e wet o nes

S u lta n s of sw i m swi ng sou t h The "Parkland Seven" will tell you numbers have advanlagf Winning individual events, but losing team-wise was the story th rippled through the season. PlU ha d wins against lewis and Cia and WSU, a second at the lewis and Clark Relay s, and a third conference. losses were to the University of Ida h o, Central, UP and WiUamette. The coaching reins were intially in the hands of Pete Kennel of Georgia, but were then shifted in January to Jim Johnson Montana. This year's swimmers included four All Americans, sel iers Wayne laVassar, Bruce Templin, Bruce Wakefield and Juni, Dave Krueger; Conference top six finishers, senior Greg Peirso and sop homores Rick Manson and Drew Nelson. Gettmg their shaved bodies to NAIA nationals in Huntsvill Alabama saw over a half day of airport layovers and motels lackir everything but cockroaches. Yet the PlU fleet, led by Wakefielc 4th and 9th in the 100 and 200 backs, ca ptured 15th place natior ally. The three relays, 600 freestyle (13t h ); 400 medley (20th) ar 400 freestyle, were stron g points. According to Johnson, "01 relay times were incredible drops." Individually, Krueger (100,200 fly); laVassar (50 free); Nels{ (400lM); Templin (100,200 free) and Wakefield (200 1M) all plaCE in the top 30. With full intentions of rebuilding, Johnson is enthusiastic abo cominยง seasons. "We re looking foreward to getting more people involvel -not onl y freshmen but current enrollees. We need to recrt harder in h opes of getting our conference championship back

"

1. Swimmers Veronica Baldwin and Dave

Krueger count laps at the Conference Cham­ pionship. 2. Jim "The Clock-Never-lies" Johnson took on the swim coaching po$ition in January.

,'s Swimming: First Row: Greg Pierson, Rick Mattson, Dave Kru�ger. Second Row: Bruce Wakefield m Co-Cilptain), Bruce Templin (Team Co-Captain), W�yne LaVas5;lr, Drew Nelson.

"

Who a re t h e best? Add chlorinated water t o some 2S well-trained bodies, throw in innu­ merable league championships, with a tradition of top len national fin­ ishes and what do you get? The highest nationally ranked sport at PlU- men's

and

women's

swim­

ming. Behind each year's fleet of AII­ Americans lies one trait- dedication. As most red-eyed, bleach-haired fish will lell you, swimming means at least four hours a day of suspension in an eerie blue-white world. It means sawing through water at early hours when other athletes are blissfully sawing wood. It means working 10 near exhaustion day in day out, September through March, Christmas vacation included. I t means between one and two million t. Encouf.lging her ICOImmOile and keeping track of her laps j� Sue Everhilrl. 2. In competition ilt lhe NOrlhwest Conference in Portlilnd, lynn Peters swims free-style.

Women's Swim Team: First �ow: Lynn Peters, S ue Everhart. Second Row: VelOnica Baldwin, Chlis Cassell, Beth Neufeld, Tami Bennet!.

..

strokes a season before that goal is reached-Nationals. Training for swimming is difficult because the individual is so isolated. Other shapes glide by one's narrow vision like distant islands in a stream. It is inhale, stroke, exhale stroke, in­ hale . . . 14 strokes flip-turn . . 16 laps, 10 second rest, 12 laps, 20 sec­ onds rest, 32 laps. It is not enough to finish the thou­ sands of daily yards; one must pit himself against the impassive clock. Breaths become gasps, muscles lead­ en excuses for propulsion. Time bar­ ely proceeds as thoughts jumbIe . . . inhale, stroke, flip, rest, inhale . . . .

-David Krueger

Q u a l ity Swi m m i n g It w�s quality, not qwnlily u PLLJ sent 10(11 swimmers to N�tiOOOlls in Reno, Ncvalb. In )lNrs p.m, there has been both quality and quanrily in the lute lank. For lhi�and upcoming seasons it wiU be � rebuilding program to reemil num­ bers. Dr. David Kennedy slanw out the swimmers In October ilnd was joined mid�lrcam by Jim Johnson. Johnwn look over the cOiChlng p�t and guld. ed Tami Hcnn('!II, lenny Millo, SUI" Evcrh;,trl .lnd Beth Newfetd to N.lItion­ .1\. SenIor Tami Senne!! bellcrcd Ihe Nation.! QlUhfying Times in the 100 meter free-style and 50, 100 and 200 meter bUlIerll),. She now holm lhe � Individu.i' fmish of .ny l� lute at the NC\V5A Regionals held in Eugene. Ore. AI Ihc NeWS" Benneu swam 10 a lrd place 'in�h in the 100 mCIlU buncrlly. �nny Millo, a freshman, benered Niltion<lt Qualifying Times in 1M; 100 indillidlkll medly, .lind Ihe SO and 100 meier brcaSISlrolr.c. Sophomore [lIerh.m and freshmen Ncwfeld compelCd in IWO rctolys a l Nol· liOOdI�. AnOlhel brighr SpOI during the S('.ll­ son wu lynn PCil!IS. Peters won Ihe championship in rhe 200 breasmloke 411 Ihe Northwest Inllilalional Confer· ence fOf" Women.

"

rim�, energy d<ly in,

cUr 01,11 '-"'1

C rew d oes it

1. Dianna Koneman and fellow clew mem­ bers carefully lift thei, boat from Green lake in Se.l1Ile. 2. Crew members leave all their worries behind, and enjoy the peace­ ful Willers. ). The l�dy lutes wrap up the fall season al the Frosbile Regattd. The dreary cold S�turday morning was indeed "frosbile" we.uher. 4. Men'� crew practic­ ing al American lakl' near Fon Lewl�.

"

" I t was good vol l ey ba l l a l l t h e way" The lutes most successful volley­ ball team ended their season with a 23-15 season record. Debuting in a new seven member league they were number one in the league, and advanced to the Northwest College W o m e n s ' S p o r t s A s s ocia t i o n (NCESA) B Small College Volleyball Tournament. The spikers battled league learns of Eastern, Central, Western Wash­ ington, Boise State, Easlern Oregon Siale, and Seattle University. Easily qualifyi n g for the NCWSA !Ournament hel d in Spokane, the team p laced sixth out o f eight teams. Sa d bumps and hits caused the learn trouble early on; they were de­ feated by Whitworth in the first round of play. The Lutes were then handed two more defeats by South­ ern Oregon and Or egon College of Education. They �irn lly did not play up to their potentia . Sixth place wa� �ecurcd by victo­ ries over orthern Montana and Ida­ ho. To Coach Kathy Hernion the lutes played their "best ever," during the season; said Hernion, "though the team peaked two weeks before the tournament in Spokane, it was good volleyball competition all the way."

r.

1. In high flying action, S.lIIdy Krebs leaps for a spike. 2. Positive reinforcement i� provided by Kathy Hernion, volleyball coach. 3. PUlling forrh grC'at effort, Teddy Breeze volleys the ball. 4. KAthy Wales retu/O� the ball whh a bump. S. With concentration and �tyle, Pal Shehon mak(!s a rewin.

Front Row: Teddy Breeze, While, Jince. lange; Back Sandy Kteb�, Pall Shehan, Wales, Becky 8aum"n, Robin Julie Goodwin.

Vied Row: Kathy Koch,

"

Aircheson, homi nebcMkOfn, lori N\.lIbrown. lulie Groh,lynlb Rich Front Row' Devon Hill, N .mcy . B�rn�rd, Middle Kow: Boirbara Youngquisl, Eileen Schipper, Pal Weslfall, Kalhy heil, Kilhy P�.-.r­ son, Chm r.venson, Sh.-.nnon Kobinson, linda [rickson. Bad Row: linda D.-.UKS. Heidi Olson, Sigrid Olsl'n, tylm Pcle'�, te-.lic Price, Paula Slor.-..-.sli, Jcn('.-.ne M('icr. Marjorie Anderson, cNch Olliet.'!'

F un p lenty­ goa ls not so many II was a frustrating season for Coach Sara Officer and the field hockey team. Expected t o be one of PlU's lOp teams, they fielded two complete learns who campaigned as PlU I and PlU II. The latent and experience wt!rc available, but the lack of scoring did the learn in. Moving the ball down­ field was no problem as shown by veterans linda Rich, Lori Nutbrown, Jeneane Meyer, Julie Groh and leslie Price. The problem throughout the competition was pUlling the ball in the opponents goal cage. Senior Cris Evenson provided the balance of the scoring power of the lutes during the regular season. but Nutbrown and Meyer cut loose in Regionals against Northwest Nazer­ ine winning 5-1. Although defeated in each of their 3 meetings with the University of Oregon, the lutes im­ proved with every game. The U of 0 had twelve recruited players on their roster. The best game undoubtly was at Regionals against Nonhwest Nazer­ ine in freezing weather. Officer said, "This game was excel­ lent. We always had the ability but weren't sure of it. We gOI through the frustrations-needed time 10 ge1. It was it learning and growing season." 1 . l n ,) home &lme, Sh�nnon Robin�on �ipped by it Weslem defender. 2. Goatie Tilml Fiebldcorn itnd L�lte Price! mm up wilh it (enl,,)1 ploiyc'. 1. Lind. Ditugs ch;lItged 10 litkc Ihe b.J1I.

"

Uncertai n ly WH the word th"! rmrked the be· ginning of the renon for PlU's �ki tNrn cmched by jon Thieman. The: ski team raced on nl.lny unfa­

miliar courses. In a seven 5<:1'1001 compet itiOn on Whistler M ount ain, Be, the men's learn look third, the women's tcam, seventh. Biorn Malsom placed Se(;­ Olld in ClOiS count,y while Ole Kjorleftord look seventh in cro� counl,y. AI the UPS sponsored race J,anu.uy 12-14 on Crys,.,! Mountain, Ine men's and women's le.llrn each placed fourth in a six learn compelilion. The three day Schweitzer Basin, lanuouy 19-21, uw the strongesl individual performance in Ihe history 01 the lute program. Ole Fjorrefjofg cap­ tured Ihc slalom, giant slalom ,tnd Sidmeistcr Award. The lute men finished wcond while the women took third. A. the Crystal Mountain Invitational February 9' 1 , the men t ied for second wilh Washington Sme. The women's teams were five points off the pace set by University of British Columbia. Bjorn Mel­ som, D�ve Susong and Dana Manens place 151, 2nd, �nd 4th cross country. Ingrid lotu.nnessen claimed 1St In the women's crO$s country. linda Davenport was second In the giant slalom, while eisea We/y was funne/up in the sl<llom. At thc Univcrsity of Wash ington meet held at Hyak on Febfuary 16-18, the men look second and the women third. PLU pliiced third in the Northern Division stand­ ings. This qUiilified them for the Nonhwest Colle­ giate Ski Conference ChampiOnship. There the men placed 7th while the womell placed 6\h. Top cross COUlltr y finishers were 8jotn Mehom, eighth, and Ingrid Johannessen, lenth. linda Davenport took 61h in Ihe women's slAlom, she also took 11th In the slalom.

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93

H oops Played on bright shiney floors or cement backyard courts What happens when you mix a round ball with an apple crate? The result is basketball or, commonly called today, hoop. Strangely enough when first played in the 1800's hoo p used crates as baskets and a ball that was barely round. Basketball is played in every way, shape or form. It is played in the most luxurious places, with all the extras - glass backboards with super thin nets attached, and bright shiney hardwood floors. Or the same game can be seen at the nej � hborhood playground, complete wIth cement court and clanky chain nets. But it's not where you play but how you play, that counts. What draws so many different people to this sport? It has been called a game for big people, yet short people play . Although height seems 10 be ao ad ­ vantage of the game, il really doesn't matter how the ball gets through the hoop as long as it gets there. You can slam-dunk it if you are tall enough and draw oohs and aahs from the p eop le watching. Or if you can't get Insi d e, for fear of having the ball rammed down your throat by one of those 'big people,' you can play hot­ shot and pump it in from never-nev­ er land. Employed in this crazy little game are some terms nearl y everyone is familiar with. Althoug h words have significant meaning to the hoop p rayer, they are easily misconstrued by those w h o could care less. Myself included. The term man-Io-man defense will probably be changed to person­ to-person defense, so as not to be seXISt. After all women do play bas­ ketball. Don't they? The word 'key' used in conventional basketball lan­ guage to mean that square where one can wander for the long period of three seconds-in Frosty's terms would mean an important idea or concept-a key idea. Hoop is an all purpose sport com­ binin g endurance with qUickness, spee d and touch. The reason most people play though, is for the chal­ l enge of seeing the ball drop throu g h the rim and two points score d. It doesn't matter who you are, or how big, small, fat or skinny you may be; anyone can play, because hoops is everyones sport. -Wayne Anthony

95

It was almost to Ka nsas City "This was by far (he besl PlU team, our record was a shade betler in 1977-76, but we had a tou g her schedule." These were the feelings of head basketball coach Ed Ander­ son, after the lutes had lost the Dis­ trict I title to Central Washington 7553. With that loss the team also losl the chance to go to the national tournament in Kansas City, for the first time since 1964. The season started off with a one point overtime loss to St. Marlins 8483. Still unsure of themselves the lutes took a 2-3 record to Cheney, Washington and the Christmas Clas­ sic Basketball tournament hosted by Eastern Washington University. The Classic proved to be a major turning point as they won the tournament. At the tournamem they defeated a stron g California Baptist team 87-82, after being down by as much as ten points in the second half. The lutes met Eastern i n the final game, and handled them with ease 73-58. Se­ lected to the All-Tournament Team were guard Ric Clark, and forward Dave lashua. After Christmas break attention was focused on Northwest Confer­ ence play. PlU took 10 the road to pla y Willamette, and the Linfield Wildcats, who shared the 1978 Northwest Conference with the lutes. led by Dave lashua's 32 points and 23 rebounds for both games,

Men', Basketball: from Row: ....sst. Coach Roger Iyerson, John Gordon, Don Tugglc, Steve KinKmil, Mike Meyer, Ric C�rk, Sley!;! ....nderson, Dan ....Ucn, COilch Ed ....nderson. B.d Row: SI!;!ve

"

PlU beat the two schools by identi­ cal scores of 73-58. The next four games were in th@ friendly confines of Olson Audito­ rium. Even though the lutes had the crowd on their side the scoreboard was not, as thy lost three of four games. They first fell victim to the University of Hawaii, an NCAA Divi­ sion IA school 69-67. The entire game was close, but the lutes' hopes were shattered as Mike Meyer missed a shot at the buzzer which would have tied the game. The next game was one of the most disap­ pointing for the lutes. lewis and Clark's 20 point 65-45, victory not only snapped the lutes' 14 game Northwest Conference home court win streak, but also held PlU to its lowest point output in 21 years. lashua, made his presence known once again against lillfieid. He threw in 22 p oints and grabbed off 24 re­ bounds as PlU defeated the Wildcats 77-65.

Central Washington picked up ilS second win of the season over PlU, 53-47. Then the lutes went down to Oregon the following week to avenge an earlier loss to lewis and Clark 78-67, but lost to Pacific 66-59 the following night. Coach Ander­ son said, "We're a model of inconsis­ tency." After the Pacific loss, the lutes went on a binge, winning their next

HoIt8ecrl�, Dave Lashua, Craig Mutter, BU1Ch Williilms, Tim Thomsen, SIeve Wiley, Dayc Law­ son, Cr!;!g8 louroyich.

eight games. During this period bench depth p roved to be a real as­ set. Guard Don Tuggle, forwards Steve Holt geens and Gre� lovrovich provided clutch play. AgalOst Pacific, the lutes forgot their previous loss, as Butch Williams scored a career high 25 points and added 1 5 re­ bounds in a 105-72 lute victory. Coach Anderson said that "it was the best performance of his career." II was a different player that pro­ vided the spark in each game. lovro­ vkh had his season high of 17 points against Alaska-Fairbanks in a four point 83-79 win. lashua, had his sea­ son high of 17 points against Eastern, and a 73-67 lute win. "The bench has been extremely productive," said Anderson. The lutes ended their homcstand with a 80-51 trouncing of Whitman. On the road PlU played its final two Northwest Conference games beat­ ing Whitman 76-63 and- Whitworth 58-57. In the process of winning those two games they won the Northwest Conference title outright for the first time since 1974. The final games of the regular sea­ son were played at home. Turnovers, a total of 29, were the demise of the lutes against Western as they lost 6452. They came back to defeat SI. Marlin's 73-62 and finished third in the District. PlU's first game in the district playoffs was against Easlern in Me­ morial Gym. A hig h school basketball tournament had been previously scheduled in Olson Auditorium. After being behind by two at the half. the lutes put together one of their better second halfs to defeat Eastern 72-56. It was down to St. Martin's for round two of the play­ offs as PlU struggled to a five point 73-56 win. It was then on to Central Washing­ ton for the District crown, and the chance to go to the NAtA National tournament in Kansas City. The lutCi. hung close for most of the first half. Then a ten minute lapse where nothing seemed to go right took away any hope of a trip to Kansas City. I! was the first time since 1971 that PlU had reached the runnerup spot in the District. The Conference re­ cord was 10-2 and the overall season record was 19-9. Tabbed for all-star honors were Dave lashua, named to both the NAIA District I and Northwest Con­ ference teams; guard Ric Clark, named to the All-Conference team; senior center Tim Thomsen, on the NWC second team, while senior Don Tuggle earned honorable men­ tion recognition.

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Dete r m i na t i o n p l u sThe beginning of the season was slow as the lady hoopsters dropped their first ten games. Then they won the next four contests, building con­ fidence in the young team. Prior to the University of Alaska/Fairbanks games the won/loss record was 6-11 and they were coming on strong. North to Alaska was fatal. The team 10s1 all their games and picked up a few injuries. Height and quick­ ness hurt the Lutes in these games. The best games were in January and February. The nine member team batlled big schools such as the University of Washington and Seattle Pacific, where height was again a factor. Against lewis and Clark, Uni­ versity of Puget Sound, George Fox and Willamette the Lutes were awe­ some. Shooting confidence was building as almost everyone was scoring in every game. Sophomore Pat Shehon lead the lutes in scoring. The 5'10" center, the tallest member of the team, grabbed some key rebounds. Freshmen Sandy Krebs was hot on the steals, gelling six in the George Fox Game. Rosemary Mueller and Nancy Ellertson provided additional power in rebounding. The determined, improving, hard working, and freshmen based team earned a sixth seeding in the AIAW Region 9 Qualifying Tournament. 1. Freshman Kim Ross looks for In opening, u she dribbles p.nl her UPS opponcnlS. 2. Usually lacking heighlh, PLU Ildies hId 10 put fonh more effort. 3. Hometowne, (rom 8allie Ground, WA Nancy Ellenwn, looks for a decent shol. 4. Fr�hman Sandy Krebs lakes a shot while being guarded by a n Oregonian.

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Peop l e n ews a n d d o r m report College life . . . it's more than just study­ ing. II'S an adventure. It's a pleasant suspen­ sion between high school adolescence with its acne and awkwardness; and the workin g world, when you're on y our own-for goo d. What are students li k e? There are musi­ cians with bulky brown envelopes; jocks in flashy yellow sweatshirts; then there afe li­ brary inmates confined in . "carrel-cells," ghames roomics engaged in the pool-hall ustle, and Cave regulars indulgin g in bagels and cream cheese. Each student h as his Of her own way in surviving this transitory Slale. Student life is an experience. II is a chance to leave home slowly, a 1351 opportunity to enjoy Christmas and summer breaks. It's h av­ ing every thing within an arms reach (or a shorf wa lk); and it's a chance to make some very close-perhaps lifelong -friends. That is why many get sentimental a1 the thought of graduation. Says a button worn by one student, "Is there Ijfe after college?" Maybe.

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BETTY i\i\R VIK SRIM-l i\SERN[THY [VEL YN i\aER NETI·IY Mi\RGi\RET MERNETHY 'i\N MRi\Hi\MSON HlZi\BETH i\Oi\MS 'i\NET i\IU Ii\N MBIN Ki\Rt Al8RECIH SI·tARON ALCANTARA ELIZABETH AllEN SUSAN ALLEN KIM AMBURGY i\NITA AMBURN

Mi\RCI i\MElUXEN RHONDA AMMONDSON NEil AMONDSON PHILLIP AMUNDSON

V I TA L STAT S

DEBORi\H ANDERS DEAN ANDERSEN JOYCE ANDERSEN BRIAN DALE i\NDERSON

DIANA ELIZABETH IILl 1001

ANDERSON ANDE.RSON ANDERSON ANDERSON

KAHlY KRISTIN KRISTINE LORI

ANDERSON ANDERSON ANDERSON ANDERSON

Bookworms, jocks, social butter­ flies, and you - there is a lotal of 2,478 bodies attending PlU fulltime. Of these 2,478 bodies, 35% are freshmen, 24% are seniors, 2 1 % are juniors, and 20% are sophomores. Because of PlU's historically low re­ tention rate, it is not unusual for the largest group to be Ihe freshmen class. High cost coupled wilh limited programs and student indecision re­ sults in this low retention rate. Another normality is the male-fe­ male ralio. Anyone attending a PlU dance can easily surmise Ihal there are more female wallflowers than male wallflowers. The actual ralio is two males to every three females. Ahhough many women are present­ ly pursuing male-dominated careers, PlU's notable nursing and education programs remain contributing fac­ tors in the large female ratio. While the PlU population has in­ creased from '77 to '78, the tradi­ tional characteristics have remained the same. -Carrie Holland

NANCY ANDERSON scon i\NDERSON SUE ANDERSON CATIIAY ANDRESEN

RAlP'i ANDRESEN STEVEN ANSINGH ANNIE APPLEN DAVE ARBAUGH

LYLA ARENSMEYER DONNA ARMSTRONG LINDA ARMSTRONG JULIA ARTIIUR The male/female ralio is ea�ily defined in this crowd shO! of lUle f�ns at Ihe UPS-PtU KinS­ dome same. The aClual ratio is aboul 1.S sirls for every guy.

CAROl ASBERG BRIAN ASII KARYN ATKINS scon AUSENIIUS ,

SHelLEY AUSTIN BECKY BABINGTON DAVE BABINGTON JOANNE It"ER TRESA BAHADUR$INGH RONALD BAHR UANE BAilEY MIKE BAINTER CATHY BAKKE MIKE BALCH ANDY BALDWIN LAURA BALDWIN SANDY BALDWIN VERONICA BALDWIN

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KAHILEEN BARTHOlOMAV DAVE BATES KAREN BATES

LAURA BATUNGBACAL ANN BAUGHMAN KATtIV BAVNE -Mike lUinr.

JOHN BEACH BARBARA BECK MARGO BECK

IOANIE BEEKSMA KATHV BEll [VIE BENDER

ROBIN BENNER BRAD BENNETT GRETCHEN BENNETT

SHERYL BENNETT SANDY DENSON KEVIN DENTON

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HOWARD CARLSON JULIE CARLSON

MARl( CARLSON KATHLEEN CARTER

KATHLEEN CARY SHARON CASSIDY

LISA CATI[RAU SARA CEDERHOLM

JUt YE CESSNUM KAREN CHAMBERLIN

DAVID CHAMNESS JlM OIAPMAN

ROSS CHMMAN NELSON CHARlSTON

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111

Living it u p off A combination of freedom and responsibility

Autonomy. Independence. Privacy. These are just some of the reasons people move off campus. However, there are hassles that go along with these benefits. "Where is the near­ est and cheapest laundromat7""How do I get a phone installedl""How do J gel food if I don't have a car?""Who does the dishes this week?" or better yet, " Will the dishes gel done this week?" According to one off-campus junior, "You inherit a 101 of concerns, like paying bills on lime, going to the grocery Siore and defrosting your refrigerator," Some students mOve off campus so they can cook their own meals. Face it, Food Service just can't handle crab crepes, cheese omelettes or Oriental stir-fry dishes. On the other hand, those students who want the benefits of off­ campus life without the food hassles {lime to prepare, dirty dishes, elc.) Oiln take their meals

1. Ju�t one of Ihe small ha��les of off c;ampus Jiying-difl� dishes. 2. A SlOye and wok can ereale a quick but !.CrumpllOU5 Chinese dinller. Kathleen Hosleld, who liyes in OnE' of Ihe old Cenlre Apartmcnu on Garfield, Ir;ldl.'ti � room in Har­ llad for Ihe independence of her own place.

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on campus. Most people living off-campus re­ port that they eal more cheaply, but for those who "consume mass quantities", on-campus eating is a bargain. Then there are those students who hated all the togetherness of dorm life, "screw-your­ roommate" functions, dorm initiations and other organized fun and have exchanged dorm living for privacy. "8U1 you miss a lot," said one coed. "Nobody tells you when dorm dances are. You also miss the security of thc dorm. Noises in thc night scare you more." Autonomy-being self-governing-is a ma­ jor feature of living off campus. Students crawl out from under the protective wing of the stu­ dent conduct code and are forced to make their own alcohol and visilation policies. "I feel good about that," said one sopho­ more. "If I wasn't mature enough to make the decisions before, I am becoming that way as a resuh of working through silUations." To toga or not to toga. Another aspect of "living it up off" is the party scene. With the added space, lack or RA's and no prohibitive policies, off campus quarters provide a great "function" atmosphere for off campus and on campus students alike. And then there is the telephone! A first phone is a strange and wonderful experience. (cont. p. 115)

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Harstad: ghouls, goblins, and girls

JEFF ISEMAN KAREN ISENBERG BRIAN JACKSON ,Ill JACKSON STEVE JACKSON LOLA JACOBSEN GARY JACOBSON

NANCY JAEOICKE PETER JAMTGAARD

KEN JELINCK BRAD JENSON

JACKIE JENSON NANCY JEPSON

PHIL JERDE JERI JERIN

ALLYN JOHNSON ANN JOHNSON

BRENDA JOHNSON DARRell JOHNSON

DIANNE JOHNSON GREG JOHNSON

JEAN JOHNSON KAAREN JOHNSON

KAREN JOHNSON KATHY JOHNSON , ,.,

KELLIE JmlNSON LORI JmlNSON lOUIS JOI·INSON ROBIN JOHNSON RUTH /OJ·INSON WILLIE JONES

JULIE IORGENSEN CARY IUDD RHONDA IULIANO ANGIE lUST STEVE KAGELE DONNA KAHRE

ANDREW KANOOLL JAN KANKE JEff KASlER STEVE KASTAMA PAULA KAUTH HEATHER KEITH

WAYNE KELLER ESTELLE KELLEY STEVE KELLEY

ANORA KELNIN ANN·MARIE KEMP SHERRY KENAGY

KATHY KENDALL DEBRA KENNEWEG ROBERT DODGE KERR

MICHELLE KIMURA RAY KIMURA KARl KINDEM

Ivy H ouse Formerly "the zoo" Ivy House-a sociable dorm known for ii's "relaxed" atmosphere and unrestrained attitude. Ivy is in its second year of being Co-ed. last year's big shock is over and this year things seem 10 be settling down a bit, or as much as they settle in Ivy. Ivy held their annual initiation for new students in the ever popular "Ioga" fashion. Dressed in their own sheets, the Ivy rookies were first pa­ raded through campus, then blind­ folded and transported in small groups to various parts of the city including Fife, Bremerton Ferry Dock, UPS and the Tacoma Mall. Those who made it back were treat­ ed to a candlelight dinner in the cave. The evening's events were highlighted by the annual Miss Ivy contest. The latest controversial issue con-Mike Bilin

-� .,",,�.,.

-Mike lJiJinler

\' - ---

-SIeve TurCOII

cerning Ivy is the administration's at­ tempt to dampen Ivy's spirits. Each studenl in Ivy received a statement warning him that any misconduct would result in immediate action of dorm reassignments, fines, proba­ tion, and other possible actions. The leiter stated that there had been too much damage done by Ivy residents in previous years and that there had been a great deal of peer pressure involved. What someone obviously forgot is thai well over 70% of Ivy is new to PlU. Residents of Ivy enjoy its different atmosphere. Most appreciate the loose attitudes. Water fights happen frequently as well as a few pumpkin fights at Halloween. Not only do the people there live together but they party together, (off campus of course.) It's not unusual to see a group of people i n one of the end lounges just getting together and being crazy at 2 or 3 in the morning. No matter what outside pressures are felt, Ivy will maintain this " re­ laxed" feeling, mainly because the residents of Ivy prefer it this way. -Shelly Swanke 1. Early in the fall sem"'�fcr, Ivy fesident� de­ bated between the sex symbol� of the times, Roben Redford and Cnarlie's Angeh hrrah Fawcet-Major� and Cherty ladd. 2. Aher an evening with the books, Kim Ross and Mike Patton leI loose by playing broom­ ball in Ivy's lobby. 3. Remains from the "off-campus panies." 4. Proof of Ivy's new coed structure - even in the showers. Kirk Stewart and Shelly Swanke testify to its validity.

-5leve Turco"

Why be an RA? . Patrolmen are lonely and boxes cramp one's style. "My heat's not workingl"

"I lost my keyl"

"Can't something be done about the noise?" "Hey. I've got a problem with my roommate." "Can I talk to you for a minute?" SO WHY WOULD ANYONE WANT TO BE AN RAI

No more on-campus panies. Visita­ tion to be strictly observed. Move to a new dorm with a preattached label. Responsible for over $50.00 worth of :.---­ keys. SO WHY WOULD ANYONE WANT TO BE " RAl It's more than a single room and it's more than just a job. The RA is placed in a position of learning to communi­ cate with a great variety of people. Through this communication, one en­ counters numerous situations where instead of just listening, is able to take some action. This action often helps to make the lives of those involved just a litlle smoother. Some will always view the RA un­ trustingly as a fanatical patrolman look­ ing for a "bust." Others will keep RA's in a well defined box to be used as a last resort and then quickly stuffed back in again. It hurts when one isn't allowed to be human. Patrolmen are lonely and boxes cramp one's style. fortunately these are not the norm. Most residents realize that five days of meetings have not transformed last se­ mester's friend into an adversary. They know that they can have a good lime with their RA and sliU use him (her) as a valuable resource. After all, an RA is just a wingmate with a few extra re­ sponsibilities and a few extra opportu­ nities. 15 it worth i l l Mosl of the lime, yes. -Beth Youngquist

!

1. WorkIn wilh people and improving tler lis­ tening skil s, were jUll M)me of the re�ns why En8lim major, SIlly Gray, became an RA. 2. The money !sn'l what makes it wonhwhile fOf Rick Frazier, RA on lsi East in Piluqer. "II'S be­ caUie I'm a people person."

MARY JEAN KINDSCHUH NANCY KINDSCHUH JANE KINKEL ANNE KIPFER fDDIE KLEIN JEAN KLINGEN8ERG

CINDY KLOTH LISA KLOTH SHARON KNAPP WIlliAM KNAPP CARL KNOX KRIS KNUTZEN

DALE KOESSEl RANDY KOETIE JEFFREY KOGLE KRISTINE KONISHI SUE KORSNESS JIM KOSKI

KRISTIE KRAHMER DE881E KRAKEN8ERG LINDA KRAMER TIM KRAMER PETER KRATZKE SUSAN KRAUSE

8ECKY KRAUSS CHERYl KREH81El Sl[VE KRIPPAEHNE CARLA KRUEGER DAVE KRUEGER JENNIFER KULlO

51-IERRIE LAHN JIM LAIDLER EllEN LAKEV

SUE LAMB FRITZ LAMPE KIM LANDEIS

C"ROl L"NGSTQN DEB l"PP J"NET L"PP

JOHN L"RSEN BR"D L"RSON J"N" L"RSON

K"RIN L"RSON K"RL LARSON L"N" L"RSON

MARGARET LARSON MARV LARSON SUE LARSON

SZEWAI-I LAU BOB A tAUNHARDT JULIE L"UNHARDT

SUE LEE SUE LEE VEDA LEGGETT

G. CHARLES LEitMAN DAVID LEHM"N D"VE LEMLEV

BONNIE LE P"RD MARK LF$TU I: ROBERT LESTER ".

-8rJd Jenson

E l evato r b r o k e n? D o n 't bla m e Cascad e Second and third floor Tinglestad­ -Cascade-sI3ned (he year with a challenge. Half the people were new, the staff was new and of course there were minor obstacles such as dorm dues, new roommates and "dang" freshmen to overcome. To become beller acquainted and aware of other's inleresrs the dorm held a retreat early in the year at Camp Hahobas near Hood Canal. Here Cascadians indulged in "good food, good fun and good fellow­ shi p" while canoeing, playing volley­ ball and sharing in a communal sleeping arrangement. Meals have always been a lime for socializing; residents have never had to worry about eating alone for there is always somebody you know at the "Cascade table." Besides sharing mealtimes, ideas and communicable diseases, resi­ dents also shared in the boycott of the elevator. God help those that enter the elevator with some Alpine residents and push "2."

For the first time in a long time Cascade displayed its talents by sweeping the field in Homecoming competition-thanks to a lot of those "dang"freshmen. If not taking part in sports, resi-

dents could be found aCTively watching Monday Night sports, Batt­ lestar Galactica or Johnny Carson. You name it-sleepers and scholars, P.K.'s and party-ers, junkfood junk­ ies and joggers, Cascade has them all.

-Brad Jenson

The relrcat at Camp Hahobils made "goofing off" ea�y and entoyable. 1. Rolf Lunde sets up the volley as Eric Frojker looks on. 2. C,JSCiI­ dians A,Jroll Couch, Kim Rogers, Sue C.lrlsen, Jennifer Tada, Kathy Seiu ,Jnd Jim Ford join in a few tun(.�.

J. Although C,JSCilde lost in the pt,Jyoffs this ye�r, their men's rntr�muul footbdll team lost only one of lheir rCl!ul�r games.

135

ANDREA LEUEN8ERGER CINDY LEUNG KIRK lIOER

TAMARA lIE811.EctIT 8rnl LIMING MIK[ lINDEl

LAURA LISKA JUDITH LOGAN TAMI LOlmlAMER

ANN LOMAX INGUNN M. LONNING KRISlY LORE[N -

KAREN LORENZ KATHY LOUOEN KIRSTEN LUDWIG

Pfl u eger

with

o n ly a pa m ph l et C!-IUCK LUHTULA NANCY LUND MONICA l Y8ECK

CINDY lYCKMAN STEVE- LYNCH KURT MAASS

属MA.RK MAA.SS LAUREN MA.CAN LUANN MA.CA.N

KA.REN MADSEN STEVE MA.GEE KRISTEN MA.CSS

A.NNA MA.HAN DE8BIE MAIER LOIS MA.IEII. 136

and a map With only a pamplet of general descriplions of every dorm and a map of the entire campus, I had to choose where I would reside during my college ca足 reer. Being completely ignorant to the PlU scene, I simply chose Pflueger because it is strategically lo足 cated. On lower campus, Pflueger is near the two dining halls, the gyms, the tennis courts, and the pool. From looking at the map, I noticed most of the classes and the library were on upper campus-I figured I'd be seeing enough of that part of the campus without having to live there. Smart cookie, huh 1 Well, yes it was smart. For the past two years " 'Ie lived in Pflueger and I've enjoyed almost every mo足 ment. What brings this joy is not because Pflueger has the longest beds on campus or that we have laundry rooms for every wing, rather that the friends

• •

I've met and the momenls we've shared will stay with me forever. Whether il was porking out at Toga Traveling Treats, practicing the jitterbug for the Number One skit of Songfest, just B.S.'ing around the front desk, or cramming all night in the second floor lounge we all have shared the foot-loose and fancy-free times, and the pressure packed times. We've not only learned about Bohr's Theory of Hydrogen, but we've also learned about ourselves and each other. -Carrie Holland

-Mike /himer 1. Walching for freaky strangers coming imo the dorm is one of the main responsi­ bilities of Ihe person on desk dUly. Allhout\:h as Mary Danielson can auest, it's hard !O ICl! Inc strangc looking ones from Inc residents of Pflueger, Robin Benner and Karen Lou!:nz. 2. Vacuuming in Pflueger wu Yirlually impt"lssible during Ihc Dad's Day Foolball Game, for }eft Pcnigrew, Eric Glick, and Chuck luhtula wefe "borrowing" Ihe extcnsjon� Along wilh Ihe extensions, styrofoam cups, and their energelic Yoice bo�es, Ihcy Icad an impromptu cheer in fronl of lhe football crowd. J. Being Ofl the fint flOOf makes it possible (or Munro Cullum, Pflueger's Vice Presidcnt, 10 carry on business wilh Kim Amburgy, even through Ihc windows.

You wa nt m o re? Fo rget it, s m i l i ng wo n 't h e l p "Please sir, I want some more." So said Oliver in the musical and so it is on steak night, salmon night or cream puff night. But the answer is always the same. "More, more, you want some more?!" Deep down in the pit of my stomach muffled sounds responded-emptiness. CROWL Back to peanut butter and honey, the substance of surviv· a[ it seems. Except on weekends. Then survival is left to the craftiest. Un less you are a football player and can have "meat" for breakfast, the rest of us carni· vores must try our hand at peeling soft boiled eggs. But eating is not only a necessary evil for our body engines. II is a time for social gathering, for checking Qut who's with who, for a legitimate break from studying; a lime for relaxing with the din of scraping forks, clanking glasses, shuffling feet and an occasional good meal. -Joye Redfield

1. Choosing de�en can sometimes be difficult as seen by this unidentified coed in the U.c. 2. Setting out a favorite desert , strawberry shortcake, is D<lna Davidson. 3. ASPLU sponsored severa! th�me dinner nights. Here Renae Schiff, LiSol Haase and Stacie Morris converse after an "Italiano Night" complete with candle�. menu, sourdough brc<ld and Italian music. -Mike Baint,

138

MELISSA MAlAR MARK MANDT MARCI MANESS

DENISE MANN LAURA MANNING GRACiE MARIBONA

PAUL

MARTH DANA MARTENS KATHLEEN MARTIN

-Mike 8.Jinfer

-Sreve

Turcorr

ROB MASON VERNITA MATTHEWS DEBORAH MAYERS VICKIE McAlliSTER KEllY McCAR lY GAIL ANN McCRACKEN CHERYl Ms::CRUM

BRIAN McCLUSKEY PAT McCORMICK DEBBIE McCULLOUGH LAURIE McLEAN BRIAN McCULLOUGH MEAGAN McDOUGAll BILLIE )0 McGARVEY SCOTT McKAY KELL YE McKINN" BETH ELLEN McKINNEY CARLA McMASTERS PATTI McMILLAI\I MATT McTEE MARIA MEYER

139

N"NCY MEYER C"RL" MEYERS CINDY MICIM£l

ERIK MICH"LSON fRED MICHU "BBY MILES

T "MI MILES ERVIN MILLER LORI MILLER

JENNY MILLO B"LDWIN MINTON J"NET MISKIMENS

M"R Y MITCHElL TERES" MIZUK"MI S"NDI MOEN

ERIC MONSON DI"NE MOORE RICK MOORE

CYNTHI" MORICK JULIE MORL"ND M"TT MORRIS

...

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RICtMRD MORRIS ST"ClE MORRIS M"RY8ETH MORST"D

DON ELL MORTON "NN MOSS LaVONNE MUElLER

SUE MUELLER K"YLYN MUNSEY STEVE MUNT 1<.

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Evergree n : good times a nd good feeli n gs

Individuality is the word which best describes the lifestyle of Evergreen's residents-individuality and the freedom to be who you are. Sandwiched between the fifth and eighth floors of Ting­ lestad, the dorm is comprised mainly of juniors and seniors. Evergreeners are outgoing, energetic, and vivacious when it comes to group activities. Dorm four-square games and coed saunas are the order of the day, as are impromptu water fights and Ever(green) famous "group shares." Although the general living atmosphere is carefree, there is a common tie of love and concern that holds residents together. Evergreen's individuality, coupled with its variety of resident personalities and lifestyles, makes a comfortable "home away -Dennis Hake trom home."

-Dille Simonson 1. He.ad residenl, Pelc Morris, and fellow Evergreener's go for some m.ake·shih baskelball in the 71h floor lounge. 1. A favorile siudy break. for residenlS i� � game 01 four-sqlUre.

-Dille Simonson

1<,

SHANNON MURPHY SYLVIA NABBEN SHII.RYl NII.PIER STEVE NASE SANDI NEILL

JEFF NELLERMOE 0..\1110 NELSEN 8RII.OLEY NELSON CYNTHIA NELSON ElIZA8ETH NElSON

ERIC GII.RY KEITH KEN LISA

NElSON NElSON NELSON NELSON NELSON

MAREN NELSON SII.NDY NELSON LINDA NESSET RICK NESTEGARD BETH NEUfELD

SHII.RON NEIIIN scon NEWMII.N JII.CLLYN NICHOLS INGRID NIELSEN JII.NET NIELSEN

DIANE NIEMII.N

w. GREG NIEMII.N

JULIE NIKELII.ISEN II.NN NOBLE NITII. NORDBERG

-

,,,

That just began the Foss change of image. Certainly you can remember the Night Club Disco: the lighted dance floor, lighted wall panels, mir· rored wall, etc., etc., etc. And how about the ever·popular toga parade through the other dorms on cam· pusl Some of you dumped buckets of water on the poor Fossilites who braved the cold of the night in noth· ing but sheets. And all the other events . . . Not only did Foss sponsor all·cam· pus activities, but also intra-dorm events. Fun limes like the grocery cart race (Compliments of lucky), se· cret pals, (a Foss Favorite), a beard­ growing contest (for males of course/), and the Foss Olympics (all that lacked was coverage by ABC). Along with the fun, though, came learning, through events like Cup 'n' Reader (bring your cup and listen to a guest speaker), a CPR training ses· sion (a valuable skill to have), and disco dance lessons (look out Tra· volta!). Congeniality is one of Foss's prime virtues; everyone enjoys being with everyone else (almost). Though Foss residents must occasionally study, they seem to find time to be in­ volved in a variety of extra·curricular activities: sports, musical groups, AS· PlU committees, drama, clubs, and a host of others. Under the leadership of dorm council. Foss had transformed into a Ahhough some members of the dorm thai's fun and exciting place to PlU community have underestimat­ live; a dorm with a fresh and lively ed it for many years, Foss Hall is a reputation. dormitory where vitality, energy. and spirit(s) abound. Throughout this past year it has been Foss's goal to show the entire campus ils true reputation. A formidable goal, bUI one well attained. You may ask: "Jusl how did Foss change the attitudes of all those eyn­ 1. Hou�in8 189 sludenlS on lower c...mpus. icsl" F�s u�u;ally c....e" 10 .he underclassmen. And any,"Fossilite" could answer: 1. P�in8 polcer Is )viI one of Ihe m.any POlS' "look at all we did!" Indeed. Foss limes of O...n Childbu,n ...nd Jeff Omum. sponsored many all- campus func­ 1. Man MOUlS, Fou's dorm presidenl, cans tions this year. Think back to the around SUSolin V... ugNn k Ihe F�$ Olympics. very first day of classes in September. A dedication took place: foss gener­ ously gave ils prize possession - Foss Pond - to Hinderlie Halt. Who could forget the momentous chris­ tening of lake Hinderlie with a bot­ tle of lysol1 Sign and aroma were both present, as was Dr. Rieke who officiated. •

N ever

u nderest i mate

the powe r of Foss

'"

CHEll. Yl NORMAN ROBERT NORMAN MARK NOSTE SUE OAKES RONDI OFELT ERIC OFSTUN DIANA OHLUND

-

MARK OLAFSON KATHY O'LEARY BRAD OHNSTEO Doue OLLIGES SANDY OLMSTEAD ERIC OLSEN MIKE OlSEN

TOM OLSEN AL OLSON

CAROL OLSON JEFF OLSON

JOANNE OLSON KAREN OLSON

LOR EN O'NEAL SANntA OORJITHAM

CHERLYl OPGAARD DAWN OPJORDEN

RANDY OTIERHQLT PATRICIA OWENS

lAY PALMER KEN PlAMER

JEANNIE PARTRIDGE MikE PATION '"

-Milt.e Bilim

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U n d e r n eath St ue n's covers Over the years Stuenites have earned a reputation for being hard� working, studious, and just plain boring. Present residents enjoy per­ petuating this image. as it serves as an excellent cover for such clandes­ tine activities as SLA (Sluen liber­ ation Army) raids during the Christ­ mas season, floor-wide penny-ins, and traveling happy hours. Dorm members also participated in the an­ nual Bim Born Festival and Parade on Rosh Hashana and a confelti orgy at the Kingdome. In a surprise move, Sluen organized PlU's first fraternity - Phi Upsilon Kappa - with both

male and female pledges. Anyone going to Martini Wednesday this week? Historically, SlUen doesn't mix much with other dorms - it's haz­ ardous. For example, the 1M football team returned from its first confron­ tation with two casualities: a dislo­ cated shoulder and a broken jaw. How about a pureed cheese dream, Stevel Other attempts at interdorm fraternization have proved more fun, however. There was the heated Broomball Battle against Evergreen, and of cours'e no one will forget

those great Stuen dances. Well, per­ haps it is better that Stuenites con­ tinue to party quietly behind closed doors, lest next year residential life decides to double the staff instead of cutting it . . . 1. A few days before Thanhgiving, Swen,

as

most of the Puget Sound, wa5 blanketed with snow. 2. Allempting incognito to overcome the swdious Sluen stereotype, the SlA was the organizer of many myslerious campus raids. 3. Sluen plays Evergreen broomball at Sp3naway's Spdnker Reue�tional Center.

MICHAEL POWELL UNOA POWER LENORE PRICE LEAH PREST KARIN PRESTEGAARD CHRISTINA PROCTOR

FAWN PURCELL VALERIE QUOIDBACH PAM RAINES PEGGY RAMPKE JOVE REDFIELD MARTY REDMAN

DEREK REESE DIRK REESE PAMELA REESE DAVID REIERSON SHARI REINMUTI-I KAREN RENTKO

MARY REPASS RANDY RETTIG DANIEL RICHARDSON NEAL RIDER STEVE RIEKE SUSAN RIMMERMAN

ROBIN RINERSQN SUSAN RISDAHl NANCY R ISOAl ANN RISTUBEN JANA RITTER SUE RQAlKVAM

".

K re i d l e r : more than j u st n u rs i n g maj ors •

-Mike B�jn/e,

Kreidler Hall is an all-women's dorm on the lush PlU campus and is a mere 5 minutes away from downtown Parkland. The hall boasts a beautiful view of Ihe wildlife found in the shad­ ow of Rainier (not the mountain) and is also proud of its excellent waterfront scenery of the well-known pond on lower campus. Included in its recreational facililies is an olympic-sized, heated swimming pool, private sauna, raquetbail/handbail/tennis courts and an 18 hole golf course in the basement next to the laundry room. Besides these, Kreidler initi­ ates many of its own activities which are always well attended (except for Cheryl Tiegs look­ alike contests). All in all, the best thing Kreidler is known for is the trust and friendships found among the girls who live there. Rather than calling it a dorm, residential hall, or housing complex, Kreidler's best title would be a loving commu­ nity. -Melissa Robinson -Tami Loidhammer 1. Winning the Inlramural championship for Kreidler was

possible wid, the Impressive foot�1I techniques of Corri Minden, Karen Nelson, and L�I.Jfi Wright. 2. The ole' stuffing Ice down the gill's back Is performed by Rainier'$ Robert Hansen �nd is pcrlormed on Kreidler's Alaine Kuhlman while Kreidler was hosting an lee Skilting Party for RJinier at the Sprlnker Recreational Center. 1. Watching their foothall tcammates play Ordal is Mellina Robinson .lnd lisa Co�. 4. Aspiring to audition for the Ice (.lpades is �ndy Nelson, Mary Swanson, .:md Brook Mason as they practice their "train" routine.

'"

M o u nta i ns a n d m o le h i l ls The following may have happened, and it may not have happened .. But it could have happened. long, long ago, but not far far away a cataclismic geological event lifted the earth and split the settle� ment into two camps. This geographic barrier sprouted tall trees and caused long reaching biological changes. In the lower camp, some grew longer hind legs and liked to play with large round rocks. Others became infatuated with their biceps and insisted on bowling their friends over while exclaiming "six, six." Still others galloped around beating the lurf with crooked sticks. Altogether they became boisterous-especially at feeding lime where they guzzled a strange red drink at every chance-, played with racously loud small boxes, consumed strange liquids beginning Thursday nights, and every blue moon looked briefly at no more than two pieces of printed mailer. Above the barrier strange events were also taking hold. There were nOI as many trees to climb, rocks with which to play, or paths to jog. Hence, time was instead spent in murky rock structures. As their infatuation with printed matter grew, their physique changed le� Marc�like: in time, their foreheads bulged farther and farther forward; their fluttering hands became cal� loused and well�muscled from turning pages and table scribbling. And their legs barely shuffled the body· supported cranialis between the numerous dens, now named "chateaus." Though they too ate, they usually muttered about "veal vultures and cheese nightmares" between aca· demic discussions of Kant and Kepler. Altogether, though some murmurs of "Rainier, Rainier" could be heard, the pulse of nodding heads and rustling pages was everywhere dominant. But this was long ago. Several passageways have since penetrated the barrier. Mixing has brought freshness to the now joined camps. large congregations in diml lit rooms are now the rule. Some remnant groups stil cling to seclusive ideas, but most are making light of the mound that was made into a mountain. Darwin states. 1/ all progress toward perfection." -Dave Krueger

r

HEATHER ROBBINS AMANDA ROBINSON CORAL ROBINSON MElISSA ROBINSON SHANNON ROBINSON KAAREN ROE MARY ROE

NANCY ROE LAVONN[ ROGElSTAD KIM ROGERS KEVIN ROHR HARRIET ROHRENBACH JANIE ROLEDER DEBBIE ROM

150

K ....REL ROSE KAREN ROSE KIM ROSS P.... UL ROTHI K ....THY ROWBfRG R USS ROWL....ND KR ISTINE RUDD

ERIC RUNNING TRACY IWTT TINA RYAN STEPt-IEN SACKMANN CINDY SAFFORD ICEl-LY SANDERS NANCY SATHRE

DAVID SAVER MIICE SCHACHT UNDA SClIEI J[ANN[ SCHEIBE MARLENA SCHELLER HEATtiER SCHILTZ EILEEN SCHIPPER HOWARD SCHLENKER

MICH[LLE SCHOENBERG

DANA SCHROEDER JIM SCHROEDER ICATV SCHULTZ MARIE SCHULZ BRAD SEE8ERG

'"

WAVNE SELLS SHERYL SCONZO ERIC SCORE RANDY SCOTT VICTORIA SCOTT ARM EN SHANAFELT STEVEN SHEARER CATHY SHEFFElS CINDY SHELBY ROBERT 5H[N . KRISTEN SHERMAN RENAE SnUH TODD SHORT CHRIS SHULTZ

KARl SHULTZ SAUY SHUMACHER

SUE SIEFKES

JOAN SILflOW JODI SIMMONS DALE SIMONSON DIANA SKIBIEL

LARISA SLEZAK lIGL E SlOVICK MICHELLE SMALLEY KAY SMITH KIM SMITH JANET SMITH JUDY SMITH

PAUL SMITHSON STEVE SMITH TERESA SMITH NANCY SODERLUND NANCY RAE SONNER KATHLEEN SORTE KENT SOULE

DOUG SPRUTE DAVE SOUTHLAND KIM STAGNER BETSEY STAHLER DIANA ST ANOH AlIA STAPARS JOAN STAVEE

D r TA

,

,

Delta: Independence on the outskirts

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TRACV STRANDNESS DEBBIE STARK JENIE STRATTON STEVE STRAUME CHARLIE STRAUZ

PETER STROM DIANNE STROTHER DOUGLAS STUBSTEN DENISE STUCKEY JEFF STUHlMILlER

JANET SUGARS SHELLY SWANKE MARK SWANSON MARY KAY SWANSON REBEKAH SWENSON

1. In an allempl tO be rid of unnece�sary col­ lectables, Hong had its own auction, in order 10 gain necessary money. 2. Auctioneer Jeff Olson rallies at the mouth as usual.

,,,

H o n g : You o u g ht to be havi ng fu n A funeral for a frogH A double wedding for drah dodg­ ers?? Unusuall Crazy? Off the walll You would think so unless you were a mem­ ber of the People's Socialist Collective of Nils J. Hong. What other dorm can boast the Celia Holt Husband Contest, the famous 3rd floor Rude Board or an HVC (Hong Virgin ClubH At the year's beginning "spontane­ ous" was the byword and activities that followed often turned out to be im­ petuous TP and shaving cream raids, involuntary showers, wrestling matches or famous Hong dances. (The marathon pinochle games don't count.) Who can forget the frequent jaunts to hot spots like len's; or the night the

whole dorm crammed into an off-cam­ pus apartment for singapore slingsl Even though the intramural football anJ basketball teams remained relative­ ly winless, our College Bowl itellects swept the PlU and Regional competi­ tions and headed for Nationals in Mi­ ami this summer. Hongites don't always do things that are totally wacko. An all night spaghetti feed changed the pace. In ski lodge restaurant style, a talent night was topped by the 1979 Macho Man Award. As it is always said in Hong-"Vou ought to be having funl" -Melissa Flotree

ISS

UNOA SWOPE CHRISTA TAYlOR JOHN TEKRONY DAN TENGESOAl

MARK TENGESDAL . NATALIE TEWS KATHY THOMAS MIKE THOMASON

BRAD THOMPSON HElOI THOMPSON NAOMI THOMPSON ERIC THOMSEN

DIANE THORBECK LAURA THORNE JIM THORSNESS TAME LA TIEDE

MICHAEL TINSLEY TONY TIPTON BRIAN TiPPLE PAM TOlAS DEAN TOLLEFSON JOEL TOllEfSON MAR EN TOLLEFSON

BILL TOLQ KA THY TORVIK TERESA TROWER OlAF TRYTTEN PEHR TUFF KENT TUOHINO STEVE TURCOTT

HOLLY TURllS LINDA TUR NER KATHY TVEIT ANDV UMAMOTO KARl URDAHl UNOA VAN DER MAAS DEBBIE VAN SOfST

156

Rainier : it 's the men and a lot more . What causes a herd of some 130 male-Rainiers to inhabit the wild, barbaric jungles of a un i-sex dorm? Some like the companionships that devel­ op in this all male dorm, some like 10 raid their next-door neighbors, Kreidler; some like to walk around flashing their silky "Top of Rainier" jack­ ets, while others like 10 distribute 'Foss Pond "in Yo' Face'" stickers around the campus. Whatever their reasons for living in this wild sanclUary, "The dorm does maintain a reputa­ tion," claims one resident, "of being just a liule more sophisticated than Animal House.

--

1. In ,m �u{'mpl 10 coum�'r·all,)ck lhc dion 01 Foss's lJh· HII,ucrh(' coImpJ1xn, R.liniCf, formerly known as Hindcrlic.

covered lh(' L.lmpU� with 'Fo)� Pond " In Yo' Face.'" 2. On hi, way 10 Ih.. UC, JUnim Chuck H,Ilrher swint'S on � Red Squarl' IiKtll pole. l. How did two R�lOlt'r 'oomm.Ucs bribe Ihen' lhrt.'C Kreidler residents 10 paint Ihdr rooml 4. Rainier's m<!in lobby hol� �n .qu<!tmm WIth an ��'>OIlnlent of fi<h. Jnhn Mu<;scfwhit.. WdlChc\ the behavior of the dorm'� fish �1 feeding lime.

DIANE VAN VLEET SUSAN VARGHAN MARl VEGOAHL KIRK VEIS WENDY VERMEER LORI VII( AUDREY VILSTRUP

CliRISTINA VINCENT STEVE VITAUCH JUlIE VOlLY

LISE VOSS JEANNE WACKER TERRI WAlDHERR

KENTON WALDNER SANDRA WALKER ElIZABETH WAlliS

CINDY WAND[RS(E JOI-iNEnr. WARD CARRIE WARREN

IS.

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Al p i ne : A prem ium Par kla nd v iew •

Alpine-the highest dorm on campus, sits atop the eighth and ninth floors of the campus sky­ scrapper, Tingelslad. Alpine residenls enjoy a premium Parkland view of the Cascade beauty. When the clouds part to bring a clear Northwest day, many PlU stu­ dents take their cameras 10 Alpine and shoot this "Alpine" scenery. LESLIE WIELAND DAVE WIEMERSLAGE STUART WILEY ALAN WIlliAMS DAVE WILLIAMS DORI WILLIAMS JOY WILLIAMS

JUDY WILLIAMS MARILEE WILLIAMS PEGGY WIlliAMS WENDY WILLOW EDITH WILSON IULIE WILSON RAY WILSON

SHIRLEY WILSON DAVID WISHART ROBIN WITTKOPf SANDY WIVAG JENNIE WODAEGE KRIS WOLD DENISE WOLff

BARCLAY WONG MARIANNE WORTH KEN WOOLMS MAR K WOOLSEY TIM WULf RANDY YOAKUM ROBIN YOST

160

J......MES YOUNG TIM YOUNG SUS......N YOUNGBLOOD BAR BAR...... YOUNGQUIST

RANDY ZEILER JANET ZINGALE JON ZURFLUH ED ZVIRZDYS

Eighth floor members of Alpine, Stuart Wiley and John Larsen, get together with their voices and guitars.

161

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.,

NANCY BELL Education: Social Sciences Rupert, 10 TAMI BENNETI Education: P.E. Bellvue, WA JAN BERG Eduntion: Music Bellevue, WA JUDITH BERG Education: Social Science Gonvick, MN

KARIN BERNHARDSEN Business Tacoma, WA BLANE BERRY Business Bellevue, WA CURTIS BEVOlDEN History Zurich, MT CORRINE BEYER Music Jacksonville, OR

JANET BEYERLEIN Nursing Corvallis, OR LADD BjORNEBY Biology KaiJspell, M T LISA BLOCH Education: Social Science Portland, OR PARKE BLUNDON legal Studies Eugene, OR

BRUCE BOGARD Engineering Fedenl Way, WA CINDY BRANDT Communication Arts Federal Way, WA TEDDY BREEZE EduCilition: P.E. Tacoma, WA GARY BROG Business Bellevue, WA

JEANNE BROOKS Business Tacoma, WA KAY BROSSARD German/History Chehalis, WA KRISTIN BROWN Psychology SteiJacom, WA DAN BUCKLIN Economics Tacoma, WA

".

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DEBBIE BUEGE Nursing Yakimďż˝, WA snVE BUMP Biology Vancouver, WA SHARON CANTRlll Communicalion ArlS Gig Harbor, WA RANDY CAREY Businen longview, WA

16'

lAl Cl--IANDWANEY Business Tacoma, WA CAMIE CHRISTOPtlER Hiswry SI. louis, MO BONNIE CLARE Educalion: Social Scences Anchorage, AK RON CLINK Business ["erell, WA

TALIS COLBERG History Palmer, AZ EVELYN CORNWALL • Business Woodland, WA AARON COUCH English West Covina, CA BEn! COUGlillN Education: P.E. Fargo, N.D.

BONNIE COUGHLIN P.E. Fargo, N.D. KAREN CROCKEn Biology Tacoma, WI'.

DWIGHT DANIELS Communicalion Arls San Amonio. TX ROBERT DARDIS School Administration Tacoma, WI'.

DAN DAVISON Education: Music Bellevue, WA MIKE DAVISON P.E. Aurora, CO

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CAROLYN DOLAN Edoc,ulon; Soci�1 Science .... n(horage, AK STEVE DOUCETTE Sociology Tacoma. \VA CINDY DRAINO Nunina Anchorage, AK KAREN ORUGGE Education: English Hoquiam, \VA

/ANEANE DUBUAR Music Seattle, WA MAREN ECERTSON CommunlClolion Aru Anacones, WA PEGGY EKBERG P.E. Bismark, N.D. SHARON ENGER Business lOOI, CA

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BRUCE JOHNSON Biology Saljn�s, CA -CHRISTY JOHNSON Biology Portland, OR DEBBIE JOHNSON Education: Social Sciences Shelton, WA

RANDY JOHNSON Business Delano, MN TIM JOHNSON Sociology Tacoma, WA NATALIE JUHL Scandinavian Studies/English Seattle, WA

JOAN KAHNY Business LOOi, CA VALERIE KAUFMAN Nursing Ponland, OR BRENDA KINGMA Education: Music Seattle, WA

BETH KIRKPATRICK Eduation: Social Sciences Los Banos, CA MICHUlE KLARICH EduCilition: Art Tacoma, WA DAVID KNAPP History Gjg Harbor, WA

KATHLEEN KNAPP Education: Mu\lc Sandy, OR DEAN KNUTSON Business Bellevue, WA TIM KOBERNIK Chemistry Roy, WA ALANA KOTIE Religion Oak Harbor, WA

172

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jill MARTINSON [duc.uion; Soci�1 Science Honolulu, HI CATHY McCltEADY EduQlion: Soc�1 Science Puy,lIup, WA,

KAREN MCELHINNEY Nursing Burien, WA. B08 MCINTYRE Cbs$ia Auburn, WA

CATHY MCRAE Edunlion: Social Science/P.E. Longview, WA NANCY MEADER PsychoWgy lillieton, CO

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CAROLE MHAND Nursing

Tacoma, WI'. COUN MHBY Business Bellevue, WI'. KIMBERLEY MILLER Education: Science Edmonds, WI'. STACIA MOGCK Edut�tion: Social Science Port Angeles, WI'.

KEN MORRISON Communication Arts

�aule, WI'. TOM MORROW Education: Music Port Orch�rd, WA

MICHEllE MYERS

Education: Mu�ic

Simi Valley, ell.

STEVE NELSON Nursing

New Albanv, IND

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VICKIE POMEROY Musk Puyallup, WA JERILYN PROBST Nursing Long Beach, CA MARY PURCELL A" Tacom�, WA DENISE RALSTON Communic�lion Arts Oak Harbor, WA

RICHARD RASMUSSEN Education: Social Science Astoria, Or MARK REIMAN Economics/Religion Seattle, WA DEBORAH RUEHL Education: All Spokane, WA

" H orse ce nts .

MON EY TA L K

178

an

Have you ever really thought how much PlU means to you and your pig­ gybank 1 No, not the standard reply­ groans of "more than five thousand a year" or "too many pounds of flesh." I mean, in this age of pocket-you-name­ it and world news on the half hour what we need is a horse sense of daily finance. For instance, at 1979 prices Day­ dream 101 is $444, or nearly $8 per lec­ ture, or 16¢ per minute. A large fresh­ man course of 150 people means $1200 per lecture or $78,000 per semester for PlU. Thus, at $24 per minute, if the prof is five minutes late, bam, he owes the class $120. If he pauses 20 seconds even to blow his nose-that will be $8 professor. For a regular size class this "sense" clutches at your stylish (thin) pocket­ book. That is if you didn't hawk it when your financial aid was cut. Imagine if a prof teaches two 30 member classes each semester. The net-a cool $53,000 plus wit ho ut counting Interim. And how many percentage points did

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RUTH SWENSON EdtKatioo: Social Science Sean Ie, WA

JIM TEKRONY An

Walnut Creek, CA

PAT TfNGESDAl Music Poulmo, WA DARIN THOMPSON Communication Ar15 Fairfield, MT

JULIE THOMPSON Education: Social Science Hoquiam, WA SANDY TIDWELL Nursing Sacramento, CA CHRISTI TITUS An Hood River, OR

PAUL TREYZ Polilidal Science Graham, WA

TOM TUFTE Busineu Ta.coma, WA JAN TYDINGS Education: Social Scieoce Pori Angeles, WA GRETCHEN UNSETH Education: Social Scien.ce Seaule, WA DIANNE VAN DYK Business TaCOrTl.l, WA

PAT WALKER Engineering Tacoma, WA SUZANNE WALKER Biology Burlington, WA SUSAN WANTZ Social Welfare Cnoctau, OK ALETA WENGER History/AOIhropology Aubulll, WA

EUGENE WHIT[ Business Longview, \VA

vlcel WHIT[ Education: P.E. Prosser, WA

ROBERT WILDRICK Busi:1e-ss San leandro, CA

JOHN YOUNG Chemistry Renton, W A

BETH YOUNGQUIST Education: Math Bellevue, WA

18'

The C l u b h o use Involvement. Accomplishment. A sense of belonging like a kid and his treehouse. Whether it be the Big Sky Society in adula­ lion of Montana or the US5AC swim pro­ gram for the handicapped-we all find a place to direct our energies. Alpha Kappa Psi, IK's, Spurs-the medi­ eval world of the House of the Black Rose; ROTC, ASPlU, RHC, RlC, USPB-whatever the abbreviation, whatever your gender or religion, the opportunity to belong is there. Some alive. some dead-or nearly; some for the "somebodies" that are kept going by the "nobodies." All things said and done, it comes down to being a big-little-kid belonging to The Club­ house-and that sort of thing.

1. Knigtm form the Kingdom of Ihl! We$!. SOCiety for Cre�liye Anacronism, attended it lourn�menl in Van­ couyer B.C. 10 walch Ih(' crowmng 01 the new king for the weSlern kingdom_ Mcmbcr� Irom Ihc PlU-based House 01 [he Black ko�c also altcndcd. 2. Social Welfare malor, Amy BI�ke, took l ime 10 be � USSAC volunleer in their �wim prOliram

Ron rellefson Univcrsily Pastor

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INDEX •

,

BRAUTIGAM, PETER 106 BRAZIER, WILLIE BRECHT, ELEANDORE 108 BREDESON, KIM "REDVOI.D, MARILYN 108 BREEDEN, CARLA BREEZE, TEDDY 89, 164 I1RFITENFELDT, NORMA BREKKE, LISA 108 BR[NGEL JOHN BREVIK, JON 108 BREWER, BETTI BREWER, DENNIS BREWSTER, DOUGLAS BREZICHA, GRETCHEN BRIDGES, CHERI BRIDWELl, RONALD BRIDWELL, SHARON BRIEN, FRED BRIGGS, KENDALL BRIGGS, KENT BRINK, ANlJE BRINKMAN, CYNTHIA BRINKMEYER, DONNA BROCHTRUP, CAROLYN BROCI-ITRUP, WILLIAM BROCK, CHARLES BROCKER, DONNA BROCKER, LORILEE BROCKER, MARK RRODAHL, CAROL 108 BRODAHl, GAYLE 106 BRODERSON, ANCY liR ODIGAN, DONNA BROEKER, JEFF BROEKER. STEVE 7J BRaG, GARY 164, 193 BRONSON, K ATHLEEN BROOKS, JEANNE 164 BROOKSHIER, BRYON BROOM, VONDA 106 BROSSARD, ANN 108 BROSSARD, KAY 164 BROSTED, KATHY 19S BROSTEN, KARIENA 108, 190 IJROTHERSTON, STUART BROWN, AL YSON BROWN, BARBARA BROWN, ElIZABETH BROWN, IILL BROWN, JOSEPH BROWN, KARA 108 BROWN, KATHLEEN BROWN, KERRY 108 BROWN, KEVIN BROW'i KIM 108 BROWN, KRISTIN 164 BROWN, MICHA�L 108 BROWN-PETERSIDE, 194 BRULAND, RUTH BRUNNER, PETER BRUNS, NANCY 108 BRUNSVOLD, BARBARA 110 BRUS, JEFfREY 73 BRYE, TIMOTHY BUBLITZ, DAVID 1 1 0 BUCK, CARYN BUCK, MARGARET BUCKLAND, LAURA BUCKLEY, GARY BUCKLIN, DANiEl 164 BUCKLIN, JOYE BUCKNUM, GREGG BUDIS ELICH, DIANA BUDlOW, GLENN BUEGE, DEBRA 16S BUEGE, JEFFREY 110, 127 BULLOCK, BARBARA 1 10 BUMP, STEPHEN 165 BURGESS, DENICE BURICH, SHANNON

BURK, ROBERT BURNSON, JAMES BURRELL, K IMBERL Y BURRESS, HAROLD 189 BURRINGTON, scon BURY, MICHAEl 206 RUSE, TERESA 110 BUSTER, DONNA DUllER, C H R ISTINE BUtlER, JENNIFER BYE, LAURA BYl, MARK BYRD, LILLIE BYRD, LUCILLE

c CABLES, MELBA 110, 194 CADLE, MARSHA CAIN, JOHN CALDENOER, ROBIN 1 1 0 CALL, ANDREW CALLAHAM, DEBORA 1 10 CAMBRIDGE, AGNES CAMPBELL, DAVID CAMPBELL, DAVID CAMPBELL, KARRA CAMPBELL, MARY CAMPOS, LEEANNE 110 CAMPOS, LYNN CANTRILL, SHARON 165 CARDWELL, CHRISTOPHER CAREY, RANDY 165, 193 CARLILE, JILL CARLISLE, KELl Y '10 CARLSEN, JOHN ,1' CARLSEN, NAOMI CARLSEN, SUSAN 135 CARLSON, CHRISTINE CARLSON, DEBORAH 110 CARLSON, DONALD CARLSON, ERIC 7J CARSLON, FAYE CARLSON, GAYLE CARLSON, HOWIE 77, 111 CARLSON, JULIE 1 1 1 CARLSON, MARK 1 1 1 , 189 CARLSON, NANCY CARLSON, NANCY CARLSON, PHYlliS CARLSON, SUSAN CARLSTROM, ELSA CARMICHAEl, JACK CARNAHAN, DAVID CARNAHAN, VICKIE CARPENTER, JOHN CARR, INGER CARROLL, DANIEL CARROLL, LAURA CARSON, DAVID CARSTENS, TODD CARTER, KATHLEEN 1 1 1 , 189 CARTER, MARTINE CARTER, SANDRA CARY, KATHLEEN 111 CASSELL, KRISTINE 84 CASSIDY, SHARON 1 " CATRON, MIKE 22, 73 CATTERALL, LISA 1 1 CAULKINS, ROBERT CAULKINS, SUSAN CEDARHOLM, SARA 1 1 1 CESSNUN, JULY E I l " 195 CESSNUN, WILLIAM CHAD BURN, DANIEL 143 CHAMBERLIN, K,\REN 16, 1 1 1 CHAMNESS, DAVID 1 1 1 CHAMPION, SUSAN

CHAN, CONNIE 202 CI-IANDWANEY, LOU 166 CHAPIN, SUZANNE CHAPIN, VALERIE CHAPMAN, JAMES 1 1 1 , m CHAPMAN, ROSS 1 1 1 CHAPMAN, ROY 68, 70, 73 CHAIUSTON, LEIGH 98 CHARlSTON, NELSON 111 CHARlSTON, scon CHARNESKI, DAVID CHARNESKI, UNDA CHAST AMBI, RIZAl 194 CHEATHAM, KATHLEEN CHESNUTT, MARK 1 1 1 CHESTNUT, MARK CHEUNG, LAWRENCE CHIAPUZIO, CYNTHIA CHINEN, MERTON 1 1 1 CHOI, JINHOON CHRISTEL, ROBERT CHRISTENSEN, TAWNI CHRISTENSEN, WENDI 111 CHRISTIAN, LOIS 111. 195 CHRISTIANSON, DENISE CHRISTIANSON, JUDITH CHR ISTOFFERSON, GLEN CHRISTOPHER, CAMERON 166 CHU, JOSEPH CHU, PEGGY CHURCH, LAWRENCE CHURCH, SANDRA ClASSEN, MICHAEL ClAPP, RUTH CLARE, BONNIE 166 ClARE, 10H "1 ClARE, SCOTT CLARK, NANCY ClARK, RICHARD 96 ClARK, SUSAN ClARKE, BARBARA ClEGG, PIERCE ClElAND, ALAN ClEME S, JAY CUNE, TIMOTHY CUNK, RONALD 166 ClOTHER, ALAN COATE, DONNA COB EN, KIRSTEN COCKRAM ANN " 1 COR, ANNE 1 1 1 COEN, ANITA 1 1 1 COFEHIN, STEVEN COHRS, PAUL " 1 COLBERG, TAliS 166 COLBURN, GARY COLE, JOHN COLE, TIMOTHY 73 COLEMAN, BYRON COLLINS, DEBORAH 1 1 1 COLlONS, lESLIE 1 1 1 COMPTON, IJlll Y JR . CONANT, HEIDI " 1 CONDE-MCCOURY, ARLENE CONKLIN, JAMES CONLEY, DARLENE 196 CONLEY, ROBERT CONNELL, KATHLEEN CONNERS, SHERRILL 1 1 1 CONNERLY, CHRISTINE CONNON, CATHERINE CONRAD, DELBERT JR CONRAD, PATRICIA 1 1 1 COOK, BERNICE COOK, SONNA 113, 195 COOLEY, ROBERT 30, 113 COONEY, CHARLES

COOPER, BRUCE 113 CORBIN, VICTORIA 1 1 3 CORNELIUS, EVANGELINE CORNELIUS, ROBERT CORNELL, CHERI 1 1 3 CORNISH, JEFFREY 66, 73 CORNWALL, EVELYN 116, 193 CORNWEll, LELIA CORREY, JEAN COTTON, KATHERINE 113 COUCH, AARON 135, 166 COUCH, fRANK COUGHlI , BETH 77, ,.. COUGHLIN, BONNIE 77, ,.. COULHR, SUSAN COVEY, LAURA COX, USA 113, 149 CRABB, JEANNE CRABS, MARLYS CRAIG, DENNIS CRAIG, JEFFREY CRAIGHEAD, CAROLE CRANE, NANCY 1 1 3 CRAWFORD, CHARLES CRAWFORD, DENISE CRAWFORD, DOUGLAS CRAWFORD, LAURA 113 CRAWFORD, MARK CREASY, ROBYN CREIGHTON, STEPHEN CRIM, RUSSEll 77 CRINER, ALBERT 113 CRISSON, PHilliP CRISPE, MIKE 80 CRITCHLEY, GERALD CRIVEILONE, ANTI-IONY CROASDlll, GREGORY 57 CROCKER, LYNNE CROCKETT, DONNA CROCKETT, KAREN 166 CROMIE, DANIEL CRONI-IOlM, MARTA 1 13 CROSBY, SHARON CROSGROVE, JAMES CROSSLER, JANICE 1 1 3 CROSSON, EARL Y CROWELL, MARGARET CROWL, MARJORIE. CROWLEY, THERESA CRUMP, JAN 1 1 3 CUEVA, PETER CULLEN, PRISCILLA CUI.lUM, COLIN 113, 137 CUMMING, BRIAN CUMMINGS, CRAIG CUMMINS, PETER ' 1 3 CUNHA, IRENE CURTIS, DANiEl CURTIS, JANIE 1 1 3

o D'AMBROSIO, LOUIS DAHL, CAROL 113 DAHL, DAVID 113 DAHL, KRISTE , 1 13, 195 DAKA, LEONSIO 1 1 3 O A K E, DONALD DALE, LORRAINE DALEN BERG, DOUGLAS DALGLEISH, MARY 114 DAlO, LEONOR OAMINO, RA YA DANiElS, DWIGHT 166 DANIELS, MATT 73

DANIELSON, MARY 114, 137 DANSBY, ,\LMA DARDIS, ROBERT 166 DARY, RANDALL DASTIS, DIXIE DAues, CINDY 57, 114 DAUGS, KENNETH DAues, UNDA 91 DAUTH, NORBERT DAVENPORT, UNDA 1 1 4 DAVENPORT, ROBERT DAVIDSON, DANA 138 DAVIDSON, DONNA 124 DAVIE, JOHN DAVIES, KENT DAVIS, ANNIE DAVID, DIANE DAVIS, JEFFR EY DAVIS, KEVIN 1 1 4 DAVIS, LAURA DAVIS, MARK 114 DAVIS, MICHAEL 114, 189 DAVIS, SCOTT 73 DAVIS, STEVEN DAVISON , DANIEl 1 1 4 , , .. DAVISON, MICHAEL 66 DAWSON-HAGEMAN, RAEDE DAY, VICKI D E FORD, ROY JR DE GROSSE, DEBORAtI ,. DEDMORE, PATRICK 114 DEDNER. DONNA DEHART, PAMELA DELAP, JOHN 1 1 4 DELONG, LYNN DEMMER, DIANE DENEEN, DANIEl IR DENNIS, KATHERINE DENNY, MElINDA 1 1 4 DEOCAMPO, CATHERINE 1 1 4 DETWilER, REBECCA DEVISH, DENISE DEVRIES, JACQUELINE DEWEY, SUSAN 114 DEZIHAN, EGON DICECCO, JAMES DICUS, LONNIE DIERS, PAUL DIETSCHE, RENEE DINGERSON, MICHAEL DlOTTE, LORI DIRKS, JEFFREY DISPAlTRO, ADA DIXON, TERRIE DORBROWOLSKI, YUMI 114 DODSON, DONNA DOHlSTEOT, MARGARET DOERING-BURMARK, DOlA, , CAROLYN 167 DOLAN, SUSAN 114 DOlHANYK, JAMES 73,114 DOLHANYK, ROBERT JR 73 DOMINA, GARY DOMINO, JOHN DONALDSON, BRENT 114 DONG, PAUL DONG, STEVEN 114 DONLAN, SHARON DORN, GALE 114 DaRK, DOUGLAS DOTY, JUDITH 114 DOUCETTE, STEP�IEN 73, 167 DOUGLASS, MARK '16, 190

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IN CLOSING . . .

"Everything can be taken from a man but one t h i ng . . . freedom to ch oose one's own way."

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JUST O N E MORE

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Colophon


Saga 1979