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Because I am a Gir Campaign

Youth Toolkit

Ready To Get Involved? By joining Youth United for Global Action and Awareness (YUGA) today, you’re becoming a part of a nationwide movement of youth working to promote gender equality! This toolkit is specifically designed to give young people like you the opportunity to take action with Plan International USA’s Because I am a Girl campaign.

On the pages ahead, you’ll find resources and information to help you: • Educate yourself and your peers on the barriers girls face around the world • Understand the strategies Plan uses to combat these issues • Raise awareness in your school and community • Get involved in the global call to action and support the International Day of the Girl

About Youth United for Global Action and Awareness (YUGA) YUGA is a nationwide network of ambitious young people who take action on global issues. Through campaigns and advocacy activities, YUGA members educate their schools and communities on global challenges and engage their peers in finding solutions.

About Because I am a Girl To reach the most vulnerable and marginalized girls living in extreme poverty, Plan International created the Because I am a Girl initiative. The goal of the initiative is to identify and combat the barriers girls face in an effort to improve the lives of 4 million girls by 2016. Why girls? Because by investing in a girl and her future, we know for a fact that she can lift herself out of poverty, altering the economic condition of her family, her community, and ultimately her country. How do we know? Decades of experience and in-depth research have proven it. Yet even today, a girl in the developing world still faces overwhelming odds from the day she’s born. However, by working with young leaders like you, we can change that. By educating others about the barriers girls face, together we can raise awareness and help give girls the voice they need to change their own lives. But it’s not just a girl thing. We actively engage men and boys in all of our initiatives because real change can’t happen without the support of the entire community. All over the world, young people are taking action to raise awareness about girls’ rights and gender equality through YUGA’s Because I am a Girl campaign. Join us and be part of a global movement that promises 4 million girls a brighter future!

About International Day of the Girl On October 11, 2012, the United Nations was marked the first annual International Day of the Girl. This special day is meant to prioritize girls’ rights as one of the most important issues of the decade. In honor of the occcasion, Plan International launched the Because I am a Girl campaign in 68 countries around the world—and you can be a part of it! Take action by using the awesome resources in this toolkit. Educate yourself about the issues, then raise awareness through activities, videos, tweets, and Facebook posts. You can also invest in a girl by holding a fundraiser in your school or community.

Table of Contents Educate So, What’s the Problem?.............................................................................................................................................5 Girls’ Dictionary............................................................................................................................................................6 Top 10 Barriers......................................................................................................................................................... 7-8

Raise Awareness Take Action.............................................................................................................................................................. 9-10

Fundraise Invest in a Girl............................................................................................................................................................. 11

Because I am a Girl Girl Spotlight: Meet Fatmata from Sierra Leone...................................................................................................12 Solving the Problem..................................................................................................................................................13

YUGA Spotlight...............................................................................................................................................14 Activities Activity #1: The Root of the Problem.....................................................................................................................15 The Unhealthy Tree....................................................................................................................................................16 The Healthy Tree........................................................................................................................................................17 Activity #2: So, What About Boys?................................................................................................................... 18-19 Activity #3: Step Forward.................................................................................................................................. 20-21 Role Cards..............................................................................................................................................................22-23

References 1 UNESCO, Global Education Digest 2011. http://www.uis.unesco.org/Library/Documents/global_education_digest_2011_en.pdf 2 Adapted from “Take a Step Forward” at http://www.eycb.coe.int/Compass/en/chapter_2/2_38.asp.

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So, What’s the Problem?

Girls are entitled to the exact same human rights as boys. But in reality, girls face discrimination in countries all over the world, simply because of their gender and age.

discrimination in her own home. Because she is a girl, she’ll have limited access to a doctor or an education, if she’s allowed to go to school at all. Around the world, a girl’s opportunities are determined by cultural norms and values that her society deems important. For example, most traditional gender roles place women and girls at home, raising children, cooking food, and taking care of the household, while men work outside the home. For a girl, decisions about her role in the household, her education, or her husband are often determined by men or adults, without her consent or consultation. When a girl’s family is poor, her parents have to make difficult decisions about how they will spend their money so they can survive. Because girls are seen as an asset in the home, it is common for parents to invest in the education of their son so he can get a good job and support his own family someday.

“The percentage of girls enrolled in school in Ethiopia is less than 40 percent. This number is equivalent to the percentage of girls enrolled in school in the United States during the 1830s.” (World Bank)

Because she is a girl, she’s more likely to eat dinner last, be forced into an early marriage, be subjected to violence, and be sold into the sex trade. Because she is a girl, she faces

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When a girl from a poor family doesn’t go to school or doesn’t finish school, she is likely to stay poor. She will probably have no say in whom or when she will marry. She is likely to get pregnant before she turns 18. She is also more likely to contract diseases and have no access to a doctor. And it’s likely that her daughters will share the same fate. That’s what we call the cycle of poverty. In short, from the day they are born, girls are up against some very tough odds. Just how tough? Keep reading to find out. Youth Toolkit | 5

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Girls’ Dictionary

To help fuel the conversation, we’ve put together a list of words we use when talking about girls’ rights. 1. Arranged Marriage is when the parents or family members decide whom their son or daughter will marry. 2. Assets are skills, knowledge, capacities, and material items that help individuals remain stable and secure when they experience a crisis or disaster. 3. Domestic Labor is work that takes place within a home and generally includes caring for children, cleaning, cooking, and other household responsibilities. Girls often perform this work in another person’s home in order to make money.

decisions, and provides financial support. 7. Life Skills are skills, knowledge, and attitudes developed throughout a person’s life that promote healthy behaviors like critical thinking, decision making, and financial literacy. 8. Missing at Birth is a phenomenon taking place in developing countries where girls are not valued as highly as boys. Girls may be aborted or abandoned at birth because they are perceived to be a burden to the family. 9. Vulnerable Employment is any type of work that puts a person in danger, pays so low that a person is not able to meet his or her basic needs, or fails to provide job security.

4. Dowry is generally a gift in the form of money, livestock, jewelry, or land that the family of a bride presents to the potential husband (or his family) at the time the marriage is proposed. In many countries, the dowry can be interpreted in different ways; it can also be a gift given to the bride’s family by the potential husband at the time of proposal. For poor families, a low dowry can be an incentive for parents to marry their daughter early—sometimes as young as 12. 5. Early Marriage is when a boy or girl is married before he or she turns 18. 6. Head of Household is an individual who takes care of family members, makes all the planusa.org/youth

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Top 10 Barriers

Imagine your school with no girls... In the developing world, there are countless girls who do not have the opportunity to go to school. And for the few that do start school, they will most likely not continue their studies once they hit their teens. In fact, in places like Tanzania, only 36 percent of students make the transition to secondary school.1 What are the most common barriers girls face in trying to get an education? Here are the top 10: 1. Lack of Money. Many parents lack the necessary fees for tuition, books, supplies, uniforms, and food, and therefore cannot afford to send their daughters to school. 2. Distance. In rural areas, schools are often few and far between, requiring girls to take long and often dangerous walks to school. 3. Responsibilities at Home. In rural communities, girls often have many duties at home that take away from their time in the classroom. Some of these chores may include planusa.org/youth

caring for younger siblings, housekeeping, and fetching water. 4. Value of Girls’ Education. In some societies, little value is placed on girls’ education. In these communities, girls struggle against social and familial pressures in order to attend school. 5. Child Marriage. In some parts of the world, girls are forced to marry at very young ages, often to save the family money. Some families receive a dowry when they marry off their daughter and this extra money helps raise their standard of living. However, a young wife must take care of her new husband and household, which interferes with her going to school. 6. Pregnancy. A lack of comprehensive health education, little to no access to contraception, a societal taboo against discussing reproductive health, and the prevalence of

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Top 10 Barriers

child marriage can all contribute to early pregnancy among girls and young women. If a girl is pregnant or has a young child, she will not be able to regularly attend school or focus on her studies. 7. School Facilities. Often schools are not properly maintained and therefore do not offer safe and healthy learning environments for students. Classrooms can be hot, crowded, and lacking in materials such as desks, chalkboards, and books.

long hours. Children are sometimes also trafficked illegally within their country or internationally. If children are working, they often do not have the energy to keep up with their studies. While working, children and youth often miss days of school, or withdraw from school all together.

8. Sanitation Facilities. In addition to classrooms, students need safe and sanitary bathrooms, including separate spaces for boys and girls. Children and youth also need access to clean drinking water throughout the school day, which schools often cannot provide. 9. Quality of Teachers. In some instances, teachers are underpaid, inadequately trained, or not fully invested in providing quality education for their students—especially girls. So even if a girl is allowed to attend school, she sometimes does not receive personal attention or effective instruction. 10. Child Labor. Millions of children around the world are forced to work in order to help contribute to their family’s income. Their jobs can include unpaid and paid work (though often for very low wages) in agriculture, domestic service, textiles, and other industries. Sometimes their work can be dangerous and can require planusa.org/youth

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Take Action

Take action to educate yourself about the issues, then raise awareness through activities, videos, tweets, and Facebook posts. You can also invest in a girl by holding a fundraiser in your school or community. 1. Get active. Educate your peers and raise awareness by running on of the following activities in your club, your classroom, or your entire school!

15-Minute Activity: Root of the Problem 20-Minute Activity: So, What About Boys? 35-Minute Activity: Step Forward

“Girls are being neglected, marginalized, and discriminated in families and society. Most of the girls are ignorant about their rights. The International Day of the Girl will make girls feel respected, recognized, and their contributions valued in society.” – Lil, Plan Cameroon

2. Raise your hand! Organize the football team, the choir, or your entire class and get them to raise their hands for gender equality—and then photograph it! Post your “Raise Your Hand” pictures on YUGA’s Facebook page. The photo with the most people raising their hands and the most creative photo will be showcased on our website! If snapping pics publicly isn’t your thing, you can also raise your hand virtually on Facebook by visiting YUGA’s Facebook page at facebook.com/YUGAcentral and clicking on the “Raise Your Hand” app! 3. Visualize it. Show a video that explains the importance of girls’ rights in your club or classroom, or in a school assembly. There’s nothing like a movie to get your point across!

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Hand Now! Because I Am A Girl: Raise Your

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She’ll Learn

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Marcia Cross for Because I am a Girl

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Check out the entire Because I am a Girl film library on YouTube: youtube.com/biaagusa

4. Speak up on Facebook and Twitter. In honor of International Day of the Girl, we’re giving our Facebook profile a makeover—and you can, too! Change your Facebook cover photo to let all your friends know that you are part of the 4 million girl promise! Use our Twibbon to get the word out on Twitter. Then follow it up by spreading the word about gender equality and girls’ rights! Visit becauseiamagirl.us to download powerful images and read suggested tweets.

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Invest in a Girl

Holding a fundraiser is a great way to raise awareness about gender inequality in your school or community. When you invest in a girl, she will change the world!

School Uniforms

Literacy for a Girl

1. Change Her World. This is a challenge for your whole class—or your whole school! The goal is to fill a container with all the spare change you can find. Start by selecting a container—like a large can or a bottle—and then set a deadline. Do you want to run the challenge just during the month of October, when we celebrate International Day of the Girl? Or will you keep at it until the container is filled? Set a goal for your fundraiser by selecting one of Plan International USA’s Gifts of Hope to put your money towards. Track your progress each week and use the facts from this toolkit to teach your classmates about the importance of these issues. Your collected change will add up!

Complete a Classroom 2. Take Action with a T-Shirt. First, create a t-shirt using our easy online system. Next, share your fabulous design with your friends. If they like it, encourage them to buy one for themselves and a few more for their friends. When enough t-shirts have been ordered, they will print! All proceeds from the t-shirts will go to Because I am a Girl projects. Got your creative juices flowing? Start your custom t-shirt campaign today! teespring.com/design/becauseiamagirl (Stumped for a logo or design? Don’t worry—there are plenty to pick from, and you can personalize it! Our favorite motto: “This t-shirt helped change a girl’s life. What did yours do?”)

Visit our Gifts of Hope store at planusa.org/giftsofhope and put your money towards the project that’s most meaningful to you!

Any money raised should be sent directly to the Youth Engagement Team at Plan International USA • 155 Plan Way • Warwick, RI 02886 planusa.org/youth

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GIRL SPOTLIGHT:

Meet Fatmata from Sierra Leone

Fatmata, 17, of Sierra Leone, and her four siblings were raised by a single mother who was forced to marry at 14—just like millions of girls worldwide who are forced to marry older men when they are still children. Fatmata’s mother was determined that her daughters would have access to education. Fatmata’s commitment to ending the harmful practice of early marriage is a testament to her mother’s efforts and shows that change is possible. “I stand on behalf of the girls of Sierra Leone, for our rights to choose who we marry and when,”

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Fatmata told a room filled with policy-makers, ministers, journalists, government officials, and activists gathered in New York City for the 56th Commission on the Status of Women. In addition to presenting to stakeholders, Fatmata also acts in plays, dramatizing the issue so that people in rural areas can better understand the consequences of early marriage. She speaks on the radio, writes and performs songs, and puts up posters and distributes brochures, all while studying to become an accountant and working her way through high school.

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Solving the Problem In every area—health, education, employment, and rights—investing in girls drives economic growth, reduces poverty, and improves the lives of individuals, families, and entire communities. To ensure the promise and potential of present and future generations, the Because I am a Girl

initiative focuses on projects that specifically address the needs and rights of girls. Visit becauseiamagirl.us to follow the stories of girls fighting for rights and equality in their communities around the world.

Protection Nepal Fighting Against Child Trafficking and Gender-Based Violence Protection India Combating Child Labor in Andhra Pradesh

Education Ethiopia Girls Empowerment through Education

Microfinance Vietnam Village Savings and Loans for Women

Health Indonesia Food Security and Nutrition Project

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YUGA Spotight

A YUGA chapter in New York City, called Unity & Hope, took their Because I am a Girl advocacy to the runway! To raise money for a girls’ education project in Ethiopia, the chapter put on a fashion show called “Simply a Girl,” with an “Africhiq” theme inspired by African fabrics. They charged $5 admission and sold food and African jewelry, raising $500 for the cause! There’s a lot you can learn from Unity & Hope’s success. First, fundraise in whatever way makes the most sense for you. Do you like art? Music? planusa.org/youth

Food? Dance? Then put on a performance, a concert, or a cook-off. Whatever it is, it will make for an event that people will want to come to and support with donations. Second, don’t forget to use Facebook and Twitter to connect! (The chapter set up a Facebook page to help them organize and reach more people.) And finally, keep it up! This year, Unity & Hope will perform another fundraiser and donate that money to the same project in Ethiopia. Talk about a continuous impact! Youth Toolkit | 14

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#1: The Root of the Problem

i t i v i t c A Concept:

Students learn how decisions made at a young age can impact their lives.

Time:

15 minutes

Ages:

10 and up

Participants:

10

Materials:

Copies of the healthy tree and unhealthy tree for each student, pens/pencils

Part A: Healthy and Unhealthy Trees Explain to participants that the way a tree grows and flourishes is similar to how humans flourish. A healthy tree grows because good nutrients from the soil are passed through its roots into its trunk and branches, allowing its leaves to grow and its fruit to blossom. However, if there isn’t enough sunlight, water, or nutrients, or if there are harmful chemicals in the soil, then the roots, trunk, branches, and leaves will all suffer. A healthy human grows because he or she has strong roots, meaning that he or she has all the necessary resources to fulfill his or her potential, including the support of his or her family and community.

On the branches, write the consequences of not being able to continue to go to school after second grade. Example: “She did not learn about her basic human rights and was married off at a young age.” After the group has finished writing, ask students to share their answers. Discuss the causes and consequences of dropping out of school. Together as a class, fill in the “healthy tree” diagram by providing the enabling causes and resulting consequences of the opposite scenario, i.e., a girl in a developing country graduates from high school.

Part B: Discussion

Give students a copy of the “unhealthy tree” and ask them to fill in the tree as follows:

Using the “unhealthy tree,” how would the consequences change if this were about a boy?

In the center of the tree, select a scenario a girl might face. For example, a girl in a developing country has to drop out of school.

Using the “unhealthy tree,” could this example happen at your school? Why or why not?

In the tree roots, write possible causes as to why a girl would have to drop out of school. Example: “She has too many chores to do and doesn’t have time to attend school.” planusa.org/youth

What has helped you stay in school? Who has helped you stay in school? What positive consequences have you experienced from staying in school? How do you think it will impact your future? Youth Toolkit | 15

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The Unhealthy Tree

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The Healthy Tree

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#2: So, What About Boys?

i t i v i t c A Concept:

Participants reveal and discuss their perceptions about the differences between girls and boys.

Time:

20 minutes

Ages:

15 and up

Participants:

25

Materials:

Papers and markers

Prep:

Make space! Move desks and tables away from two walls in your classroom. Write “true,” “false,” and “I do not know” on three separate pieces of paper. Hang the papers along one wall of the classroom. Write “agree” and “disagree” on two separate pieces of paper. Hang the papers along a different wall of the classroom.

Part A: True/False Explain to students that one part of the room is “true,” one part of the room is “false,” and one part of the room is “I do not know.” Read the statements below and ask students to stand on the side of the room corresponding to their guess.

6 out of 10 women experience physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime. (Answer: True.) Girls spend approximately 25 percent more time per day on unpaid care work than boys. (Answer: False. Girls spend 85 percent more time per day on unpaid care work.)

After the students have stopped moving, ask for at least one person from each group to tell you why he/she chose to stand on that side of the room. Once participants have discussed their guesses, reveal the answers.

The following characteristics are facts about men and boys: They enjoy physical labor, sports, big meals, and action movies. (Answer: False. These are all gender norms and are shaped by culture. None of these are facts!)

Statements

Women account for 48 percent of the labor force but 59 percent of the workers who make less than $8 an hour. (Answer: True.)

The average grade point average for high school students in the United States is 3.09 for girls and 2.86 for boys (on a 4.0 scale). (Answer: True.)

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Part B: Agree/Disagree Explain to students that one part of the room is “agree” and one part of the room is “disagree.” Read the statements below and ask students to stand on the side of the room corresponding to their guess.

Over 60 percent of children interviewed in India agreed.

Part C: Debrief Were you surprised about the group’s overall responses?

After the students have stopped moving, ask for at least one person from each group to tell you why he/she chose to stand on that side of the room. Once participants have discussed their answers, reveal how individuals selected from India and Rwanda responded.

In the second part of the activity, in what ways did your responses look similar to the responses of young people in India and Rwanda?

Responses

Why do you think the individuals in India and Rwanda responded in the manner that they did?

A woman should tolerate violence in order to keep her family together. 65 percent of participants from India and Rwanda totally or partially agreed. A further 43 percent agreed with the statement “There are times when a woman deserves to be beaten.”

In the second part of the activity, in what ways were the responses different to the responses of young people in India and Rwanda?

What can be done to help women and girls live lives that are free of violence? What can be done to make sure women and girls have equal opportunities as men and boys?

Changing diapers, giving kids a bath, and feeding kids are the mother’s responsibility. 67 percent of boys and 71 percent of girls in Rwanda agreed. 83 percent of boys and 87 percent of girls in India agreed. If resources are scarce, it is better to educate a boy than a girl.

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#3: Step Forward

i t i v i t c A

2

Concept:

Students learn about advantages and disadvantages to being born and raised in different parts of the world.

Time:

35 minutes

Ages:

13 and up

Participants:

25

Materials:

Open space, role cards (one for each student)

Prep:

Print and cut out the role cards. If you want to, create your own—for example, you could add role cards to match the city or community in which you live.

Part A: Assign Roles, Step Forward!

not to take a step forward.

Hand out the role cards at random, one to each student. Tell them not to show it to anyone else.

After reading all the statements, invite everyone to take note of their final positions. Students will notice that they are standing at different points and some may never have left the line.

Give them a minute to think silently about their new identity and help clarify what the identity means if anyone is confused. Ask the group to line up in one single-file line against a wall. (Make sure there is plenty of open space. See diagram on the following page.) Tell the students that you will read a list of statements. The student will have to make assumptions about their identity and should take a step forward if they think the statement is true for them. If the statement does not apply to them, they should stay put. If a student takes a step forward, they stay there. If another statement applies to the student, they will take another step forward. Students never move back. Read the statements on the following page out loud, one at a time. Give students time to think about the statement before deciding whether or planusa.org/youth

Part B: Discussion How did you feel stepping forward or not stepping forward? Can you guess one another’s identity? (Let students reveal their identity during this part of the discussion.) How easy or hard was it to take on the identity of the person on your card? If two people had the same card, did they end up at the same spot? Why or why not? How do you think this game represents advantages and disadvantages of people living in the United States and people living in developing countries? Which human rights are at stake in this activity? Youth Toolkit | 20

Students line up along a line

Teacher calls out situations

Students take steps forward

Situations: I have never encountered a serious financial crisis.

I am not afraid of being stopped by the police.

I can go to the doctor when I am sick.

I have never felt discriminated against because of my age.

I have the confidence to make my own decisions about my money. I have personal documentation, such as a birth certificate.

I have never felt discriminated against because of my gender. I know how and when to wash my hands properly.

I have an adult role model.

I will attend college.

I have received all of my immunizations.

I believe I can study and follow the career path of my choice.

I am never hungry after a meal. I can walk to the nearest hospital or clinic.

I am not afraid of being harassed or attacked on the streets.

I believe boys and girls have the same opportunities in my community.

I can vote in national and local elections.

I have housing with running water and electricity.

I am not afraid for the future of my children.

I have a television and telephone line.

I can buy new clothes at least once every three months.

I believe that my language, religion, and culture are respected in the society where I live.

I can marry the person of my choice.

I believe that people listen to my opinion on social and political issues. planusa.org/youth

I can use and benefit from the Internet.

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Role Cards

You are a 14-year-old girl in the Bronx, NY. Your parents are married and have jobs, and you are in an after-school program.

You are a 5-year-old boy born to the President of Tanzania. Your parents are very wealthy and you live in the city.

You are a 5-year-old boy in a city in Mozambique. Your dad has a job and your mom sells vegetables at the market. Your siblings attend boarding school.

You are a 15-year-old girl in the Hamptons in New York. You have lots of friends, you can buy new clothes every three months, and you are thinking about where you want to go to college.

You are a 5-year-old girl in rural Tanzania. Your father died when you were 3, and you do not attend school because you have to watch your younger siblings while your mom works.

You are a 10-year-old girl in Haiti. Your house has no running water, but your school does. You are the youngest of seven children. Your family is considered poor, but you have enough food to eat and can pay school fees.

You are a 10-year-old boy in Rwanda. You attend primary school. You are the youngest of three children and your parents have passed away from HIV/ AIDS. Your 15-year-old brother works so the family can have an income.

You are a 15-year-old girl in Vietnam. You will be married next year to a man your parents will choose. You have completed primary school but did not continue to secondary school because you have to help your parents grow rice. Your two brothers are in secondary school.

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Role Cards

You are an 11-year-old girl in El Salvador. You walk two hours to fetch water for your family instead of going to school. You are often harassed by men in your community.

You are a 12-year-old girl in Burkina Faso. You are married and pregnant. You never went to school, and you had no say over when or whom you married.

You are a 17-year-old girl in Egypt. You are married to a man with HIV, and your newborn child also has HIV.

You are the 5-year-old son of LeBron James. You live in Miami, FL and your family is very wealthy.

You are a 14-year-old girl in Guatemala. You have the measles. You have never been severely ill before. You are in secondary school.

You are an 8-year-old girl in Kenya. Your younger siblings died before reaching age 5. You go to school, and your family has enough money to eat three meals a day.

You are the teenage daughter of the president of the United States. You go to a private school and have access to your own car.

You are a 4-year-old girl living in India without a toilet or clean drinking water. None of your siblings go to school, and your younger brother is always sick.

You are a 10-year old boy born in Indonesia, but your family immigrated to New York City when you were a baby. You go to public school and your family is considered middle-class.

You are a 10-year old girl born in Thailand, but your family immigrated to New York City when you were a baby. You go to public school and work at the family business after school and on weekends.

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Get Connected to Plan’s Youth Programs! yuga@planusa.org planusa.org/advocate facebook.com/YUGAcentral youtube.com/user/PlanUSAvideos yugaplanusa.wordpress.com @YUGAPlanUSA

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Youth Toolkit: "Because I Am a Girl" Campaign