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Omaha Public Schools

& s e i t i n u t r pp o r o f s e i t i l i ossib s t n e tud

Provided by the Omaha Schools Foundation

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Becas para estudiantes hispanos

Llame a Anita al 402.449.2928

FUNDAMENTOS CRISTIANOS

Educaci贸n Superior Econ贸mica 1311 S 9th St Omaha, NE 68108

Publisher Writers Team

Bernardo Montoya Marina Rosado

Contributing Writers

Leo Adam Biga Adam Payson

Translations

Carlos Millán Alexzia Plumber

Production Manager Photography

John Heaston

Paula A. Restrepo Bernardo Montoya Marina Rosado Marlon A. Wright

Sales Manager

Carrie Kentch

Account Representatives

Sergio Rangel

Management Analyst Hispanic Market Research Analyst Special Thanks to

Diana González Sonia A. Neira

Jorge E. Espejel, Consul

Jim Suttle, Mayor

CONTENT

Contenido

An Official Letter Una Carta Oficial

A Letter from Mayor Jim Suttle about the importance of the Latino Community in Omaha> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 4 Una Carta del Alcade Jim Suttle sobre la importancia de la comunidad Latina en Omaha>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 4

Mexican consulate’s letter Una Carta del Consulado Comments from the Mexican Consul Jorge Ernesto Espejel Montes on the Latino Community in Omaha >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 5 Comentarios del Cónsul de México Jorge Ernesto Espejel Montes sobre la comunidad Latina >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 5

YEAR IN REVIEW Año en Resumen An Annual Review of Omaha’s Latino Community Activities >>>>>>> 7 Un Resumen Anual de las Actividades de la Comunidad Latina en Omaha >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 9

soccer matters in omaha Asuntos de Fútbol en Omaha Sports Event >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 8 Eventos Deportivos > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 11

OUR LATINO COMMUNITY Nuestra Comunidad Latina Omaha Latino Organizations and Businesses >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 12 Organizaciones y Negocios Latinos de Omaha > >>>>>>>>>>>>> 12

censUS 2010 Censo 2010 A Crucial Count in 2010 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 22 Un Recuento Crucial en el 2010 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 24

Copyright 2010 by ABM Enterprises, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Derechos reservados por ABM Enterprises, LLC ©2010. Todos los derechos son reservados y está totalmente prohíbida cualquier reproducción sin autorización del publicador. For distribution and advertisement information Para distribución e información sobre publicidad

(402) 734-0279

Reforming Health Reforma de Salud New insurance law will benefit Latinos, but challenges remain >>>> 23 La Nueva ley de seguros beneficiara a los latinos, pero los desafíos continúan> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 25

THE HEARTBEAT OF OMAHA LATINO LEADERS Young Latina on the Rise - Itzel Lopez >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 26 Jose and Linda Garcia Find a New Outlet for their Magnificent Obsession > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 27

OMAHA PROMINENT LATINOS Community Leaders >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 28 Líderes Comunitarios >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 28

Dear Friends:

T

here are many outstanding opportunities that lay ahead for our community in 2010 and beyond. While cities around the country are struggling from the national economic downturn, Omaha has fared far better. In fact, Forbes magazine recently recognized Omaha as the fastest recovering city from the recession. This is great news for Omahans and I am confident that we will only continue this. As we look back on 2009 and enter the early days of 2010, we must remember that the greatest strength of our community is our citizens. Our citizens bring rich diversity _ diversity of backgrounds, cultures, and ideas _ and we must leverage our wide range of experiences as our city continues to grow and thrive. You may be surprised to learn that there are at least 64 different languages spoken across Omaha, which is further evidence that we can gain great strength by sharing what makes each of us unique.

Jim Suttle

Mayor/alcalde

Omaha’s Latino community is a key part of our city’s diversity. The contributions Latinos make in the areas of business, education, arts, culture, and more are very important to our city. At City Hall, I’m working to ensure that all people who call Omaha home have a voice in their local government, through appointments to boards and commissions and through community outreach efforts. I look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead to continue to grow our city. Best wishes for 2010! Kind regards,

Jim Suttle, Mayor City of Omaha

Queridos Amigos:

H

ay grandes oportunidades que se avecinan para nuestra comunidad en el 2010 y más allá. Mientras que otras ciudades del país están luchando contra la recesión económica a nivel nacional, a Omaha le está yendo mucho mejor. De hecho, la revista Forbes recientemente reconoció a Omaha como una de las ciudades de más rápida recuperación durante la recesión. Esta es una gran noticia para los residentes de Omaha y estoy seguro de que continuaremos así. A medida que recordamos el 2009 y el comienzo del 2010 debemos tener en cuenta que la mayor fortaleza de nuestra comunidad son nuestros ciudadanos. Ellos traen la riqueza de la diversidad, diversidad de orígenes, culturas y ideas, y debemos hacer uso de nuestra amplia gama de experiencias a medida que nuestra ciudad continúa creciendo y prosperando. Usted puede que se sorprenda al enterarse de que en Omaha se hablan por lo menos 64 idiomas diferentes, lo cual demuestra que nosotros podemos fortalecernos al compartir lo que nos hace excepcionales a cada uno de nosotros. La comunidad Latina de Omaha es una pieza fundamental en la diversidad de nuestra ciudad. Las contribuciones que los Latinos hacen en las áreas de negocios, educación, arte y cultura son muy importantes para nuestra ciudad. En la Intendencia Municipal, yo estoy trabajando por asegurarme de que todas las personas que llaman a Omaha hogar tengan una voz en su gobierno local, a través de nombramientos en las juntas directivas, comisiones y mediante esfuerzos de alcance comunitario. Espero con interés trabajar con ustedes en los próximos meses y años a medida que continuemos haciendo crecer nuestra ciudad. ¡Mis mejores deseos para el 2010! Un cordial saludo,

Jim Suttle, Alcalde Ciudad de Omaha



A YEAR IN REVIEW

MEXICAN COMMUNITY ABROAD, CONSULATE OF MEXICO AT OMAHA, P R E S E N T, To all Hispanic Nebraskans: I am honored to write some words to you to reiterate that we will continue working to expand our heritage fortify the opportunities that this country offers our community.

Jorge Ernesto Espejel Consul/Cónsul

2010 is a momentous year for Mexico; Mexicans will continue to tirelessly promote our history and our culture during the Bicentenary of the Independence and the Centennial of the Mexican Revolution. We will proudly display how much Mexicans have accomplished in 200 years as independent Nation through our traditions, art, music, food, and democracy. I want to express gratitude to La Vision Latina, El Perico, and to ABM Enterprises for of its commitment to promote and to defend the interests of Mexican nationals abroad and for their continued dedication covering issues of interest to the Spanish speaking population. Wishing you a happy 2010 year.

COMUNIDAD DE MEXICANOS EN EL EXTERIOR, CONSULADO DE MEXICO EN OMAHA, NEBRASKA P R E S E N T E, A todos los hispanos de Nebraska: Tengo el honor de escribirles unas palabras para reiterarles que nosotros continuaremos trabajando para ampliar nuestro patrimonio y fortalecer las oportunidades que este país le ofrece a nuestra comunidad. El 2010 es un año transcendental para México; los mexicanos continuaremos incansablemente promoviendo nuestra historia y cultura durante el Bicentenario de la Independencia y el Centenario de la Revolución Mexicana. Nosotros mostraremos con orgullo lo mucho que los mexicanos hemos logrado en 200 años como una nación independiente a través de nuestras tradiciones, arte, música, comida y democracia. Quiero expresar mi gratitud a La Vision Latina, El Perico y ABM Enterprises por su compromiso de promover y defender los intereses de los mexicanos en el extranjero y por su continua dedicación en la cobertura de temas de interés para la población hispanohablante. Les deseo un felíz año 2010. Atentamente,

Visión Latina



Fiestas El Grito 2009

Hechiceros

Aniversario de Radio Luz

Festival Internacional Festival Latino Las Posadas

Independencia de Guatemala

Viacrusis

Rieleros del Norte

Festival Latino

HLLC 2009

Nueva Localidad del MLCDC en la calle 24

Mes de la Herencia Hispana en El Museo Latino

Festival de Nuestra SeĂąora de Guadalupe

Linderos del Norte

HerĂŠndira Moreno, Reina de la Independencia Mexicana

Candidatas al Reinado de la Independencia Mexicana

Reinado del Cinco de Mayo

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he most important acts that influence the development of a community are those in which the residents become involved in its daily happenings. For this reason we are doing a review of news in Omaha and the surrounding areas during the last 12 months, where the Hispanic community was present

2009 APRIL,

Melina Baeza-Villa, Bryan High School student, received the Marie Curie scholarship worth $72,000. Meanwhile, Bellevue University concluded its third successful Conference for Latina Women, Gina Ponce was introduced as the Education and Art Director of the Kroc Center and Annabelle García was honored by the Boys & Girls Club as “Youth of the Year.” Similarly, the Panamanian community started the Panamanians in Nebraska Association, naming Aura WhitneyJackson as president. Meanwhile, hundreds of Catholics witnessed the drama of the Cross during Holy Week.

MAY,

Magdalena García, director of El Museo Latino, inaugurated the exhibition “Ex-Votos y Retablos”, celebrating 16 years of exhibitions, and Martha Sonia Londoño, founder of the Midlands Latino Community Development Corporation, presented “Latinodir”, a database of 650 bilingual social services. Later, the streets of South Omaha were filled with chatter with the celebration of Cinco de Mayo, where the beauty of the queen, Marisol Suárez, stood out. Musically, Guaca Maya offered national and international alternatives, highlighting the talent of local duet, Los Jalapeños. Equally, Casa del Sol did its own culminating activity with the Ponzoña Musical.

JUNE, Bishop George Joseph Lucas

was named Archbishop of Omaha. Then, the Omaha Community Foundation launched the Latino Future Fund, supporting diverse initiatives in the Hispanic community. Returning to music,

celebration of cinco de mayo Grupo Bryndis and Grupo Hechicero conquered the local population.

JULY, showed diversity with Miss Ne-

braska Gay Latino where Jacqueline Rojas won. Later on, Nebraska Appleseed Center hosted a dialogue and analysis meeting to recommend positive approaches to immigration reform, while local businesses satisfactorily concluded the first Diversity Week. Similarly, Joslyn Art Museum opened the exhibit “Mexican Popular Art” whose curators were Linda and José Garcia. Then, the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Nebraska celebrated their anniversary, and the Los Rieleros del Norte performed a concert.

AUGUST,

centered on Sonia Sotomayor and her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. Locally, the Collin Stadium at South High opened its facilities, while the Church of Guadalupe and Saint Agnes hosted it 43rd celebration with the participation of 8,000 parishioners.

SEPTEMBER,

the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Nebraska acknowledged the festivities of Mexican Independence, presenting Heréndira Moreno as queen. Also, Guaca Maya Restaurant held an event entitled “Viva México.” Guatemalans ,celebrated their independence and Cándida Velázquez was named Miss Independence. Meanwhile Salvadorian Alex Núñez from Radio Luz 1420-AM, celebrated a year of radio activities.

Musically, Omaha danced with Los Socios and Herencia de la Sierra in Guaca Maya, while Casa del Sol held a charity event to benefit One World Medical Center.

OCTOBER, the Mexican Consulate

in Omaha inaugurated its “Health Desk” benefiting Mexicans and foreigners. For those dates, the celebrations for the Day of the Dead included the exhibition at the Cultural Center for the Arts, an offering by Guaca Maya and El Museo Latino, the Festival of Mexican Art, Joslyn Art Museum and Festival del Día de las Brujas at the Midlands Latino Community Development Corporation.

november,

centered on the Heartland Latino Leadership Conference and its 10th anniversary; meanwhile, Panamanians celebrated their independence with the event “This is our Panama”, and the RNG Gallery exhibited the work of artist Claudia Álvarez. A conference dedicated to the Spanish language was offered at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, then there was a call for high school students to chat with Sonia Nazario of the LA Times, while the Midland Latino Community Development Corporation opened its new offices.

december, had a religious fervor and the Christmas spirit with Catholic celebration at the Virgen de Guadalupe and diverse Christmas parties.

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year in review y continued from page 7

Later, Nancy Ibarra assumed direction of the Girls, Inc. Center in South Omaha and the Kroc Center opened its doors. The Americas Society and the Council of the Americas held a public discussion about America and the eventual Latino integration, and finally, Omaha Public Schools concluded its anniversary.

2010 january,

started with celebrations of Day of the Child and Glaucoma Prevention Month. There was also a fight over immigration in Fremont and the Nebraska Supreme Court said a vote could proceed on the proposed ordinance that would prohibit the sale or rental of housing to undocumented residents. Metropolitan Community College presented an annual series of lectures about diversity, followed by training for merchants by the Micro-business Program of Catholic Charities; later there was the announcement of the naming of Javier Rodríguez as Bilingual Links Specialist for OPS.

FEBRUARY, started with a confer-

ence by Andrea Skolklin, president of One World Community Health Center, to discuss the impending crises of Medicaid for prenatal care, because as of March 1 undocumented, pregnant women were not covered by this service. In turn, Dr. Shannon Kinnan, of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, reported the low access to mental health care by Hispanics in Nebraska. On the subject of the 2010 Census, the campaign to get Latinos to participate told the public “If we are not counted, we simply don’t exist!”, while in music more than 2,500 people enjoyed a concert by Espnioza Paz. And to close the month, OPS presented the show Generación Ñ.

April,

presented the new Catholic Charities Program Director, the Colombian Adriana Zambrano, which coincided with the arrival of the leader of the Mexican city of Xalapa. The city received ambulances and equipment through a donation of the Rural/Metro 

A YEAR IN REVIEW

Ambulance Service, the Fire Department and the City of Omaha. Artist Linda Garcia paid tribute to Latin American women who have gone before her in the exploration of creative work, while Metropolitan Community College was the host of the Annual International Fair XXI; the month closed with a celebration of the Day of the Child at El Museo Latino.

may, brought the colorful celebration

of “Cinco de Mayo, XXV”, whose new administration reported nearly 40,000 attendees. Meanwhile, Compañía de Danza Folklórica of the Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua performed at El Museo Latino as part of the festivities for the Bicentennial of Mexican Independence and the Centennial of the Revolution. This month continued with the participation of Anglo tourists joining the “Cultural and Historical Tour Visita el Barrio”, which benefits the Latino business owners of South Omaha. At the same time, the Office of Latino and Latin American Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha met with nearly 400 participants in the summit called “Human Mobility, the Promise of Development and Political Participation.”

june, in turn, highlighted the local

festivities of the Mexican Bicentennial, exposing the work of photojournalist Agustín Victor Casasol. Omaha Public Schools celebrated International Refugee Day, bringing together ten nationalities in the school district; and the city held the eighth edition of the S.A.F.E. (Safety, awareness, fitness, and education), organized by the Southeast Precinct of the Omaha Police Department. The Monroe School received the second generation of the Institute of Family Leadership, made up of 20 families that participated during 10 months of educational work, with interfamily and social connections. The second annual Week of Diversity in Omaha concluded activities promoting the inclusion of labor; and in Fremont a municipal ordinance was approved that prohibits the renting or sale of homes to illegal immigrants, through a public vote of 3,906 in favor and 2,908 opposed.

Soccer Matters in Omaha Sports Event Latino League Tournament/ Outdoor President and Founder: Rafael Franco Vice President: Gustavo Márquez Telephone number: 934.9087 For 15 years this league has played a six-month season (March-September) in the categories Men’s Open, First Division and Second Division. Mayateca Football League/ Outdoor Founder and Organizer: Jaime Francisquez Telephone Number: 706.5273_Divides its activities between “Guatamalan and Central American Emancipation Tournament” (April-September) and the “Post-Liberty Tournament” (SeptemberNovember), under the Men’s Open category. La Amistad Tournament President and Founder: Victorino Jiménez Telephone: 706.7217 For seven years the league has operated, dividing its activities between indoor (October-March) and outdoor (April-October), the latter starts with an Open Tournament and ends with a Cup Tournament; under the categories of Men’s and Children’s Open, only adults are divided between First and Second Division. United Latinos Tournament Founder: Sergio Martínez Telephone: 578.9711 For seven years the league has played indoor (October-March) and for three years it has also played outdoor (AprilOctober), under the categories Men’s Open and Veterans, dividing the teams into First and Second Division. Nebraska Women Football President: Rogelio Guerrero Telephone: 215.5633 For three years the league has played uninterrupted, dividing its activities between indoor (October-March) and outdoor (April-September), under the category Women’s Open. National Star Soccer League/ Outdoor Founder and Commissioner of the League: Daniel Cortez Telephone: (712) 301.6677 For two years the league has played in the summer (June-September) in the Midwest, with an opportunity for players to play outside their region, under the Men’s Open category. — Bernardo Montoya

año en Resumen

d e s d e

a b r i l

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os hechos más importantes que influyen en el desarrollo de una comunidad, son aquellos en los que sus habitantes intervienen convirtiéndose en el protagonista del acontecer cotidiano. Por ello realizamos un resumen del entorno noticioso en Omaha y su periferia durante los últimos 12 meses, donde estuvo presente la comunidad hispana.

2009 ABRIL,

Melina Baeza-Villa, estudiante de la secundaria Bryan recibió la beca Marie Curie de $72,000. Mientras, la Universidad de Bellevue concluyó exitósamente la Tercera Conferencia para Mujeres Latinas, Gina Ponce fue presentada como Directora de Educación y Arte del Centro Kroc y Anabelle García fue homenajeada en el Boys & Girls Club como Youth of the Year. Paralelamente, la comunidad panameña inauguró la Asociación de Panameños en Nebraska nombrando presidenta a Aura Whitney-Jackson. Entretanto, centenares de católicos presenciaron la dramatización del Viacrucis durante la Semana Santa.

MAYO,

Magdalena García, Directora del Museo Latino, inauguró la exhibición “Ex votos y retablos”, celebrando 16 años del recinto, y Martha Sonia Londoño, fundadora de Mi-

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dlands Latino Community Development Corporation, presentó el “Latinodir”, base de datos que concentra 650 servicios sociales bilingües. Posteriormente, las calles del Sur se llenaron de algarabía con la celebración del Cinco de Mayo, donde sobresalió la belleza de la reina Marisol Suárez. Musicalmente hablando, Guaca Maya ofreció alternativas nacionales e internacionales, destacando el talento local del dueto Los Jalapeños. Igualmente, Casa del Sol hizo lo propio culminando actividades con Ponzoña Musical.

JUNIO,

el Obispo George Joseph Luca fue nombrado Arzobispo de Omaha. Luego, la Fundación de la Comunidad de Omaha lanzó el Fondo para el Futuro Latino, apoyando diversas iniciativas en la comunidad Hispana. Regresando a la música, Grupo Bryndis y Grupo Hechicero conquistaron al público local.

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JULIO, mostró la diversidad con el

evento Miss Nebraska Gay Latina donde ganó Jacqueline Rojas. Más adelante, Nebraska Appleseed Center realizó una reunión de diálogo y análisis para adoptar acciones benéficas por una reforma migratoria, mientras empresas locales concluyeron satisfactoriamente la primera Semana de la Diversidad. Paralelamente, el Museo de Arte Joslyn inauguró la muestra “Arte Popular Mexicano”, cuyos curadores fueron Linda y José García. Luego, la Asociación de Traductores e Intérpretes de Nebraska celebró su décimo aniversario, y los Los Rieleros del Norte ofrecieron un concierto.

AGOSTO,

centró su atención en Sonia Sotomayor y su postulación para la Suprema Corte de Justicia. Y localmente, el estadio Collin de South High estrenó sus instalaciones y la Iglesia de Guadalupe y Santa Inés realizó su festejo número 43 con la participación de 8 mil feligreses.

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Visión Latina



y viene de la página 9

SEPTIEMBRE, la Cámara de Co-

mercio Hispana de Nebraska, precedió los festejos de la Independencia Mexicana presentando a Heréndira Moreno como reina. En tanto que Guaca Maya Restaurante llevó a cabo el evento titulado “Viva México”. Los Guatemaltecos también festejaron su independencia y Cándida Velázquez fue nombrada Señorita Independencia. Mientras, el salvadoreño Alex Núñez de Radio Luz 1420AM, celebró un año de actividades radiofónicas. Musicalmente Omaha bailó con Los Socios y Herencia de la Sierra, en Guaca Maya, mientras Casa del Sol realizaba un evento de caridad a beneficio del Centro Médico One World.

OCTUBRE, el Consulado Mexica-

no en Omaha inauguró su “Ventanilla de Salud”, beneficiando a mexicanos y extranjeros de la demarcación. Por ésas fechas, los festejos por el Día de Muertos incluyeron la exhibición del Centro Cultural de las Artes, la ofrenda de Guaca Maya y El Museo Latino, el Festival de Arte Mexicano en el Museo Joslyn y el Festival del Día de las Brujas de la Corporación para el Desarrollo de los Latinos en el Midlands.

NOVIEMBRE,

se centró en la Heartland Latino Leadership Conference y su décimo aniversario, entre tanto los panameños celebraron su independencia con el evento “Este es Nuestro Panamá” y la Galería RNG exhibió el trabajo de la artista Claudia Álvarez. Una conferencia dedicada al idioma español se ofreció en la Universidad de Nebraska en Omaha, para luego convocar a estudiantes de secundaria a una charla con Sonia Nazario, de LA Times, mientras Midlands Latino Community Development Corporations inauguraba nueva oficina.

DICIEMBRE,

tuvo fervor religioso y espíritu navideño con los festejos

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A YEAR IN REVIEW

católicos a la Virgen de Guadalupe y diversas fiestas navideñas. Posteriormente, Nancy Ibarra asumió la dirección del Centro Girls Inc., del Sur, y el Kroc Center abrió sus puertas. Después, la Sociedad de las Américas y el Consejo de las Américas realizaron un evento de discusión en torno a la Integración Latina y finalmente las Escuelas Públicas de Omaha (OPS) concluyeron sus actividades anuales de aniversario.

2010 ENERO,

comenzó con celebraciones por el Día del niño y las actividades del Mes de Prevención del Glaucoma, al igual que se sostuvo una pelea por la inmigración en Fremont por lo que el Tribunal Supremo de Nebraska escuchaba argumentos en contra de la prohibición, albergue o renta de vivienda a indocumentados. Metropolitan Community College presentó su serie anual de lecturas sobre diversidad, seguida del entrenamiento para comerciantes del Programa de Micronegocios de Caridades Católicas, para luego recibir la noticia del nuevo nombramiento del mexicano Javier Rodríguez, Especialista en Enlaces Bilingües para OPS.

FEBRERO,

arrancó con la conferencia de Andrea Skolkin, presidenta de One World Community Health Center, para discutir la inminente crisis del Medicaid para el cuidado prenatal, pues a partir del 1 de marzo las embarazadas indocumentadas quedaron fuera de este servicio. A su vez la doctora Shannon Kinnan, del Departamento de Psiquiatría del Centro Médico de la Universidad de Nebraska, denunció el bajo acceso a la atención de la salud mental por parte de los Hispanos en Nebraska. En materia del Censo 2010, la campaña para que los Latinos se dejen contar publicó la frase: “Si no somos contados, ¡simplemente no existimos!”, mientras que en música más de 2,500 personas disfrutaron el

concierto de Espinoza Paz. Ya para cerrar el mes, OPS presentó el espectáculo de Generación Ñ.

Abril, presentó a la nueva

Directora del Programa de Caridades Católicas, la colombiana Adriana Zambrano, lo que coincidió con la llegada de mandatarios del territorio mexicano de Xalapa, quienes recibieron ambulancias y equipo complementario donados por Rural/Metro Ambulance Service, el Departamento de Bomberos y la Ciudad de Omaha. En la parte plástica, la artista Linda García rindió homenaje a las mujeres Latinoamericanas que la han precedido en la exploración del trabajo creativo, mientras que Metropolitan Community College fue el anfitrión de la XXI Feria Anual Internacional; finalizando el mes con la celebración del Día del Niño que realizó El Museo Latino.

Mayo,

trajo el colorido de la XXV celebración del “Cinco de Mayo”, cuya nueva administración reportó cerca de 40,000 asistentes. Mientras tanto, la Compañía de Danza Folklórica de la Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua se presentó en El Museo Latino como parte de los festejos del Bicentenario de la Independencia Mexicana y el Centenario de su Revolución. Este mes continuó con la participación de turistas anglosajones se unieron al “Recorrido Histórico y Cultural, Visita el Barrio”, que benefició comercialmente a empresarios latinos del Sur de Omaha. Al mismo tiempo la Oficina de Estudios Latinos y Latinoamericanos de la Universidad de Nebraska en Omaha reunió a cerca de 400 participantes en la llamada Cumbre, “Movilidad humana, la promesa del desarrollo y participación política”.

Junio, a su vez reforzó los feste-

jos locales del Bicentenario Mexicano, exponiendo el trabajo del fotoperiodista Agustín Víctor Casasola. Por su parte, las Escuelas Públicas de Omaha celebraron el Día Internacio-

año en Resumen

sexto festival Viva Mexico nal de los Refugiados, congregando a 10 diferentes nacionalidades de su distrito escolar; mientras que en el otro extremo de la ciudad culminaba la VIII edición del evento de Seguridad, Conocimiento, Salud y Educación “SAFE”, organizado por el Recinto Sureste de la Policía de Omaha. Paralelamente, la escuela Monroe recibió a la segunda generación del Instituto de Liderazgo Familiar, conformada por 20 familias que partici-

paron durante 10 meses de trabajo educativo, con alcances intrafamiliares y sociales. En tanto, la segunda Semana Anual de la Diversidad de Omaha finalizaba actividades promoviendo la inclusión laboral y de manera sorpresiva, en Freemont se aprobaba la ordenanza municipal que prohibiría el alquiler o arrendamiento de bienes a inmigrantes ilegales, tras una votación pública de 3.906 a favor y 2.908 en contra.

Asuntos de Fútbol en Omaha Eventos deportivos Torneo de Liga Latina/ outdoor Presidente Fundador: Rafael Franco Vicepresidente: Gustavo Márquez Teléfono: 934.9087 Desde hace 15 años se juega en el verano por 6 meses consecutivos (marzo-septiembre) en las categorías Libre Varonil, Primera División y Segunda División. Liga Mayateca de FUtbol/ outdoor Fundador y Organizador: Jaime Francisquez Teléfono: 706.5273 Divide sus actividades en el ‘Torneo Emancipación Guatemalteca y CentroAmérica’ (abril-septiembre) y el Torneo Pos-Libertad (septiembre-noviembre), bajo la categoría Libre Varonil. Torneo La Amistad Presidente Fundador: Victorino Jiménez Teléfono: 706.7217 Desde hace 7 años se juega ininterrumpidamente, dividiendo sus actividades en Indoor (octubre-marzo) y outdoor (abril-octubre), esta última comienza con un Torneo de Apertura y concluye con un Torneo de Copa; bajo las categorías Libre Varonil e Infantil, siendo unicamente los adultos quienes se dividen en Primera y Segunda División. Torneo Latinos Unidos Fundador: Sergio Martínez Teléfono: 578.9711 Desde hace 7 años se juega indoor (octubre-marzo) y hace 3 años se juega también en outdoor (abril-octubre), bajo las categorías Libre Varonil y Veteranos, dividiendo los equipos en Primera y Segunda División. Nebraska Women FUtbol Presidente: Rogelio Guerrero Teléfono: 215.5633 Desde hace 3 años se juega ininterrumpidamente, dividiendo sus actividades en indoor (octubre-marzo) y outdoor (abril-septiembre), bajo la categoría Libre Femenil. National Star Soccer League/outdoor Fundador y Comisionado de la Liga: Daniel Cortez Teléfono: (712) 301.6677 Desde hace 2 años se juega en verano (junio-septiembre) en el Medio Oeste, como una oportunidad para los jugadores que buscan salir de su región, bajo la categoría Libre Varonil. — Bernardo Montoya

Visión Latina

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Centro Comercial Providencia 4810 S. 24 St.

Sports Clothes; Music and movies; Jewelry; AVON Products; Men’s and Women’s clothes; Internet service; Travel Agency and Taxes.

Nenas 4901 S. 24 St. • (402) 733-0737

Lending services in South Omaha for more than 15 years. Offers different products from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and South America. 12

A YEAR IN REVIEW

Abarrotes El Alteño 1052 Park Ave.................. 346-1055 El Pueblito 5023 S 24 St.................... 734-1584 Jacobo’s 4621 S 24 St.................... 733-9009 La Económica 5520 S 36 St.................... 734-0611 La Esmeralda 3215 Q St......................... 734-1021 La Guera/Promex 4233 S 24 St. ................. 733-9194 La Mexicana Abarrotes y Carnicería 1601 Vinton St................. 346-9147 La Tapatia 84 W 6 St.................(402)721-0426 Nena’s Mexican Imports 4901 S 24 St.................... 733-0737 Peñas Plaza 2809 Q St......................... 731-2629 Selena’s Market 3228 California St............ 341-9880 Super Tienda El Quetzal 1941 Vinton St................ 933-9154 Tienda Latin America 6619 Sunshine Dr............ 917-5405 Tienda Mexicana 622 Main St............(712) 328-3340

Agencias de Compra y Venta de Automóviles Usados CarHop 4420 S 24 St........... 1-866-829-5555 El Paso Auto Sales, Inc 3801 Q St......................... 733-5000 Melody Motors 809 S 25 St...................... 706-4337 Oscar Motors Inc 4002 L St......................... 734-2404 Sonny Gerber 4519 Cuming St. ............. 556-4086 4021 Cuming St. ............. 558-7400 Southwest Motors 3328 S 24 St.................... 738-8400

Agencias de Viaje Costa Azul 4811 S 24 St.................... 934-0036 Plaza Latina Travel 4938 S 24 St. .................. 991-2907

Almacenes y Tiendas de Ropa Christian Fashion 5110 S 33 St.................... 714-6301 Dana’s Gift Shop 4733 S 24 St. .................. 933-0822 El Vaquero Imports, Inc 4910 S 24 St. .................. 731-4381 Franky’s Fashion 4814 S 24 St. .................. 731-4200 La Chica Sexy 2424 M St........................ 714-6700 La Fiesta 2410 Q Street................... 714-4091 La Plaza Latina 4938 S 24 St.................... 991-2907 4938 S 24 St.................... 208-9057 Laura’s 3811 Q St......................... 312-1173

Novedades Alondras 4802 S 24 St. ................. 714-7219 Novedades El Progreso 3814 Q St. . ..................... 612-1122 Novedades Rosalinda 2317 S 23 St. .................. 504-1494 Tienda Guatemala 3000 S 25 St.................... 345-1636 Tienda Mexicana Alejandra’s 4805 S 24 St. .................. 734-8290

Artículos para Deportes Deportes Gol 4302 S 24 St.................... 734-1929

Artículos para Fiestas Fiesta Time 4620 22 St. ..................... 216-9640

Bienes Raices Fernardo Olazabal DEEB Real Estate 4018 L St......................... 805-2401 Remax - Marilyn Morales 1820 Hillcrest Dr., Ste. B ........................................ 660-1014 Ricardo Castro DEEB Real Estate 4018 L St......................... 319-0093 Unico Real Estate 3814 Q Street................... 934-2272 Vision Casa Real Estate 6311 S 36 St.................... 991-7721

Bolsas y Carteras Purse Mart 8444 Park Drive............... 339-9558

Carnicerías Carnicería Los Paisanos 1715 Vinton St................. 502-1411 Carnicería Selena’s Market 3228 California St............ 341-9880 Carnicería El Pueblito 5023 S 24 St. .................. 734-1584 Super Fresh Meat 3702 S 24 St.................... 813-9911

Clínicas Metro OB/GYN 2323 Vinton St. ............... 345-9132 SOMA 4828 S 24 St. ................. 731-9100

Construcción en General Gonzalez Construction 3405 S 127 St.................. 990-6039 J.C.J Construction 10820 Wortman Ave. ...... 612-5401 O.P. Construction Company ........................................ 510-9326

Envíos de Dinero y Transferencias El Dorado Restaurante 5134 S 24 St. .................. 734-4947 El Finito 3205 Leavenworht .......... 614-9940 El Quetzal Market 1941 Vinton St................. 933-9154

El Vaquero Imports, Inc. 4910 S 24 St. .................. 731-4381 Joyeria Boutique Cristal 2705 Leavenworth .......... 614-1528 La Casita Taqueria Reastaurante 1328 Park Ave.................. 934-7575 La Economica 5520 S 36 St.................... 734-0611 La Esmeralda 3215 Q St......................... 734-5830 3215 Q St. . ..................... 884-1146 La Fiesta 5110 33rd St. . ................ 734-0616 La Guera/Promex 4233 S 24 St. ................. 733-9194 La Mexicana Abarrotes y Carnicería 1603 Vinton St. ............... 346-9147 La Palma Market 1616 Vinton St. ............... 932-4450 Novedades Ventura 3173 Leavenworth .......... 342-9493 Novedades Veronica 3001 Leavenworth .......... 934-4287 Nueva Plaza Latina 4938 S 24 St ................... 991-2907 Paisano’s Meat Market 1715 Vinton St................. 502-1411 Pupusería El Rinconcito 2308 N St. . ..................... 991-5452 Santa Marta Grocery 2101 Q. St. . ................... 934-3833 Selena’s Market 3228 California................. 341-9880 Super Q Market 3302 Q St. . ..................... 505-6636 Tienda El Bazar 4810 S 24 St.................... 884-8954 Tierra Caliente 9537 Q St. . ..................... 933-4547 Zamora Market Las Nenas 4901 S 24 St. ................. 733-0737 Zapateria Andrea’s 3902 S Q St. ................... 731-1977

Fotografos Moonglow Photography 3003 S 16 St. .................. 346-6391

Guarderías Bere’s I 2021 Q St......................... 733-3039 Bere’s II 5214 S 21 St.................... 733-5331 Bere’s III 5601 S 22 St.................... 932-1410 Mayita’s Daycare 2220 S 18 St. .................. 714-2876 ........................................ 885-8526 My Little Angels Daycare & Preschool, Inc. 3512 Leavenworth St. ........................................ 614-3260

Hojalatería de Automóviles Cabaña Body Shop 2229 S 28 St.................... 345-0512 Eric’s Body Shop & Auto Repair 3009 12 St. ............(402) 910-3504 ...............................(402) 617-4682 Rubio’s Auto Body Repair 2517 Y St........................ 714-0613

Iglesias Centro Comunitario y Iglesia Del Pueblo 2228 S 16 St.................... 706-1771 Iglesia Cristiana Bendicion 3126 Lake St.................... 612-5936 Iglesia Evangelica Monte Sinai 4622 Monre St................. 208-0623

Joyerias Joyería El Bazar 4810 S 24 St.................... 208-0319

Llanta para Automóviles California Weel’s 1719 Fortcrook Ave. ............505-8673 Nebraska Tire & Automotive Service 5034 S 24 St.................... 731-9166 Tommy’s Tires 4601 N 60 St.................... 455-8473

Museos El Museo Latino 4701 S 25 St.................... 731-1137

Música El Quetzal 1941 Vinton St................ 933-9154 El Korita 2424 Q St......................... 614-2118 La Esmeralda 3215 Q St......................... 734-5830 Sonido Mixx Inc. 4312 S 24 St. .................. 738-9204 Trixies 2320 N St......................... 733-1502

Organizaciones Artes Latinas 4907 S 25 St., Ste 3..............516-4892 El Consulado de México 3552 Dodge St................. 595-1841 Latino Center of the Midlands 4821 S 24 St. .................. 733-2720

Paleterías Helados Santa Fe 4807 S 24 St. .................. 731-1344 La Michoacana Inc. 4002 1/2 S 24 St.............. 706-1512

Panaderias International Bakery 5106 S 24 St. .................. 731-0988 La Flor de Mexico 4808 S 24 St. .................. 738-9197 Nietos Panaderia 1605 S Vinton St. . ......... 733-0482 Panaderia Juarez 2405 N St......................... 733-5300

Plomeros The Maintenance Man - Jose Iniguez 5822 S 18 St ................... 813-4795

Preparación de Impuestos Ortega Tax Service 4923 S 24 St. .................. 734-4745 Brenda Income Tax Service 5601 S. 36 St. ................. 734-0851

Reparación de Automóviles Gomez Tire & Auto Repair 2310 Q St......................... 731-2572 Gomez Tire & Auto Repair 4121 Harrison St.............. 731-0663 J.R. & Jerry’s Garage 3601 F St......................... 733-1821

Junior’s Tire 3229 S 24 St. .................. 502-3447 Piña’s Auto Repair 6110 S 13 St.................... 734-3121 Ray’s Body Shop 2655 Gomez Ave. ............ 731-9992 Sanchez Auto Repair 4333 S 24 St.................... 208-3816 Servicio Mecánico Perlas 3102 Q St......................... 933-0269

Restaurantes Alvarado’s Restaurant 3420 N 90 St.................... 571-2333 Azteca 9429 S 142 St. ................ 896-6766 Birrieria El Chalan 4518 S 24 St. ................. 734-2488 Cabaña D’Frank’o 4835 S 24 St.................... 614-9977 Club Mex 3018 N 93 St. . ............... 572-8640 Costa El Sol 4454 S 84 St. .................. 596-1978 Don Gaby’s Restaurant 4806 S 24 St. .................. 731-0936 El 7 Mares 5447 S 24 St. .................. 934-4753 El Aguila 1837 Vinton St. ............... 346-7667 El Alamo 4917 S 24 St.................... 731-8969 El Alteño 1052 Park Ave. . .............. 346-1055 El Catrín 6500 Railroad Ave............ 884-7608 El Dorado 5134 S 24 St. .................. 734-4947 El Rancho 2030 Martha St................ 346-3300 Guaca Maya 5002 S 33 St. .................. 733-3440 Howard’s Charro Café 4443 S 13 St. ................. 731-3776 La Carreta Rosa 620 S Main St.........(712) 328-3380 La Esmeralda - Taquería 3215 Q St. . ..................... 502-2274 Los Portales 2614 S 13 St.................... 991-1190 Mary’s Restaurant 3916 L St......................... 734-3135 Netties Fine Mexican Food 7110 Railroad Ave............ 733-3359 Peru Mucho Gusto 7755 L St. ....................... 505-3445 Pupusería El Rinconcito 2380 N St. . ..................... 991-5452 Restaurante La Casita 1328 Park Ave.................. 934-7575 Restaurante Los Nuevos Gallos 4630 S 20 St.................... 933-5834 Restaurante San Luis 4804 S 24 St.................... 933-9940 Restaurante Variedades Salvadoreñas 3702 Q St......................... 933-5099 Taco Durango 3121 Q St......................... 733-0346 Taco Mex 14805 W Maple Rd.......... 933-0235 Taquería El Rey 5201 S 24 St. .................. 502-0674 Taqueria Tijuana 5139 S 24 St. .................. 731-1281

Ropa para Vaqueros y Charros El Vaquero Imports, Inc. 4910 S 24 St. .................. 731-4381 La Esmeralda 3215 Q St......................... 734-5830

Salon de Belleza Artistico Salon De Belleza 3301 Leavenworth St. ........................................ 502-4602 Belen’s Beauty Salon 722 Creek Top #1 ...............................(712) 256-4726 Estetíca “Paris” 1615 Vinton St................. 991-6585 Estetíca “Yazmin” 1913 Vinton St................. 505-6683 Estética Daniela 3111 Q St......................... 933-8142 Estetica Tammy’s 4735 S 24 St. .................. 884-0458 Juan’s Studio 4624 S 20 St.................... 315-1560 Plaza Latina 4938 S 24 St. .................. 991-2907 Salon D’ Fabios 4822 Q St......................... 733-9277 Salon de Chelena 4502 S 24 St. ................. 734-6388 Salon Erisel 4103 L St......................... 884-6524 Salon Nouveau 5130 S 20 St.................... 502-5378 Vega’s Beauty Salon 3175 Leavenworth St. ........................................ 422-0359 V’s Salon 4733 Giles Rd. ................ 734-1505 Yeily’s Unisex 4308 S 24 St.................... 738-1544

Seguros Alvarez And Associates Insurance Agency 4629 S 23 St. .................. 733-1878 Confia Insurance Agency 3801 Dodge St ................ 731-1400 1901 Misouri Ave............. 731-1400

organizaciones y negocios latinos de omaha Vision Casa Real Estate 6311 S. 36 St. • (402) 991-7721 www.visioncasa.com

Buy and sell houses. Serving Council Bluffs, Omaha, Lincoln, Fremont, Schuyler and all Nebraska & Iowa.

Olvera Auto 2522 S 35 Ave. • (402) 612-9819

Servicio de Grúa para Automóviles Albert’s Towing ........................................ 210-9038 Aztek Towing ........................................ 612-3768 Felix Towing 6717 Railroad Ave............ 734-0307 ........................................ 208-4150 Garcia’s 1101 S 10 St ................... 812-8700 Maraca’s Towing & Removal ........................................ 812-6607 San Luis Towing.............. 201-3780 Servicio de Grúa Bocanegra 2325 S 16 St.................... 612-9931 Servicio de Grúa Bustamante ........................................ 706-8903

Servicio de Limpieza de Alfombras y Tapetes Aleman Cleaning 5814 S 21 St. .................. 216-8762 Alex’s Carpet Cleaning ........................................ 660-0239

Auto glass Specialist FREE MOBILE SERVICE LIFETIME WARRANTY

Turiservicios Hispanos 4810 S 24 St Suite #8 (En el Centro Comercial Providencia)

Vestidos y Accesorios para Bodas Casa de Novia El Kiosco 4819 S 24 St................... 706- 6773 Creaciones y Florería Fabi 4815 S 24 St.................... 932-0478 Lucero’s 4725 S 24 St.................... 738-4464

Vidrios y Cristales para Automóviles Garcia’s Auto Glass 1101 S 10 St ................... 812-8700

Airplane tickets for any part of the world; Great promotions to travel to Europe and ASIA ; International Licenses Secondary Identifications

Visión Latina

13

Cinco de Mayo 2009

Chilanga Banda

1ª Asociación de Panameños en Nebraska

Abraham Perez

Ventanillas de Salud

3ª Conferencia para Mujeres Latinas

Carolina Padilla

Grupo Exterminador

Chuito Rincón, ‘El Paisa’

Banda Brisa

Melina Baeza-Villa

Cinco de Mayo 2009 Semana de la Diversidad

Anabelle García

Independencia Mexicana en el Consulado Mexicano

Fiestas El Grito 2009

Ex-Votos y Retablos en El Museo Latino

Felicitaciones Congratulations Latino Scholars of Distinction 2010-2011!

Best Buy, ConAgra Foods Inc., Wells Fargo y el Latino Academic Achievement Council felicitan a los Estudiantes Latinos 2010-2011 y sus familias por su arduo trabajo y dedicación en el éxito académico. El Consejo Académico Latino de las Escuelas Públicas de Omaha (LAAC) se siente orgulloso de estos estudiantes por alcanzar un promedio de 3.5 o superior en una escala de 4.0. La misión del LAAC es la siguiente: “El Consejo Académico Latino se dedica a servir de catalizador para la excelencia académica mediante el fomento del liderazgo dentro de los estudiantes Latinos, padres de familia y la comunidad”. Para obtener más información sobre el LAAC, por favor llame a Charo Rangel al 557-4478. ¡La Visión Latina, el periódico El Perico y el LAAC le dan las gracias a Best Buy y ConAgra Foods Inc. por patrocinar el Latino Scholars of Distinction 2010-2011!

Jonathan Agras 3.56 Bryan Sr. High

Francisco Antuñez 3.5 Central High

Lucero Aguilar 4.38 South High Magnet

Gabriela Arellano 3.69 Central High

Best Buy, ConAgra Foods Inc., Wells Fargo and the Latino Academic Achievement Council are pleased to Congratulate the 2010-2011 Latino Scholars and their families for their hard work and dedication to academic success. The Omaha Public School’s Latino Academic Achievement Council (LAAC) is proud of these students as they enter this school year with a 3.5 or greater grade point average (GPA) on a 4.0 scale. The mission for the LAAC is as follows: “The Latino Academic Achivement Council is dedicated to serve as a catalyst for academic excellence by promoting the advancement of leadership within Latino students, parents and community.” If you would like more information regarding the LAAC, please contact Charo Rangel at 557-4478. La Vision Latina, El Perico newspaper and the LAAC would like to thank Best Buy and ConAgra Foods Inc. for sponsoring the Latino Scholars of Distinction 2010-2011!

Luis Aguirre 3.54 Bryan Sr. High

San Juana Aguirre 3.56 Bryan Sr. High

Noemi Alaniz 3.5 South High Magnet

Anthony Arenas 3.8 South High Magnet

Sergio Avalos-Vargas 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Juan Ayon 3.63 South High Magnet

Visión Latina

15

Congratulations!

Elena Becerril 3.9 Burke High

Camila Benavides 3.69 Burke High

Beatrice Benitez 3.88 Bryan Sr. High

Diana Carranza 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Oscar Castillo 4.24 Northwest High

AndrĂŠs Chairez 4.46 South High Magnet

Jessica Chairez 3.97 South High Magnet

Edwin Chavez 4.25 Bryan Sr. High

Juan Chavez 4.09 Burke High

Miguel Chavez 3.53 Burke High

Angela Chicas 3.75 Bryan Sr. High

Stephanie Colin 3.72 Burke High

Elizabeth Contreras 3.93 South High Magnet

Joseph Contreras 3.54 Burke High

Nickolas Contreras 4.0 Burke High

Tania Contreras 3.56 Bryan Sr. High

Armando Corral 4.12 South High Magnet

Felix Cortes 3.89 South High Magnet

Francisco Cortes 3.75 North High School

Mauricio Davila 4.0 South High Magnet

Yoselin DeLeon 4.06 Bryan Sr. High

Gerardo Diaz 3.53 Bryan Sr. High

Grace Diaz 3.63 South High Magnet

Jessica Diaz-Orozco 3.81 Burke High

Julissa Chaidez 3.56 South High Magnet

16

Students

A YEAR IN REVIEW

Congratulations!

Kelvin Dub贸n 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Rosa Duran 4.28 Burke High

Yaritza Estrada 3.83 South High Magnet

Mackenzie Franklin 4.59 North High Magnet

Vanessa Garcia-Cruz 3.63 Benson High School

Students

Jocelyn Elizarraga 4.06 Bryan Sr. High

Brandon Erives 4.67 South High Magnet

Gloria Espejel-Rangel 3.81 Burke High

Jonathan Galeano 3.88 Bryan Sr. High

Veronica Gallardo 3.78 Bryan Sr. High

Yanelh Garcia 3.83 Burke High

Jos茅 German-Arellano 3.93 Central High

Jazmin Gomez 3.65 Bryan Sr. High

Azure Gonzalez 4.31 North High Magnet

Benjamin Gonzalez 3.53 North High Magnet

Mario Gonzalez 4.31 Burke High

Joseph Gonzalez-Kelso 4.47 Bryan Sr. High

Rosio Granados 4.13 South High Magnet

Breanna Greenhagen 3.8 South High Magnet

C茅sar Guardado-Marin 3.67 Burke High

Rafael Gutierrez 4.34 South High Magnet

Francisco Guzman-Jimenez 4.5 Bryan Sr. High

Erick Hernandez 3.94 Bryan Sr. High

Hernan Hernandez 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Jorge Hernandez 4.29 Bryan Sr. High

Visi贸n Latina

17

Congratulations!

18

Kimberli Hernandez 3.52 South High Magnet

Maria Hernandez 3.72 South High Magnet

Nathaly Hernandez 3.57 Central High

Ashley Herrera 3.59 Bryan Sr. High

Gibram Herrera 3.5 North High Magnet

Maria Lizardi 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Students

Alejandra Hernandez-Cervantes 3.78 South High Magnet

Andrés Hernàndez Domínguez 4.44 South High Magnet

Alejandra Iñiguez 3.63 South High Magnet

Nicolas Jeovanni Ladron De Guevara 3.93 Central High

Paula Leon-Francisco 3.73 South High Magnet

Elizabeth Lopez 4.38 South High Magnet

Erica Lopez 3.88 South High Magnet

Gabriela Lopez 3.78 Bryan Sr. High

Isela Lopez 3.51 South High Magnet

Marco Lopez 4.44 Bryan Sr. High

Tania Lopez-Tovar 4.25 Northwest High

Laura Magaña 4.62 South High Magnet

Carolina Malavasi-Sanabria 4.38 North High Magnet

Jose Marquez Gaspar 3.93 South High Magnet

Federico Marrufo-Gallegos 3.63 South High Magnet

Alexis Martinez 3.86 Central High

Andrew Martinez 4.61 South High Magnet

Christina Martinez 3.76 Bryan Sr. High

Luis Martinez 3.94 Bryan Sr. High

A YEAR IN REVIEW

Congratulations!

Maria Martinez 3.5 Central High

Angel Mujica 4.29 Benson High School

Nancy Martinez 3.81 Bryan Sr. High

Andrea Mu帽oz 3.93 South High Magnet

Students

Veronica Martinez 3.79 South High Magnet

Divna Martinez-Hernandez 4.0 South High Magnet

Lucio Mora 3.67 Benson High School

Eduardo Neri 4.44 Bryan Sr. High

Diana Ortega 3.61 Bryan Sr. High

Nery Ortega-Castillo 3.79 Burke High

Isaac Ortiz-Fernandez 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Vanessa Patino 4.44 Bryan Sr. High

Diana G. Ortiz 4.0 Bryan Sr. High

Jaquelin Ortiz 4.19 South High Magnet

Yvette G. Ortiz 4.38 South High Magnet

Enrique Perdomo 4.33 Central High

Nohely Perez 3.66 Bryan Sr. High

Keila del Rocio Placido 4.21 South High Magnet

Xochitl Pliego 4.06 North High Magnet

Eduardo Ponce 3.5 Bryan Sr. High

Leslie Ramirez 4.44 South High Magnet

Charito Rangel 4.57 South High Magnet

Dulce Maria Rangel 4.44 South High Magnet

Nancy Rivera 3.5 South High Magnet

Edgar Rivera Rojas 3.69 South High Magnet

Visi贸n Latina

19 

Congratulations!

 20

Abel Rodriguez 3.75 Bryan Sr. High

Alondra Rodriguez 3.64 Burke High

Priscilla Rodriguez 3.93 South High Magnet

Students

Jorge Adrian Rodriguez 3.75 South High Magnet

Luis Manuel Rodriguez 3.75 South High Magnet

Maria I. Rodriguez 4.38 Bryan Sr. High

Yesenia Rodriguez 4.63 South High Magnet

Gloria Rodriguez 4.25 South High Magnet

Ruby Rogel 4.06 Bryan Sr. High

Adriana Romero 4.31 Northwest High

Alejandra Rosas-Antolino 3.81 Benson High School

Breanne Marie Rubio 3.71 Bryan Sr. High

Enedina Ruiz 3.94 Bryan Sr. High

Cesar J. Saavedra 3.72 Burke High

Karen D. Saavedra 4.13 Benson High School

Russell A. Saavedra 3.89 Burke High

Kathia Salgado Antunez 3.88 Bryan Sr. High

Heriberto Salinas 4.03 Burke High

Danilo E. Sánchez 3.88 Bryan Sr. High

Ernesto Sánchez, Jr. 3.94 Bryan Sr. High

Holly Sánchez 4.13 South High Magnet

Kenia Sánchez 3.69 North High Magnet

Nydia Sánchez 4.09 Bryan Sr. High

Rodrigo Sánchez 3.75 South High Magnet

Gabriela Sandoval 4.0 Bryan Sr. High

A YEAR IN REVIEW

Congratulations!

Students

Dalton Sartain 3.63 Burke High

Albert M. Scholting, III 3.63 South High Magnet

Javier Serrano 4.31 South High Magnet

Abraham Silva 3.78 South High Magnet

Efrain Silva 3.63 South High Magnet

Samantha Sinecio 3.63 South High Magnet

Noelle Slater 3.51 Burke High

Carolina Soto 3.79 Bryan Sr. High

Berenice Taviz贸n 4.63 South High Magnet

Dalia Taviz贸n 3.59 Bryan Sr. High

Armando Testa 3.63 South High Magnet

Brandon Tovar 3.93 Central High

Karla Marie Trujillo 3.86 Burke High

Isis Ivette Uribe 4.13 South High Magnet

Hytzel Valadez 4.13 Bryan Sr. High

Erika Valadez 3.79 Benson High School

Ana Valdovi帽os 3.90 South High

Karen Isabel Vargas 3.79 Northwest High

Leslie Vargas -Mejia 4.19 Bryan Sr. High

Jesus Villagomez 4.19 Bryan Sr. High

Nicolas Zarazua 3.69 South High Magnet

Joseph Castellanos 3.53 South High Magnet

Jose A. de Arcos 4.34 Bryan Sr. High

Oria Simonini 4.2 Central High

Rafael Corrales Orozco 4.75 Benson High School

Alexis Rodriguez 3.69 Bryan Sr. High

Juan Trejo Hernandez 3.56 Benson High School

Isaac Zavala-Alvarado 4.13 Bryan Sr. High

Visi贸n Latina

21 

censo 2010 A

C R U C I A L

C O U N T

Blanca Ramírez-Salazar talks about the 2010 Census, the partnerships and the Census Summit

By Marina Rosado

I

n April 2009, Blanca Ramírez-Salazar joined the Census Bureau as a Partnership Specialist covering Nebraska. One of her main tasks was to promote participation in census, including withing the Hispanic community. “The 2010 Census process included a focus on those geographic areas and groups of people who were identified as difficult to be counted,” explained Ramírez-Salazar. Historically, undercounting has been

22

A YEAR IN REVIEW

I N

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a problem in the Hispanic, African American, Asian American and Native American communities, and also in areas where families live with limited resources, and among the homeless.” With the premise that the count should be complete and that the information provided by the residents should be correct, Ramírez-Salazar supported key organizations to spread the message and dispel the fears resulting misinformation. “Many people in the Hispanic community were afraid because they thought that the information they provided on the census questionnaire would generate problems later on. But this is not true, because the questionnaire only consisted in 10 questions and none of those were related to a Social Security number or the legal

situation of the person in this country. Furthermore, by law, all the information received is confidential,” and those who worked on the project are barred by law from discussing the information. Ramírez-Salazar and her team of five assistants (in Lincoln, Lexington, Scotts Bluffs and Omaha) supported various organizations, churches, and businesses as formal Census Partners, spreading the message through community action, “sticking our posters or stickers in your location or office, talking to your clients about the Census, participating in the national March to the Mailbox, etc. Either way, the partners used their creativity to support the Census and some served as Help Centers to help complete the questionnaire.” Knocking on doors at institutions of

Reforming Health New insurance law will benefit Latinos, but challenges remain faith, public schools and private schools, Ramírez-Salazar also put other outstanding Census projects into action: “We established “Census in the Schools”; we were helped by Susan Mayberger (of OPS); and also the Northeast Upward Bound program in Norfolk, where we were allowed the develop the “Census Ambassadors” program in which approximately 20 students completed various activities in four rural communities promoting a complete count.” For their part, the South Omaha Community Care Council (SOCCC) was a key partnership in the Census 2010 effort to serve as the Committee for a Complete Count for the Hispanic community in Omaha. “The members of this committee committed to represent the interests of the Hispanic community in Omaha with respect to the census including diverse types of organizations.” It’s worth noting that in January, the Multicultural Summit on the Census met in Nebraska, where participants like the SOCCC, Hispanic leaders and the public in general talked about how to mobilize people to participate. It was an event for the partners to meet each other and plan how to work together.” Attendants included the Mexican Consul in Omaha, Jorge Ernesto Espejel. He said the meeting was “very fruitful, the regional, state, and local organizations, and also representatives of diverse multicultural communities all met.” Espejel said it was important to note “the repercussions that the Census has in all government programs, like for example, education, health, social security, urban development and other programs.” Luis Ortiz, general director of Nebraska

Latino Television (“La Voz Latina”) said at the summit, “the environment was pleasant, then we formed work teams so that as participants we could give ideas about Census promotion; and important proposals came up for us to get closer to the people and motivate them to participate.” Nebraska Latino Television, together with Community Telecast Inc., broadcast Census 2010 videos on Channel 22 (Cox Cable). “We broadcast them from July 2009 until the moment of the summit,” said Ortiz. “We were supported with approximately more than $100,000 through donated air time. We also produced a DVD with four community leaders in Omaha, Dr. Lourdes Gouvei, José Garcia, Dr. José Villegas and Alberto Cervantes. This material was distributed to approximately 60 organizations.” “With a complete count we are talking about money and power for our community, even coming from the database that this national project will provide, which make me proud to participate,” said Ramírez-Salazar. “The information will be made public in March 2011 and our partners should feel proud to have helped us with this civic responsibility. The United States Census Bureau is very grateful for all of our partners that offered their continuous support with this process. We hope to work with them again in the following Census of 2020.”

By Hilary Stohs-Krause Nebraska’s Latino community lags behind on health care coverage. Seventeen percent of Latinos born in Nebraska don’t have health insurance, compared with 10.2 percent of non-Latino, native-born Nebraskans, according to a 2009 report by the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s Office of Latino/Latin American Studies. When looking only at working age native-born Nebraskans, the difference is even greater: 22.6 percent for Latinos compared to 13.1 percent for non-Latinos. But the health care reform act President Barack Obama signed into law in March should benefit Latinos in a number of ways, said Jane Delgado, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. “First of all, Hispanics have a high rate of employment, but they often work in places that don’t offer health insurance,” she said. Government-run insurance exchanges will allow people who meet certain standards and who aren’t covered by employers to purchase coverage in a health insurance marketplace. Many Latinos also work for small businesses that could benefit from new government incentives to provide health care. The bill also allocates funds for data collection and research about health disparities, expands initiatives to increase the racial and ethnic diversity of health care professionals, and creates the Office of Minority Health within the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as a network of similar offices, according to a fact sheet on Latino health from the Campaign for Better Health Care. But despite the law’s benefits, Delgado said, obstacles to quality health care for Latinos remain “If you are earning minimum wage, and a family plan costs $600 a month, there’s no way you can afford it,” she said. “So I’m concerned the plans may be out of reach for some people.” Undocumented Latinos are explicitly excluded from coverage in the new insurance exchanges. “That’s a difficult situation,” Delgado said. “This health care bill only addresses part of our health care concerns in the United States. “It really is for people who are in the United States legally.”

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censo 2010 un

r e cu e nto

crucial

Blanca Ramírez-Salazar habla del Censo 2010, los socios y la Cumbre del Censo

Por Marina Rosado

E

En abril del 2009, Blanca Ramírez-Salazar se incorporó al Buró del Censo como Especialista en Socios para cubrir el Estado de Nebraska. Una de sus tareas principales fue la de promover el participar y ser contado durante este proceso, en comunidades como la hispana “El proceso del Censo 2010 incluyó un enfoque en aquellas áreas geográficas y grupos de personas que fueron identificadas como difíciles de ser contadas”, expli-

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e n

e l

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có Ramírez-Salazar agregando que históricamente, no sólo la comunidad hispana ha reflejado este problema, sino también la comunidad afroamericana, la asiática, la nativoamericana y también, aquellas zonas donde viven familias de bajos recursos y desamparados. Con la premisa de que el conteo debe ser completo y que la información que proporcionen los residentes de este país debe estar correcta, Ramírez-Salazar se apoyó en organizaciones claves para esparcir el mensaje y disipar los temores generados a partir de la desinformación: “En la comunidad hispana muchas personas tuvieron miedo porque pensaban que los datos proporcionados en el cuestionario del Censo podrían generarles problemas posteriores.

Pero esto no es cierto, porque el cuestionario solo consistió en 10 preguntas y no incluyó ninguna relacionada al número de seguro social o la situación legal de una persona en este país. Además, por ley, toda la información recibida es confidencial y quienes trabajamos para el Buró del Censo sabemos que hay que respetar esto bajo juramento, pues de no hacerlo podemos recibir una multa de 250,000 dólares y/o hasta cinco años de cárcel”. Ramírez-Salazar y su equipo de cinco asistentes (en Lincoln, Lexington, Scotts Bluffs y Omaha), se aseguraron de que aquellas organizaciones, iglesias y negocios que se formalizaron como Socios del Censo, difundieran su mensaje, mediante acciones comunitarias, “al pegar alguno

Reforma de Salud La Nueva ley de seguros beneficiara a los latinos, pero los desafíos continúan de nuestros pósters o calcomanías en su local u oficina, hablar con sus clientes sobre el Censo, participar en el programa nacional de Marcha al Buzón, etc. Como fuera, los socios utilizaron su creatividad para apoyar al Censo y algunos sirvieron como Centros de Ayuda para completar el cuestionario”. Tocando puertas de instituciones de fe y escuelas públicas y privadas, RamírezSalazar también puso en marcha otros destacados proyectos del Censo: “Establecimos ‘El Censo en las Escuelas’ ayudados por Susan Mayberger (de OPS); y también el programa Northeast Upward Bound en Norfolk, nos permitió desarrollar el programa de ‘Embajadores del Censo’ con el cual aproximadamente veinte jóvenes estudiantes, completaron varias actividades en cuatro comunidades rurales promoviendo un conteo completo”. Por su parte el South Omaha Community Care Council (SOCCC) fue socio clave del Censo 2010 al funcionar como Comité de Conteo Completo para los hispanos de Omaha: “Los miembros de este comité se comprometieron a representar los intereses de la comunidad hispana en Omaha con respecto al censo incluyendo a diversos tipos de organizaciones”. Cabe enfatizar que en enero, se realizó en Omaha, la Cumbre Multicultural del Censo en Nebraska, donde participantes de organizaciones como el SOCCC, líderes hispanos y público en general, dialogaron sobre cómo movilizar a las personas a la participación: “Fue un evento para que los socios se conocieran y planearan cómo trabajar juntos”. Uno de los asistentes a tal Cumbre fue el Cónsul de México en Omaha, Jorge Ernesto Espejel quien consideró que tal reunión fue “muy fructífera, ya que reunió a organizaciones regionales, estatales y locales, así como a representantes de las diversas comunidades multiculturales”. Espejel consideró que entre los puntos más importantes que se trataron “fue el destacar el impacto y repercusiones que tiene el Censo en todos los programas

del gobierno, como por ejemplo de educación, de salud, de asistencia social, de desarrollo urbano, etc.”. Por su parte, Luis Ortiz, Director General de Nebraska Latino Television (“La Voz Latina”) expresó que en la Cumbre, “el ambiente estuvo muy agradable, pues se formaron equipos de trabajo para que los participantes pudiéramos dar ideas sobre la promoción del Censo y surgieron propuestas importantes para acercarnos más a la gente y motivarla a participar”. En este sentido, Nebraska Latino Television junto con Community Telecast Inc. transmitieron videos del Censo 2010 en sus emisiones en canal 22 (Cox Cable). “Hemos contado que desde julio del 2009 y hasta el momento de la Cumbre – aclaró Ortiz -, aproximadamente apoyamos con más de 100,00 mil dólares mediante la donación de tiempo al aire. También producimos un DVD con cuatro líderes comunitarios de Omaha, la Dra. Lourdes Gouveia, José García, el Dr. José Villegas y Alberto Cervantes. Este material fue distribuido a aproximadamente 60 organizaciones para que la comunidad se identificara”. Todo con el propósito de alcanzar ése conteo completo que muestre el crecimiento sustancial de la comunidad hispana. “Con el conteo completo estamos hablando de dinero y de poder para nuestras comunidades, mismo que viene de la base de datos que se obtenga en este proyecto nacional en el cual me siento orgullosa de participar. Los datos se harán públicos en marzo de 2011 y nuestros socios deben sentirse muy orgullosos por haber ayudado con esta responsabilidad cívica. El Buró del Censo de Estados Unidos está muy agradecido con todos los socios que brindaron su continuo apoyo con este proceso. Esperamos trabajar con ellos nuevamente en el siguiente censo del 2020”, concluyó Ramírez-Salazar.

Por Hilary Stohs-Krause La comunidad latina en Nebraska está quedando atrás en relación a la cobertura de atención médica. El diecisiete por ciento de los latinos nacidos en Nebraska no tiene seguro de salud, comparado con el 10,2 por ciento de los no latinos, nativos de Nebraska, según un informe de 2009 de la Universidad de Nebraska en Omaha, Oficina de latinos / Estudios de América Latina. Con tan solo mirar los trabajadores a su edad laboral, de los nativos nacidos en Nebraska, la diferencia es aún mayor: 22,6 por ciento de los latinos comparado con el 13,1 por ciento de los no latinos. Pero el acto de reforma del sistema de salud que el presidente Barack Obama firmó como ley en marzo, beneficiará a los Latinos en diferentes maneras, sostuvo Jane Delgado, presidenta y CEO de la Alianza Nacional para la Salud Hispana. “En primer lugar, los hispanos tienen una alta tasa de empleo, pero a menudo trabajan en lugares que no ofrecen seguro de salud”, ella dijo. El gobierno está trabajando en las bolsas de seguro de salud (Insurance Exchange) que permitirá a las personas que cumplen con determinados estándares y que no están cubiertos por los empleadores, adquirir una cobertura de seguros de salud en el mercado. Muchos latinos que trabajan para pequeñas empresas también podrían beneficiarse de los nuevos incentivos del gobierno para proveer asistencia médica. El proyecto de ley también asignará fondos para la colección de datos e investigación sobre las desigualdad en salud, ampliando las iniciativas para aumentar la diversidad racial y étnica de los profesionales de la salud; y creando la Oficina de Salud para las Minorías en el Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos, así como una red similar de oficinas, de acuerdo con un volante informativo sobre la salud latina de la Campaña para mejorar la atención médica. Pero a pesar de los beneficios de la ley, afirmó Delgado, los obstáculos a la asistencia sanitaria de calidad para los latinos continúa “Si gana el salario mínimo y un plan familiar cuesta $ 600 dólares al mes, no hay manera de que lo pueda pagar”, dijo. “Así que me preocupan los planes que están fuera del alcance de algunas personas.” Los latinos indocumentados están explícitamente excluidos de la cobertura en la nueva bolsa de seguro de salud. “Esa es una situación difícil”, dijo Delgado. “Este proyecto de ley de salud sólo se refiere a una parte de nuestras preocupaciones de salud en los Estados Unidos”. “Realmente es para personas que están en los Estados Unidos legalmente.”

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the heartbeat of omaha latino leaders L atina

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Marlon A. Wright

Y oun g

By Leo Adam Biga

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ising young Latina professional Itzel Anahi Lopez is making her mark. This spring the 20-something earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Bellevue University. Her studies included marketing and communication arts. She wants to be a CEO, and successfully launched her family’s popular restaurant, Maria Bonita, 1921 Missouri Ave., a year ago in August. According to Lopez, the eatery attracts everyone from South Omaha residents to suburbanites to visitors from Mexico. Her mother Miriam is head chef, and her father Miguel is the jack-of-all-trades assistant. Both her sisters work there. Lopez manages the busy catering operation that serves major community events, including the Latino Heritage Awards Banquet and Cumbre. “What we offer is very unique, very personalized. We decorate our banquet tables. It’s 26

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all authentic, flavorful, colorful. We go above and beyond.” The restaurant’s received high praise for its authentic, homestyle food, inspired by the cuisine from the family’s native state of Hidalgo, Mexico, and for its colorful, festive decor. The warm, floral greens, blues, purples, oranges and reds are on a mural adorning the west wall, on signs out front, and on the table tops inside. Miriam’s handmade arts and crafts hang on the walls. Homemade, handwrapped candies occupy a display case. Even the menu and website (www.mariabonitaonline.com) continue the theme. The distinctive look is a homage to the family’s homeland. “Where we’re from. it’s just sun all year long,” said Lopez. “My grandparents owned a huge ranch, growing watermelons, papaya, you name it.” She said her father would harvest the fruit and bring it to the local market, where the entrepreneurial family sold not only produce, but flowers, tacos and craft items.

“My grandmother used to garden. Lots of flowers. Very colorful. That was transmitted from my grandmother to my mother, our mother transmitted that to us. This is what we grew up with -- colors, flowers, gardens. It was just all in our lives, So, when we opened this place, we wanted to transmit that in the color scheme. We admire our culture, we love our customs, we want our traditions to still be here.” Wherever Lopez’s path leads, she said faith and family will be front and center in her life. Education, too. The Omaha South High graduate was the first in her family to attend college. A younger sister followed in her footsteps, just graduating from Creighton University. The sisters’ youngest sibling starts at Central High School in the fall. Itzel was 14 when she came to America. After a year in ESL classes she was proficient enough in English to join regular classes at South, where she excelled academically and in extracurricular activities. “I love South and South loves me. They have been very supportive of my restaurant and we support South any way we can.” She earned South alumni scholarships and other financial support, opting for Bellevue University, where she said she “fell in love with the small class setting and personalized attention from teachers.” Gina Ponce was her mentor and advisor. Her biggest influence though is her mother:. “My mom’s definitely my role model. She’s done great things.” She’s grateful her father’s dream of sending his girls to college is being fulfilled. “My dad’s dream came true, that’s quite nice,” she said. She’s humbled by how far her family’s come in America in only a decade. “It’s very satisfying,” she said. “I’m very proud of my family.” Studying for a master’s may be her next move on the path to “help minorities reach their goals. That’s my passion. That’s why I do all the things I do.” Her community service includes Cinco de Mayo coordination, South Omaha Arts Institute educational outreach and Community Learning Center site supervision (Castelar).

J os e

the heartbeat of omaha latino leaders

an d L in d a Garcia F in d a N e w O utl e t for t h e ir M a g nific e nt O bs e ssion

By Leo Adam Biga

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ose and Linda Garcia spend every day immersed in Mexican-American heritage. After devoting years to their Las Artes Cultural Center, the couple recently closed it. Their magnificent obsession with Latino art and history is now expressed through the Mexican American Historical Society of the Midlands. He’s executive director and she’s secretary of the new nonprofit in the Mercado building, 4913 South 25th Street. The Garcias bring passion and expertise, along with a collection of photographs, art objects and books, to their mission of building awareness of Mexican-American achievement. Behind the scenes, preservation will be a major focus. Publicly, the community will be invited to exhibitions, lectures, art classes, film screenings and other cultural events. Unlike Las Artes, which the Garcias ran alone as a labor of love, the society has a formal board, its operations and programs funded by grants and donations. A $10,000 Futuro Latino Fund grant and a $5,000 South Omaha turn-back tax grant have helped the organization get running.

Why restart with a new institution? She said it’s an opportunity to employ their collection as a teaching tool on a new level, reaching more folks. Besides, she said, “somebody’s gotta do it.” Linda, a storyteller and artist, is a retired children’s librarian. Jose is a Union Pacific retiree. “The reason we have a collection is we use it,” she said. “Anything we do, whether design an exhibit or give a talk, we do a lot of research. We go out there and dig.” Her hunger to learn more about her cultural heritage and to disseminate it was inspired by her first visit to Mexico. The thenCollege of St. Mary senior was exposed to many facets of her people’s art and history not taught in school. This was part of her immersion in the Chicano movement. “What was awakened was the art, the literature, the becoming who you are as a Chicano,” she said. “I’m not really Mexican, I’m an American, but the combination made me a Chicano, which means I seek knowledge. But it’s not enough to stop there; you must transmit it to other people and share it. It’s not enough to collect and learn and keep it all to ourselves. That’s the reason for this place.”

Jose, originally from Kansas City, Mo., served three years in the U.S. Army, including one long year spent near Saigon during the height of the Vietnam War. Back home, he went from job to job, always snapping pictures on the side. He moved to Omaha in the 1970s. It was some time before he and Linda got together, each drawn to the other’s curiosity and drive. “Aesthetic quality is what she’s taught me,” Jose said of Linda. His digital pics documenting South Omaha are posted on picasweb.google.com/razatimes. “One thing I really learned from Jose,” said Linda, “is to speak out and not be this timid girl. I saw the respect people would give him because he would ask for what he wanted, and now I’ve learned to ask for what I want. We really blend. I’m the artist, he’s more the corporate type. We like to spend time together.” “We’ve learned to become old souls together,” said Jose. “We want to leave a legacy,” she said, “but it’s more than that, it’s trying to teach the community they also have a legacy and they also have a responsibility to carry their family traditions and to know how to take care of photographs and keepsakes. We want them to know what they have is really valuable, even if only to family or forbearers.” It’s all about self-determination, said Jose. The historical society goes public with these upcoming events: September 15, Mexican Independence Day, 10 p.m. greeting, 11 p.m. El Grito de Dolores September 16-19, Bicentennial of Mexican Independence, exhibit/lecture, 6 p.m. October 1, Grand opening, Las Americas South O City Center, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. program A website will soon launch. After October 1, the facility will be open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Friday; 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday. Admission is free. Donations accepted. Memberships available. The historical society number is 884-1910.

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Omaha Prominent Latinos C O M M U N I T Y

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L I DE R E S

Gustavo Camacho

Maria Elena Castro

Alberto Cervantes

Jamie Francisques

Victoriano Jimenez

Sergio Martinez

Hector Moreno

Carolina Padilla

Yesenia Wilson

Jorge Zepeda

Now retired, Camacho helps to organize community events. He negotiates donations, musical groups, personal volunteers, and cleaning. He was recognized by the Police in South Omaha after their Christmas event, and for his work in collecting more than $8,000 for Haiti.

President of the South Omaha Community Care Council since 2008. Because of his efforts the organization receives close to $100,000 through government and private donations. The work of his organization and others aliases help to improve the level of health of Latinos in Omaha.

Founder of the soccer league for girls and boys of La Amistad. In 2009 he created/ organized more than 5 soccer tournaments. He also helps inspect and establish regular and public tournaments that raise money for injured players’ medical treatments while they are recovering.

Director of the Artistic Ballet Xiotal and the Educational Program at Queen Bicentenary. Moreno organized the first event of beauty for the gay community, now in it’s fourth season; and he supports diversity. and supports the diversity of people. The organization also helps support emotional and physical self- esteem.

Through her work with the Midlands Latino Community Development Corporation Wilson assists in providing Latinos with opportunities to stimulate economic growth and to develop a healthy and sustainable future for themselves within the Greater Omaha community helping to create a community enriched by Latino influence.

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C O M U N I T A R I O S

Castro has been cited for her noted leadership in the program, “How to manage a family childcare.” Through this program Maria has helped to start 16 childcare programs’s and has been giving ongoing support to 46 women who have childcare centers’s in greater Omaha with passion and dedication.

Founder of the organization Mayatecas and the church soccer league “Emancipacion Guatemalteca and Centro-America and Pos-Libertad.” These games are intended as cultural gatherings with musical marimba and custom food. The community of Guatemala has now found a space to call home.

Martinez is the founder off the Latin United Tournaments where he has worked for the past seven 7 years. Through his efforts, Latin youth have been given more opportunities to join sport teams, helping to keep them off of the streets and away from gangs.

Padilla is a community outreach coordinator who is involved with many organizations, such as Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging, One World Community Health Center, South Omaha Community Care Council, UNMC, Creighton, Alegent Health, UNL, UNO, Latino Center of the Midlands, and Methodist Hospital.

Founder and director of the group the Danza Prehispanic “Las Gudalupanas” and “Los Copetones”. These groups work to help the younger generation appreciate the beauty of artistic expression, remembering that Mexico has served the religious manifestation in art, and also increasing the Catholic festivals and community in Omaha.


La Vision Latina