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The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

VO LUME 1 8 3 , N O . 3

InsIde

thiS week

QHC proposes major cuts at hospital Nine beds, maternity could be scrapped to balance gap JAson PArks

Staff writer

TRENDY

PefaC shows off all the amenities in new change room PAge 3

TRASH

Councillors decide not to extend hours at transfer site PAge 4

TRACTION

After a few years without many serious threats to its services, Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital once again finds itself threatened by the financial scalpel of the Quinte Healthcare Corporation (QHC). The hospital corporation announced late last week in light of a projected $10 million budget gap in 2013-14 and an additional $5 million decrease in funding in years afterwards, QHC would be examining a number of cost cutting measures. The budget gap is due in part to a new imagining of Ontario's healthcare system by the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care where hospitals are no longer the centre of the system and more funding is pumped into community services for close to home or in home health care. Locally, the proposals that would impact PECMH are drastic although all three southern QHC hospitals (Belleville General Hospital, Trenton Memorial Hospital and PECMH) are facing cutbacks. The local hospital’s allocation would go from 21 beds to 12, a reduction of nine. The loss of beds also means a final stake in the heart of delivering babies PECMH as all babies would now be delivered at Belleville General Hospital. As well, the proposal calls for the end of the endoscopy program in Picton.

See CUTS, page 26

Dukes gain momentum with four consecutive victories PAge 18

seCTIons

Looking back.......6 Weather.............6 Editorials.............7 Letters....................8 Puzzles.................17 Sports....................18 Classifieds.............22 CaNaDa’S OLDeSt COMMUNitY NewSPaPer

In JeoPArdy? Quinte Healthcare Corporation department of rural medicine division head Dr. Donald Koval and Prince Edward Family Health Team president Dr. Elizabeth Christie show one of the medical beds and equipment that could be lost as a result of Quinte Health Care’s proposed cost-cutting measures for area hospitals. (Chad Ibbotson/Gazette staff)

Changes could affect physician recruitment, says Sprague JAson PArks

Staff writer

Service reductions and the removal of beds at Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital could have a negative domino effect on the Prince Edward Family Health Team (PEFHT). Duff Sprague, executive director of the PEFHT, told the Gazette this week he worries that not having a fully functioning hospital in Picton could have a deep impact on the growth and success of what the Ministry of Health and Long-term

Care once billed as the model for local Family Health Teams in Ontario. “The proposals are significant and what I worry about is having a fully functional hospital. Having PECMH has been critical in recruiting the great physicians we have to this community. I worry about services reductions will affect the recruitment ability of young doctors that are dedicated to practice comprehensive, cradle to grave medicine,” Sprague said. Quinte Health Care announced late last week it was rolling out a set of cost

cutting proposals in light of a projected $10-million budget gap that come by way of a new healthcare funding model. As they stand prior to any consultation with employee groups and physicians, the proposals would see the number of beds at PECMH cut from 21 to 12, end the practice of local obstetrical care, end the endoscopy program in Picton and cease outpatient physiotherapy. Sprague worries the cuts will reduce the capacity and capability of the PEFHT to

offer comprehensive care for the community. “We've worked hard over the past six years to build up these community services, but it feels like a slippery slope. You make a gain, then there's a hospital reduction and there's a step back and it leads to frustration. The ability to practice complete medicine in a rural setting has long been a key catalyst in bringing family physicians to Prince Edward County.

See REACTION, page 26

Hospice to make case residential facilities can divert costs from hospitals Extra bed sought for Downes Avenue pilot AdAm BrAmBurger Staff writer

The announcement that Prince Edward Memorial Hospital may lose nine beds was seen as a catalyst by Hospice Prince Edward. With an approval for a residential hospice pilot project from the South East Local Health Integration Network (SE LHIN), Hos-

pice will try to use the concept of diversion as one of its arguments in favour of funding three beds instead of the two the LHIN initially envisioned. “The proposed changes we heard this week at our local hospital, particularly the reduction in beds makes making two or three hospice beds available in our community more important than ever,” Hospice president Birgit Langwisch told the Picton Rotary Club Tuesday. She told Rotarians that the cost to keep a palliative

P U L L - O U T

R E A L

patient in a bed at an Ontario hospital is $800 per day. The province’s budget for residential hospices suggests that patient could stay there for $400 a day. Executive director Nancy Parks said that in working on business plans with the LHIN, Hospice has been asked to show value to receive funding. “We will show the value for that third bed,” said Parks, who indicated projections suggest a three-bed hospice will operate at at least 90-per-cent capacity and the local facility

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already has a waiting list. Considering their own financial contributions to the project, Rotarians asked Hospice representatives several questions about sustainability. Parks explained the LHIN has $643,000 per year in base funding allocated between three twobed pilots in Picton, Perth, and Kingston. Being thefirst with a facility and looking to open by June, Prince Edward is seeking additional funds to operate a third bed in its proposal. She also indicated there

S E C T I O N

may be additional funds reallocated for start-up. Parks said Hospice has determined that $75,000 will have to be raised in the county on top of the LHIN funding every year, but through events like Hike For Hospice, the Coffee Break, and Autumn Leaves Gala as well as memorial donations, it expects the facility will be able to sustain itself. Hospice also announced Tuesday it is seeking expressions of interest to conduct the necessary renovations to open.

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The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

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The man who was the catalyst for the great strides the Prince Edward Family Health Team (PEFHT) has made over the past five years is moving on. Duff Sprague, the executive director of the PEFHT will no longer be with the organization after February 15. Sprague confirmed the Gazette inquiry Monday that he was leaving the Quinte area in search of a new challenge in Western Canada, accepting a post with KPMG in Edmonton as a senior project manager as Alberta tries to replicate a Family Health Teaminspired model called Family Care Clinics. Prior to coming to Prince Edward County in 2006 where his relatives settled in the 1800s, Sprague was the director of Family Health Team implementation with the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care and is a firm believer in the concept of building a group of very skilled health professionals working together to provide patients with better access to high quality

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co-ordinated health care and health services as close as possible. The Prince Edward Family Health Team has been one of the best organizations of its kind in Ontario to the point of drawing Ministry praise on numerous occasions so picking one highlight from his tenure would be tough. But overall, Sprague said he's been pleased with the calibre of those joining and taking an active part in the PEFHT. “The highlights have been the quality of the Healthcare professionals that came forward to work in the PEFHT. Amazing nurses, social workers, dietitians, you name them,�

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Sprague said. “ Our turnover is about as close to zero as you can be and I think our average sick days in a year are two.� One of the keys to team retention and dedication Sprague said was professionals were empowered to develop and ruin their own programs. He also said the dedication from the leading physicians such as Dr. Cliff Rice and Dr. Greg Higgins has had a trickle down effect to other professionals. I continue to be impressed by the sweat equity the lead doctors pour into this organization day after day. The leadership role isn't compensated so the driver has been belief

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they can make health services better for their patients,â&#x20AC;? Sprague added. Specialists willing to come and see patients such as psychiatrists, neurologists, orthopedic specialists, respirologists have helped make the organization a dynamic one. Sprague, who's spent over 25 years working in health and social services in government and not-forprofit organizations, called the half dozen years spent in Prince Edward County the best professional experience of his life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The last six years have just flown by and I can't say enough about the community, working with the media, it's been all positive,â&#x20AC;? Sprague said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If there was one thing I didn't do enough of, it's spending enough time communicating what the PEFHT is and what they do. People are taking advantage of these great services everyday and most of them don't understand its the leading doctors and the team that brought them here.â&#x20AC;? The PEFHT is developing a plan to find Sprague's replacement and Sprague said the job should be highly sought after. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will be a thorough search and the lucky candidate is going to find that they've landed the best job in Ontario,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

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president Bill Halman, contractor Lee Cole, councillor Bev Campbell, PEFAC treasurer Mat Smith, and Meloni Horton celebrate the grand opening of the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s change room after a five-week upgrade. (Chad Ibbotson/Gazette staff)

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PEFAC changes look of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s change room $44,000 renovations offer new shower stalls, plumbing, and suit dryer Chad Ibbotson

Staff writer

The Prince Edward Fitness and Aquatic Centre (PEFAC) unveiled its latest upgrade last week at the grand reopening of the women's change room. PEFAC general manager Stephanie Roth emphasized the work of PEFAC's board of directors as well as local contractors in the ability to bring the project in both on time and on budget. She thanked local contractors Rusty Brooks, Dan Claxton, Lee Cole, Rob's Installation, Garrett Hirschfield, and Ron Simmons for their work on the approximately five-week $44,000 project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a real pleasure to do this change room. We learned our lesson with the men's,â&#x20AC;? laughed Roth. Roth also said PEFAC president Bill Halman also played a crucial role in the renovation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank God Bill was

here because Bill was the catalyst and driving force behind getting this done on time and on budget,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it weren't for the co-operation of the contractors and for Bill, being one of our volunteers, we wouldn't have got this done three days ahead of schedule.â&#x20AC;? The renovations included new shower stalls, plumbing, tiling and a new Suitmate bathing suit dryer. Halman also thanked the contractors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's amazing to work with these guys. (They're) so easy to get along with, so hardworking and everybody came in on time,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were a year in the making here, finding the finances and getting the money up front to get it done.â&#x20AC;? Halman also offered thanks to the municipality, which contributed $20,000 toward the renovation, and to PEFAC volunteers who

raised a portion of the funds needed for the renovation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to thank the women for putting up with our makeshift shower,â&#x20AC;? Halman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were troopers, they powered right through it. There were no complaints and no griping so we were very happy we got the change room done on budget and on time.â&#x20AC;? Halman said PEFAC was also able to complete some things that weren't in the budget with the help of the contractors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got it done on budget and it was great,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We're glad we could do this for the women.â&#x20AC;? Picton councillor Bev Campbell spoke on behalf of the municipality. Campbell also sits on the PEFAC board. She said from that perspective she knows how much work went into the project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find myself in a good

Notice of Public Meeting Regarding Proposed Development Charges By-Law On Thursday, February 14, 2013, Council of the County of Prince Edward will hold a public meeting pursuant to Section 12 of the Development Charges Act, 1997 to present and obtain public input on the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed development charges by-law and underlying background study. All interested parties are invited to attend the Public Meeting of Council and any person who attends the meeting may make deputations relating to the proposed by-law and background study. The meeting is to be held: Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:00 pm Council Chambers, Shire Hall 332 Main Street, Picton, Ontario In order to ensure that sufficient information is made available to the public, copies of the proposed by-law and background study will be made available as of January 30, 2013 on the Municipal website and by contacting the undersigned. Interested persons are invited to express their comments: x at the Public Meeting on February 14, 2013 and/or x by submitting written comments to the undersigned no later than February 7, 2013. Written submissions will be placed before Council for the meeting. Victoria Leskie, Clerk 332 Main Street, Picton, ON K0K 2T0 Tel: 613.476.2148 Fax: 613.476.5727 e-mail: vleskie@pecounty.on.ca www.pecounty.on.ca

spot in being able to see from the inside how much work has gone into, not only this, but in managing the whole operations,â&#x20AC;? she said. She congratulated the board, management and all who worked on the project. She said the job done on the change room is phenomenal, but PEFAC also deserves kudos for their operations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It certainly is a wonderful job on the change room and we're very pleased to have contributed financially to that, but I'm talking as well about the whole operation,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This facility has been maintained and has been modernized in a very professional way under the guidance of the board and, on behalf of the County, we're very proud to be a part of that.â&#x20AC;?

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The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Councillors dump bid to open Picton waste transfer station an extra day Move would have cost municipality $12,500 per year Chad ibbotson

Staff writer

status quo The Picton waste transfer station will continue to stay open only on Saturdays after a close vote at council this week. Some councillors felt it should re-open on Wednesdays to provide better service to ratepayers. (Adam Bramburger/Gazette staff)

Another attempt to modify the municipality's landfill schedule has ended with no change. Councillor Kevin Gale brought forward a motion at last week's committee-ofthe-whole meeting to open the Picton waste transfer station on Wednesdays, but a close vote narrowly defeated the move. Engineering, development and works commissioner Robert McAuley estimated the cost of opening the site an additional

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day per week at $12,500. Gale said garbage is becoming more of a problem today and said more of the household trash is finding its way to the side of the road. “Even if people put garbage or recycling out, it's a long time between Saturday and Saturday,” he said. He said on a recent trip to a Sophiasburgh landfill, he had received comment that the site was extremely busy. “It is an issue. From a business point of view and a personal home point of view, we need some place in the county that's open sometime during the week,” he said. He said he's spoken to businesses who are having trouble handling the garbage and recycling from week to week. “We just made this comment in the newspaper that we're focusing on customer service. Well, we're in the garbage business. That's one aspect of our business,” he said. “By cutting back for the sake of $12,500 per year we're doing the ratepayers an injustice in my opinion.” Councillor Brian Marisett agreed with Gale. He said garbage aside, people need someplace to take their recycling as regular pick-up comes just once every two weeks. “Until we get to a point where we have that on a weekly basis we need some facility open during the week to accommodate our businesses and individuals,” he said. Councillor Jamie Forrester was among those who didn't support the move. He said people need to look at the bigger problem and reduce the amount of garbage they produce. “We keep on wanting to

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open dumps instead of really talking about the need to reduce the amount of garbage that's going out there,” he said. He said opening the dumps more days per week isn't the answer. “It just allows easier disposal of garbage and I don't think we're really getting the message across that we have to find ways to reduce the amount of garbage,” he said. Mayor Peter Mertens also voted against opening the site. “Quite frankly I'm getting tired of having this on the agenda,” Mertens said at the meeting. “My own feeling is what we have in the county at this point is a reluctance to change a habit.” Mertens said he doesn't believe there's a real need for the sites to be open more days per week. “It's a habit. 'We've always done it this way, we always want to do it this way, so we're going to continue to do it this way. Then we'll complain if we don't get it that way,'” Mertens said. He said he lived in a municipality of 80,000 people that had no dumps of its own. He said the closest dump was 45 minutes away. “We had recycling every two weeks. In the summertime we had garbage every week and normally had garbage every two weeks. That's what you have,” he said. “People, they cope.” He agreed with Forrester that the municipality shouldn't be making it easier to get rid of garbage, but should be making it more difficult. He said this would force more people to change their habits, recycle and reduce the amount of garbage they produce. Specializing in Tree Preservation

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The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

OPP has new Mann on the community services job Veteran officer to teach DARE, lead public awareness programming

Oh no, say it isn’t so. Not the big 3-0

Happy 70th Birthday HEAVY D

AdAm BrAmBurger Staff writer

Starting Monday, the Prince Edward OPP will have a new ambassador. After spending six of the last eight years in the community services officer role, Const. Kim Guthrie is handing off her duties to Const. Anthony Mann. For many people, the community services officer offers a personal link to policing they might not otherwise have. “The majority of people within our community the only time they meet a police officer it's a brief interaction whether it be a RIDE spot check or highway traffic stop,” said Mann. “Not too often do they have an opportunity to speak with an officer, engage them, ask their questions or voice their concerns.” Much of a community services officer’s work comes through liaising with schools, teaching the DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program to Grade 6 classes, and promoting student safety. The community services officer also serves as a public face of the police department. That officer oversees safety campaigns, like those promoting the use of helmets and life jackets, bicycle rodeos, and positive ticketing initiatives. Mann will also pick up work Guthrie has done on the Adopt-a-Child snowsuit fund and other charitable events, like the Pedal For Hope relay, which raised money for pediatric cancer in 2011. First hired as an OPP officer in 1998, Mann has spent much of his 15-year policing career in the Prince Edward detachment, save his first year, which was spent in Long Sault, just west of Cornwall. He has a young family and has kept himself active in the community coaching minor and junior hockey. Guthrie thinks all those experiences, both on and off the beat should help him moving forward. “Anthony brings so much

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chAnging over Const. Anthony Mann is taking over the Prince Edward OPP

detachment’s community services officer role from Const. Kim Guthrie. In doing so, he’ll receive custody of Daren and the popular DARE program. (Adam Bramburger/Gazette staff)

experience to the table. He brings his patrol experiences, his general policing — he was in the drug unit — he has compassion with kids and is involved in the community with hockey,” she said. “He has some great ties to community and great characteristics and experiences.” Guthrie said her advice to her successor was fairly simple — keep an open mind and keep an open schedule. “Flexibility is key,” she said. “And have fun with the kids and the community and enjoy a different side of policing.” Mann said he was really interested in making the change and taking on a new role within his detachment. “It’s really having more of an opportunity to work more with the community in very much a more proactive and preventive way,” he said. “Certainly, I’ll enjoy working with the kids through the DARE program.” Guthrie brought that pro-

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gram to the county in 2006 and she lists it as one of her highlights because unlike the Values, Influences, and Peers program before it, it has a set curriculum for all of the classes who take part. One of Mann’s first tasks will be returning to the Ontario Police College in Aylmer next month to become a certified DARE instructor before heading into county elementary schools in March to teach. Asked if he had any plans to change programming or introduce new aspects of the role, Mann said he has ideas but would have his hands full learning his duties and living up to the commitment and high standards Guthrie offered. Mann becomes the fifth community services officer in Prince Edward, following Mick Chalmers, Greg Richardson, Guthrie, and Nicole Lott. Guthrie said the change of having a fresh face is good, both for the role, and for the

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officers themselves. “ Change is good. Anthony will bring new energy to the community services role and I'll go back to my role with renewed energy as well,” she said. Guthrie will return to front-line duties. Meanwhile, Mann will fill his role for a two-year commitment, but says he’s hoping it could be a long-term fit.

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January 19, 1963 50 Years Ago A Legend Was Born Happy 50th Birthday Tom Foster

It’s 4:30am and most are still in bed, But Big Tom is in the barn, milking cows instead. Never sick, never late, this kind gentle giant Loves to work hard, and there is no one more reliant. He always has a smile, and an inquiry to make Knows everyone and everything – your privacy may be at stake! But we love him just the same; he has a heart of gold. Keeping busy milking cows, he says he will never be too old. So we wish Dear Tom the happiest of days, Thank him for his dedication, and all his entertaining ways. Sincerely, The deBoef Family

Hospice Prince Edward -- Request for Expressions of Interest

Hospice Prince Edward (HPE) is requesting Expressions of Interest from General Building and Landscape Contractors (need not be combined) to undertake renovations at 40 Downes Avenue, Picton to create a three-bed hospice that includes the development of outdoor amenities. This is the first step in a process that may result in a Request for Proposal to undertake the work. Project Scope: Work to include the demolition and removal of existing interior partitions, millwork, fixtures, devices and finishes and the rebuilding including plumbing, electrical, mechanical, communication, millwork and finishing of interior spaces. The work is proposed to be initiated in February 2013 and end by May 2013. Landscape work includes the design and execution of landscape features that would include spaces for peaceful relaxation with hard and soft landscape features. For Additional Information contact: Peter Matthewman, Chair Building Committee Hospice Prince Edward Tel: (613) 848-7797 Email: pmatthewman@kos.net

Expressions of Interest to be received by Hospice Prince Edward no later than January 31, 2013, 4:30 p.m. Hospice Prince Edward – Our Vision: Supporting the journey of living with dying

6

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY

Looking back in the

Picton Gazette 80 years ago — 1933

■ Milford blacksmith George Lowery celebrated a rare milestone as in his 80th year, he marked his 60th year in the trade. He learned the trade in Brighton and spent 20 years working in and around Rochester, N.Y. was well as twice serving in the village. ■ A 14-year-old boy was given a suspended sentence for two years for what was deemed a serious offence against two young girls. His crime was not described in the newspaper, nor was evidence of the crime brought forward in open court. The evidence was presented in a closed hearing the previous Saturday. The magistrate indicated more interest should be taken by trustees on the welfare of the school where the crimes happened. ■ Hallowell’s Osborne Brant was to serve three months in jail for illegal liquor possession. Police found 20 quarts of homemade brew and empties at his home just west of Bloomfield.

60 years ago — 1953

■ A Tweed doctor was called to the scene of a motor vehicle accident to find his two sons dead and his wife and daughter seriously injured. After pulling his sons from the wreckage and realizing they were beyond aid, Dr. John Empson tried to make his wife and daughter as comfortable as they were transported to Belleville General Hospital via ambulance. ■ School chairman Gerald Norman turned the sod at the site of the new $711,000 high school in Picton alongside Mayor H.J. McFarland. McFarland’s construction company was to build the facility. Norman said schools and churches are two ways to combat communism. ■ Canada’s food caning industry had packed more than 300 million cases since 1920 and boasted an annual product value of more than $150 million. New technologies allowed for rapid growth.

40 years ago — 1973

■ Provincial judge J.L. Clendenning ruled that Ontario did not have jurisdiction to pass judgement on pollution charges under the Environmental Protection Act after a Toronto woman made complaints about Triad Truckways and Lake Ontario Cement polluting the environment while hauling sand from the Sandbanks. The province was expected to appeal to the Supreme Court. ■ A panel of doctors working at Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital agreed there is a need for more volunteer help at the facility. The doctors suggested volunteers would be helpful in providing direction for visitors and patients. ■ Police chief George Pitt came forward to council to ask for renovations and additional space allocations to consolidate offices and lock-ups at one facility.

20 years ago — 1993

■ The Prince Edward County Board of Education met with MPP Paul Johnson to ask for a Ministry of Education appraisal into the board’s operations with a goal of achieving any great efficiencies than those it had already achieved. Trustee Ruth Hart said the board already had among the lowest per-pupil costs in Ontario. ■ The community rallied to help feed, clothes, and relocated the Selwah family, which lost everything when its duplex was destroyed by fire Christmas morning.

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Wintering warblers and persistent pipet

The icy spume and wind off Lake Ontario pelted our car as we tried to survey the waterfowl on Lake Ontario, during a census that would take us from the Trent River to Point Petre. A small flock of juncos and a single tree sparrow fought to stay upright as they scoured the grassy knoll at the end of North Beach Road that had become bare of snow by the relentless winds off the lake. I was the first to notice a bird that didn’t look quite right as it catapulted in the wind past the car and disappeared over the edge of the embankment to the shoreline below. The odd flight pattern must have been attributable to the wind. Within a few seconds, the bird returned to the opposite side of the car where my birding partner for the day had a fleeting glimpse and suggested a pipit. It disappeared, along with the juncos and tree sparrow, and all vanished in the direction of North Beach. I suggested we wait as feeding birds have a circuit they follow, and this one could be back. Fifteen minutes later, the roving group returned and the pipit obligingly foraged in the grass ahead of us. American pipits are terrestrial birds, common enough in the spring and fall as they migrate through our area, but rarely seen after early December. Only two January sight records in the Quinte and Kingston areas seemed to exist for this breeding bird of the Hudson Bay Lowlands. Immediately we wondered what would have

OUTDOOR RAMBLES TERRY SPRAGUE

caused this bird to remain into January, during a winter that so far had not been very kind. However, its appearance was no less surprising than a few others that have turned up so far this winter. In Oakville, five species of insectivorous warblers have appeared. Only a few warbler species can switch diets to accommodate the winter’s lack of insects. That’s why we seldom see them here in winter – they need to migrate south to find food. They have been doing this for a very long time. One of those that can adapt, of course, is the yellow-rumped warbler (still the myrtle warbler to most of us). Often it will remain into November, switching from a diet of summer insects to one that includes lingering spiders in the fall. If a few questionably decide to not bother migrating at all, they can take this process one step further

and swing over to a diet of berries – primarily red cedar berries around these parts. And they seem to do quite well which might explain why there are no concerns with overall continental populations of yellow-rumped warblers. Others, like the fall plumaged orange-crowned warbler that created a mild furor at a Wellington feeder late last month just don’t get it. Out of desperation, this warbler resorted to seed fragments and suet. Not a very nutritious meal for an insect eating bird, but indigestion is likely a better option than interment. Rarely, though, do they survive for long on such boring fare, and seldom survive for more than a few days. This one was around for only two days. We can only speculate that it succumbed to colder temperatures More remarkable was a yellow-throated warbler at a Brighton feeder. It’s bright yellow throat was in sharp contrast to the pinks of house finches and redpolls and greys of chickadees that also were present. Its appearance was remarkable in that it is a species that doesn’t even belong here, even as a migrant. It is southern in distribution, and this one migrated north, not south. It is not the first time one has appeared in the Quinte area either. There was one east of Brighton a few winters ago, and another at Trenton before that, in 1987. Even Kingston has had a number of worrisome late November records.

So, what goes on in the psyche of birds that fail to migrate, or head north when they should be heading south. No, despite dire warnings from the soothsayers, it has nothing to do with the presence of bird feeders as these individuals decided on their aberrant behaviour long before winter set in. They often end up at feeders out of desperation in their search for food. The mysteries of migration are still poorly understood. We have learned a lot over the years about inherited knowledge, magnetic fields, landmarks, photoperiod and just pure instinct — all those things that make birds do what they do, and have been doing for centuries. Is it simply because the finely tuned habits that have been programmed into birds become short circuited occasionally? Many seem to discount the theory that winds or prolonged storm fronts have much to do with it, although they may to a point. Maybe birds are “just human”. They make mistakes and more times than not, pay for it with their lives. And is that such a bad thing in the final scheme of things? If the bird is out of the running then it won’t pass those inferior genes to its children thereby keeping the migratory instinct strong. For more information on today’s topic, please e-mail tsprague@kos.net or phone 613-476-5072. For more information on nature in the Quinte area, be sure to check out www.naturestuff.net

Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus sets priorities for 2013

The Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus has set economic development and financial sustainability as its top priorities for the upcoming year. On the first priority, the caucus, which features representatives from 13 eastern Ontario municipalities including Prince Edward County, will work to create an Eastern Ontario Economic Development Strategy

with key components like business retention, skills development, completion of the Eastern Ontario rural broadband network, and addressing the Algonquin land claim. With regard to financial sustainability, last year, the caucus researched the kind of investment needed for capital improvements to the nearly 88,000 kilometres of roads in the

area it serves, exposing a growing deficit of nearly $3 billion in needed improvements. This year, that research will be expanded to look at other key municipal services including social housing, waste management, asset management, and bridge funding. Prince Edward County Mayor Peter Mertens said the agenda seems within reach.

“We believe we can make some significant strides forward in 2013 by zeroing in on these two key priorities, while remaining prepared to deal with any other issues that may arise.” The caucus also elected Rick Phillips, of Hastings, and Ron Holman of Leeds and Grenville as its new chair and vice-chair. -Staff

EDITORIALS The Picton Gazette

7

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

our oPINIoN

‘The vision is hospitals are no longer the centre of the healthcare system. It's still important but the intent is they are only there to deal with the most sick, the highly acute patients at their specific portion of the journey.’

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT

-Q uInTe H ealTHcare c orporaTIon

presIdenT and cHIef execuTIve offIcer M ary c lare e gberTs on THe InTenT of THe provInce ’ s new fundIng forMula and ITs IMpacTs on HospITals .

luck of the draw The Picton Elks recently announced the winners of their annual Christmas draw. Evelyn

Drew, right, earned $500 for first place, Brian McKnight (not pictured) earned $300 for second place, and Bob Cole , left, earned $200 for third place. (Submitted photo)

Health-care changes must come in reality, not just in theory

INITIALLY, the news that the Quinte Healthcare Corporation is considering a reduction of nine beds at the Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital was likely met with trepidation and anger by many in this community. Surely, they say, cuts of that magnitude would weaken the functionality of a hospital that is already running a lean operation. In her explanation for the moves — which QHC stresses have not been finalized — Mary Clare Egberts discusses the province’s direction with health care funding is one where it is hoping to spend money in other areas in hopes of diverting patients and higher costs away from hospitals. In theory, that’s a direction that makes a lot of sense. If a residential hospice can palliate an end-oflife patient for half the cost a hospital can, that is probably a place where money should be diverted. If a paramedic could be trained and allowed to do more without transporting a patient to a hospital, maybe that would free up emergency beds. There’s also a lot of potential for ideas like the Prince Edward Family Health Team’s home-based medicine idea that just make sense. There was even an idea of this type of thinking on display the last time QHC attempted to cut beds at Prince Edward County Memorial, when the local family health team put together its own proposal to take some of the pressure away from Belleville General Hospital to allow it to do more acute care. The question mark here, however, is whether the system is able to handle this type of diversion. With no residential hospice beds in this area to date and a shortage of long-term care beds, where are the people going to go who are using hospital beds now for those functions? Is the system not going to serve their needs, or are they still going to end up relying on hospitals and staying in beds that are going to be at an even larger premium while they either get healthy or succumb to their illnesses? One would think that QHC has done extensive analysis on how their beds are being used and where that diversion is to take place — though it’s disturbing to hear a distinguished group like the Prince Edward Family Health Team say it didn’t have input into the latest set of recommendations — and it could only be expected that those figures would form the basis for much of the discussion going forward. If the system isn’t ready to handle this type of thinking, it would seem the public is about to expend more resources rather than fewer to clean up the mess and maintain the quality of care now offered, let alone improve upon it. Plenty of innovative work has been done in this county to discover better ways to keep its aging population healthy. That is evident in the notion that people across Ontario and in other provinces are looking to those involved with the Family Health Team for answers. It is hoped that those in power will look to that innovation for more answers before making an irreversible decision.

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8

ON GUARD FOR THEE

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Requests from the community drive learning initiatives

Whether it is learning French, unraveling technology through computer workshops, learning to play bridge or chess, hearing from experts on important issues, or helping children with tutoring to help them succeed in school, the community is seeking and finding the help they need at the public library. “We have responded to requests for clubs, workshops and other avenues for learning,” says Library CEO Barbara Sweet, “and as people have found the experiences positive, these have created a rich climate for further learning and greater demand.” The snowball effect is what successful libraries are experiencing as more people recognize libraries as places to go to connect with their community and to expand their knowledge base by, for example, learning a new language. “Learning to speak French has become increasingly popular, with beginner to advanced groups in four of our six branches,” says Sweet. “Our challenge now is finding instruction to fill the demand for Spanish.” Additionally, this interest in French language has provided the foundation for events such as the upcoming “Mes aventures en France” talk by well know local singer/songwriter Jeanette Arsenault. On Friday, Jan. 25, at 2 p.m., Arsenault will be presenting a slide show with commentary about her recent trip to France and entertaining with a few songs as well, mostly in French at the Wellington branch of the library. All are welcome to the free event. Technology is also driving demand for workshops, including how to use e-readers, tablet computers, and other electronic devices. In addition to workshops and one-on-one sessions, drive groups are taking classes geared to their specific needs. Providing free access to knowledge takes many forms in today’s world, including sharing the unique and insightful experiences of others. To that end, the library presents authors, such as the award-winning journalist and author Jamie Swift who will be speaking on the historical and political implications of today’s gov-

InsIde the lIbrary CHRISTINE RENAUD

ernment as it relates to Warrior Nation – Rebranding Canada in an age of anxiety, a book he co-authored with noted historian Ian McKay. Swift will be at the Picton branch of the library on Sunday, Jan. 20 at 2p.m. and all are welcome to the free event. “We are fortunate to have exceptional people within our own communities to share unique experiences as well,” says Sweet. Krista Dalby and Susanne Larner are two women who recently returned from Ghana on a volunteer expedition and they will be presenting photos and a talk on Tuesday, Jan. 22 at 7 p.m. in Picton. For parents and children, and in celebration of family literacy day on Jan. 27, early childhood literacy specialist Donna Kaye will share a story from the east to help children learn about another part of the world, plus a free book will be given to participants as well as take-home activities. This family event will take place at three branches, including the Milford branch at 6p.m on Thursday, Jan. 24, the Picton Baby Group meeting on Friday, Jan. 25, and at the Bloomfield branch on Saturday, Jan. 26th at 3:30 pm. In the future, the library will present a talk on various meditative practices, seed saving, vegan cooking, as well as song writing workshops, a drama workshop, and more. We welcome your ideas and requests for learning opportunities at the library. Please contact us at 613-4765962 or e-mail: crenaud@peclibrary .

Two developments should both be viewed with concern

I absolutely agree with the letter from the Hudsons in Black Creek ("Will Grimmons Woods remain protected?) that the destruction of any part of this scenic locale near their home for the purpose of erecting hydro poles would be a travesty. Sadly, as vocal proponents of industrial wind

turbine construction in the county, they apparently do not share the same concern for the massive environmental damage their neighbours in South Marysburgh will suffer should the Gilead or wpd projects proceed. C. Keen, Picton

Wednesday social bridge results

Some 46 bridge players made 11.5 tables at the Prince Edward Curling Club last Wednesday despite the spring temperatures outside. First place went to Mari-

on Sagar, second spot was taken by Jim Champagne, and the third position was secured by Maurice Carlier. -Bill Gray

Members of the St. Gregory Catholic School choir preform O’ Canada prior to the start of the Belleville Bulls-Windsor Spitfires game at the Yardmen Arena on Saturday evening. (Jason Parks/Gazette staff)

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Council missed opportunity to protect residents

The first responsibility of any elected official is to ensure that the people who elected them are being represented and secondly that in times of need, our elected leaders will make good decisions. When it comes to the decade long debate over industrial wind turbines (IWTs), our municipal council has failed us on both accounts — miserably! It doesn’t matter if you are for or against the wind machines — what I’m writing about is the lack of public process and lack of council involvement — in other words the people we elected to uphold our democratic system didn’t do the their job. I understand the undemocratic limitations that our provincial government imposed on local councils when it came to alternate energy, but that didn’t

mean that our council had to remain quiet and accept it — which they did. They could have engaged in direct conversations with this community about what the facts are surrounding these huge machines — but that would have meant for them to educate themselves with the facts, and we now know that didn’t happen. Despite the ongoing war of words between groups in our community over IWTs, our council did nothing to calm the waters or to clarify the situation. They mistakenly believed that the controversy would deflect responsibility away from them. Not so! According to the latest news articles, our council didn’t have the basic information to appeal IWTs at Ostrander Point. After years of noninvolvement, neither coun-

cil nor our staff had the necessary information to launch an appeal. A fair question to ask is — what information has council been functioning on all these years? Council gave the responsibility to various citizen groups to appeal on behalf of this community! In other words our council has totally abdicated their responsibility to represent this community at a time when they are needed the most! One newspaper account reported that our council was afraid to appeal Ostrander Point in the event of provincial reprisals. What nonsense! The process was there for our council to use. Instead they hired a lawyer and decided to do nothing! For the most important development issue in this

county’s history, one that could potentially impact on all aspects of county life — our council for years avoided taking an official position on turbines, and even today they still don?t have one- unbelievable! Without an official municipal position of opposing wind turbines, it made it easy for the province to ignore us — and they did. Even at the eleventh hour when appealing the Ostrander Point development was still possible, our council abdicated their responsibility by deciding to do nothing — again! The mayor and every council member should hang their heads in shame — they have left our community unprotected from developers. Dennis Fox Northport

Stand up and fight service cutbacks at hospital Here we go again. Due to a funding shortfall from the Ministry of Health, the Quinte Healthcare Corporation (QHC) will have to find $ 10 million in savings beginning April 1. On Jan. 10 they announced a list of proposed changes . I will concentrate on only those changes that affect Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital (PECMH). Inpatient beds will be reduced from 21 to 12. If this does happen patients who are admitted will possibly have to spend more time in the emergency department until a bed becomes available upstairs. As you can imagine wait times in emergency will become longer. Babies will no longer be delivered in Picton but rather in Belleville.Only 26 were born in Picton last year

as opposed to 1,400-1,500 in Belleville. As a point of interest resident physicians from Queens in Kingston train with our local physicians here in Picton. We have five doctors here in Picton who work with the residents in the delivery of babies on the maternity ward. Invaluable training for those residents who plan on setting up a practice in small or remote areas. The next proposal is to stop all outpatient physiotherapy with the remaining resources directed to inpatient physio. Keep in mind that the average cost to obtain treatment in a private physio clinic is approximately $50 per visit. Another proposal is to consolidate all endoscopy in Belleville once the new operating rooms open there in 2014. For any of you who

have had scopes at PECMH you know that it is an extremely well-run OR with caring an d very competent nurses that most of you know.The operating room at PECMH performs approximately 18 scopes a day while having the lowest cost per patient as compared to other hospitals at QHC. We can only hope that the surgeons who perform these scopes "pick up the ball" on this proposed cut. Once again patients will have to drive to Belleville and pay very high parking rates there. I remind you that the cost of a taxi to Belleville one way is $50.00. I have only touched on a few cuts .You can read in detail all the proposals in the local media. I have been quoted as saying I don't totally blame QHC. They must find $10 million in savings so are looking at many

options. I strongly encourage you to learn about and comment on the proposals at www.qhc.on.ca or by calling 613-969-7400 ext 2027. As I stated earlier the blame is not totally with QHC but rather with the provincial government. .I personally feel that many of these proposals will become a reality if residents don't voice their concerns. You can either sit back and say nothing or you can speak up for our wonderful little county hospital. The decision is yours . Once we lose these services we will not get them back. By the way PECMH will celebrate it's100th birthday in six short years. Let's do everything possible to help it celebrate that momentous day. Fran Renoy Picton

The Picton Gazette welcomes letters to the editor of 500 words or less. The letters may be edited for clarity, legal ramifications, length or general taste at the editor’s discretion. We also reserve the right to refuse to   publish submitted letters for the same reasons. Letters published do not necessarily reflect the views of the Gazette, its publisher, or staff. Submitted items become the property of the Picton Gazette. 

9

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Councillors to tweak meeting procedures Committee start to change, prayer to remain ChAd IbbotsoN

Staff wRIteR

Some changes to council's meeting procedures may be on the way. Committee of the whole voted last week to approve several changes to the procedure bylaw, which regulates meetings of council and committees of council. If approved by council, the changes will include moving the committee of the whole meeting time to 9 a.m. While some councillors were pushing for an evening start time, a proposed 6 p.m. slot was defeated. Councillor Terry Shortt was in favour of the evening start time, saying holding the meetings in the afternoon or morning excludes a large section of the working population of the county. “When we discussed this initially I heard concern about the public being able to attend. Those concerns have to be taken into consideration if we're going to change the time,” he said. Councillor Kevin Gale argued for the early start time, saying that starting the meetings in the evening would have a budget impact as staff would be required at the meetings. He said morning meetings provided balance. “We have evening meetings in council. The nice thing about committee of the whole is that those recommendations go to council. If there's somebody who works in the evening they can come to committee of the whole,” he said. “You have two day meetings and two night meetings.” The approved recommendations also included allowing debate on — and amendments to — referral and deferral motions, and will require members of council to disclose pecuniary interests in writing and post them with the meeting's minutes. Members of council wishing to put forward a motion that would require a change in municipal policy would be required to provide a notice of motion to the clerk. The item would be listed on a committee of the whole agenda preceding the meeting where the recommenda-

‘The way it’s going now it’s working. If you don’t want to say (the Lord’s Prayer) you don’t say it.’ KEVIN GALE COUNCILLOR

tion would be discussed, allowing for public notice and the opportunity for staff to review the issue. Under the changes any closed session materials would have to be returned to the clerk at the end of closed session meeting to minimize the risk of leaked confidential information. Each of the changes garnered healthy debate from councillors, but it was several of the items not approved which were most hotly contested. Gale moved that several of the proposed changes to meeting schedules and structures be deleted. Staff had provided 12 recommended schedule and structure changes for meetings in a report. Those included combining the current two committee-of-thewhole meetings, two council meetings and one planning public meeting per month into two meetings per month. Each meeting would have a committee of the whole and council component. The recommendations from committee of the whole would be submitted to the subsequent council meeting, but a recommendation could be adopted at the council meeting of the same date if there was some urgency. “Council meetings vary in length but are generally under one hour, with some lasting less than half an hour. By combining meetings we can make more efficient use of meeting time without diminishing public access or transparency,” the report says. “ Gale said combining five meetings into two was “ludicrous.” “Sure there are some meetings that are relatively quick and then we go home, but there are other meetings that go for hours and at the end of the day — especially if you've been working during

the day or whatever — you get tired, things slip through the cracks and we're not doing it justice,” he said. Councillor Jim Dunlop concurred. He said leaving the meeting schedule and structure as is would better serve the public. “Sometimes meetings can be an hour or three hours and it wouldn't do justice to the public to have a council meeting (right after committee),” he said. He said if some items were passed at council the same day it went to committee, it wouldn't give the public enough time to comment. Also heavily debated was the inclusion of the Lord's Prayer at the beginning of council meetings. Staff had provided four options: An inter-faith prayer; a moment of silent reflection; a combination of the two; or that the Lord's Prayer be removed and council meetings simply start. Ultimately, two changes were defeated and the prayer remained unchanged. Shortt and Gale were both vehemently against removing the prayer from the start of the meetings. Shortt said there haven't been any complaints that the practice is inappropriate. “The three major religions believe in one god and, when we say the Lord's Prayer, I'd say it's a very generic prayer and it's not specifically related to the Christian faith,” he said. Gale said the current process works. “The way it's going now it's working. If you don't want to say it, you don't say it,” he said. Councillor Alec Lunn suggested the prayer be removed and that no prayer or reflection take place at the start of council meetings, but the motion lost. Councillor Nick Nowitski seconded the motion. He said removing the Lord's Prayer would bring the County in line with what's happening in other municipalities. “The majority is becoming the minority and will quickly be the minority and then you'll have to change your thoughts,” he said. “… Whether we like it or not, whether it's law or not, it's changing. One of the problems everybody has said is inherent in the county is change — people don't want to change.”

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130 MAIN ST., PICTON WWW.TCVIDEO.FORMOVIES.COM nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

WHATTAM’S COMMUNITY CALENDAR The Community Calendar is donated as a public service to our community by The Whattam Funeral Home, 33 Main St., West, Picton (613-476-2450)

SPACE IS AVAILABLE TO all non-profit groups or organizations that serve 'The County' ONLY. Calendar items can be faxed 476-3031, email whattamfh@sympatico.ca or placed in drop box at the side door of the Funeral Home by Saturday at noon. WHATTAM'S is proud to present....'Free Family Movie Day' at the Regent Theatre the last Sunday of each month 2pm. January 27 “Rise of the Guardian” LOYALIST HUMANE SOCIETY – In need of food, litter, cleaning supplies, paper products & dire need of kitten food canned & dry. PICTON FOOD BANK in need canned fruit/veggies/cereals/kraft dinner/ cookies/ juice crystals/peanut butter/tuna. Donations to the newly established Pet Food Bank also appreciated. CONSECON LEGION – Senior Bid Euchre every Tuesday 7pm. Cost is $5. Everyone welcome. CONSECON LEGION – Mixed Fun Darts every Thursday 7:30pm. Everyone welcome. BLOOMFIELD YOGA CLASSES – Drop-in classes at the Bloomfield Town Hall Wednesdays 5:30 – 6:30pm beginning Jan 23. Cost is $5/class. Everyone welcome. Sponsored by Bloomfield/Hallowell Recreation Committee. Info call 393-3798. CHERRY VALLEY YOGA – One-hour, drop-in Yoga Classes $5. Every Tuesday 5:30-6:30pm. Every Thursday 9:3010:30am at Athol Community Hall, 1679 County Rd. 10 Cherry Valley. Presented by Athol Recreation Committee. All welcome. www.atholreccentre.com. CHERRY VALLEY GAMES NIGHT – First & third Fridays of the month. Casual, friendly games night from 7:30 to 10:30pm. Board games, cards, ping pong & more, but just for adults. Bring snacks/refreshments. Athol Community Hall, 1679 County Rd. 10 Cherry Valley. Presented by Athol Recreation Committtee. SOCIAL BABY GROUP – Picton Library every Friday morning 10am – 12noon. A social time for parents, caregivers & their little ones. www.peclibrary.org. DROP IN CHESS – Picton Library Tuesdays from 1-4pm. Play a partner or learn to play. www.peclibrary.org. DROP IN BEGINNER FRENCH – Picton Library every Thursday 2pm. www.peclibrary.org. AFTER SCHOOL FUN CLUB – Wellington Library every Tuesday 4 – 5pm. ZUMBA TONE CLASSES – Every Thursday 5:45 – 6:45pm at the Picton Arena. $10. Doors open at 5:30. Everyone is welcome, must be over 16 years to participate. ALZHEIMER SOCIETY OF PEC – Looking for people interested in sitting on the Board of Directors or volunteering. If interested contact Linda at 476-2085. PE CHILD CARE SERVICES – EVENING & SATURDAY PLAYGROUPS – For parents & their children 06 years old. Siblings welcome. Thursday evening, 5-7pm at Q.E. School Auditorium (enter from Elm St.). Saturday morning, 10am-noon, at the Ontario Early Years Centre, 10 McFarland Court, Picton. Contact PE Child Care Services 476-8142. ST. ANDREW’S ANGLICAN CHURCH WELLINGTON – The What Not Shop NEW hours starting Nov 22. Tuesdays 911am, Thursdays 2-4pm & Saturdays 1012noon. Selling clothes, boots, bedding & household items. TOPS 4918 - 7pm - Every Wed night St Mary Magdalene Parish Hall. InformationGena 399-3461. ALBURY FRIENDSHIP GROUP – Meets every Wed morning at Albury Church Rednersville Rd. Quilts for sale. Proceeds to local charities for women. JAN 18 – ART THERAPY LECTURE & HANDS-ON SESSION – 11am. By registration only. Contact Christine at 476-5962 Picton Library. www.peclibrary.org. Jan 18 – PEC ROCK GEM & MINERAL CLUB – Regular meeting at the Bloomfield Town Hall 7:30-9:30pm, 289 Main St. Bloomfield. Open to all ages from novice to

experienced. Everyone welcome. JAN 18 - CHERRY VALLEY GAMES NIGHT – First & third Fridays of the month. Casual, friendly games night from 7:30 to 10:30pm. Board games, cards, ping pong & more, but just for adults. Bring snacks/refreshments. Athol Community Hall, 1679 County Rd. 10 Cherry Valley. Presented by Athol Recreation Committtee. JAN 19 – AGM OF CHRIST CHURCH CEMETERY HILLIER BOARD – 10:30am at St. Andrew’s Church Hall in Wellington. JAN 20 – CONSECON LEGION – Bid euchre at 1pm followed by a Roast Beef Supper from 4:30 – 6:30pm. Cost is $12 per plate. Everyone welcome. JAN 21 – AL-ANON – Meets Mon(s) 7:30pm Gilead Fellowship Church. 1-866951-3711. Affected by someone’s drinking? JAN 22 – NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS – Meets Tues(s) 7pm Picton Hospital Boardroom. 1-888-811-3887 Problem with drugs? JAN 22 – AL-ANON – Meets Tues(s) 8pm Gilead Fellowship Church. 1-866-951-3711 Affected by someone’s drinking? JAN 22 – ALATEEN – Meets Tuesdays 8pm Gilead Fellowship Church. Age 12-19 Affected by someone’s drinking? 1-866951-3711. JAN 23 – PEC RADIO CORPORATION – 2013 Annual General Meeting 7pm upstairs at Books & Co., 289 Main St. Picton. Members & non members welcome. Special guest speaker & refreshments. Info www.county-community-radio.ca. JAN 24 – AL-ANON – Meets Thurs(s) 10:30am St. Mary Magdalene Church. 1866-951-3711 Affected by someone’s drinking? JAN 26 – WALK FOR MEMORIES – Alzheimer Society of PEC. On line registration is now open at www.walkformemories.ca. 1-3pm at either PECI or Wellington & District Community Centre. Each dollar raised supports families in PEC. PE County’s indoor fundraising walk. Info 4762085. JAN 26 – SEVENTH TOWN HISTORICAL SOCIETY – Annual Meeting 1:30pm Ameliasburg Community Hall, 13 Coleman St. Ameliasburg. Speaker Bruce Bedell, Belleville Town Crier presents the continuing saga of the war of 1812. JAN 27 – WHATTAM’S FREE FAMILY MOVIE 2pm at the Regent Theatre “Rise of the Guardian” JAN 29 – PEC FIELD NATURALISTS – Member’s Night “Galapagos Presentation” 7pm at the Bloomfield Town Hall, 289 Main St. Bloomfield. JAN 30 – LOAVES & FISHES LUNCHEON – Salvation Army Hall at 12 noon. All are welcome. No charge. JAN 30 – PEC HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY – Picton Town Hall above the Fire Station. Elevator available. Doors open 7pm. Meet the new Executive Board. Guest speaker Kurt Chris presents “Attracting Birds to Your Garden” Free refreshments. Info at pechorticultural.org. FEB 1 - CHERRY VALLEY GAMES NIGHT – First & third Fridays of the month. Casual, friendly games night from 7:30 to 10:30pm. Board games, cards, ping pong & more, but just for adults. Bring snacks/refreshments. Athol Community Hall, 1679 County Rd. 10 Cherry Valley. Presented by Athol Recreation Committtee. FEB 2 – PICTON KINETTE CLUB – Presents “Groundhog Day Picnic” at the Elk’s Hall Picton. Doors open at 6pm. Ham Dinner with Live Music by Jenica Rayne. Tickets $15 each. Under 12 $7.50. Available at Flowers N Such or from Kinette members. FEB 2 – K of C COUNTRY JAMBOREE – Doors open at 5:30pm at St. Gregory the Great School Gym. Meal served at 6pm followed by entertainment at 7pm. Meal & Entertainment $12. Entertainment only $6.

10

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Government web site offers flu assessment tool to help those suffering with symptoms

The Government of Ontario has a web site dedicated to providing information about “the flu”. The information below is taken from that web site. Read more about it at this address www.health.gov.on.ca and search for “flu”. Influenza, commonly known as "the flu" is a serious, acute respiratory illness that can lead to pneumonia. It is caused by a virus. People of any age can get the flu, and illness usually lasts two to seven days, sometimes longer in the elderly and in people with chronic diseases. Most people who get the flu are ill for only a few days. However, some people can become very ill, possibly developing complications and requiring hospitalization. Symptoms of the flu include: fever; chills;

INFO FOR SENIORS

DEBBIE MACDONALD MOYNES

cough; runny eyes; stuffy nose; sore throat; headache; muscle aches; extreme weakness and fatigue; ear aches (children); nausea (children); vomiting (chil-

dren); diarrhea (children). Symptoms may vary from person to person. For example, the elderly may not have a fever, while children can have symptoms like earaches or stomach problems. The cough and fatigue can persist for up to several weeks, making the return to personal and work activities difficult. The common cold and flu symptoms are often very similar. There is a useful chart on the website that can help people determine if what they have is a simple cold or the flu. The influenza virus spreads mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing. People can become infected by touching objects or surfaces with flu viruses on them and then touching their eyes, mouth or nose. Remember that you should

never cover your mouth with your hand if you cough or sneeze. Always cough or sneeze into the crook of your arm so that you don’t spread germs. People with the flu may be able to infect others one day before symptoms develop and up to seven days after becoming sick. That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Children, especially younger children, might be contagious for longer periods. If you or a family member have the flu, the web site includes a flu assessment tool to help you decide what to do next. If you don’t have your own computer, we have printed some copies that are available at the Community Care office for pick up. Remember that all County

CONSECON BLOOMFIELD PASTORAL CHARGE UNITED CHURCH “Where Faith is Fun” 272 Main St., Bloomfield

Worship 10:30am

10:30am Morning Worship

Theme: It’s time to expand the “Golden Rule” to include the planet.

Music by Mark Despault & Tom Dietzel Photography by Phil Norton

Rev. Ross Bruleigh

*****************************

Friday, January 18 at 11am

1 hour for contemplation with music by Sara Barrett Harris & photography by Phil Norton

FRIENDSHIP Demorestville Sunday, Jan 20th

“The (Five) Practices of Fruitful Congregations” - Deuteronomy 6:5 All children welcome at Sunday School

**** 11am ****

Message: “The Practice of Passionate Worship”

Open House at the Manse in Northport this Sunday 2-4pm Monday Jan. 28th Friendship Potluck 6pm. Bring a friend and your own dishes. Great meal, great socializing! Rev. Kirby Breithaupt

613-403-4742 or 613-476-2020

princeedward.north@kos.net friendshipunitedchurch.org EVERYONE WELCOME COME VISIT WITH US!

bloomfielduc@lks.net

613-393-2160

EMMANUEL Baptist Church

Sunday Services 9am, 11am, and 7pm. Full children’s programs. Tuesdays. 6:30pm Children’s Programs. (J/K - Gr 8) Wednesdays. 1:30pm Bible Study. 6:30pm Dinner and Service. Thursdays. Surge Student Ministries. 7pm. (Gr 9-12) Wish you could see what a service at Emmanuel is like? You can! Check out www.youtube.com/emmanuellifenetwork. ϮϰϬDĂŝŶ^ƚ͕ůŽŽŵĮĞůĚͮĞŵŵĂŶƵĞůůŝĨĞ͘ĐŽŵͮϲϭϯͲϯϵϯͲϮϮϯϰ

ST. GREGORY

THE GREAT ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

7 Church St., Picton, Ont. K0K 2T0

613-476-6276 Fax: 613-476-7293 stgregory@smypatico.ca www.stgregoryparish.ca

Mass Schedule Saturday 5:00pm Sunday 10:00am

January 20 - Second Sunday after Ephiphany “180 GALLONS VQA!” Carrying Place worships at 9:30am Consecon worships at 11am

Minister: Lynne Donovan Radio: 88.3 FM 31 King St. Picton 613 476-1167 www.standrewspicton.com

UNITED CHURCH

of the United Church of Canada

Wellington Pentecostal Church

Rev. Polly Marks-Torrance Box 213 Wellington, Ontario K0K 3L0 613-399-2384 Affiliated with the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada

SUNDAY WORSHIP 10:00AM BIBLE STUDY SUNDAY6:00PM

EVERYONE WELCOME COME VISIT WITH US!

Rev. Phil Hobbs 613-476-5278

“The Church in the Heart of the Village” Welcoming the Community

Libraries have a computer and printer on site and staff who can help you find and print the information referenced here. For more information about the flu call the ServiceOntario INFOline between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m at 1-877-844-1944; TTY 1-800-387-5559. To speak with a registered nurse 24 hours a day, seven days a week visit Telehealth Ontario (go to www.health.gov.on.ca and search for “telehealth”) or call 1-866-797-0000 To find health care options in your community visitwww.ontario.ca/healt hcareoptions or call 1-866330-6206 .To find a health care provider, if you don’t have one, you can register for the Health Care Connect program. Please visit www.ontario.ca/healthcareconnect or call 1-800445-1822.

WALKING PROGRAM IN PICTON AND IN WELLINGTON

Put on your walking shoes because Prince Edward Community Care for Seniors sponsors a walking program Monday to Friday at the Prince Edward Collegiate Institute in Picton, at C.M.L. Snider School in Wellington and at the Wellington and District Community Centre. Participants must register in advance. This is a great opportunity for seniors and others to walk in a safe environment during

the winter months. Call the Prince Edward County Community Care for Seniors Association at 613-476-7493 to register or for more information.

TAI CHI

Prince Edward Community Care for Seniors offers Tai Chi classes as a way to help seniors stay fit and flexible. Tai Chi is a low-impact form of exercise, but it is also a weight bearing exercise, which is an important component of managing osteoporosis. Some of the benefits of Tai Chi are: better balance, which lowers the risk for falls, less pain and stiffness, stress relief and increased calmness and sense of wellbeing. And to top it off, it also helps to improve memory. No experience is necessary and all fitness levels are welcome. If you are a senior who would benefit from Tai Chi and would like to give it a try, please call the Prince Edward Community Care office at 613-476-7493 to register. Space is limited.

VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDED

Volunteer drivers escort seniors to medical appointments and essential shopping. If you enjoy driving and meeting people, Prince Edward Community Care for Seniors staff want to discuss with you volunteer opportunities tailored to your availability.

CALL BRIAN RABY, C.A., Trustee in Bankruptcy To Discuss Your Options

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS?

613-548-1816

Flexible Appointments Free Consultation - Personal Service

303 BAGOT ST., SUITE 1, KINGSTON

PICTON UNITED CHURCH 12 Chapel St. 613-476-6050 Minister: Rev. Dr. Hal Wilson Organist & Choir Director: Mr. Ronald Laidlaw

Worship Service 10:30am Serving the Community for 219 years

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME

Public Input Sought on Proposed Changes to the Purchasing By-Law The public, members of the business community, suppliers and other stakeholders are invited to express their views on proposed changes to the County’s Purchasing By-Law. The staff report recommending proposed changes will be considered at Committee of the Whole on: Thursday January 24, 2013 1:00 p.m. Council Chambers Shire Hall, 332 Main Street, Picton Copies of the staff report can be viewed electronically on the County’s website, with hard copies available at the Shire Hall Customer Service Kiosk. Written comments can be directed to the undersigned by mail, fax or e-mail no later than 4:30pm on Wednesday January 16, 2013. Susan Turnbull Commissioner of Corporate Services and Finance 332 Main Street Picton, ON K0K 2T0 Tel: 613.476.2148 ext. 341 Fax: 613.471.2051 Email: sturnbull@pecounty.on.ca www.pecounty.on.ca

JUST LISTED

CHARMING COUNTRY HOME Located close to Village of Milford, this brick home is situated on a nicely-treed & landscaped lot. Features spacious living spaces, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, mudroom & sunroom with walk-out to deck. Includes a huge attached garage. $299,000 CHRISTINE & COLIN HENDEN, Broker & Sales Rep Tel: 613-922-2251 www.christinehenden.com QUINTE LTD., BROKERAGE colinhenden@remax.net

Be a part of the vibrant downtown of Picton. This two storey commercial building has over 2300 sqft on the main floor for retail, with 16 ft ceilings, non slip floor, all walls with shelving and counter space at the rear. Second floor mezzanine overlooks the main floor with 2 private offices. The third floor is over 2300 sqft and has been fully renovated with kitchen, 3 piece bath, storage room and a large office/lounge with 4 floor to ceiling windows overlooking the main st. The building is three phase power, fully air conditioned, newer windows, newer roof, service elevator, and service door at rear. This building has plenty of opportunity, call listing broker for more details and to book a viewing. $565,000 MLS 2126862

Call LORI SLIK, Sales Rep 613-471-1708 www.chestnutpark.com

Newly decorated 1 bedroom condo for sale on Main Street in Picton. Secure entry and elevator service makes for easy living. Steps to post office, banks, and grocery stores. Even restaurants in the same building. Immediate possession available $139,900 LANTHORN REAL ESTATE LTD., BROKERAGE* *INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Call VINCE MARTEL, Sales Rep 613-476-2100

NEW LISTING

Let the tenant pay the mortgage! This 2 bedroom bungalow on a quiet street in Demorestville has had almost everything updated in the last 5 years, including hardwood laminate flooring, carpet, paint, bathroom, roof, windows, laundry, pellet stove and new septic in 2011 - shows beautifully! Featuring an open concept kitchen with tile counter, large living room with sliding doors to large deck and flower gardens. Plus a 2 bedroom in-law suite with separate driveway and entrance with tenants paying $600 a month plus heat. A perfect starter home to start building equity in or for extended family in a great location for the commute to Belleville or Picton. A great investment – both sides currently rented for $1,100 plus heat & hydro! $144,900 MLS 2130272

QUINTE LTD., BROKERAGE MUST SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT - Elevated high on an escarpment with panoramic views of Picton and surrounding areas, this stately stone home on 70 acres exudes majestic appeal. Boasting over 3,500 sq. ft. of living space, this home will be a must-have to the buyer who knows bigger IS better. All the bells and whistles: completely built out of Arxx block (R60 for super insulation), steel roof, gourmet kitchen with large pantry, granite countertops in kitchen and baths, glass showers, fireplace, gas infloor heating, slate and hardwood throughout, 3 car garage and massive workshop....and on, and on!! This home truly is a must see to believe! $885,000 MLS 2126388

The Picton Gazette

ofHOMES Prince Edward County’s

SHOWCASE

SERVING THE COUNTY FOR OVER 14 YEARS Thursday, January 17, 2013

The luxury of privacy and 2.96 acres on the edge of Picton! Set on a knoll back from the road with wonderful views. The house boasts, newer windows, electrical, offering lots of light, new kitchen, refinished floors, propane fireplace, hot tub on the rear patio. 3 bdrm, 2 bath with single car attached garage. For the handyman, artist or person who collects there is a spacious insulated barn/building and a pole barn for storage. Lovely wooded area on one side and views over fields from the rear. A great place to start and raise a family or a place to relax and be close to all but still not give up that special place in retirement. $342,900 MLS 2127470

Call GAIL FORCHT, Broker SARAH SCOTT, Sales Rep Office: 613-471-1708 Cell: 613-961-9587 www.homeinthecounty.com

BAY OF QUINTE WATERFRONT At the Telegraph Narrows. Hint Lane off County Rd 15, easy access from Hwy 401 & 49. Lg lot, drilled well, hydro, zoned for residential use. Landscaping is done, extensive decking at shore. Perfect retreat while you are waiting to build your dream home. Call for more details. Asking $199,900 MLS® 2120805 GEORGE REID, ® Broker 613-399-2134 Real Estate Inc. Brokerage quinteisle.com

Q

uinte Isle

REDGATE SUBDIVISION LOTS STARTING AT $70K Construction has begun! 2nd phase of the very popular Pineridge Sub-Division. See feature sheet for all the details. MLS 2126574

QUINTE LTD., BROKERAGE 613-476-5900

HERB PLIWISCHKIES, Sales Rep cell 613-921-7441 613-476-5399

WATERFRONT

INCREDIBLE LAKEFRONT $629,000 Spacious 4 bedrooms, 3 bathroom, brick and vinyl bungalow on West Lake close to Wellington. Park like setting with 385 ft of swimmable waterfront Built approximately 25 years ago has 2 fireplaces - one gas, one wood, partial basement with walk-out and attached double garage. Approx 2 acres with irrigation system. MLS® 2124799 Call ELIZABETH CROMBIE, Sales Rep 613-476-2700 or toll free 1-877-476-0096 www.pictonhomes.com

SOLD

Call MARY JANE MILLS, Broker 613-476-5900 mills2@sympatico.ca www.maryjanemills.com

NEW YEARS SPECIAL All Remaining Rosemary Lane Condos in the Heart of Picton 5 Free Appliances and 2 Years Maintenance Fees Paid! It has never been more affordable to own one of these amazing Condominium Units. Limited time offer, Call Herb for all the details!! $219,900 MLS 2130192 HERB PLIWISCHKIES, Sales Rep cell 613-921-7441 QUINTE LTD., BROKERAGE 613-476-5399 613-476-5900

Call MARK GARDINER, Sales Rep Office: 613-476-2700 Cell:613-391-5588 mbgardiner@yahoo.com

PICTURE PERFECT $585,000 Victorian heritage farm house on knoll overlooking pastures and natural marshland of Muscote Bay. Features 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, large principle rooms, huge detached garage, inground pool, gazebo. Peaceful and private, a perfect retreat property. Perfect for entertaining. MLS® 2126234 Call ELIZABETH CROMBIE, Sales Rep 613-476-2700 or toll free 1-877-476-0096 www.pictonhomes.com

CENTURY FARM 1800's brick farmhouse sits on close to 30 acres of farmland. Large rooms, 10` ceilings, original woodwork and doors, spectacular staircase and more. Great potential as horse farm, hobby farm, B&B or retirement home. Potential to grow grapes. You gotta see it, believe it! MLS 2126953 $399,000 KEVIN GALE, Sales Rep cell 613-476-1874 H. 613-242-7295 C. QUINTE LTD., BROKERAGE kevingale@remax.net

21 PHOTOS

6 acres of beautifully treed land with a custom built 3 bdrm, 2 bath home nestled at the base of the escarpment. Family room with f/p, spacious living room w/ floor to ceiling stone f/p. Tiered decks lead to an above ground pool. A small horse barn with split rail fenced corral completes this idyllic scene. New 50 yr. roof shingles. Only minutes to Picton and 20 minutes to the Sandbanks Beach. $339,900 MLS 2124949 Call BEV SKIDMORE, Broker 613-476-2100 email: skidmore2100@yahoo.ca LANTHORN REAL ESTATE LTD., BROKERAGE* *INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED www.bevskidmore.com

YOU CAN HAVE YOUR BUSINESS AT HOME All this on 8+ acres of land with view of Bay of Quinte. Elevated bungalow, lg bright living room, eat in kitchen, patio doors to deck. Foyer leads to double garage and lg deck with pool and hot tub. Full finished basement with fireplace in family room, lg workshop. Perfect for growing family. MLS® 2126106 SHARON ARMITAGE, ® Broker of Record 613-399-2134 Real Estate Inc. Brokerage quinteisle.com

Q

uinte Isle

Stately Century Home, formerly the manse of the Anglican Church in Carrying Place (c.1844). Large private lot surrounded by lilacs. This home boasts a centre hall plan and is full of upgrades throughout. New roof, windows, wiring, heating, kitchen, deck off the side, main floor laundry are just a few. Beautiful pine and maple floors.Country size kitchen and eating area. Spacious formal diningroom with exposed brick and tin ceilings. Large master bedroom with ensuite. The sunroom is finished and ideal for a family room/games/tv room. This 5 bedroom home is a pleasure to show. Close to the 401, Trenton and Belleville yet easily accessible to the `County` beaches. $269,900 MLS 2126029

Call GAIL FORCHT, Broker SARAH SCOTT, Sales Rep Office: 613-471-1708 Cell: 613-961-9587 www.homeinthecounty.com

CHARMING VILLAGE HOME It's ideal!!! As a get-away spot from the city or vacation rental (located in the artsy village of Bloomfield and only minutes to the beach), or as a starter or retirement home (5 appliances are included and absolutely nothing to do but move in). Recently renovated with new flooring, kitchen and bath. Bright & airy with updated windows and doors. Wrap-around sundeck. Metal roof. A huge detached & insulated double car garage w/ workshop. $164900 MLS 2125866 LANTHORN REAL ESTATE LTD., BROKERAGE* *INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Call CAROL BROUGH, Sales Rep 613-476-2100 or carolbroughc21@hotmail.com

MCKINLEY CROSS ROAD 1 LOT LEFT! The `Millpond` model to be built. See attached feature sheet under documents for all the specifications and details. One seven acre lot left ! Located on one of Prince Edward County`s nicest crossroads. Excellent wells. Nicely treed to the rear of property. Many other home models to choose from. Approx 14 week construction time required. Excellent in-house financial terms available. $328,900 MLS 2127111 QUINTE LTD., BROKERAGE 613-476-5900

HERB PLIWISCHKIES, Sales Rep cell 613-921-7441 613-476-5399

RE/12 f THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

THE PICTON GAZETTE NEW LISTING

WATERFRONT

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

$198,500 Panoramic views of Adolphus Reach from the large wrap around deck, living room, dining room & master bedroom. Raised bungalow on ¾ acre private lot, minutes from Lake on the Mountain and Glenora Ferry. 3+1 bedrooms with 4pce. bath & partially finished lower level . Updates throughout: newer vinyl windows & doors, propane fireplace in living room, laminate flooring, newer shingles (2005), waterproofing of basement (transferable), extra insulation in attic, new back deck, updated kitchen (2005) & central air (2001). Other features: heated sunroom, newer electric panel (100amp breakers), forced air propane furnace & includes appliances & some furniture. Partially finished basement offers a potential fourth bedroom, workshop & recroom area as well as a walk out to side yard. Bright home with many updates & breathtaking waterviews, approximately 20 mins to Picton. MLS® 2130154

Elizabeth Crombie Sales Representative 104 Main Street, Picton

613.476.2700 or toll free

Libby says... “Come out and enjoy Milford Winter Carnival this weekend!”

1.877.476.0096 Hrs: Mon.-Sat. 9-5

To see the Feature of the Week check out my web site:

www.pictonhomes.com To contact me, email:

elizabeth.crombie@sympatico.ca Tradmarks owned or controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association. Used under licence.

NEW PRICE

CLARK/SUTTON HOUSE $749,000 Magnificent Italiante style 4 bedroom, 4 bath historical home located in the thriving artisan village of Bloomfield. Centre hall plan with formal dining room which opens to beautiful sun porch. Wide plank flooring, open hearth fireplace with Baker's oven and woodstove in the English library are just a few examples of this home's character. This home has operated as a successful B&B since 1995. Ample parking and easy walk to shops, bank, post office, library and restaurants. MLS® 2111566

WATER FRONT!

INCREDIBLE INSIDE & OUT!

Absolutely All the Bells & Whistles! Snugged at Water’s Edge, With Boathouse & Ramp, Panoramic Windows, Totally WOW Call To View. #2126834 $599,000

WATERFRONT Get ready for Summertime Fun. Boating ,100’ Dock, Charming 2 bedroom cottage with Bunkie room, Open & Sunny With Income Potential!#2126084 $349,000

BOATER'S PARADISE GLENORA ROAD

$285,000 What a great price for this completely updated bungalow just minutes from Picton. Mature trees on a level lot in a private location. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, combination wood and electric heat, lots of closet space, 2 car detached garage. MLS ®2122055

Your Property Listed on Both TORONTO & QUINTE Real Estate Boards

$985,000 Privacy, unobstructed views, spectacular sunsets with magnificent home on professionally landscaped grounds. The impressive executive home is on nearly 3 acres with a mature tree lined drive to a 3 car garage and circular drive. On the shores of Adolphus Reach this property is ideal for the active boater. Level shoreline with dock included. MLS® 2113636

LIMESTONE IN THE COUNTY

RARE OPPORTUNITY! 11 Acres with View! History, Beauty & Location, this Stone c1857 . This Awesome Home is Reno’d & Ready to Own , Would Make a Fabulous B&B #2130001 $499,000

ELEGANCE! ~ ON 2.5 ACRES

YEAR ROUND FUN!

SSunny open plan, ssunrises & sunsets, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood, b excellent well & meex chanicals, upgrades ch ggalore.. better than new!#2126217 $289,000

IIri riiss & & Brian B riian a n Andrews A n drew reews ws Iris Bri Andre re THE BELLE OF BELLEVILLE T HE B ELLE O FB ELLEVILLE

RAVINE LOT! Incredible! State of the Art Media Room, Soaring Ceilings, GraniteWalkout Finished Lower, Decadent Finishes $469,000 # 21255572

A YOUR O DREAM A HOME O PLAN 3.5 ACRE WATERFRONT LOT! Planning to Build on the Water? Rolling Terrain, Harwood Trees, Great Boating on the Trent Waterway Call For Details

613.969.2044

C CALLING ALLING A ALL LL C CHEFS! HEFS!

800.303.1044

andrewsproperties.ca andrewsproperties.ca

SELLING?...BUYING? Interested In a Market Update? WE’D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU!

WHY BUY NEW?

NEW OFFERING!

OPPORTUNITY O KNOCKS H Historic Beauty. 7 Bedrooms & Baths... Inn, Spa B & or Restaurant Possibilities. Turn Key ShowT piece! #2125971 $675,000 WARKWORTH Century Charm in Destination Village of Trendy Shops!4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Original Charm, Incredible Treed Lot, Hot Tub, #2130012 $225,000

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 f RE/13

THE PICTON GAZETTE

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION?

That’s why we’re always looking ahead. We’ve been finding the best mortgage values for years - through all kinds of markets. That experience is coming in handy in today’s economy as we help clients boost cash flow, drive down debt, and build financial security nets for the future.

Call or email me for rates today!

By dealing with more than 50 lenders - including most of the major banks and with exclusive access to Partner Mortgage - we have the tools to build the best mortgage plan in today’s environment.

MICHELLE BOWES

MIKE HEFFERNAN Sales Rep. Office: (705) 639-5388

‘THE PERFECT LIFE’

Email: mheffernan@bowesandcocks.com Website: www.youronlineagents.com/mikeheffernan

Production Manager

The Picton Gazette

Call today!

R0011627630

Craig Dick, Mortgage Agent

The Napanee Beaver

613-968-6439 ext.22 Cell 613-921-8141 cdickrun@cogeco.ca www.mortgagesapproved.ca

613-354-6641 ext 113 chimelle123 @gmail.com

BOWES & COCKS LIMITED, Brokerage

Live in the country, work from home. Business known as `Jewel Just Fine Wines`, on location fermentation with excellent repeat customer list. Wine making with a difference. Two bedroom bungalow with large master bedroom, open concept main floor recroom with wet bar. Very private, 20`x 37` deck overlooking huge flat stone pond, outbuildings 10` x 10` with hydro, 12` x 27`, heated 12` x 20`. Say so long to commuting. $490,000. MLS® 152202000325101

Make a difference! Please, Recycle!

Network Partner Mortgage Intelligence Independently owned & operated-license #12179 Corp: 855-654-3434

Are you looking for a business that provides you with a comfortable income while putting smiles on faces? Established handmade chocolate/seasonal gourmet ice cream business with repeat clientele plus potential for expansion. Leased space in a Century Old Main Street location that looks like the old fashioned chocolate store that folks remember from their childhood. High volume traffic location with accessible parking. The recipes, quality of product and marketing presentation brings people back for more. Turn key. $97,000 MLS 2125481 Gail Forcht** & Sarah Scott*

Bright and spacious, open concept, brick bungalow situated on a large and centrally located country lot. This home has four, main floor bedrooms, including a very generous master bedroom with an ensuite. As well as a den, also on the main floor, which makes a great family room area especially for kids and teens! Recent updates include a large open concept kitchen, living and dining area - featuring tile and hardwood floors, a high efficiency airtight fireplace insert, a beautiful bow window and garden doors leading out to the patio. It truly is a fantastic space for entertaining. The basement is quite large and semi finished with a lovely fireplace. Offers a seperate entrance. $262,000 MLS 2130046 Gail Forcht** & Sarah Scott*

Quaint 1 ½ storey home with four original tin ceilings in great shape. 2 bedrooms spacious home within walking distance to all the shops and amenities in downtown Picton. Great starter home or investment! Large backyard and outbuildings. $153,900 MLS 2127090. Call for appt. now! Peter Lynch*

THE "BIJOU" OF DOWNTOWN PICTON! Exquisitely renovated and decorated by its designer-owner, this classic County Victorian has been featured in Canadian House and Home Magazine (July 2012). Situated just steps from the shops and cafés of Main Street, it’s ideal for a couple or a single, either as a full-time home or as a perfect pied-a-terre. The second level is comprised of two large bedrooms, a laundry area, and a generous full bathroom. The main floor features a large living room with a fireplace, a stunning new kitchen with concrete counters, a powder room, and a large family room/library at the rear overlooking the garden. A private driveway leads to a newly-built carriage house with a portico and potential area for a studio or potting shed. The oversized lot has been professionally landscaped with flagstone and grass areas, and with a large deck. This polished gem is guaranteed to please. Don’t miss it! $409,000 MLS 2130027 Laurie Gruer*, Sam Simone*, Monica Klingenberg*

www.homeinthecounty.com

www.homeinthecounty.com

W NE ICE PR

www.chestnutpark.com

www.lauriegruer.com

`County Country Farmhouse` - picture-perfect farmhouse located down from Lake- on-the-Mountain and close to the water, wineries, cheese factories and restaurants plus marinas. No close neighbours and over two acres to enjoy of your own. Newer well, drywall and electrical plus forced-air furnace. This is an easy-to-maintain home that is perfect for a first-time homeowner or as a retreat from the city. Master bedroom on main level and dining-room plus modern kitchen. The porch is a wonderful place to sit on those lazy summer days. $198,000 MLS 2130278 Gail Forcht** & Sarah Scott*

W NE

12 acres of level farmland fronting on the Black River. Wonderful cared for large barn suitable for horses or sheep/goats. A driveshed full of character and charm needing some work. 4 season pond and fenced fields. The Canadiana farmhouse offers a separate apartment (modern kitchen, own bath, updated electrical), 2 bathrooms in house. Main house has numerous original features ie. tin ceiling, bead board ceilings, claw foot bath. Updating is required or build (sever potential) a new house on this truly lovely property. Property across road is also for sale 117 acres. $398,000 MLS 2130226 Gail Forcht** & Sarah Scott*

www.homeinthecounty.com

www.homeinthecounty.com

Outstanding 7.10 acre waterfront lot on Prince Edward Bay/Lake Ontario with spectacular views. Unbelievable opportunity to build your dream home! Drilled well on property. $225,000 MLS 2125327

270 FEET OF WATERFRONT ON HUYCK’S POINT! A waterfront manor house on one of the County’s most-coveted roads! This gracious property features walled gardens, oak-paneled rooms, a two-storey great room, and 270 feet of spectacular Lake Ontario shoreline! Outstanding four-season solarium, mature trees, and a waterside studio/cottage/guest house are all huge features. $759,000 MLS 2124793 Laurie Gruer*, Sam Simone*, Monica Klingenberg*

Laurie Gruer*, Sam Simone*, Monica Klingenberg*

www.lauriegruer.com

Betty Burns

Office Manager Sales Representative

Ann Cooper Sales Representative

Gail Forcht Broker

www.lauriegruer.com

Laurie Gruer Sales Representative

Liz Jones

Sales Representative

Monica Klingenberg Peter Lynch Sales Representative

Sales Representative

Rob Plomer Sales Representative

Catherine Deluce Pres. & CEO Broker

Duane Russell Broker

Sarah Scott Sales Representative

Richard Stewart LLB

Sam Simone Sales Representative

Lori Slik

Sales Representative

Vise President Legal Counsel

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE AT www.pictongazette.com DID YOU KNOW YOU CAN GET RECENT LOCAL LISTINGS FROM THE AREA’S LEADING REAL ESTATE AGENTS

Kate Vader Sales Representative

RE/14 f THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012

THE PICTON GAZETTE

1 Lake Street, PICTON, ON 613.476.5900

www.countyremax.com

QUINTE LTD. BROKERAGE Colleen Green Sales Rep.

Tel: 613.476.5900 Cell: 613.476.6553 colleen.green@sympatico.ca Twitter: @ColleenGreenatR Website: www.colleengreenpicton.com

Ron Norton Sales Rep.

Tel: 613.399.5900 ronnorton@bellnet.ca

$69,000

CLOSE TO WELLINGTON HARBOUR. Municipal services at lot line, fenced on two sides and nicely treed. Ready for your new home or buy now for future development! MLS 2126158 CHRISTINE & COLIN HENDEN

$169,900

PICTON – Great starter! Big yard, two bedrooms & 4 pce. bath up – living, dining, kitchen & laundry on main floor. Appliances included – new gas furnace. MLS 2127596 CHRISTINE & COLIN HENDEN

$179,000

PICTON BUNGALOW In one of Picton's finest neighbourhoods. Walking distance to schools, shopping, fine dining & theatre. 3 generous bedrms, full poured concrete basement, detached double garage. Diamond in the rough, requires extensive renovations and could be your opportunity to make your next dream home come true. MLS 2130283 JIM WAIT & DARLENE ELDRIDGE

304 Main Street, WELLINGTON,ON 613.399.5900 or Toll Free 1.888.217.0166

$179,000

NO NEED TO DRIVE! Just 2 blocks from downtown Picton, this bright & cheery home, features hardwood floors, 2 bedrooms, updated bathroom, eat-in kitchen, plus full basement. MLS 2126338 CHRISTINE & COLIN HENDEN

Veronica Norton Sales Rep.

Tel: 613.399.5900 veronicanorton@bellnet.ca

Jim Wait

Sales Rep.

Tel: 613.848.6433 Office: 613.476.5900 jim.wait@remax.net www.loveprinceedwardcounty.com

$181,000

This affordable family home has been renovated for great family living. Beautiful hardwood floors, open concept kitchen/dining room,4 bdrms & 2baths. MLS 2124529 RON & VERONICA NORTON

$229,900

Everything has been updated in this 2 bed, 2 bath side split. Attached garage, and detached garage/workshop. Just on the outskirts of Picton. MLS 2126903 MARC OUELLETTE

$229,000

Great waterfront lot on beautiful East Lake just a few minutes walk to the Outlet Park with a great sand beach and campgrounds. MLS 2130188 RON & VERONICA NORTON

$244,900

Spacious, updated country home with 3 acres of property. Large main-floor rooms include living room with wood-stove, dining room, 2 kitchens, den, sunroom, laundry/ mudroom, 3 bedrooms & 2 bathrooms. This could be the country retreat you have been dreaming of!! MLS 2126911 CHRISTINE & COLIN HENDEN

Darlene Eldridge Broker

Tel: 613.848.6433 Office: 613.476.5900 jim.wait@remax.net www.loveprinceedwardcounty.com

Colin Henden

Sales Rep.

$279,000

$299,000

BIG ISLAND Bay of Quinte views from master bedroom, kitchen, front room or front deck. Quaint 3 bedroom well maintained bungalow. Sophiasburgh School District. Exclusive use of the waterfront just across the road. 1 1/2 yr old beautiful kitchen, granite counters, laminate flooring and propane fireplace, this home shows well. MLS 2127465 MARY JANE MILLS

4 yr. old Bungalow in trendy Wellington, large eat in kitchen, south facing deck, hardwood & ceramic flooring, privacy fence surrounds back yard, huge unfinished basement offers enough room for a 4th BR, workshop and large man cave/ rec room, located 2 blocks from CML Snider Public School. MLS 2130091 RON & VERONICA NORTON

$342,900

$399,000

Tel: 613.922.2251 colinhenden@remax.net

Christine Henden

Broker.

Cell: 613.967.9305 ChristineHenden.com

Mary Jane Mills

JASPER AVENUE Shows like an interior designer has been at work! Two bedrooms, two bathrooms and main floor laundry. Studio with separate entry is perfect for an artist. Fenced yard with extensive low maintenance landscaping. So many upgrades and a full height unfinished basement too. MLS 2120648 JIM WAIT & DARLENE ELDRIDGE

FISHERMAN’S PARADISE! Featuring 870 ft. on Hay Bay & 6.96 acres with a year-round cottage, lagoon & docks. Accessed by a year-round maintained road. Lots of room for family & friends! MLS 2125738 CHRISTINE & COLIN HENDEN

$309,000

2 bdrm year round home on South Bay.Large open kitchen and living area. Could bea good source of income via weekly vacation rental. MLS 2127321 MARC OUELLETTE

$400,000

PICTON MAIN ST. Plenty of assigned parking in the rear, full basement with walkout. Newer roof is in excellent condition, and the building is on municipal water and sewer. Core Commercial zoning. MLS 2126074 JIM WAIT & DARLENE ELDRIDGE

Broker

Tel: 613.476.5900 Cell: 613.921.0028 mills2@sympatico.ca

Marc Ouellette Sales Rep

Tel: 613.476.5900 Cell: 613.849.8864 marc@remaxquinte.com www.rightonthemarc.ca

$492,000

Victorian beauty in Old East Hill Belleville, renovated for the modern family but with many original features. Private back garden with in-ground pool and enclosed porch. MLS 2127421 COLLEEN GREEN

$849,000

EAST LAKE WATERFRONT Set on a gorgeous 20 acres with 528ft. of level, clean, waterfront on East Lake, plus an additional 34 acres (10 acres hardwood bush) across the road. An excellent opportunity for a B&B, vacation rental, or build your dream home closer to the water. MLS 2125198 JIM WAIT & DARLENE ELDRIDGE

$1,200,000

Prinyer’s Cove Marina and Bed & Beyond is a unique waterfront property featuring a custom built 6 yr old home. MLS 2124296 MARY JANE MILLS

$325,000

4 year old custom built 2 bdrm brick bungalow, fully wheelchair accessible. Open concept layout. Full unfinished basement w/ 9 ft. ceilings and roughed in bath! MLS 2126200 MARY JANE MILLS

$429,000

Main floor master, finished basement, lovely gardens walking to Main St. See virtual tour www.rightonthemarc.ca MLS 2122099 COLLEEN GREEN

Bringing Buyers from Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa and across Canada to Vendors in the County!

The Time To Buy Is Now. The Place to Look Is In The Picton Gazette Prince Edward CountyÊs

SHOWCASE of

HOMES

uinte Isle®

Q

SHARON ARMITAGE

Broker of Record

Real Estate Inc. (613) Brokerage

287 Main St. Wellington, Ontario, K0K 3L0 • Fax 399-2140 sharon@quinteisle.com www.quinteisle.com

LAKE ONTARIO VIEWS 9 Carla Court, Wellington. Modern Quebcois Keirstead log home. Open concept with high cathedral ceilings. Relax on your deck, listen to Lake Ontario. Tastefully finished on both levels, large decks off main and lower level, w/o from lower level. A very special home for a unique buyer. MLS® 2126485 Call for more info.

Whether it’s your first home or your fifth, it’s the biggest investment you’re ever likely to make. One of the reputable agents in this section can help you find what you’re looking for!

The Picton Gazette

Prince Edward County’s

399-2134

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 f RE/15

THE PICTON GAZETTE

WELLINGTON ON THE LAKE 2 bedrm bungalow on nicely treed lot in adult community. 2 baths, formal diningrm, bright living rm, eat in kitchen, attached 1 car garage. Close to rec centre with lots of activities, pool, shuffle board. Lease fees and maintainance fees applicable. Asking $129,900 MLS® 2123993

MAITLAND ST., PICTON The perfect home for retirees going south or a young couple starting out. Small lot, maintenence free exterior, neat and tidy interior. 2 bedrm, new oil furnace and tank 2010. Call to view. Asking $139,900 MLS® 2126793

CLOSE TO SOUP HARBOUR Peaceful and tranquil. 2 plus acres of land with deeded access to Lake Ontario. Drilled well, hydro to lot and entrance is in. Ready to go to build your new home on. Asking $69,900 MLS® 2125759

LOOKING TO BUILD THAT NEW HOME? The lot is cleared and ready for you to build your retirement home or a getaway cottage. 100 ft clean shoreline, perfect for swimming, fishing or deep water sailing. Private and pretty. Hydro to lot line, driveway is in. Call for more details. MLS® 2124707

AREA OF GREAT FISHING AND BOATING Bay of Quinte Waterfront Telegraph Narrows. Large treed nicely landscaped lot with drilled 1 ACRE PARCEL OF LAND CHASE RD., HILLIER WARD well, entrance and hydro are in. Ready to go to build your new home. Approx 90 ft of shoreline. Close to Closson Chase Winery and Karlo Just west of Hillier. Drilled well on property, enSet in the trees. Close to 401, Kingston and Estate Winery. 25 ac of land. Asking $129,900 trance permit available and hydro is close to lot line. Asking $41,900 MLS® 2126538 MLS® 2120655 Napanee. Asking $199,900 MLS® 2120848

SHARON ARMITAGE, OWNER/BROKER OF RECORD 613-399-2134

*Member of the Quinte and District Real Estate Board Inc.

Plan No. SHSW00821

CHARMING AND ECONOMICAL

6 Talbot Street, Picton

www.thewoodcrafters.on.ca

Otto Buikema

Off: 613-476-3144 Fax: 613-476-2562 Cell: 613-967-9319 981 Cty Rd 8, Picton

otto@ottocarpentry.com

Feel free to visit our website - www.ottocarpentry.com

HELMER’S BUILDING

NEW HOMES CUSTOM HOMES

Renovations, Additions Soffit, Fascia, Siding ERIC HELMER 613-476-4945

Want to do business in Napanee/Deseronto markets? Call your Picton Gazette sales rep. at 476-3201 today to book your advertisement.

Broker

SHOWCASE

of HOMES

476-7893

GEORGE REID

Charming and economical to build, this 1,319-square-foot brick design is ideal for first-time homeowners, retirement couples, or any-one who would enjoy an affordable, easierto-maintain home. A tiled foyer leads past the open-rail basement stairs (choose a crawl space foundation instead, if desired) to the vaulted great room. Here a gas fireplace warms the generous living and entertaining area. The din-ing room offers buffet space and sliding glass doors to the rear deck. An island adds extra prep space in the nearby L-shaped kitchen,which overlooks the rear deck. Sleeping quarters rest to the right and include the master suite with its double closets and private bath-room, and two family bedrooms that share another full bath. Skylights bring natural illumination to both bathrooms. Square Footage: 1,319

To see more details on this plan, visit www.selectfloorplans.ca/dfl and enter the plan number above. Use advanced search features to browse thousands of other home designs, including bungalow, two-storey, multi-level, and cottage country homes. Order blueprints online or call 1-800-663-6739 for more information on how to order and modify plans.

Alternate Layout

RE/16 f THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012

THE PICTON GAZETTE

102 Main Street, Picton

The Gold Standard in Prince Edward County $6,000

Lanthorn Real Estate Ltd., Brokerage*

*Independently owned & operated

PICTURE YOUR HOME HERE

PICTONREALESTATEINFO.COM WANT TO SEE YOUR PROPERTY ADVERTISED HERE? IF YOU ARE THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING,

I

CHECK OUT MY WEBSITE AT PICTONREALESTATEINFO.COM CAN SHOW YOU HOW YOUR PROPERTY WILL BE FEATURED ON OVER 20 DIFFERENT WEB SITES. YOUR LISTING WILL BE SENT TO OVER 10,000 EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS

$374,900 MLS 2125798

WWW.10928LOYALIST.COM

• EASY ACCESS WATERFRONT • 100' ON ADOLPUS REACH • 4 LEVEL SPLIT, SPACIOUS • 3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHROOMS • HARDWOOD & CERAMIC • NEWER WINDOWS & DOORS • METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED • MANY UPGRADES COMPLETE • GOOD VALUE WATERFRONT MLS 2127081

MLS 2124674

$384,000 MLS 2122268

58 CTY RD 18, CHERRY VALLEY

• BRIGHT, RENOVATED CENTURY HOME • RED PINE FLOORS, ORIGINAL TIN AND BEAD

BOARD CEILINGS • MODERN CONVENIENCES AND TOUCHES • INCOME PRODUCING VACATION / RETIREMENT PROPERTY • INFO INSTANTLY: TEXT GOLD116 TO #33344 • 140’ X 311’ LOT INCL HOME & BARN/STUDIO • 3 FLOORS, LOTS OF LOFT SPACE • IDEAL FOR AN ARTIST AND STUDIO, WORKSHOP OR CONVERT IT TO A GUEST HOUSE

Paul Gentile

FOR LEASE

Carol Brough

Sales Rep.

carolbroughc21@hotmail.com

• LARGE INDUSTRIAL BUILDING IN PICTON • LARGE COMPRESSOR • 400 AMP. 3 PHASE ELECTRICAL • IN FLOOR RADIANT HEATING • INDUSTRIAL DUST COLLECTOR • ALMOST 2 ACRE LOT WITH PLENTY OF PARKING

Broker

$160,000

paul@paulgentile.ca

PRIVACY YET CLOSE TO TOWN

• 5 AC. GARDEN SOIL • 4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH HOME • FAMILY ROOM W/ FIREPLACE • WRAP-AROUND SUNDECK • DOUBLE CAR GARAGE • FULL BASEMENT • 1200 SQ. FT DETACHED STEEL • BUILDING INSULATED & HEATED

$185,000

MLS 2122401

MLS 2127411

NEW PRICE

$1,200,000 MLS 2124292

21 PHOTOS

$225,000

$389,900

MLS 2124897

NEW PRICE OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, Jan 20 1:30-3pm 15 First Avenue Wellington

WWW.MARINAPRINYERSCOVE.COM

21 PHOTOS

• STUNNING NEWER 2 STOREY HOME • OPERATING AS BED & BEYOND B&B Jason, Kevin • OR USE AS YOUR OWN PRIVATE ESTATE • MARINA – GREAT SEASONAL INCOME & Sandy Young • FULLY ESTABLISHED BUSINESS Sales Reps. • IDEAL PROPERTY FOR SNOWBIRDS www.pec.on.ca/young • RESORT COMMERCIAL ZONING thefamilyteam@gmail.com • EXCELLENT WATERFRONT DEAL • 176 FT EXCEPTIONAL WATERFRONT

COMPANY AND ARTISAN CHEESE FACTORY

• SURROUNDED BY MATURE PINE AND

SPRUCE TREES • STONE FIREPLACE IN GREAT ROOM • NEW FURNANCE AND OIL TANK (2012) www.colleengalway.com • SOME NEW WINDOWS, NEW WATER SYSTEM colleen.galway@century21.ca • EXCELLENT STARTER HOME OR DREAM COTTAGE • A MUST SEE IN WAUPOOS

Sales Rep

$249,000 MLS 2127265

PICTON PRIME DEVELOPMENT SITE

VIEW OF THE BAY

INSTITUTIONAL USES

WWW.878COUNTYRD24.COM

Pat Benson Moore

Jason, Kevin & Sandy Young Sales Reps.

www.pec.on.ca/young thefamilyteam@gmail.com

Sales Rep.

• 3 +1 BEDROOM BUNGALOW • UPDATED MAPLE KITCHEN • NEWER ROOF, WINDOWS, FURNACE • LOWER LEVEL WALKOUT • 2+ CAR GARAGE • CLOSE TO PT. PETRE • 2 & 1/2 ACRES & WOOD LOT • GREAT DUG WELL • A PLEASURE TO SHOW

$325,000

pat.bensonmoore@century21.ca

MLS 2130291

WWW.10-FIRSTAVE.COM

21 PHOTOS

• VILLAGE OF WELLINGTON • 3 BEDROOMS UP, 1 DOWN • NEWER KITCHEN, DECK & ROOF • FULL BATHROOM UP & DOWN • MANY UPGRADES COMPLETE • ATTACHED 1+ CAR GARAGE • FA GAS HEAT, GAS FIREPLACE • NICE DESIGN FOR SPACE • WELL CARED FOR HOME

$395,000 MLS 2130317

MLS 2122832

EAST LAKE WATERFRONT FARM

Sales Rep

21 PHOTOS

ROAD

• IN AREA OF EXTENSIVE COMMERCIAL/ • LOVINGLY CARED FOR OVER THE YEARS • BUSY WEST END OF PICTON

$244,900

$1,295,000

• 52 ACRES WITH FRONTAGE ON HWY • WWW.417COUNTYROAD11.COM • 80 AC FARM, 1200’+ USEABLE 33 AND TALBOT STREETS EAST LAKE W/F • IDEAL FOR COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL • C 1850'S BRICK HOME, BACK FROM THE DEVELOPMENT

FAIRGROUNDS AND THE SHOPS OF MAIN STREET • CUTE SIDE-SPLIT WITH 3 BEDROOMS UPSTAIRS AND 1 DOWNSTAIRS • DINING AREA OFF OF THE KITCHEN • NEW LAMINATE FLOORING ON THE MAIN LEVEL MLS 2130115

21 PHOTOS

Tracey Dickson 21 PHOTOS

• QUIET STREET CLOSE TO HOSPITAL,

MLS 2127015

SEE YOU ON SUNDAY!

MLS 2115169

Colleen Galway

$174,900

• 2 LEVELS OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE • CENTURY STOREY AND A HALF 3 • 2 BEDROOMS & FULL BATH ON BOTH BEDROOM HOME • LOCATED IN NORTHPORT LEVELS • EAT IN KITCHEN, SEPARATE DINING • LARGE TWO CAR GARAGE WITH AREA, FAMILY ROOM WITH FIREPLACE, EXTRA STORAGE • DOUBLE PAVED DRIVE, ATTACHED • ABOVE GROUND PRIVATE POOL • GREAT LANDSCAPED LOT WITH A VIEW GARAGE WITH INSIDE ENTRY • PRIVATE DECK OF THE BAY OF QUINTE • LARGE LANDSCAPED FENCED YARD • QUICK CLOSING IS AVAILABLE

$1,600,000

IDEAL LOCATION NEW LISTING • CENTURY HOME CLOSE TO WINERIES, CIDER • GREAT IN TOWN LOCATION

Bev Skidmore Broker

• FEATURES UPDATED AMENITIES www.bevskidmore.com • ORIGINAL BAKER'S OVEN & FIELDSTONE F/P skidmore2100@yahoo.ca • ONLY 7 MIN TO PICTON, 3 MIN TO SANDBANKS PROV PARK

Direct: 613-403-7690 tracey.dickson@century21.ca

Hugh Jackson Broker

Direct: 613-476-5026 h.jackson@sympatico.ca

SOUTH BAY WATERFRONT HOME

• SPACIOUS 2,000+ SQ FT • FAMILY ROOM WITH FIREPLACE • LARGE SUNKEN LIVING ROOM • FORMAL DINING ROOM • 3 BEDROOMS • FULL BASEMENT • 100 FT GOOD SHORELINE • 1.7 ACRE LOT • ATTACHED GARAGE

WATERFRONT BUILDING LOT

• PANORAMIC VIEW OVER PR ED BAY • 360+ FT SHORELINE • 3.3 ACRES OF LEVEL LAND • NO ESCARPMENTS • PARTIALLY WOODED • 318 FT OF ROOD FRONTAGE • YEAR ROUND ROAD • SPECTACULAR VIEWS • IDEAL FOR YEAR ROUND HOME

Picton - 613-476-2100 Toll Free 1-866-294-2100

for more pictures visit: www.century21lanthorn.ca

PUZZLES

17

The Picton Gazette

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

— This week’s crossword —

CLUES ACROSS

LAST WEEK’S SOLVED

1. Point that is one point E of due S 4. Slithered 8. Brain and spinal cord (abbr.) 11. Direct the steering of a ship 13. Chops with irregular blows 15. Plural of hilum 16. Incline from vertical (geo.) 17. Simple word forms 18. Paddles 19. Roman garment 21. Meat skewers 23. Ethiopia (abbr.) 25. The cry made by sheep 26. Beatty-Benning movie 30. Concealed 33. Political action

committee 34. High rock piles (Old English) 35. Scottish county (abbr.) 36. Goat and camel hair fabric 37. A very large body of water 38. Fabric stain 39. Israeli city ___ Aviv 40. Shoe's underside 42. Military legal corps 43. Patti Hearst's captors 44. Undecided 48. '__ death do us part 49. Supervises flying 50. Many headed monsters 54. Literary language of Pakistan 57. Halo 58. Hawaiian hello 63. Lubricants 65. Mild exclamation

66. Greek fresh-water nymph 67. Nickname for grandmother 68. A restaurant bill 69. Automaker Ransom E. 70. A young man CLUES DOWN

1.Singular cardinals hypothesis (abbr.) 2. Small water craft 3. Opposite of ecto 4. The woman 5. Skeletal muscle 6. Devoid of warmth and cordiality 7. Decameter 8. Italian goodbye 9. Mediation council 10. Impudence 12. A desert in S Israel 14. Japanese seaport 15. Nob or goblin 20. Ingested 22. Swiss river 24. Protects head from weather 25. Lava rock 26. Designer identifier 27. 34470 FL 28. Petrified ancient animal 29. Gas used in refrigeration 30. Journeys to Mecca 31. Eighth month, Jewish calendar 32. Small indefinite quantity 33. Taps 41. Extremely high

frequency 44. Iguanidae genus 45. From the Leaning Tower's city 46. Cologne 47. Moses' elder brother (Bible)

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, if you find you have been falling behind on things or simply cannot seem to get organized, then it's time to reconsider your approach. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, when party planning is put into your hands, you are right in your element as a natural leader. You are bound to have all of the details perfect. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Someone could require a pep talk this week, and you are the person for the job, Sagittarius. Figure out ways to downplay any struggles and point out all that this person has accomplished. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 You may find a turnaround in your financial situation has finally arrived, Capricorn. Just don't spend all of that newfound money in one place. Put some into an account for later. AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, you may need someone to light a fire under you this week. Welcome this effort because once you get going you will be able to accomplish anything. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, it may be a challenge to balance work and home life responsibilities this week. Aim for a 60/40 split of requirements.

56. The inner forearm bone 59. Tai language of the Mekong region 60. Embrocate 61. Possessed 62. Public promotion 64. Sorrowful

s u d o k u

— Horoscopes—

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, your domestic side will come out this week when you decide to play host or hostess to friends or family. You may reveal some surprising skills in the kitchen. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 It will take fast action for you to get something accomplished this week, Taurus. If you blink, the opportunity may pass you by, so get moving. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 You may need to reconsider your purchasing power, Gemini. Your finances may not be what they seem at this moment, and you could need to play things conservatively. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, there are a few obstacles you will have to overcome before you can move on to something more enjoyable this week. Make the hard work a priority and the rest will follow. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Maintain the status quo this week, Leo. You may be tempted to do things differently, but going with the flow and not rocking the boat is the best approach this week. VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Flexibility will be the key this week, Virgo. If you are able to bend, then you will be much more successful than if you are rigid in your opinions and actions.

50. A minute amount (Scott) 51. Hindu name for 4 epochs 52. Faded and dull 53. Radioactivity unit 55. The face of a clock

Answers

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18

SPORTS The Picton Gazette

“Maker of Small Appliances”

Factory Outlet Open 9am-3pm Weekdays

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Essroc Cement is made by local people

Support your Community. Specify Essroc Cement at your local retailers. PICTON CEMENT OPERATION 613-476-3233

Making a Break Wellington’s Erick Delaurentis gets away from Pickering Panther Brodie Tutton to eventually score a shorthanded goal in the first period of Wellington’s 4-1 win Sunday evening. The Dukes have won their last four games and look to make it five in a row on Friday evening against Trenton at the Essroc Arena.. (Jason Parks/Gazette staff)

Dukes round into form with four victories in a row Wellington beat teams it expected to beat going down the stretch Jason Parks

Staff writer

During their seemingly annual runs to the top of the OJHL's East Division, the Wellington Dukes relied on two-must haves. First, always win the games you should. Second, dig deep against those close rivals and come out with a favourable result more often than not. While the club isn't going to challenge for the Eastern Division title this season, they did go back to a rarely seen page in their playbook this past weekend, sweeping the Pickering Panthers in a homeand-home series and then dropping the hard -charging Cobourg Cougars in their tracks on Monday evening. The fact Wellington took four points out of the NorthEast Conference doormats isn't surprising but the fashion in which it held the balance of play was a nice surprise to Dukes fans considering the struggles the club had in the month of December. Wellington was full value for the wins a 6-1 road win on Friday night and a 4-1 home win on Sunday. Then the Dukes parlayed those victories with a 4-1 decision over the Cougars who

had taken points in 11 of their last 13 games. Wellington Dukes coach and general manager Marty Abrams agreed keeping teams that are behind you in your rearview mirror is a key to success and one the club has always tried to maintain. “That's always been the philosophy here. There's a section of games after about the first 10 or so that you have to win if you want to be successful,” Abrams said. “The mandate was to come out with some points after playing this section of games and the team was sharp, energized, and accountable to each other.” Abrams said he was extremely proud of the club after Monday night's performance in the Cougar den, a rink that has given the locals their fair share of trouble since opening last season. “The was as close to a perfect road game as you can play. Everyone was accountable defensively and Matt Larose was solid all night and outstanding when called upon when did have a breakdown,” Abrams said. Wellington's Cam Nicoll opened the scoring in the first when he beat Cougar starter Nathan Perry at 9:17. Nicoll has looked sharp since returning from a broken

Foiled Wellington Duke Jake Marchment was stopped

by Pickering netminder Conor Barrie on this first period penalty shot.. (Jason Parks/Gazette staff)

finger sustained early in the season and has found a nice spot playing along fellow rookie Nik Coric. “There's a lot of chemistry there and both players bring different things to the rink. Nicoll is sharp and can shoot while Coric adds some playmaking skills,” Abrams said. In the second, the Craig Campbell show got rolling as the Wellington leading scorer bagged a couple at 9:16 and 15:54, respectively, and chased Perry from the Cougar cage in favour of back up CJ Sharp. Campbell has come back from a shoulder injury just as

hot as he was when he sustained it back in early December and his strong play could be looked upon as a reason the Dukes are on a four game tear. But Abrams said the reason is deeper then just the goals and assists Campbell has been racking up. “The point production is really secondary to the amount of confidence he brings to the dressing room. It's a much more confident team when he plays,” Abrams said. The clubs traded goals in the third. Jake Emilio let the air out

of a Matt Larose shutout bid at 11:12 but Abbott Girduckis restored the Wellington three goal spread at 15:17 with his 11th of the season. Larose went the distance, making 28 saves for his third win of the weekend and securing his fourth win in four starts. Larose was solid the night before as well. The only Pickering shot to beat him was a by way of a puck that took a happy bounce off the top of the glass wound up in the slot where Jeff Heard made no mistake at 11:27 and carved the Wellington lead in half 2-1. Wellington staked themselves to a 2-0 margin in the first when Campbell scored just 11 seconds into the game and Erick Delaurentis added a nice shorthanded effort at 17:41. In the third, Campbell bagged his second of the game off a Delaurentis feed at 4:09 and Coric sealed it whit his first of the season at 10:26. On Friday, Wellington gave up the first goal and then scored six unanswered en route to a 6-1 win. Spencer Turcotte lead the way with a pair of goals while Joe McKeown, Delaurentis, Jake Marchment and Parker all lit the lamp for singles. Jan Kaminsky wound up three helpers in the winning effort and Larose turned aside 25 Pickering volleys. Wellington had 55 shots on net as the club dominated the Cats in terms of score and

puck possession. After winning four in a row and getting on a roll, the team will get a chance to enjoy some home cooking as Wellington plays nine of its final 11 games at the Essroc Centre. “We need to start feeling more comfortable playing at home, we really haven't had a opportunity to build a home identity and feel comfortable in our rink after so many road games. We had a great crowd on Sunday night and I'm hoping that the fans can spur us on to a solid home stand prior to playoffs,” Abrams said. Wellington hosts Trenton on Friday night and welcomes Aurora on Sunday. ‘Round the 'Roc: The win in Cobourg on Monday might go a ways to keeping the Cougars behind Wellington. The Cougars only have one more game against Wellington this season and its at the Essroc Arena...Wellington finds itself tied for sixth in the conference with Lindsay at 45 points, though the Muskies have two games in hand. The Dukes have an eight-point spread on eighth place Cobourg and nine point spread on on ninth place Stouffville....With 21 wins, Wellington would have to win nine of its last 11 to maintain a streak of 30 win seasons that started in 1999-2000 season.

O U T S TA N D I N G A G E N T S O U T S TA N D I N G R E S U LT S

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19

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Novice Kings reach final in Colborne

battling Port Hope’s Chris Jones tries to sweep the puck away from Picton forward

The County Farm Centre Prince Edward Novice BB Kings had a solid tune-up for playoffs at the annual Frozen Toes tournament in Colborne last weekend. The Kings opened the tournament with a commanding 7-1 win over the Oakville Flyers. Nick Foster led the scoring with three goals and two assists, while Jarret Osterhout had a goal and two assists. Josh Cunningham, Aiden Reddick, and Ben Lamorre also scored. Riley Grimmon and Nathan Percy contributed assists to the cause. In their second contest, the Kings managed to take a 2-1 victory over Aurora to advance to the A final. Foster and Osterhout each had a goal and an assist, while Cunningham also picked up a helper. The Kings couldn’t muster another win to take the championship as they fell to the Campbellford Colts 42. Emerson Byford had a highlight reel unassisted goal to give the Kings an early 1-0 lead, while Foster also found the net in the game. Coach Jamie Lane said he was impressed with the team’s effort, noting all of the lines did what their coaches asked them to do throughout the tournament. He said the

Finalists The County Farm Centre Prince Edward Novice BB Kings celebrate their appearance in the final at Colborne’s Frozen Toes tournament. (Submitted photo)

team’s defence and goaltending came through repeatedly, while call-up Osterhout put in an impressive showing. The Kings also stared their OMHA playdowns Sunday in Stirling, but came up short in a 3-1 loss. The county squad got its goal from Reddick, assisted by Foster and Nathan Steen. They also felt they could have had a closer outcome as the referee waved off a goal in the dying minutes, stating that from his vantage point it hit the crossbar. The Kings players felt the puck had hit off the back crossbar.

AES EARN FIRST WIN

After gaining momentum with a tie in Pickering and some other close games, the Beatty Seeds Novice AE

Kings finally got their first win in the tougher A-AA Lakeshore League with a 4-1 win in Wellington Sunday over the Port Perry Predators. The Kings did it with four unanswered goals — two off the stick of Lochlan MacDonald and one each from Dominic Guerrara and Reese Kleinsteuber. Gerrit Kempers had two assists in the game. Osterhout, Kieran Young, Liam Rice and MacDonald had the others. At the other end, the defensive corps and goaltender Austin Stock stood their ground. The Kings have five road games before their season finale against top-seed Whitby in Wellington Feb. 3. -Staff

Evan Greer during the first period of last Thursday’s 9–1 Pirates victory. Greer was held off the score sheet, but has been a big part of the team’s success. (Chad Ibbotson/Gazette staff)

Chad ibbotson

Staff writer

The Pirates continue to pile up points. The team collected their 10th straight win last Thursday with a 9-1 thumping of the Port Hope and remains in first place in the league with 52 points – 11 points ahead of second-place Panthers. The club also demonstrated some depth at the coaching position as head coach and general manager Ryan Woodward wasn't able to be on the bench. “The boys did a fabulous job of going out and executing the game plan and taking care of Port Hope,” Woodward said of the game. “The staff, Kyle Hawkins-Schulz and Rick Van Vlack and the rest of them did a fantastic job preparing the boys and they came out and put up a big effort on home ice.” Despite the score things got off to a slow start. The teams traded chances in a chippy and rough first period, but it was Geoff Cleminson burying an opportunity in the slot to put Picton on top late in the first period. Pirates forward Levi George collected an assist on the play for his 100th career point. The second period opened with the Picton owning a slim lead. That lead was erased just over a minute in when Brad Heykoop found the net behind goaltender Andrew Pearson. Shawn Mackie and Nick Clark had the assists. The Pirates weren't deterred and just over a minute later captain Brandon Peever scored an unassisted goal to restore the lead.

Two minutes later Ryan Sizer fed the puck to Jack Davison who buried one to give the Patcheyes the twogoal lead. Just two minutes later Davison had his second of the night, finishing off a play from Mitchell Smith and Sizer. The Pirates continued to roll as the second period went on. At 15:22 Peever scored his second of the game to further increase the lead with Cleminson and Riley McGuire getting the helpers. Two minutes later Cleminson found the net again after receiving a feed from Riley Main. Despite Port Hope's 18-16 shot advantage in the middle frame the Pirates went into the final 20 minutes with a big 6-1 lead. Just five minutes into the final frame Sizer connected with Smith to make it 7-1. At 13:50 George made it 8-1 with Brian Bunnett tallying an assist. Two minutes later Sizer scored again with Smith and Davison getting assists. Sizer had four points in the game while Davison and Smith each had three. The trio leads the league in points -- Sizer with 66 points and Davison and Smith each with 59 – and goals with Sizer and Davison tied for first with 31 each. The league-leading line shows no signs of slowing down, said Woodward. “I don't think so, and they shouldn't be,” Woodward said. “They've been putting up points all season against every team and they need to push each other to demand the most from themselves each night.” The team had only one game this week. Woodward said the time would be used to focus on the finer details of the team's play. “It's time to really fine tune our game and get prepared,” he said. “We're really

focusing on details of our game. The stuff we're talking about it the dressing room is the fine details in the defensive zone and when we have the puck in all three zones during a game.” He said there are always things the team can work and improve on and right now the team is having fun doing it. With just nine games remaining Woodward said the focus will remain on taking the season one game at a time, but the playoffs are in the back of his mind. “We understand playoffs are not that far away but there's a little bit of urgency to continue to improve on certain things as a group,” he said. “We've been able to score goals and we've been able to keep them out, but we want to just play better in all three zones.” The team faces Napanee again tonight at 7:30 before hitting the road to face Deseronto tomorrow at 8:30. R0011807100

Second-place club didn’t offer much of a challenge for league leaders

R0011788203

Pirates pound Panthers in 9-1 decision

20

The Picton Gazette

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

BUSINESS DIRECTORY ROOFING

PAINTING

B&T

Cowan Roofing

Boyce’s PAINTING & ODD JOBS

CONCRETE

PLUMBING / HEATING / CONSTRUCTION

C.B. FENNELL LTD.

READY MIX CONCRETE

Everything for your home from the Castle

CHERRY VALLEY

476-2653

General Construction Renovations Additions Concrete Siding

Terry Cowan 613-476-2525

ADVERTISE HERE!

THIS IS AFFORDABLE FEATURE AD SPACE! Call your

Picton Gazette sales rep. at 613-476-3201 today to book your advertisement. ARBORIST

Call

Jason

613-399-2862 OR

CELL

613-827-0487

EXCAVATING

Now taking orders for

MULCH

Red • Black • Cedar •Top Soil • Gravel •Retaining Walls •Septic Systems •Backhoe & Dozer Work •Mini Excavator •Trucking

613-813-4147 613-476-6940

CONTRACTOR Home Finishing & Contracting FULLY INSURED

FREE ESTIMATES CERTIFIED ARBORIST FULLY INSURED

Kevin Halloran & Sharon Toth

613-827-8672

C.F. EVANS LUMBER CO. LTD.

~ SERVICES OF A.C.I. TECHNICIAN AVAILABLE ~ “Providing quality products & service since 1947”

56 MAIN ST., PICTON, ONTARIO K0K 2T0 PHONE (613) 476-2446 FAX (613) 476-5272 Serving the County Since 1933

WINTER HEAT

Hennessy Removal, Pruning, Canopy Raising and Thinning, Cabling & Bracing

CERTIFIED MEMBER OF READY MIXED CONCRETE ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO

NO MORE STAINING! • PATIO DOOR & WINDOW SPECIALS • CUSTOM FIREPLACE FINISHING • NEW BATHROOM & KITCHEN • ALL INTERIOR JOBS ARE MY SPECIALTY

Bruce Hennessy

613-399-3793 613-827-3793 Cell

bruceh@sympatico.ca

PROPANE SUPPLIER

Crushed Gravel - Screenings - Septic Stone - Sand Fill Screened Masonry, Concrete & Filter Media Sand Portland, Masonry Type “N” & “S” Cement • Cement Blocks & Brick Poured Walls & Floor Finishing Available Excavator - Backhoe - Dozer Rentals • Septic System Installations

APPLIANCE REPAIR

COUNTY APPLIANCE SERVICE • Refrigerators • Freezers • Washers • Dryers • Dishwashers

• Ranges (No Mileage Charge)

DAVE HOEKSTRA • All Work Guaranteed

476-5388

After hours call 399-2504

Goheen Construction Co.

Propane for Farm, Home & Industry, Automotive, Conversions, Parts, Service

Michael Goheen

THE PROPANE PEOPLE SINCE 1937 • High Efficiency Furnaces • Fireplaces • Air Conditioning • Clothes Dryer • Water Heaters • BBQ’s, Cookstoves

Harold Gerow

Highway #2 Just East of Brighton

Tel. (613) 475-2414 RENOVATIONS

HOME UPGRADES

HUBBS

Kitchen, Bath, Flooring, Patio, Decks, Fencing, Painting, Decorating & Staging.

613-476-2274 gerry.v001@gmail.com

CONSTRUCTION From Drywall to Complete Reno

Over 25 Years Experience

Call Jamie 613-503-0185

1-877-544-3335 613-544-3335

24 Hour Emergency Service

Unit #1 - 1525 John Counter Blvd. Kingston

WELL DRILLING

Prince Edward Well Drilling • Well Cleaning • Flow Tests • Licensed & Certified by the Ministry of the Environment

— Box 3, Picton, Ontario K0K 2P0 —

Owner/Operator

Snow Plowing • Excavators • Dozers Skidsteer / Bobcat Float Service • Dump Trailer

C: 613.920.3178 R: 613.476.1187 F: 613.476.6101 E: mike@goheenconstruction.com FARMING

ke’s JaFarm Hand

Brush Cleanup Leaf/debris Removal • Flower Beds Dump Runs Pick up Appliances & Scrap Metals BOOK NOW FOR SNOW! shovelling, snowblowing walkways & driveways

Jake Smith 613-921-0045 613-476-8067

JacobSmith6@me.com

RENOVATING

HEATING & COOLING

INSTALLATION

McCann Heating & Cooling SERVING: Residential • Commercial • Industrial • Agricultural • Bulk Markets • Small cylinder exchange program

EXCAVATING

Gerow Propane Ltd.

HOME UPGRADES

SALES & SERVICE

PROPANE

PROPANE

Owner/Operator Jerry McCann

Insured & Licensed Tel 613-354-5512 Cell 613-572-5071

4003 County Rd. 9 Napanee, Ontario K7R 3K8

PLUMBING

HEATING

sid the Plumber licensed 25 years #09285

Affordable rates Seniors discounts repair & installations Prompt * Quality Service

Sid Wells Plumbing 613-476-1172 sidtheplumber@gmail.com

Olde Tyme Builders KEN THURSTON • • • • • • •

Hardwood Floors Custom Tiling Drywall Interior Painting Additions New Homes Custom Building

FROM START TO FINISH ~ WE ARRANGE IT ALL

613-476-7377 LAWN CARE

unty The Co

30

• Wood, Gas, Pellet, Electric • Stoves, Fireplaces & Accessories • Sales, Service, Installations • Free Estimates • Chimney Sweeps

County’s Largest Fireplace Showroom

• • • •

YEARS EXPERIENCE

Lawn Maintenance Flower Beds Leaf clean-up Vacation Home Insurance Checks snow shovelling

walkways & drives book today!

124 Main St., Picton

613.476.9259

613.885.1307

MASONRY CONTRACTOR • Natural Stone • Brick • Block • New Construction, Restoration, Renovation • High Efficiency Masonry Heaters & Wood Burning Bake Ovens

Creative Solutions, Built to Endure, Green Approach

Call Lawrence 613-476-4187

La Montagne Masonry Contractor PAINTING

PAINT GUY Robert Cole

613.399.2896

New & Renovated Home Painting PAINTING

Wayne Cronk Painting

Brush & Roller • Airless Spraying Barns & Commercial Building Interior & Exterior Houses Roof Replacement & Repair Bucket Truck Service General Maintenance Sandblasting • Parking Lot Striping Prompt Service • Free Estimates

613-476-5863 20 Years Serving Prince Edward County

21

The Picton Gazette

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

The Ag & Rural Update is an electronic bulletin that is produced weekly by staff at the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture & Food, (OMAF), Brighton Resource Centre. It is distributed free to subscribers. Not all of the information used in this farm calendar is supplied by the electronic bulletin.

Grand Champion Melbar Farms - Barry and Melissa Baldwin Buyer - Deerhaven Farm & Garden, Ken Morton

January 17 - Hastings/Lennox & Addington Soil Improvement Association Annual Meeting, Hart Acre Farms (Herb Hart 613354-0404), 461 Woodcock St., Napanee, 10 am to 2 pm – For more information contact Shane Smith, TCO, Napanee, 613-3544424 January 23 – Prince Edward SCIA Annual Meeting, 9:30 am to 3 pm, Bloomfield United Church. Guest Speakers: Greg Stewart OMAFRA Corn Specialist; Darcy Oliphant. Thompsons Trader; Seminar on how to read soil samples with A & L Labs. Lunch provided. Contact: Lindsay Williams 613 476-9183.

January 30 – Codrington Tie Stall Housing 2013 - Dairy Housing Design Seminars, Community Centre, 2992 County Road 30, Codrington, 9:30 am – Cost is $107.35 ($95 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or visit www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/dairy/facts/info_freetiestall.htm

Thank You for Supporting Your Local Farmers GRAIN PRICES FOB Trenton as quoted by

TRENTON GRAIN Wednesday, January 16, 2013

J. H. Anderson Elevators & Farm Supplies Inc.

Buy & Sell Top Prices

476-6597 RR 2 Picton

CORN $264.00/t NEW CROP CORN $204.00/t NEW CROP WHEAT $243.00/t SOYBEANS $497.00/t NEW CROP SOYBEANS $438.00/t

DEERHAVEN FARM & GARDEN LTD. The Big Green Machinery Dealer!

896 Bell Blvd. West Belleville, Ontario (613) 962-5021 www.deerhaven.ca

JOHN DEERE

JOEL WALKER - ELECTRIC -

Residential and Farm Wiring Farm Generator Sales and Service R.R. 3, Picton 476-4700

BUS TRIP Ottawa Valley Farm Show

Century 21

Sales Representatives

Jason, Kevin & Sandy Young

613-476-2100

Lanthorn Real Estate Ltd., Brokerage

thefamilyteam@gmail.com Full Service Family Team www.pec.on.ca/young

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 Bus leaves Picton at 7:00am Cost: $35.00 includes admission to the show More details & sign up at the County Farm Centre

38 Cold Storage Rd., Picton 613-476-2171 Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-6pm Sat. 8am-4pm

MASSEY FERGUSON HESSTON LANDINI

Bus: 613-395-3883 1-800-465-9297 Fax: 613-395-2652

Parts Sales & Service

McKeown Motor Sales

SPRING BROOK, ONT.

Dodge Jeep CHRYSLER

PICTON FARM SUPPLY

Premium Wood Burning Pellets Skid Price $4.95/Bag WE DELIVER

179 Talbot St. Picton 613-476-7507 Mon-Fri 8am-5pm, Sat 8am-12pm

OLDE TYME HEATING

• WOOD • GAS • PELLET STOVES • WOOD COOKSTOVES • CHIMNEY SYSTEMS • ZERO CLEARANCE FIREPLACES • PELLET STOVES Quality Sales, Service & Installation • Regency • Jotul • BIS 177 LAKE ST. PICTON 476-8100

www.quintehomeimprovement.ca

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES AND INFORMATION CLASSIFIED ADS: $5.49 for 15 words or less. 12¢ each additional word. BIRTHS MEMORIAMS, CARDS OF THANKS: 15¢ each word, minimum $8.50 (50 words)

ARTICLES FOR SALE

14ft STAIR Climber $3,000 or best offer; Elevator (left sided) $5,900 or best offer. Call 613-922-9807

205 70/15 set of four Michelin X Ice snowtires, driven one winter $350, over $600 new 613-399-2438. 664B CLARK Skidder $15,000. 10 tonne 3 axle trailer made for backhoe $6000. 2005 4 sled closed in trailer, black, $6000 Call for info Scott Cronk 613-393-2564 or 613393-2438.

AUTOMOTIVE KEYS & remotes with programming. By appointment. Prince Edward Locksmith 613-476-3382.

BE PREPARED. YARDMAN 2 stage snowthrower, used I season 208cc, electric start, hand warmers, power assist steering, light, pd. $1200+tax, excellent condition asking $700 613-393-2402.

County Traders We Purchase Estates Furniture & Antiques BUY, SELL, TRADE 39 Stanley Street Bloomfield, Ontario

WINTER HOURS: JAN, FEB, MARCH MON.-THURS. CLOSED Fri. & Sat. 10am-4pm, Sun. Noon-4pm

613-393-9993 888-905-9993

ESTATE SALE! Cherry Valley United Church hall, Saturday, February 2nd. Many interesting items including silver, china, household and kitchen utensils, some furniture. Mark your calendars. Don't miss it! Details to follow. FIREWOOD,Hardwood, log lengths, 8 cord load, $1,100. Doug Storring 613-393-5078.

FIREWOOD- well seasoned, cut/ split and delivered 613-399-5673.

FRESH EGGS DAILY. Picton Farm Supply, Brown, white & green eggs, this weeks special: 3 doz Jumbo $10. 613-476-7507.

USED SNOWBLOWERS, sizes vary from 5hp- 22" cut up to 10hp 28" cut, some electric start, others manual start. Call 613-476-7212.

WOOD HEAT SOLUTIONS 2013 WINTER SALE

ANTIQUES

PROFESSIONAL FURNITURE refinishing and restoration. Antiques bought and sold. Free pick-up and delivery. Butler Creek Antiques, Schoharie Rd. 613-476-1142.

COMMERCIAL

DOYLES WINDOWS AND SUNROOMS BUY DIRECT AND SAVE HUGE FACTORY DISCOUNTS Take advantage of the weather and large Discounts available on our custom made Windows, Entrance Systems, Patio and Storm Doors. Come see our displays at our showroom at: 140 Industrial Blvd., Unit 1, Napanee, ON Call 613-354-3597 or 1-888-282-5213 Office Hours: Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm Evenings and Weekends by appointment

MUSIC

GUITAR LESSONS, all ages. 1 free month guitar use. Contact Drew Ackerman, 613-476-8900.

PETS

QUINTE PET Minders.Loving care for your pets in their own home.Daily visits,also overnights & vacation stays 613-476-6265.

VEHICLES FOR SALE

AUTO PARTS, new and used, auto and truck parts, we buy scrap metals. cars and trucks wanted. 816 Goodyear Road, Napanee. Call Rebel Scrap Metal Inc. 613572-1281, 1-877-292-1281. Yes, we have tires. CARS AND trucks wanted for scrap or recycling, we buy scrap metal, free pickup or you bring in. Dan 613-929-7572. We also sell auto parts and tires.

FINANCING NOW AVAILABLE! Good or bad credit, let me get you on the road... Affordably!!

Factory incentive on the ECL 1400.

Ronnie B’s Auto Sales 613-393-3336

Limited quantity.

www.ronniebsautosales.com

Call for more information

Your local CENTRAL BOILER DEALER FRANKFORD, ON 613.398.1611 BANCROFT, ON 613.332.1613

Check us out on Facebook

APPLIANCES FOR SALE R0011836601

NEW and USED

APPLIANCES USED REFRIGERATORS

Stoves, washers, dryers, freezers, dishwashers, 3 mos. old & up. Sold with written guarantees. Fridge's $100. & up.

NEW APPLIANCES

At the lowest prices in the area. Trade-ins accepted on new appliances. Big selection to choose from.

PAYS CASH$$$

For good used appliances in working order or not but no junk please. VISA & MASTERCARD accepted. We have our own financing also. Shop at our competitors & then come see for yourself quality at low prices. Open evenings 7 days a week. We Deliver.

SMITTY’S APPLIANCES LTD. 969-0287

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

COMMERICAL/RETAIL space, 500sq.ft. air conditioned on Main Street, Picton for $800/mo includes all utilities & parking, available immediately. Call 613-476-4085 or email bwybenga @rogers.com

FOR RENT

1 BEDRM apartments available, 44 Main St. Picton. These units have been completely redone, new flooring, kitchen cabinets, bathroom fixtures & kitchen appliances. Also heavily insulated for sound. Units are starting at $800 plus hydro, includes heat, water, garbage & laundry. Please contact Jeff at jeffinpec@gmail.com 1 BEDROOM $600 plus hydro. Water and parking included. King Street apartment, one block from Main Street. Laundry in building. Available February 1. Send inquiries to pictonapartments@bell.net or 613-399-5822 $40/month add'n for smoker and/or $40/month add'n for pet(s). 1 BEDROOM completely renovated incl new floors, new appliances and new bathroom. $700 plus hydro. Water included. Main Street apartment. Available February 1. Send inquiries to pictonapartments@bell.net or 613-399-5822 $40/month add'n

The Picton Gazette

C LASSIFIEDS Ph. 613-476-3201 - Fax 613-476-3464 Email: gazetteclass@bellnet.ca THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 - 22 DEATHS - $21.00; FOUND, BEREAVED - No charge Box Replies $5.00; EXTRA $1.50 charge for billed ads. EXTRA $5.00 charge for a HEADING COMBINATION RATES available for The Picton Gazette and The Napanee Beaver

FOR RENT

for smoker and/or $40/month add'n for pet(s). 1 BEDROOM $675 plus hydro. Water included. Main Street apartment. Available February 1. Send inquiries to pictonapartments@bell.net or 613-399-5822 $40/month add'n for smoker and/or $40/month add'n for pet(s). 1 BEDROOM on Main Street, ground floor, $500+ utilities, 877588-2174. 1 BEDROOM, main floor, nonsmoking, all inclusive-includes, heat, hydro, water/parking. Available Feb. 1st. $875 monthly. Contact Brian, 613-240-5332 or katiaandbrian@rogers.com 2 BEDROOM apt. 1100sq', small balcony, over looking harbour, $850 monthly plus H & H, includes fridge, stove, washer, dryer and 2 car parking 613-771-3203. 2 BEDROOM 2 bath, 2012-13 models natural gas heat, very economical utilities. Lawn cutting, snow removal & water included. Starting at $99,900 purchase or lease at $1095/mo Raspberry Fields, 100 Upper Lake St. 55+years community. 613-8851307 for details. 2 BEDROOM, 2 level house, Spring St. Picton, $1200+utilities, large yard, washer/dryer, fridge & stove. Ph. 613-476-6459 available now. 3+ BEDROOM , 2 full baths,open concept, suitable for professionals, located south of Belleville 613-4711360. FURNISHED 1 bedrm in our home in Ameliasburgh in PEC, satellite & utilities included except telephone $700 (negotible) 613-969-8196. HEATED INDOOR storage, new secure building for cars, boats, etc. Bloomfield, 613-393-3890 or 613849-1977.

Large open concept 2 bdrm apt with yard, fireplace and large ensuite bath with jacuzzi. $1200/mth including all utilities. Available Feb 1st. Call 613-813-5686

IDEAL LOCATION in Picton. Small 3 bedroom, 2 storey in charming semi-detached century home. Newly renovated. Great neighbours. Parking, yard, fridge, stove. $1100 plus heat and hydro. Rent rebate available. Would suit 2-3 people. Contact mypechome@gmail.com or 416-909-7819

SENIORS PLEASE 105 Bridge St

Bachelor Apartment available! Quiet area on the Bay Appliances, laundry Super on site

1-905-885-2350

SHORT TERM accomodations. Beautifully furnished 1 & 2 bedrm units, until May, one block away from downtown Picton, view at thefenix.ca or call 613-391-1441. TWO BEAUTIFUL, 2 bedroom apartments in an Adult orientated building, each unit is on the 2nd floor, over looking the harbour and located close to the Main Street in Picton. These 1100 square foot units include a private balcony, fridge, stove, washer, dryer and parking for 2 cars. These are a must see! Both units are $850 plus h &h and available today 613-771-3203.

WANTED

MINT AND used postage stamps, covers, post cards, coins and paper money. Call Bob 613-967-2118.

WANTED TO BUY

WILL Buy Scrap Vehicles Metals and Appliances

CALL CHAPPY’S

613-476-2994 or 613-242-0117

EMPLOYMENT WANTED

A CERTIFIED Personal Support Worker. Do you or a loved one need in home personal care, meal preparation, light housekeeping, Tracey 613-399-2080. A WINTER day is the time to get rid of unwanted trash, trees trimmed, pruning and any other jobs. Half ton truck available. No job too small. For reasonable rates call Paul 613-393-5021.

www.hicksfuneralhome.ca

Providing professional service with care, dignity and personal attention to all details surrounding the loss of a loved one. 2 Centre Street, Picton Robert C. Osborne 476-5571 Funeral Director NOTE: Report errors immediately. The Picton Gazette will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement. CLASSIFIED DEADLINES: Tuesday at 4:00pm

BUSINESS SERVICES

BLACK RIVER TREE SERVICE

Stump Grinding Tree Trimming and Removal Brush Chipping Lot Clearing Cabling & Bracing Fully Insured 15 years Experience

Glenn Guernsey

476-3757

RODGER ANDERSON

EXCAVATING

SAND & GRAVEL - TOP SOIL EQUIPMENT RENTAL HOURLY OR CONTRACT BULLDOZER - LOADER - TRUCK - HOE RAM

FREE ESTIMATES

BAILEY’S RECYCLABLES

Scrap Metal & Scrap Cars & Electronics - TV’s, Computers, etc. Appliances

We buy & sell

613-476-1621

CHAPPY'S. We'll do almost anything! Moving, dump runs of brush, grass cutting. Garage and basement cleaning. Ph 613-476-2994 or 613-242-0117 or Jenny 613243-7204. HOUSEKEEPING. One time clean or whatever you need 613-3931357. JULIE'S CLEANING SERVICE has openings on Monday afternoon and all day Friday 613-8480798. THOROUGHLY CLEAN Housekeeping currently have a few weekday openings available. Services available: Housekeeping, vacancy cleaning, residential & seasonal properties, property maintenance, carpet cleaning. VA & Smile Program clients always welcome. Come home to a Thoroughly Clean Home- you deserve it! 613-476-0338

HELP WANTED

FULL AND/or Part time position available immediately on a tie stall dairy farm. Experience an asset but not required. Email ourownholsteins@kos.net or 613-399-5649.

Napanee business looking for a FULL-TIME male or female

OFFICE ASSISTANT

to start immediately. Duties include sorting of mail, a/r, cash sheets, licensing of vehicles, organizing safety department by maintaining of records and setting up courses. Person must have computer skills, knowledge in Simply Accounting, the ability to work independently and good people skills. Please send resume to jobposting130@yahoo.ca

LOST

LADIES GOLD BRACELET. If found please call 613-399-5213.

To place your Classified Ad Call 613-476-3201

BIRTH

RR2 PICTON

476-6717

AULTHOUSE CARPENTRY

Renovations - Additions Siding - Decks Painting - Floors Phone 613-393-2819 613-393-1196 Book for Spring!

FOSTER ROCK QUARRY Winter Hours: Open Upon Request

613-885-5544 613-827-4154

SPECIAL NOTICES ([OVS9LJ*VTTP[[LL»Z

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^^^H[OVSYLJJLU[YLJVT HERITAGE HALL

BUFFET DINNER HAM & SCALLOP POTATOES Sunday, January 20th Serving 4pm - 7pm $10 per person

613-476-2342 166 County Rd 6 *No Reservations

LOST & FOUND

• Lady’s gold ring • Found at Maker’s Hand event - key on tag - glass case • Found at Picton Fair - pair sunglasses - pair subscription glasses • Found on Cty Rd 10 after Marathon -Windjacket & pair of socks To claim come to

267 Main St. Picton

The Picton Gazette

Christina & Mike are thrilled to announce the birth of their first child FLETCHER JOHN MACLELLAN weighing 7 lbs 5 oz on November 21st, 2012 at 3:42am at BGH. Proud grandparents are Cyril and Ann MacLellan of Brighton, Ray Fox and Sharon Coulter of Bloomfield and the late Connie Fox. A special nephew for Cynthia. Special thanks to Dr. Kovacs and the maternity staff at BGH for their excellent care.

CARDS OF THANKS

I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to my clients who have stayed with me all this time. After 47 years of hairdressing, I have finally retired! I can't begin to tell you how much I appreciate your kindness, your loyalty, your patience and especially, all the love you have shown me. I will miss you. Freda Manlow. Thank You to all the people who attended by 80th Birthday Party at the Legion Hall on January 5th. Thank you for all your best wishes! It was so good to see you all! God bless, Glenn Brooks. The family of the late Donald Wesley Ostrander would like to thank famiy, friends and neighbours for their outpouring of condolences and gifts of food, flowers, cards and donations. Our gratitude to Dr. Hal Wilson for his kind words at the service. Heartfelt thank you to Hospice Prince Edward, VON services, Community Care and Access Centre and Veterans Affairs who were so caring to Don when he needed assistance. Warm appreciation to Dr. HaywardStewart for the medical attention given to Don in his final year of life. We appreciate the assistance of the Bloomfield-Hallowell firefighters and paramedics who attended to Don on the night of his passing. Hallowell House staff were very kind in giving Don respite care and including him in their "family". Thanks also to Whattam Funeral Home and The Waring House for services and reception. We so appreciate the kindness shown to us at this very sad and difficult time in our lives. Marilyn Ostrander and family The family of the late Herman Hawley after a brief illness passed away December 14, 2013 at PECMH would like to thank Nancy Andrews and nursing staff for the compassionate and excellent care. Dr. French who always takes time for others with his words of comfort. Dr. Hayward-Stewart, Cathy, Dr. Cleminson, Dr. Whattam, Mary Steever, Jackie Rea, Sylvia Kempers, Bayshore Nursing, some how "thank you" seems inadequate for the care, kindness and beyond excellent services provided for Herman at his time of need. Bob Osborne and staff for their guidance and services provided. Rev. Aundrey Whitney, Flowers'n'Such, Donna and Moe for the beautiful flowers. To all those who made donations, phone calls and cards. Our daughters Robin (Adam), Melissa (Derrick) and grandchildren for the many visits while grandpa was in hospital. Melissa for her eulogy in memory of her grandfather. Special thanks to our family and friends who attended. My two sisters Cindy Forrester and Debra Tindale for taking the day off to be there for us at our time of sorrow. Sincerely Ron, Susan Hawley & family.

23

The Picton Gazette

MEMORIAMS

FOSTER, Arnold. In loving memory of a dear husband, father and grandfather, who passed away January 23, 2009. He left us quietly, His thorughts unknown, But left us a memory, We are proud to own; So treasure him Lord, In Your garden of rest, For when on earth, He was one of the best. Doris, Nancy, Bruce, Muriel and families.

JOHNSTON, In loving memory of Howard William Johnston, October 23, 1931 - January 18, 2008. Always remembered by Eleanor & family

KIMMERLY- KENNY. In loving memory of a dear son and brother, who passed away January 19, 2010. In tears we saw you sinking We watched you fade away, Our hearts were almost broken, You fought so hard to stay, But when we saw you sleeping So peacefully free from pain We could not wish you back, To suffer that again. Love your family.

LEWIS David. In loving memory of a dear father and grandfather who passed away 8 years ago on January 18. God saw you getting tired and a cure was not to be. So He put His arms around you and He whispered "Come to Me" With tearful eyes we watched you. We watched you fade away, Although we loved you dearly, We could not make you stay. A golden heart stopped beating, Hard working hands at rest God broke our hearts to prove to us, He chose to take the best. It's lonesome here without you we miss you more each day. Life doesn't seem the same since you have gone away. When days are sad and lonely and everything goes wrong, we seem to hear you whisper "Cheer Up and Carry On" Each time we see your picture you seem to smile and say, "Don't cry, I'm in God's hands, we'll meet again someday!" Always loved and never forgotten by Jo-anne, Jim, Jamie, Evan, Amie, Emilie, Ellen, Martin, Angela and Austin. MITCHELL/MONROEMorley 1983, Mitch (Laverne) 2008, Albert 2003, Donald Monroe 2002, (Topper) Leighton 2004. The joys that they missed on life's highway May they find in God's garden of rest. Still missing you all. Mitchell and Monroe famlies.

ORSBORNE, Dorothy. In loving memory of a mother and grandmother, who passed away 22 years ago, January 21, 1991. They say memories are golden Well, maybe that is true, But we never wanted memories We only wanted you. Forever loved and always remembered by Les, Jane, Brian, Pam, Ginny, Phil, Patti and all the grandchildren. RANKIN- In loving memory of our dear dad, grandpa and greatgrandpa, Stanley, who passed away January 14, 2009. Softly the leaves of memory fall, Gently we gather and treaure them all, Unseen, unheard, you are always near, So missed, so loved, so very dear. Forever in our hearts, your family. ROSENBLATH, James "Rosie". November 23, 1978 - January 16, 2010. Gone but not forgotten, Although we are apart, Your spirit lives within us, Forever in our hearts. Always loved, Mom & Dad, Wil, Lisa, and all your family and friends. SLAVEN- In loving memory of our husband, dad and grandpa, David, who passed away January 18, 2007. It doesn't need to a special day To bring you to our mind For the days without a thought of you Are very hard to find. We think of you in silence We often speak your name. But in our hearts your'e always there Remembered every day. Bette Jean, Rhonda, Harry, Sydney, Craig, Dawn-Marie, Zachary and Carter.

DEATHS

BRUMMELL, Areta Clara (Pearsall) June 14, 1919 – January 11, 2013

Reta Brummell passed away on Jan. 11 2013 at the age of 93 years. Reta was born and raised near Picton, Ontario, daughter of Earl and Eva Pearsall. She met and married the love of her life, Marshall Brummell until his death in 1991 after 50 years of marriage.  Married in Picton, Reta and Marshall moved with son Darryl to Kingston in 1944. Arden was born 4 years later. Reta, always smiling, was a devoted wife and mom who loved and cared for her family. She was an outstanding cook famous for her berry pies and baked beans, and skilled bowler for many years. After retiring, Marshall and Reta divided their time between Florida and the cottage on Hay Bay – a place of many memories. After a stroke, Reta moved to Leamington and later Kingsville to be closer to family. In her last years she received wonderful care at Kingsville Court and Royal Oak. Reta is survived by her brother Leland (Barbara) of Picton, sons Darryl (Diane), Kingsville and Arden (Susan), Calgary, grandchildren Craig (Debbie) Brummell of Kingsville, Sara (Vince) Orlando of Leamington, Ruth Brummell of London, Martin Brummell of Saskatoon, and Jessica Brummell of Vancouver, and great-grandchildren Lauren, and Carson of Kingsville and Ryan of Leamington.. Reta had many wonderful friends over the years with a special recognition of to Dick and Wilma Dodds of Napanee and all the gang of teachers from Kingston.  A celebration of Reta’s life will be held on Thursday Jan 17th at 2 P:M with visitation on Wednesday Jan 16th from 6-8 P:M at Whattam Funeral Home 33 Main St. Picton, On.   Best wishes may be sent to whattamfh@sympatico.ca. Donations to The Gideons or a charity of your choice On-line donations and condolences at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

Whattam Funeral Home

STILL, John William

Suddenly at his home, R.R.#9, Picton, on Sunday, January 13th, 2013, at the age of 58. Beloved son of Joan Still and the late Arthur Still. Dear brother of Velda Tuttle of Fenelon Falls and the late Elizabeth Everall and the late Anthony Still. John will be sadly missed by his many nieces and nephews. John was a special Godson of the late Don McGinnis. John is resting at the Whattam Funeral Home, 33 Main Street, Picton, Ontario. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Thursday, January 17th at 10:30 a.m. The Reverend Audrey Whitney to officiate Spring Interment at Glenwood Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Loyalist Humane Society would be appreciated. Friends may visit with John’s family on Thursday morning from 9:30 a.m. until the time of service. Online donations and condolences at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

Whattam Funeral Home

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

DEATHS

COOPER, Lillian

Peacefully, with her family by her side, at the HJ McFarland Memorial Home on Wednesday January 9, 2013, Lil Cooper (nee Wilkinson), at the age of 92. Beloved wife of the late Jack F. Cooper. Loved mother of Lynn and her husband Calvin Grimmon of Black Creek. Special Nana of James and his wife Jaclyn of Belleville and Elizabeth and her husband Hendrik van der Bij of Milford. Great Nana of Hudson Grimmon and Elliott van der Bij. Dear sister of the late Kathleen, William and Reginald. Mrs. Cooper rested at the Whattam Funeral Home, 33 Main Street, Picton. Funeral Service was held in St. Mary Magdalene Anglican Church on Saturday January 12th at 11 a.m. The Reverend Bishop Peter Mason officiated with the Reverends D. Lancaster and F. Langlois. Interment Cherry Valley Cemetery. Memorial donations to St. Mary Magdalene Church, HJ McFarland Memorial Home or Hospice Prince Edward would be appreciated. (Cheques only, please). The family received friends at the Church on Saturday morning from 10 am. until service time. On-line donations and condolences at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

DEATHS

DEATH

LEWIS, William (Bill)

WWII Veteran At his home on Sunday December 9, 2012, Bill Lewis of RR 8 Picton, at the age of 88. Beloved husband of Gretha of 67 years. Dear father of John and his wife Anita of Bancroft, Margaret Harris of RR 4 Picton, Florence Coghlan of Consecon, Carol and her husband Lyle Mitchell of RR#8, Picton and Garry and his wife Cheri of Demorestville. Dear brother of the late Florence Perry. Sadly missed by his granchildren and great grandchildren. A celebration of Bill's life will be held on January 19th at the Demorestville United Church Hall, 2-4pm.

MARTIN, Andrew and MARTIN, Eleanor

Andrew passed away on Saturday, January 12th, 2013 at the age of 94, and Eleanor joined him one day later on Sunday, January 13th, 2013 at the age of 89, after 71 years of marriage, at the Quinte Gardens Retirement Residence in Belleville. Dear parents of Linda Ann Nugent and husband Garry of Picton, Suzanne Nourse and husband Stephen of North Gower, and the late Patricia Scott (Ronald). Andrew and Eleanor are loved by their five grandchildren, eleven great grandchildren, and one great great grandchild. They will be fondly remembered by their families in England. Arrangements in the care of the John R. Bush Funeral Home, 80 Highland Avenue, Belleville (613-968-5588). In keeping with Andrew and Eleanor's wishes, cremation has taken place. Family and friends are invited to gather at the Quinte Gardens Retirement Residence on Sunday, January 20th, 2013 at 2:00pm to celebrate their lives. Donations to the Salvation Army, or to the charity of choice, would be appreciated. Online condolences can be made at www.rushnellfamilyservices.com

DEATH

INCH, John David

July 2, 1937 - December 21, 2012

Suddenly and unexpectedly on Friday, December 21, 2012, John David Inch of Mercer, Missouri, at the age of 75. Beloved husband of Stacy Torrey-Inch, father of Deborah Thompson (JR), David Inch (Laurie), Charlene Inch BonhamCarter (Gavin), Dwayne Inch (Kim) and Stacy Tripp (Eric). Sadly missed by his 11 grandchildren Jamie, Jessica, Brandon, Sean, Christopher, Aaron, Bethany, Shayne, Connor, Stephen and Kyle, and 2 great-grandchildren Max and Andie. Brother of Barbara and the late Margaret and Harry Inch. Son of the late Francis (Frankie) Hennessy. Fondly remembered by Carline Inch. Memorial donations may be made to The Hope Centre. Funeral Service will be held at First Baptist Church in Picton (across from Giant Tiger) on January 19th at 2pm. The family will receive friends at 1pm

.

Whattam Funeral Home

TERPSTRA, Tonia Tjitske

Surrounded by love, Tonia passed away at the Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital January 12, 2013 after a valiant 18 month battle. Tonia lived her life full of love and laughter. Predeceased by her parents (Elmer and Jane) and her sister Betty. Survived by her loving husband Greg Poushinsky,  her brothers Henry (Sharon), Alan (Lynn), Ed (Dorothy) and Roy (Suzanne), and her ‘wicked step-daughters’ Natasha and Katya (Normy). She loved being  Tante Tonia to her many nieces and nephews, and MiMi to three grandsons, Isaac, John and Charlie. Tonia had special Canadian ‘sisters’ Janet, MJ, and Bettyo. Tonia had a long career across Canada and the US, and retired as Executive Assistant to the President of Microsoft Canada. She and Greg enjoyed travelling around the world. She specially loved her home in Bonita Springs, FL and her American ‘sisters’ Shelley and Vicki. She touched many hearts and there are many friends and extended family members who will miss Tonia very much.  Friends and family will share a celebration of her life at a later date.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. On-line donations and condolences at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

Whattam Funeral Home

Babies of 2012!

HAENNEL, Kenneth Gerald

Surrounded by his family at Quinte Health Care Prince Edward Memorial on Monday, January 14, 2013, Ken Haennel, of Picton, at the age of 70. Loved husband of Ailene. Much loved father of Lisa and her husband Dan Adams, Darren and his wife Laura and Tammy and her husband Brent Stewart. Proud grandpa of Megan, Andrew, Spencer, Sarah, Evan and Taylor. Dear brother of Gary and his wife Shelley and brotherin-law of Fred Burford and his wife Kathy. A Celebration of Ken’s Life will be held at The Whattam Funeral Home, 33 Main Street, Picton on Friday January 18th at 2:00 p.m. with visitation one hour prior. An informal celebration will continue at 3 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 78, Picton. Spring Interment at Mount Olivet Cemetery. Memorial donations to Hospice Prince Edward or the Ontario Lung Association would be appreciated. (Cheques only, please). Online donations and condolences at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

Retired Vice President of Marketing for Independent Order of Foresters. Peacefully, with his wife at his side, at the Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital on Thursday January 10, 2013, after a short illness. He will be sadly missed by his wife Lee.  Dear father of Stephen (the late Ann) of England, Sue (Phil) Baxter of England, Lori Taylor of Picton, Kelly (Bud) Cave of Whitby, step-father of Nyshea (Jeff) Brown of Cambridge, ON, and special uncle of Tony (Joanne) Cundy of England.  He will be sadly missed by his many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. At Jim’s request, a private celebration of his life will be held at a later date. If desired, donations to the Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family. (Cheques only, please). Arrangements entrusted to the Whattam Funeral Home, 33 Main St., Picton, ON. On-line donations and condolences at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

Whattam

Whattam

Funeral Home

Funeral Home

We can’t wait to see the babies born in 2012! Here’s your opportunity to show off those little ones (just a little). We will be publishing our Annual Showcase of Babies on Thursday, January 31, 2013. Just bring in, or email your baby’s colour picture, along with the information below on or before January 25, 2013! Don’t miss out!

CUNDY, James robert

16

$

1 2

00

plus HST!

Baby’s Name: _________________________________________

Date of Birth: _________________________________________ Weight: _____________________Time: ____________________

Parents’ Names: _______________________________________

Phone Number: ___________________________________________

The Picton Gazette

267 Main St Picton ON K0K 2T0 Tel: 613-476-3201 e-mail: gazetteclass@bellnet.ca We accept VISA, M/C, AMEX, DEBIT OR CHEQUE

1 2

24

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Eat fresh, local foods to help with budget and health this year

Another New Year has begun! I like this fresh-start feeling. For me, it’s time to remake myself, and a time to clear up clutter, bringing a sense of order and organization to my life and home. Okay, so it doesn’t always last long, but it’s here for awhile. Long enough to know it’s possible…. There are many repeat resolutions out there each year, you know — quit smoking,lose weight. The two most popular, and necessary! I am no exception. We do the same thing year after year, so it’s time to try a new approach, look for new ideas to conquer your problems. After all, the def-

inition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, while expecting different results! Think on that one! So I found some online help this time. At About.com I signed up for daily newsletters for ending smoking and healthy eating/lifestyle stuff. There was lots of good info, great reinforcement to keep us going. Through this I saw Smokers’ Helpline advertised also. They have three options for assistance, phone, internet, or text. I didn’t know that. So I went for the online program. The info there is quite impressive. And interesting. Very

HELP WANTED

good program. One near thing is that every time you log into it, it shows you how many days you have been smoke free and how much money you have saved, as well as how much time, days and hours, have been added back to your life! Seeing these numbers in black and white is very effective. Okay now you are gonna freak at this new resolution I made.It’s a tough one. I am not going to buy anything made in China anymore….Can it be done? Hopefully. Let me challenge you all on this one, give it a try. You will be amazed when you start

reading product tags that almost everything comes from there. It’s beginning to disturb me lately that we are overrun with “offshore” products. Do I really want to help support a communist country with my hard earned dollars? Do I really want to contribute to the increase of dangerous sweatshop conditions in another land? No I do not. Now I will make it a priority to look for items made here in Canada or the USA primarily. I am thinking it shouldn’t be too difficult for me as I don’t shop much nor do I really need anything more. But if you shop

CAD/CAM Technician / Engineer (Mechanical) – Full time

This is an exciting opportunity working with composites

QUALIFIED CANDIDATES WILL POSSESS THE FOLLOWING: • 5+ years CAD/CAM Technician/Engineering experience • Experience in Solid (parametric) 2D and 3D modelling is required • Advanced skills in “Solid Edge” (Siemens) and NX CAM software & programming is a strong asset • Knowledge of FRP Composites would be beneficial • Competencies: • Sound knowledge of engineering design principals • Advanced numeracy and computer skills • Excellent written & verbal communication skills (English) • Knowledge of material properties; specifically composites • An understanding of manufacturing processes and construction methods • Excellent problem solving and time management skills • Creative flair • The ability to work individually and as part of a team To apply for this position, please send your resume to: ashleyg@universalfan.com

CLEAVE ENERGY INC. DRILLING OPERATORS NEEDED Ontario’s largest drilling company is seeking experienced drill operators to join their team on a full time basis. Qualifications: • Minimum 1 year experience with top hammer or down hole hammer rock drills • Ability to work in a fast paced and dynamic work environment Cleave Energy Inc. is a high growth company in the RENEWABLE ENERGY industry offering a very attractive wage and bonus package for successful applicants. Email resume to: sales@cleave-energy.com

BRIGHTON ESTATE AUCTIONS

LARGE ANTIQUE & COLLECTOR’S AUCTION Sunday , January 20 - Preview 9:30 a.m. Auction 11:00 a.m. Auction to include: Large Amount of Smalls, Crystal, Jewellery, Royal Doulton Figures, Oriental Items, Books & Furniture. Large Collection of Oil Paintings, Prints & Watercolours. Watch Web Site for Updates. Large Indoor Yard Sale: Sunday @ 9:30 a.m. David Simmons: Auctioneer & Appraiser Looking for quality estates or single items for upcoming auctions www.brightonestateauctions.com 101 Applewood Drive, Brighton, Ont. K0K 1H0 Phone 1-613-475-6223

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23

AT 5:00 P.M. AUCTION SALE DOUG JARRELL SALES ARENA, BELLEVILLE DIRECTIONS: From Hwy 401 at Belleville take Hwy 37 north 2 kms to Casey Rd. Follow Casey Rd. east 6 kms to 1146. Samsung 40” flat screen TV, Kenmore fridge/freezer on bottom, Kenmore apt. size chest freezer, Moffat 30 inch range, Inglis washer spin dryer, pine baker’s table, open kitchen cupboard, French provincial china hutch & server, FP high back chairs, 4 metal chairs, wooden kitchen table, walnut hall table, 2 wing back recliners, coffee & end tables, French provincial bedroom suite …double bed, gentleman’s & lady’s high boy chests & 2 night tables ( all in new condition), oak rocker & arm chair, ¾ bed/ mattress, oak coffee table, Heirloom cedar chest, oak smoker, small open book case, cane bottom chair, cabinet model sewing machine. Large qty. of smalls including glass & china, costume jewelry, chest of flatware, Bravetti toaster oven, Persona set of pots & pans, everyday dishes, canister sets, old sealers, 4 old crocks, old paintings, prints & frames, floor & table lamps, electric oil heater, brass pieces, linens & bedding. Craftsman 6.5 H.P. 22 inch push mower, Yard Machines 4.5 H.P. 20 inch push mower, garden dump cart, garden tools, lawn furniture etc. & numerous other pieces. See my web site for detailed list & photos. AUCTIONEERS: DOUG JARRELL & BEN TREVERTON 613-969-1033 www.dougjarrellauctions.com

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often and buy often, see what you can do with this challenge. Think how you spend is your voice in our economy. I know cost is often the big factor here, so be careful. I mean see if you can find a comparable item made closer to home. Or can you make it yourself? Or can you find it secondhand? Or the big one, do you really need it at all? Anyways make your shopping habits count somehow, something to be aware of, okay? We have many new things to try and new ideas for living better this year. Definitely, this is our time for renewal! Remember whatever you decide, keep things small —changes, projects, et cetera — break big ideas down into small bits, that way you accomplish more. It’s a manageable approach helping to create a better brighter outcome. So what are we cooking this winter? We are simplifying.So many of us have reduced incomes in winter and tend to eat a lot of crap because it’s cheap, I am told. Well I don’t buy that. it’s cheap, nor do I buy the crap any more either. If you go with basic foods to start on your shopping list, then the snack items and sweets become “extras” and those are things we cannot afford right now. Now get your winter veggies please — carrots, cabbage, beets, potatoes, onions. They’re always available, not imported, and grown in Ontario. Cut them up, throw in a pot, cover with water, bring to a boil and simmer till done. Drain it, dish it up, add some butter and pepper and there you go. Or you can roast them all in the oven as well. We all need more produce in our daily diets, especially in winter. So this is the way to do it, when money is tight. Of course, you can buy and cook other veggies you like. Any of them are better for you than buying other processed, prepared, packaged, or

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KATE’S CORNER

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ready-to-eat foods. I am just pointing out the local, economical foods in my view. One exception is with fruits, though. Citrus fruits are at their peak in winter. So are bananas. We need them for potassium and for peanut butter! I like that. Of course, great Ontario apples area must and this is our fruit selection each week. I would rather spend $10 of my grocery budget on this, than any high calorie junk food. This is what you need to snack on, not chips and candy. That is for once in a blue moon because it just isn’t any good for you at all. So, again, make wise choices with what money you have. It will keep you healthier and happier. Now go and put on your assortment of vegetables to cook, fill the prettiest bowl you can find with your fresh fruit on your table. Bake or buy some healthy whole grain buns and maybe add a bit of good cheddar cheese. This is a decent winter meal. You need to eat real food to feel like a real person! You will recognize real food as it usually doesn’t have a nutrition label or product list stuck on it. Okay now let me know what your trying for your own self improvement this year, okay? E-mail me at kminaker53@yahoo.ca and we can share with readers. Remember to look forward to the new year and not back at the past. Bye for now.

Museums plan county trivia fundraiser

Do you think you know more about Prince Edward County than your friends? If so, the Museums of Prince Edward County have the event for you. On Wednesday, Feb. 20 at the Taskforce Lounge in the Wellington and District Community Centre, the museums are hosting a county trivia challenge. The event will feature teams of six competitors — individuals can sign up teams in advance or join teams when they arrive — facing off against one another to answer questions. There will be some great prizes and snacks available and the Heritage Week challenge will be a licenced event. Call 613-476-2148 ext. 258 or e-mail museums @pecounty.on.ca to RSVP. -Staff

25

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Bale wrap recycling touted as economical, environmental Loyalist students update localagriculture federation on status of project JAsOn pARks

Staff writer

GEttInG WRAppEd up Loyalist College businessprofessor Bob Millard and his students are looking to develop a bale wrap recycling program to help farmers within the Quinte. region. (Jason Parks/Gazette staff)

While added nutrition values and storage possibilities have made wrapped silage a must on most livestock farms, the disposal of the flimsy plastic casing continues to be a thorn in the side of all producers that utilize the feed advancement. Burning and burying huge amounts plastic wrapping has unfortunately been the normal on farm practice as recycling options for the material locally has been near non-existent. But those days may be changing as a group of business administration students are in the beginning stages of a farm plastics recycling program that could both help protect the environment and lower costs. Loyalist College professor Bob Millard and student

bale wrap project manager Jeremy Meyer laid out a bale wrap recycling project overview Thursday evening at the Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture annual general meeting in Bloomfield. The duo is touting a potential bale wrap recycling program that could not only lower the cost of the material for farmers but also provide environmental and social enhancements to the Quinte community. The initiative comes by way of the Loyalist branch of the Enactus program. Taken from “Entrepreneurship and Action for us,” Enactus is a competitive worldwide post secondary entrepreneurship program for business students that develop projects addressing social, economic and environmental con-

TRENVAL PARTNERS WITH SMALL BUSINESS CENTRE TO EXPAND SERVICE

plete a survey that indicates what farmers do with the wrap after they've used it. “I have a critical need the accurate numbers of what's being burnt and what's being buried so I can go to the government to find funding,” Millard said. “I need to gather as much data as possible. I have numbers on what's sold so we have an idea what's out there but we need to know the environmental impact. We want to work with you and develop a cooperative solution to this issue.” Millard said it's hoped this plan could come to fruition as quickly as possible and the goal is to eventually reclaim all agricultural plastics. During research, Millard has worked with Lynn Leavitt of Melmar Farms. Leavitt accumulate's just over 500 pounds of plastic in a month feeding his 300 head of cattle. Hallowell dairy farmer Don Williams said he's pleased to see a solution to the bale wrap issue coming forward. “This plastic is a tremendous tool that we as farmers use and it's been terrific but it is one major headache and if you guys can figure out a way of safely getting rid of it we will love you forever. We all detest it,” he said. In other PEFA news, Sophiasburgh poultry producer and past PEFA president John Thompson is returning to the head of the organization as he was elected 2013 president. Thompson replaces Hillier farmer Tom Bakker who served as president for the past three years.

Lawlor gives up role at Brighton agriculture ministry office

Left to right Sandy Abbott, Deb Williams, Amber Darling, Bruce Davis, Charlene Bessin, Harry Todd, Michelle Ryder Trenval Business Development Corporation is pleased to announce that it has partnered with the City of Belleville and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation (MEDI) to deliver small business counselling and information services to businesses operating in Belleville, Quinte West, Prince Edward County and Hastings County. The integration of federally-funded Trenval with the provincially/municipally-funded Small Business Centre will broaden the geographic reach and increase accessibility to the thousands of small businesses currently operating in this catchment area. “We are excited with this new delivery model, one of the first in the Province”, said Bruce Davis, Trenval’s Executive Director. “Combining the skill sets of both organizations can only result in a higher level of service for our small business clients”. Karen Poste, Belleville’s Economic Development Manager, adds, “This integration is just what small businesses in our region needs. Bringing these two well-known organizations together is a great fit for existing small businesses, as well as for aspiring entrepreneurs who are seeking support to get their business ideas to market.” In addition to its counselling and information services, a stand-alone Small Business Centre has always done a tremendous job in delivering workshops and seminars to small business. However, this integrative model will add a new dimension to the service offerings – financing. Trenval has been lending money to small businesses since 1987, and it is expected that this part of Trenval’s service will increase as a direct result of this broadened exposure to the small business sector. “We have assisted close to 700 small businesses with their financing needs – 48 in the past year alone”, says Davis. “We are able to help a small business in getting launched or to expand when conventional financing options are not possible. I know that there are other small businesses out there that we can help in a similar way. Tapping into the Small Business Centre’s network virtually guarantees it.”

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Recently the Trenval/Small Business Centre team held a focus group session attended by managers of many regional agencies that “touch” small business. Using their input, an operational plan is now being prepared that will encompass the identified needs of the small business community. It is fully expected that this plan will include a higher frequency of topical workshops and outreach activities, and a heightened profile within the local communities for the services that both Trenval and the Small Business Centre can provide. Trenval (613-961-7999) and the Small Business Centre (613-961-0590) are co-located at the Quinte Business Development Centre in the Pioneer Building of Loyalist College, 284B Wallbridge-Loyalist Road.

cerns in local communities. Meyer has developed FARM, (Full Circle Agriculture Recycle Management) a potential business based in Quinte that would see the collection and cleaning of bale wrap. As it stands now, the bale wrapping is far too dirty for a complete reclamation project to work and Meyer is looking into a process to clean the bale wrap in which he could utilize low skilled individuals from Pathways to Independence or similar organizations that help find roles for differently abled members of the community. “We've got a solid warehouse plan,” Meyer said. “We are still thinking about the logistics of collection, but our workers would sort it at a staging area, get all loose hay out of it, The plastic would be cleaned likely using a bath procedure and then our workers, hang the sheets of plastic in a drying process.” The reclaimed plastic would then be baled or cut into smaller pieces and be returned to a plastics manufacturing plant. While some plastics could be returned to back to bale wrap, lower grade plastics could be turned into composite decking and chairs or ceramic tile backing. The operation which addresses economical, social and environmental issues could become a non profit, self sustaining model rolled out all over Northeastern North America where bale warp is commonplace on most dairy and beef operations. Millard is currently asking local farmers to com-

A familiar face in the fields is retiring from his field. Eric Lawlor, an Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Regional Information Coordinator and Economic Development Consultant, retired from his post at the of end 2012. A Ministry representative since 1987, Lawlor was instrumental in connecting local producers with government run programs, assist in developing farm and rural business plans and strategies and as a point of contact for municipal government and farm organizations. While retired, Lawlor still took time to attend the recent Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Annual general meeting and was presented with a gift basket by secretary Patti Stacey on behalf of the membership. “Eric has been a very good friend to Prince Edward County for a number of years,” Stacey said. “He's always been there, no matter the task and he's done a great job for us always with a smile and great sense of humour. (He) will be missed.” Lawlor, who was sur-

ERIC LAWLOR

prised by the presentation, said he was very touched by the gesture. “If I did help someone in anyway, I guess it's been a success and my life will continue to be a success. Just because I'm not working for OMAFRA doesn't mean 'I'm going to stop helping people,” Lawlor said, adding the trips south from his Brighton office to the County were always enjoyable. “You people here in Prince Edward County have always been a delight to work with and I've always looked forward to coming here,” Lawlor said. -Jason Parks, Staff

26

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Egberts says model intends to take services out of hospital, not out of county

CUTS, from page 1

In addition to the above cuts, all outpatient physiotherapy will cease. QHC chief executive officer Mary Clare Egberts has been attempting to prepare the community for the past few months of the potential for a severe belt tightening but the news still hit the local community hard on Thursday. Egberts said QHC's worst case scenario is that, because of a decrease in funding through the Ministry's health-based allocation model, QHC will be short $10 million next year although they have yet to get any confirmation form the South East Local Health Integration Network. In trying to soothe a community that's fought for every bed and service at PECMH since the days of

hospital amalgamation, Egberts said the proposals are small part of a provincially sized picture when it comes to healthcare. “The community is concerned so I'm trying to take them to the provincial level. This is a huge transformation of the entire health-care system in Ontario including hospitals. It isn't about taking services out of the county, it's about changing how the services will be delivered in the county,” Egberts said. “Almost all hospitals across Ontario will have reduction in beds and the vision is that more patient care services are delivered in the community and by that, the hope is they are delivered in the patient's home...The fact the number of beds is going down really doesn't need to concern the patients that it's the end of their hospital, it's the impact on their hospital of the transfer of

services into the community, into doctor offices and into their own homes.” Ultimately, under the province's paradigm shift, the hospital is no longer the hub of the health-care wheel. “The vision is hospitals are no longer the centre of the health-care system. It's still important but the intent is they are only there to deal with the most sick, the highly acute patients at their specific portion of the journey,” she explained. Across the province, hospitals in low-growth areas are receiving a zero-per-cent increase in terms of funding while community health sectors are getting increases of up to four per cent under the new funding formula. Egberts said the switch in the direction of funding will build up health-care services in the community and should prove to be much more cost effective for

Ontario taxpayers. “This is designed to keep people healthy in their home and the entire system will transition to preventative management of people's health so they don't have to come to the emergency room for all their events like when their diabetes isn't under control, for example,” she said. The overall shift is bing made to make health care more sustainable for future generations. “When 46 cents of every tax dollar is spent on healthcare, there has to be a way to transfer care to more efficient, less expensive settings with less infrastructure costs,” said Egberts. In terms of what the cuts might mean to the proposed new Prince Edward County Memorial Hospital, Egberts said the vision remains the same. “The vision has not

changed at all,” she said. “(A new PECMH) may be a bit smaller, but the vision of working very closely with the family physicians in the total care of the patient remains very alive and well,” she said. One item the new hospital likely won't have is an endoscopy department. In spite of a high rate of success with the program that seems to run seamlessly and draw rave reviews at PECMH, it would likely wind up at Belleville General Hospital once that site has opened their new section of operating room suites. “I did push back when I heard the proposal to end endoscopies at PECMH but in order to support endoscopies you have to have a reprocessing area at the hospital and it's very inefficient to have one of those departments at each hospital. We greatly increase efficiency

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when we only have to maintain the infrastructure on two (BGH, TMH) reprocessing areas,” Egberts said. In total, QHC said the proposals could save the hospital $8 million on an annual basis once fully implemented. Egberts added there would need to be some discussion with the local LHIN as the proposals and the time frame simply do not provide QHC enough time to realize the complete scope of costs savings. “If it is the full $10 million next year, I don't think we could implement these programs in time to balance our budget. There just isn't enough time,” she said. While these are proposals and some items could be taken off the table, others would have to be put back on, she added. QHC says Residents of the area served by the hospital can go to the QHC web site at www.qhc.on.ca to learn more about the proposed changes and provide comments or questions. Alternatively they can call 613-969-7400, ext. 2027.

Local doctors seek alternate solutions

REACTION, from page 1

With only 26 babies on average being born here, the cessation of the delivering babies at PECMH in favour of a single birthing centre at Belleville General Hospital might seen moot, however, to some doctors, this practice is key to keeping up their skills. “The government has invested millions in the development of physicians and they want them to work to their full scope and the county doctors do just that. Sprague added the Queen's University Rural Medicine program routinely places 24 doctors on placement in Prince Edward County and many enjoy the ability to practice complete medicine including the delivering of babies. Recently, the PEFHT has been developing a 'Hospital at Home' program. The pilot project would see physicians and nurses administer care to patients in their home. “We believe we can care for very specific patients where they feel most comfortable at a much reduced cost,” Sprague said. “Unfortunately, these beds at PECMH could be gone before we even get a chance to launch a pilot project and see its impact.” Sprague said the program is currently lacking start up funding but the PEFHT in communication with the South Community Access Centre is trying move move the project ahead. Sprague said the physicians and staff members of the PEFHT will meet to discuss the proposed cuts this week. “They will meet and like always have in the past, they will generate creative solutions and ideas that will hopefully be heard. We are never asked in advance of the announcement of these proposals and we always wonder why,” he added.

27

The Picton Gazette THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Loyalist donation referred to budget process

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College requests $250,000 from municipality for technology, sciences centre ChadIbbotson

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A donation to support the campaign for Loyalist College will be among the issues debated by council during the upcoming budget process. Officials from Loyalist were in Prince Edward County last week where they asked the municipality for a $250,000 donation for the new Sustainable Skills, Technology and Life Sciences Centre. Councillor Bev Campbell put forward a motion to refer the request to the 2013 budget process, moving the discussion to next month at the earliest. The 121,900 square-foot skills centre was constructed 2010-2011 with the provincial and federal government's pitching in $16.6 million. The college is in the midst of a campaign to raise an additional $6 million — $5 million to equip the centre and a further $1 million for student financial assistance — and is ask-

‘There are hundreds of students from the county studying at Loyalist.’

M. PIERCY COLLEGE PRESIDENT

ing municipalities in the region for their support. To date $4.5 million has been raised. The City of Belleville has contributed $500,000, Quinte West has also contributed $500,000 and Hastings County has contributed $350,000. Capital campaign cochair Bernie Ouellet and Loyalist College president Maureen Piercy asked county council last week to consider contributing to the cause. “We're revisiting all other area municipalities in hope that over the next five

years those corporations could make a pledge on our behalf,” Ouellet said. “We're so close and we believe in this so strongly.” Piercy said the focus is on equipping the centre. She said the centre would hold life sciences labs which would be unequalled in the province. She said studies point to a shortage of skilled tradespeople in the future. “Our skills centre will help us and help our community meet this demand to stay ahead of the curve,” she said. She said any financial donation from the county would be an investment in the health of the economy and community. “There are hundreds of students from the county studying at Loyalist this year and every year. There are hundreds of Loyalist grads contributing to the success of the economy in the county,” said Piercy. She also noted that the college's graduation and

placement rates are significantly and consistently higher than the provincial average. Piercy said the college would be making similar presentations to about 15 municipalities in the region. The financial donations would be payable over a number of years.

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Draft code of conduct reviewed Councillors asked for input on policing their own actions Chad Ibbotson

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Councillors got their first look at a draft code of conduct for members of council last week. Mayor Peter Mertens brought forward the draft code at council's committee-of-the-whole meeting last Wednesday. Members of council will now submit their input on the code and their proposed revisions, deletions or additions before the mayor brings a report back to the Feb. 14 committee-ofthe-whole meeting with a second draft reflecting the

comments. Councillor Terry Shortt was supportive of the principle. “It never hurts to have a code of conduct. This simply gives us some rules to live by as we have our discussions around the table,” he said. “To this point we've done a good job of respecting each other, but to have something down on paper to refer to, I don't have a problem with that.” Councillor Alec Lunn expressed some concern regarding the complaint procedure, which would come into effect if individuals

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weren't following the code. He said the procedure could be inviting councillors to critique each other's behaviour. “I'm concerned we're going to be looking at each other's behaviour personally and picking at it,” he said. The code of conduct covers areas such as conflict of interest, integrity, relationship with employees, and gifts, hospitality and benefits.

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The Picton Gazette

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

MILFORD WINTER CARNIVAL JANUARY 25 26, 2013 sponsored by The South Marysburgh Recreation Committee

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 MOUNT TABOR

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25 MILFORD TOWN HALL 5:00 - 7:00pm

2:30pm Free Family Movie, Popcorn & Drinks

Chili Dinner

Rolls, apple crisp bottled water, tea & coffee Adults $8 Children $4

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 MILFORD TOWN HALL 8:00 - 11:00am

7:15pm Fireworks

Pancake Breakfast

(supplied by QEOS)

7:30pm Family Bingo

Adults $7 Children $3

$1 per card for all night

FAIRGROUNDS

Prizes!

11:00am Onward Free Hot Chocolate, Hot Dogs, Coffee Free Horse Drawn Wagon Rides Kids Games Ice Sculpture (events subject to change)

Broker Member of the Quinte & District Association of Realtors and The Toronto Real Estate Board

BLACK RIVER SAND & GRAVEL Bill & Mary Creasy

HE

FOR M IL

D WINTE

RC

geoffchurch@sympatico.ca 104 Picton Main Street, Picton, ON K0K 2T0

w w w. m y c o u n t y h o m e . c o m

s k o rRoIC B nLECT h o • RESIDENTIAL J E • COMMERCIAL • FARM WIRING

A RN IVA L!

E NJO YT

RR 2, Milford 476-8010 Meet your neighbours at the Carnival

BUS: 613.476.2700 TOLL FREE: 877.476.0096 FAX: 613.476.4883

“FREE ESTIMATES”

R R 9, PICTON

476-3757

BLACK RIVER TREE SERVICE Stump Grinding Tree Trimming and Removal Brush Chipping Lot Clearing Cabling & Bracing Fully Insured Over 15 Years Experience

JOEL WALKER —ELECTRIC—

Come on out to see your friends & neighbours! Glenn & Barb Guernsey

Residential and Farm Wiring Farm Generator Sales and Service

R.R. 3 PICTON

613-476-4700

WALKER’S GARAGE 1955 Cty. Rd. 17

one mile east of Milford

613.476.2837

Come to the Winter Carnival! COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE CARE Free Vehicle Pickup & Delivery

We’ll race you there!

476-5295

What’s OLD is NEW Again! Retro-Look Frames at a Great Price.

See you at the Milford Winter Carnival

Enjoy the Winter Carnival!

C.F. EVANS LUMBER CO. LTD.

... then roll on over to

B L AC K R I V E R C H E E SE ! HOME OF AWARD-WINNING FINE ARTISAN CHEESE OPEN DAILY 9-5

ȪȪt County Road 13t.ĶĹijļĿı www.blackrivercheese.com

Serving the County and beyond for over 30 years

297 Main St., Picton

613-476-1655

56 MAIN ST., PICTON 613-476-2446


Picton Gazette Jan 17 2013