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“ You don’t take a photograph, you make it” - Ansel Adams

Issue 001 Fall 2012

The Download Zooming into 100% with Pro Retoucher S T EVE PIN TER

CHRISTOPHER MORRIS

talks about inspiration, his rise through photojournalism & shooting the

2012 LONDON OLYMPICS Kids in the Frame: by MA RY JEN SEN

Quest for the Right Light: Increasing Real-Estate Values with Great Photography by R I C HA R D HULBERT

Plus How It’s Lit by WAYNE HOECHERL

Photo Tours to the

American Southwest & Yunnan China Masters in the Haus: Douglas Kirkland Greg Gorman Don Giannatti Freeman Patterson Eddie Soloway

vancouverphotoworkshops.com photohaus magazine fall 2012 1 VANCOUVER PHOTO WORKSHOPS FALL COURSE LISTINGS INSIDE

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

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a letter from the director

I

t is with great excitement that I welcome you to this first edition of PhotoHaus, the new magazine produced and published by the team at Vancouver Photo Workshops (VPW) and PhotoHaus Gallery. PhotoHaus Magazine is written by photographers for photographers.We at VPW and PhotoHaus are passionate about photographic education, and we aim to infuse this same passion into each and every issue of PhotoHaus Magazine with a carefully curated selection of information and inspiration pertaining to the craft of image making. We’ll feature articles focusing on fine-art and commercial photography alongside interviews with up-and-coming as well as seasoned photographic professionals. Finally, our educational section will provide you with tips, tricks and technical know-how to take your photographic skills to the next level. PhotoHaus Magazine is written for you. Whether you’re a fresh beginner, aspiring amateur or seasoned professional, we’re inviting you into our photographic family where we hope to showcase new work, share valuable insights and nurture this creative community.

meet the team

contents 04 th e in te r view

with Christopher Morris

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th e lig h t

Marc & Xenija Koegel – Our Fearless Leaders

Marc and Xenija (pronounced Zen-yeah!) hail from a far-off land called Deutschland. They opened the doors to VPW over 8 years ago and have been educating the creative masses and throwing fabulous studio parties ever since. Their kids Mila and Max can often be found tearing the office apart with youthful abandon. Marc is an award-winning fine art photographer, traveling the globe producing beautiful nude and landscape photography. He’s a borderline photo gear hoarder, a diet-coke-aholic and devoted family man. Xenija keeps us all in line with an iron fist and great big smile. She’s crazy about her kids, she’s the glue that keeps us together and the way to her heart is with blueberry bread.

Christa LeCraw – Business Development Manager Christa’s checkered past in production and arts-related management lead her to VPW | Photohaus this summer, where she does a little bit of everything. She’s a sailor, a foodie (but hates sushi) and is the trusted guardian of our faithful office mutt “Chewy”.

Wayne Hoecherl – Studio Manager A veteran editorial fashion & portrait photographer, Wayne’s been with us for 3 years and rules the studio as our in-house lighting guru and all-around fix-it master. Wayne loves long walks and good green tea. He never cries at movies, has been nominated for a Juno, and wishes he could fly.

with Wayne Hoecherl

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th e pro file

Katie Huisman

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vpw co u rs e listin g s

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que st fo r th e r ig h t lig h t by Christa Lecraw

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in crease re a l e sta te va lue s with ph o to g ra phy by Richard Hulbert

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kids in th e f ra m e Richard Amies – We Don’t Know What He Does Here A jack of all trades and a master at...most of them! Richard is our resident designer, carpenter and one of the best photo assistants in town. He makes proper English tea, loves sandwiches and is nearly incomprehensible on the telephone.

by Mary Jensen

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th e d own lo a d

with Steve Pinter

Ronnie Lee Hill – Office Manager New to the VPW team, Ronnie keeps the day-to-day in order and keeps smiles on everyone’s faces by making sure the candy machine never runs dry. She has a soft spot for the three B’s: Beers, Beards and Beaches (not necessarily in that order)

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master cla s s s e r ie s Cover Image © Christopher Morris All images contained with are © Vancouver Photo Workshops and its contributors

Times they are a changin’... ...Well to be more specific the studio is. We are currently improving our space to serve you better, so we apologize in advance for any minor renovation mess. We can still accomodate small shoots in our studio space and workshops are running as usual. Please contact Ronnie with any questions or booking enquiries. 14 West 7th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Y 1L6 | 778 898 5256 | info@vancouverphotoworkshops.com

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

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CHRISTOPHER MORRIS

F

or local photojournalist Christopher Morris, shooting the 2010 Winter Olympics on home turf was a triumphant and well-deserved win in a twenty five year climb up the steep road to a successful career in photography. Two years later, his determination,  ambition  and passion are taking him across the pond to shoot the London 2012 Games.We caught up with Christopher shortly before he hit the road for his second go at this dream assignment.

the the inte r v iew work - just loving it. And that was long before I knew who Annie Leibovitz was. I had no idea. She wasn’t huge then because we are talking, like, 1984 when I would have been looking at that book. Another photographer whose work I loved, and I still love, is Ernst Haas. Just really phenomenal work. Those were some of the early influences. Now, some of the photographers that I think are phenomenal are Dan Winters, Chris Buck, Gregory Heisler…those are some of the photographers working now whose photography I think is fabulous.

After I quit school, I went to work in my stepfather’s used bookstore. That gave me a little bit of money to pay for film. I had a darkroom in my basement where I would process my own film. My first job in photography was as an assistant. A neighbour of mine had a commercial studio. I worked there for about a year - just long enough to realize I didn’t want to be a commercial photographer. Actually, going into it I knew I wanted to be a photojournalist. I saw this movie [Under Fire with Nick Nolte] that depicted a photojournalist and that sort of sealed the deal for me.

What was your first assignment as a photojournalist? After I quit working at the studio, I started working freelance - and I use the term loosely. I quit to go work at a local paper. I worked there for free at first. When I was getting paid I was getting $10 per assignment and that included expenses. I was using my darkroom in the basement. That was such a great experience because it was my first experience where the pictures had to come out. I had never, before that, shot under pressure. I had to shoot pictures where, if they didn’t turn out, I was screwed. There was someone who needed results and they needed to be good! I tried to go to as many events around the city as I could find. Montreal was having a mayoral race and I went to cover the debate. I met a photographer there - he suggested that I go see the photo editor at Canadian Press because he was known for mentoring young photographers. So I called him up and he said ‘yeah how about we meet Monday morning?’ That weekend there was also the collegiate football championships and I went to shoot them. There was a photographer from Canadian Press there and I talked to him and he said ‘why don’t you come with me, we’ll soup your film and see how it looks…’ because I had told him I was meeting with the photo editor the next morning. We processed my film and I had a picture that he liked so that went out on the wire. That was a great introduction to the photo editor - when he came in the next morning - I already had a picture out on the Canadian Press wire! That’s really what it took. And that’s what I don’t think some people understand, is how hard you have to work, and how much initiative you have to take.You really can’t sit at home and wait for the phone to ring. The only way you’re going to get work is if you go out and chase it down, wrestle it to the ground and make it yours. That was a great introduction for me and it showed the editor that I had initiative - that I was going to go out and do things. He was probably the toughest boss I’ll ever have but he was fair. I still talk to him and he’s probably the only one that ever sat me down and tried to teach me lessons in photography.

Who were some of the first photographers that inspired you and are there any photographers whose work you admire now? I look at a ton of photography. Two of the first photographers that I remember were Mary Ellen Mark and Annie Leibovitz. My stepfather used to save photography books for me. He’d save anything that looked remotely interesting. There was this book that profiled Mary Ellen Mark and Annie Leibovitz. I remember being just blown away by their

How did you come to shoot the 2010 Winter Olympics and who were you shooting for? I shot the Vancouver Olympics for Corbis. I’ve been a Corbis contributor for about ten or twelve years and before that I was with an agency called SABA Press Photos. I think I’d been with SABA for about eight years when Corbis bought out SABA. It was at a time when Corbis and Getty were going around buying up every agency on the planet. SABA was one of the small agencies made up of about fifty-

When did you first know that you wanted to be a photographer? In University I was going to be a lawyer. I was doing a history poly-sci undergrad degree at Carlton University - the ‘quintessential’ under-grad degree for law school. I just realized that I hated school, so I quit. I had been interested in photography in high school. Then sports and girls became way more interesting than photography.When I was in university people would ask ‘what did I major in?’ and I said ‘I majored in beer and I minored in squash.’ One of the things that I never cease to see the humour in is the fact that I failed math in high school and now there are times, when it comes to the technical aspect of photography, that I have to explain math to people. So I tell them, ‘if I can get this, you can get this’, because I have no capacity for math. So my academic career was an inauspicious one to say the least.

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five photographers. It got bought up and suddenly I found myself as part of the collective. It was sort of like we’d been absorbed by the Borg. That’s the way it felt at the time, but Corbis has been really good for me. I worked for Corbis for the 2010 Olympics and I’m going to London for them in a couple of weeks. I’d say probably the reason why I’ve had such a good experience at Corbis is because I’ve dealt with some really good people and right now, one of the best people I’ve dealt with is my editor Seth. He

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and I are going to be working together in London and I am just over the moon. I’m really pumped and excited - I haven’t shot the summer games before. Working with Seth, my editor, is just going to be fabulous. This may sound ridiculous, and maybe it is, but I would say that it is harder to go to the Olympics as a photographer than it is as an athlete. There are fewer photographers at the Olympics than there are athletes. A lot of photographers that have been there, some of them are on their tenth

or twelfth Olympics. Every Olympic games, probably eighty percent of the athletes are new whereas for photographers, probably seventy percent of them have done it before, so the turnover of photographers that shoot the Olympics is low. It is humbling to be included in that group, because it is a really elite club and sometimes I question whether I should be there. The Olympics is the Olympics for the athletes but it is also the Olympics for the photographers!

Was 2010 your first experience shooting an Olympic games? Yes it was. As a freelancer at Canadian Press and Reuters I was always so jealous of the photographers going off to shoot the Olympics. It was only the best that were chosen to go and to go now is really a privilege. Were you with the same editor in 2010? Yes, but he was in LA, so I was just transmitting >>

The only way you’re going to get work

is if you go out and chase it down, wrestle it to the ground and make it yours

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

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“The number one thing that affects photographers is access...the correlation between access and the quality of the pictures is a straight line” pictures directly to him. In London he’ll probably be at half the venues I’m at, so I’ll just hand him cards and that will give me the opportunity to shoot more. I’m hoping to do the same thing that I did in Vancouver, which is to shoot two events a day. It’s grueling. I think the most sleep I got during the Olympics was five hours a night. On more than one occasion I got just two hours of sleep. I’d finish transmitting pictures at two am and then I’d have to get up at four to get the position I wanted at the venue. Getting through security with bags of gear is always a hassle - you just have to resign yourself to the fact that it’s just a part of the Olympics. Unfortunately, it’s the world we live in now. I spend more time getting through security and waiting for an event to start than I do shooting. Shooting time per day is maybe three or four hours and then the other fourteen hours is getting to and from venues, through security, downloading cards, editing, processing, ‘FTPing’ them…that’s the vast majority of it. The proportion of shooting to other stuff is the same in all of photography. Whether it’s talking to clients, billing clients, doing paper work, filling out insurance forms, permits...it’s all the same. The photography is the fun part and it’s all the other stuff before and after that makes the photography possible. Do you choose the events that you shoot at the Olympics? That is something that Seth and I will discuss, but the criteria is: what will make great pictures? I’m already thinking of ideas. I already have an idea - if I can make it work - the logistics of this are horrific, but I would love to shoot a picture at Wimbledon centre-

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

court with a perspective control [tilt–shift] lens just focused on the base line, and that needs to be fired with a remote camera up in the top row. That’s a picture that I’m already visualizing in my mind. I positioned some remotes at the 2010 games but I’m hoping to position at least one remote at every venue I go to, which will be hard. It’s really good to go into these events with an idea of what I want to do because the best pictures are usually made - they are planned in advance. But at the Olympics there are a lot of restrictions about what I can do and access, so that all needs to be negotiated. And you have to do that yourself [position your remote cameras]? Yes. I don’t have any minions. [laughs] And the thing is, I wouldn’t want someone to install a remote for me because shooting a remote picture is no different from looking through the viewfinder and pushing the shutter and I don’t want anyone else doing that for me either. So, you know, you can sleep when you’re dead…nobody gets any sleep during the Olympics…it’s just one of those things. They’re eighteen to twenty hour days. You start installing remotes at 6 am but even before that, I go and put my bag down to secure my spot. You’re not supposed to do that but there’s a sort of honour among thieves - that if somebody’s bag is there, you don’t move their stuff and take their spot. Not all photographers honour that code but for the most part it’s something that people respect. So, I’ll put my bag down and then wait for maybe three, four, five hours for the event to begin. We call that ‘hurry up and wait’. Then I shoot. Hopefully I’ll shoot some

great pictures. If there is any break in the action I’ll download the cards or give them to my editor. After the event is over, download the cards, back them up, then pack up and go to the next event and do it all over again. I’ll maybe finish up at around eleven o’clock at night. If I’m waiting for four or five hours at the next event, that’ll give me some time to edit my pictures. There is no WiFi at the Olympics - you have to go to the press centre to plug in to get an Internet connection. So if I’m not using my laptop, I’ll take my stuff that I don’t need, like my rolling bag and my hard drives, and I’ll stake out my spot in the press room and then go out and shoot the event. But if I can, I’ll do all that editing sitting in my spot while I’m waiting for the next event and get everything queued up. That means selected, all the post processing, cropped and captioned. Captioning is a pain in the ass because you’ve got to make sure everyone is identified. That’s very time consuming, making sure that the captions are accurate because a great picture is useless without an equally good caption. Sometimes it means hauling my computer around asking people at the event, ‘Who is this? Do you recognize this athlete?’ In some sports the numbers are really obvious but in others [they’re not], or if you’re doing something more artistic like a pan or a blur, sometimes it’s hard to figure out who’s who. So you try to track down a coach or somebody from the team who can help you identify them. Does your editor help you with that? He will, yeah. That’s what I’m looking forward to. I’ll hand him the cards and say ‘have fun Seth’ and go off and shoot some more. I’m hoping to get more shooting in, but that may be offset by the additional security and the hassle of getting around London. That’s the thing - the Olympics is all about the logistics. It’s no different from a studio photographer who spends three or four days pre-planning a shoot…and then another week or two on the other end working on all the other elements. It’s the same idea - it’s the logistics. People think it’s so glamorous, and truth be told it is great - you get a front row seat to history - but people don’t understand the amount of work that goes into getting to the spot where you are shooting - to where you have your hand on your camera. So that’ll be my Olympics. Some people say ‘Aw, you’re so lucky you get to go to London and sit in the pub and drink beer!’ Yeah, that’s exactly what I’ll be doing – sitting in the pub and drinking beer, shooting the odd picture as somebody runs by. [laughs] Which events are high on your priority list? Events that I think will make cool pictures. Track cycling, diving, gymnastics, BMX...I also like the pictures from the white water events. The kayaking is really cool…I think that will make for some good pictures. This will probably be my only opportunity to shoot at centre-court at Wimbledon. I don’t know that I can make that happen but I’m hoping I can work that in. The marathon. The marathon is where the Olympics started and it’s also one of the few events where I will be able to situate the games in London. Beach Volleyball is another one that will be great because they’re putting a beach vancouverphotoworkshops.com

in front of the Royal Horse Guards Parade, which is supposed to have a really spectacular background and you can situate it in London. Triathlon - I have to shoot some triathlon because my wife is a triathlete and if I don’t she’ll kill me [laughs]. But another reason I want to shoot triathlon is because there’s a good story. The Brownlee brothers from Britain are very likely to finish first and second in the men’s triathlon. Another good story will be the women’s boxing. There’s an American woman who is slated to be the next Mohammed Ali. She’s set to dominate the sport and that’s a great story. That means I need to do research going into the games, to know what’s important and to know what’s going to make for interesting pictures. The pictures that I’m shooting are not for the newspapers the next day…. these are for long term. I need to take the long view on this, so these have to be pictures that will sell between now and the next summer games. That’s what Corbis wants me to shoot, and what I want to shoot, because to me that’s more interesting - pictures that stand on their own merit, as opposed to just a record of somebody who did something on a specific day and, really, the picture doesn’t have any photographic merit but it has interest just because it was interesting at that particular moment in time. Those kinds of pictures I’m not as interested in making. I want to make the kind of pictures that, a year from now, two years from now, somebody will look at and go ‘Wow that’s cool. I like that’. What gear is in your bag? Everything. Everything but lights and a tripod. You are not allowed to use flashes, so no strobes. Tripods are not allowed at the Olympics - they take up too much space. I will be taking four or five camera bodies. I’ll be using two Nikon D4’s, a D800, a D3 and a D700 - probably shooting with two or three bodies in the spot that I’m in, and another one or two installed as remotes. Nikon has been fabulous. They’re helping me out with gear. I’ll need two 1724mm’s because if one is stashed away somewhere on a remote, I need to have one with me as well.The lenses that I need doubles of are the 14-24mm and the 70-200mm. There are certainly sports where a 600mm is what I need - Nikon will be there with a huge pool of equipment that I can borrow on a daily basis. Of my own gear I will have two 14-24’s, 24-70, two 70-200 f/2.8’s, 1.4x extender, 1.7x extender and a 200-400. That will probably be my main lens for the long lens stuff. When necessary I will borrow from Nikon a 500 or a 600 or a 400 f/2.8. I wheel it all around in a rolling Think Tank bag so I don’t

severely compress my vertebrae. I’ll also have a backpack to move that amount of gear around. When you’re working long days any unnecessary gear just makes your day longer and harder. You’re slower and it takes longer to get from place to place. You’ve got to be smart about what you’re using. It sounds like a lot of gear but I’ve thought long and hard about every piece of it. Is there anything you learned from 2010 that will help you in London this time around?

out to the Richmond oval, I know Cypress, I know Whistler, I know BC place…what Skytrain to get off at. Just getting around London I know I’m going to get on the wrong Tube and end up going in the wrong direction, so everything is going to take me that much longer, but I am as prepared as possible for the logistics. I tell all my students that the number one thing that affects photographers is access - the access you have, meaning the access to locations and access to somebody’s time. The correlation between access and the quality of the pictures is a straight line. It’s very difficult to get access during the Olympics, to be where you want to be, to make the pictures you want to make and it can be very frustrating. I have to work hard to play well with the other children. I, like most photographers, don’t respond well to being told ‘no’. I know where I need to be to make the picture. So I guess the biggest thing that I learned in Vancouver would be patience, which doesn’t come easily to me when I’m working. It’s hard to be patient. The reality is, getting worked up about stuff like that is counter-productive because it makes the days harder and longer. The amount of energy you have in a given day is finite and if you waste a lot of it getting frustrated and upset it’s not productive.

“The Olympics is the Olympics for the athletes but it is also the Olympics for the photographers!”

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Yes - how to manage the logistics. I was very fortunate going into the 2010 Olympics, I’ve got some very good friends - Andy Clark and Nick Didlick who, between the two of them, have probably shot nearly twenty Olympics. I sat down with both of them. Nick was actually the Photo Manager for the entire Olympics so he’s over in London now. And another friend of mine who is the Photo Venue Manager is also in London now. So that’s certainly helpful because I can email them and they can give me the heads up about what to expect. But the biggest unknown for me, the advantage that I had that I’m losing - and I know this isn’t your question - but I had home field advantage in Vancouver. I know how to get around Vancouver, I’d shot in all the venues before because I shot all the test events. I’d been

There is already enough pressure on you to get the shots that you are there to get… Yeah, absolutely. While it’s a privilege to be among the world’s best photographers, it’s a tremendous amount of pressure. Their pictures are going to be out there instantly and my editor can see those pictures, and if I’m sitting in the same spot as where those pictures came from… I better bloody well have those pictures. That’s why I’m paid to be there.

If there is one piece of advice that you could give someone wanting to start a career in photojournalism, what would it be? Shoot every single day. Go out and shoot. Probably the best place to start is the local minor league baseball field, or soccer field or something like that to hone your skills and just be out there shooting. My father was a creative director at a number of different ad agencies and a writer came in to see him one day to try to get work. My father said to him ‘what did you write today?’ and the guy said to him ‘well I didn’t write anything because I’m going around talking to people like you…’ and my father looked at him and said ‘well you’re not a writer today.’ If you didn’t write anything today, then you’re not a writer today.’ And if you didn’t shoot any pictures today then you can’t call yourself a photographer today. Check the VPW course listings for Christopher’s upcoming workshops

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th e lig ht the b reakd ow n Canon T3i body Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens shutter speed 1/200 aperture f/20 Profoto Pro-7b battery pack beauty dish with grid

the d iagram

the s nap s hot

H OW IT’ S LIT BY WAYN E H OE CH E R L This shot is a reminder of the importance of thinking on your feet. We were shooting in studio but when I saw this sky, I decided to go up on the roof to take advantage of the natural drama.We stood the model on a platform draped in black fabric to get her above the roof line and shot from a very low angle to create that imposing, powerful feel. I under-exposed the background by stopping down my lens to f/20 [”proper” exposure would have been approximately f/8] and lit her with a single gridded beauty dish to play up the drama and angular lines of the face. This look can be taken further by adding a 2nd

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

or 3rd source for a rim light. If you’re blessed with the sun shining through the clouds, then use it as a rim or backlight. I decided to work with the single light and let all the drama come from the sky. Remember to keep an eye on your background. I had to shift my angle of view to ensure I had the best clouds in frame. Some subtle post-production including contrast and colour biasing as well as some retoucihng on the model complete the effect. Wayne teaches one-day fashion and creative lighting workshops at VPW

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th e profile

KATI E H U I SMAN Katie Huisman is a photographer, filmmaker, curator and lecturer. She produces, directs and shoots video-based work and short films collaborating with choreographers, musicians and other artists. Currently, she is producing a series of documentary films exploring contemporary artists who have become masters in their fields. This work recognizes the importance of cultural documentation and preservation. Katie has developed a series of fine art/photography workshops that facilitate critical thinking and constructive dialogue while implementing knowledge of historical reference and contemporary ideas. All of her workshops place a strong focus on style development and conceptual ideals.

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

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VANCOUVERPHOTOWORKSHOPS.COM Level 1 - beginner Introduction to DSLR Photography 10 Sessions

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Intermediate DSLR Intensive Weekend 2 Days Our Intermediate DSLR Photography course condensed into one weekend for maximum immersion into photography, giving you maximum learning potential.

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03/11/12

Canon 29/09/12

Intermediate DSLR Photography

$295 Saturday

14/08/12

DSLR Bootcamp

Level 2 - intermediate

1 Day

Thursdays

1900 - 2200

vancouverphotoworkshops.com

Fall/Winter Course Listings 2012 Adobe Photoshop for Photographers 10 Sessions Photoshop is a huge program with many applications. We’ve designed this course specifically for photographers, distilling Photoshop down to focus on the key tools that will help you enhance the quality of your images.

$350 26/09/12

Wednesdays

1900 - 2200

Adobe Lightroom Retouching Semi - Private (max 6 students)

Level 3 - advanced Creative Lighting 1 Day This premium, intensive day of shooting is a format unique to VPW and will have you creating interesting and intriguing, images using top models and lighting equipment under the guidance of one of our most creative and seasoned photographers, Wayne Hoecherl..

$225 09/09/12

Sunday

0900 - 1700

1 Day 24/11/12 Saturday 0900 - 1700 From portraits to landscapes to architecture, Lightroom has amazing tools to help you get the most out of your images. This semi-private workshop, limited to 6 participants, will teach you Small Strobes Bootcamp how to use the Lightroom Develop module to its full creative 2 Days potential with lots of hands-on and personal instruction. This workshop, lead by acclaimed local photojournalist $135 Christopher Morris, is designed for all you Strobists out there, looking not only to practice your skills in a professional 13/10/12 Saturday 1000 - 1700 environment but also to pick up additional tips and tricks that take your images to the next level.

Adobe Photoshop for Photographers Intensive Weekend 2 Days You’ll be surprised at how much you can learn in just one intensive weekend. You’ll leave this workshop with a better understanding of basic Photoshop functions and how to apply them to your images for impressive final results.

$195 17/11/12

Sat & Sun

1000 - 1700

$350 20/10/12

Sat & Sun

0900 - 1700

3rd Annual

OPEN HOUSE & SEMINAR EVENT Saturday September 8 2012 10:00 am to 08:00 pm Join us in kicking off a new season!

10:00 - 1:00

Indulge in gourmet coffee and pastries from our friendly neighbours at Cocoa Nymph

12:00 - 7:00

Enjoy delicious BBQ eats and cold drinks

10:00 - 7:00

Browse our community Photo Gear Garage Sale

Advanced Studio Lighting 8 Sessions Lighting is one of the most important characteristics that can make or break a photograph. In a market flooded with images, skillful lighting can take your images to the next level and get you noticed. This course is designed to deepen your understanding of how light works, both from a technical as well as a creative approach.

$350 31/10/12

Wednesdays

1900 - 2200

Advanced Lighting for Portraiture 1 Day This workshop is a continuation of “Studio Lighting for Portraiture”. Demonstrations and a hands-on photo session with professional models will help students build striking lighting set-ups.

Enter the raffle to win fabulous Grand Prizes

EXCLUSIVE SEMINARS RUNNING10:00 - 6:30 TICKETS JUST $35 FOR UP TO 3 SEMINARS Choose from over 20 different seminars presented by some of Vancouver’s top photo pros. Check our website for seminar schedule and full event details.

$150 19/08/12

Sunday

1000 - 1700

18/11/12

Sunday

1000 - 1700

BBQ COUPON FOR SEMINAR PARTICIPANTS present this coupon with your seminar ticket and receive a free lunch item and ice cold drink

vancouverphotoworkshops.com info@vancouverphotoworkshops.com

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photohaus magazine fall 2012

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specialty workshops

Fine Art Long Exposure

Peak Action & Sports Photography

2 Days

2.5 Days This hands-on workshop focuses on capturing peak action with perfect timing, clean composition and powerful lighting. After an introductory evening lecture, you’ll spend the weekend shooting on location with skilled athletes using professional strobe lighting and walk away with jaw-dropping images.

Take advantage of Vancouver’s natural and urban landscapes with this one-of-a-kind weekend workshop lead by VPW director Marc Koegel. You’ll learn how to make stunning black and white images using long exposures, and more importantly, how to visualize a monochromatic composition.

Hands-On HDR

1 Day This workshop looks at how the process of HDR imaging can improve your photography for many different subjects. We will discuss how to know when HDR is the right technique for the final image you want to produce, and work through the process $295 of creating effective, jaw-dropping HDR images. 13/10/12

$195

26/08/12

Sunday

0900 - 1700

27/10/12

Saturday

0900 - 1700

Exhibition & Critique 12 Sessions Photography is an exciting way of seeing & sharing your vision with your audience. This course focuses on concept development & critique while working toward having a successful exhibition. You will be supported in recognizing and developing your visual integrity and will be rewarded with a group exhibition at the PhotoHaus Gallery.

$395 06/09/12

Thursdays

1700 - 2200

10 Sessions

Style & Portfolio Development 10 Sessions

6 Sessions

$295

16/10/12

Tuesdays

1900 - 2200

Photographing Kids

22/10/12

13/11/12

5 Sessions

Mon 1900 - 2200 Tue 0900 - 1200

This hands-on portrait photography workshop builds on the foundation of traditional
portrait lighting styles and posing to explore more relaxed, candid contemporary
portraiture. Students will be guided through the process of lighting, posing and building rapport to produce creative and compelling portraits of our professional models.

$295 22/11/12

This workshop is designed exclusively for women who are drawn to fine art nude photography. Through lectures and workshops you’ll explore evocative lighting concepts with an emphasis on figurative language. Regular critique sessions will encourage critical thinking and aesthetic awareness and help you to grow as an artist.

$195

Thursdays

1900 - 2200

Mondays

1830 - 2130

Pinhole Photography 2 Days In this digital age of megapixels and megabites, a step back into retro photographic processes can be a fresh and inspiring perspective on creative photography. In this workshop the basics of photography will be explored through the construction of a simple box camera. You’ll be surprised and delighted by the unexpected images created using this historical process.

$295 08/12/12

1000 - 1700

1900 - 2200

Femme Fatale

2 Days Mini landscapes and colourful abstacts are limited only by your imagination. Macro photography opens up endless possibilities for $350 the photo enthusiast. 22/10/12 Sat & Sun

Tuesdays

Creative People Photography

Kids are impetuous, unpredictable and absolutely full of energy…so how do photographers get them to sit still for the camera? This workshop is a glimpse at some tricks of the trade, with a hands-on BYOK (Bring-Your-Own-Kid) shooting session to put your newfound skills to the test.

9 Sessions

Macro Photography

Photographing the Nude

$350

$595 0900 - 1200

Fri 1900 - 2200 Sat & Sun 1000 - 1700

Discover and develop your style as a photographer with this lecture series. We’ll discuss the intricacies of compositional language, how the human eye reads imagery and trends in the contemporary visual world.

$195

Tuesdays

03/11/12

This course lays the foundation for photographing the nude by building on traditional figure study to create contemporary nude portraiture. You’ll explore the intricacies of conceptualization, direction and retouching to create arresting images that communicate character and mood through visual design.

Spanning the genres of Travel, Street and Architectural Photography, this course will help propel your photography to the next level. Whether you are interested in recording and documenting buildings, or artistically interpreting urban environments through photography, this course will be fun, informative and will help you produce great work.

15/09/12

1000 - 1700

1.5 Days

Architecture & the Urban Environment

11/09/12

Sat & Sun

$350

Sat & Sun

1000 - 1700

Femme Fatale Intensive Weekend 2.5 Days

The Business of Photography 2.5 Days We are proud to offer you what we believe is the most comprehensive, informative and currently viable workshop on business for photographers. We’ll cover all of the must-know aspects of running a successful commercial photography to give you your best shot at success in today’s image creation industry and a leg up on the competition.

$195 21/09/12

Fri 1900 - 2200 Sat & Sun 1000 - 1700

Fashion Photography Workshop 1 Day In this intensive, one day workshop, you’ll learn how to create impeccable lighting, to be a masterful director, and most importantly, to refine your sensibility for current trends in the industry. Be prepared for a jam-packed day of hands-on lighting and shooting.

Our fine art nude photography course designed exclusively for women, condensed into an intensive and inspiring weekend experience.

$295 22/10/12

Fri 1900 - 2200 Sat & Sun 1000 - 1700

Fine Art Black & White Nude & Figure Photography 2 Days The goal of this workshop is not only to have you walk away with stunning images; our aim is to introduce you to a different way of seeing and to ignite your passion for the creative process through the fine art nude.

$350 27/10/12

Sat & Sun

1000 - 1700

$195 28/10/12

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Sunday

0900 - 1700

photohaus magazine fall 2012

vancouverphotoworkshops.com

master classes

photo tours

Greg Gorman

Photo Tour: World Heritage Urban Destination Quebec City

Weekend Workshop Vancouver Photo Workshops proudly presents this intensive weekend workshop, “Greg Gorman on Portraiture” with internationally acclaimed photographer Greg Gorman.

7 Days

Join photographers Richard Hulbert and Marc Koegel in le Vieux-Québec for a photographic experience steeped in history. Set in beautiful Vancouver, British Columbia, this is an incredible Imagine 7 days of visual delights in one of the select UNESCO opportunity to expand your visual horizons under the guidance World Heritage Cities on the planet . . . Old Quebec City, of one of the great masters in contemporary photography. Take Quebec, Canada part and experience a renewed sense of energy, inspiration and $1695 vitality in your photography. Sept 22 - 29, 2012

$1295

31/08/12

See Website

Fri, Sat & Sun

Photo Tour: Southwestern USA 7 Days

Don Giannatti: Learn to Light

Follow veteran photographer Kaj R. Svensson through his favourite photography destination. Kaj will guide you through one of America’s most striking landscapes on a photographic journey Vancouver Photo Workshops proudly presents this intensive two day hands-on workshop,”Learn to Light” with internationally designed specifically to maximize your shooting opportunities. renowned photographer and workshop leader Don Giannatti. You’re sure to come away from this trip with the best travel After the great sucess of Don’s workshop in 2011, we knew we photos you’ve ever made. had to get im back to Vancouver! Contact us for pricing and itinerary details Weekend Workshop

This is really like no other workshop out there!

$650 13/10/12

See Website

Sat & Sun

Oct 14 to 21, 2012

Photo Tour: Yunnan, China 14 days

Eddie Soloway: A Natural Eye Weekend Workshop Vancouver Photo Workshops proudly presents this exclusive weekend workshop, “A Natural Eye” with acclaimed photographer Eddie Soloway from Santa Fe. In this weekend workshop, you’ll have a chance to explore photography and the natural world with master landscape photographer Eddie Soloway.

Yunnan, in southwestern China, is a region made famous for its natural beauty and cultural diversity. This photo tour is a oncein-a-lifetime adventure to a land with natural features unlike anything found North America, and a culture rich in history and tradition. Your photo guide will help you capture the magic of this place with travel photos as vivid as this exotic landscape.

Contact us for pricing and itinerary details

Check out our website for earlybird discounts on select workshops and courses. Register for any of our courses and workshops using our secure, fast and convenient online registration system. We accept Visa and Mastercard for online registrations. Debit, cash and cheques are accepted in person at our Vancouver studio. Hours of Operation: Monday to Friday 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm info@vancouverphotoworkshops.com 778.898.5256 Course details and dates are subject to change. Please visit

Mar 17 to 31, 2013

Eddie is a respected educator with a great ability to inspire and reinvigorate photographers.

$650 30/11/12

See Website

Fri, Sat & Sun

World Heritage Photo Tours

Douglas Kirkland Weekend Workshop Vancouver Photo Workshops proudly presents this exclusive weekend workshop, “A Master Class with Douglas Kirkland” with iconic photographer Douglas Kirkland from Los Angeles. This will be Douglas’s first ever workshop conducted in Vancouver, and VPW is proud to be bringing him up here! This workshop is for aspiring and professional photographers that are looking to advance their photographic skills to a level only an iconic photographer like Douglas Kirkland can elicit. During this weekend workshop, Douglas Kirkland will give students exposure into the mind of one of the photo industry’s most influential artists.

$1100 18/01/12

See Website

Le Vieux-Québec has survived and thrived as an historic urban destination that is today a travel photographer’s paradise. Experience the Old City, and its four centuries of history, alongside international awardwinning Architect, Urban Designer, and Photographer Richard Hulbert MRAIC, FRAIC, RCA, AIA 
and with the expert guidance of international award-winning Photographer, Educator and Director of Vancouver Photo Workshop, Marc Koegel. This photo tour is designed for avid travellers with a passion for photography, architecture and history. You’ll come away from this tour with enough memories, stories and travel photos to last a lifetime.

Fri, Sat & Sun

Freeman Patterson JUST ANNOUNCED! Freeman Patterson will be returnng to Vancouver in January 2013. Check website for full details.

vancouverphotoworkshops.com

Quebec City, Canada

7 Days Sept 22 - 29, 2012 photohaus magazine fall 2012

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AMERICAN

SOUTHWEST PHOTO TOUR

Certain things catch your eye, but pursue only those that capture your heart.

- Unknown

It’s high noon and I’m standing on the surface of the moon being buffeted by a hot cross-breeze. The vista that unfolds before me is otherworldly. Red and white rock collides into a jagged layer cake of ancient history, and it’s so arresting that I can’t look away. This is the American Southwest…specifically; the Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada, and it’s the last stop on a week-long road trip that has taken me from Las Vegas, east to the South Rim of the majestic Grand Canyon, then north to the awe-inspiring Bryce Canyon and finally to this wind-swept land so ancient and arid that it’s like being swallowed by a classic western film. The sun, heat and wide-open space were a welcome respite from the long dreary Vancouver winter, and as I drove in a wide arc around the Southwest Mountain States I was surprised, almost hourly, at how much the landscape changed. Mocha-coloured flatlands would suddenly drop away into gaping canyons. Rolling ranch land would spring up into majestic red spires reaching for the sky. From a photographer’s perspective, the aesthetic appeal of the terrain is undeniable, but it’s the history of the place that gives depth to the dramatic panorama. Prehistoric humans occupied the Valley of Fire as early as 300 B.C. and their legacy is left behind in scores of petroglyphs peppering the red rock formations. In recent history it was the early settlers whose romantic tales of conquering this rugged frontier were, until this journey, only the stuff of Hollywood flicks. The reality is even more enchanting than the fiction. By Christa LeCraw

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vancouverphotoworkshops.com

Yunnan

China

PHOTO TOUR

Yunnan China is famous for its striking scenery, eclectic culture and diverse ethnic population. Colours and textures are bountiful in this varied landscape, providing endless inspiration for adventure-seeking photographers.

Photographers have unique travel habits. We like to take our time, and wait until the light is just right. We plan our days around those magic sunrise and sunset hours and lug around heavy gear to capture the magic before us. Vancouver Photo Workshops is partnering with Silkway Travel & Cruise to bring a new travel experience to photography enthusiasts with tours designed specifically to maximize photographic opportunities in some of the world’s most breathtaking natural and urban settings. Join our experienced photography guides in discovering new corners of the world while capturing it all in the best travel photos you’ve ever taken.

Visit www.vancouverphotoworkshops.com for full details.

vancouverphotoworkshops.com

photohaus magazine fall 2012

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KIDS IN THE

FRAME BY MARY L G JENSEN -nationally accredited portrait photographer MPA, F/PPABC

INCREASING REAL-ESTATE VALUES WITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY Richard Hulbert Did you catch the article in the Wall Street Journal regarding how real estate listings with better photos command higher prices? There are teachable techniques for increasing the bottom line for Real Estate Professionals. One of the essential skills in real estate photography is learning how to convey the impression or illusion of 3-dimensional space in a 2-dimensional image. If we turn to lessons learned from the movie industry, we can glean some valuable, simple-to-execute techniques. After all, cinematographers have been exploring ways to portray the “real” world on the silver screen for well over half a century. My passion for architecture and photography has lead me to teaching, where I often explore the notion of depth cues in buildings and how to recognize them. Using these “depth cues” can help you better portray the interiors and exteriors of buildings and land holdings in your photography.

MRAIC, FRAIC, RCA, AIA

Let’s touch on three of these depth cues here: Vertical and Horizontal Planes Think of the walls and floors of buildings and rooms as physical planes that, if composed appropriately, can make a huge difference in creating a feeling of 3D space. The location of the camera relative to these planes has a significant effect on the creation of the sense of depth for the prospective buyer.

The only way to photograph children is to get them to come to you. What I mean is, you need to engage them and get them interested in doing what you want them to do; Sit up straight? Look at the camera? Smile? Get your finger out of your nose? They have no interest in doing what you want just because you want it. You have to make them want it — and I find the way to get kids to want what I want, is to make it fun! It’s important to focus entirely on the kids while you’ve got their attention, and that means being set up and 100% ready for them. It’s no fun running after kids while dealing with technical glitches. You have to plan ahead, be prepared, and do what it takes to make it happen. Then, you can achieve great lighting, great backgrounds and great expressions, all in one frame. Mary will be teaching a new workshop on photographing children in October. See VPW course listings for fulll details.

Subject or Object Overlaps Overlapping objects add to the feeling of depth. The staging or placement of furnishings in a photograph can increase the perception of depth. Windows and doorways can be used to further provide a sense of depth. Photographing through portals from one room to another can set up a great on-line or on-paper home tour for a potential buyer. Size Progression of Like Elements When the viewer of a photo senses like elements that get progressively smaller or larger, the notion of depth is enhanced. These elements might be columns, windows, light fixtures,or patterns in the floor or ceiling of buildings that can be used to advantage.

For a hands-on photography experience covering real estate, architecture and design, check out Richard’s VPW course listings.

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th e d ow nloa d

wi th

St e ve Pin t er

In this climate where the creative tides are rising, Pinter is staying afloat by adapting to new technologies & evolving his aproach to digital imaging.

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here were you born? Vancouver. I always joke that I am one of three people actually born in Vancouver. When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? Race car mechanic. My parents taped an interview with me when I was two or three years old and I say ‘I want to fix race cars.’ My insensitive dad asks ‘1969 Chevys?’ I say ‘no, I want to fix green ones.’ I now take that to indicate Lotus or Aston Martin. You know, British racing green. What is your absolute, can't live without, favorite Photoshop tool? Curves What is your most used/ useful Keyboard short cut? That's easy. Command Z [undo] Canon or Nikon and why? The contrarian in me says ‘why so narrow minded?’ How about Apple iPhone for snaps, Fuji X100 for serious snaps, Hasselblad and PhaseOne for serious work? I have a soft spot for old Pentax glass so I use a Pentax K-5 for my personal work. There are bits of C and N gear that intrigue me....Canon's TS-E 17mm f/4 and Nikon's D800 come to mind. So, can I mount the TS-E 17mm on the D800? Of course not. Do you use any other software in your workflow? Yes, Lightroom, Capture One, Phocus, Photomatix, Modo

vancouverphotoworkshops.com

What are your thoughts on CGI and how do you see it impacting the photography industry? I see CGI as just another tool in the arsenal of image making. Does it really matter if the image was created entirely in CGI or shot in camera or a Photoshop composite of dozens of images? In the end if you create a compelling image, how you got there is irrelevant. As far as how it is impacting the photography industry - anything that needs to look perfect - a car, bottle of beer, a wristwatch, or cosmetic product - these are already transitioning to CGI. It's the best way to represent these objects. Now a photographer can lament the loss of work in these categories or see an opportunity to be the visionary (read: Director or DOP) in the CGI studio. What is the photographer's number one talent? Seeing light. It doen’t matter if it’s film or digital or CGI - that eye for quality of light is what is needed to make that great image. Do you think there's still a place for darkroom and other conventional processes? Yes. I have a lot of respect for B&W printing - seeing the image come up in the developer. It's still magic to me. But, I find that I don't have the precise control, the repeatability that I have gotten used to with Photoshop....and I don't miss the chemistry. What other types of media inform your work? I love to look at painting - the Dutch masters in particular. It is amazing how they made such photorealistic images with the careful application of dabs of paint. I find it incredible to look at a painting and see the detail, the brilliance, and then look closely and see what tricks they played on the eye. Who are the photographers you'd absolutely love to work with? What photographers, dead or alive, inspire you? Elliott Erwitt is my all time favourite photographer. I love his sense of humour. He is a keen observer of people and he finds humour just about anywhere. Micheal Kenna, for his beautiful B&W work and his reserved style of presentation. Arnold Newman, for his portraits. And W. Eugene Smith, for some of the most compelling prints I have ever seen. What's your favourite blog or website? www.aphotoeditor.com www.macperformanceguide.com Does the Mac or PC debate really matter, or does it all come down to Adobe? This is the same as the C vs N debate. It is a religious war and you can not reason with fanatics. Either platform is a viable choice.

What’s your favourite visually inspiring film? Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon - some of the most beautiful cinematography in film. Any thoughts on the future of the photography industry? Adapt or die. There will be even more rapid changes than what we have seen in the past ten years. We have to be open to changing expectations from clients seeing opportunities as change comes. Some kinds of photography will be going away, but new opportunities with present themselves. Don't be average. The bottom is pushing upwards. The low end is getting better and you have to offer something extraordinary to not be drowned in the rising tide.

Do you listen to music while working at the computer? Depends on the kind of work I am doing. Sometimes I need total silence to concentrate on the task at hand. Other times I have either instrumental music, vocal music, or even podcasts like This American Life and Radiolab and All Songs Considered playing. Sometimes I have an audiobook playing. That's how I "read" the Steve Jobs Biography. How else do you like to spend your time, when you're not tethered to a computer screen? I am the current custodian two fine old Studebakers. Wash and drive.

Steve will be teaching a Photoshop course at Vancouver Photo Workshops starting September 26. See VPW course listings for fulll details

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a master class with

D OU G L A S K I RK L A ND See a master at work and gain a more intimate understanding of that special connection between a photographer and his subject This workshop is a rare opportunity for aspiring and professional photographers alike, to advance their photographic skills under the guidance of one of the industry’s most influential artists. Mr Kirkland lifelong commitment to the pursuit of creative excellence is what drives our industry forward, and to experience such vigor straight from the source is an opportunity NOT TO BE MISSED.

January 18, 19 & 20 2013

learn to light with

DON GIANNATTI

GREG GORMAN on portraiture

Real world information you can use immediately to increase the level of your photography. And it is intensive... no sitting around, no wasted time, we even shoot through lunch! This is like no other workshop out there.

Be inspired and guided by a true Master. Shoot amazing models, all cast by Mr Gorman himself, at incredible locations. And because this is a true Greg Gorman Workshop experience, we have even thought about the wine. Take part and experience a renewed sense of energy, inspiration and vitality in your photography.

October 13 & 14 2012

August 31, September 1 & 2 2012

for full details on our master class series, visit us online 18

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WEST 7 STUDIOS O P E N I N G FA L L 2 0 1 2 A N E W C R E AT I V E S PA C E

STUDIOS the natural eye with

14 WEST 7TH AVE, VANCOUVER BC TEL: 778.734.0222

a master class with

EDDIE SOLOWAY Freeman Patterson Set in beautiful Vancouver British Columbia, this master class will expand your visual horizons and stretch your creative potential. Study under one of the great masters in contemporary photography and walk away with renewed confidence in your potential as an artist and photographer

Allow your intuition to guide your creative response and gain an enlightened perspective on landscape photography. This workshop is a chance to transcend technical concerns and focus on the art and craft of fine image making. You’ll learn to respond to the essence of the landscape around you and to translate that vision into successful imagery.

November 30, December 1 & 2 2012

JUST ANNOUNCED FOR 2013

www.vancouverphotoworkshops.com/masterphotoseries vancouverphotoworkshops.com

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PHOTO H A U S GALLERY

Fall|Winter Exhibitions 09|07|12 C H I C [Open Call for submissions]

Elegant and stylishly fashionable. Submission deadline: 08.17.12 Visit us online for more details.

09|28|12 N U D E I N T H E H O U S E One house. One Model. Twelve photographers. Thirty minutes each.

10|12|12 P H O T O C L U B V A N C O U V E R 11|02|12 U N A S S I S T E D

A group show featuring work from Vancouver’s past and present photography assistants. Please contact us at info@photohausgallery.com for submission criterea

11|23|12 E X H I B I T - C

A photographic exhibition featuring the work of ourexhibition and critique students, curated by katie huisman at PhotoHaus gallery

12|14|12 W I N T E R S A L O N [Open Call for submissions] An inspired collection of affordable photography.

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PhotoHaus Gallery 14 West 7th Avenue Vancouver, BC V5Y 1L6 Canada info@photohausgallery.com www.photohausgallery.com vancouverphotoworkshops.com


PhotoHaus Magazine Issue 001