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STRIP MINING: WITH DEVELOPMENT ON THE WAY, WILL THE STRIP DISTRICT HOLD ONTO ITS CHARM? 06

EVENTS 8.28 – 11am POP GENERATION For the generation that inspired Warhol, Pop Generation is a new program exclusively for older adults, age 65 and over. Tickets $10/FREE Members

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

André Costello and the Cool Minors 10.3 – 8pm

11.21 – 8pm ISABELLA ROSSELLINI IN GREEN PORNO Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Warhol theater | Tickets $10/$8 Members & students | visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes the Pittsburgh-based trio André Costello and the Cool Minors to our intimate theater, celebrating their debut release on Wild Kindness Records. This special multi-media performance will feature the trio performing with projections comprised of various found footage from the 1950’s, including public service announcements on coal mining, the suburbs, space missions, sensory deprivation and drive-in ephemera, as well as their “visual EP”, Summer’s Best (2014).

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THE BEST IN CITY LIVING

08.27/09.03.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 35

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[MAIN FEATURE] got to be a sense of urgency going 18 “There’s into the season, and if we don’t step it up now, Cleveland is going to come into our house and beat us.” — Steelers defensive end Cam Heyward on the team’s preseason performance against Philadelphia. City Paper looks at the pros and cons of the upcoming Steelers season in our annual Steelers preview.

[NEWS] challenges are to keep the Strip 06 “The District real and authentic.” — Architect Daniel Rothschild on the effect an influx of residents will have on the historic neighborhood

[TASTE] a beef burger with shaved kielbasa 28 “It’s and onion-bacon sauerkraut on it.” — Heinz Field’s new Emperor Burger

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

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{ADVERTISING}

“When you say you have The Wonder Years, they’re like, ‘OK, make an offer.’” — Four Chord Music Festival organizer Rishi Bahl on working with booking agents

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER}

[SCREEN] to be a hard fact that there 52 “Itis noseems such thing as a ‘retired’ spy.” — Al Hoff on the new espionage thriller The November Man

[ARTS] building the sculpture in public, 54 “We’re because we want to show people exactly what the program is like.” — Marcus Rettig of Hazelwood’s Mobile Sculpture Workshop

[LAST PAGE] want to watch the Steelers game?” 78 “Don’t — A handy flow chart

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 60 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 70 STUFF WE LIKE 71 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 72 NEWS

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STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“THE CHALLENGES ARE TO KEEP THE STRIP DISTRICT REAL AND AUTHENTIC.”

INCOMING Re: Point of Law: Do ‘safe passing’ regulations really make it safer for cyclists if they’re not enforced? (Aug. 20) “Pittsburgh cops could go undercover as bicyclists and issue citations to vehicle drivers who break these laws, like they did in Houston. … [Make] an example out of disrespectful drivers and those with no regard for other human lives, making the roads safer, and more revenue for the city in the form of tickets? Sounds like a win-win.” — Web comment from “Nicole MK” “Everyone knows this is a law that cannot be enforced (same as the cell-phone-texting law). Please explain to me how a vehicle is going to keep a 4-foot distance with a bicycle rider when the bicycle rider does not have a designated lane. The law should require bike riders to stay to the far right, no weaving in and out of traffic, stop for stop signs and red lights, etc. Bicycle riders have to have some responsibility when riding on roads.” — Web comment from “Patrick Simpson” “The problem is that [the law is] not advertised. A new law like that needs to be disseminated to the public, and nobody has heard of it other than cyclists. Too much energy in promoting deadly bike lanes (like the downhill door-zone lane on Liberty Avenue) detracts from promoting more sensible measures.“ — Web comment from “Dan Sullivan” “So many people are unwilling to open their mind, leave the status quo behind and learn new ideas. There are vast wonderful worlds out there for those who choose to adapt and change. As a cyclist, I am not asking you to share your roads. I am exercising my right to use our roads and hoping that you will open your heart and mind to respect that right and see all the good that comes from our efforts.” — Web comment from “papyroy”

“Coach Tomlin, this is Snoop Dogg. Man, fire that motherfucker and get us a real offensive coordinator. We ain’t won a playoff game since we had this motherfucker. Shit!” — Excerpt of an Aug. 21 Instagram rant about Pittsburgh offensive coordinator Todd Haley from Snoop Dogg, hip-hop artist and Steelers fan, during the Steelers preseason game against Philadelphia

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STRIP LIVING {PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN COLOMBO/FURNISHINGS BY MAHLA & CO. ANTIQUES}

T

AKE A STROLL down Penn Avenue

in the Strip District and you get the sense of a neighborhood stuck in time. Vendors and shops line the streets much like they have for the past 50 years, selling produce, fresh seafood, Steelers memorabilia and more. But as you venture onto Penn’s parallel streets closer to the river, you can’t help but notice things are changing. Here, tractor trailers on their way to and from Smallman Street’s produce warehouses dodge pedestrians navigating narrow, fragmented sidewalks, and residents walk their dogs along railroad tracks lined with upscale restaurants. The influx of residents calling the Strip District home marks yet another shift in the neighborhood’s history — and that increase in residents is set to skyrocket. Over the next few years, the Strip District could welcome as many as 1,400 residential units, as at least seven developers

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

vie to rehabilitate dilapidated factories and vacant lots. But they could have an unforeseen impact on the neighborhood’s diversity, nighttime economy and overall identity. “The challenges are to keep the Strip District real and authentic,” says Daniel Rothschild, president of Rothschild Doyno Collaborative, an architecture and urban-

Will more residents change the Strip District’s historic landscape? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} design firm in the Strip District. “It’s one of the most vibrant shopping districts we have and has that old-world feeling that most cities covet. So the challenge for us is to make sure we don’t disturb that.” According to a 2002 report by students at the University of Pittsburgh, there were an estimated 266 residents living in the

Strip District in 2000. (The population was nearly the same in 1990, at 275.) A decade later, that number has ballooned to more than 600, according to the most recent U.S. Census data and that figure could triple after proposed developments are completed. Residential developments in the neighborhood began to pick up steam in 2007, when the 400-unit Cork Factory building opened. Shortly after, the Otto Milk condos followed suit with 82 units. Like these developments, the residential units in the works will cater to residents with higher incomes than those traditionally found in the Strip. Before 2000, three quarters of the 58 families living in the neighborhood made less than $25,000 a year. Today, with one-bedroom condos in the Otto Milk Building selling for almost $300,000, the median income in the neighborhood is also rising. From 1999 to 2009, the median household income in the Strip CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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District rose from $55,000 to $75,000, according to census data. While Becky Rodgers, executive director of community organization Neighbors in the Strip, is a proponent of residential development in the neighborhood, she worries the pending residential projects will have a negative impact on economic diversity. “We’re very supportive of residential development, especially when it’s rehabbing old buildings,” Rodgers says. “But I would love to see more diversity in the price of housing.” Among the projects currently under construction are 11 homes priced at $1 million or more. And while price details for the other projects aren’t known, Rodgers says she anticipates they will similarly be luxury housing and worries that high rents will exclude young professionals. Rents at the Cork Factory range from $1,500 to $4,000. Rodgers would like to see rents as low as $750. “What can we do to get the government to do that? Even if it’s a small percentage of the housing being built,” Rodgers says. “I know the developers are doing it to make money. I know money is tight for all government agencies, but it seems to me there has to be a way everyone gives a little to keep the diversity.” In order to maintain the Strip’s diversity, state Sen. Wayne Fontana says Neighbors in the Strip should look at what residents have done to fight for affordable housing in the lower Hill District development. In residential projects that use public subsidies, community groups can require developers to set aside a number of affordable housing units. “That’s something that needs to be considered,” Fontana says. Rothschild agreed saying, “One only need to look at the lower Hill District to see the importance of the community voicing their interest in maintaining diversity through affordable housing.” The Urban Redevelopment Authority and city planning department did not respond to requests for comment. However, of the seven residential projects in the works, only one includes a request for public funds. So far at least, residential developments have attracted a somewhat diverse population that also includes young professionals. “I like that you can walk to pretty much everything you need, and you are still very close to Downtown amenities, but you don’t have to pay quite as much as apartments that are right Downtown,” says 29-year-old Amanda Roll, who lives in the Cork Factory. “The location is terrific,” says 70-yearold Richard Nimtz, who moved into the Cork Factory three years ago. The Cork Factory was built in part by Chuck Hammel, president of Pitt-Ohio

trucking company. Hammel is currently involved in plans for two more developments: One involves 11 luxury homes in an old warehouse at 25th and Smallman that are currently under construction, and the other, a plan to repurpose one of his truck terminals along the riverfront to build a 300-unit apartment complex between 25th and 26th streets. Hammel has also thrown his hat into the ring, as part of McCaffrey Interests, to bid on the Strip District’s most high-profile development: the Pennsylvania Railroad Fruit Auction & Sales terminal building. McCaffrey is among three developers hoping to be selected by the city to develop the historic site.

A LIST OF RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPERS WITH PROJECTS

PLANNED FOR THE STRIP DISTRICT: OXFORD DEVELOPMENT: 299 units on the riverfront between 26th and 27th

SCHREIBER REAL ESTATE: 59 units at Smallman and 11th

SAMPSON MORRIS GROUP: 144 units at 1501 Penn Ave.

CHUCK HAMMEL:11 units at 25th and Smallman INDOVINA ASSOCIATES: 14 units at 3155 Penn Ave.

JACK BENHOFF: 40 units at 2419 Smallman St. ZAMAGIAS PROPERTIES: 72 units at 1627 Penn Ave. *Plans for the historic produce terminal have not been finalized, but as many as 600 more units could go in at that location.

“The city’s decision is going to be very important to the Strip,” Rodgers says. “Will it enhance what’s here or detract?” Hammel’s Pitt-Ohio trucking company has been a staple of the Strip District for years, but he’s in the process of relocating his terminal to Harmar as a result of changes in the Strip District — changes he helped usher in as one of the developers of the Cork Factory. “When we moved to the Strip District back in the late ’60s, the only thing that was happening in the Strip District were a bunch of old warehouses,” Hammel says. “You didn’t have the traffic; you didn’t have the pedestrians. Frankly, it’s still locationwise the best place we could be, but to me it just became too dangerous to run trucks in and out of a heavily populated area.” Along with the neighborhood’s trucking terminals, another part of the Strip’s identity is its nightclubs. The Strip District’s reputation as a nightlife destination has increased and decreased over the years as a result of crime, but since 2000, crime in the Strip has decreased by 75 percent and nightclubs have again become a staple of the neighborhood. Chris Firman is a partner in Static and Xtaza two nightclubs in the Strip. Over the near-decade he’s been a stakeholder in the CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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neighborhood, he says he’s seen a number of improvements, and he welcomes more. “We support all of the residential developments,” Firman says. “I think it’s going to positively impact the nightlife and businesses.” While Firman welcomes the new development, local DJ Aaron Clark worries he and others like him will soon have to relocate after-hours events they hold at Club Pittsburgh, a venue in the Strip District. “We know that we’ll have to go eventually because it’s inevitable,” Clark says. “Residents are always going to complain about noise, even if the noise was there first.” Hot Mass, the after-hours cooperative event Clark helps organize with several others, brings in noted DJs from around the globe. The event’s central location makes is a draw for locals coming from areas across the city, and its proximity to nearby hotels makes it easier for organizers to find lodging for visiting artists, says Clark. But Clark doesn’t know how long the events will continue after the completion of a 59-unit development set to be located a block from Club Pittsburgh, at 1100 Smallman St. He anticipates neighbors will complain about the noise. Rodgers didn’t comment on the Hot Mass events specifically, but said daytime and nighttime businesses are going to have to make “adjustments.” But if businesses don’t break the law, including having “music at a certain level, they’re entitled to their freedoms to operate their business. If a

nighttime business is doing that, everyone can live together peacefully,” Rodgers says. Still, Clark worries about other business owners being displaced as landlords look for ways to capitalize on the impending development. “It’s a lot of people that are going to move in,” Clark says. “The thing is, do all of these businesses that have been there forever own their buildings? If they’re leasing space, that’s where it gets tricky, because landlords only see dollar signs.” Despite Clark’s concerns, several local business owners are excited to have more residents in their neighborhood. Pamela’s Diner co-owner Gail Klingensmith says she and her partner chose the Strip District to expand their franchise because of its neighborhood feel and more residents will only add to it. “Even when there were not a lot of people living there, there was a neighborhood feel,” says Klingensmith. “We loved the neighborhood, we loved the diversity.” In the 10 years since Klingensmith opened the Strip District location, she says the neighborhood has steadily improved. And she doesn’t see the neighborhood losing its identity anytime soon. “If I could live anywhere in the city, I would buy a unit in the Strip District, and I’m 60,” Klingensmith says. “There’s so much culture and diversity there and everyone is welcome. It’s a multi-ethnic neighborhood. Everyone has a little bit of ownership there.” RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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RENEE WILSON GRAY has memories of the police officer who lived three doors down from her childhood house in Homewood. “They cared about the community they were policing, because it was their community,” she says. “They knew who was the bad apples and they knew who was the good apples.” Gray was a teenager in 1975, the year a federal judge mandated the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police hire black and white officers in equal numbers, a response to charges of racial discrimination in hiring. And while the quota system had its share of critics, “It certainly diversified the bureau and it gave opportunity to people who otherwise historically were being excluded,” says Beth Pittinger, executive director of the Citizen Police Review Board. In 1990, the year before a different judge dissolved the quota system, 22.2 percent of the force was black and nearly 77 percent white, according to a 2002 CPRB report. Today, though, 13 years after the quota system was abolished, the force is getting less diverse. Only 13 percent of city police officers are black, while 85 percent are white, according to the bureau’s recently released 2013 annual report. That’s a 2 percentage-point decrease in black officers since 2012. By contrast, 26 percent of the city’s population is black, 2010 census data show. And according to a 2012 American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit alleging a “practice of systemic disparate treatment” of African Americans “causing a significant statistical imbalance in hiring,” just 14 out of 368 officers hired between 2001 and 2012 were African-American — only 3.8 percent. “That number’s going to keep dropping because most of your African-American officers came in a long time ago with the [consent] decree,” says Pennsylvania ACLU legal director Vic Walczak, who notes the ACLU is in the middle of settlement negotiations with the city in the discrimination lawsuit. The lack of diversity isn’t just a problem of optics, say many activists and residents: It can lead to less effective policing, and produce mistrust like the kind that has been boiling over in days of protests over the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. “At the foundation of the problems in Ferguson are the same racial disparities

that exist in Pittsburgh,” says Paradise Gray, a local hip-hop artist and activist, who is married to Renee Wilson Gray. He quickly lists other incidents in Pittsburgh in which unarmed black men wound up in violent confrontations with police — from Jordan Miles to Leon Ford, who was shot several times during a traffic stop in Highland Park. These incidents, Gray believes, could have been defused by officers with better relationships with the people they police. “When a police officer looks at a 13-yearold white kid, he sees his son,” Gray says, but when it’s a black teenager, “he sees him as a threat and as a grown man.” For their part, city officials acknowledge there’s a diversity problem and say they’ll be coming up with “recruitment strategies” in September. “There’s a dynamic going on in public safety in general, where those jobs are not for whatever reason […] highly sought after” by minority candidates, says public-safety spokesperson Sonya Toler. While Toler declined to comment on the ACLU suit, she acknowledges there is “room for improvement” on diversity throughout the city’s Department of Public Safety. Mayoral spokesperson Tim McNulty wrote in an email that the city is working on several initiatives to address “minority presence in the police bureau,” including offering incentives to Pittsburgh Public Schools graduates, recruiting in “economically depressed cities with high minority populations” and expanding pretest preparation for the fitness and oral interview elements of the hiring process. “It’s certainly a complicated issue, but one the city is committed to tackling,” McNulty says. And while there are clearly a number of factors at work in shaping the relationship minority communities have with the police, there is a sense of urgency for Renee Wilson Gray, the 53-year-old who grew up in Homewood. She explains that when they were growing up, she told her four children not to go anywhere alone and to be careful at night: Even if you’re doing nothing wrong, people, including police, will be suspicious. “It’s very scary for a black mother,” she says. “Every day when they leave outside, you don’t know if they’re coming back.”

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2014 STEELERS PREVIEW

FIVE REASONS THE 2014 STEELERS ARE

DESTINED FOR GLORY Ben Roethlisberger (left) should be no stranger to touchdown celebrations this season.

Hint: a lot depends on the no-huddle offense {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

N

OT MUCH WENT right for the Steelers in 2013, least of

all when it counted. They dropped the first four games of the season and six of their first eight before rebounding for a 6-2 record in the second half. And while their playoff hopes were alive — at least mathematically — until the last day of the season, their future had already been determined long before then. “We didn’t do enough,” Coach Mike Tomlin said in the press conference that ended the team’s second straight 8-8 season. “We didn’t do enough, particularly early this year.” But at least one aspect of last season does bode well:

Through tinkering with what was broken, the Steelers found a way to turn their season around. It wasn’t enough, but it was also no easy feat, given how the team started. “There are a lot of reasons to be optimistic about what transpired when you look at it over the course of the season,” Tomlin said. “But at the same time, as I look back at the body of work … you’ve got to acknowledge we are what we are — and that’s an 8-8 football team on the outside looking in.” But this year will be different. The team is younger and faster, and the players are hungry in a division full of teams that are also in transition. There’s also history on the line: Since 1971, no Steelers team has ever posted three consecutive non-winning seasons. The Steelers have put the past behind them, or so Tomlin said at the start of training camp: “I’m singularly focused on the now. I’m going to sell that

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

2014 STEELERS PREVIEW

FIVE REASONS THE 2014 STEELERS ARE

DESTINED FOR DISASTER The young Steelers defense could find itself manhandled all season long. {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

The Black-and-Gold could be facing a transition year — again {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

P

RIOR TO THE START of the 2013 season, there were a lot of questions surrounding the Steelers, who had gone 8-8 the previous year. The running game had been nonexistent, quarterback Ben Roethlisberger spent a lot of time on his back and a lot of time arguing with offensive coordinator Todd Haley. There had been key free-agent losses, like receiver Mike Wallace, while the defense was getting older and slower. But during last year’s training camp, you’d have been hardpressed to find a player willing to say the Steelers were in

trouble. “We don’t rebuild,” cornerback Ike Taylor said at the time. “We reload.” But after going 8-8 again last year, it seemed like the team had been loading up with blanks. And this year, rebuilding looks like the team’s only option. There’s a good chance the Steelers can improve upon last year’s performance, but a lot has to go right. And if the team’s third preseason game — the traditional bellwether for how a team will look in the regular season — was any indication, missing the playoffs for the third straight year is as real a possibility as being the next AFC champions. Factor in a latebreaking off-field distraction — a traffic stop in which marijuana was found in a car containing starting running back Le’Veon Bell and backup LaGarrette Blount— and the negative vibes start to stack up.

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to the football team. We don’t need to carry last year’s baggage.” And while he’s known for spouting great lines, it’s easy to believe Tomlin that the Steelers will see success in 2014. Here are five reasons why … and a focus on the no-huddle features in almost all of them.

HEAD COACH MIKE TOMLIN The way some fans and pundits have called for Mike Tomlin’s head the past several seasons, you’d never know that he’d brought the team to two Super Bowls, won one and posted a career record as head coach that sits at 30 games over .500. In fact, notwithstanding his back-to-back 8-8 seasons, Tomlin has never had a losing campaign — something neither Chuck Noll nor Bill Cowher could boast. That record comes from his ability to adapt to adversity. Critics will point to last season’s disastrous 2-6 start as a negative. And while that start is the reason the Steelers failed to make the playoffs, Tomlin’s response — like his decision to introduce more no-huddle offense — paid off. And while last year the Steelers moved to a new defensive philosophy that emphasized the outside pass rush, they were trying to do it with an older, slower defense. This year, Tomlin — a coach with a history of sticking with proven veterans — made some big personnel moves, and now his defense is younger and faster. It remains to be seen how effective that defense can be (see “Five Reasons the 2014 Steelers Are Headed for Disaster”), but Tomlin is the type of coach a player will die for. That leadership could well take the Steelers back to the playoffs in 2014 — and beyond.

QUARTERBACK BEN ROETHLISBERGER It doesn’t seem like that long ago that Roethlisberger was often listed as a weak spot in the Steelers lineup — as much for

his antics off the field as his performance on it. But Big Ben has undergone some changes in recent years. He’s more mature and has emerged as a team leader. At 32, he came to camp in perhaps the best condition he’s managed in years, thanks to work in the offseason. “I just put extra work in [with] personal trainers [and] nutritionists,” he said at the start of camp. “You’re 32 years old and you’re in your 11th year, it’s time to do some extra [work].”

Roethlisberger should thrive in the no-huddle offense.

Roethlisberger started to prosper late last season when the Steelers decided to emphasize the no-huddle offense. While in that formation, Roethlisberger is the main play-caller instead of offensive coordinator Todd Haley. Roethlisberger has wanted to be in that leadership position for some time, and the results were obvious: Over the final eight games of the season, he threw 16 of his 28 touchdowns alongside just five interceptions. (He had 14 interceptions on the year).

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

2014 STEELERS PREVIEW

Can coach Mike Tomlin bring the discipline necessary for success?

Here are five reasons the Steelers teams know can hurt them most. A strong second and third receiver could falter this year:

When it comes to the team’s success or failure, Mike Tomlin will always be the guy to get the credit and the blame. And for the past few years, he’s been heaped with the latter. Despite the fact that Tomlin has never had a losing season, fans have shown little patience with the seventh-year head coach. At times, he has made it easy to question his judgment. Last season, he stepped onto the field in front of an opposing player who was streaking toward the end zone, resulting in a $100,000 league fine. In 2009, after an overtime loss to the Ravens, Tomlin famously told reporters he would “unleash hell in December.” The team then lost the next two games — to lackluster Oakland and Cleveland. “We’re here to build our team for 2014,” Tomlin said during his first training-camp press conference. “I’m singularly focused on the now. … We don’t need to carry last year’s baggage, and I say that every year regardless of what transpired last year.” Still, Tomlin does seem to get in his own way at times. And if his young team finds itself struggling in late October, it’s just as easy to imagine him wrecking the ship as righting it.

ANY STEELERS RECEIVER NOT NAMED ANTONIO BROWN Prior to the 2012 season, it would have been hard to find a trio of receivers more talented than the Steelers’ Mike Wallace, Antonio Brown and Emmanuel Sanders. Wallace and Sanders are gone now, and while Brown is a superstar, he’s going to find himself in a lot of double-coverage this year: The Steelers lack a strong threat on the other side of the field to take the pressure off. Tight end Heath Miller has had a pretty good preseason, but he’s not going to draw much attention from the one guy that opposing

ARTWORK BY MARY HAMILTON

MIKE TOMLIN

are also crucial to an effective no-huddle offense, which the Steelers figure to run with gusto this season. What the Steelers have instead is veteran Lance Moore, who is fighting to become the third receiver behind second-year man Markus Wheaton … and while Wheaton comes with a lot of upside, he’s shown little sign of being that secondthreat receiver.

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Second-year receiver Markus Wheaton

“[Wheaton] is going to be key, because if we don’t have another receiver, then people can just watch Brown,” Roethisberger said early in training camp. “We all see what Brown can do in a game, so we need Markus to step up. We can’t afford for teams to put three guys on [Brown].” Add to the mix rookie Martavis Bryant, second-year man Justin Brown and third-year receiver Brandon Moye and you’ve got a lot of hope for the future … but maybe not much promise for this season.

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THE RUNNING GAME The Steelers have two very capable running backs in Le’Veon Bell and LeGarrette Blount. But there is some question about whether the Steelers can successfully run the ball this

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2014 STEELERS PREVIEW

Antonio Brown should continue his break-out success of 2013.

Based on what they’ve seen in the preseason, fans should be hoping to see a lot of Roethlisberger in the no-huddle during 2014. In the Aug. 16 game against Buffalo, Roethlisberger threw for 128 yards and two touchdowns in limited action. If he can duplicate that proficiency — even if the no-huddle is used sparingly — the Steelers should find a lot of success.

WIDE RECEIVER ANTONIO BROWN Two seasons ago, Brown was just one of a trio of talented receivers the Steelers had to depend on, along with Mike Wallace and Emmanuel Sanders. He was, in fact, seen as the No. 2 pass-catcher behind Wallace. But that all changed last year when Wallace followed the money to the Dolphins — and Brown stepped up in a big way. His 1,499 receiving yards ranked second in the NFL last year. And with the introduction of more no-huddle offense, Brown is likely to get far more than the eight touchdowns he scored in 2013. Prior to last year, Brown had more than 1,000 receiving yards just one other time in his career — in 2011, before falling off to 787 yards in 2012. He’s looked good in the preseason: In the game against Buffalo, he took a seven-yard pass from Roethlisberger over the middle 76 yards down the left sideline for a touchdown. Brown is also one of the team’s leaders: Fellow Steelers have twice named him team MVP. With young receivers all around him, he’ll need to step up and he knows it. “Everyone’s watching me this year — my attitude, my demeanor and my approach,” Brown says. “[Wide-receiver Coach Richard Mann] says I’m the guy to look to on how to do things, and that’s all part of being a leader.”

RYAN SHAZIER Over the past several seasons, the Steelers roster became a Who’s Who of the game’s

best-known linebackers: James Harrison, Lamarr Woodley, Larry Foote and James Farrior. But those guys are gone and the Steelers are hoping a younger, faster group will lead the team into the future. It’s too early to tell whether the unit as a whole will be able to solve the defensive woes that have plagued the Steelers for the past two seasons. But rookie linebacker Ryan Shazier, out of Ohio State, might be the player to make Steelers fans forget the veterans they’ve lost.

Ryan Shazier looks to be the Steelers’ next great linebacker.

In his first preseason game, Aug 16 against Buffalo, the super-fast Shazier made his presence known by notching nine tackles and an interception. He didn’t appear as dominant in the team’s third preseason game, but still managed six tackles. “I thought he did some good things,” Tomlin said of Shazier after the Buffalo match-up. But that was no surprise, Tomlin added: “From the instant he’s got here, he’s proven that [playing at the pro level] is not too big for him.”

CONTINUES ON PAGE 24

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

2014 STEELERS PREVIEW

Welcome Back!

Offensive coordinator Todd Haley is 16-16 in two seasons with the team.

year … and the backs’ recent off-field antics aren’t helping matters. Bell in particular has shown an extraordinary talent for finding room to run … but the offensive line hasn’t been as proficient at opening up space. Against Philadelphia, neither Blount — who spent last season with the Patriots — nor Bell ran especially well outside of the no-huddle. They can improve as the season goes on, but still unclear is how the pair’s extracurricular exploits will affect their performance. Until a few seasons ago, the Steelers seemed largely immune to the kind of off-field hijinks that plagued other teams. Now, however, there seems to be a controversy every year. The day before that third preseason game, against Philadelphia, a Ross Township police officer pulled over a car that Bell was driving and, according to reports, discovered marijuana in the car. Bell was charged with possession and is expected to be charged with operating a vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Charges might also be filed against Blount. There’s no telling what the response from the league or the team will be, although the initial reaction was to let them play. “Obviously that conduct is detrimental to our efforts. They’ll be dealt with appropriately,” Tomlin said after the Eagles’ game. “I didn’t view it as punishment to send them home, to be quite honest with you, to not play in this pre-season game.” “I’d rather them play more than anticipated than to remove them,” Tomlin added. “So that’s why we took the stance that we took tonight. Obviously we have some things to do regarding the matter moving forward.”

TODD HALEY If there’s a member of the Steelers coaching staff who absorbs more vitriol from fans than Tomlin, it’s Haley. He’s an explosive figure whose in-your-face-style has attracted heat everywhere he’s coached. In fact, the offensive coordinator hears it not only from

fans but from his players as well. He’s famously had his differences with Roethlisberger over the team’s offensive strategy. And last year he had a sideline argument with Brown over how often he called passing plays.

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Will Le’Veon Bell’s off-field problems be a distraction?

In fact, Haley seemed all but gone last year before the Steelers turned around a 2-6 start to finish 8-8. A lot of that success was due to an increased use of the no-huddle offense. But that’s not Haley’s style. He’s a run-focused coach who prefers short passes to take the pressure off of the QB — a style Roethlisberger has referred to as “dink-anddunk.” The no-huddle worked to perfection this year in the team’s second preseason game, against Buffalo. But once it faltered against Philadelphia, it was quickly abandoned, and the Steelers went back to their old style of offense … which often seems to consist of two-yard rushing plays and Roethlisberger running for his life. The Steelers can have some success on offense this year if Roethlisberger and the no-huddle get a chance to develop. That means Todd Haley stepping back and getting out of the way. But history suggests that may not happen.

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OFFENSIVE LINE

THE DEFENSE

When you think of the Steelers offensive line the past few years, several words come to mind, few of which are positive: injured, soft, just plain bad. The Steelers have spent a lot of time, money and draft picks to give Roethlisberger the kind of protection that he needs, and none of it has paid off. This may be the year when that changes. If the line stays healthy, it could be the biggest reason the Steelers find success. If Maurkice Pouncey, David DeCastro, Marcus Gilbert, Ramon Foster and Kevin Beachum remain in the line-up, they stand to be a tough unit to penetrate. They’ve got new leadership under veteran line coach Mike Munchak (see “Moving the Line,” page 26) and a no-huddle offense that will allow them to take advantage of fewer defensive substitutions. The quicker pace should allow them to keep Roethlisberger clean — a feat the O-line hasn’t accomplished much since the QB entered the league in 2004. Last year, Roethlisberger was sacked 42 times, the fourth-most of his career. However, that number dropped significantly in the second half of the season once the no-huddle became a focus. He was sacked just 11 times in the final eight games, and in five of those games he was dropped just one time or not at all. The line still isn’t perfect. Questions remain about the team’s run-blocking and its success outside the no-huddle. In the Aug. 21 preseason game against Philadelphia, the no-huddle was jettisoned early after it looked flat on the first drive. From that point on, Roethlisberger looked pressured, and the run game failed to produce. Even with those concerns, however, this should be the season when the team’s patience with its line will pay big dividends. “We’re young, we’re athletic,” says Pouncey, the center who missed all of the 2013 season with a knee injury. “All the guys here have the same goals in mind, and we’re hungry this year. … I think that it’s just going out there, putting the work in and showing everybody instead of talking about it. That would be the best thing for us this year.”

In the past, it was borderline blasphemy even to insinuate that the Steelers defense was getting old and losing its edge. Former Tampa Bay Buccaneer and NFL analyst Warren Sapp was slammed by Steelers fans when he said they were old and slow in 2011 — and when he did it again last year. In 2011, the team ended up with the league’s top defense. But their decline began in 2012, and now the Steelers have apparently admitted to themselves that this time, Sapp was right. There is still a veteran presence on the unit: cornerback Ike Taylor, safety Troy Polamalu and recently re-signed lineman Brett Keisel. But the heart of the defense — especially the linebacking corps and defensive line — is now fresher and faster. And the entire squad seems to have recognized that in this league, you have to be able to get to get to the quarterback to be successful. While this unit has the makings of another great Steelers defense, it will probably be a work in progress this year. There are too many young players still trying to find their way, and a few too many veterans who probably still need to be phased out. In addition, a defense which was once impenetrable to the run has been leaking like a sieve for the better part of two seasons. The results were little different in this year’s preseason games against New York and Philadelphia. The latter game especially offered evidence that this defense isn’t ready for prime time. Not only was it scorched by the first team, but second-string quarterback Mark Sanchez — cast off from the Jets for general shittiness — also had his way with the Steelers defense. So what does that mean for the regular season? Defensive lineman Cam Heyward said it best after the Philadelphia game. “Everything went wrong,” he said. “Missed tackles, execution, a lack of energy. On top of that, we played terrible on the defensive side. “There’s got to be a sense of urgency going into the season, and if we don’t step it up now, Cleveland is going to come into our house and beat us.”

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Jody DiPerna contributed to this report

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FAST LEARNERS

The Steelers’ linebackers are younger and faster, but will that make them better? {BY JODY DIPERNA} THE 2013 SEASON raised a host of questions about the Steelers’ once-vaunted defense — and summer training camp made it pretty clear where they hope to find the answer. “Speed is your weapon! Speed is your weapon!” bellowed Joey Porter, the outstanding former linebacker and first-year defensive assistant coach, as the linebacking unit drilled on the St. Vincent College field. The NFL has been trying to legislate defense out of the game for the past 10 years or so, and with the league’s renewed emphasis on limiting hand-chucks in the defensive secondary this year, receivers will have even more room to roam, creating more opportunities for pass-happy offenses. If you were a defensive player and felt beleaguered by all of this, you’d have a right to. But you’d still have to tailor your skills and schemes to survive — and the only viable response might be speed. The Pittsburgh Steelers know that, and they’ve spent the summer drumming it into the heads of their defense. Gone are the team’s former household names: James Harrison, LaMarr Woodley, Larry Foote and Ryan Clark. They’ve been replaced by a nucleus of fresher talent, and with all this youth comes speed, especially at the linebacking position. Or so the coaching staff hopes. The linebacking corps is anchored by the surprisingly quick Lawrence Timmons, the most underrated LB in the NFL. And the emphasis on speed has been increasingly evident in recent drafts. The Steelers selected Sean Spence in 2012; he returns this year

from a horrific knee injury to battle for one of the starting spots. In 2013 and 2014, the team used first-round picks to get two swift backers, Jarvis Jones and Ryan Shazier, the rookie linebacker out of Ohio State. “I really feel [speed] can be an asset,” Shazier told City Paper on a break during training camp. “The coaches tell me to try to use it as much as possible. Sometimes you can’t use it in every situation, but when you have the chance, use it. A lot of times, I try to shake guys up with my speed. I’m not the biggest guy.”

Steelers defensive assistant Joey Porter

The same is true of second-year player Jones, who spent much of the off-season getting stronger and developing an inside pass-rush, so that offenses cannot key on him going to the outside every time. Jones was drafted to be Harrison’s heir apparent, and while his 2013 rookie season was underwhelming, he’s putting in extra work this year to make sure 2014 is not a repeat. Long after practice, Jones lingered on the field with Porter, learning everything he could from the once-explosive pass-rusher. Linebackers appear to be putting more

emphasis on getting to opposing quarterbacks, as they should be. The Steelers ranked 25th in the league in sacks last year (34) and 27th in sack percentage — a dramatic drop-off from their usual lofty rankings. The feeling among the players is that if they can get a good pass rush, it will ameliorate many other defensive woes. But fourth-year defensive end Cam Heyward said you can’t go to sleep on the running game, even with the rise of passdominant offenses. “I think everybody likes to overlook the running game,” Heyward explained. “I don’t think it’s a lost art, but we have to continue to work on it. Everybody’s keying in on the run first, because you can get beat pretty quick if you don’t stop the run.” Heyward might be a prophet: Two days after he uttered those words, the Steelers defense was gashed for a 73-yard touchdown run by Giants running back Rashad Jennings. Sure, it was the first preseason game. Sure, those games generally mean very little (if anything) in the grand scheme of things. But when you combine that play with the ugly stats from last year — when Timmons and company spent much of their time chasing after the backs of wide-outs and running backs — it can be concerning. Big, dramatic plays became a regular occurrence in 2013, with the Steelers defense allowing 11 plays of 50 yards or more over the course of the season. By comparison, the defense allowed only three such plays in the 2011 and 2012 seasons combined. Heyward said the Steelers have lofty goals: to return to the playoffs, of course, and to become the “No. 1 defense [in] rushing and passing. If we can be No. 1 in rushing, it puts us in a better situation for [stopping the] pass.” But if they expect to return to form by the Sept. 7 season opener … they’ll have to hurry.

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2014 STEELERS PREVIEW

MOVING THE LINE

Munchak’s experience could bring O-line to next level {BY JODY DIPERNA} MIKE MUNCHAK’S approach to coaching

can best be described as holistic. Which is not to say the former Tennessee Titans head coach — and new Steelers offensive-line coach — uses crystals and herbal concoctions or invokes spirit animals. It’s that he believes his players must understand the totality of each play call, and his overall offensive philosophy. Fans may wax nostalgic about the old smash-mouth days, but for the players, it’s not as simple as lining up and hitting the guy in front of you. Inside and outside zones are the thing. Players move, pull from one side to the other to block different zones. Assignments change depending on the defense or an audible call. “I think it’s the preparation, for the linemen, to prepare for any situation,” Munchak explained on a break during training camp this summer. “They know if a guy lines up here, lines up here, lines up here, how they should set him, what technique to use. They understand what we’re doing. It’s not just memorization — they understand the concepts of the play. “That’s a process. It’s a progression of teaching.” There’s a lot to understand. Some might even say that an inadequate understanding of blocking schemes led to center Maurkice Pouncey’s knee injury on the eighth play of the 2013 season (when Munchak was still with Tennessee). There are few NFL coaches who under-

New Steelers offensive line coach Mike Munchak {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

stand how to play on the offensive line better than Munchak. His 12 years on the front line of the Houston Oilers earned him nine Pro Bowl appearances and a spot in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He then spent 14 seasons as the offensive-line coach of the Tennessee Titans before starting a short run as head coach in 2011. Offensive-line play doesn’t break down into easy-to-digest sabermetric bite-sized portions. But while good play is hard to quantify, sub-par play is easy to spot. You don’t need to know that the Steelers ranked in the bottom half of the NFL in sacks allowed (43) — giving up one

sack for every 13.6 attempts — to know that this unit has been a disappointment for some time, particularly the past two seasons. And in those two seasons, the Steelers’ record was a textbook display of fair-to-middling performance, posting two 8-8 records and golfing while their division rivals, the Bengals and Ravens, appeared in the playoffs. Some of the line’s lackluster performance has been due to injury. Pouncey’s injury in the first game of last season, along with David DeCastro’s rookie-year preseason knee injury, have kept the line from excelling. Nearly every starting lineman has

“THE MORE CONSISTENT THEY ARE WITH TECHNIQUE, THE MORE SUCCESSFUL AND CONSISTENT WE’LL BE.”

missed time due to injury: Ramon Foster is the only starter who has come close to playing two full seasons, starting in 31 of 32 games. Short of waving a magic wand to prevent injury, how can Munchak get this unit to reach its potential? By going back to basics: Fundamental precision is the essence of Munchak’s view of his job. “I’m big on that. I think it helped me throughout my career,” he says, downplaying his talent and Hall of Fame career. While other units can be caught occasionally standing around at practice, his players are a study in constant motion. “The more consistent they are with technique, the more successful and consistent we’ll be,” Munchak says. “That will be all year long. We’ll keep hammering away at it. That’s my job: to figure out what their weaknesses are, and have drills to attack that. It’s not just busy drills. If I can have a drill and put it on the tape, then they can see that and see that it’s helping. So, as a coach, as a teacher, that’s what I’m trying to do.” There was a time when offensive linemen toiled in obscurity. But even though Munchak says linemen prefer working outside the limelight, the heat is on the Steelers line to perform this year. The line is loaded with early-round draft picks: Pouncey and DeCastro were taken in the first round; Marcus Gilbert and Mike Adams (who will not start barring an injury to one of the starters ahead of him) were both taken in the second. When there are that many blue-chippers, they will not be able to remain, as Munchak puts it, “outside of the dialogue.” Attention will be paid. Because that’s what being holistic is all about. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

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ON

TAMARIND TOFU WAS EXCELLENT, WITH FIRM CHUNKS OF FRIED TOFU AND TENDER VEGETABLES

GRIDIRON GRILLING {BY ANDY MULKERIN} A marquee new-menu item at Heinz Field this year: the Bacon, Egg and Cheese Dog. (Like many of the higher-end options, it’s only available for Club Level ticketholders.) The dog is what it sounds like: a foot-long frank, wrapped in bacon and topped with cheese, chipotle mayo and a fried egg. “There are a lot of day games scheduled this year,” says Aramark general manager Dominic DePaola, who oversees concessions at Heinz Field. “So, that one takes care of breakfast, lunch and dinner!” Many of the new options seem designed to help you make next year’s offensive line — the overarching theme might be “meat on meat.” The D-Line Burger (also on the Club Level) has smoked brisket, jalapeño jam, barbecue sauce, cheese and a fried egg on it. The Emperor Burger — available to all ticketholders — honors Chuck Noll in its name, and Pittsburgh’s culinary history in its contents: It’s a beef burger with shaved kielbasa and onion-bacon sauerkraut on it. DePaola notes, though, that vegetarians aren’t completely out of bounds at Heinz: There’s a plain pizza, offered this year by Fox’s (a new partnership with Heinz Field). And there are gluten-free options available. There are city-specific options at stadiums throughout the AFC North, if you’re planning on heading into enemy territory this fall. Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium, for example, has items like Crab Tots (tater tots with crab dip). Sounds tasty, sure, but nothing says smash-mouth Steelers football like three kinds of meat at once. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

On Fri., Aug. 29, the high-end Fairmont Hotel is taking it to the streets with a one-day, pop-up p

barbecue stand d. Chow down on houseousesmoked brisket, pulled pork and sides. Look L k for f the to-go stand on Fifth Avenue, near Andys bar. Lunch only: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., or when the food runs out. Come early.

28

ANOTHER TAKE ON THAI {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

I

N A TOWN near Pittsburgh named

for a city in Italy, there is a Thai restaurant run by a man whose name sounds Russian. We couldn’t wait to find out more. Pittsburgh Thai Restaurant by Boris is the third generation of Thai eateries to occupy its sweet little storefront on a Verona side street. Its immediate predecessor was Nicky’s Thai Kitchen. Nicky’s outgrew the space and moved into two locations, Downtown and on the North Side, freeing this spot for another restaurant to make its name. And what an intriguing name it is! We sought the back story from our server — an enthusiastic Thai man who turned out to be Boris himself. The nickname is a truncation of his full name, Borisuth, and after working at another local Thai restaurant for years, he decided to open his own. Mystery solved, we availed ourselves of Boris’ frank expertise, as he guided us toward some selections and away from others. At first glance, the menu was fairly rote, with the standard array of

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Tropical bird’s nest

Thai curries, noodle dishes and stir fries, some of which seemed to veer quite close to Chinese-American fare. But between the “Specialties” section of the laminated menu and a loose sheet of “Chef’s Specials,” we put together an order of several dishes outside the usual offerings at local Thai restaurants. These were dishes that, we hoped, would reveal Boris’ particular tastes and talents.

PITTSBURGH THAI RESTAURANT BY BORIS

321 South Ave., Verona. 412-828-0339 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 4-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $4.50-8.50; entrees $14-17 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Corn fritters may be our favorite Thai snack, but we usually make them from a Thai cookbook at home, since few restaurants offer them. Boris’ version was

all about the corn: whole kernels lightly bound together in an ultra-crispy batter, and served with a spicy-sweet sauce enhanced with pineapple juice. Chicken satay was unremarkable, and deep-fried Thai toast wasn’t quite crisp enough. But steamed dumplings, in shumai form, were superb, topped by little bits of crispy, minced garlic, which acted as garnish, flavor and texture enhancer all at once. Alas, the accompanying sweetand-sour soy sauce was mostly just regular soy, unworthy of the dumplings. One of the entrees we were most eager to try was the tropical bird’s nest. Part of the appeal was that, instead of the fried noodles used in the Chinese classic, Boris used shredded potato. Unfortunately, like the toasts, the potato wasn’t crisp enough. Even the unsauced edges, which should have been crackling, were chewy instead, and the bottom of the nest, soaked in sauce, was soggy. Within the nest was a stir fry that hewed too closely to Chinese takeout, with meat, seafood and a familiar cast of veggies tossed in a brown sauce

that wasn’t particularly spicy. That said, all of the elements — shrimp, chicken, scallops that weren’t even mentioned on the menu and vegetables — were superbly cooked. With a bit more spice, and a much crispier nest, this dish would be amazing. No caveats are necessary to describe the Massaman curry, that mellow, supremely satisfying stew of earthy potatoes and crunchy peanuts to which Boris added pineapple chunks, lending a note of tropical brightness. A dining companion’s pad see ew, a street-food classic, featured wonderfully chewy flat noodles that took up the simple soy-based sauce without any sogginess. But the pork, chosen from a list of proteins, didn’t have the chance to do the same, and failed to cohere with the rest of the dish.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

UNCOMMONLY GOOD

Spoon beverage director creates a new classic gin

Choo chee, an herbal, coconut milkbased gravy similar to red curry and accented with kefir lime leaves, is a common preparation for seafood. Boris used tilapia, cooked with more care than we often see with this farmed fish: It turned out mild and moist without any tough or dry edges. Along with a bed of green vegetables, this made for an excellent (and visually pleasing) base for the aromatic choo chee sauce. Tamarind tofu was also excellent, with firm chunks of fried tofu and tender vegetables maintaining their distinctive flavors and textures in a sweet-tart sauce. We were charmed by our time with Boris, an engaging man who maintains a pleasant restaurant. Reflecting on the dishes we liked best, we think that, next time, we’ll just tell him what we like, and trust in his obvious enthusiasm and long experience to guide us to a great meal.

John Wabeck, the beverage director at Spoon, is obsessed with gin. He stocks 28 brands at Spoon’s bar and has over a dozen in his collection at home. Wabeck loves gin so much that he decided to create his very own. He and wine and spirits compadre Jared Slipp toyed with the idea of creating a custom gin while they were working together in Washington, D.C., but both moved on to other jobs before they could finish the project. When the owners of Quakertown, Pa., distillers Midnight Madness recently approached Spoon owner Rick Stein about creating a custom blend, Wabeck took the project on. He had one caveat: “I didn’t want to make generic gin and then slap a label on it.” Wabeck says that Common Decency — named for an obscure Mighty Mighty Bosstones song — has “everything I’d ever ask for in a gin: It’s heavy juniper, it’s floral and it’s very dry.” Common Decency is a straightforward London Dry gin. While it’s popular in today’s craft-distilling world to toy with the classic gin style by bringing forward different botanicals, that’s not a game Wabeck wants to play. “Everyone is running away from London Dry,” he says, “but there’s a reason it’s classic. It’s delicious. It’s versatile.” And although he’s working in the classic style, Common Decency is far from generic. If you still think of gin and tonic as a “let’s drink a ton of these and get hammered” order, Wabeck’s label may make you revisit the noble combination. A gin and tonic made with Common Decency and Schweppes finishes like a pocket of bitter, botanical air. Wabeck and the Midnight Madness distillers are working through distribution legalities, so for now, your best chance of sipping Common Decency is at Spoon (134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty; 412-361-6001 or spoonpgh.com). You can try it in a number of cocktails, but I’ll be having another round of Common Decency and tonic. As Wabeck knows, sometimes it’s satisfying to stick to the classics.

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“EVERYONE IS RUNNING AWAY FROM LONDON DRY GIN, BUT THERE’S A REASON IT’S CLASSIC.”

Owners Gary Karpinski and Boris Saen Kaew

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Under New Management. Look for our new menu in September.

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an openminded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF

FREE* event parking when you purchase $25 in food at Pittsburgh Grille! *

EL BURRO COMEDOR. 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412-9043451.A casual Southern Californiastyle taqueria offers a variety of tacos, burritos and Cal-Mex specialties, such as carne asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles (a homey casserole). Tacos are come with a variety of fillings, including mahi mahi and shrimp, and burrito fillings run from standard to breakfast and French fries and steak. JF

Parking pass is only valid in the U.S. Steel Tower Garage, Monday-Friday, during any concerts, games, or events held at the Consol Energy Center.

600 Grant Street

Downtown Pittsburgh

412-434-0800

www.pghgrille.com

We’re tapping our Rocktoberfest Bier!

Wednesday, September

17 6pm-9pm

A portion of the proceeds raised will be donated to the Special Olympics of PA.

Live music, German food, Raffles and a guest beer from Penn Brewery.

171 E. BRIDGE ST. • AT THE WATERFRONT 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-7812546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — are traditional, not made up to satisfy eclectic contemporary tastes. The cannelloni alone merits a visit to one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyfriendly dining rooms. KE

Off the Hook {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} by China, India and the Middle East, but still remains distinctive. The menu spans appetizers like the crispy street-food pancake martabak and fish cakes to entrees such as Javanese fried noodles and spicy curry-like stews. J THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookishthemed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT. 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500. This restaurant, situated in a charming reclaimed Victorian building, pulls off being both upscale and casual, with a fresh and original seasonal menu. Appetizers are as varied as Chinese-style pot stickers and scallop tacos, while entrees include pastas, fish and chops. There is also a selection of burgers and sandwiches. KE HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J KUSUKA INDONESIAN CUISINE. Ponsi Plaza, 13380 Lincoln Highway, North Huntingdon. 724-382-4968. At this humble Indonesian restaurant, diners will find fare that has been influenced

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Kusuka Indonesian Cuisine LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-3221106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar (meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese) while applying upto-the-minute sensibilities to

the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-3816000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/steakhouse, and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knifewielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. This modern take on the traditional Jewish deli makes the argument that such Eastern European cuisine deserves to be served alongside the world’s favorites. Stop in for matzoh-ball soup, egg creams, blintzes and classic deli sandwiches, including one made with “Montreal meat,” a sort of Canadian hybrid of corned beef and pastrami. JF OFF THE HOOK. 98 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale. 724-719-2877. This fine-dining fish restaurant features a menu almost exclusively from the sea; even the pastas are seafoodcentric. The fresh-fish section has a variety of suggested preparations, from classic (almondine) to modern (finished with chimichurri). Off the Hook also offers a fresh-oyster bar, expertly curated wine selection and impeccable service. LE PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-7586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo mein, seafood hot pot, Thai CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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Daily Saloon Specials

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Happy Hours

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Tuesday BURGER NIGHT

$2 off ALL Burgers 4 - 9pm $3 Miller Lite Draft All day till Midnight

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$6 Long Island Iced Tea All day till Midnight $4 Stuffed Pretzel & $6 Buffalo Chicken Dip 11am - 11pm 412-765-3270 www.augusthenrys.com

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

Try kibbee, lamb kabob, tabbouli, falafel and much more!

LEBANESE FOOD FESTIVAL

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

PRESENTED BY

OUR LADY OF VICTORY MARONITE CHURCH

1000 Lindsay Road Scott Township Food & Fun for the Whole Family! It’s Dancing! It’s Singing! It’s eating the most fabulous Lebanese food, hand-made by church members.

SEPTEMBER 12-14

Fri. & Sat. 11am-10pm • Sun. Noon-6pm Games • Prizes • Raffles Live Entertainment from Tony Mikhael and band All Ages Welcome! Free Admission & Parking

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Call for Directions & Take Out Orders

412-278-0841

Now accepting Credit Cards ORDER ONLINE! www.pghlebanesefestival.com

Hartwood Restaurant {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-935-9870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a well-curated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-and-cheese, made with Buffalo hot sauce. Wellprepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East Ingomar Road, Allison Park. 412364-6622. Located on the verdant edge of North Park, Tomato Pie is more than a pizzeria. It offers other simple Italian specialties including pasta and sandwiches, and the chef uses plenty of fresh herbs grown on the premises. FJ

PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan TSUKI JAPANESE RESTAURANT. Road, Cranberry. 724-776- 7675. 11655 Frankstown Road, This family-run BBQ joint Penn Hills. 412-242-0188. does two things right: Most of the myriad sushi There’s a lot of smoke rolls on offer center on flavor in their meat, just a handful of raw and the kitchen takes options, rounded out its rub seriously. The www. per a p with traditional cooked ribs, for instance, are pghcitym o .c ingredients such as eel studded with cracked and shrimp. The menu pepper and intensely offers the full gamut of maki, flavored with spices — spicy from classics like cucumber or tuna and crusty without, perfectly to truly original creations, some of moist and tender within. Add them just short of gimmickry. KF in: four sauces, plus traditional sides such as mac-and-cheese or URBAN TAP. 1209 E. Carson baked beans. JF St., South Side. 412-586-7499. Though it’s wallpapered in giant PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 TVs, the menu here is mostly Butler St., Lawrenceville. devoid of sports-bar clichés. 412-781-8724. Traditional Thai Instead, there is duck-confit sauces and curries from scratch poutine, mac-and-cheese with are among the reasons to stop smoked Gouda, a burger topped by this charming eatery, which with pork belly and even aged boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t rib-eye steak. With top-notch miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, service and excellent food, Urban the classically prepared tom Tap elevates tavern dining. KE yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF WAFFLES, INCAFFEINATED. 1224 Third Ave., New Brighton STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 (724-359-4841) and 2517 E. Carson McKnight Road, Ross Township. St., South Side (412-301-1763). 412-369-5380. There is an art to The fresh-made waffles here are making a really good sandwich, a marvelous foil for sweet and and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu savory toppings. Sweet options include the Funky Monkey spans traditional sandwiches (chocolate chips, bananas, peanut but also burgers, quesadillas butter and chocolate sauce). and wraps, as well as salads and The Breakfast Magic has bacon, homemade soups. Originality cheddar and green onions inside, is a hallmark: “Green fries” topped with a fried egg and sour are shoestrings tossed with cream. Or customize your waffles pesto, artichoke hearts and bits with a dizzying array of mix-ins. J of brie. FJ

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LOCAL

“BEING IN A SCENE IS ABOUT BEING FRIENDS WITH PEOPLE.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

BACK IN COLOR It’s been a while since T.J. Fennell has lived in Pittsburgh — he followed his now-wife to the Boston area about three years ago — but he hasn’t pulled up his roots. As a member of bands like The Copyrights and Two Sexy Beasts, Fennell was something of a staple in the local music scene. And this week, he’s returning with a new record, which he spent the last few years making with local guitarist Mike Layton, under the band name Full Color Illustrations. Full Color Illustrations was originally Fennell’s solo project, consisting of him and a drum machine. After playing a few shows, he recalls, “It was like, this isn’t exactly what I’d like to do.” He put together a full band (just called “Full Color”), and Layton joined near the end of that phase of the project. The two began writing songs together, and when Fennell moved, they continued collaborating remotely. They finished the self-titled record in December, but Saturday’s show will be their first time playing the songs live; when they get together, it’s usually to work on new material. “I’m coming into town three or four days before the show,” says Fennell, “and we’re going to be having some marathon practices.” Joining Full Color Illustrations are fellow Pittsburgh ex-pats More Humans, elegant indie-rockers whose years-long history with Fennell extends beyond having played dozens of shows together. The Full Color Illustrations album is, in fact, being released on Enamel Records, a label Fennell founded with More Humans frontman Clinton Doggett back in the early 2000s. Given the complex recording process, Full Color Illustrations — a solid collection of fuzzy, sinister and frequently hugesounding ’90s-esque rock — seems almost surprisingly cohesive. But, as Fennell says, “Mike and I have been playing together in one capacity or another since 2000. I’ve never known anyone else where we can get together and put songs together without even having to talk about the actual music too much. It’s really amazing. There’s almost the sense of someone reading your mind.”

K N U P P PO ALL DAY

“WE’RE GOING TO BE HAVING SOME MARATHON PRACTICES.”

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS with MORE HUMANS. 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 30. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net NEWS

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{BY ZACH BRENDZA}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VOXLIVEHOUSE}

Rishi Bahl (center) of The SpacePimps organized the Four Chord Music Festival.

T

HE INAUGURAL Four Chord Music

Festival, taking place Sun., Aug. 31, will feature 13 bands playing two stages and will be headlined by a pretty big draw: The Wonder Years. But that wasn’t the initial plan. The Philadelphia-based pop-punk outfit came on after a booking error left festival organizer Rishi Bahl without his initial top choice, a veteran ska band from Gainesville, Fla. Bahl had confirmed Less Than Jake for the festival while the band was in the process of switching booking agents. When the new agent came on, the band had already been booked elsewhere on the same date. The agent apologized for the double booking, but offered a solution: Take The Wonder Years, another band he represented. Bahl took the band without hesitation. The Wonder Years has been at the forefront of the pop-punk scene nationally in the past few years, with its last two albums, Suburbia I’ve Given You All And Now I’m Nothing

M A I N F E AT U R E

and The Greatest Generation, charting at No. 73 and No. 20 on the Billboard 200, respectively. The band was the first puzzle piece for the festival’s booking, and gave the firsttime festival organizer momentum.

FOUR CHORD MUSIC FESTIVAL

FEAT. THE WONDER YEARS, REAL FRIENDS, THE SPACEPIMPS, MANY MORE 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 31. Xtaza Nightclub (formerly Club Zoo), 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. $28-35. All ages. www.fourchordmusicfestival.com

“I got the Wonder Years, then I got 50 emails from 50 legit agents saying, ‘You gotta put so-and-so on,’” Bahl says. “It’s about getting that one band first. Then it’s a domino effect. When you say, ‘Hey, I’m Rishi, I’m doing this festival,’ [agents] think, ‘Oh, it’s just some idiot kid.’ When you say

[you] have The Wonder Years, they’re like, ‘OK, make an offer.’” With The Wonder Years secured, Bahl continued to contact bands and make offers. But convincing people that he was legit proved to be the big challenge, he said. He made an offer to Real Friends, a Fearless Records band that just came off playing its first year on Warped Tour. After some back and forth, the band got on board, but with one condition: Up-and-comers Turnover and Modern Baseball, bands represented by Real Friends’ booking agent, would play too. With the headliner switch, Four Chord Music Festival turned into a new pop-punk festival, when it was set to have “old-school bands” like Less Than Jake and New Found Glory. The festival even takes its name from an old Ataris song, “Four Chord Wonder,” according to Bahl. The idea for the festival arose from a conversation Bahl had with a friend last CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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POP-PUNK ALL DAY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

Four Chord bands (from

top): Modern Baseball,

December. He was talking to Nate Dorough, who puts on Bled Fest, an all-ages, mixedgenre one-day music festival in Howell, Mich. Dorough asked if Pittsburgh had anything similar to Bled. Bahl said there wasn’t; “You should just do it,” replied Dorough. Since preparations began in early April, Bahl says he has spent four to five hours a day planning, fielding emails, designing all festival media (website, program and so on) and teaching himself HTML code and Adobe Flash just for the event. While planning the 1,500-capacity festival, he is also juggling writing his Ph.D. dissertation

Real Friends, The Wonder

Years, We Are the Union

in integrated marketing, and preparing his curriculum as a visiting professor of marketing at LaRoche College, where he was recently hired. Between all his commitments, professional and musical, he says he’s been catching four hours of sleep a night since planning began. “I’m a super control freak. So when I get my mind on something, I do it until there’s nothing left to do,” Bahl says. “It’s fun. It seems stressful, and it is stressful, but it’s actually really fun: taking something from the ground up and trying to make something of it.” CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

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DON’T ACCEPT SCHOOL BUS IDLING EITHER. Did you know school bus idling exposes kids to harmful diesel emissions that are linked to asthma attacks, cancer, diabetes, and reduced brain function? The good news is that Pennsylvania has a law prohibiting unnecessary idling beyond 5 minutes in an hour. Unfortunately not all school bus drivers know or follow the law. If you see excessive idling, let your child’s teacher and principal know. You can also contact GASP at idling@gasp-pgh.org. ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

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O EDEN HALL CAMPUS O SUMMER EVENTS SERIES

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Tickets $25, $15 high school and college students. Purchase tickets at the website.

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SHANNON CURFMAN SHANNON LABRIE BROOKE ANNIBALE JEFF CAMPBELL THE MIKE MEDVED BAND SPONSORED BY:

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POP-PUNK ALL DAY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

Besides booking the festival, Bahl is playing it himself with his band The SpacePimps, one of the festival’s top-billed acts. He and partner Greg Roscoe are taking on the cost of the festival. The past three months have been “really crazy” for Bahl; he’s received more than 170 emails from bands asking to play the festival. But he’s been in those shoes before, and still is, with The SpacePimps. “I’m that band. I email every festival that happens in the United States, saying, ‘You gotta put The SpacePimps on. You gotta put the SpacePimps on,’” Bahl says. “And I never understood until now that it’s a total shit show. It’s a crapshoot to get a band on there.” Brandon Lehman, guitarist in local poppunk band Mace Ballard, says that Bahl approached his band and was very cryptic (which he sometimes is with the bigger things he plans), asking if they were available on the festival date and not offering much else. “I think a big festival, sort of independently put on like that, is really cool,” Lehman says. “I think it shows how strong the DIY music scene in Pittsburgh can be.” Bahl has known Mace Ballard and the majority of the bands playing the festival, local or not, for years. And booking his acquaintances isn’t an accident. “I’ll be the first one to admit that a lot of the bands on the show I know. It’s about being friends,” Bahl says. “Being in a scene is about being friends with people and I think that’s not around anymore. I think it’s all a competition.” Pittsburgh needs more shows like Four Chord, Lehman says, with the music and the bands being the focus. He also thinks that bands need to support each other, the way Mace Ballard has been supported. “More of the veteran bands need to step up and maybe take a few of the smaller local bands under their wing, sort of what Rishi and The SpacePimps have done for us,” Lehman says. “I think that camaraderie really brings people together.” With the first Four Chord Music Festival ready to go, Bahl wants to make it an annual event. and would like to book bands like New Found Glory, Bayside or Reel Big Fish in the future —simply keeping the festival within the theme of punk rock. “It’s not gonna be Christina Aguilera. It’s not gonna be Katy Perry — as much as I would love to have Katy Perry and hang out with her. I just don’t think it’s going to happen that way,” Bahl says. And first, he has to survive this year. “My blood pressure is through the roof, let’s be real here,” Bahl says jokingly. “I’m probably gonna have a heart attack before this event happens.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

JAZZ LICKS {BY MIKE SHANLEY} Musical worlds collide with the East Gipsy Band. The group of musicians, hailing from Budapest, Hungary, plays music with a clear link to members’ ancestors. Vilmos Oláh’s cimbalom, a hammered dulcimer with a sharp metallic tone, adds a haunting, traditionally exotic sound to the minor-key tunes. But the band’s sound doesn’t start and end with gypsy music. Although its rapid-fire melodies lean close to tradition, they also evoke the sound of bebop in their rhythmic and melodic complexity. This isn’t a fluke either. East Gipsy Band pianist József Balázs has proven himself to be a solid jazz man, having played with trombonist Robin Eubanks and other international improvisers. While performing, he can be seen singing the melody of his piano solo as he plays it, a la Oscar Peterson.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LOURDES DELGADO}

Tim Ries, the Rolling Stones saxophonist who’s playing with East Gipsy Band

If that fusion of sounds wasn’t enough, the group received something of a profile boost when it was joined by Tim Ries. This American saxophonist can lay claim to his own lengthy résumé, but he’s best known as the saxophonist in the Rolling Stones touring band. Ries tackles the East Gipsy Band’s music as if he too has been playing it for years, spinning soprano sax melodies in tandem with Lájos Sarközi’s violin. Ries performed with the band on a 2011 tour that brought the festive atmosphere to Small’s jazz club in New York City. In a DVD documenting that trip, Ries calls the East Gipsy Band “magical.” “The audience feels the energy,” he goes on. “It’s fusing so many great traditions of classical and Roma music with jazz and folk.” Playing with Mick and Keef might be a good meal ticket, but somehow, this gig seems more fulfilling. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EAST GIPSY BAND feat. TIM RIES. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 3. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Schenley Drive, Oakland. $20. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

CTRS

CRITICS’ PICKS

Life after being in a band is hard Simone sometimes, but some Felice persevere in other projects. Simone Felice is one of those. After he left The Felice Brothers, Simone ventured into the music world on his own, and it was the right move: His solo work is downright Bob Dylan-esque, in terms of singing and guitar work. Check out his latest album, Strangers. The March release is not to be missed, as presumably will be the case with his performance at WYEP’s Final Fridays tonight. Felice plays tonight at Schenley Plaza with Tom Brosseau. ZB 7 p.m. 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www.wyep.org

[BENEFIT] + SAT., AUG. 30 Giving back is cool: volunteering, donating blood, dumping ice on yourself. Benefit shows, too. Help Your Homies, a Pittsburgh concert series that donates admission fees to a particular cause, and Cool Shoes, a DIY record label that books shows, paired up to produce a benefit show tonight for Girls Rock! Pittsburgh. The organization empowers young girls and

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teaches them life skills through making music. Buy some pizza, make some spin art and rock on. The show will be held at Assemble, and will feature Amanda X, Roulette Waves, Toy Life and Swampwalk. ZB 7 p.m. 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5. All ages. 412-432-9127 or www.assemblepgh.org

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Live Music Scene!

[PUNK] + SUN., AUG. 31 Earlier this year, for some reason, people were surprised that Exene Cervenka, whose job fronting the legendary Los Angeles punk band X included screaming stuff like “We’re desperate / Get used to it / It’s kiss or kill,” was outed as a conspiracy theorist, linking mass shootings to so-called “false flag” operations. The legendary poet and singer, who formed the band with then-partner John Doe and guitarist Billy Zoom, has never been one to shy away from controversy, though she did lock down a lot of her social-media activity after her rants went viral. Either way, she’s back touring with the original lineup of X, and tonight, they play Altar Bar. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $25-30. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN HUBA}

[FOLK] + FRI., AUG. 29

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Calendar Venue Tour

Not even a van crash could keep the Kings of Leon clan off the road — at least not for long. The brothers Followill were in a bus accident after a show in Boston, leaving drummer Nathan Followill with a broken rib. But the Nashville boys wouldn’t be down for long, taking two weeks off the Mechanical Bull tour to let Nathan heal and still playing The Tonight Show with Questlove filling in on the kit. The band plays tonight at First Niagara Pavilion with Young the Giant and Kongos. Zach Brendza 7 p.m. 665 Route 18, Burgettstown. $15-$18. All ages. 724-947-7400

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CLINICAL TRIALS

UPCOMING SHOWS

[REGGAE] + SUN., AUG. 31 There’s no time like Labor Day Eve to give one last shout to summer — and there’s nothing more summery than a reggae show. Tonight at Hard Rock Café in Station Square, locals Truth and Rites headlines an end-of-season reggae celebration. Portions of the proceeds from the show benefit the P.R.O.M.I.S.E. Group, a nonprofit dedicated to preventing gun violence. AM 9 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $20-25. 412-481-7625 or www.hardrock.com

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SHOWS THIS WEEK Wed 8.27 MANICURES & MARTINIS and CAR CRUISE // 5 pm-8 pm RIVER TRAIL // country // 8 pm Thu 8.28 SCOTT, ROB & GREG OF THE CLARKS // 7 pm Fri 8.29 THE CORBIN HANNER BAND // Ticketed Event // 9 pm show // SOLD OUT Sat 8.30 OFF THE HOOK // rock covers // 9 pm +

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The Palace Theatre Highlights! 9:30&11AM 7:30PM 7:30PM 7:30PM 7:30PM 8PM 2&7:30PM

Sep 26/27/28 Oct 4 Oct 9 Oct 11 Oct 14 Oct 15 Oct 17 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 26 Oct 30 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 21/22/23 Nov 28 Dec 5 Dec 6 Dec 7 Dec 9 Dec 13/14 Dec 18

Fr/Sa/Su Sat Thu Sat Tue Wed Fri Fri Sat Sun Thu Sat Sun Fri Sat Fr/Sa/Su Fri Fri Sat Sun Tue Sa/Su Thu

7:30/7:30/2PM 7:30PM 8PM 7PM 8PM 7:30PM 8PM 8PM 8PM 2PM 7:30PM 7:30PM 4PM 8PM 7:30PM 7:30/7:30/2PM 11AM 2&7:30PM 7:30PM 2&7PM 2&8PM 2&7PM/2PM 7:30PM

The Palace Theatre FREE Open House Tours River City Brass presents 42nd Street Latshaw: Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley Elko Concerts: The British Invasion Tour Latshaw Productions: The Bronx Wanderers Elko Concerts presents Steven Wright STEVEN WRIGH Latshaw: Steve Solomon’s My Mother’s T Italian, My Father’s Jewish & I’m In Therapy Stage Right: Sleeping Beauty The Musical River City Brass presents Legends Elko Concerts: An Intimate Evening/Clint Black Big Brothers Big Sisters/Laurel Region: The Clarks Latshaw Productions: Huey Lewis and The News Latshaw Productions : Engelbert Humperdinck CLINT BLACK Elko Concerts presents Robin Trower Elko Concerts: Girls Night: The Musical Elko: The Best Of Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson Latshaw Productions presents Kenny Rogers Latshaw Productions: The Beach Boys Westmoreland Symphony: Tchaikovsky Festival Break The Floor Productions: Shaping Sound Elko Concerts presents Don McLean HUEY LEWIS & THE NEWS River City Brass presents American Heroes Stage Right presents Fiddler on the Roof WCT: Junie B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells Latshaw Productions: The Motown Experience River City Brass: Christmas Brasstacular Latshaw: Oak Ridge Boys Christmas Night Out Latshaw: Latshaw Pops’ Christmas Memories BOYS WSO presents The Nutcracker (On sale 9/4) THE BEACH Westmoreland Cultural Trust: A Christmas Carol

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS

PITTSBURGH’S NEWEST HOT SPOT IN THE NORTH HILLS

1st Floor Restaurant

(American Menu Specializing in Burgers)

2nd Floor Bar & Night Club

Friday, August 29 – Dj Hypnotiza Saturday, August 30 – Corn Beef n Curry Friday, September 5 – Rhubard Band Saturday, September 6 – DJ Nugget Friday September 12 – Dr. Zoot Saturday, September 13th – DJ Nugget Nugget part of the NPL Restaurant Group

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Open Seven Days Per week 11am to 2am 3385 Babcock Blvd Phone 412-847-3300

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 28

CLUB CAFE. Black Taxi. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Troll Kicker, Iron City Hooligans, Justice Bloc, DJ Jeffery. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Dirty Bourbon River Show, Pandemic. Strip District. 412-251-6058. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall w/ violinist John Parrendo. Downtown. 412-697-3120. SONNY’S TAVERN. Wreck Loose, Narrow Arrow. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Glowstik Willy. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 29

ALTAR BAR. RATM2 (Rage Against The Machine Tribute) & Deftones performed by Red Hands. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Bayardstown Happy Hour: The Working Poor. Strip District. 412-251-6058. CLUB CAFE. Tim Easton (Early) The Red Western, Light Waves. South Side. 412-431-4950. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Kings of Leon, Kongos, Young the Giant. 724-947-7400. FRANKIE I’S. Waiting for Ray. Washington. 724-743-3636. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Catbath, Noise Nothing, The Lopez, Roulette Waves. Garfield. 412-361-2262. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. LOCAL. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Joe Fletcher & The Wrong Reasons, Pennsyvania Hat Band. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Generation 13, Shakedown. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Hugo Down. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMILING MOOSE. Sworn In The Buckle Downs, WreckLoose, The Charlie Wheeler Trio. South Side. 412-431-4668. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Jason Kendall Band. South Side. SPACE. Jasmine Tate. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

SAT 30

31ST STREET PUB. Esé, Latecomer, Downtown Rejects. Strip District. 412-391-8334. AVONWORTH COMMUNITY PARK. KardaZ. Ohio Township. 412-766-1700. BRILLOBOX. Full Color Illustrations, More Humans.

Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Lisa Ferraro & Erika Luckett (Early) Suite Mary, Noise, Nothing (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Bottom Floor. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Buffalo, Buffalo, Buffalo. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Matt Motta. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LA CASA NARCISI. Antz Marching. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Bleachers, Young Rising Sons, TeamMate. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE NIGHT GALLERY. Different Places in SPACE. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. The Clintones - Ultimate 90s Tribute. Greensburg. 724-552-0603.

SUN 31

ALTAR BAR. X, Not In The Face. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB ZOO. The Wonder Years, The Spacepimps, Real Friends, We

Are the Union. Four Chord Festival. Strip District. 412-201-1100. CRANBERRY COMMUNITY PARK. KardaZ. Cranberry. 724-776-4806 x1129. HAMBONE’S. Ronnie Weoss, Woody Stoner. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARTWOOD ACRES. Rusted Root, Grand Piano, The Color Fleet, Derek Woodz Band. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HEADLINERS. The Holidays. Washington. 724-503-1200. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. Harlan Twins, Mon River Ramblers, Bastard Bearded Irishmen. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. TUGBOAT’S. The Dave Iglar Band. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

MON 01

THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Monomyth, Nap Eyes, Triangle & Rhino, Znagez, RJ Myato, Lucy Goubert. Bloomfield.

TUE 02

SMILING MOOSE. The Dread Crew of Oddwood, The Bloody Seamen. South Side. 858-848-7667.

MP 3 MONDAY CHRIS STOWE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREW SCOTT KING}

Sat Sat Sat Wed Thu Fri Sat

PalacePA

Sep 6 Sep 6 Sep 13 Sep 17 Sep 18 Sep 19 Sep 20

Each week we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Chris Stowe; stream or download “Blood Drinkers” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

RESTAURANT. Acoustic Daze. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

SAT 30

WED 03

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SMILING MOOSE. KEN Mode. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

THU 28

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-969-0260. LAVA LOUNGE. Emo Night 16. South Side. 412-431-5282.

COLUMBUS {SUN., SEPT. 07}

Bishop Allen

FRI 29

Treehouse

MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. Vikter Duplaix & DJ Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-657-2279. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. 412-431-5282. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Saturdays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

Kimbra

SUN 31

FULL LIST ONLINE

SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. East Liberty. 412-657-2279.

WED 03

MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES FRI 29

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Billy Price Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 30

THE HOP HOUSE. Sweaty Betty. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Satin Hearts. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

NEWS

FRI 29

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Jazz it Up: Celebrating the Pittsburgh Sound. Uptown. 412-396-6000. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Kenia, James Street Swing All-Stars. North Side. 412-904-3335.

SAT 30

ANDYS. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Hot Club of Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

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MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

412.326.5964

WE’LL CUT YOU.

SAT 30

STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. The Flow Band. 724-205-6402.

World Café Live

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844. PARKLET ON PENN AVE. Taste de . w ww per Flava. Wilkinsburg. a p ty ci h pg 412-727-7855. .com

ANDYS. Gerdan. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

{FRI., NOV. 07}

THU 28

WED 03

FRI 29

PHILADELPHIA

JAZZ

4504 BUTLER STREET

WORLD

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

The Fillmore Silver Spring

THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

THU 28

DJ Shadow

SUN 31

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. HARD ROCK CAFE. Jeremiah Clark, Molly Rae, Nick Barilla. Station Square. 412-481-7625. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE

{MON., SEPT. 08}

SAT 30

WED 03

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Poogie Bell & Friends. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Sue Leslie. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Roby Edwards. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

SUN 31

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 01

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 02

KATZ PLAZA. Kenny Blake. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 03

FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM. East Gipsy Band. Oakland. 412-624-4125. RIVERS CLUB. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 28

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

FRI 29

TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE

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SUN 31

HARD ROCK CAFE. Congo Ashanti Roy, Sista Bunny Brissett, the Freedom Band. Station Square. 412-481-7625. KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. The Flow Band. 724-728-0222.

MON 01

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. The Flow Band. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0450.

COUNTRY THU 28

ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. 724-265-1181.

OTHER MUSIC THU 28

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Mt. Lebanon High School String Quartet. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

FREE

FRI 29

LEMONT. Vida. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

BOURBON TASTING

SAT 30

––– Friday, August 29th ––– JOHNNY WALKER BLACK DOUBLE BLACK GOLD RESERVE- PLATINUM

TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Night Star. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

TUE 02

BRIGHTWOOD CHRISTIAN CHURCH. The Harmony Singers of Pittsburgh. Bethel Park. 412-835-6703.

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8-10pm - Cheers! 1908 C LIKE US ON FACEBOOK ARTS

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What to do August

27 - September 2

WEDNESDAY 27 The Pajama Men

CITY THEATRE MAINSTAGE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. through Sept. 7.

IN PITTSBURGH Light Waves / The Red Western

Glostik Willy THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 10:30p.m.

FRIDAY 29

Slightly Stoopid STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

THURSDAY 28 Black Taxi

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. With special guests Heaf &The Deep Vees. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Oddball Comedy and Curiosity Festival

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guests Young The Giant & Kongos. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. 7p.m.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Featuring Sarah Silverman, Bill Burr & more. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 5p.m.

Sworn In

NGHBRS / Off & On

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 6:30p.m.

Comedian Mike Weldon LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through Aug. 30.

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival THROUGH SEPTEMBER 28 WEST NEWTON

guests Young Rising Sons & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 31 Four Chord Music Festival

SATURDAY 30

Kings of Leon: Washed Out MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 2014 Mechanical Bull Tour 412-821-4447. With special guests Small Black. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Bleachers MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special

XTAZA (Formerly Club Zoo) Strip District. 412-720-1396. All ages event. Tickets: fourchordmusicfestival.com. 2p.m.

MONDAY 19

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival WEST NEWTON. All ages event. Tickets: pittsburghrenfest.com. 10:30a.m. Saturdays & Sundays through Sept. 28.

TUESDAY 29 Emily’s Army

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

TRAVELING ON {BY AL HOFF} If you’re going to take an aimless road trip, you might as well go somewhere exotic. In Land Ho!, a low-key indie comedy written and directed by Aaron Katz and Martha Stephens, two older men amble across the rugged, gorgeous terrain of Iceland. Mitch (Earl Lynn Nelson) is a garrulous, up-for-a-laugh retired surgeon from Kentucky, and Colin (Paul Eenhoorn) is a quiet, slightly depressed fellow, long ago from Australia. The pair are ex-brothersin-law, having been married to sisters, but now both are alone, and lonely. Mitch forces Colin to accept his gift of a trip to Iceland — seemingly chosen at random — and they’re off!

Road-trippers Paul Eenhoorn and Earl Lynn Nelson

They spend a couple days in Reykjavik — where food in fancy restaurants is served on rocks — before heading into the country in a Humvee. (Speaking of food, this film opens with a scene featuring ramps! Possibly a cinema first.) They take in the sights — the Lonely Planet guidebook is everpresent — while joking, bickering and opening up a bit to each other. Honestly, not much happens here. It’s 90 minutes of watching two mostly likable guys get their groove back, while surrounded by beautiful scenery. There are a few gentle reminders about the social hazards of growing old, to be countered with the fight to stay engaged and fun-seeking. If that’s enough for you, you’ll enjoy this outing. Starts Fri., Aug. 29. Regent Square

THE FILM IS AS MUCH ABOUT MOLDING PURPOSEDRIVEN YOUNG MEN AS IT IS ABOUT TOUCHDOWNS

L L E NGE A H C M A TE

{BY AL H Pretty much OFF ie ov m } ts or sp l na io at ir — sp r in te y at er m t ev n’ es do ng ni in y of the about how w e, the memor has a speech ty of the gam ti es of tears, nc en sa sc e e th th , team t when all Bu . on it’s about the so ning. Even d an w all about in playing for, is ’re ly ey al th re hen the it on , rs are over dead pe rter’s film W deity-invoking  Thomas Ca d r. te Neil Hayes’ an la on ng in d gi w se ug n man-h rd it tries. Ba so they ca y ha pl w m ho si ball team r ’s te it at , lose gh school foot ning, no m hi in a w ni ed, when teams or om fr lif ay Ca things happen Northern Tall can’t get aw en some bad De La Salle, a Th mojo s of  it Game Stands . y s 03 or se st 20 lo d ue een 1992 an ss. The team the mostly tr lo tw a lls be d te ak players it an re , y ) st el el ok bo inning of unlik m Caviez a 151-game w e stepping-up Ladouceur (Ji th b , e makes Bo er iv h ay at ac pr rr e co na or that racked up e choppy g losses, m isis for head in Th cr at  th ili storyal m n. he ai hu ve a e ag ts up se ral n win ayer, mor including , but Carter se fact, they ca ilt on drills, pr am jerk in te bu , se e re so th ho t be w ng ), ou to ni ig s and ha ow — it’s ab about win nder Ludw t xa kn I le no , (A ’s ow it on an kn s I at Ry th Chris nging. 100 flag and learning ncerns senior embers challe want to throw it emotions co lot made me vidual team m ba di ely, When bp in at to su g m at ed in lti th w U gn si of  llo fo The one de the movie.) e resolution s. r Th er fo . en ay rd en pl tt co t ri re un w ou e iven yo g m t a stat rs were lines ab of purpose-dr e two characte ating him abou ng es be di ed Th ol ot ow : m br qu ed e st is ly th d ve ct d da o in o dire faith an need to get to only these tw out religious the field. (No about feelings is as much ab that contains y ll zz lm Ta fu fi d ds PG an an a St m ar is w s is hi at (T . the Game th r a film ugly tackles t touchdowns s-word.”) But fo ith plenty of he w “t e, as it is abou d er an w ” es no en w heck game sc t to be better profanities: “a s. There’ve go w violent the ct ho fe ef te d no un d so di each other, up with and faith, I ng, all amped them pummel ki ng ac vi cr s ha ad by he an and out brotheryoung men th platitudes ab ed su ways to build -is m oo er-r ntt tto win … driven by lock y y u wan w, iff yo ow no kn uk ou utt,, yo hood. Bu OM .C AP ER AH OF F@ PG

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AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

You’ve likely seen

Richard Attenborough, who died last weekend, as the park owner in Jurassic Park. But all those giant dinos weren’t nearly as unsettling as the amoral teenage punk Attenborough portrayed in 1947’s Brighton Rock — a dark classic of British noir.

NEWS

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL

DIRECTED BY: Thomas Carter STARRING: Jim Caviezel, Michael Chiklis, Alexander Ludwig

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— girls, beer and clueless parents — there was Skynyrd, conversion vans, giant headphones and the cultivation of certain herbs. Drift back in time with Richard Linklater’s nostalgic 1993 coming-ofage comedy, set in Austin in 1976. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 27. Hollywood

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

THE TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE. Running through the woods. Branches snapping. Screaming in terror. The unmistakable sound of a chainsaw revving. Once you’ve seen this 1974 cult-classic flick, shot on a shoestring budget by Tobe Hooper, you’ll never forget these very effective horror scenes. Nor will you ever think about leather furniture the same way again. Some teens, some trees, a twisted family of laidoff slaughterhouse workers — the title says it all. Screens in a re-mastered version. 10 p.m. nightly Fri., Aug. 29 and Sat., Aug. 30. Melwood (AH)

CP

AS ABOVE, SO BELOW. You never know what’s lurking in the catacombs of Paris. John Erick Dowdle directs this found-footage-style horror film. Starts Fri., Aug. 29. THE NOVEMBER MAN. Everything I know about espionage I learned from movies, and it seems to be a hard fact that there is no such thing as a “retired” spy. Former CIA operative Peter Devereaux (Pierce Brosnan, still looking very on-the-job suave) is just chillin’ in Switzerland when an old colleague comes to visit: Can Devereaux go to Moscow and exfiltrate another former colleague who’s got some compromising info about the hard-ass most likely to be Russia’s new president? Of course, everything goes pear-shaped, and Devereaux winds up in Belgrade, Bulgaria, chasing down a mysterious Chechen woman (Olga Kurylenko) and dodging his old buddies from Langley. (Another truth: Never trust your co-workers.) The action in Roger Donaldson’s film is pretty standard: car chases, nimble escapes and shoot-outs, plus a lot of wizardry with mobile phones and computer databases. And November relies heavily on old-school set-ups: handsome spy guy, pretty girl in peril, spy-vs.spy and bad-acting government institutions. It’s another tenet from the Movie Spy Bible: The system is corrupt, and only the rogue agent, the lone wolf with a code, can be trusted. “You just doomed us to another decade of conflict,”

THE MON STER SQUAD. A gang of kids try to rid their town of Dracula, the Wolfman and other classic-horror-film baddies in Fred Dekker’s 1987 comedy. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 27. AMC Loews. $5

The November Man the villain grouses to our hero. Maybe, but another truism is: sequel. (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY

CIN EMA IN THE PARK. Last week for films in the park. Oblivion, Wed., Aug. 27 (Schenley) and Sat., Aug. 30 (Riverview). Planes, Thu., Aug. 28 (Brookline), Fri., Aug. 29 (Arsenal), Sat., Aug. 30 (Grandview) and Sun., Aug. 31 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free

“An INVENTIVE WHODUNIT With a PITCH-BLACK HEART.” Rodrigo Perez, INDIEWIRE

ROW HOUSE CIN EMA. Beer tasting and movie: beer at 7 p.m. Night of the Living Dead at 9:45 p.m., Wed. Aug. 27. Date Night Classics: Princess Bride (everybody’s favorite fairy tale, with kissing), Aug. 27-28. Clueless (1995 Alicia Silverstone comedy), Aug. 27-28. Love Actually (many Brits in love), Aug. 28. Big (Tom Hanks is a giant kid), Aug. 28. Roman Holiday (1953 film starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck), Aug. 28. Intro to Japanese Cinema (from post-war classics to contemporary anime and gangster pics): Princess Mononoke (Miyazaki’s 1997 fairy-tale anime classic; great for kids), Aug. 29-30, Sept. 1-2, and Sept. 4. Tokyo Story (changing life after World War II in Ozu’s 1953 drama), Aug. 29-30 and Sept. 1-3. Nobody Knows (a young boy is left parentless to fend for himself in this 2004 drama), Aug. 29-30, Sept. 1 and Sept. 4. Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 samurai tale told from four differing perspectives), Aug. 29-30, and Sept. 1-4. Brother (Yakuza gangsters go to Los Angeles in this 2000 crime story), Aug. 30, Sept. 1 and Sept. 3-4. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. DAZED AN D CON FUSED. Ahh, to be young in the mid-’70s: Besides the usual thrills and trials

-TheDazed - - -Beaver - -and- - - -Confused -Trilogy -----------------------------AVGeeks - - - - - - - Presents: - - - - - - - - -When- - - - Computers - - - - - - - - Were - - - - Young -------Road- - - - to- - -Ninja: - - - - -Naurto - - - - -the- - -Movie -------------------Zombo’s - - - - - - -Ed- - -Wood - - - - -PJ- -and- - - -Scopitone - - - - - - - - -Party --------(1993) - 8/27 @ 7:30pm

(2000) - 8/28 @ 7:30pm, 8/31 @ 7PM A strange, funny, and ultimately poignant portrait of a true outsider. Starring Sean Penn and Crispin Glover.

8/29 @ 7:30pm - Screening of vintage 16mm films explaining the wonders of this new machine called the computer.

(2012)

8/30 @ 3:00pm, 8/31 @ 3:00pm Anime, based on the TV series. New to the U.S.!

8/30 @ 6:00pm - Music by Vertigo-go and the Royal Shakes, screenings of Ed Wood “classics” Plan 9 From Outer Space and Glen or Glenda.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS

NOW PLAYING 52

PITTSBURGH The Manor Theatre (412) 422-7729

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

WEST HOMESTEAD AMC Loews Waterfront 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

BEAVER TRILOGY. This 2001 film from Trent Harris comprises three parts, shot respectively in 1979, 1981 and 1985. In the first documentary segment, viewers meet “Groovin’ Gary,” a Beaver, Utah, man who does impressions of Olivia Newton-John. In 1981, Sean Penn portrays Groovin’ Gary, and in 1985, Crispin Glover does a further re-imagining of both Gary and Penn’s portrayal. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 28, and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 31. Hollywood MADE IN DAGEN HAM. Rita O’Grady (Sally Hawkins) was a working-class British gal who led women in a 1968 strike against the automaker Ford, a strike which produced new labor laws. Nigel Cole, directing William Ivory’s articulate script, often uses a telephoto lens to create a documentary feel, and the period detail is spot on. The 2010 film continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 28. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412831-3871 or www.battleofhomesteadfoundation. org. Free (Harry Kloman)

CP

WHEN COMPUTERS WERE YOUN G. An evening of screenings from the A/V Geeks Film Archive, a North Carolina-based collection curated by Skip Elsheimer that includes more than 24,000 films gathered from auctions, thrift stores and Dumpsters. Tonight’s selection of 16 mm films are all about the great (or not-so-great) new machine known as “the computer.” Bring an electronic item (no TVs or

OPEN

Noon-5PM Daily and evenings by appointment.

A Rock n’ Roll, Baby Boomer, Collectors Emporium specializing in 50’s, 60’s and 70’s collectables. 3623 California Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15212

4 12 .76 6. 18 4 6 WWW.JAGINCHYSTUFF.COM

[COMEDY]

“WE CAN PRESENT THE PROJECT AS A VIABLE NEW TRAINING SYSTEM.”

COMIC RELIEF

Don’t be fooled by the name: There’s nothing particularly fringe about the comics on the Oddball Comedy Festival. Far from it. Topping this year’s bill are names like Sarah Silverman, Bill Burr, Jim Jefferies and Hannibal Buress (not to mention Louis CK, Aziz Ansari, Amy Schumer and others not on the Pittsburgh date). Funny or Die’s Oddball Comedy and Curiosity Festival is a behemoth. It’s the world’s biggest comedy tour, and it returns to Pittsburgh for a second annual run on Aug. 30. After a successful debut in 2013 with headliners Flight of the Conchords and Dave Chappelle — Pittsburgh attendees might remember Chappelle’s cathartic set after a rough show in Hartford, Conn. — the fest has expanded to six additional cities this year. Once again, there’ll be food-truck amenities, a second stage for local comics and the Cut Throat Freak Show, providing the titular “curiosity” and the festival’s carnival motif. Others performing include Brent Morin, Chris Hardwick, DJ Trauma, Chris D’Elia and Michael Che. The crowds, sword-swallowing sideshows and beer prices give Oddball the feeling of a mainstream music festival — a “full-festival experience,” as its website says. Unlike a mainstream music festival, though, Oddball operates on a weekendonly schedule, with revolving-door lineups that allow the comics to work at home all week then ship out to the next city each Friday. Without that flexible approach, it’d be tough to book all these marquee names on one bill. As a result, the atmosphere is unexpectedly casual. It’s the world’s biggest comedy tour, but they don’t go overboard with spectacle. And that’s a good thing. Spectacle would feel wrong. The appeal of Oddball is in its laid-back presentation. Against all odds, it feels intimate. If there’s a downside, it’s that the conveyer-belt approach keeps every comic to a relatively short set: A dozen or so acts are condensed into a single evening. But for most of the working standups, a spot on a festival like Oddball is more important than the set length. “You work hard to get on a tour like [Oddball],” said Chris D’Elia (of NBC’s Whitney) during a recent teleconference. “Then once you get there, it’s a little bit easier.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE ODDBALL COMEDY AND CURIOSITY FESTIVAL 2014 5 p.m. Sat., Aug. 30. $30400. First Niagara Pavilion, 665 Route 18, Burgettstown. www.oddballfest.com

CORRECTION: In last week’s article “Bang Up Job,” the name of artist Brian Gonnella was misspelled.

Slightly odd: Chris D’Elia

{BY ALEX GORDON}

[ART]

METTLE-URGY {BY DAN WILLIS}

O

N A SWELTERING Sunday morning in August, at Munhall’s Sunday Heritage Market, a couple of young men are trying to figure out the most efficient way to bend a piece of rusty rebar. Their instructor tells them there is more than one correct way, and that they need to choose their method to match the desired goal. It’s not the kind of black-or-white, highly structured rigor you might find in a high school shop class, but that’s the function the program is trying to serve. The Mobile Sculpture Workshop is a pilot program from Pittsburgh’s Industrial Arts Cooperative, a collective of metalworkers and sculptors who have installed many public works over the past 20 years. The IAC’s guerilla projects have included the Carrie Deer, at Rankin’s Carrie Blast Furnaces; its most recent commissioned piece, “The Workers,” consists of two 20-foot-tall human figures built from steel recovered from abandoned mills. And immediately after that sculpture was unveiled in South Side Riverfront Park, in 2012, the IAC launched the Mobile Sculpture Workshop. That project is now taking form as a 6½-foot dove spreading its steel-reinforced

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mobile Sculpture Workshop instructor Chad Sekely, of Turtle Creek, oversees Allderdice student Javon Collins, 16, of Hazelwood, in welding the sculpture’s frame.

wings. It’s significantly more biomorphically detailed than the hard, I-beam edges of “The Workers,” if less impressive in scale. But even before the IAC artists knew what they’d build next, they asked why. By recruiting the youth of Hazelwood

THE MOBILE SCULPTURE WORKSHOP will display its work-in-progress Sat., Aug. 30, outside the Hazelwood Farmstand, 5000 Second Ave., Hazelwood. For more information, visit www.mobilesculpture.org.

to design and build the sculpture, the IAC intends to prove the validity of private apprenticeship programs as an alternative to vocational schools and high school shop classes. Organizers also hope to improve the Hazelwood community by training and paying their apprentices, and eventually installing the sculpture in the neighborhood permanently. Butx the Mobile Sculpture Workshop is as much proof of concept as it is a community service or art installation. “We’re building the sculpture in public this time, because we want to show CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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Check out our new recreational and professional training courses for teens and adults.

Now registering!

GETCreative.ArtInstitutes.edu/Pittsburgh Some of our upcoming courses include: Basics of Wine Tasting* Essentials of Home Decorating Lens Flair: Introduction to DSLR Photography Watercolors for Beginners: Still Lives to En Plein Air Artisan Breads at Home Elements of Garment Construction

A Day in the Sushi Kitchen Telling Tales: A Creative Writing Workshop Red Velvet Cupcakes and More! Trash to Treasure: Furniture Refinishing Sausage from Scratch Game Jam: A Design Workshop

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See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is one of The Art Institutes, a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. 420 Boulevard of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Š 2014 The Art Institutes International LLC. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu. Courses are shorter in duration than our degree programs, are noncredit bearing, and do not transfer into any degree program offered. *Participation in any program involving the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages for those under the legal drinking age will be conducted in accordance with the law. To request accommodations in connection with this event, contact the GETCreative Program Coordinator at _AIPGETCreative@aii.edu.

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Of service, courage, home and friendship. Learn more at picttheatre.org/sons.

Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme By Frank McGuinness Presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

September 4-20

The unforgettable story of an Irish “band of brothers.”

Discount: CP5OFF

412.561.6000 | 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

+++++ “One of the most dazzling displays of comedy theatre I’ve ever seen.”

A SUMMER COMEDY LIKE YOU’VE NEVER EXPERIENCED

—The Times, London

August 27 – September 7, 2014 ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEETS MONTY PYTHON MEETS “SOUTH PARK”!

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY [2489] CityTheatreCompany.org

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[ART REVIEW]

ROBO-PAIN {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

“Limping Machine,” from Bill Vorn and Louis-Philippe Demers’ La Cour des Miracles

A Celebration

people exactly what the program is like,” says instructor Marcus Rettig. “That way we can present the project as a viable new training system.” The current eight apprentices were chosen in May, and began taking weekly introductory welding classes. Any time the students were in the shop, they were getting paid, thanks to a generous community-service grant. And although some instructors were paid too, others were volunteers who set out to show what they were capable of, scheduling events at a dozen separate locations in the Hazelwood-Homestead area. “We had been trying to get into more direct community outreach, and we knew we really wanted to work with Hazelwood,” says project administrator Andy Prisbylla. “We built ‘The Workers’ here and learned a lot about the history.” As a steel boomtown and ethnic crossroads, Hazelwood was once a thriving Pittsburgh neighborhood. But heavy industry is gone, and the neighborhood’s population has been declining for decades; as of 2010, some 26 percent of Hazelwood residents were living below the poverty line. Says Prisbylla, “It’s a neighborhood that feels like it’s on the precipice of some long-overdue re-growth, and we wanted to reflect that with a piece of art.” It’s a truism that between budgetconstrained school districts and a cultural focus on college prep, resources for future blue-collar workers are lacking. Pittsburgh Public Schools still offer vocational programs: Taylor Allderdice High School — where many Hazelwood youths go — has 16 Career and Technical Education Labs, whose curriculum is designed to help students find high-demand jobs immediately after graduation. Still, as with many school initiatives, the future of such programs is uncertain. Thanks to a major grant from a company that declines to be named (plus $1,000 from Awesome Pittsburgh), the IAC is looking to build an innovative new program that will be ready if and when the bell finally tolls for shop class. “We passed out applications at a bunch of high schools in the area, so we could get a group of apprentices from all different backgrounds,” Prisbylla says. “But I get the feeling that the workshop has become an inspiration to all of them. Something about it just feels necessary.” “I go to the Winchester Thurston School, and we have a shop class, but it’s very visual-artsy, not as practical as this,” said one apprentice, Andrew Mullins, while taking a break from grinding the rust off some rebar. “My art teacher recommended the Mobile Sculpture Workshop to me, but I had no idea it would be this much fun.”

In the not-too-distant future, it is easy to imagine, humans will not only have robot helpers and companions but will be robot hybrids themselves. Despite science-fiction depictions of evil robots, such machines are already enmeshed in aspects of our lives like manufacturing, science and health care. In fact, cyborgs and fyborgs walk among us as prosthetics, robotic exoskeletons and even Google Glasses become more advanced and commonplace. Technology exists to serve us. But given our tendency to anthropomorphize inanimate objects, it seems entirely possible that your next Roomba could look like Rosie from The Jetsons, C-3PO or even a Terminator or Transformer. At what point would they become more than appliances? And would their servitude become ethically objectionable, particularly if they were bionic? Thankfully, our technological tools are, for the moment, emotionally neutral. Still, if you think it might be cool for robots to be more like us, check out La Cour des Miracles, at Wood Street Galleries. Curated by Murray Horne, the galleries’ two floors are filled with two installations, one by Bill Vorn and one by Vorn and Louis-Philippe Demers. Both use intelligent robotics to create surreal landscapes of suffering machines. In the first one, the viewer, assaulted by noise, flashing lights and metallic clicks, must navigate a darkened and menacing space of metal barriers, fencing and cages that corral and contain “animats” — neither animal nor human. Disconcerting and clamorous, the installation is at first so unpleasant that you might want to flee. But then you realize that the machines are anguished and miserable, and you start to feel sorry for them. Like those animals at the zoo that pace back and forth incessantly, these creatures also exhibit abnormal behavior. They are misfit machines that limp, whine, groan, screech, convulse and hiss. Some even lash out at visitors. Vorn’s DSM-VI is a more somber immersive environment, despite the grating background noise. Robots here look more human, some with big sad eyes, others with articulated limbs, but they exhibit behaviors found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Their torments are psychological — depression, neurosis, paranoia and delirium. While both installations elicit our empathy, our discomfort takes us only so far. Ultimately there is no way to help these contraptions, and our total indifference gets the better of us. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LA COUR DES MIRACLES and DSM-VI continues through Sept. 7. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RAW MATERIAL {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

NO, THERE’S nothing X-rated in In the Raw: (R)evolution. But the Bricolage Production Co.’s play-development festival is definitely adult entertainment — that is to say, for grownup intellect and perspicacity. What’s “raw” is the creative process, laid bare for and with the audience. The result is two new works with different takes on the themes of community and its subsequent displacement. While each piece has its own playwright and director — all are relative newcomers to Pittsburgh — what’s on stage is a group effort. Each cast, comprising two men and three women (one of them African American), brought a range of talent and input to its script, still a work in progress. The creative process started last month with an audience “town hall” brainstorming session about Pittsburgh, followed by four weeks of collaboration, improvisation and revision. The offering from #TeamIncline (“A” group) is Dis Place, which starts in 1952 with the “urban removal” (as it was often called) of the Lower Hill District to make

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TAMI DIXON}

Bria Walker in #TeamIncline’s show Dis Place

way for the Civic Arena. I’m not sure about the “team” name, except that there indeed once was the Penn Incline from

IN THE RAW (R)EVOLUTION

continues through Sat., Aug. 30. Bricolage Productions, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25 ($40 for both plays). www.bricolagepgh.org

the Hill to 17th Street in the Strip, still in operation back then but never mentioned in the play. The “B” group’s moniker, #TeamBlastFurnace, is easier to relate to: Hymns to Future Tense is set in Homestead, both past and present, with a dose of magic realism. Mountains and rivers literally move (offstage, of course), serving as a metaphor for

the cataclysmic changes that continue to hit this former über-steel town. Dis Place, written by Maureen McGranaghan and directed by Cynthia Croot, is a straightforward narrative. First there’s the breakup of the Lower Hill’s diverse community of blacks, whites, Jews and Christians of many denominations. Jump several generations to today, and we see their plugged-in descendants detached from the sense of neighborhood, and discovering that “place matters.” Bria Walker plays a pivotal role in both eras as the communicator: a DJ and blogger, respectively. Other actors similarly portray generational echoes: Andrew Wind plays a dashing ne’er-do-well and failed father; Jill Keating provides comic relief as the ’52 comic-relief girl pal, then morphs perfectly into modern spirituality with a sense of humor. Lara Miller is a fragile but special flower, while Joel Richardson is the down-to-earth guy. Despite some historical problems and the occasional anachronism, Dis Place rings true. Former Pittsburgh city councilor and activist Sala Udin provides an important cameo and analysis. Hymns, written by Connor Shioshita Pickett and directed by Risher Reddick, is far more ethereal, even exotic, with totally CONTINUES ON PG. 58

Design a Bike Rack The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust invites Pittsburgh area artists (residents of Allegheny County) to design and develop functional bicycle racks to be located along the Penn Avenue corridor from the Convention Center (11th Street) to Stanwix Street. This second phase of the project will produce five more racks with the potential for more to follow.

Questions? Please email staggs@trustarts.org Visit trustarts.org/visualarts/bike for more information and an application.

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different demands on its ensemble. For one thing, it’s very musical — not just the canned variety but also live singing and strumming. There’s even an original song, “Bridge to Nowhere,” by cast members and improv masters Connor McCanlus and Missy Moreno. The “bridge” symbolizes the disharmony between father and daughter portrayed by Chris Josephs and Kelly Trumbull: Their more personal plotline weaves through the larger story of the Coming Change, and how the people prepare and react. Lauren Ashleigh Bethea comes into her own as a soul-singing preacher (a contrast, perhaps unintentional, to Keating’s modern priest in Dis Place). All the actors are multi-cast, often seamlessly moving from children to adults and seniors, and from swingers to churchgoers. Moreno and McCanlus bring a yinzer sensibility to the classic notion of “wise fools,” and add drama to the plight of a young woman and her teenage brother hanging onto the remnants of “family.” Josephs plays not just one geezer but two, kindly and otherwise, plus a bar stud. The ambitious Hymns nevertheless fails to really gel. The characters are still unformed, the sub-themes about race and sexuality too timid. Where Dis Place jumps

Cavacini ni

into potential controversy with both feet, Hymns shies away. In structure, the former is very literal, the latter more literary. But both provide engrossing entertainment and talkbacks after each performance — of which there are only a few left. The proof of their success will be in whether there are future productions. Thanks for this one to dramaturge and project manager Annie DiMario, assistant Tyler Crumrine, production manager Alicia DiGorgi, lighting designer Mark Bailey and stage managers Katie Keirs (Dis Place) and Brandon Martin (Hymns to Future Tense). I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

SOUTH/BOUND {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

A POTENT history lesson of a musical is elo-

quently staged by Front Porch Theatricals. Parade is the story of Leo Frank, a pencil-factory superintendent in Atlanta

PARADE continues through Sun., Aug. 31. Front Porch Theatricals at The New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-30. 888-718-4253 or www.frontporchpgh.com

Vast selection of gardening supplies, decorations, and plants, ensure that you’ll find the perfect plant or accent for your yard or garden.

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MUMS

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100 51 51st st STREET • LAWRENCEVILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

OF MICE AND MEN SEPTEMBER 5-21

aJOHN STEINBECK kROBERT A. MILLER

who in 1913 was falsely convicted of the murder of a 13-year-old girl who worked at his plant. Frank was a double outsider — a Brooklyn-bred Jew in the post-Reconstruction South — and this often grim but consistently engaging 1998 show forcefully pins his fate on rank provincial anti-Semitism. Creators Alfred Uhry (book) and Jason Robert Brown (music and lyrics) are fueled by righteous anger, but their vision is fairly complex. Leo himself is a prickly fellow, incompletely sympathetic even in his innocence. The demonization of industry in the not-yet-New South is explored. (Victim Mary Phagan was a poor rural white whose family moved cityward for work.) While the rumor and frame-up that doomed Leo are abetted by an evil reporter, the villains in Parade include some who think they’re heroes — and others fully aware of their corruption. And just when you’re asking whether Leo really represents the most oppressed demographic in pre-World War I Atlanta, here comes “Rumblin’ and a Rollin’,” a number in which two black characters bitterly note that Frank’s topical plight gets more out-of-state sympathy than their historic one. Still, this is a show, not a seminar, and Front Porch knows it. Director Benjamin Shaw’s staging is vibrant, his pace brisk. The talented cast includes Jesse Manocherian as Leo, Daina Michelle Griffith as his put-upon (but ultimately heroic) wife, Lucille, and Joe Jackson in two zesty supporting roles. And Justin Lonesome’s show-stopping “That’s What He Said” makes perjury criminally entertaining. Brown’s brilliant suite of songs steeped in gospel, ragtime and blues range from an elegy for the Old South (“a way of life that’s pure / a truth that must endure”) and a heartbreaking funeral song for murder victim Mary to the bracingly satirical “Come Up to My Office,” in which Manocherian breaks character to act out some factory girls’ coerced characterization of Leo as a proto-hepcat Lothario. Parade might make you weep for humanity, but you’ll still feel like applauding at the end.

DIRECTOR BENJAMIN SHAW’S STAGING IS VIBRANT, HIS PACE BRISK.

DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

CURB APPEAL {BY TED HOOVER}

RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES, PRODUCING DIRECTOR

PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM OR 412.392.8000

Stop, I remembered a local college production last season, and the friend I’d coerced into going with me. After so many years of enduring bad theater at my side, members of my circle usually remember a previous engagement if I suggest seeing a show. But I’d promised my friend that not even the most “artistic” of directors could mess up this quintessential comedy, set in a rural bus stop/diner on the Kansas plains where, due to a snow storm, the passengers are stranded for the night. So we walked into the theater and found that the director had set the production in a zombieapocalypse wasteland; a bombed-out bus inside of which the actors stood mute until they made their entrances, some tumbleweeds and a yellow line across the stage with some tables and chairs. This diner wasn’t roadside: It was in the middle of the road. I don’t think my friend has ever forgiven me. So whatever else I want to say about the Summer Company’s production, I want to commend director Justin Sines for not setting it in a zombie-apocalypse wasteland. John E. Lane Jr. has, in fact, designed a lovely (and textually appropriate!) set, proving that you can do a lot with little money if you have a good eye. The only downside is that everything’s a little too new and scrubbed clean for this tale of worn-out people in a worn-out place.

ON MY WAY to the Summer Company’s production of William Inge’s classic Bus

BUS STOP runs through Sat., Aug. 30. The Summer Company at Peter Mills Auditorium, Rockwell Hall, Duquesne University campus, Uptown. $10-15. 412-243-6464 or www.thesummercompany.com

An empathetic Roberta Honse and punchy Michael McBurney, as diner proprietor and bus driver, have been sanded down enough by disappointment to settle for the fleeting joy they find. A melancholic Richard Eckman and rock-ribbed Everett Lowe, as an old ranch hand and sheriff, are wise enough to know which battles to pick; Patrick Conner is the drunk, lascivious Dr. Lyman. Caitlin Young, Moira Quigley and Ross Kobelak as Elma, Cherie and Bo, provide youthful optimism and high spirits, giving this production enjoyable energy. I can’t say that this is a definitive Bus Stop — Sines allows a dragging pace, for one. But at least there’s not a zombie in sight. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.2809.04.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Fred Seifried and Second City Improv alum Chrissy Costa. Dan Willis 8 p.m. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. Free. www.gabbonesso.com

+ SAT., AUG. 30 {FESTIVAL}

AUG. 28 {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIA BOADA}

Jeffrey Condran

+ THU., AUG. 28 {WORDS} Jeffrey Condran, an assistant professor of English at the Art Insitute of Pittsburgh, also co-founded Braddock Books, an up-and-coming local publisher. But Condran still finds time to write. He has followed up his fine story collection A Fingerprint Revealed with his first novel. Prague Summer (Counterpoint Press) concerns the intrigue that results when an expat American bookseller and his diplomat wife are visited by an old friend in a bind. Tonight’s the book-launch party, at East End Book Exchange. Condran reads with fellow local writers Sherrie Flick and William Lychack. Bill O’Driscoll 7-9 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www. eastendbookexchange.com

+ FRI., AUG. 29 {COMEDY} Are you good at staying quiet? If you answered “yes” aloud, you might need to hone your skills before attending Shhh!, the latest installment of local absurdist Gab Bonesso’s Cheap Date Factory comedy series. The free show at Harvard & Highland cocktail bar challenges audience members

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to remain silent the longest while Bonesso and her co-host Neal Rosenblat try to make them laugh by any means possible (except touching). Winners receive gift cards for Harvard & Highland or iTunes. In between competitive rounds, the hosts conduct interviews with local celebrities including ’60s Greenwich Village resident

Inspired by British youth culture of the 1960s, the fifth annual Steel City Mods vs. Rockers rally takes place today on the streets of Millvale. And whether your allegiance is with the leather-clad bikers or the buttoned-up scooter enthusiasts, you can drop by to check out some vintage bikes or even show off your own. Awards are given to the best bikes in each of 10 categories, and ladies are encouraged to participate in the pin-up modeling contest. Live music is provided by Nox Boys, Thunder Vest and DJ Ian. Vendors include Franktuary, Rocker Regalia, MotorRad and South Hills Cycle. DW Noon. Butler Street and Grant Avenue. $5-10. www. steelcitymodsvsrockers.com

AUG. 29 Shhh!

sp otlight Shenoah Allen and Mark Chavez’s self-titled, hour-long comedy spectacular The Pajama Men — which begins its nine-show Pittsburgh-premiere run on City Theatre’s main stage on Aug. 27 —is pretty inexplicable, but there are still some leading theories. “People always tell me that because we’re wearing pajamas, they think our show is supposed to be like a dream,” says Chavez in a phone interview. “That’s not where it comes from, but it definitely fits.” The two creators and stars met in high school, in New Mexico; they were trained in variety-show-style sketch comedy, and designed The Pajama Men with a loose plot as outlined by a series of loosely defined, seemingly unrelated scenes. It’s dream logic, but they fill in all the blanks with improv, just to keep on their toes. And thanks to Allen’s penchant for sound effects, alongside Chavez’s absurdist, self-referential bent, their shows have toured internationally. Among this tour’s sketches are an encounter with a group of people with oddly similar names (Christine, Kristen, Kirsten), and a gossipy bit where the duo imitate members of the audience. And all while wearing velvety sleepwear and no shoes. As Chavez says, “It’s just a basic outfit and we didn’t want to do any costume changes, because it’s a seriously fast-paced show.” Dan Willis Aug. 27-Sept. 7. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-40. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

{STAGE} Year-old gallery and artistresidency program Bunker Projects has teamed with the Mr. Roboto Project to put on the inaugural Performance Art Festival. The free, day-into-night festival in Bloomfield features artists and collaboratives both local and national. So even if you get a little bit weirded out when someone walks on stage and starts eating garbage in front of your face, have no fear. This festival has something for everyone. Performers include Pittsburgh native Mario Ashkar, performing a lipsyncing drag routine, and NYC experimental dance troupe Cocoon, which turns its dancers into “moving sculptures” by encasing them in fabric. Other performers include Pittsburgh’s Ella Moriah Mason (pictured). DW 4-11 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-440-8422 or www.bunkerprojects.org

{WORDS} In the press release for Labor Saturday, a themed reading at East End Book Exchange, the writers and poets emphasize the motley collection of jobs they’ve worked. Novelist and poet Dave Newman has been a truck-driver, bookstore manager, air-filter salesman. Essayist and poet Adam Matcho is an obituary writer who’s clerked in a mall novelty store. Poet Stephanie Brae has slung coffee and worked for a company that builds museum exhibits. And Jason Baldinger “has spent a life in odd jobs,” and if that’s not enough, he just published a poetry chapbook titled The Studs Terkel Blues. But let the readers do all the work at this BYOB event. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield.

NEWS

+ SUN., AUG. 31

Free. 412-224-2847 or www. eastendbookexchange.com

at The Priory were already paid for. Left holding lemons, Laboon says, he’s going on with the party — except now {FUNDRAISER} {SCREEN} it’s a fundraiser for Surgicorps This space seldom touts $75 Celebrate low-low-budget International, an all-volunteer, events, but LemonAID is cult classics and more with Pittsburgh-based charity that unique. It’s what happened the Ed Wood Pajama and sends doctors to developing Scopitone Party at the countries to repair cleft lips, Hollywood Theater. The cleft palates, burn scars and evening, presented by other deformities. With help DJ Zombo, offers two from a big raffle, and all Wood films — the proceeds going to alien-and-monsters Surgicorps, Laboon thriller Plan 9 From {PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH hopes to raise $50,000 Outer Space (1956) CULTURAL TRUST} tonight, enough to and the 1953 crossfund one Surgicorps dressing drama Glen overseas mission. All or Glenda. Scopitones SEPT. 02 that, and you won’t (short wacky films from even have to do the 1960s that are akin Kenny Blake the Electric Slide. BO to music videos) will 6-11 p.m. 614 Pressley St., also be screened, and North Side. $75. www. Vertigo-go will be on hand eyeflow.com/lemonaid to play live music. If you’re feeling competitive, come {STAGE} prepared for the trivia quiz when local Internet marketing In its 24th year, the Pittsburgh and/or the “Wildest Pajamas” entrepreneur Phil Laboon, New Works Festival soldiers contest. Al Hoff 7 p.m. just three weeks from his big on. The biggest local Sat., Aug. 30. 1449 Potomac wedding, suddenly had to showcase for new one-acts Ave., Dormont. $10 ($5 call it all off. (Don’t ask.) And by playwrights from across if wearing pajamas). of course, the gourmet food, the country is also a proving 412-563-0368 or www. open bar, DJ and ice sculpture ground for area stage talent, thehollywooddormont.org with these comedies and dramas produced by small troupes. This year’s fest runs Sept. 4-28, but it’s warming AUG. 30 up with evenings of staged Performance f Art Festival readings at Off the Wall Theatre. Tonight, see “Roadway to Heaven,” by Marla E. Schwartz (produced by Prime Stage Theatre); “Shadows,” by Austin Uram (R-ACT Theatre Productions); and “Blowjobs in the Park,” by Tyler Jennings (Industrial Gardens). The show is free. BO 7 p.m. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. www. pittsburghnewworks.org

+ TUE., SEPT. 02 {MUSIC} Blending traditional jazz

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values with modern R&B flavor, nationally known tenor saxophonist Kenny Blake has been an important part of the Pittsburgh jazz scene ever since the ’70s, when he rose to fame as part of local fusion group King Solomon. And tonight, as part of BNY Mellon’s JazzLive series, he’s playing a free show at Downtown’s Agnes Katz Plaza. Also a session player for the legendary Heads Up

+ WED., SEPT. 03 {KARAOKE} “500 Miles,” “Don’t Stop Believing” or “Grenade”? So many choices for contestants at Steel City Karaoke, the new team-based karaoke league. This affiliate of the multi-city United Karaoke launches its 10-week season tonight, at the Bloomfield

AUG. 30 Steel City Mods vs. Rockers record label, Blake has played with groups like Cabo Frio and Pieces of a Dream, as well as being a part of the label’s in-house supergroup. Tonight’s performance features Blake in a combo setting, performing a mix of standards and contemporary pieces. DW 5 p.m. Seventh Street and Penn Avenue, Downtown. Free. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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Bridge Tavern. The bracketstyle competition for eightmember teams includes solo and group performance rounds. Today’s also the last day to register — but even if you just watch, you can vote for your favorites. A season champ will be crowned in November. BO 7 p.m. 4412 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. www.steelcitykaraoke.com

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61

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BUS STOP. William Inge’s

August 30th PennRock Scholarship

FINALS

The Altar Bar 1620 Penn Ave

Enjoy a Straub during the show!

classic American comedy. Presented by the Summer Company. www.thesummer company.com Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Peter Mills Theater ( Duquesne, Rockwell Hall ), Uptown. 412–243-6464. THE DEATH OF DR. PEPPER. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., Aug. 30, 9 p.m. South Park Club House, South Park. 412-833-5599. THE FOURSOME. Norm Foster’s comedy about 4 friends who get together to play a round of golf at their 25th college reunion. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE GOSPEL SINGER. Isaac Dumont has received a cult following as “Ruthie” in The Eden Club, a jazz haven where his partner, Donnie, serves as emcee. Isaac’s dream is to sing the gospel music his mother loved, a dream that frustrates Donnie, who has lost faith in

himself and God. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun. Thru Aug. 31. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. IN THE RAW: (R)EVOLUTION. Using the audience to generate source material, 2 teams of local theatre artists work together to create 2 new plays inspired by Pittsburgh’s landscape, people, history & future. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. LATE NITE CATECHISM LAS VEGAS: SISTER ROLLS THE DICE. The convent needs a new roof, so the order has decided that Sister will organize a Las Vegas night. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, Sun, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 10. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. PARADE. The true 1913 story of Leo Frank, a Brooklyn Jew accused of murdering a young girl in his Atlanta, Georgia pencil factory. Presented by Front Porch Theatricals. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 31. New

FULL LIST ONLINE

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Hazlett Theater, North Side. SQUABBLES. A cautionary tale of what happens when PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS parents move in w/ their FESTIVAL. Staged readings children. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. to open the festival. Sun, and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31. Off Sept. 7. Apple Hill Playhouse. the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-468-5050. 724-873-3576. TAMARA. Play by John Krizanc. PLAY ANGEL. 2-person play Presented by Quantum about indecision, innocent Theatre. Wed, Thu, Sat, blood, & heavenly rewards. 7 p.m. and Tue, Sun, Feat. the music of 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. The 20 Digit Orchestra. Rodef Shalom Congregation, playangel.wordpress.com Oakland. 412-362-1713. Sun., Aug. 31, 4 p.m. The New Bohemian, North Side. 412-551-6994. SHREK THE MUSICAL. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. COMEDY Thru Sept. 6. Comtra www. per pa OPEN MIC. Thu, pghcitym Theatre, Cranberry. o .c 9 p.m. Thru 724-591-8727. Sept. 25 Hambone’s, SOUTHERN COMFORTS. Lawrenceville. A taciturn Yankee widower 412-681-4318. & a vivacious grandmother OPEN STAGE COMEDY from Tennessee find themselves NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, stuck inside his house together Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. through a nasty storm. Thu-Sat, PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Sept. 7. South Park Theatre, Theater Square, Downtown. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY THU 28

THU 28 - SUN 31

THE PAJAMA MEN. Critically-acclaimed sketch comedians. Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 7 City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

FRI 29

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. COMEDY ROYALE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE HARVEY WALLBANGERS. Sketch comedy troupe. 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. LAST FRIDAYS W/ DAVON MAGWOOD. Feat. a rotating cast of comedians. Last Fri of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 26 Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-251-6058. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. THE REVEREND BOB LEVY. 10 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668. CONTINUES ON PG. 65

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

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VISUALART DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Opens Sept. 1. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. PENN AVE. Performance Art Festival. Feat. works by 20 artists & collaboratives from Pittsburgh, DC, New York City, Baltimore, Richmond, Chicago, Boston, & Philadelphia. Aug. 30, 4-11 p.m. Bunker Projects & Mr. Roboto Project, Penn Ave., Garfield. Garfield. 412-440-8422. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. Opens Sept. 1. North Side. 412-231-7881.

ONGOING

709 PENN GALLERY. Monotype Prints: An Exploration of Color. Work by Jo-Anne Bates. Downtown. 412-456-6666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Recent Work by Mary M. Mazziotti. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Untangled. Work by Elaine Bergstrom & Charles Sawyer. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting,

& digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. The Pittsburgh 10. Group show of 10 local artists. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099.

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FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. THE FRAMESMITH. Lisa Marie Jakab on View. Paintings, drawings, & prints. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-0300. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Hidden & Revealed. Work by Todd Sanders & Jason Schell. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Once Again Calm. Surreal minimalist landscapes by Thomas Frontini. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. Banking The Fire. Lithography prints by Keith Clouse. 412-464-4020. CONTINUES ON PG. 65

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 62

VISUAL ART

FRI 29 - SAT 30

KEVIN NEALON. 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 30, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. MIKE WELDON. Aug. 29-30, 8 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SPINSTER COMEDY PRESENTS BEST OF THE GREATEST HITS: 1492-2014. Aug. 29-30, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Investigations in Terraforming. Prints by New Academy Press. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Time & Place. Paintings by Tom McNickle. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169.

SAT 30

CAFE AU LATE NIGHT. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. LOUIS C.K., SARAH SILVERMAN, AZIZ ANSARI, AMY SCHUMER, JIM GAFFIGAN, BILL BURR, CHRIS HARDWICK, WHITNEY CUMMINGS. The Oddball Comedy & Curiosity Festival presented by Funny or Die. 5 p.m. First Niagara Pavilion. 724-947-7400.

SUN 31

SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 02

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 03

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. Third Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 1 Gay & Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. 412-422-0114.

CONTINUED FROM PG. 63

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual Exhibition. Curated by Joan McGarry. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland,

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. THE PAJAMA MEN. Critically-acclaimed sketch comedians. Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 7 City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew,

Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves. Work by Masha Fikhman, Zack John Lee & Travis K. Schwab. Gallery talk w/ Jessica Beck Aug. 22, 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. SHAW GALLERIES. Ruth Levine: Radiant Life. More than 30 works of art by the late Ruth Levine. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Collective Unconscious. Photographs by Jay Brown, Melissa Catanese, Ross Mantle, Matthew Newton, Jake Reinhart, Justin Visnesky. unsmokeartspace.com/ index/#/collective-unconscious. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition by Sue Pollins, Doreen Currie, Michael McSorley. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. DEPRECIATION LANDS Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome MUSEUM. Small living (planetarium), Miniature history museum celebrating Railroad and Village, USS the settlement and history Requin submarine, and more. of the Depreciation Lands. North Side. 412-237-3400. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. CARRIE FURNACE. Built FALLINGWATER. Tour in 1907, Carrie Furnaces the famed Frank Lloyd 6 & 7 are extremely Wright house. rare examples of 724-329-8501. pre World War II FIRST PRESBYTERIAN iron-making CHURCH. Tours . w technology. Rankin. of 13 Tiffany ww per a p ty ci h pg 412-464-4020 x.21. stained-glass .com COMPASS INN. Demos windows. Downtown. and tours with costumed 412-471-3436. guides featuring this restored FORT PITT MUSEUM. stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. Reconstructed fort houses CONNEY M. KIMBO museum of Pittsburgh history GALLERY. University of circa French & Indian War Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: and American Revolution. Memorabilia & Awards from Downtown. 412-281-9285. the International Hall of Fame. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Oakland. 412-648-7446. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of

FULL LIST ONLINE

Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor CONTINUES ON PG. 66

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

THURSDAY AUGUST 28/10PM

EMO NIGHT 16 THURSDAY SEPT 4/10PM

DAILY GRIND THURSDAY SEPT 11/10PM

MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPERS, SOUL KITCHEN, SKINNY TIE CLUB $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 65

rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. 412-621-4253. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

DANCE SAT 30

AMAISTWOORMORE. Dance & music by Lilly Abreu, Mariana Batista, Lea Havas, & Naoko Hirai. PearlArts Studios, Point Breeze.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

FUNDRAISERS FRI 29

6TH ANNUAL RUN YOUR ROX OFF 5K RUN & 1-MILE WALK. Benefits the McKees Rocks Community Development Corporation. 6:30 p.m. Miles Bryan School, McKees Rocks. 412-331-9900. JAZZ IT UP: CELEBRATING THE PITTSBURGH SOUND. Live jazz, vendors, auction, more. Benefits The Academy for Music Enrichment. www.eventbrite.com/e/ jazz-it-up-tickets-11874602255 8-11 p.m. Mary Pappert School of Music, Uptown. 412-396-4632.

SUN 31

SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 30

LABOR SATURDAY READING. Poetry & prose by Dave Newman, Adam Matcho, Stephanie Brea, & Jason Baldinger. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

MON 01

OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. LEMONAID. Gourmet food, open bar, silent auction, DJ Eric Schiemer, more. JAPANESE Benefits Surgicorps CONVERSATION www. per a p International. 6 p.m. CLUB. First pghcitym o .c The Priory, North Side. and Third Tue of 412-325-8033. every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DORMONT DOGGY DIP. Swim KID’S BOOKS FOR sessions for your dog, raffles, GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. more. Benefits the Western First Tue of every month, Pennsylvania Humane 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Society & the Dormont Pool. Sewickley. 412-741-3838. 4 p.m. Dormont Pool, LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Dormont. 412-321-4625. Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. UNLEASHED: ARTIST PARTY 412-422-9650. & DOG FASHION SHOW. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL Kick-off party for the Arts PHILOSOPHY READING Day of Giving feat. emcees GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. PhatManDee & Hollyhood. East End Book Exchange, 6-9 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. North Side. 412-391-2060 x 227.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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MON 01

WED 03

LITERARY THU 28

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafter happyhour.wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. JEFFREY CONDRAN. Book launch for Prague Summer. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 03

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 28 - FRI 29

RECYCLABLE WEAVING. Re-purpose old plastic bags into art. Thru Aug. 29, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 28 - SUN 31

XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

[WORKSHOPS ]

Whether you’re a tea drinker with adventurous tastes, or never ventured beyond Earl Grey, there’s plenty to learn at the Wildflower Reserve of Raccoon Creek State Park’s Wild Teas program. The 314-acre reserve boasts one of the most biodiverse selections of wildflowers in Pennsylvania, including more than 700 species of flowering plants. Saturday, instructor Vince Curtis shares information on how to make — and offers a chance to taste — teas from some of these local (and, of course, edible) plants. 10-11:30 a.m. Sat., Aug. 30. 3000 State Route 18, Hookstown. Free. 724-899-3611 or www.visitpaparks.com

THU 28 - MON 01

SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

THU 28 - WED 03

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 29

CAMPOUT STORYTIME. Fri, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 30

KIDS/FAMILY FRIENDLY OPEN MIC. 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 30 - SUN 31

THE FANCY ROMANCER’S WHISPER BOOTH. Reflect, release, respond, & appreciate the love & joy in your life. Sat,

Sun, 12-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Aug. 29-30, 8 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

TUE 02

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

SUN 31

DISCOVERING THE WILDFLOWER RESERVE HIKE. 3.5 mile hike. 1-3 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611.

WED 03

WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

TUE 02

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

OUTSIDE

WED 03

FRI 29 - SAT 30

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by The Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Aug. 29-30, 6:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get upclose and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat.

OTHER STUFF THU 28

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m.

benefit for Circle C’s 12th annual rgh area! bu at-risk kids in the Pitts

Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HARNESS THE SUN: SOLAR HOME PROJECTS & ENERGY SAVING TIPS. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh @gmail.com. LEGAL RESOURCES IN PITTSBURGH: THE PRO BONO CENTER. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MT. LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Drawing workshop. Fourth Thu of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. POP GENERATION. Educational tours & complimentary refreshments for ages 65+. Last Thu of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SLIDE RETROSPECTIVE OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY’S ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

S HELP KID UES!

LOSE THE BL

pt. 13 day, Sept 7pm - Saturd n’ roll by... With blues, soul & rock

Billy the Kid and the Regulators

Cash Bar, Great Food, Silent & Chinese Auctions $30 AT DOOR • $20 IN ADVANCE • 4129371605 x227 Proceeds benefit the kids at Circle C Youth & Family Services

Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers Building 10 SOUTH 19TH STREET • SOUTH SIDE Find us on facebook! • www.circlec.net

School of Social Work

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

FRI 29

CHATLINE TM

4TH ANNUAL PITTSBURGH CIRCLE OF COURAGE AWARDS. 6:45 p.m. DoubleTree Monroeville. 412-321-2240. ABRE TU NEGOCIO: STARTING A BUSINESS—IN SPANISH. 6-9 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-1633.

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

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OPEN:

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Celebrating 20 Years! Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

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(412) 771-8872

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BACK TO BASICS BURLESQUE W/ CHARLEE MONROE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Begin at Lower Parking Lot of the Duquense Incline, Downtown. 9 a.m. 412-323-4709.

FRI 29 - SAT 30

HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223. PA STATE ATHEIST/ HUMANIST CONFERENCE. atheistpa.org Aug. 29-31 DoubleTree Hotel, Downtown. 989-430-8184.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Improv Showcase at the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival, Oakland CRITIC: Sai Ramachandran, 35, web designer visiting from Atlanta WHEN: Fri.,

Aug. 22

My friends were coming and I thought I’d join them. I haven’t seen much improv before, but I really thought this was fantastic. All three acts were really fun to watch, but those last guys, Cackowski & Talarico, were just incredible, particularly the way they would remember and refer to tiny little details from 15 minutes before. I guess this is the first time that the comedy festival is happening, but I’m really excited to see if it comes back. Pittsburgh’s a great city, and it deserves this kind of stuff. The more interesting acts like this we can get, the better. BY DA N W I L L I S

SAT 30

BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CITY OF CHAMPIONS! THE PITTSBURGH SPORTS HISTORY TOUR. Begins at Duquesne Incline, 1220 Grandview Ave, Mt. Washington. 9-11:30 a.m. COOKING @ THE LIBRARY: INDIAN CUISINE W/ A VEGAN TWIST. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. THE ED WOOD PAJAMA PARTY. Ed Wood double feature, live music, more. 7-11 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MEDITATIVE YOGA FLOW. Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 30 Crafton Park, Crafton. 412-999-9153. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VEGETABLE PRESERVATION WORKSHOP. 10 a.m. Buffalo Inn, South Park. 412-835-4810. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 31

SAT 30 - SUN 31

TUE 02

HUNTING & FISHING EXPO. Aug. 30-Sept. 1 Meadows Casino, Washington. 724-503-1200.

AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN EXPLORATION IN FILM. Screenings of works by experimental black filmmakers. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. SEWICK’S CHICKS. Behind-the-scenes, selfguided tour of the backyard chicken coops of Sewickley. www.theitaliangardenproject. com 11 a.m.

MON 01

RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

HOW: HANDS-ON WORKSHOP SERIES — PRESERVING THE HARVEST. 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 03

singers. Nominations due by Sept. 5. chfl218@gmail.com 412-977-2047. UNDERCROFT OPERA. Auditions for our 2014-2015 season. Aug. 28-31. www.under croftopera.org/community/ audition/ Waverly Presbyterian Church, Regent Square. 412-422-7919.

welcome, must make a commitment to Saturday rehearsals. www.hopeacademy arts.com East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR. Auditioning young singers. Visit www.themendelssohnchoir.org or call for information. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 412-926-2488. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056.

SUBMISSIONS ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening Sept. 28. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.-

DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAKE IT HAPPEN IN Join the MWCDC at Olympia Park on Sept. 9 for Urban MON VALLEY. Program EcoSteward Fall Invasive Plant Training. EcoStewards presented by the Institute adopt a section of park to care for throughout the year; for Entrepreneurial Excellence. 5:30 p.m. the training program provides information on identifying Carnegie Library of and removing invasive plants, and other tips for Homestead. 412-648-1544. keeping our parks healthy. Email judith@mwcdc.org or THE PITTSBURGH visit www.mwcdc.org. SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. 2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. MCKEESPORT LITTLE Union Project, Highland Park. aapgh.org FrameHouse, THEATER. Auditions for 412-363-4550. Death by Chocolate. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. SPANISH II. Geared toward Sept. 14-15. Comedic actors those who already have a THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY & actresses ages 21+, 2-min. basic understanding of HOUR REVIEW. Seeking comic monologue & cold Spanish & are interested in submissions in all genres readings. www.mckeesport increasing proficiency. First for fledgling literary magazine littletheater.com and Third Wed of every curated by members of McKeesport. 412-673-1100. month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. the Hour After Happy THE MENDELSSOHN Carnegie Library, Oakland. Hour Writing Workshop. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. 412-622-3151. afterhappyhourreview.com Auditions for all voice TEA CLASS & TASTING. THE IRMA FREEMAN parts. Call or visit www. History of tea, steeping CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. themendelssohnchoir.org techniques, Storing Tea, Accepting submissions for for information. Third Health Benefits, more. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Tea samples & European Artists IV. Seeking work 724-263-5259. cookies will be served. by artists who live here, NEW HORIZON THEATER. First Wed of every moved away; solo or Auditions for Queens month, 7 p.m. collaborative. Deadline: Sept. 13. Of The Blues. Margaret’s Fine Email sheiladali@irmafreeman.org Sept. 6. 4 AfricanImports, Squirrel Hill. for information. Irma Freeman American females 412-422-1606. www. per Center for Imagination, mid 30’s-60 & 2 pa WEST COAST SWING pghcitym .co African-American Garfield. 412-924-0634. WEDNESDAYS. males late 30’sSwing dance lessons. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking mid 50’s. newhorizon Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, original essays about literature, theater@yahoo.com South Side. 916-287-1373. music, TV or film, & also essays PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS generally about Pittsburgh. THEATRE COMPANY. To see some examples, visit Auditions for the 2014-15 ADVANCED LABOR & www.newyinzer.com & view the season. Sept. 20-22. Actors CULTURAL STUDIES. current issue. Email all pitches, of all ages, ethnicities, & Auditions for a live radio submissions & inquiries to backgrounds are encouraged production of The Thin Man newyinzer@gmail.com. to audition, prepare 2 Comes to Pittsburgh. Ideal SILVER EYE CENTER FOR contrasting contemporary candidates will have experience PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking monologues. www.pgh w/ sketch comedy or live submissions for Fellowship 15. playwrights.com/auditions. radio & performing music Submit a 1-page Artist’s Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, from the 1930s-40s. Statement in PDF format, Downtown. Complete this form by a biography/CV in PDF PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Aug. 31: alcstudies.org/newformat, & work sample to ORCHESTRA STUDENT upcoming-events/auditions/ . www.silvereye.org/f15apply/. CHORALE. Open to high HOPE ACADAMY ARTS. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for school students in grades Auditions for HAT’s Teen Rock information. 10-12, as well as college Band. Sept. 6. All instruments

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

My boyfriend of two years cannot climax or maintain an erection unless his testicles are handled, squeezed, pulled or pressed on (preferably with my stockinged foot or knee). N eedless to say, intercourse does not work very well, and our sexual repertoire is rather limited. His doctor says his ED is not physiological. I would love to try to “rewire” him; we have started trying to conceive, so we need him to ejaculate successfully at least a few times per cycle (to increase our chances but also for sperm health). We are in our mid-30s, so I don’t want to wait months for him to increase his sensitivity. What would you suggest? ALMOST RESIGNED TO A TURKEY BASTER

My first suggestion is that you drop the stigmatizing and unhelpful talk about ED (“erectile dysfunction”). Your boyfriend’s dick works — he can obtain and sustain an erection, he can blow loads. He just requires a very specific and inconvenient form of stimulus. My second suggestion is to accessorize. He needs to have his balls handled, squeezed, pulled and pressed on? There are toys for that! At Mr. S Leather (mr-s-leather.com), for instance, you’ll find all sorts of metal and silicone ball stretchers; some of them lock, some are electrified and some snap on with magnets. This is complicated to explain — it would be easier to show you, but I don’t make house calls — but try to picture this: You roll up one of your stockings, put his balls in the toe, bolt a ball stretcher around his now-stocking-wrapped sack, and then unroll the stocking. Then yank on one end of the stocking either with your toes (pulling his balls down) or with your hand after pulling the stocking up through his crack and over his shoulder (pulling his balls back and up). Voilà! Your boyfriend’s balls are being handled, squeezed and pulled on during PIV intercourse, you’re doing the pulling, and your stockings are in play! Work with his kink and there’s no need to waste time retraining him — and who knows? A few dozen successful PIV/ball-stretcher sessions could help your boyfriend make the leap to plain ol’ PIV. Quality metal ball stretchers aren’t cheap; a good one will set you back $150. But they’re cheaper than fertility treatments and sexier than turkey basters.

bonus, and we moved on. Now I’m thinking about it a lot because seeing him satisfied is a major turn-on for me. But rather than just doing it, I’d like to enjoy it. Do you have any suggestions for helping me sexualize it in my mind? PISS IS SORTA SEXY

Nothing will sexualize piss for you as effectively as seeing the effect it has on your boyfriend. Just do it, as they say, and even if piss play never becomes your thing, your boyfriend’s enjoyment of it (his excitement, his gratitude) should provide you with all sorts of bank-shot thrills. (Please note: Don’t do it first thing in the morning.) And to kinky readers dating vanillas: Do you see what PISS’s boyfriend did? He disclosed his kink (“into piss”), downplayed it (“not a requirement”) and dropped it (“moved on”). Now PISS, having grown more attached to his boyfriend, is coming around on his own. Disclose, downplay and drop isn’t a foolproof strategy — there’s no guarantee a partner will come around — but it’s more likely to work than, say, the “present, pressure and pout” strategy that too many kinksters employ.

“I’M NOT AWARE OF AN ALTERNATE MEANING FOR SANTORUM. MAYBE SOMEONE SHOULD COME UP WITH ONE?”

I’m considering having a threesome with a couple, but the friend I routinely confide in about my sexual adventures has warned me against it. She had a threesome once, and it didn’t go well — there were jealousy issues that resulted in heartbreak — and now I don’t know if I should risk it. THIS HESITATION IS REALLY DRAINING

Your friend is right: Threesomes don’t always go well. So you should stick to twosomes, THIRD, which always go perfectly, present no potential jealousy issues and never result in heartbreak. I’m a 53-year-old woman. From 1971 until my daddy died in 2001, he and I played cribbage nearly every week. It’s a card game where points are recorded with pegs that fit into tiny holes in a wooden “cribbage board.” That process is called “pegging.” Well, thanks to you, I can’t use that term anymore without snickering like an 11-yearold. What term do you suggest I substitute for “pegging” the next time I play cribbage? PERPLEXED EXPERT PLAYER

My husband has seen a professional dominatrix for more than a decade. We’ve gotten to know her socially, but I feel she should stop charging my husband for sessions, as we are now friends. She is a “lifestyle dominant” and enjoys her job. THE VANILLA WIFE

My lawyer is a “lifestyle arguer,” he enjoys his job, and I see him socially — and I pay him for his services, because he is a professional. The same goes for your husband’s dom. I am a gay man in a new relationship. My boyfriend is amazing, and our sex life is hot. We’re very open with each other, so he was comfortable telling me that he’s into piss. I’ve never done anything like that before, so he said it was not a requirement, just a

I’m a cribbage player, too, and while we refer to the thingies we move around our cribbage board as pegs, we don’t call the process of moving them “pegging.” Maybe that’s a regional thing? But words can have more than one meaning. Pegging can mean “a woman fucking a man in the ass with a strap-on dildo” and also mean “moving your pegs around a cribbage board,” just as pussy can mean “domesticated cat” and “lady parts,” or santorum can mean “the frothy mix of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex” and … actually, I’m not aware of an alternate meaning for santorum. Maybe someone should come up with one? On the Lovecast, Dan and the awesome Mary Martone argue about fat shaming: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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*Stuff We Like

FOOTBALL EDITION Upcycle Designs Steelers Skirt Now your favorite little person can cheer on the Steelers in style. Each skirt is made from “pre-loved” shirts and is one-of-akind, though Pittsburgh sports teams make frequent appearances. www.etsy.com/shop/ upcycleddesign

Friday Night Lights TripleHeader The heart and soul and controversy of small-town high school football. Pick your delivery system: 1990 H.G. “Buzz” Bissinger book, 2004 movie or 2006-2011 TV show.

Logo of the Eastside Panthers Youth Football Team Painted on a piece of plywood and hanging on the fence at Sullivan Field, in Lawrenceville. The Black Panthers also used this logo. g

Steelers-Themed Baked Goods at Bethel Bakery Cakes, cookies, cupcakes, even a good-luck pretzel. Our pick: the cake shaped like a ’70s-style knit cap. 5200 Brightwood Road, Bethel Park

Brian’s Song The 1971 TV movie about Chicago Bears Gayle Sayers and Brian Piccolo, and the cancer that destroyed their bromance. A sports-weepie classic: On its release, President Nixon said the film was a “beautiful production” that “every American should see.”

Against Football: One Fan’s Reluctant Manifesto Author and essayist Steve Almond (Candyfreak) got g tons of hate mail for asking in The New York Times whether football’s too dangerous. He fo broadens the argument in this b new n book, chronicling the sport’s violent past and the reality of v inevitable head trauma.

Mean Joe Greene Always and forever.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.27-09.03

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): As you know, real confidence has no bluster or bombast. It’s not rooted in a desire to seem better than everyone else and it’s not driven by a fear of appearing weak. Real confidence settles in when you have a clear vision of exactly what you need to do. Real confidence blooms as you wield the skills and power you have built through your hard work and discipline. And as I think you already sense, Virgo, the time has come for you to claim a generous new share of real confidence. You are ready to be a bolder and crisper version of yourself.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

As I understand your situation, Libra, you have played by the rules; you have been sincere and well-meaning; you have pressed for a solution that was fair and just. But that hasn’t been enough. So now, as long as you stay committed to creating a righteous outcome, you are authorized to invoke this declaration, originally uttered by the ancient Roman poet Virgil: “If I am unable to make the gods above relent, I shall move hell.” Here’s an alternate translation of the original Latin text: “If heaven I cannot bend, then hell I will stir.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“Start every day off with a smile and get it over with,” said the misanthropic comedian W.C. Fields. I know it’s weird to hear those words coming from a professional optimist like me, but just this once I recommend that you follow Fields’ advice. In the near future, you should be as serious and sober and unamusable as you have ever been. You’ve got demanding work to

attend to, knotty riddles to solve, complex situations to untangle. So frown strong, Scorpio. Keep an extra-sour expression plastered on your face. Smiling would only distract you from the dogged effort you must summon. Unless, of course, you know for a fact that you actually get smarter and more creative when you laugh a lot. In which case, ignore everything I said. Instead, be a juggernaut of cheerful problem-solving.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Mahalia Jackson (1911-1972) was a renowned African-American gospel singer who lent her talents to the civil-rights movement. Martin Luther King Jr. often called on her to be an opening act for his speeches. She was there on the podium with him on Aug. 28, 1963 in Washington, D.C. when he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. In fact, it was her influence that prompted him to depart from his prepared notes and improvise the stirring climax. “Tell them about the dream, Martin,” she politely heckled. And he did just that. Who’s your equivalent of Mahalia

get your yoga on!

Jackson, Sagittarius? Whose spur would you welcome? Who might interrupt you at just the right time? Seek out influences that will push you to reach higher.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

When Europeans first explored the New World, ships captained by Italians led the way. But none of them sailed Italian ships or represented Italian cities. Cristoforo Colombo (today known as Christopher Columbus) was funded by the government of Spain, Giovanni de Verrazzano by France, and Giovanni Caboto (now known as John Cabot) by England. I see a lesson here for you, Capricorn. To flourish in the coming months, you don’t necessarily need to be supported or sponsored by what you imagine are your natural allies. You may get further by seeking the help of sources that are not the obvious choices.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Walter Kaufman had a major role in clarifying the meaning and importance of Friedrich Nietzsche. His English translations of the German philosopher’s books are benchmarks, as are his analyses of the man’s ideas. And yet Kaufman was not a cheerleader. He regarded Nietzsche’s Thus Spake Zarathustra as brilliant and triumphant, but also verbose and melodramatic: a “profusion of sapphires in the mud.” I love that phrase, Aquarius, and maybe you will, too, as you navigate your way through the coming weeks. Don’t just automatically avoid the mud, because that’s probably where you will find the sapphires.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

I’m not tolerant of greed. Acquisitiveness bothers me. Insatiableness disgusts me. I am all in favor of people having passionate yearnings, but am repelled when their passionate yearnings spill over into egomaniacal avarice. As you can imagine, then, I don’t counsel anyone to be piggishly selfindulgent. Never ever. Having said that, though, I advise you to be zealous in asking for what you want in the coming weeks. It will be surprisingly healing for both you and your loved ones if you become aggressive in identifying what you need and then going after it. I’m confident, in fact, that it’s the wisest thing for you to do.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

In the coming weeks it will be important for you to bestow blessings and disseminate gifts and dole out helpful feedback. Maybe you already do a pretty good job at all that, but I urge you to go even further. Through acts of will and surges of compassion, you can and should raise your levels of generosity. Why? Your allies and loved ones need more from you than usual. They have pressing issues that you have special power to address. Moreover, boosting your largesse will heal a little glitch in your mental health. It’s just

what the soul doctor ordered.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

The Icelandic word hoppípolla means “jumping into puddles.” I’d love to make that one of your themes in the coming weeks. It would be in sweet accordance with the astrological omens. You are overdue for an extended reign of freelance play … for a time of high amusement mixed with deep fun and a wandering imagination. See if you can arrange to not only leap into the mud, but also roll down a hill and kiss the sky and sing hymns to the sun. For extra credit, consider adding the Bantu term mbuki-mvuki to your repertoire. It refers to the act of stripping off your clothes and dancing with crazy joy.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

During the course of its life, an oyster may change genders numerous times. Back and forth it goes, from male to female and vice versa, always ready to switch. I’m nominating this ambisexual creature to be your power animal in the coming weeks. There has rarely been a better time than now to experiment with the pleasures of gender fluidity. I invite you to tap into the increased resilience and sexy wisdom that could come by expanding your sense of identity in this way.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

I’m getting the sense that in the coming days you will be more casual and nonchalant than usual. More jaunty and unflappable. You may not be outright irresponsible, but neither will you be hyper-focused on being ultra-responsible. I suspect you may even opt not to be buttoned and zippered all the way to the top. It’s also possible you will be willing to let a sly secret or two slip out, and allow one of your interesting eccentricities to shine. I think this is mostly fine. My only advice is to tilt in the direction of being carefree rather than careless.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

In his novel Les Miserables, French author Victor Hugo chose to write a convoluted sentence that was 823 words long. American novelist William Faulkner outdid him, though. In his book Absalom, Absalom!, he crafted a single rambling, labyrinthine sentence crammed with 1,287 words. These people should not be your role models in the coming weeks, Leo. To keep rolling in the direction of your best possible destiny, you should be concise and precise. Straightforward simplicity will work better for you than meandering complexity. There’s no need to rush, though. Take your time. Trust the rhythm that keeps you poised and purposeful. Imagine it’s 40 years from now and you’re telling God the worst things and best things you ever did. What would they be? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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MODELS: Women wanted for figure modeling. Good pay, same day.

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Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

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Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

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Squirrel Hill Duplex

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

2 units avl. 2BR or 3BR. Eq. kitch w/dishwasher, h/w flrs, gar, w/d, near bus, univ. & shops.

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY

BIRTH CONTROL CALL TODAY!

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This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking.

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

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Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers.

Compensation will be provided. For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999

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talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio*

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LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

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www.invisionhs.org www.burns-scalo.com

Start your career at the Top! Burns & Scalo Roofing specializes in all aspects of roofing, including commercial and residential roofing, sheet metal/metal wall panels, repair and maintenance, waterproofing, and green renewable services such as solar and vegetative roofing.

We are seeking Experienced Roofing Technicians. These positions will work directly on our commercial and residential job sites. JOB QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE: · Reliable transportation is a must (includes Pittsburgh and surrounding areas). · 2 Years roofing experience with commercial and/or residential applications · Ability to lift 75 pounds, stand/walk, pull, bend over, work on knees regularly, work at heights, use ladders, and tolerate work outdoors at varying temperatures · Possess Customer Care focus and have ability to communicate effectively with people from diverse backgrounds · Permissible background check including clean drug screen and references · Strongly Preferred: Valid Driver’s License and personal transportation · Experience with Smart Phones or running a job site a plus Full Benefit Available: Includes Paid vacation and holidays, comprehensive medical benefits, retirement plan with company match, and other supplemental benefits.

QUESTIONS OR TO APPLY: Visit http://www.burns-scalo.com/roofing/index.php/our-company/careers to print an application OR Submit your resume via - email: jobs@burns-scalo.com Mail to: Burns & Scalo Roofing- Human Resources, 22 Rutgers Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Call Human Resources - (412) 458-3884 Walk in’s are welcome to complete an application. Burns & Scalo is an EEO (Veterans, Disabled, Women/Minorities) and Military Friendly Employer, and has a GI Bill Approved OTJ Apprenticeship Program for Veterans.

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mainstaylifeservices.org

IN-HOUSE

Innovative Approach. Shared Vision NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF Looking for a non-traditional schedule? Work 2 ½ days and be a full-time employee with a once a week commute! We are currently seeking staff to support adult males 1:1 in our Comprehensive Living Program in the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties. Work a FT block shift (56 continuous hours with two sleep periods running Sun-Wed, Wed-Fri, & Fri-Sun). Steady schedule. Priority attention will be given to those able to work the Fri-Sun schedule. Other openings include FT & PT Awake Overnight positions as well as Support Staff openings. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off. Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org Questions? Call a recruiter at 724-933-5166

reer a C air F

On the spot interviews: September 17th | 9:30 am – 3 pm 200 Roessler Road | Pittsburgh, PA 15220

Now Hiring: Residential Direct Care Staff FT afternoon/weekend – $10.30/hr + benefits FT overnight – $9.79/hr + benefits Substitute – $9.54/hr (flexible hours) Assist adults with developmental disabilities with daily living in community homes throughout the South Hills area.

In-Home Direct Care Staff PT Substitute – $11.83/hr (flexible hours) Provide 1:1 support to individuals with developmental disabilities throughout North, South and East Allegheny County. Assist with a variety of integrated community activities and/or personal care.

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GENERAL FOR SALE

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $32.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888992-1957 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

GENERAL FOR SALE

Adopt:

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED

Loving couple promises your baby a life of secure endless love.

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

Christine + Tom 888-316-5136 Exp pd.

412-403-6069

Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023. CPRB PITTSBURGH

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on September 23, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for five Service Contracts (General Prime) at Various schools for the following: • Roofing • Masonry • Fire Extinguisher and Fire Hoses • General Construction • Asbestos, Lead Based Paint, Mold and Animal Excrement Abatement Services; Repair, Restoration and Re-insulation

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on August 18, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. l Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 l www.pps.k12.pa.us NEWS

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

412-401-4110

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

322 Fourth Ave.

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR

China Massage

Superior Chinese Massage

Open 24 hrs

$60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

724-519-7896

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

MASSAGE

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

Grand Opening

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology Mon. – Sat. 10am-9:30pm Sunday 2pm-9:30pm 1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2 McKees Rocks

412-777-7171

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Xin Sui Bodyworks

TIGER SPA

76

Asian 888 Massage

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

WELLNESS

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Recovery Without Judgement™

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

GET HELP NOW

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Alcohol & Drug Treatment Services

Pregnant?

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 1-800-243-1001

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

www.myjadewellness.com

www.glenbeigh.com

We can treat you!

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Let Us Help You Today!

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz NEWS

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YES

TAKE NAP WITH CAT

NO

NO

IS CAT BEING PISSY?

YES

ADOPT DOG

TAKE WALK; FEEL VIRTUOUS

NO

YES

NO

NO

DO YOU HAVE A DOG?

DO YOU LIVE ON NORTH SIDE?

MAKE CAT VIDEOS

YES

STAY INSIDE; TAKE NAP

IS IT A HOME GAME?

YES

DO YOU HAVE A CAT?

OPEN A L PTOP;T STARE A WALL S YE

NO

IS IT RAINING?

WATCH CAT VIDEOS ON PHONE

DON’T WANT TO WATCH STEELERS GAME?

YES

YES

NO

YE S

YES

IS SOMEONETV USING THTECH TO WA GAME?

IS THERET A MY CALL FROM HEON MARATH ON?

YES

BUT IS IT A CRITICAL GAME?

YES

NO

NO

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.27/09.03.2014

WHO CARES

YE S

NO

MEET THE PRESS RE-PLAY?

DO YOU HAVE CHIPS?

WHO CARES

REALLY? THERE MIGHT BE CHIPS.

GO SHOPPING; BUY CHIPS

NO

YES

78

THINK AGAIN. EVERYBODY HAS A NOVEL IN THEM.

HUNGRY?

LAW AND: ORDER SVU ?

WATCH; TAKE NAP

GRAZE; TAKE NAP

NO

NO

NO

DO YOU HAVE A NOVEL IN YOU?

EAT THEM. IT’S GAME DAY.

LU

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Y DR R U X

GIVEAWAY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 23 & 30

DRAWINGS 1PM - 8PM | 5 WINNERS EACH HOUR!

SATURDAYS | EARN 10X ENTRIES - SUNDAYS | EARN 5X ENTRIES - MONDAYS | EARN 3X ENTRIES 6:00AM - 11:59PM

Visit RIVERSCASINO.COM FOR COMPLETE DETAILS

KIOSK DRAWING

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM Must have valid ID. Earn entries August 11 at 6:00am through August 30 at 7:59pm. Must be present to win. 25 base points = 1 entry. Must be a Rush Rewards Players Club member. Car options include 2014 Mercedes-Benz® CLA45 AMG®, 2014 Lexus® GS 350 and 2014 BMW® 143W 328xi S. Lexus® is a registered trademark of Toyota Motor Corporation. BMW® is a registered trademark of Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Corporation. Mercedes-Benz® and CLA45 AMG® are registered trademarks of Daimler AG Corporation.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


August 27, 2014