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CRITICAL QUESTIONS: BIOPIC LIFE ITSELF REVIEWS LIFE OF AMERICA’S BEST-KNOWN REVIEWER 37

EVENTS 7.20 – 6:30pm SOUND SERIES: BAND OF HORSES, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MIDLAKE Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets are $36/$40 day of show; for tickets visit www.ticketmaster.com

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

8.15 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

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8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Her life was a Cabaret.

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10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

THE COLOR.

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The artist's hand and Navajo Point Diamond at the Grand Canyon, 2012. Photo: Allison Watkins. Courtesy of the artist.

ARTIST TALK AND OPENING

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

Friday, July 18, 2014 6:30 p.m.: Artist Talk 7:30–9 p.m.: Exhibition open; Reception with cash bar FREE! Join us for this lively presentation by Corey Escoto on the eve of his first solo museum show. Learn about his two- and three-dimensional works which meditate on the production and consumption of illusion. Part of the city-wide 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial.

07.16/07.23.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 29

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[NEWS] “I think this whole thing actually 06 causes more problems than we had in the first place.” — South Side resident Sarah Heiber on the city’s residential parking-permit program

[VIEWS] part of a PR plan: It’s better than 16 “It’s saying, ‘We’re the boring company who would like to operate according to the rules.’” — Economist Mark Price on the secret to ride-sharing’s success

[TASTE] new school versus old school.” 19 “It’s Bobby Fry on the upcoming “pizza dojo” between Pizza Boat and Bread and Salt

[MUSIC] trouble with the schedule, waking 24 “Iuphave that early. It’s, like, really early: 5:30 in

[SCREEN] foreknowledge doesn’t stop this 37 “Grim being a tense, and enjoyable, film.”

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] “My mother got 80 phone calls saying they were going to cut off my head and put it in a bucket of shit.” — Author Israel Centeno on the threats he faced in Venezuela

[LAST PAGE] batter hits until he makes an out. 62 “A Otherwise, he can swing away for the rest of recorded time. Or so it feels.” — Abby Mendelson on the ultimate pastoral sport: cricket

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 STUFF WE LIKE 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 +

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{PUBLISHER}

— Rebecca Nuttall on Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

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{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

{ADMINISTRATION}

the morning.” — Marissa Nadler on teaching art in between touring stints

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“WHAT WE AGREE ON IS: PEOPLE USE THE SOUTH SIDE FOR A PARKING LOT.”

INCOMING RE: Bye Lines (July 9) In his July 9 Potter’s Field column, Chris Potter did a creditable job in encapsulating the life of the unique and inimitable late billionaire Richard Mellon Scaife (“Bye Lines”), noting his many contributions to this region and his contradictions. I did not know nor ever meet Mr. Scaife. I suspect from all that I have read and heard that he could be extremely difficult and dictatorial, traits which I do not endorse, but which are probably common in those with a net worth of his reported $1.4 billion. I will choose to remember him for the positive, innumerable and enduring contributions bestowed upon this region by him and his family, the most notable for me being, as Mr. Potter duly notes, the provision of a second major daily newspaper with talented staff members. Mr. Scaife was quoted as saying that a city with only one newspaper is “impoverished.” Pittsburgh, then, is an embarrassment of riches in its availability of periodicals. The Tribune-Review has been made available to the reading public for peanuts. I often disagree with the Trib’s editorial opinions and the harsh and dismissive manner in which it sometimes states them, but I am and shall be thankful every day to Mr. Scaife for providing us this publication, a gift which is expected to endure due to a trust fund he set up to fund operations over the long term. Mr. Scaife did not have to contribute money to worthy individuals and organizations, but he did, to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars over the years. He considered philanthropy to be an obligation for someone with his resources. A knowledgeable individual was quoted as saying that one cannot walk very far in Downtown Pittsburgh without stumbling upon something for which the Mellon and Scaife families were responsible. It has often been written since his death that Mr. Scaife always insisted that he receive no publicity for his acts of kindness and benevolence. Regardless of what one thought of Richard Scaife’s views and political activism, I recognize him as a person who did what he thought was right, and I consider him a patriot. I thank him for helping to make the Pittsburgh area great, and I hope that he is at eternal rest and peace. — Oren Spiegler Upper St. Clair

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Permit parking could reduce congestion for residents on this section of Jane Street, in the South Side.

PARKING PROBLEMS P

ARKING IN THE South Side at night

or on the weekends can be hit or miss. Paid parking meters and lots fill up fast and spots on residential streets are sparse. But it’s even worse for the residents who live in the densely populated neighborhood. A newly proposed residential permitparking district seeks to remedy parking issues for a segment of South Side residents. However, some critics of the plan wonder if it will create more problems than it solves. In addition to causing hassles for small-business owners and residents outside the proposed permit area, they say the city’s antiquated permit system won’t adequately address parking problems in the neighborhood. “Over the years, we’ve heard a lot of people complain about residential permit parking,” says Candice A. Gonzalez, execu-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

tive director of the South Side Chamber of Commerce. “A lot of business-owners are unhappy; a lot of residents are unhappy.” The city’s Residential Parking Program was created in the 1980s, primarily to keep commuters from using residential streets as parking lots. In most neighborhoods,

Will more permits ease South Side residents’ woes? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} visitors are given a grace period, and receive a $45 ticket if they stay longer. Of the city’s 34 zones, 29 are enforced between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. But parking issues in the South Side are unique. While the neighborhood’s close proximity to Downtown is a draw for commuters, residents experience most of their

parking issues from night-life traffic at bars and restaurants on Carson Street. “There’s definitely a parking problem,” Gonzalez says. “There’s not enough parking to meet everyone’s needs, but a lot of people are unhappy with the permit program itself and they say it doesn’t serve their needs.” The new South Side zone would extend from 22nd to 29th streets south of Carson and impact approximately 700 household units and 10 streets, including Jane Street, Larkins Way, Sarah Street and Carey Way. In an effort to address nighttime parking issues, the district would be enforced from noon to midnight Monday through Saturday. There are already two other zones in the South Side with enforcement hours until midnight. In the proposed zone, Pittsburgh Parking Authority enforcement officers must wait two hours before ticketing a car, so if a car CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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C H A U TA U Q U A I N S T I T U T I O N • C I W E B . O R G Boyz II Men live at Heinz Hall with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra! Boyz II Men remains one of the most truly iconic R&B groups in music history. Recently celebrating their 20th anniversary, the band has penned and performed some of the most celebrated classics of the past two decades, including “End of the Road,” “I’ll Make Love to You,” “One Sweet Day,” “Motownphilly” and many others.

To purchase tickets, visit pittsburghsymphony.org or call 412.392.4900.

ACROSS THE NATION, WE’RE STEPPING UP ON BEHALF OF OUR FRIENDS, OUR FAMILIES AND OUR FUTURE. EVERYONE HAS A REASON TO END ALZHEIMER’S — AND EVERYONE CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.

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PARKING PROBLEMS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

The new proposed South Side parking-permit zone

is parked at 8 p.m., it couldn’t be ticketed until 10 p.m. But because the zone is only enforced until midnight, anyone parking after 10 p.m. could not be ticketed. And there are only two enforcement officers from the Pittsburgh Parking Authority assigned to monitor the zones after 5 p.m. For these reasons, Daria Brashear, who lives in the proposed zone, worries enforcement won’t be effective. “The problem is people who don’t want to pay to park at night, who come to Carson Street,” Brashear says “You’ve created a system that nominally addresses the problem you have, and then there’s no teeth to it.” But program administrator Ashley Holloway, from city planning, says the city is trying to adapt permit parking to meet the evolving needs of neighborhoods. “In the past, nighttime enforcement was not available, but things are changing,” says Holloway. “My department, along with the Pittsburgh Parking Authority, has recognized that in some communities parking has become an issue at night. We are both working together to address the issue and resolve it to the best of our abilities.” And in the face of criticisms about permit parking, Holloway emphasizes that the program is a resident-driven initiative. In order for a street to qualify, 70 percent of residents must petition for permit parking. But Gonzalez, who also worked as the Neighborhood Initiatives coordinator under former mayor Luke Ravenstahl, says she’s heard people express concerns about whether those residents who voted for permit parking are permanent South Side residents.

“One concern has been that a lot of transient residents are making these big decisions about permit parking, but they’re there for a year or two and then they’re gone,” Gonzalez says. A public hearing before city planning will be held Tue., July 22, to further gauge community support, and the expansion will ultimately have to be approved by city council. In addition to community support, a study was done by Holloway to determine the extent of parking congestion in the proposed area. Surveyors check the license plates of cars parked in the area to find out how many are registered to addresses outside of the neighborhood. Seventy-five percent of the spaces must be filled and 15 percent must be taken by non-residents in order for a street to qualify. Houses on approved streets can receive parking passes for up to three cars at a cost of $ 20 each per year, and one visitor pass for $1 per year. Smallbusiness owners can only receive one pass and one visitor pass — another flaw in the system, critics say. “The noon-to-midnight enforcement is affecting businesses, like hair salons, that can’t [accommodate] their customers in two hours, but there’s a two-hour limit,” Gonzalez says. For businesses in the proposed permit zone with multiple employees, parking would also be more challenging. But City Councilor Bruce Kraus, who represents the South Side, says it’s no different than employees who work Downtown and must either pay to park or take public transit.

“WHAT IS BEING SOUGHT HERE IS A SENSE OF BALANCE SO BUSINESSES AND RESIDENTS CAN LIVE IN HARMONY.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PARKING PROBLEMS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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Tight parking along Jane Street near 26th Street

“It doesn’t meet the needs of every business, because they [may] have more than one employee, and I understand that,” says Kraus. “But what is being sought here is a sense of balance so businesses and residents can live in harmony.” While Kraus has heard from residents on both sides of the debate, he says that since permit parking is a “resident-driven process, I tend to take a hands-off approach.” Still, he believes expanding the permit program is the best possible solution to

South Side’s parking problems. “The number-one call I get from constituents — regardless of the neighborhood I represent — is always parking,” Kraus says. “This is the best solution that addresses the all-day parkers and the people who use the neighborhood as a parking lot.” Parking isn’t a problem for every residential street in the South Side, and for that reason, some streets don’t qualify, or didn’t petition for permit parking. But if these streets are excluded from the proposed CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PARKING PROBLEMS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

zone, they could become the new destination for outside visitors looking for a free parking space. “I’ve lived here eight years and I’ve never had serious issues with parking,” says Sarah Heiber, 32, who lives in the 2300 block of Larkins Way. “But I figure if everyone else around us is going to have these permits, we need [them] too, because otherwise we’re going to become a free-for-all for outside parking.” Heiber and some of the other residents in the proposed zone live on streets where cars must be moved for a few hours one day a week for trash pickup. “I wasn’t originally for the permit, but the reason I changed my vote to yes is because when we move our cars for garbage pickup, [we’d] have to park far away, because surrounding streets have permit parking,” Heiber says. That’s why when Heiber saw her street had initially been excluded, she went scrambling to get additional signatures from her neighbors. As a result, her street is now included, and other residents are attempting to do the same. But not all South Side residents are currently eligible for permit parking. They worry their streets will soon become overcrowded. “There’s a number of residents who want this for themselves, and I don’t blame them,” says resident Jonathan Growall. “I’m not going to fight my neighbors, but now if we’re surrounded by this zone we’re going

to become a free zone.” Growall sees another solution: creating one zone for all of the residential areas in the South Side. Although it wouldn’t address every issue with the permit system, it would keep streets, like his, that are excluded from the parking-permit zones from becoming flooded with visitors. “What we agree on is: People use the South Side for a parking lot,” Growall says. “I don’t think anyone disagrees that that should be curtailed. I want to see the whole neighborhood done.” As far as the impact zones have on surrounding streets without permit parking, Holloway says he’s looking in to meeting with more South Side streets in the future to create additional zones. He also says there are reasons neighborhood-wide zones don’t work. In addition to problems with enforcement, he says, it would create cross-parking, where residents from one end of the zone can routinely park on an opposite end of the zone. “The zone will be too large for an enforcement officer to walk on a daily basis and make it harder to catch visitor’s-pass violators,” Holloway says. So the system’s limitations and questions about whether the expansion will curtail parking congestion have left some wondering if the district should be expanded at all, especially those who felt forced to opt in. “I think this whole thing actually causes more problems than we had in the first place,” Heiber says. RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

IDIOTBOX

Summer with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

July 25 . 7:00 PM

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Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Resident Conductor Lawrence Loh and the Pittsburgh Symphony throw a summer symphonic celebration ˇ featuring Dvorák’s Carnival Overture. Enjoy a breathtaking performance of Rachmaninoff’s Concerto No. 2 for Piano featuring Olga Kern and Brahms’ Symphony No. 3.

august 2 . 7:30 PM

Triple Play!

Join the Pittsburgh Symphony, conductor Christian Capocaccia and Xiayin Wang for a one-of-a-kind summer concert with light classical favorites, virtuoso piano fireworks and music from the silver screen. “Triple Play” offers something for everyone during a unique concert experience featuring The Tales of Hoffmann, Concerto in G major for Piano and Orchestra and suites from “Pirates of the Caribbean,” “Batman: The Dark Knight Rises” and more!

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July 19–20 Celebrate the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing! • Learn about current space travel and how it differs from the bigscreen version.

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ROUTE QUESTIONS Baldwin residents pushing the conversation on transit route restoration {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} WHEN PORT AUTHORITY eliminated Bet-

ty Bickar’s bus in 2011, her daily roundtrip commute ballooned from 40 minutes to over three hours. “The old bus used to stop in front of my house,” explains the 67-year-old, who often leaves her Baldwin home at 4 a.m. to start a 6 a.m. shift at the South Side Giant Eagle. The journey requires her to walk about a mile to catch a bus that is often overcrowded — and she worries about how she would earn a living if she became physically unable to walk to her stop. Bickar isn’t alone. At a July 9 meeting in Baldwin Borough — a community of about 20,000, located 8 miles south of Downtown — about three dozen residents met to discuss their progress on a campaign, organized by Pittsburghers for Public Transit (PPT), to convince Port Authority to restore a version of the 50-Spencer. That route was cut as part of a 15 percent service reduction in 2011 — an era marked by financial crisis at Port Authority and transit agencies across the state. Today, however, Port Authority

is on firmer financial ground, thanks to a transit bill passed late last year that PAT says will wipe out hundreds of millions of projected deficits. Some transit activists, community members and state political leaders say the new funding should give the agency enough room to bring some of the routes back — even in a limited capacity. Legislators met with Port Authority before and after the transit bill was passed and “we indicated there ought to be some conversations about restoration of service,” says state Rep. Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill). “[Port Authority] expressed a willingness to look at restoring service to some of the routes that had been discontinued. […] It would surprise me if they didn’t consider it at all.” From Port Authority’s perspective, though, that’s not something the transit agency is in a position to seriously consider. “We have a list a mile long of requests like that, and it’s not just people who are showing up at the board meetings,” says Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie, who did not provide cost estimates for

running individual routes. “It would only take restoring a few routes before that money is maxed out.” Instead, Ritchie explains, the authority is focusing on “service enhancements” — like adding more buses on existing routes that are overcrowded, and rolling out real-time tracking of its 700-bus fleet. State Rep. Dom Costa, a member of Port Authority’s board, thinks the focus should be on route restoration, calling it his “primary concern.” While the Stanton Heights Democrat says the agency can’t act as a “valet” that provides service to every household, he adds, “I think there’s funding in the new budget that will allow us to look at some routes and restore them.” Molly Nichols, a community organizer for PPT, says about a dozen Baldwin community members recently met with Port Authority officials to talk about restoring service there — a meeting some residents said was “encouraging.” “They’re working on enhancing existing service and what we’ve been asking is, ‘What about people who still don’t have a bus?’” Nichols says, emphasizing that those enhancements represent costs that could be allocated to some limited service restoration. She points to ridership numbers that show that Baldwin’s 50-Spencer route “had an average ridership of 500 per day before it was cut, and now they don’t have that service at all. It’s a question of what you prioritize.” According to a December 2013 ridership report, there are several routes that tend to operate with fewer than the 50-Spencer’s 500 average weekday rides, including the 18-Manchester (454), 60-Walnut-Crawford Village (386), 68-Braddock Hills (400) and the 78-Oakmont (219). “Where did we fall?” asks Patricia Davis, property manager at Churchview Garden Apartments, a Baldwin complex whose units have been harder to rent out after the cuts. “Was it 600 people we had to have?” Port Authority’s Ritchie explains that deciding how to reduce service is more complicated than merely lopping off the routes with the lowest ridership. “Cut-

ting service is not necessarily a scientific process. […] It’s more driven by the financial necessity. That’s why you see what you see in communities like Baldwin.” Few Baldwin residents know the issue like Mike Harms, a driver who’s been with Port Authority for 17 years. He acknowledges there’s no promise of restored service, but thinks the campaign has a good shot at succeeding if they’re realistic. “A lot of people want service from 6 in the morning to 9 at night — that’s just not going to happen,” he says, adding that he doesn’t speak for the transit union, or Port Authority. But he says there should be enough rush-hour demand to bring some limited service back, especially since the community is only a couple miles from transit centers like the West Mifflin garage and the South Busway. “My argument has always been it makes sense to restore routes that are closest to Downtown,” Harms says, “If this community keeps the pressure on, they’re going to do it.” But some observers contend that if routes can be added, it should be done on the basis of hard numbers, rather than on who exerts the most pressure. “It should be based upon looking at maps that tell you where the zero-car households are and where the sidewalks are, where the concentrations of poverty are, where the concentrations of walkable properties are,” says Chris Sandvig, regional policy director at the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group. But while Costa says he wants to see some service restored, it’s not clear how the Port Authority would go about it. “If you’re going to have public hearings, everybody is going to say their route is most important,” he says. And for his part, Ritchie notes, “there’s no requirement to hold public meetings on route restoration,” adding Port Authority would not hold those meetings on its own accord. But after years of cuts, hardly anyone has much experience with adding service. “We spent the last decade fighting like hell to keep the system from disappearing,” Sandvig says. “There’s no road map to know how to put service back.”

“IT MAKES SENSE TO RESTORE ROUTES THAT ARE CLOSEST TO DOWNTOWN.”

A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

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A CONFESSION: I haven’t used either of the city’s ride-sharing services. But I’m already impressed by their ability to get everyone else on board. Take Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto’s July 10 press conference celebrating Senate Bill 1457, which would establish new rules permitting ride-sharing within city limits. On hand were what Peduto, a vocal ridesharing supporter, called an “interesting pairing” of “progressive Democrats with free-market Republicans,” the latter group including suburban legislators John Maher and Mark Mustio. Lyft and Uber drivers have been ferrying about passengers without such a law, and despite sanctions by the Public Utility Commission. Usually, Republicans are all about law and order, but it’s not like these guys are Occupy Pittsburgh: Lyft and Uber are billion-dollar companies backed by the likes of Goldman Sachs (Uber) and hedge fund Third Point Capital (Lyft). Those are rule-breakers the GOP can get behind! Nor are they alone. This past weekend alone, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ran three ride-sharing stories. They included an editorial-board member praising his own Uber experience, and an op-ed cowritten by conservative archfiend Grover Norquist, who argued that ride-sharing could help splinter unions and big-city Democrats. Um. But in Pittsburgh, at least, no one appears to be worried. As state Sen. Wayne Fontana, the Brookline Democrat who sponsored SB 1457, told me July 10, “I’ve gotten more emails about this than keeping the Penguins in Pittsburgh.” Given all this support, it’s worth asking: Why did Uber and Lyft break the law in the first place? Why not use the time-honored democratic process that made this country great: changing the law by hiring lobbyists and buying up politicians with campaign contributions? When I asked that question of David Barmore, who was on hand to represent Uber at Peduto’s press conference, he said that judges elsewhere had ruled that “the law needs to catch up. … It’s an example of technology outpacing regulations.” That’s an argument for changing the law or suing over it, not breaking it outright. (In fairness, Lyft is respecting some

hallowed traditions: It’s hired Harrisburg lobbyist Triad Strategies.) But Mark Price suspects the outlaw approach offers other advantages. “It’s part of a PR plan,” says Price, an economist at the labor-backed Keystone Research Center. “It’s better than saying, ‘We’re the boring company who would like to operate according to the rules.’” While Price acknowledges that “if cab service in Pittsburgh is loathed, that raises serious questions about the rules governing the PUC,” he adds that the agency “has been pilloried unfairly to some extent. The companies were violating the law, and the PUC’s job is to bust people who do that.” The PUC also must negotiate the concerns of state insurers, who don’t want to be on the hook should a driver injure or kill a passenger. Arguably, that’s a dispute best resolved before someone ends up in the hospital. Anyway, the PUC’s regulations do have an upside. Lyft and Uber get free publicity every time a politician sends out a press release and local media outlets — desperate for the eyeballs of the young and hip — run with it. And while the PUC’s $ 1,000-a-day fine would put the brakes on a true upstart service, an operation like Uber, which is valued at more than $18 billion, can write the fines off as a marketing expense. If anything, they demonstrate the company’s street cred as a purveyor of rebellious Urban Cool. There’s nothing new about that strategy. As Tom Frank wrote in his book The Conquest of Cool, during the heyday of 1960s counterculture, corporate America began marketing campaigns that “encouraged resistance to established power.” That laid the foundation for what Frank calls “hip consumerism,” a mindset in which a pink mustache can become the perfect disguise for a hedge-fund investor. Other industries can only envy such a marketing coup. Not long ago Range Resources, the Marcellus Shale drilling heavyweight, put up a YouTube ad that sought to align the interests of gas drillers with those of urban cyclists and magenta-coiffed hair stylists. So far, however, no one has moved to scrap Pittsburgh’s ban on gas-drilling within city limits. Next time, maybe Range ought to set up an unlicensed rig in Point State Park, and slap a furry mustache on it.

HAS A PINK MUSTACHE BECOME THE PERFECT DISGUISE FOR A HEDGE-FUND INVESTOR?

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

DE

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LAMB BHUNA FEATURED SMALL CUBES OF TENDER LAMB IN A THICK, RICH GRAVY

PIZZA WARS {BY CHRIS POTTER} Stand aside, Mineo’s and Aiello’s: Two Bloomfield-based upstarts have established a new pizza feud. On July 25, the Strip District’s Bar Marco will host a “pizza dojo” contest between Pizza Boat — a food truck with its own wood-fired oven — and a work-in-progress bakery, Bread and Salt. Pizza Boat co-owner Jeff Ryan says the dojo was originally intended as a “tongue-in-cheek competition” to promote collaboration between pizza-makers. But things got real, he says, when Bread and Salt owner Rick Easton “started talking shit” on Pizza Boat’s approach. “I just wanted to teach them some things,” maintains Easton, who hopes to open his Pearl Street bakery by summer’s end. Easton and Pizza Boat first went head-to-head at Bar Marco back in March. But both sides declared victory, prompting the rematch. The contest will increase visibility for both outfits, no matter what the outcome. And it’s unclear how serious the rivalry is. Easton is “a good guy, but he’s really annoying,” Ryan says. “They’re nice guys, but I do think they’re assclowns,” counters Easton. “Feuds can be real,” he adds. And this is a fight not just between pizza-makers, but between pizza philosophies. While Pizza Boat works in a contemporary vein — its “Slam Pig,” for example, features spinach, mushrooms, pork sausage and taleggio cheese — Easton calls himself “a pizza fundamentalist.” “If you want to call your pizza ‘Monkey-Humper’ or whatever, fine,” he says. “But to me, good pizza is all about the dough.” Accordingly, he focuses on traditional preparations like pizza margherita. Ryan allows that while Easton’s pizza “tasted all right,” it “was kind of boring.” “It’s new school versus old school,” says Bar Marco co-owner Bobby Fry. “And they were all here the other night, making fun of each other’s starters.” This month’s event should start around 6 p.m., in Bar Marco’s soon-to-becompleted beer garden. Bragging rights will be determined by sales and customer feedback, but as yet, there’s no formal judging process. That, says Ryan, “leaves things open for more shit-talking in the future.”

“IT’S NEW SCHOOL VERSUS OLD SCHOOL.”

A PICK FOR

‘INDO-PAK‘ FARE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

E TRY TO shop local whenever we can, but sometimes a need arises that can only be served in the vast commercial mosaic of big-box retail that is Monroeville. Though the fact is often overlooked, the great thing is that Monroeville has local businesses, too. They cluster hopefully around the bland focus-grouped offerings of the national chains, hoping for some coattail action, or perhaps even to peel off a shopper — or diner — hungering for something a little different. A little different, indeed, is Kohinoor, the second Pakistani restaurant in succession to occupy one of the funkiest dining spaces in Monroeville — if not the region. Formerly part of the Sunrise Motel, it’s a soaring space seemingly built around a two-story umbrella that’s been blown inside-out. The best tables are in the loft that’s up in the umbrella’s spokes, but you can admire the vaulted wooden ceiling, circular stone buffet and incongruous photo-canvases of Italian breads and cheeses from any seat in the house.

Chapli kebab lamb

Actually, Kohinoor bills itself as “IndoPak,” with a specialty in halal meals. Like many an Indian menu, this one is formidably lengthy: no fewer than six folds of an 11-inch-high brochure, printed small. We started in the “Chat Corner” and branched out from there.

KOHINOOR 4155 William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-376-2181 HOURS: Tue.-Sun. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $3-13 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Chat, for the uninitiated, is sort of like Indian nachos: a kind of snack that generally consists of a bed of something bite-size and crispy, topped with some combination of yogurt and/or chutney, legumes and/or vegetables, and herbs and/or spices. The combinations are endless. We cannot get enough chat, and Kohinoor’s samosa chat gave us another version to love. A savory whole samosa, still crisp

at the edges, was smashed and crumbled, then topped with saucy chickpeas and garnishes of sweet-tart tamarind chutney, tangy house-made yogurt and zesty mint. Another of our favorite Indian snacks, the enigmatically named “chicken 65,” looked right: craggy and reddened, promising moist flesh within the crust of the lumpy little chicken fritters. But that crust was disappointingly bland, more like regular fried chicken than the addictive, saltyspicy blend that makes satisfyingly good chicken 65 (which in our book can be even better than Buffalo chicken). Chicken came in two other preparations as part of a mixed-grill platter from the tandoor. A drumstick had the traditional vermilion coloring and yogurt-marinated flavor of tandoori chicken, while a boneless thigh, simply seasoned, was cut into juicy chunks. Like most tandoors, Kohinoor’s is just too hot to produce succulent shrimp, but the flavor was still nicely spicy and briny despite the chewy texture. On the other hand, salmon subjected to the same heat was amazingly tender and CONTINUES ON PG. 20

CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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A PICK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

moist without a strong fishy flavor, and beautifully rosy-red outside. These platters usually include lamb kofte, a dark, skinless sausage, but here the lamb was in tender shreds that barely held together once slipped off the skewer. Bhuna is a curry preparation in which the sauce is reduced until it is highly concentrated and just clinging to the meat. Kohinoor’s lamb bhuna featured small cubes of tender lamb in a thick, rich gravy, complexly flavored with tomatoes, onions and plenty of warm roasted spices. Sarso da saag, mustard leaves cooked Punjabistyle, distinguished itself with plentiful bits of zingy minced ginger in the thick, green sauce.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

GETTING A BUZZ Mead lovers will be making a beeline for Carnegie’s Apis Meadery When someone asks if you’d like a cup of mead, it’s easy to cringe at visions of Renaissance Faires. But “What you get at a Renaissance Faire isn’t something you want to drink. It’s sticky, sweet and boozy,” says Dave Cerminara, who just opened Apis Meadery in Carnegie. Mead is one of the world’s oldest alcoholic beverages, first fermented by accident at least 20,000 years ago. It was revered as the nectar of the gods by Greek, Norse and Celtic societies. It’s also stunningly straightforward. “Mead is honey, water and yeast. Nothing else,” says Cerminara. But that doesn’t mean that making mead is easy. It takes a significant amount of patience and expertise to make a mead worth drinking.

“WE HAVE A GREAT CIDERY AND A MILLION BREWERIES, AND WE NEEDED A MEADERY.”

Kohinoor staff

Haleem, a subcontinental variation on the popular Arabic dish harissa, was a marvelous stew consisting of a sort of pureed lentil dal — a combination of three varieties, according to the menu — plumped up with finely shredded chicken and lamb. The texture was almost silken, the flavor deeply seasoned and savory without being spicy. We’d wanted to order a dosa (similar to a rice-flour crepe) from the South Indian specialties section of the menu, but that wasn’t available the night we were there. For side breads, we satisfied ourselves with thick, fluffy naan and aloo paratha, tender and almost dumpling-like from the seasoned potatoes within. Though the restaurant was never full, a steady stream of customers certainly kept the staff running the night we were there. If Kohinoor can draw more customers, perhaps it will become possible for the establishment to bring on additional help. It sure tastes good to support local business. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

Fortunately, Cerminara comes to Apis with a terrific brewing pedigree. He spent the last few years at Penn Brewery; before that, he says, he “brewed all over the world.” Mead has always had a siren call for him, however: “I’ve been brewing mead longer than I’ve been brewing beer.” Currently, all meads at Apis begin with honey from Bedillion Honey Farm, in nearby Hickory. The meads come in three styles — Florea, Mellifera and Dorsata — all of which are fermented with the same yeast strain. As a result, tasting the progression is an experience of Cerminara’s skill. The Florea is a light-bodied mead with lower alcohol content — though at 7 percent, it still packs a punch. Mellifera is a mid-proof, full-bodied mead, with a balanced acidity that hints of riesling. Dorsata is the heavy hitter, coming in at a boozy 14 percent, and it resonates with notes of wildflower pollen as much as with the honey’s sweetness. For the time being, Apis is only available to drink on site or take home by the bottle. But Cerminara says he’s working hard to share offerings all across the city. “We have a great cidery and a million breweries,” he says, “and we needed a meadery.” Now we have one. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

212 E. Main St., Carnegie. 412-478-9172 or www.apismead.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BAR MARCO. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900. At this former firehouse-turnedrestaurant, a small but wellcurated menu makes a perfect complement to this venue’s wine and cocktail list. The tapasinspired roster ranges from charcuterie plates and classics, like patatas bravas, to smokedpork tamales and grilled radicchio and endive salad. KE BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE

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CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE

Reyna Restaurante Mexicano {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable, with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE GATTO CYCLE DINER. Wood Street and Seventh Avenue, Tarentum. 724-224-0500. This lovingly restored 1949 vintage diner, now appended to a motorcycle shop, serves breakfast, sandwiches and burgers, all re-named in honor of motorbikes. Nitro chili gets its kick from onions, hot sauce and sliced jalapenos; the Bar-B-Q Glide sandwich is topped with bacon, barbecue sauce and cheddar; and the Sportster is a delicious tuna melt. J

DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-6660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hot-doggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and

Bar Marco {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} HANDLE BAR AND GRILLE. 342 W. Pike St., Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. A motorcyclethemed venue offers mostly typical bar-restaurant fare — burgers, sandwiches, wings — prepared from scratch. The menu also offers a modest South of the Border section, and the kitchen’s creativity shows in unique items, like chorizo-filled wontons and the Black Friday, a roast-turkey

sandwich comprised of typical Thanksgiving ingredients. KE JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-to-date selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-683-4004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends in sophisticated casual dining while still offering an atmosphere of offthe-beaten-path funkiness. While some dishes emphasize unusual juxtapositions of ingredients, such as a lobster-and-white-bean purée alongside fish, or fig in a “rustic marsala sauce,” other dishes are of the moment, with pistachio dust atop duck cannoli or deep-fried gnocchi. KF LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-2510031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: aboveaverage sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE MAURAMORI CAFÉ. 5202 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. 412-4083160. This café-style breakfastlunch spot serves, as expected, bacon, eggs, pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, burgers and fries.

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Kaleidoscope Café {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} This is still down-home cooking, but better-quality ingredients (applewood-smoked bacon) are emphasized, and care that goes into their assemblage (handformed burger patties). J MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them less-familiar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg of lamb and stuffed tomatoes. LF PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-661-3334. This Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, in either a traditional cream-wine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE

SOCIAL. 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-362-1234. This casual eatery at Bakery Square offers upscale pub grub: Pizzas, sandwiches and salads have ingredients that wouldn’t be out of place at the trendiest restaurants, but preparations are un-fussy. Or be your own chef, with the checklist-style, build-your-own-salad option. For dessert, try a custom icecream sandwiches. KE SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J

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TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and 701 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). The concept is original and simple: blending the salty, citrusy flavors of Asia with the bright, spicy flavors of Latin America. Although the execution is high-end, individual dishes are quite . w ww per reasonably priced, with a p ty ci h pg lots of small plates. KE .com

SPECIALTY BURRITOS FOUND ONLY AT EMILIANO’S

REYNA RESTAURANTE MEXICANO. 2031 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-1242. The city’s oldest Mexican grocery brings a serious, sit-down exploration of moles, rellenos and other mainstays of Mexico’s regional cuisines. There are tacos (albeit Mexican-style), but the more adventurous should check out more fare such as tamal Oaxaqueno (lime-soaked corn dough filled with chicken in Oaxaca mole sauce, wrapped in a banana leaf) or a relleno made with ancho chiles. EK

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WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF WINGHART’S BURGER AND WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, Downtown (412-4345600) and 1505 E. Carson St., South Side (412-904-4620). Big beefy burgers, wood-fired pizza and a selection of whiskeys make this an above-average bar stop, whether Downtown or on Carson Street. Burger toppings range from standard cheese and fried onions to arugula and truffle oil. Don’t miss the pizza with its excellent crust. JE

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PARIS 66 BISTRO. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166. A charming venue brings Parisian-style café culture to Pittsburgh, offering less fussy, less expensive everyday fare such as crepes, salads and croques, those delectable French grilled sandwiches. With fresh flowers on every table, specials chalked on boards and French conversation bouncing off the open kitchen walls, Paris 66 epitomizes the everyday glamour of the French neighborhood bistro. KF

For A d Limite ! ly n Time O

BREWS N BRUNCH

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ALL DAY THURSDAY, JULY 24TH!

5846 Forbes Ave., 2nd Floor • SQUIRREL HILL • 412.521.0728

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LOCAL

“I THINK IT’S GOOD TO GET MY BRAIN OUT OF THE INDIE-MUSIC WORLD.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

WON’T YOU BE MINE?

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BEAGLES BROTHERS 7-INCH RELEASE with THE BLOODY SEAMEN and MOTHER HAWK. 9 p.m. Fri., July 18. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

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ART OF

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MUSIC {BY MARGARET WELSH}

T Mike Seamans {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mind Cure Records owner Mike Seamans doesn’t necessarily like to flaunt it, but he comes from Pittsburgh royalty: Seamans’ mother, Elizabeth, is Mrs. McFeely. That’s why, for one thing, when Seamans and Mr. McFeely portrayer David Newell appear in character in a new video promo for the store and record label (along with dozens of other local notables), Seamans points out: “That is my mom. That guy is not my dad.” It’s also one reason why Mind Cure is releasing a 7-inch single this weekend to benefit WQED and The Fred Rogers Company. “My mom and dad both moved to Pittsburgh to work for public television at WQED,” Seamans explains. “I literally grew up hanging out in the hallways there, hanging out on the Mister Rogers set.” And it was at a WQED event — Rick Sebak’s 25th-anniversary party — that Seamans saw The Beagle Brothers performing the theme song from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood — and something clicked. “Right then, I had the idea that we should do a record, and they’d record the song, and give all the proceeds to public television,” he explains. The Beagles, who had become favorites of WQED’s Sebak (hence the invite to play the party), gladly signed on. “His pitch to us was he wanted it to be a love letter to Pittsburgh, and to QED,” explains the Beagles’ Read Connolly. The result is what the Beagle Brothers call an “interpolation,” rather than an interpretation. “We wrote this song that we interpolated ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’ into,” Connolly says. The song is titled “9 out of 10 / It’s a Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” and begins as a sweet Beagles ditty, with the famous Mister Rogers melody line entering gradually before it becomes the focus of the song’s second half. The 7-inch — the B-side of which is called “Hey There Blackbird” — marks the end of Mind Cure’s year-long series of local singles, and will be available in person at the show (and at Mind Cure Records’ store in Polish Hill). The tracks will also be sold online for those more digitally inclined.

HE WORLD that Marissa Nadler

creates in her most recent release, July, isn’t, as the title may suggest, one of sunny, heart-of-summertime fun. Instead, it’s a little closer to what life is often actually like in the peak of the season: hazy, placid, with the faint sense of melancholy that comes with hot weather and too much time to think. Nadler’s music has always had a shadowy quality, though her past releases were more firmly rooted in Americana and gothic folk traditions. There were hints of something otherworldly on those earlier records — manifested mostly in Nadler’s dewy vocals — but they were ultimately grounded with an earthy heft. While July hardly finds Nadler floating through space, the record is ghostly, seemingly straddling the line between this world and the next. “I feel like this record sounds like what I wish my other records sounded like,” Nadler says. “I feel like it took me a really long time to get to a place where I was making music that was as dreamy and cosmic as I wanted it to be.” The Boston native started writing songs on her guitar as a teenager, and continued as a way to blow off steam while she studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design. While, for Nadler, music and art occupy separate realms, there is something painterly about her songwriting: The sonic worlds she creates are as easy to envision as if she was sketching them out. As her music career has taken priority,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BROOKE HALL}

Part folk, part black metal: Marissa Nadler

she’s maintained her connection to the fineart world as a teacher. “I [started] teaching when I was taking the time to make this record — I was like, ‘Maybe I should get out

MARISSA NADLER WITH COTOPAXI

7 p.m., Sat., July 19. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz

of [the music] world a little bit while I’m writing,’” she says. “But I definitely think I’m a lot happier being an artist full time. I have trouble with the schedule, waking up that early,” she says with a laugh. “It’s, like, really early: 5:30 in the morning.” She’s since quit to focus on touring, though she admits, “I think it’s good to get my brain out of the indie-music world.” While July shares the influences that CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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THE ART OF MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

were evident in Nadler’s earlier work (Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen are some of the most obvious), producer Randall Dunn, most noted for his work with bands like Earth, Sunn0))) and Eagle Twin, certainly had a hand creating the atmosphere that makes the new album some of Nadler’s best work. Nadler is no stranger to the world of extreme music — she has offered her voice to the ambient black-metal project Xasthur, and collaborated with drone outfit Locrian. But, while the black-metal aesthetic has never been more popular (have you ever seen so many suburban teenage girls decked out in upside-down crosses?), Nadler’s music is blackened in a way that is all her own. “I think that I’m drawn to music that has a lot of emotion,” she says. “It doesn’t really matter what genre it is, but I think black metal and extreme metal has a lot of emotion in it, so that’s really the unifying force right there. I don’t want to pigeonhole my music by saying it’s all dark, because it’s not, but there’s this element lyrically that we have in common.” July does have its murky and even menacing moments, but it’s hardly a meditation on evil. Thematically, it deals with, among other things, the “ups and downs of a romantic relationship.” But Nadler makes it clear that it is not a breakup record. (Though with haunted tracks like “Was It a Dream” — “It’s true that I lost a year / stumbling from room to room / hoping to wake up / somehow next to you” — it could certainly serve a listener as such.) It was Dunn who sought out Nadler, not knowing if she even had plans to make a new record. “Over the years,” he says, “a lot of people were like, ‘Hey, you two should work together!’” Both describe the recording process as easy and organic, and on it — as on records like Wolves in the Throne Room’s Celestial Lineage — Dunn deepens and softens the existing darkness, infusing July with a mystic, naturalistic heaviness. He’s modest when it comes to his contributions to the quality of the project: “A lot of it is the performance, in my opinion,” he says. “It was the way the songs resonated with her, the confidence and clarity she had coming in had a lot to do with the sort of crystalline aspect of the record. That just allowed me to enhance it with ideas and bring other things to it.” And while Dunn might be best known for his work the metal world, he says, “Most of the time, I’m looking for something beautiful, and there’s a peacefulness in [Nadler’s] music that I find very enduring. There’s a commonality in all music, a thread of expression that supersedes whatever style it is, and of course she has something really unique and special.” MWE L SH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES

THE NIED’S HOTEL BAND ONE NIGHT STAND (SELF-RELEASED)

The local rock supergroup’s first fulllength in a couple of years. As per usual, the sounds are all great: Well-produced ’70s/’80s-style funky rock with copious saxophones and plenty of instrumental precision. A lot of these tunes are about love affairs and having a good time; the band does get slightly political with one song that’s a vague upbraiding of the tax system. (Rock ’n ’ roll, meet Reaganomics!) It’s dad-rock, but very well-done dad-rock. BY ANDY MULKERIN

THE NIED’S HOTEL BAND CD RELEASE. 7 p.m. Thu., July 17. Rivers Casino Outdoor Amphitheater, 777 Casino Drive, North Side. Free. 412-231-7777 or www.riverscasino.com

MARCUS MESTON OUR VOICES ARE JUST NOISE (SELF-RELEASED)

A five-song EP from local synth-pop producer Marcus Meston. The multiinstrumentalist gets the party started with the album-opener/title track, changes dynamics and covers Prince — all in 14 minutes. The release starts on a high note with an energetic, dancey tune, but loses that fervor at track one’s end. Trading funk for pop on Prince’s “17 Days,” the EP ends well. For fans of Swimming with Dolphins (Adam Young’s pre-Owl City project). BY ZACH BRENDZA

POWER PILL FIST with VFKR BASALTIC DAY TERRORS (SELF-RELEASED)

Basaltic Day Terrors is a grinding instrumental collaboration between Power Pill Fist —an alum of Pittsburgh’s Black Moth Super Rainbow — and Georgia’s electronic noise duo VFKR. In what’s billed as an off-the-cuff collaboration, the two groups achieve a low-end growl that BMSR fans will enjoy, but Basaltic Day Terrors lacks the flourishes that make BMSR shimmer. They’ve built a dystopia, but there are no people to suffer in it. As a result, the album lacks drama. BY IAN THOMAS

California fog: The Donkeys

LIVING THE DREAM {BY IAN THOMAS} AS POP-MUSIC descriptors go, “dreamy” and its fancy cousin “dream-like” are blanket terms meant to impart a certain gravitas to sounds that are distant, blurred at the edges, or hard to pin down. But due to their overuse, the terms also imply blandness, and in the end, they convey little more than a vague, non-threatening tone. The thing about dreams, though, is that they can be nightmares in waiting. That inherent duality is often overlooked. Coming from San Diego — a city less celebrated than San Francisco or Los Angeles, but still lauded for delivering the quintessential California experience — The Donkeys are no stranger to that sort of nuance. “[San Diego] is kind of like the [weird] step-child of L.A.,” notes keyboard player Anthony Lukens. “Half the national acts that go on tour skip San Diego completely.” The concept of dreaminess figures prominently in the Donkeys experience. But The Donkeys’ notion of dreaminess is of a more distinctly American variety. The shimmering harmonies conjure images of sun-baked stretches of open road. It speaks of taking to that road in search of something better, but also to the doubts that might prevent a traveler from lighting out. Ride the Black Wave, the fourth album from the four-piece, espouses all the beauty to be found on the frontier of new experience, but also acknowledges that there is menace in so much possibility. The Donkeys seem to be in constant conflict, trying to find the best way to honor the seeking spirit that the music embodies. Is the band’s role to keep its roots in San Diego and be standard-bearers of the

California lifestyle? Or should it hit the road in a Kerouac-ian manner, leaving fate to fortune? They are at once dreamers and dream. “Should I stay in California? / Should I move to France?” vocalist Tim DeNardo asks on the album opener, “Sunny Daze.” The choice between California and some nebulous alternative is posed a few more times on the album. “We’ve all thought about moving. Everybody does, I think, when they get to a certain age,” says Lukens. “Everybody has that moment where you’ve seen people come and go. [It’s that] existential thing where you’re like, ‘I don’t know what the hell I’m going to do with my life.’”

THE DONKEYS

WITH CAN’T DANCE, MUTINY ON THE MAYFLOWER 6:30 p.m. Thu., July 17. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

This indecision should come as no surprise, given the band’s influences. The Donkeys’ sound draws from the wanderlustladen California canon, from the Grateful Dead to Pavement. To say that The Donkeys draw from past sounds would be an understatement, but the results are genuine and don’t feel derivative in the slightest. (In fact, a few years back, a Donkeys song was reworked and credited to the fictitious band Geronimo Jackson in an episode of the TV show Lost wherein the gang traveled back in time to the 1970s.) This timelessness forms the crux of The Donkeys’ appeal. In an era when quirk and irony is often a band’s foot in the door, The Donkeys’ earnestness puts it at odds with the pop landscape. All of these conflicts fuel The Donkeys. And whether the members stay or go, the band holds onto its concept of the American Dream unapologetically.

JULY 17, 2014 – THRU –

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For more locations, visit guitarcenter.com.

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SHANNON CURFMAN SHANNON LABRIE BROOKE ANNIBALE JEFF CAMPBELL THE MIKE MEDVED BAND

CRITICS’ PICKS Nameless In August

SPONSORED BY:

THE HARD ROCK CAFE | SEPTEMBER 4 VIP DOORS OPEN @ 5:00PM GENERAL ADMISSION @ 6:30PM WWW.BEATCANCERPITTSBURGH.COM

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH L. WILSON}

[FOLK ROCK] + FRI., JULY 18

grey blues The 20th Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival presented by Peoples Natural Gas. July 25-27 at Hartwood Acres. Benefits the Food Bank. Check out the rock, soul, funk, blues of J.J. Grey & Mofro, along with Dr. John, Bernard Allison, the Spin Doctors, Albert Cummings and lots more as they play for a great cause.

PITTSBURGH BLUES FESTIVAL

20TH ANNIVERSARY pghblues.com

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It’s still July, but the guys of Nameless in August couldn’t wait any longer to release their first full-length, Wheelhouse. The Pittsburgh-based four-piece provides plenty of banjo-picking goodness on the debut release, plus some sweet, tender vocals that set the band apart from plenty of others locally. Fans of the Avett Brothers and that camp of new Americana will do well to check the band out tonight at the Pittsburgh Winery, because Nameless in August will likely be playing bigger stages soon enough. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-20. 412-566-1000 or www. pittsburghwinery.com

with Midlake. Zach Brendza 6:30 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $36-40. All ages. 412-229-5438 or www.stageae.com.

[HARDCORE] + TUE., JULY 22 L.A.’s Touché Amoré has this pedal-to-the-floor mentality about it, both in the band’s songs and in its touring ethic. The post-hardcore/screamo band is on Deathwish Inc., the label founded by Converge frontman Jacob Bannon. And while TA fits in well on the label, its latest album, 2013’s Is Survived By, is not the stereotypical

[FOLK] + FRI., JULY 18 The official anniversary of Woody Guthrie’s birth was this past Touché Monday, July 14, Amoré but tonight, he gets a proper tribute at Club Café courtesy of a local lineup put together by Bryan McQuaid. McQuaid will perform, along with the likes of Slim Forsythe; Chet Vincent and Molly Alphabet; Broke, Stranded and Ugly; and a few out-of-towners — Jason Bennett, Matt Charette and Zach Schmidt. Discover a few of our contemporary folksters while paying tribute to the greatest. AM 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[INDIE ROCK] + SUN., JULY 20 As part of the Warhol’s Sound Series, Band of Horses is back in our fair city. The Seattleites’ last studio album came in 2012, in the form of Mirage Rock. Then, this past February, the band released Acoustic at the Ryman, a live album recorded over two nights at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, with hits like “The Funeral” and “No One’s Gonna Love You” played in a stripped-down fashion. The band, now operating out of Charleston, S.C., hasn’t said anything about new music, but perhaps fans will be clued in at tonight’s show at Stage AE,

“this is noise”-type record; it’s worlds better. With each LP it puts out, the band refines and sharpens its sound. Touché Amoré plays Altar Bar tonight with Tigers Jaw and Dads. ZB 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[FOLK] + WED., JULY 23 Geography doesn’t always dictate what an act sounds like: Pop-country darling Taylor Swift, for example, was raised in Wyomissing, Pa., until she was 14, don’t ya know. In the same vein in terms of misplaced pieces is Milk Carton Kids. The Grammy-nominated folk duo hails from Eagle Rock, Calif., a neighborhood in northeast Los Angeles. From somewhere in the blur of glitz and glamour in the City of Angels comes one of the most talented folk groups around right now. Give folk a chance: The band plays the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater tonight. ZB 8 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $25-28. All ages. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} No Movement, Fubar Strip District. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lord Huron. Millvale. 866-468-3401. 412-391-8334. RAMADA INN HOTEL & BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE CONFERENCE CENTER. The TAVERN. Uke & Tuba, Midge CATTIVO. Miniature Tigers, Clintones - Ultimate 90’s Tribute. Crickett, Adorabulls. Bloomfield. The Griswolds. Lawrenceville. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. 412-682-8611. 412-687-2157. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. BRILLOBOX. Night Vapor, CLUB CAFE. The Shift, Sister Hazel. South Park. T-Tops, Crappy Funeral. Between Two Rivers. South Side. STATION SQUARE. Bastard Night Vapor record release. 412-431-4950. Bearded Irishmen, Good Brother Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. LAVA LOUNGE. Love Isn’t Love, Earl. Station Square. CLUB CAFE. Slim THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Molecule Party, Stone Cold Forsythe, Chet Vincent, The Beagle Brothers, Killer. South Side. 412-431-5282. Molly Alphabet, The Bloody Seamen. MELLON SQUARE PARK. The Zach Schmidt, Jason Lawrenceville. Nied’s Hotel Band. Downtown. Bennett, Matt Charette, www. per 412-682-0177. pa 412-316-3342. Broke Stranded & Ugly, pghcitym .co PITTSBURGH WINERY. Feufollet. Bryan McQuaid. Long Strip District. 412-566-1000. Live Woody Guthrie! 31ST STREET PUB. RIVERS CASINO. The Nied’s Hotel South Side. 412-431-4950. Castle, Gran Gila, The Munsens. Band. North Side. 412-231-7777. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Strip District. 412-391-8334. SMILING MOOSE. The Donkeys. Eastend Mile, From The Four. ALTAR BAR. I Claim As Mine, South Side. 412-431-4668. Garfield. 412-361-2262. Kevlar, Shiva Stone,Jivan. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. HAMBONE’S. The Girlie Show Strip District. 412-263-2877. Cheick Hamala Diabate, A.T.S. w/ Joanna Lowe, Toria Susan, BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Life(Liss), Charmaine Evonne. Pond Hockey, The Lampshades, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. The Washington Beach Bums. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Bloomfield. 412-480-7803. 31ST STREET PUB. Voice of Joel Lindsey. Canonsburg. CLUB CAFE. Nick Barilla, Northern 724-746-4227. Addiction, Crooked Cobras, Vibe (Early). Nick Barilla EP Release Show, Kopecky Family Band, Essential Machine (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Ages & Ages, Butterbirds. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GATOR’S LOUNGE. PIPEWRENCH, Horrid Ordeal, Hericide, Lost-N-Found, Embers To Ashes, Lythem, Raven Mocker, As Dreams Fade. Jeannette. 724-527-5262. HAMBONE’S. Filthy Low Down. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. THE HOP HOUSE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Roulette Waves, Good Thing, Blood Maud, White Like Fire/ Ex planets. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JENNINGS ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER. Nameless in August, Rachel Brown, Matthew Ryan, Steve Madewell, Bejae Fleming w/ Jackie Blount. Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. Jimbo & the Soupbones. 724-728-0222. LA CASA NARCISI. Each week we bring you a new MP3 from a local Antz Marching. Gibsonia. band. This week’s track comes from Save Us 724-444-4744. MOUSETRAP. The Dave Iglar From the Archon; stream or download Band. Beaver. 724-796-5955. MR. SMALLS THEATER. TOBACCO, The Stargazer Lilies, on our music blog, FFW>>, Zackey Force Funk. Millvale. at pghcitypaper.com. 866-468-3401.

ROCK/POP THU 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 19

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

4504 BUTLER STREET

NORTH PARK CLUBHOUSE. Austin Drive Band. Robinson. 724-449-9090. PALACE THEATRE. The Drifters, The Coasters, The Crystals. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. CC & Company. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMILING MOOSE. SOLARBURN (early) Cyrus Gold, Bardus, Fight Amp, Secret Tombs.(late) South Side. 412-431-4668. WATERFRONT TOWN CENTER. Olga Watkins Band, Mikey Yurik. Homestead. 412-476-8889.

SUN 20

DJS THU 17 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 18 ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. Tony Touch & Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Yes. 412-368-5225. 412-431-8800. HARTWOOD LOS SABROSOS. Salsa ACRES. Lake Street Night. Downtown. Dive. Allison Park. 412-465-0290. 412-767-9200. REMEDY. Push It! . HOWLERS w ww per DJ Huck Finn, a p ty ci COYOTE CAFE. h g p DJ Kelly Fasterchild. .com Captain Catfeesh, Lawrenceville. Union Rye, Sun Hound. 412-781-6771. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. MR. SMALLS THEATER. AFROHEAT! A Dance Party Keystone. CD Release. Millvale. Celebration of Afrobeat Music. 412-821-4447. DJ Vex & DJ SMI. Lawrenceville. RUMFISH GRILLE. The Tony 412-904-2279. Janflone Jr. Duo. Bridgeville. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 412-914-8013. South Side. 412-431-2825. SMILING MOOSE. Silver Snakes, S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Vattnet Viskar. South Side. 412-481-7227. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Band of Horses, Midlake (Outdoors). North Side. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. 412-229-5483. Downtown. 412-465-0290.

SAT 19

412.326.5964

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS. COM

We’ll cut you.

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 23

MON 21 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Curt Oren, Znagez, Mortis, In Arthur’s Court. Garfield. 412-361-2262. SMILING MOOSE. Rattlehead, Mower, Dreadeth. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 22

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP House-Made Liquor Infusions: VODKAS: CHERRYCHERRY GRAPEGR RAP APE E ESPRESSOESPRE ESS SSO O MIXED BERRIES- OLIVE-PINEAPPLE. RUMS: PEACH. GIN: CUCUMBER. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO CHILI PEPPER. TEQU QUIL ILA A: MA MANG NGO O - CH CHIL ILII PE PEPP PPER.

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30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

BRILLOBOX. Bombadil, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Natalie Merchant. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Matthew Sweet Rock Show, Tommy Keene. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Runaway Dorothy. Station Square. 412-481-7625.

WED 23 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. The Singles, Nox Boys. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. Gas House Gorillas, The YJJ’s, Haggard Wulf. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Camera Obscura, Laura Cantrell. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Subhumans, Mischief Brew, The Sicks, Wrathcobra, Pressin’ On. South Side. 412-381-6811.

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 19 CJ’S. The Old School Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

WED 23 HEINZ HALL. Boyz II Men. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

BLUES THU 17 BAR STREET KINGS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Blues Jam Session. Strip District.

FRI 18 MOONDOG’S. Riff Mitchell & the Soul Survivors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 19 KELLY ST. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. The Black Arts & Culture Festival. Between N. Homewood & N. Lang. Homewood. KOSBAR RANCH. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Neville Island. MOONDOG’S. Eric Lindell. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Greensburg. 724-205-6402.

THE R BAR. Ron & The RumpShakers. Dormont. 412-561-9634. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Sugar Ray & the Bluetones feat. Monster “Mike” Welch. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

SUN 20 THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

TUE 22 SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

WED 23 JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Tarentum. 724-226-3301.

JAZZ THU 17 ANDYS. Maria Becoates-Bey. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DOWNTOWN IRWIN. Irwin Art & Jazz Night. 724-863-342 x 3315. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Brian Culbertson. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

FRI 18 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. RML Jazz. Monroeville. 412-370-9621. LA CASA NARCISI. The Etta Cox Trio. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Andrea Pearl Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada, Reggie Watkins, Neon Swing, John Gresh. Downtown. 412-471-9100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Daniel May. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SAT 19 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Tarentum. 724-226-3301.

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SAT 19 BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. Joel Lindsay. Bloomfield. 412-708-1277. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Acoustic Daze. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

SUMMER CONCERT

TUE 22 AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. The PBJs. Oakland. 412-904-3400.

COLUMBUS

S E R I E S

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WED 23 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

{SUN., AUG. 31}

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FRI 18

{Sat., Sept. 13}

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

Sylvan Esso Rock and Roll Hotel

Tomorrow,

JULY JU LY 17

COUNTRY

PHILADELPHIA

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lucky Tubb & The Modern Day Troubadours, Molly Alphabet, Danny Kay & The Nightlifers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

{TUE., OCT. 07}

King Tuff First Unitarian Church

CLASSICAL

LEMONT. NightStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Jazz Live. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Donna Bailey & Joe DeFazio. Downtown. 412-338-6463. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Olga Watkins, Billy the Kid, Rick Matt, Dan Bubien, RML Jazz, Roger Barbour w/ Don Aliquo RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621. RIVERVIEW PARK. Stacia Abbott. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

TUE 22

SUN 20

THU 17

BREW ON BROADWAY. Reggie Watkins Trio Jazz Jam. Beechview. 412-437-8676. SONOMA GRILLE. Jessica Lee. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny & Jeff. 724-733-4453. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

MON 21 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

N E W S

KATZ PLAZA. Kenia. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Book Exchange. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 23

THURSDAY,

SAT 19 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS THE MUSIC OF JOHN WILLIAMS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Al Dowe & Etta Cox. Homewood. 412-731-3080. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414.

SUN 20

ACOUSTIC

ALPHABET CITY TENT. Gold Tones Choir. North Side. 412-323-0278. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. David Cutler w/ Project Pinata: Swinging w/ a Blindfold. East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

JULY 24

TRIGGER HAPPY

ROBERT WISNIEWSKI, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC

NOON TO 1PM

THU 17

FOR ALL THE DETAILS

www. BOBFM969.com www.BOBFM969 .com www.QBURGH www .QBURGH.com .com

SAT 19

FRI 18

UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181.

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

July 16 - 22 WEDNESDAY 16

Raised by Wolves / Johnny Leitera-Tuff Sunshine / Morgan Erina CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 17 The Donkeys

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Can’t Dance, Mutiny on the Mayflower. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Steve Byrne and The Cast of Sullivan & Son Comedy Tour REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 18 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Stayin Alive: One Night of the Bee Gees HEINZ HALL Downtown.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

SOUND SERIES: Band of Horses

Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org or 412-392-4900. 7:30p.m.

ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 18

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through July 27.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Midlake. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

SATURDAY 19

Silver Snakes / Vattnet Viskar

Cats

2nd Annual Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: pittsburghbeerfest.com. 7:30p.m. Through July 19.

I Claim As Mine, Kevlar, Shiva Stone & Jivan

Bastard Bearded Irishmen / Good Brother Earl

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Kopecky Family Band

Comedian Sonja White

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 10:30p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through July 19.

Lord Huron MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest James Apollo. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or

SUNDAY 20 2nd Annual Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest JULY 18TH & 19TH STAGE AE

Cavanaugh’s Bride Show

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Red Hands. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

TUESDAY 22 Touche Amore

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Tigers Jaw, Dads. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Nickel Creek

SHERATON HOTEL Station Square. Tickets: brideshow.com. 11a.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

SUMMER CLEARANCE Men’s and Women’s 40-70% OFFF 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

“EBERT BELIEVED THAT EVERYBODY SHOULD BE ABLE TO ‘GET’ A MOVIE.”

POWER STRUGGLE {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} The second installment in the rebooted Planet of the Apes franchise is a bleak science-fiction tale. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes begins 10 years after 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes. While the human race has been nearly wiped out, the apes who escaped into Muir Woods are living in relative harmony.

Leader of Apes: Caesar (Andy Serkis)

CP APPROVED

The remaining humans struggle to get by in San Francisco. Led by Dreyfus (Gary Oldman), they’re in search of a power source, and send a small party to investigate a nearby hydroelectric dam. The problem: The dam is located in the apes’ territory. Caesar (Andy Serkis), who led the ape rebellion in the first film, gives the explorers and their leader, Malcolm (Jason Clarke), three days to restore the dam. But the temporary truce is constantly tested as the opposing camps struggle to trust one another. Viewers likely know what’s coming, either because of the Planet of the Apes films of the 1960s and ’70s, or because of the human race’s propensity for war. Despite their attempts at peace, it seems like Caesar and Malcolm are simply delaying the inevitable. But such grim foreknowledge doesn’t stop Dawn from being a tense, and enjoyable, film. Director Matt Reeves forces viewers to invest in the fate of both parties, showing there are two sides to every war. In 3-D in select theaters. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

It’s wildfire season, and Disney has a timely release —

Planes: Fire & Rescue. A sequel to 2013’s animated Planes, this outing finds Dusty the talking plane hooking up with a helicopter named Blade Ranger, and the Smokejumpers ATVs, to battle a huge forest fire. Starts Fri., July 18

LIFE,, REVIEWED LIFE {BY AL HOFF}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN HORAN}

Mismatched buddies of film criticism: Gene Siskel and Robert Ebert (right)

I

F MAINSTREAM film criticism of the last

half-century could be defined by a single voice, it would likely be Roger Ebert’s. Beginning in 1967, he wrote film reviews for the Chicago Sun-Times; in the 1980s and ’90s, he co-hosted (with Gene Siskel) popular film-review TV shows (Sneak Previews, At the Movies); and in his last years, he became a prolific online presence. But, as is frequently argued in this new bio-doc, Life Itself, Ebert’s influence wasn’t necessarily measured in quantity of reviews, but in quality. In particular, Ebert had a gift for conveying his appreciation (or disappreciation) of a film, while still retaining what New York Times film critic A.O. Scott calls “a clean, Midwestern newspaper style.” Thea Flaum, producer of Sneak Previews, concurs: “At his heart, [Ebert] believed that everybody should be able to ‘get’ a movie.” Fans of film criticism will be most interested in some of Life’s discussion about whether Ebert’s populist style helped or hindered how we approach and analyze

film. While the TV show could reduce films to a simple binary (thumbs up or down), it also championed small films like El Norte and Gates of Heaven, and exposed countless impressionable minds to thinking about films and arguing their merits.

LIFE ITSELF DIRECTED BY: Steve James Starts Fri., July 18. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Life Itself is adapted from Ebert’s 2011 memoir, and directed by another notable Chicagoan, documentarian Steve James (Hoop Dreams, The Interrupters). Ebert’s epic writing life — he started a newspaper as a child, and wrote non-stop until his death in April 2013 — is just one facet of the film; also extensively documented are Ebert’s last cancer-plagued years, when he was left variously disabled, most notably without a speaking voice.

As one might expect, Life is a hagiography, despite the acknowledgements of some warts. (Ebert could be pompous and petty, and the sniping outtakes from Siskel and Ebert’s show don’t do either man any favors.) Family (including Ebert’s wife, Chaz), colleagues and a famous filmmaker or two contribute anecdotes and reads on a man who was both a regular guy and an outsized, nationally recognized media personality. Whether you liked Ebert and his reviews or not, there’s no disputing his influence, and in today’s fractured media, there will never be such a dominant film critic again. But his legacy is left behind in the thousands of archived reviews — which, Ebert acknowledged, you are free to disagree with. And perhaps more important are all those readers and viewers who learned to notice a film’s lighting techniques, themes or how it made them feel. You can argue that films now — even this one — are better or worse, but isn’t it grand that we’re all talking about them? A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE PURGE: ANARCHY. A couple gets stranded on the streets during “Purge Night,” the annual evening during which murder is legal and encouraged. James DeMonaco directs this horror-thriller sequel. Starts Fri., July 18. SEX TAPE. After making a sex video, a couple freaks out when it looks like it might get loose on the Internet. Jake Kasdan directs this comedy starring Jason Segel and Cameron Diaz. Starts Fri., July 18. THIRD PERSON. Several loosely connected stories play out in this ensemble drama written and directed by Paul Haggis, and yes, similarities to Haggis’ big hit Crash are rife. There’s the slate of big male stars, including Liam Neeson, Adrien Brody and James Franco, buttressed by pretty women (Olivia Wilde, Moran Atias, Mila Kunis) and a pair of respectable older actresses (Maria Bello, Kim Basinger). Plus, there’s an occasionally confusing plot, told in a choppy fashion, where each individual story informs on the others. In fact, I’ll admit: At the end, I wasn’t exactly sure whether I’d seen one story, with extra-narrative embellishments, or several unique stories. I think it was the former, because the main character (portrayed by Neeson) is a writer (hint, hint), struggling to make sense of his messy life and whether to seek much-needed inspiration from it. In any case, there are broken marriages, affairs, weird bits of sexual subterfuge and, most critically, parents who are in various states of crisis over a child. Most of it takes place in nice hotels in Rome, Paris and New York, where all the problems of movie people tend to play out. Check in if you like, but it may feel like that same room of troubles you’ve stayed in before. Pittsburgh Mills (Al Hoff) VENUS IN FUR. Roman Polanski adapts David Ives’ award-winning stage play, a two-hander that mines and explores Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s eponymous novel — you know, from the guy who lent his name to the term “sadomasochism.” Unfolding in real time, a director (Mathieu Amalric) is packing up after unsuccessful auditions for his stage adaptation of Venus in Fur, when in strolls a disheveled actress (Emmanuelle Seigner). She begs to audition — she has even brought a fancy dress and other props. Soon the two are reading lines, re-working the script and shifting nimbly between play and life — because these individuals and this audition neatly mirror the sexual dynamics and power shifts of the source material. It is stagey, but if you like this sort of thing — two actors circling, parrying, while expertly transitioning from text to meta-text — it’s a fairly engrossing funhouse of words and ideas. It helps, of course, that the material is mildly provocative (though not as naughty as it once was, alas), and that there is a fair amount of humor. Amalric is good as the increasingly submissive director, and Seigner is sublime as several iterations of the titular Venus in fur. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., July 18. Harris (AH)

Third Person Bastard in 1964, and is heralded as a critical and early feminist writer. But before that, Violette was a tough-skinned woman, born out of wedlock, who toggled between emotional bouts of selfdestruction and a fierce desire to survive. (The film begins during World War II, during which Violette grew to be a skilled black-marketeer.) But then she meets Simone de Beauvoir, and the two develop a long, if, at times prickly, friendship. De Beauvoir (Sandrine Kiberlain) believes Violette’s messy life can be saved through writing, and she encourages Violette’s on-page candor drawn from her life (abortion, affairs with both sexes, a troubled relationship with her mother). For her part, Violette (Emmanuelle Devos) is in love with de Beauvoir, and alternates between seeking and rejecting her approval. It’s melodramatic, but in that high-class French literary way, and Devos is a revelation to watch as the insecure but fiercely determined Violette. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., July 18. Manor (AH)

CP

VIOLETTE. Martin Provost’s lush bio-doc recounts the tumultuous life of French author Violette Leduc, who published The

CP

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Violette WALKING THE CAMINO: SIX WAYS TO SANTIAGO. Lydia B. Smith’s documentary lets you travel along as six individuals tackle the Camino de Santiago, the 500-mile hike across Spain. The ancient route was once traversed by Catholic pilgrims, and still today, many of the hikers regard the journey as a spiritual quest. But for others, it is a bucket-list-type expedition (the scenery is marvelous), or simply a chance to unplug from the world and walk for several weeks. (The Camino was also the subject of the recent Martin Sheen film The Way.) Smith takes us across the meadows and mountains, to the hostels and churches that serve as way stations, and through towns large and small en route. The six walkers share their struggles (both physical and emotional), as well as their triumphs and their ultimate self-discoveries. It’s a pleasant armchair visit to the popular undertaking, but be warned: If you like to walk, you may find your own feet itching for the Camino. Smith and producer Annie O’Neill will present the film both nights. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 23, and 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 24. Melwood (AH)

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Saving Mr. Banks, Wed., July 16 (Schenley) and Sat., July 19 (Riverview). Mary Poppins, Thu., July 17 (Brookline); Fri., July 18 (Arsenal); Sat., July 19 (Grandview); and Sun., July 20 (Schenley). Big Miracle, Mon., July 21 (Highland Park); Tue., July 22 (West End/Elliott); and Thu., July 24 (Brookline). The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Wed., July 23 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Moonrise Kingdom, July 16 and 17; Bottle Rocket, July 16 and 17; Fantastic Mr. Fox, July 16 and 17; Royal Tenenbaums, July 17; Big Fish, July 18-21, and July 24; Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, July 18-21, and July 24; Science of Sleep, July 18-20, and July 2224; Edward Scissorhands, July 18-20 and July 2224; and Coraline, July 19-24. Call or see website for times and complete listings through July 17. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

THE MATRIX. Turns out information and “reality” are a lot weirder than we thought they were. Join Keanu Reeves in this 1999 sci-fi classic from the Wachowskis. 10 p.m. Fri., July 18, and 10 p.m. Sat., July 19. Oaks THE SWIMMER. In Frank Perry’s existential 1968 drama, a man (Burt Lancaster) swims home via the pools in his suburban neighborhood. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of Filmmakers’ staff picks. 8 p.m. Sun., July 20. Regent Square BLAZING SADDLES. OK, so cowboys and beans don’t mix, but Mel Brooks’ riotous send-up of Westerns, riddled with gleefully offensive jokes, holds together just fine. This 1974 laugh-fest stars Gene Wilder, Cleavon Little and the incomparable Madeline Kahn. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 23. AMC Loews. $5

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this coming-ofage dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. Adapted from a Stephen King novella, the 1986 film stars Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and Jerry O’Connell. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 16. AMC Loews. $5 A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS. Clint Eastwood is the “Man With No Name” in Sergio Leone’s 1967 film, about a mercenary who pits two Old West gangs against each other. This classic Western kicks off a once-a-month “Spaghetti Western Dinner Nite,” in which patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., July 17. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Resverations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@yahoo.com. DON’T LOOK IN THE BASEMENT. A young female nurse takes a new job at an isolated psychiatric facility where there has been a murder. S.F. Brownrigg directs this low-budget horror thriller from 1973. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 17. Hollywood 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT. It’s becoming a summer tradition: Form a film-production team; be assigned a genre, a prop, a character and a line of dialogue; and shoot a short film in just 48 hours. Pittsburgh’s teams have finished their films, and you can catch the entries at these three screenings. (The BestOf screening and the awards ceremony is Mon., July 28.) 6 p.m. Fri., July 18; 11 a.m. Sat., July 19; and noon, Sun., July 20. Hollywood

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THE ONLY THING ROGER LOVED MORE THAN MOVIES

IF YOU AREN’T MOVED BY ‘LIFE ITSELF’, YOU OUGHT TO HAVE YOUR HEART EXAMINED.

A soaring, delightfully entertaining testament to the power and poetry of words. And cinema. And love.” – Ann Hornaday, THE WASHINGTON POST

A THRILLING TALE WITH UNFORGETTABLE CHARACTERS.” – Richard Corliss, TIME MAGAZINE

DON’T MISS IT.

Venus In Fur SORCERER. William Friedkin’s 1977 thriller adapts the French novel Wages of Fear, as done in the classic 1953 film. But the nail-biting plot is still the same, as a truck driver (Roy Schneider) transports explosives over a dangerous mountain road. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 23; 10 p.m. Fri., July 25; and Sun., July 27. Hollywood LIFE OF BRIAN. It’s not the story of Jesus, but that of some guy named Brian who lived nearby. The Monty Python gang takes on the New Testament in this irreverent 1979 comedy. 7 p.m. Thu., July 24; 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 25; 10 p.m. Sat., July 26; and 4 p.m. Sun., July 27. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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-Don’t- - - - -Look- - - - -In- -The- - - -Basement -----------------------48- - Hour- - - - - Film- - - - -Fest- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -K:- -Missing - - - - - - - -Kings- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Rocky - - - - - -Horror - - - - - -Picture - - - - - - - Show --------------------

– Whitney Matheson, USA TODAY

Family Fun Night - 7/16 @ 7:00pm

(1973)

7/17 @ 7:30pm

“ DEEPLY STIRRING.”

7/18 @ 7:00pm, 7/19 @ 12:00pm & 3:00pm, 7/20 @ 1:00pm (2014) 7/19 @ 9:30pm, 7/20 @ 4:00pm & 7:00pm

– Aaron Hillis, VILLAGE VOICE

OFFICIAL SELECTION

CANNES CLASSICS FESTIVAL DE CANNES

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF HOOP DREAMS & THE INTERRUPTERS AND EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS MARTIN SCORSESE & STEVEN ZAILLIAN

magpictures.com/lifeitself

- 7/19 @ Midnight

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh Filmmakers Regent Square theaters.pittsburgharts.org +

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[ART REVIEW]

PLAY STATION

“I LIVED AN INNER-EXILE.”

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE SANDBOX: AT PLAY WITH THE PHOTOBOOK continues through July 28. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

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CONSPIRACY THEORIES [BOOKS]

The Sandbox pop-up bookstore {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRYAN CONLEY}

Museums have long endeavored to be interesting. Now they’re feeling pressure to be exciting as well. This means more events, interactivity, audience submissions and non-traditional guest curators, among other evolving strategies for involving the public more directly. While these things seem to engage younger audiences in particular, they must strain staff and budgets, especially as institutions seem unwilling to trade off by scaling back traditional museum functions. Several of these innovations are being implemented at the Carnegie Museum of Art as part of the generously financed — it appears — Hillman Photography Initiative. This multi-year investigation includes live events, a reading room, web projects and documentary videos. The life-cycle of photographs is the overarching theme and includes such topics as commercial archives, family photos and competing interpretations of images. The first face of this initiative is The Sandbox: At Play with the Photobook, a pop-up photography bookstore in the museum’s former cloakroom. It makes a perfectly fine bookstore, and even the preexisting wooden counter creates the feeling that you’ve arrived somewhere that’s not a gallery. Melissa Catanese and Ed Panar have effectively recreated their Spaces Corners bookstore, formerly of Lawrenceville. It’s a win-win situation, a sort of outsourcing in-house. The bookstore gets the foot traffic it lacked in its second-floor Butler Street location, and the Museum gets the bookstore along with a variety of audience-involving projects by Catanese and Panar, artist-photographers with a devotion to photobooks. It’s nicely laid out with perusable displays of mostly small-press offerings, including thematic groupings — sorry, no cats or supermodels. Most of these books are creative projects in and of themselves, with significant input or complete control from the artist-photographers. And there are friendly, helpful people on hand. Many events are scheduled for projects including “A People’s History of Pittsburgh.” (There’s already a scholarly, Howard Zinnlike “people’s history” in Charles McCollester’s 2008 book The Point of Pittsburgh.) Catanese and Panar’s “People’s History” is busy compiling anonymous and family photos and residents’ stories — there’s even a scanning station here — to create an online archive that “unearths and reconstructs narratives through the lives of Pittsburghers.” A culminating photobook, edited by Catanese and Panar, promises a photo album for the Pittsburgh region, presumably something offbeat.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

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T WAS A case of life imitating art in the

worst possible way. In Venezuelan novelist Israel Centeno’s thriller El Complot (“The Conspiracy”), a whole country descents into confusion, paranoia and violence — allegorized by an omnipresent fog over Caracas — after an assassination attempt on a militaristic president. A newspaper reporter discovers it was a plot by the president’s own party to consolidate power. As the book went to press in 2002, President Hugo Chávez was nearly ousted in a coup. In the subsequent political climate, Centeno says Chávez’s supporters saw El Complot as a satire of the president and for the next seven years, he was the victim of threats, denouncements and a few suspicious street crimes. The confusion, paranoia and violence had jumped

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

At home in Pittsburgh: author Israel Centeno

off the page. Centeno, born in 1958, has published 14 books; in 1991, he won Venezuela’s National Council of Culture Award. But in 2011, Centeno and his wife and two daughters fled and gained permanent residency in the U.S. Since then, they have lived on the North Side, in a home provided by the nonprofit City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, which shelters writers persecuted in their home countries. In May, the group’s publishing arm, Sampsonia Way, released an English translation of the novel that started this all. It was translated by Guillermo Parra, who facilitated Centeno’s interview with CP. WAS EL COMPLOT MEANT TO SATIRIZE THE CHÁVEZ GOVERNMENT? The origin of the novel went beyond that. These conspiracy theories keep themselves going when there is a strongman in

power. They will use assassination attempts against them as a way to consolidate their power. Hitler used the burning of the Reichstag to consolidate his power. The same with Joseph Stalin: He would claim members of his entourage he was trying to get rid of were trying to have him arrested. Another example is Fidel Castro in Cuba: He’s claimed to have survived hundreds of assassination attempts over the years. When I was writing this book I was keeping some of these examples in mind. YOU WRITE EXTENSIVELY ABOUT THE PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECT OF INTIMIDATION ON THE JOURNALIST, MANUELA. WAS THIS SOMETHING YOU EXPERIENCED BEFORE THE BOOK WAS PUBLISHED? That experience of that character wasn’t from me, but I was thinking about several women journalists in Caracas who were experiencing a lot of pressure at that time. … There was an incident in which [Caracas newspaper] El Nacional’s offices were CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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CONSPIRACY THEORIES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

By Marina Carr Directed by Alan Stanford

July 10–Aug 2 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland Discount: CP5OFF Beware of what’s in the wardrobe... picttheatre.org 412.561.6000

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Order single tickets online at CHQTickets.com Or call our Ticket Office at 716.357.6250 * Subject to availability. All information subject to change.

C H A U TA U Q U A I N S T I T U T I O N • C I W E B . O R G 42

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[DANCE]

LIFE & ETC. {BY STEVE SUCATO}

DID YOU KNOW THE BOOK WOULD MAKE YOU A TARGET? I was assuming, [because] as the book was going to press, there was a mini coup or absence of power. I knew tensions would be up. WHEN DID THE THREATS BEGIN? A long time before I left. From 2003 to 2009, I lived an inner-exile. I would stay in my apartment, go hiking and teach writing workshops, but not really go out much. I felt like it was a process of becoming divorced from Venezuela. WHAT FORMS DID THESE THREATS TAKE? There were letters from parents in very local newspapers trying to get one of my books taken out of the high school curriculum in Venezuela, and it was taken out. The second incident: I was coming back to my apartment from a writing workshop and, under the guise of it being common crime, this guy mugged me, beat me up, stabbed me in the arm and used some of the words that people were throwing at the opposition. That clued me in that it wasn’t a normal robbery. One day, my mother got 80 phone calls saying they were going to cut off my head and put it in a bucket of shit. WAS MOVING TO PITTSBURGH AN INTENSE ADJUSTMENT? Pittsburgh is a very calm, tranquil city compared to Caracas. Sometimes, the silence of Pittsburgh torments me, though everyone on the North Side has treated me warmly. I was able to get my daughters here: That was my biggest success. One thing I do struggle with is becoming fluent in English. Because I am a writer, it is my job to be reading in Spanish, so I can’t fully immerse myself in English or in Pittsburgh. But Pittsburgh has started to show up in three of my recent novels, including some of the Homestead strikes. This novel is a Sherlock Holmes-type mystery that takes place halfway in Caracas and halfway in Pittsburgh. DO YOU SEE YOURSELF EVER RETURNING TO VENEZUELA? I don’t see any time in the near future it being safe. I’d rather focus on establishing the rest of my life in the U.S. It doesn’t mean I am cutting ties with my country because I am writing about it. Literature will remain my tie to the country. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Kelsey Bartman and Alan Obuzor of Texture Contemporary Ballet {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

Woman and Scarecrow

being surrounded by Chavez supporters who threw Molotov cocktails. A journalist was brought into court and accused of being part of an assassination, even though she was just reporting on it.

Pittsburgh’s “other” professional ballet company, Texture Contemporary Ballet, opens its fourth home season July 17-20 at the New Hazlett Theater with four performances of Life, Love, & Jazz. The program features three world premieres that continue the company’s winning formula of pairing contemporary ballet styles with popular music to create moving, vibrant and energetic ballets. Such works have captivated audiences here and on tour at such venues as New York City’s prestigious Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, where Texture will return on Aug. 6. Life, Love, & Jazz opens Life Texture associate artistic with Te director and resident choreogKelsey Bartman’s latest rapher Ke “Fun.,” set to music from effort, “Fu the band of the same name, including its megahit “Some Nights.” ” Bartman calls the 25-minute work “grungy 25-m modern meets musical mod theater” ballet. She says thea the a she didn’t set out to tell a story with it, but that the songs she chose for their danceability ended up suggesting one. “The ballet begins with the song ‘Bar Life,’ which sets the scene for a night-onthe-town story with girls and guys flirting. Then comes a love story and a bar brawl,” says Bartman. Two more Bartman ballets follow. “Spinning Plates” (2011), set to Radiohead’s tune “Like Spinning Plates,” features Bartman’s signature classical-ballet-goneoff-kilter movement language. Danced by Amanda Summers, the four-minute solo reflects on someone caught in a bad relationship. In the pas de deux “Hollowed” (2011), co-choreographed with Texture artistic director Alan Obuzor and danced by the pair, the ballet taps into the yearning expressed in singer/songwriter Lana Del Rey’s song “Video Games.” Next, BalletMet Columbus dancer and regular Texture contributor Gabriel Gaffney Smith showcases his choreographic talents in “Detachment. Without Reason.” The new 14-minute ballet for the full company is set to music by Arkansas spoken-word rock band Listener and North Carolina’s Sylvan Esso. The work “deals with the emotions and paths of life, and when we admit that human life can be ruled by reason, the possibilities of life are destroyed,” says Smith. The program concludes with the premiere of Obuzor’s “Life, Love, & Jazz.” Set to live original jazz by Marty Ashby and the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Jazz Quartet, the 32-minute ballet is an expression of Ashby’s music, says Obuzor. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Texture Contemporary Ballet performs LIFE, LOVE, & JAZZ July 17-20. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org.

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MAPMAKING {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} LGBT FOLKS’ place in society has changed rapidly, and you can assess some of that progress at Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography, an exhibit at Silver Eye Center. The show of work by ďŹ ve photographers and two artist teams, curated by Seattle-based Rafael Soldi, maps the artists’ “physical and emotional journeys to deďŹ ne and discover queerness across the American landscape.â€? But in a culture where depictions of same-sex couples, for instance, are increasingly common, these days there’s slightly less deďŹ ning and discovering to be done. In other words, Chicago-based Richard Renaldi’s Hotel Room Portraits — some 20 contemplative, casual images of him and his partner, Seth Boyd, in mostly anonymous accommodations from Missoula, Mont., to Vietnam and Bolivia — is nice, but it’s (happily) not the assertion it would have been 10 years back. Similarly, see the empathetic portraits and read the ďŹ rst-person accounts (some on the wall, some on a monitor) collected by Brooklyn’s Laurel Golio and Diana Scholl for their We Are the Youth project. These 31 stories of coming out (or staying in), of parental support (or not) include more accounts of acceptance than you might have feared. Yet Here & Now challenges us, too. Los Angeles-based Zackary Drucker’s

short experimental video, “Lost Lake,� reminds us of the violence that stalks people who live outside gender norms. Other portraits in the show remind us just how widely such folks range, culturally and otherwise. Seattle-based Molly Landreth’s compelling environmental portraits include both “Dusty and Judy, The Ozarks, MO� — the women’s camo tees, shotgun, hard looks for the camera — and “Simon and West, Seattle, WA,� half-naked, baby-faced boys snuggling in bed. And from Elle Perez’s series The Outliers, about alternately gendered people, there’s “Reilly,� with her direct and guarded gaze, and “Reilly’s Breast,� a disembodied, nippled silicon lump.

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Molly Landreth’s “Dusty and Judy, The Ozarks, MO�

[ART REVIEW]

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HERE & NOW

continues through Sat., July 19. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

Most challenging of all, in a way, might be selections from Seattle-based Adrien Leavitt and A. Slaven’s #1 Must Have. The series is partly about “re-framing the queer experience outside of the victim paradigm often seen in popular culture.â€? In informal images culled from the queer community itself, the subjects appear, variously, happy, conďŹ dent, proud and silly. Here & Now, indeed. The exhibit’s concluding free, public program is Harrison Apple’s Pittsburgh Queer History Project & Self-Documentation, at 7 p.m. Fri., July 18. D RI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

TALK SHOW {BY TED HOOVER} THERE’S NO question that Irish playwright Marina Carr can string together some amazing dialogue. Her 2006 play Woman and Scarecrow, its Pittsburgh premiere brought to us by PICT Classic Theatre, is a two-hour buffet of conversation that tells the story of an unnamed woman on her deathbed, rummaging through her memories. Sitting beside her is Scarecrow, an imaginary figure representing the woman’s life force, or her youth, or death itself. The woman’s husband and aunt occasionally stop in to see whether she’s still alive — but mostly it’s Woman and Scarecrow taking inventory of the past via lots (and lots and lots) of talking. And there’s no question that the cast is up to the challenge. Nike Doukas (on whom I have a bit of a talent-crush) is near-operatic as Woman; tremendous highs and bone-shaking lows informed by a passionate ferocity mow down everything in front of her. Well, not everything: Karen Baum plays Scarecrow with a mixture of petulance, sorrow and not a little rage — providing great counterpoint to Doukas’ aria. James FitzGerald and Sharon Brady, as husband and aunt, also make the most out of their comic, but poignant, roles. Director Alan Stanford, perhaps fearing the dangers of a script where the lead character never gets out of bed, highlights as much of the conflict and hostility as possible. It’s a smart, defensible — but wearying — choice. So we have a group of actors who know how to act, and a writer who knows how to write. How come I couldn’t wait for it to be over? It’s Carr’s play, and she can write whatever she wants — even if it’s a play in which nothing new happens after the

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Karen Baum (left) and Nike Doukas in PICT Classic’s Woman and Scarecrow

first five minutes. I would respectfully request, however, that she not drag it out for two unsupportable acts. Two hours of relentless regret and remorse with no variation is a lot to ask an audience to handle.

WOMAN AND SCARECROW

continues through Aug. 2. Stephen Foster Memorial Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-54. 412-561-6000 x207 or www.picttheatre.org

As a longish one-act, this play would be considerably more interesting; as it stands, you can’t help but hope the woman dies quickly. That can’t be what Carr intended.

REMEMBERING {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} AFTER MORE than half a century, The Fantasticks is still a cozy, warm blanket to snuggle up with and enjoy. The world’s longest-running musical opened in 1960 in the tiny Sullivan Street Playhouse, with music by Harvey Schmidt and libretto by Tom Jones. It ran off-Broadway for some 42 years. Opera Theater SummerFest’s staging in a converted ballroom is larger than the original, but some of the intimacy survives. The secret is director/ choreographer Peter Kope, best known as the producing artistic director and co-founder of exploratory dance company Attack Theatre. Kope also plays The

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on Now r! Tou

“A Winner!”

Featuring: Roger McClain, Zamarra The Shapeshifter & Famed Pianist Rich Adams

THE FANTASTICKS

continues 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 17; 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 25; and 2 p.m. Sat., July 26. Opera Theater SummerFest in the Art Deco Theater in the Twentieth Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. $25-75. 412-326-9687 or www.otsummerfest.org

The story is simple: The path of true love is not. And, yes, I still have a soft spot in my heart (and head) for songs like “Try to Remember,” “Soon It’s Gonna Rain,” and the always memorable “Never Say No.” Beans in your ears, anyone? I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

“Romantic Date Night Event!”

y Music, Comaends! & Shenanig

Wall, and is an onstage (but silent) presence throughout this wisp of a show. Though Fantasticks is not a “dance” show, the action flows as the players harmonize physically as well as vocally. (Un-amplified, too.) Under the musical direction of Walter Morales, who also plays piano in the accompanying quartet, SummerFest serves up a more operatic Fantasticks, not just light pop. Rachel Eve Holmes, as The Girl, stands out not only for being the sole female character, but also for her rich soprano and timeless innocence. The men, professional singers and otherwise, are a pleasant bass-baritone mix. James Critchfield and Brian Hupp are charming as the scheming, “feuding” fathers. Adam Hill perfectly complements the naivete in the romance as The Boy. Sean Cooper’s voice is hotter than his El Gallo, but he handles the narrative well. Local legend Martin Giles, (type?) cast as an old ham actor, hits a few choice notes. Daniel Arnaldos adds humor in various roles, and Attack’s Dane Toney completes the cast. Marie Yokoyama’s clever, multi-useful set matches the allegorical nature of The Fantasticks. I just wish it were easier to see in the auditorium.

Dinner Theater

One N Only!ight

Wear Costume or Come As You Are!

26th & Smallman Thursday, July 31 • 7:30pm in the Strip Call 412-261-6511 for more info & reservations

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ROYALS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} CLASH OF the seasons! Clash of the titans!

Clash of the colors? The Summer Company tackles The Lion in Winter with mixed results, ambitiously over-producing a modern classic. For fans of James Goldman’s 1966 play — about a Plantagenet Christmas that features the plots and conspiracies within the family of King Henry II — it is satisfying to hear the words delivered with various measures of aplomb. But this Lion creaks and groans. The pacing should be like a duel: careful parrying, a quick thrust, a studied retreat. Lion is about boldness, even ruthlessness. But while the king and queen (John E. Lane Jr. and Jill Jeffrey, respectively) spar with spark, their princes seem distanced from the drama. Among the youngsters, Anthony Chase Gullikson does put some fire into the French king, and Greta Englert shows her claws as Henry’s kittenish mistress. Usually the Summer Company excels in creating atmosphere, but director Jacob Wadsworth needed someone to coordinate the entire look of the production.

Too many incompatible shades of red — gowns, scenery, props, Ms. Englert’s lovely hair — distract mightily from the first act. And laborious scene changes (do we really need all that furniture?) don’t help the dramatic flow.

THE LION IN WINTER

continues through Sat., July 19. The Summer Company in the Peter Mills Theater, Rockwell Hall, Duquesne University, Uptown. $10-15. 412-243-6464

Many of Lion’s components work quite well on their own, just not all together. Lane (also a Company founding producer) is a towering, powerful Henry. Jeffrey displays the nuances and complexities of Goldman’s Eleanor of Aquitaine. Catherine Rhon’s “tapestries” add a regal touch, and not a lot more is really needed in TJ Firneno’s mostly lovely but overdone set design. And while Kim Brown (of Spotlight Costumes) is spot-on with the men’s outfits, the ladies look like prog-rock singers. Gloriously anachronistic with whiplash dialogue teetering between high drama and situation comedy, The Lion in Winter delivers laughs and the occasional punch.

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an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

Through July 28, 2014 Artists-in-residence Melissa Catanese and Ed Panar have transformed Carnegie Museum of Art’s Coatroom Gallery into a playful, hybrid space for encounters with the photobook.

nowseethis.org

Don’t miss the hands-on photobook workshop on July 27!

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.1707.24.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ FRI., JULY 18 {TALK} Retired NASA lunar cartographer and Carnegie Mellon alumnus Alex Valentine speaks tonight at a free event at Shaw Galleries. Valentine’s work mapping the moon and calibrating astronomical cameras helped make the first manned moon landing a success. Now, on the 45th anniversary of Apollo 11’s flight, he discusses the early days of the American space program and presents some of the topographic lunar maps that he worked on while at NASA, an experience which he calls “life-altering.” Dan Willis 6:30 p.m. 805 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-281-4884 or www.shawgalleries.org

JULY 18

A New New D Death

+ THU., JULY 17 {STAGE} After just one production, fledgling theater company The Phoenix has rebooted as Kinetic Theatre Company. While Mark Clayton Southers is no longer involved, co-founder Andrew Paul forges ahead with the Pittsburgh premiere of David Mamet’s Romance. The 2005 courtroom farce is about a Jewish chiropractor with an anti-Semitic defense attorney, a prosecutor in a domestic dispute and a judge on antihistamines. Paul (formerly of Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre) directs local favorites Patrick Jordan (as the defendant) and David Whalen (as his lawyer), along with Matt DeCaro, who reprises

{SCREEN} his role as the judge from the play’s Chicago premiere. The first performance at the Alloy Studios is tonight. Bill O’Driscolll 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 2. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $15-35. www.kinetic theatre.org

The 48-Hour Film Project, which gives teams exactly two days to write, shoot and edit a short film, has drawn to a close. But noncompetitors can see the fruits of local filmmakers’ labors lab a ors at this weekend’s free premiere screenings. Teams were given a prop, a character, a line of dialogue and a genre for inspiration. Throughout this weekend, the Hollywood Theater will show all 46 films that resulted, beginning with the first 12 tonight. A bestof screening is

JULY 23

Th The he Ul Ulti Ultimate tim ti m Superhero Smackdown

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

Free!Event

Dancing in the streets — and walking, biking and doing yoga there — gets feasible Downtown next Sunday morning. That’s when Pittsburgh joins some 100 U.S. cities in the Open Streets movement, which temporarily closes pavement to automotive traffic, making public space people-friendlier. San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park has been car-free on Sundays for decades; more recently, inspired by the international Ciclovia movement, cities from New York to Nebraska have held Open Streets events. Pittsburgh’s was initiated by Bike Pittsburgh, which worked with CityLab, city and county government and others on the fourhour Open Streets Pittsburgh pilot. Market Square will close to cars, as will Market Street, Sixth Street, and (as during Pirates games) the Robert Clemente Bridge. Save for car traffic passing through at Liberty, Fifth and Fort Duquesne Boulevard, it’ll be a half-mile of people-powered transport, plus three hubs for things like a gaga pit (for that dodgeball-like game) and classes in tai chi, zumba, family zumba, yoga, family yoga, roller-skating and dance lessons. It’s all outdoors, rain or shine; it’s free; and the focus is on participation, not spectatorship or consumption. “It’s a great opportunity for people to come out on the streets, be active and meet their neighbors — and who doesn’t want to do that?” says Bike Pittsburgh’s Ngani Ndimbie. A bigger Open Streets Pittsburgh is planned for 2015. Bill O’Driscoll 8 a.m.-noon, Sun., July 20. Downtown. Free. www.bikePGH.org/OpenStreets

{STAGE} Throughline Theatre’s fifth season continues tonight with A New Death. The darkly comic new work, by local playwright C.S. Wyatt, was inspired by sitcom pioneers like Bob Newhart and Mary Tyler Moore. In it, everyman Harlan Howe is unwittingly hired as a messenger of Death, and his attempts to fill the role temper the play’s existential tendencies with good oldfashioned comedy hijinks. The play opens tonight; the July 24 performance will be followed by a playwright Q&A. DW 8 p.m. Continues through July 26. Grey Box Theater, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15 (opening-night reception: $25). 412-586-7744 or www.throughlinetheatre.org

25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $1520. www.nonameplayers.org

+ SAT., JULY 19 Advocacy group Bike Pittsburgh has launched City Cycling, to teach beginning and veteran cyclists alike safe street-biking. The Fundamentals of City Cycling ($35), taught by bike educators Karen Brooks and Harry Geyer, is held Tuesday and Thursday nights at Homewood’s Wheel Mill; it covers everything from pre-ride safety checks to skills for stopping and starting in traffic. The Confident City Cycling class ($20) — which teaches skills like making climbs and descents, and safely crossing intersections — is held monthly at different locations. The first session is at 10 a.m. today, at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s East Liberty Branch. BO www.bikepgh.org

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The Carnegie Science Center’s BLUE! exhibit offers visitors blue foam blocks of all shapes and sizes — a challenge to

+ WED., JULY 23 {ART}

everyone’s inner builder. But the Center also offers two other ways to get the blues this weekend. One, it’s Blue Moon Weekend, a two-day exhibit commemorating the 45th anniversary of the moon landing, including a look at Hollywood’s takes on lunar exploration and a chance to make your own UFO. And two, the summer’s weekly blues-and-bluegrass Corey Escoto’s “Navajo Point Diamond (Grand Canyon)”

Playwright Kirk Lynn, of the Austin, Texas-based Rude Mechanicals, has a new project: “fixing” Shakespeare’s least popular plays. His first salvage effort was The Life and Death of King John, which Lynn translated into contemporary English, adding curse words and making some edits (like cutting half the characters). Austin critics liked last year’s debut production of Fixing King John (“remarkably original and fiercely energetic,” wrote one). Tonight, those cheeky No Name Players stage the play’s Pittsburgh premiere. Steven Wilson directs a cast of 10. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 2. Off the Wall Theater,

BLUE BLUE! BLUE BL E!

{CYCLING}

{EXHIBIT} {STAGE}

group Hip Hop On LOCK, and Homewood’s own St. Charles Lwango Choir. Attendees are urged to bring lawn chairs. DW 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Also July 20. Kelly Street and Homewood Avenue, Homewood. Free. 412-961-1377 or www. harambeeujima.org

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performance series continues today at 1 p.m. with master local blues guitarist Ernie Hawkins and Wil E. Tri on harmonica. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 1 Allegheny Drive, North Side. $11.95-$18.95 (free for kids under 3). 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

{FESTIVAL} The Homewood Children’s Village presents the annual

Harambee Ujima Black Arts Festival, which returns for its 21st year this weekend. It features African and AfroCaribbean dance, live music, a multimedia art gallery centered on the theme of wellness, as well as a martialarts demonstration and the Reading Is Fundamental bookmobile. Performers include Saltworks Theater Company, local arts-education

Sure, Superman’s faster than a speeding bullet, but can he really fool Iron Man’s hyper-accurate targeting system? Such questions and more will be answered at the ToonSeum exhibit When Worlds Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. Patrons can peruse artwork by legendary comic book artists like Jack Kirby and Jim Steranko, and vote for their favorite heroes. Limited-edition hand-signed prints of the matchups will also be available for purchase. The show is up today, followed by tomorrow night’s opening party. DW 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. ($8). Party: 6:30 p.m. Thu., July 24. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. ($25-75). 412-2320199 or www.toonseum.org

MainEvent

The Pittsburgh Biennial keeps growing. In 2011, for the first time, this venerable Pittsburgh Center for the Arts showcase for regional artists collaborated with other organizations, drawing on the curatorial talent at the Carnegie Museum of Art, The Andy Warhol Museum and the Miller Gallery. That went well and now — in addition to PCA’s sister organization, Pittsburgh Filmmakers — the 2014 Biennial has taken three more partners: Pittsburgh Glass Center, the Mattress Factory and SPACE gallery, all “really key places” in the local scene, says PCA Director Laura Domencic. Opening dates for the shows at the eight venues are staggered; the first is Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand, a solo exhibit of new work at the Carnegie. The internationally exhibited Escoto, who lives in Pittsburgh, will show photographic and sculptural work including his “hacked Polaroids,” part of his exploration of obsolete technologies, handcrafted processes, and the production and consumption of illusion. The July 18 opening reception includes an artist talk. Escoto’s show runs through Sept. 29; the next leg of the Biennial opens Aug. 1, at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Bill O’Driscoll Opening event: 5:30-9 p.m. Fri., July 18. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 421-622-3131 or www.pittsburghbienial.org

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

planned for July 28. DW 7 p.m. Also noon and 3 p.m. Sat., July 19, and 1 p.m. Sun., July 20. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. Free. 412-563-0368 or www.48hour film.com/Pittsburgh

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ALL SHOOK UP. Music

Look for us at Pittsburgh Beerfest

JULY

18 & 19

from the Hits of Elvis Presley. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru July 26. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ARIADNE ON NAXOS. Opera by Richard Strauss. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest. Fri., July 18, 7:30 p.m., Sun., July 20, 2 p.m. and Sat., July 26, 7:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. BE MY BABY. A comedy by Ken Ludwig. Presented by The Bobcat Players. Thu-Sat. Thru July 19. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS. Neil Simon’s family story set during the Great Depression in Brooklyn, New York. Thru July 19, 8 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. CATS. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Broadway classic. Tue-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

CHILDREN OF EDEN. Heartfelt & humorous look at the age-old conflict between parents & children, loosely based on the book of Genesis. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 3. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED). www.ticketpeak. com/jester July 18-19, 7 p.m. and Sun., July 20, 2 p.m. The Refresh Stage, New Castle. 724-674-7999. THE FANTASTICKS. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest & Attack Theatre. Thu., July 17, 7:30 p.m., Fri., July 25, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., July 26, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. FIXING KING JOHN. A contemporary adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John. Presented by No Name Players. July 18-19, 8 p.m., July 24-26, 8 p.m., Mon., July 28, 8 p.m. and July 31Aug. 2, 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-207-7111.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

LATE-NIGHT CABARET. A NEW DEATH. Play by C.S. Wyatt envisioning the Broadway favorites, jazz transition to the after-life standards, & beloved arias after as a mismanaged monopoly. each mainstage performance. Presented by Throughline Presented by Opera Theater Theatre. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and SummerFest. Thru July 19 Sat, 2 p.m. Thru July 26. and Fri., July 25. Twentieth The Grey Box Theatre, Century Club, Oakland. Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. 412-326-9687. A NEW KIND OF THE LION IN WINTER. FALLOUT. Workshop Play by James Goldman. performance of an Presented by The opera based on the Summer Company. life of Rachel Carson. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Part of Opera Theater July 19. Peter Mills www. per pa SummerFest. Tue., Theater (Duquesne, pghcitym o .c July 22, 7:30 p.m. Rockwell Hall), Uptown. Twentieth Century Club, 412-243-6464. Oakland. 412-326-9687. THE MERRY WIDOW. OLIVER TWISTED. Dark Franz Lehár’s operetta retelling of Oliver Twist. about Hanna, a rich widow, Presented by Rage of the & her countrymen’s attempt Stage Players. Mature audiences. to keep her money in the Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 19. principality by finding her McKeesport Little Theater, the right husband. Presented McKeesport. 724-292-8427. by Opera Theater SummerFest. RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC Sat., July 19, 7:30 p.m. and OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute Sun., July 27, 2 p.m. Twentieth to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, Century Club, Oakland. 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and 412-326-9687. Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. SIDE SHOW. Based on the true story of Siamese twins Violet & Daisy Hilton who became stars during the Depression. Presented by Stage 62. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. ST. GERTRUDE’S GUIDE TO HEAVEN. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat and Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 16. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. SUMMER OF LOVE. Musical feat. songs by the Mamas & the Papas, Donovan, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, & more. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and July 20-27, 2 p.m. Thru July 26. Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. SUMMERFEST EUROPE RECITAL. Showcasing 5 Belgian vocalists. Part of Opera Theater SummerFest. Sun., July 20, 6:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. A TRIBUTE TO MILLDRED MILLER POSVAR. Excepts from Opera Theater’s founder’s career. Part of Opera Theater SummerFest. Wed., July 23, 7:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. WOMAN & SCARECROW. A woman converses w/ Scarecrow, a companion only she can see, about how to CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

VISUALART

“Town and Country,” by Aaron Blum, from Born and Raised, at Pittsburgh Filmmakers Galleries, in Oakland

NEW THIS WEEK BUTLER ART CENTER. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. Reception July 25, 7-9 p.m. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Opening reception & artist talk: July 18, 5:30-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3131. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Opening reception July 19, 7-9 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-6791.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Takeaway: Made w/ Love. Feat. nearly 100 amateur artworks handpicked from thrift store collections across several states. Organized by Robert Raczka. Downtown. 412-456-6666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety

of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. A Response to Life. Work by Mari Yobp & Daniel Yobp. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Collecting: Woods to Water. Work by Sharon McCartney. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Making a Splash. Watercolors by Nancy Smith & Jeanne Adams. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUTLER ART CENTER. Works by Sally Jones Rodgers & Patricia Young. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Sandbox: At Play w/ the Photobook. Rotating selection of photobooks. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside

look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mildred Sidorow. A sunny collection of work by the 94 year old Johnstown native. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. Cranberry. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Shawn Quinlan, Elizabeth A. Douglas, Gerry Florida. Quilts, sculpture, jewelry. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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reconcile herself to these last moments. Presented by PICT. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000 x 207.

COMEDY THU 17 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. STEVE BRYNE & SULLIVAN & SON COMEDY TOUR. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 18 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE DRAFT. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. RUCKUS. 11 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. STEAMER W/ JOHN FROM YA JAGOFF! 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 18 - SAT 19 SONJA WHITE. July 18-19 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 18 - SUN 20 PAULY SHORE. July 18-20, 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., July 19, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., July 20, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 19 LAWPROV: AN IMPROVISED TRIAL. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: MAKE NICE BOOM. 8 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-212-7061. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: MONDO! W/ DJ ZOMBO. 9:30 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-212-7061.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

VISUAL ART

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& Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Niche Inheritance. Window installation by Dakotah Konicek. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Chainsaw Show. New Paintings by Anthony Purcell. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922.

WHEN I’M NOT A PERSON. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SUN 20 MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 22 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 23 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the

LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Affair w/ the Arts Part 2. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. A Walk in My Shoes: Walk the Diaspora. Interactive exhibit feat. the work of local, national & international artists, musicians & authors. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Identity Materials. Work by Theresa Baughman & Julia Betts. Bloomfield. NEW CITY CHURCH. Layers. Paintings by John J. Donnelly.

Downtown. 412-726-4217. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. CFEVA Exchange Exhibition. Work by Jake Beckman, Jeanne Jaffe & Jennie Thwing. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SANCTUARY GALLERY. Sllimdaert: Brent Birnbaum. Lawrenceville. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003.

Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400.

CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Contemporary Figurative Drawing Pittsburgh. B&W work by Stephen Tuomala, Tim Fabian, Marc Snyder & Richard Claraval. Contemporary Figurative Drawing Pittsburgh. B&W work by Stephen Tuomala, Tim Fabian, Marc Snyder & Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-441-0194. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

HARMONY MUSEUM. Flags of Freedom. Feat. several of the most prominent flags of America’s Colonial, Revolutionary & Federal periods. Harmony. 724-452-7341. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235.

NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS SUN 20 POLISH HILL ARTS FESTIVAL. Music, art, food, more. Brereton & Dobson Streets, Polish Hill. 12-9 p.m. 412-681-1950.

WED 23 UKRAINIAN FOOD & FUN FESTIVAL. www.ukiefestrox.com July 23-26, 5 p.m. St. Mary’s Ukranian Orthodox Church, McKees Rocks. 412-331-9288.

DANCE THU 17 - SUN 20 LIFE, LOVE, & JAZZ. Presented by Texture Contemporary Ballet. 7:30 p.m., July 18-19, 8 p.m. and Sun., July 20, 2 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side.

THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. VERSIFY. Poetry reading w/ Wendy Scott, Rachel Meddies, Emily Mohn-Slate. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

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SAT 19 GRACEFULLY REACHING ABSENT BOUNDARIES: A GRAB PRODUCTIONS DANCE SHOWCASE. Benefits the American Cancer Society. 7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 800-838-3006.

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RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. w r e p a p Liar, Liar by K.J. pghcitym .co Larson. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FUNDRAISERS THU 17 MICHAEL T. MUHA FOR STATE SENATE FUNDRAISER. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tonic Bar & Grill, Downtown. 724-977-5585.

SUN 20 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. HOWLING THE BLUES. Live music by The Mystic Knights Blues Band, raffle, more. Benefits Distinguished Dobermans Rescue. 2-6 p.m. Rochester Inn Hardwood Grille, Ross. 412-559-1877.

WED 23 YOGA NIDRA FUNDRAISER FOR PITTSBURGH FOOD BANK. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Schoolhouse Yoga, Strip District. 412-401-4444.

POLITICS THU 17 PITTSBURGH SOCIALIST FORUM. 7 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-303-2310.

LITERARY THU 17 BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education & Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai. 1-2 & 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 19 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LIGONIER VALLEY WRITERS’ CONFERENCE. Workshops in fiction, nonfiction, poetry & songwriting. 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Westmoreland County Community College, Youngwood. 724-593-7294. MEET THE AUTHOR: TÁMARA HILL. Author of Mental Health In A Failed American System: What Every Parent, Family, & Caregiver Should Know. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library. 412-281-7141. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. SALLY WEN MAO, CATHY LINH CHE, EUGENIA LEIGH, MICHELLE CHAN BROWN. Poetry reading & book signing. 6:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. SUMMER SPEAKER PROGRAM: ANDREA NIAPAS. Author of Fatal Friendship: The Death of Helen Richey & the Strange Disappearance of Amelia Earhart. 2 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 22 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 23 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

KIDSTUFF THU 17 3D FOR KIDS. Ages 7+. 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Norwin Public Library, North Huntingdon. 724-863-4700 x 6. STEEL CITY ROWING RIVER FUN CAMP. For ages 8-11. Mon, Tue, Thu. Thru July 17 THURSDAY CRAFTERNOONS. Ages 4-8. Thu, 4 p.m. Thru July 31 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru CONTINUES ON PG. 52

The beer that invented Light beer. BEACH PARTY

JIMMY BUFFET TIX GIVEAWAY FRIDAY, JULY 18, 8-10PM

$2.69 LITE ALUMINUM PINTS. $3 REDDS BOTTLES. GAMES & GIVEAWAYS W/ MILLER GIRLS

BEACH PARTY

JIMMY BUFFET TIX GIVEAWAY SATURDAY, JULY 19, 9PM-12AM

SUN 20 THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: PITTSBURGH PRAYS: THIRTY-SIX HOUSES OF WORSHIP. Author talk & book signing w/ Abby Mendelson. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WE WRITE! CREATIVE WRITING UNIVERSITY. Workshop w/ Shirley Showalter & Sharon Lippincott. 1-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

$3 Lite Aluminum Pints. GAMES & GIVEAWAYS W/ MILLER GIRLS PITTSBURGH’S BEST

BLOCK PARTY ON WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE.

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July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

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SAT 19 - SUN 20

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 18 PUPPET STAGE CONSTRUCTION. Use wood & real tools to construct a shared performance space to perform w/ different types of puppets. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Experience MAKESHOP after hours. Ages 10-15. 5-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 19 THE JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY. Children’s opera based on Mark Twain’s short story. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest. Sat, 11 a.m. Thru July 26 Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SUPER SCIENCE SERIES: DIPPY’S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION. Examine 155-million-year-old rocks, learn how dinosaurs have been portrayed in animation, more. 12-4 p.m. Carnegie

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Pittsburgh

ZANY UMBRELLA CIRCUS PRESENTS: THE GIFT. Theatrical performance based loosely on O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi. July 19-20, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Cultural Trust Gallery Crawl, Downtown CRITIC: Larry Howard, 20, a graphic designer/ filmmaker from the South Side

SUN 20 SUNNY DAY STORY TIME. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Aug. 3 The University Store on Fifth, Oakland. 412-648-1455.

WHEN: July

11,

2014

MON 21 BONJOUR LES AMIS. French stories & activities. Ages 2-5 w/ parent. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru July 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920.

MON 21 - WED 23 THE FURTHER ADVENTURES OF MAIDE MARIAN. While Robin Hood hides in a tree, Marian, the best swordswoman in England, furious with Robin for having deserted her, picks youngsters from the audience to become her “Gang.” Presented by Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed, 11 a.m. Thru July 30 Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050.

TUE 22 DOMINO DAYS. Learn & play domino games. For students in grades K-2. 2 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-0937. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE FRI 18 - SAT 19 MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR

I missed the arts festival a few weeks ago, so I thought I’d come down here. [The Night Market] has great energy! I love the DJ and the food and the aerial dancers. It’s also just great because it’s, like, the only place to sit in the whole gallery crawl. So far, we’ve seen SPACE, Handmade Arcade — where I made this weird leaf thing on my head — and Pittsburgh Is Art. It’s all been really great, and I’m looking forward to seeing Arcade Comedy Theater’s thing next. The best part about it, though, is the set-up. It’s all over Downtown, so every place has a different vibe, and it encourages people to explore. BY DAN WILLIS

PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. July 18-19, 6:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

SAT 19 CELEBRATE THE BLOOM! Nature explorations, vendors, live music, bonfire, more. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

NATIVE AMERICAN WILDERNESS SKILLS. Sat, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru July 26 Latodami Environmental Education Center, Wexford. 724-935-2170.

SUN 20 LOCAL INVASIVE PLANTS & ANIMALS. Learn about local invasive species & help remove invasive bush honeysuckles from the trails & meadows of the Wildflower Reserve. 1 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611.

TUE 22 RACCOON LAKE EVENING NATURE PADDLE. 6:30-8 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue,

3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 23 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 17 ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EXTRAORDINARY EXPERIMENTS: THE PRINTS OF BRUEGEL, DÜRER, SCHONGAUER & REMBRANDT. Course examining a period of dramatic change in Europe through the work of four of its most significant artists. Thu, 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: DISABILITY RIGHTS. 6:30-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-417-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: CROWDFUNDING YOUR BUSINESS W/ KIVAZIP. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PECHAKUCHA NIGHT. A dynamic presentation style where presenters have 6 minutes & 40 seconds to pair words & images. Presented by AIA Pittsburgh. 6 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-9548. RAIN COLLECTION & CONSERVATION WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Chatham University

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 17 - SAT 19 ART IN THE STREET SIDEWALK SALE. July 17-19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Lincoln Ave, Bellevue. 412-761-2113.

FRI 18 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. THE DRUMS OF NATIVE SISTERS. Performance & a display of regalia, including clothing & other accoutrements worn & carried by drummers & performers at Pow-Wows. 1-3 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-836-1800. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Begin at Lower Parking Lot of the Duquense Incline, Downtown. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-323-4709. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GEORGE GERSHWIN, HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Fri, 10 a.m. Thru July 18 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HARRISON APPLE’S PITTSBURGH QUEER HISTORY PROJECT & SELFDOCUMENTATION. Lecture w/ Harrison Apple. 7 p.m. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities.

Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

FRI 18 - SAT 19 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 19

follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108.

BBQ. Food, beer tastings by local breweries, more. Benefits Friends of Grandview Park. Grandview Park, Mt. Washington. 412-445-7801. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. NATIONAL ICE CREAM DAY CELEBRATION. Silent auction, crafts, face painting, live music, ice cream eating contest, more. 3-5 p.m.

ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. www.pittsburghtangueros.org Sat, 5-6 p.m. Thru Aug. 10 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] & BLOCK PARTY. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church, Regent Square. 412-731-2511. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Help the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy keep our Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 local parks looking healthy by joining in on Weeding 412-708-1277. Wednesdays. Volunteers meet bi-weekly at the Highland CITY OF CHAMPIONS! Park Entry Garden to weed and deadhead the perennial THE PITTSBURGH SPORTS flowers. Tools, training and water are provided. HISTORY TOUR. Begins at The next session is July 30, from 5-7 p.m. Email Duquesne Incline, 1220 volunteer@pittsburghparks.org for information. Grandview Ave, Mt. Washington. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-323-4709. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication SUMMER ARTISAN BAZAAR. Bruster’s Real Ice Cream, Ross. & conflict transformation study Craft show & sale feat. handmade 412-366-9899. group based on the work of peace jewelry, pottery, stained glass, OPEN MIC & CRAFT activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. BEER SWAP. 6:30 p.m. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and paintings, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Bridgeville Public Library, Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Aug. 9 North Hills Art Center, Bridgeville. 412-221-3737. Thru Sept. 19 412-271-7660. Ross. 412-364-3622. OPEN STREETS. Walk, FIG TREE CLASSES. SWING CITY. Learn & practice bike, dance, play to the Hands-on workshop. Part of swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Clemente Bridge w/ limited the Italian Garden Project. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. automobile traffic. bikepgh.org/ www.theitaliangardenproject.com 412-759-1569. openstreetspgh 8 a.m.-12 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. WIGLE WHISKEY Market Square, Downtown. Earthen Vessels Outreach, BARRELHOUSE TOURS. 412-471-1511. Bloomfield. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle PFLAG GREENSBURG. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH Whiskey Barrel House, Support, education & advocacy MT. WASHINGTON North Side. 412-224-2827. for the LGBTQ community, WALKING TOUR. Begins family & friends. Third Sun outside of Monongahela of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity Incline on W. Carson St. BLUE MOON WEEKEND. United Church of Christ, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Celebrate the 45th Greensburg. 412-518-1515. Oct. 25 412-302-5223. anniversary of the SQUIRREL HILL COMMUNITY I MADE IT! Apollo 11 moon FOOD PANTRY TRIBUTE WALL MARKET. Nomadic landing by exploring OPEN HOUSE. 1-4 p.m. Squirrel indie craft market www. per a p ty the connections Hill Community Food Pantry, feat. 30+ local artisans, pghci m o .c between scientific Greenfield. 412-422-7200. farmers market, more. advances & the limitless TOUR DE POINTBREEZEWAY. www.imadeitmarket.com human imagination. Grand opening celebration Third Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., July 20, of a new venue for intimate 2-7 p.m. Thru Aug. 16 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Carnegie Science weddings, showers, special events, Waterfront Town Center, Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. performances, more. 4 p.m. Homestead. 412-476-8889. NEW FRICK ORIENTATION PointBreezeway, Point Breeze. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. CENTER & FRICK MUSEUM 412-770-7830. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 STORE OPENING WEEKEND. WHISKEY REBELLION DAY Carnegie Library, Oakland. Family friendly activities, gallery & MILITARY ENCAMPMENT 412-622-3151. talks, free docent tours of the W/ WAYNE’S LEGION. KOREAN II. For those museum, free Clayton tours, more. 18th century military camp who already have a basic July 19-20 Frick Art & Historical re-enactments, musket firing, understanding of Korean & Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. music demos, more. 12-5 p.m. are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, 412-221-0348. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Oakland. 412-622-3151. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. MANCHESTER COMMUNITY WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Weekly letter writing event. BLOCK PARTY. 12-10 p.m. Support group for life goals. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Manchester Playground, Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Oakland. 412-683-3727. North Side. 412-323-1743. Library, Squirrel Hill. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. MEDITATIVE YOGA FLOW. 412-371-1707. Tue, 7 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Second and Third Sun of every Aug. 30 Crafton Park, Crafton. month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-999-9153. AFRICAN HERITAGE Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. CLASSROOM TOURS. Tours BURG BITES & PITTSBURGH Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing for the National Association URBAN GARDENING PROJECT

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CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

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of Negro Business & Professional Women’s Clubs. www.nanbpwc.org 10:30-11 a.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-621-9339. COMMONWEALTH CONNECTIONS ACADEMY INFORMATION SESSION. 6:30-8 p.m. Cambria Suites Pittsburgh, Uptown. 800-481-6227. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 22 BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. MEDITATIVE YOGA FLOW. Tue, 7 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 30 Crafton Park, Crafton. 412-999-9153. PAINT NITE. Painting event w/ food & cocktails. No experience required. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru July 29 Notion, East Liberty. 412-361-1188. WHERE HEROES LIE: STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY THROUGH BENEVOLENCE. Sponsored by Who’s Your Brother. 2-3:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

WED 23

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LESLIE CLAGUE}

It’s time again for the Polish Hill Arts Festival, and with more than 40 vendors and craftspeople, the neighborhood’s annual civic event is bigger than ever. Peruse handmade goods — like jewelry by Lisa Parker or Jason Barkley’s ink-and-watercolor paintings — make your own art with folks from Assemble and Little House Big Art, and enjoy a full day of live music and dance by Gangwish, the Polish Hillbillies, Timbeleza, Olivia Kissel and more. Noon-9 p.m. Sun., July 20. Brereton and Dobson streets, Polish Hill. Call 412-681-1950 or visit www.phcapgh.org/events.

BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru July 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. COUNTRY NIGHT LINE DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. DETROIT STYLE URBAN All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Union Project, Highland Park. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, 412-363-4550. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. SUPER HERBS FOR HEALTH & ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). HEALING. Learn about a variety Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon of super herbs that will promote Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. health and healing, & can provide 412-531-1912. support for attaining ideal weight. FINANCIAL SERVICES 7 p.m. East End Food Co-op, CAREER FAIR. Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Career WALKING THE Development CAMINO: SIX WAYS Center, Squirrel Hill. TO SANTIAGO. 412-586-3728. Documentary screening MOWA YOGA www. per about walking the pa PRESENTS: PRACTICE pghcitym Camino de Santiago .co ON THE PODS. in Spain & Q&A w/ Grandview & Shiloh St., Co-Producer/featured Mt. Washington. Wed, pilgrim Annie O’Neil. July 23-24 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Melwood Screening Room, 339-237-0891. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PFLAG WASHINGTON. WEST COAST SWING Support, education & advocacy WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance for the LGBTQ community, family lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, & friends. Fourth Wed of every South Side. 916-287-1373. month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. PGC LECTURE SERIES: BELLE VOCI. Seeking women of TONY SERVIENTE. Pittsburgh all ages & backgrounds for the Glass Center, Friendship. local intergenerational women’s 412-365-2145. choir. July 21 & 23. BV performs PITTSBURGH & THE AMERICAN compositions of wide-ranging GARDEN. Presented by the musical styles & diverse languages Frick Art & Historical Center. 2 p.m. from around the world. Call or visit Mount Lebanon Public Library, bellevocipgh.com 412-292-1928. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. COMMUNITY THEATRE PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER PLAYERS. Auditions for The SUMMER LECTURE SERIES. Mouse That Roared. Aug. 2-3. Tony Serviente. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. Everyone is invited to audition w/ 412-365-2145. a cold reading. No preparation or THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. experience is required. ctp@bactp. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. com Community Presbyterian

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.16/07.23.2014

Church of Ben Avon. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Auditions for one-act plays produced by 18 regional companies. July 19-20. Seeking all types/experience levels. Prepare a 2-min monologue. auditions@pittsburghnewworks. org Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Two questions. 1. Recently, I went to a bar with my brother and encountered a friend from high school. My brother told me that toward the end of the night, my friend followed him into the bathroom and made a drunken pass (which apparently involved a clumsy grab at his penis). My inclination is to ignore the issue. If my friend is closeted or bi-curious, I feel like I should respect his privacy. Advice? 2. My bisexual girlfriend wants to take me to a gay bar. I feel like hanging out at a gay club would be somewhat dishonest and touristy. Is my apprehension warranted? BASIC RESPECT OFFERED SINCERELY

1. If your friend had managed to make a respectful pass at your brother, then I could endorse respecting your friend’s privacy in turn. But your friend cornered your brother in a toilet and grabbed his cock. That’s not OK, and someone needs to make it clear that there are consequences for behaving like that. Outing himself to you as gay or bi and an asshole was the consequence this time, but he could wind up assaulted or facing sexual-assault charges if the drunken cockgrabbing continues. 2. Most gay men don’t mind seeing girls with straight boyfriends in gay dance/party bars and clubs, but girls and unavailable/apprehensive straight boys ruin the vibe in darker, sleazier gay pickup joints. Stick to the party palaces (dance floors and drag shows), avoid the pickup joints (hard rock and trough urinals), and you’ll be fine.

Bodybuilders grease themselves up with baby oil — which gets all over everything and requires frequent reapplication. But there’s a less messy way to achieve the super-shiny look: Google “shiny zentai suit” and “metallic zentai suit,” and you’ll find dozens of websites that sell catsuits made out of Lycra, not latex, which are easier to put on than latex catsuits, far easier to clean and a lot cheaper. At Zentaizone.com, just one of many sites, you’ll find dozens of different zentai suits for less than $50, with some less than $25. Even a poor student could afford those. I saw an ad for an escort who was possibly the hottest woman I’ve ever seen. But instead of asking for a session, I offered to take her out to dinner. She agreed to the date, and we had a lot of fun. She asked me what I did for a living, and I told her. I then asked if she liked what she did for a living, and she responded that she just worked in a department store. Most escorts are pretty subtle in their ads, so she may think I’m innocent enough not to have realized that she’s an escort. Or she knows I know but didn’t want to mention it. Either way, we’ve been on a few dates since, and at some point, I’d like to tell her that I know and I’m OK with it. Should I?

FOR MANY KINKSTERS, BONDAGE AND KINK PLAY IS SEX.

I suspect my boyfriend of seven months loves his 9-year-old dog more than me. I am 54 and divorced twice. He is 57 and has been divorced three times. I am jealous of the way he treats his dog. I have even told him so. Is it worth my time and energy to wait for my boyfriend to start treating me better? NEGLECTED HUMAN GIRLFRIEND

Your boyfriend has been “with” his dog for nine years, and with you for only seven months. Considering his track record with human females — divorced three times — he might be less selfconscious about showing affection for his dog. You don’t mention what he’s doing for his dog that he doesn’t do for you (table scraps? belly rubs? shock collars?), but the longer you “wait around,” the more demonstrably affectionate your boyfriend is likely to become. But I can’t imagine he’ll want you around at all if you continue to waste time and energy being jealous of his dog. My fiancé wants to see me oiled up and glistening. What should we be using to get a glossy, oiled-up look that lasts? Is there a name for the kink for glossy, formfitting things? He’d also like to see me in a super-shiny catsuit made of latex, but we’re poor students and can’t afford one. WANTS TO SHINE

GREAT

Drivers

PAY

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FOR ONE

Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Downtown Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

NOT A JOHN

It’s possible this woman works in a department store and does escorting on the side to make ends meet. (Most full-time sex workers would regard “willing to date guys who contact me via my escort ad” as the mark of either a novice or an ends-meeter.) She already knows you’re OK with her doing sex work — you did contact her via her escort ad — but if you want to let her know that you don’t have a problem with it, tell her. But don’t assume or imply that she lied to you about working in a department store. A lot of kink and fetish events and parties are not sex-friendly — it is standard to get tied up and smacked around while still remaining within the bounds of one’s marriage vows. But if you are going to an event that is promoted as “sex-friendly,” and you have arranged to meet someone there for, say, an extended rope-bondage session, how do you broach the issue of being “out of commission” for sex? It seems rude to string someone along (ha!), but I’m not sure what to do. NEW TO KINK SCENES

Use your words. Whether a kink party you’re attending is sex-friendly or not, you should tell your play partners in advance that you’re only up for bondage and kink play. For many kinksters, bondage and kink play is sex, so it won’t be an issue. You should make your limits clear before playing in any context — someone who takes you to a no-intercourse-allowed party might be expecting to take you home for sex afterward — and decline to play with anyone who balks. On this week’s Savage Lovecast, Dan talks bondage with kinkster trailblazer Midori: savagelovecast.com

DAY!

Must have a full-size truck/van. CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 JIM for an application

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The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

07.16-07.23

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Mozart debuted his now-famous opera Don Giovanni in Prague on Oct. 29, 1787. It was a major production, featuring an orchestra, a chorus and eight main singers. Yet the composer didn’t finish writing the opera’s overture until less than 24 hours before the show. Are you cooking up a similar scenario, Cancerian? I suspect that sometime in the next two weeks you will complete a breakthrough with an inspired, last-minute effort. And the final part of your work may well be its “overture”; the first part will arrive last. (P.S.: Mozart’s Don Giovanni was well-received, and I expect your offering will be, too.)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “We must learn to bear the pleasures as we have borne the pains,” says writer Nikki Giovanni. That will be apt advice for you to keep in mind during the coming months, Leo. You may think I’m perverse for suggesting such a thing. Compared to how demanding it was to manage the suffering you experienced in late 2013 and earlier this year, you might assume it will be simple to deal with the ease and awakening that are heading your way. But I’d like you to consider the possibility that these blessings will bring their own challenges. For example, you may need to surrender inconveniences and hardships you have gotten used to, almost comfortable with. It’s conceivable you will have to divest yourself of habits that made sense when you were struggling, but are now becoming counterproductive.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I would hate for your fine mind to become a liability. As much as I admire your native skepticism and analytical intelligence, it would be a shame if they prevented you from getting the full benefit of the wonders and marvels that are brewing in your vicinity. Your operative motto in the coming days comes from Virgo storyteller Roald Dahl: “Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.” Suspend your disbelief, my beautiful friend. Make yourself receptive to the possibility of being amazed.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Kris Kristofferson is in the Country Music Hall of Fame now, but it took a while for him to launch his career. One of his big breaks came at age 29 when he was sweeping floors at a recording studio in Nashville. He managed to meet superstar Johnny Cash, who was working there on an album. A few years later, Kristofferson boldly landed a helicopter in Cash’s yard to deliver his demo tape. That prompted Cash to get him a breakthrough gig performing at the Newport Folk Festival. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were able to further your goals with a similar sequence, Libra: luck that puts you in the right place at the right time, followed by some brazen yet charming acts of self-promotion.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In her poem “Looking Back,” Sarah Brown Weitzman writes that she keeps “trying to understand / how I fell / so short of what I intended / to do with my life.” Is there a chance that 30 years from now you might say something similar, Scorpio? If so, take action to ensure that outcome doesn’t come to pass. Judging from the astrological omens, I conclude that the next 10 months will be a favorable time to get yourself on track to fulfill your life’s most important goals. Take full advantage!

“There is no such thing as a failed experiment,” said author and inventor Buckminster Fuller, “only experiments with unexpected outcomes.” That’s the spirit I advise you to bring to your own explorations in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. Your task is to try out different possibilities to see where they might lead. Don’t be attached to one conclusion or another. Be free of the drive to be proven right. Instead, seek the truth in whatever strange shape it reveals itself. Be eager to learn what you didn’t even realize you needed to know.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Architects in ancient Rome used concrete to create many durable structures, some of which are still standing. But the recipe for how to make concrete was forgotten for more than a thousand years after the Roman Empire collapsed in the fifth century. A British engineer finally rediscovered the formula in 1756, and today concrete is a prime component in many highways, dams, bridges and buildings. I foresee a similar story unfolding in your life, Capricorn. A valuable secret that you once knew but then lost is on the verge of resurfacing. Be alert for it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Beginning in 1798, European cartographers who drew maps of West Africa included the Mountains of Kong, a range of peaks that extended more than a thousand miles east and west. It was 90 years before the French explorer Louis Gustave Binger realized that there were no such mountains. All the maps had been wrong, based on faulty information. Binger is known to history as the man who undiscovered the Mountains of Kong. I’m appointing him to be your role model in the coming weeks, Aquarius. May he inspire you to expose long-running delusions, strip away entrenched falsehoods and restore the simple, shining truths.

To do his work, he needs a never-ending supply of stories about people doing crazy, corrupt and hypocritical things. I’m sure this subject matter makes him sad and angry. But it also stimulates him to come up with funny ideas that entertain and educate his audience — and earns him a very good income. I invite you to try his approach, Aries. Have faith that the absurdity you experience can be used to your advantage.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Bananas grow in Iceland, a country that borders the Arctic Ocean. About 700 of the plants thrive in a large greenhouse heated by geothermal energy. They don’t mature as fast as the bananas in Ecuador or Costa Rica. The low amounts of sunlight mean they require two years to ripen instead of a few months. To me, this entire scenario is a symbol for the work you have ahead of you. You’ve got to encourage and oversee growth in a place that doesn’t seem hospitable in the usual ways, although it is actually just fine. And you must be patient, knowing that the pro-

cess might take a while longer than it would in other circumstances.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): While at a cafe, I overheard two people at the next table talking about astrology. “I think the problemsolvers of the zodiac are Cancers and Capricorns,” said a young, moon-faced woman. “Agreed,” said her companion, an older woman with chiseled features. “And the problem-creators are Scorpios and Geminis.” I couldn’t help myself: I had to insert myself into their conversation so as to defend you. Leaning over toward their table, I said, “Speaking as a professional astrologer, I’ve got to say that right now Geminis are at least temporarily the zodiac’s best problemsolvers. Give them a chance to change your minds.” The women laughed, and moon-face said, “You must be a Gemini.” “No,” I replied. “But I’m on a crusade to help Geminis shift their reputations.” Nietzsche said, “One must have chaos within oneself if one is to be a dancing star.” Comment at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the simplest, calmest of times, there are two sides to every story. On some occasions, however, the bare minimum is three or more sides. Like now. And that can generate quite a ruckus. Even people who are normally pretty harmonious may slip into conflict. Fortunately for all concerned, you are currently at the peak of your power to be a unifying force at the hub of the bubbling hubbub. You can be a weaver who takes threads from each of the tales and spins them into a narrative with which everyone can abide. I love it when that happens! For now, your emotional intelligence is the key to collaborative creativity and group solidarity.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I have complete faith in the continued absurdity of whatever’s going on,” says satirical news commentator Jon Stewart. That’s a healthy attitude.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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THE OLD, OLD BALL GAME Amateur cricket league keeps sport alive {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

WITH THE WVU CHARGERS — dressed in bright yellow outfits

reminiscent of baggage handlers or the ’79 Pirates — up at the wicket, the ball sails way into the trees. In the manner of a school-yard game, an orange-clad fielder races after the ball, rustling through the brush to find it. This is cricket, and that clout is worth six runs. “Good one! Good one!” the batter’s teammates cheer in English. They also append an all-Indian gumbo of Hindi and Punjabi and Tamil. With team members from India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka — as well as the British Isles, Australia and the West Indies — they’re likely to speak virtually anything. Out west of Wexford, surrounded by Linbrook Park’s scrim of trees, 22 members of the Pittsburgh Cricket Association take the field every Saturday and Sunday, April through October. While the field is a standard, lumpy green, the pitch itself — the 22 yards where the bowler hurls at the wicket — is artificial turf, ensuring a regular and easily maintained surface.

18 member teams. Bearing decidedly non-Empire names like Blitzers, Steelzags and Strikers, each squad carries an active roster of 20-odd players. While the ages run from 16 to 67, the average player is 30 years old. Matches are played here, in South Park, and in Ohio. A Mumbai native who came to Pittsburgh for college 25 years ago and stayed, Bokil founded the PCA some nine years ago. “We all played when we were young,” he says. “We’re trying to keep in touch with the game. “We can play at a professional level,” he adds, “but we play for fun. Just for fun. People have a deep passion for this game. They just want to play.” It’s a languid game — the pace so slow it makes baseball seem positively frenetic. Cricket knows no hurried throws to second, no base stealing, no plays at the plate. Just pook, and a little trot between wickets with no apparent haste, each batter holding his bat as if the opposing team might filch it

“WE ALL PLAYED WHEN WE WERE YOUNG. WE’RE TRYING TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH THE GAME.” Cricket is, of course, baseball’s step-dad. As in baseball, there is a catcher, who wears shin guards and gloves — the latter akin to the gray Iron Boy work variety. But cricket bats are somewhat heavier than those used in baseball, with a flat, paddle-like front and a rounded or scalloped back. Many players adapt their bats with duct tape and plastic sleeves on the slender handles. The pitches, thrown at a trot and overhand, bounce off the playing surface. Batters, wearing helmets, gloves and shin guards, swing underhand and up, all hips and wrists. Balls hit anywhere are in play. A batter hits until he makes an out — a ball caught on the fly, for instance. Otherwise, he can swing away for the rest of recorded time. Or so it feels. The fielders — today the Pittsburgh-based Classics Cricket Club — are in orange, like DOC inmates. Many uniforms bear sponsors’ names, much like in Little League: Eclipse Wholesale, Coca Cola, Pizza Palermo. Playing barehanded in the field, they hope for a clean catch: The leather ball feels nearly wooden. Getting the ball back quickly helps, because batters score runs by scuttling back and forth between opposing sets of wickets. “We’ve got a good mix,” Shailesh Bokil says of the PCA’s

when his back is turned. With traditional whites worn only for full-tilt league matches, not these Sunday scrimmages, the teams favor pastel colors, often with nicknames on their backs. The WVU Chargers, for instance, include Kalli, Nag, Dev, Srinivas, Vijay, Ravi, Saurabh, Arun, Venky and Virk. The Charger batsman smacks one into the field. A fielder stops it with his foot, tosses it back underhand. “Well done!” the West Virginians applaud. “Beautiful.” The next shot skips between fielders and bounces past the border sticks, meaning four runs. A soft fly ball over a fielder’s outstretched hands, a bit of back and forth, means a couple more. “Nice running, guys! Nice running!” Currently, WVU is up a few dozen runs. Since games can go to 150 runs, no Classics are sweating just yet. But as the West Virginia wrecking crew continues, a series of well-placed wallops has the Orangemen buzzing about the field. Some 30 minutes into a seemingly endless at-bat, the WVU team’s Whammer Whambold is still whappin’ ’em. A sharp smack bounces past a CCC fielder. “Great batting!” the Yellows holler. “Great batting!” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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