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PROUD DAY: PHOTOS FROM THE CITY’S 2014 PRIDE CELEBRATION 62

EVENTS 6.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NAT BALDWIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SLEEP EXPERIMENTS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

7.20 – 6:30pm SOUND SERIES: BAND OF HORSES, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MIDLAKE Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets are $36/$40 day of show; for tickets visit www.ticketmaster.com

WRAP dress 1974

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

{EDITORIAL}

06.18/06.25.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 25

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY EVETTE GABRIEL}

[NEWS] to get to the point where 06 “II’mwant not having 60-year-old guys skate around me.” — Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto outlining one of his fitness goals

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

“These guys are so old-school they’re cutting-edge.” — Mary Menniti, of The Italian Garden Project

[MUSIC] a long time, we had nothing 28 “For to offer.” — Dr. Catherine Palmer of UPMC’s Musicians’ Hearing Center on why musicians didn’t get much attention from audiologists until recently

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

and Hill are a winning team, 39 “Tatum bickering with the melodic ease of

STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[ARTS] have an insurance plan that’s 42 “Ia reasonable rate, which is nice.” — Painter Gabe Felice on the benefits of the Affordable Care Act

[LAST PAGE] Moment: Against the 62 Proud backdrop of a big win on same-sex marriage, photographer John Colombo captures Pittsburgh Pride festivities Downtown.

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 20 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 54 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 56 N E W S

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF THE CITY IS THE FIRST DUTY OF THE MAYOR.”

INCOMING RE: Doug Shields returns to council as ‘consultant’ for Darlene Harris (June 4, online only) “Darlene Harris, eh? Was Kim Jung Un not hiring?” — Web comment from “Area Man” “Kimmy-Fresh does not pay very well and, in my interview, I found his bodyguards to be a bit menacing. Then there were the communication issues. I figure if something was lost in translation I might get shot. I had the same feeling when I was interviewed by County Executive Rich Fitzgerald when I applied for the job at the Allegheny County Department of Health as an Air Quality Enforcement Inspector. So, while seeking employment, I thought it best to avoid such situations.” — Web comment from Doug Shields

Chuck Noll was never about bringing attention to himself. ... He is every bit as legendary as Vince Lombardi. — June 14 tweet from KDKA sportscaster Bob Pompeani on the death of the former Steelers coach

“Pittsburgh: where Lucinda Williams and Chaka Khan have free concerts within 10 blocks of each other on one beautiful evening.” — June 14 tweet from “MagicalGirlAnnaC” (@thecstandsfor)

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HEAVY LIFTING Bill Peduto wants a fitter Pittsburgh … and he’s trying to lead by example {BY CHRIS POTTER}

W

HEN BILL PEDUTO became Pittsburgh’s 60th mayor on Jan. 6, he was carrying a special burden. And it wasn’t the weight of new responsibility. “The day I got sworn in, I was the biggest I’d ever been — 240 pounds,” Peduto says. “I could feel it.” They call it “running” for office, but politics can be hazardous to your health. The hours are long, the work often sedentary. Peduto says that as he began gearing up for his mayoral campaign, he no longer had time for his amateur hockey league, or even for dinner. “I ended up ordering a pizza at 10 p.m,” he says. The results were obvious: “There is a horrible picture of me after [a mayoral

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

In 2007, Bill Peduto posed with boxing gloves; today he’s using them to get in shape.

debate],” Peduto recalls. “The suit I’m wearing was just … busted. There was an intervention by my staff, who made me buy three fat-guy suits.” But after five months in office, Peduto, who’s 49, is taking better care of himself — and not just for his own well-being. As his administration launches a multifaceted public-health campaign, he’s trying to lead by example. “The health and well-being of the city is the first duty of the mayor,” Peduto

says. But “having a mayor who is slugging around at 240 talking about fitness is disingenuous. And if I can do this, you can do it.” In an effort to prove that — and perhaps set a new standard for government transparency — Peduto let City Paper observe his Saturday workout. Put aside any thoughts of gleaming Nautilus machines or preening East Enders: Peduto works out alone, in a studio on Lawrenceville’s Plummer Street

owned by his trainer, Tyler Thomas Lenio. “For some people, going to the gym is social,â€? Peduto says. “But I hate it.â€? Lenio’s space is all business, and Peduto starts his workout with a series of boxing routines. Circling the oor in a blue T-shirt and shorts, and New Balance sneakers, he delivers urries of hooks, jabs and uppercuts at Lenio’s punch mitts. Within a couple orbits, Peduto might not have quite attained the eye of the tiger, but he doesn’t look like someone the average Democratic committeeman would want to fuck with, either. “I don’t like working out at all,â€? Peduto says, a bit breathlessly, between rounds. “So if I like doing this, it means a lot. It allows me to think about things — and punch Tyler.â€? Then come a series of presses and squats and hoisting kettlebells. Lenio calls this his “total body workoutâ€?: It lasts a bit more than a half-hour, and City Paper can attest it’s even more grueling than a budget hearing. Still, there’s a long road ahead — for Peduto and the city. Despite the New Pittsburgh’s aspirations for a younger, healthier look, it’s bedeviled by bad habits. Nearly a quarter of the region’s residents are smokers, for example — far more than in such metro areas as Boston and Denver. Some health threats, like air pollution, aren’t things you can ďŹ x at the gym; others are tied to outside factors. In 2011, for example, The New York Times reported that infant mortality rates among African Americans in Allegheny County were worse than rates in Mexico. Meanwhile, in a 2009-2010 A l l e g h e ny C o u n t y h e a lt h s u r ve y, roughly one in ďŹ ve people who earned less than $15,000 a year reported being physically inactive — a rate several times higher than that reported by residents earning more than $50,000 a year. Peduto’s administration has taken on the issue by joining Allegheny County’s new “Live Wellâ€? campaign, a countywide effort to address everything from neighborhood safety to smoking cessation. Pittsburgh’s agenda begins with the city’s own workforce, says Betty Cruz, who manages Live Well Pittsburgh from within the mayor’s ofďŹ ce. Again, the idea is to set an example, she says: “If everyone yells at you about what your health habits should be, it’s never as good as seeing people enjoy the beneďŹ ts.â€? And if you can stop city employees from smoking, anything is possible: Cruz says early initiatives will include encouraging workers to take the stairs rather than use city hall’s elevators — and she’s

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

already begun policing stairwells for illicit smokers. City employees are gearing up for a 10,000-steps-per-day walking challenge this month, and Cruz says the city plans to negotiate with vending-machine contractors to provide healthier fare at city facilities. Broader policies are taking shape as well, especially around bicycling. Plans include a proposed bikes-only traffic lane Downtown, and using city information systems to track bike-accident data — part of an effort to make streets safer for cyclists. Ultimately, says Cruz, “We’re looking outside physical health to financial issues, access to affordable healthy foods, neighborhood safety.” The administration won’t just track data like air quality or trail usage, but indicators like “community involvement” and “transformed blight.” Cruz acknowledges such criteria might be tough to quantify, but “If you just talk about physical health, or being active, it can be an elitist conversation. You aren’t going to go for a jog in your neighborhood if you’re worried you’ll get shot.” There are already numerous local health initiatives. But to date, “what’s

clearly missing was the bigger overarching leadership,” says Allegheny County Health Director Karen Hacker, who is in charge of the county’s Live Well effort. This summer, Hacker says, the county plans to launch a website allowing residents to find wellness programs within their ZIP code. She’s also urging school districts to track and report student health data, while incorporating healthier menus and regular exercise into the school day. But in addition to such efforts, Hacker says, “I think things like public figures stepping up and saying, ‘I lost 30 pounds’ — those are actually really important.” Peduto’s goal is actually to lose 50 pounds. And instead of ordering latenight pizzas, he now has a couple healthy meals prepared in advance each week by local chef Art Inzinga. Peduto plans to join city workers in the 10,000step challenge, and his schedule once again includes weekly amateur hockey games. (“I want to get to the point where I’m not having 60-year-old guys skate around me.”) It seems to be working: Already, he says, the campaign-season “fat-guy suits” are back in the closet.

“HAVING A MAYOR WHO IS SLUGGING AROUND AT 240 TALKING ABOUT FITNESS IS DISINGENUOUS. AND IF I CAN DO THIS, YOU CAN DO IT.”

C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Shayla Collins is in the coverage gap.

TAKING COVER After Obamacare gains, many low-income Pennsylvanians hoping for Medicaid expansion {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} SINCE THE Affordable Care Act went into

full swing last fall, those who’ve been able to acquire health insurance report a common symptom: feeling like a weight has been lifted off their shoulders. “I’m not panicked about getting injured or sick anymore,” says Julie Goodenough of Crafton, who says she previously couldn’t obtain insurance because of high cholesterol. “Anytime I got behind the wheel of my car, I thought, ‘What if I get in an accident?’ Anytime I got a cold, I thought, ‘What if this turns into something serious?’ My life feels a lot more secure now.” Not everyone has been so fortunate. Some Pennsylvanians still can’t afford

health care, even with new incentives offered by the federal government, and yet aren’t quite poor enough to be eligible for Medicaid, a longstanding program that covers health costs for low-income people. The resulting “coverage gap” might trap as many as 500,000 state residents — and advocates say Gov. Tom Corbett is to blame. Currently, individuals making more than $11,490 a year — or families of four making $23,550 — are ineligible for Medicaid. The ACA included a provision expanding Medicaid to individuals earning $15,900 or less, and families earning $32,400 or less. That expansion could extend Medicaid to cover 52,322 uninsured individuals in CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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Allegheny County alone, according to U.S. Census data. But Corbett has declined to take advantage of the program, proposing his own alternative instead. That makes Pennsylvania one of 24 states that have opted out. The federal government has pledged to pay for 100 percent of the expansion for the first three years and 90 percent in the following years. Since January 2014, Pennsylvania has rejected $4.8 million in federal funding per day, says the Pennsylvania Health Access Network. But Republican critics warn that already-strapped states may struggle to pay their 10 percent share of the bill once it comes due. Corbett’s alternative, Healthy Pennsylvania, would use federal Medicaid dollars to give qualifying Pennsylvanians a chance to purchase insurance directly from private companies, instead of a marketplace set up under the Affordable Care Act. This plan requires approval from the U.S. Department of Human Services; there is no deadline for that decision. “This is a Pennsylvania solution that reforms a broken and financially unsustainable program,” Corbett said in a statement. Healthy Pennsylvania, he said, “reduce[s] government bureaucracy by using the private health-care market, and create[s] health-care choices for consumers. I will not accept Washington’s ‘onesize-fits-all’ approach for Pennsylvania, and I will not expand an entitlement program.” In the meantime, Shayla Collins waits in limbo. A Pittsburgh native, Collins returned in 2008 to help take care of her mother, who was living with Alzheimer’s. Since that time, Collins has been able to find only temporary and part-time work; she’s been unable to get health insurance as a result. For Collins, getting covered would be about more than having a safety net in case of an emergency. She’s already dealing with chronic pain and several other health issues that have kept her from getting a job that provides health benefits. “It’s a vicious cycle,” says Collins, 56. “There aren’t a lot of jobs I can do because I have a lot of physical problems. I can’t do any heavy lifting because of my back. I could actually try to get a retail job if I didn’t have all these problems. But I can’t stand for long periods of time.” Collins currently goes to a health clinic with sliding-scale fees for basic health needs. She has a laundry list of things she would do if she could get health insurance.

“At the very least, I could start getting things looked at,” Collins says. “I could start physical therapy for my hip and my shoulder. Most places are going to want to get an X-ray to find out what’s wrong. Can I afford an X-ray without insurance? Absolutely not.” By granting health-care access to those like Collins, proponents say, expanding Medicaid would infuse $43.3 billion into the state’s economy. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, which specializes in health-policy research, other predicted benefits include $2.3 billion in federal payments to local hospitals, which support the proposal. (Hospital ERs must provide free care to those who have no coverage.) Activists haven’t given up the fight. “We’re awaiting a decision on the governor’s Healthy PA plan,” says Erin Ninehouser, education and outreach director for the Pennsylvania Health Access Network. “It looks like it’s not going to come soon, so we’re asking lawmakers to move ahead with an expansion of Medicaid while we wait.” State legislators are currently considering HB 1492, which would expand Medicaid in accordance with the Obama administration’s plans, but only until Corbett’s plan is approved. If Corbett’s plan isn’t approved, the expansion would remain in effect, but the legislation includes provisions allowing the state to opt out of the expansion if federal government drops funding. The bill was passed by the House Human Services Committee earlier this month, by a 12-11 vote; three Republicans voted in support. “Expanding Medicaid is absolutely the right thing to do, and passing this legislation now allows it to have serious consideration before the budget deadline,” said Rep Gene DiGirolamo (R-Bucks), who sponsored the legislation and a related amendment, in a statement. “This proposal allows the administration to continue negotiating with the federal government [and] gives the state the ability to draw down muchneeded federal money.” If HB 1492 fails, Ninehouser thinks expanding Medicaid could be used in state budget negotiations to help avoid a forecasted $1.2 billion budget deficit. Proponents say expanding Medicaid would generate more than $400 million in government savings for the next fiscal year. “Coverage could be expanded right away. There’s no reason to keep people waiting,” says Ninehouser. “The money is there. The need is there.”

“COVERAGE COULD BE EXPANDED RIGHT AWAY: THERE’S NO REASON TO KEEP PEOPLE WAITING.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

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TREATMENT OPTION A proposed law would make it easier for the mentally ill to be treated, but would it come at the expense of their rights? {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} WHILE THE SPATE of recent mass shootings has done little to shift the debate on gun control, it has sparked another discussion — about treating Americans suffering from severe mental illness. And a Pittsburgh-area congressman has been at the forefront. In December, shortly before the oneyear anniversary of the Sandy Hook school shooting, Republican Tim Murphy introduced a massive overhaul of the country’s mental-health system, known as the “Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act.” Murphy, a psychologist, has accused some federal mental-health agencies, like the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, of being ineffective, and says patient-privacy rules need to be changed in order to protect the public from those who pose a theat. He hasn’t been shy about linking mental-health treatment to events like the May shooting at the University of California, Santa Barbara: The shooter in that incident, Elliot Rodger, was reportedly being treated for mental illness. In a statement, Murphy said he was “angered because once again, our mentalhealth system has failed and more families have been destroyed. How many more people must lose their lives before we take action on addressing cases of serious mental illness?” (The congressman did not comment for this story before press time.) Some aspects of Murphy’s bill — like extra funding for suicide prevention, and training police to better spot mental-health problems — are widely popular. Others are more controversial, such as a measure allowing judges to force some patients into “mandatory outpatient” treatment, in which patients are ordered to take medication or risk jail. Also controversial are provisions allowing doctors to share more confidential information about patients’ mental health with caregivers. The bill is supported by groups like the American Psychiatric Association and the National Alliance on Mental Illness. “Up until now, almost all mental-health legislation has been aimed at helping the highest-functioning individuals,” says DJ Jaffe of Mental Illness Policy, a New Yorkbased group that has vocally supported Murphy’s bill. Jaffe says Murphy’s bill is the first to “address the elephant in the room” — the roughly 4 percent of individuals with severe mental illness who Jaffe says do not benefit from the current approach. “These are people who usually have a past history of violence and incarceration

and who have gone off of treatments,” says Jaffe. Murphy’s bill, he says, “provide[s] an off-ramp at the edge of the cliff rather than an ambulance at the bottom of it.” But portions of Murphy’s bill remain contentious, with some saying it may stigmatize mental-health treatment, infringe on patient rights and reverse progress made in humanely treating mental-health issues. “This bill is very broad-reaching in an effort to help a minority of the population affected with mental-health issues,” says Laurie Barnett Levine, executive director of the Westmoreland County office of the advocacy group Mental Health America. Murphy’s bill, she says, could strip rights and services from those with mental illness: “For example, they talk about ‘assisted outpatient treatment,’ but it’s not assisted — it’s coerced. And if you coerce people into treatment, it’s not as effective because they’re not engaged.” Barnett Levine also worries that Murphy’s approach will lead the public to believe people with mental-health concerns “are more dangerous, when they are actually more likely to be victims and not perpetrators.” According to a roundup of studies on the topic by the Treatment Advocacy Center, which supports Murphy’s bill, multiple studies have shown this to be the case. A better approach, Barnett Levine says, would be “to get people at the beginning to work on prevention. But this bill would strip a lot of funding from those programs.” Murphy’s approach would emphasize “evidence-based” treatment — including medication — at the expense of approaches like peer-to-peer therapies, which include outreach and treatment plans developed by trained and licensed peer specialists in the state. Barnett Levine says the program, which could see drastically reduced funding under the Murphy bill, allows individuals to get assistance from someone who has “been there, done that.” Under Murphy’s bill, she worries, “We would lose a lot of very promising, cuttingedge programs. Even though you may not be cured of your mental illness, these programs make you realize that you can live very full and rich lives.” “We used to have hundreds of thousands of mentally ill patients in institutions: Now we have that many in jail or living on the streets,” counters Jaffe. “As bad as hospitals were, they were not as bad as jail. A mentally ill person incarcerated — that’s abuse. Trying to get them help is not.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

CELEBRATE MARRIAGE

EQUALITY WEDDING SHOWCASE A wedding show featuring the best wedding vendors in the Pittsburgh area and all participating vendors have been interviewed and found to be LGBT friendly!

THURSDAY, JUNE 26 ACROSS THE NATION, WE’RE STEPPING UP ON BEHALF OF OUR FRIENDS, OUR FAMILIES AND OUR FUTURE. EVERYONE HAS A REASON TO END ALZHEIMER’S — AND EVERYONE CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

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NOT EVEN A year into her post as director of the Allegheny County Health Department, Dr. Karen Hacker has faced her share of public-health problems: startling obesity rates, an outbreak of lethal fentanyl-laced heroin, and public concern over the environmental effects of industry. Hired after County Executive Rich Fitzgerald ousted Bruce Dixon, who headed the department for two decades, Hacker has been charged with addressing everything from smoking to community violence. The former Harvard Medical School/public-health professor — and executive director at the Cambridge-based Institute for Community Health — sat down with City Paper to talk about some of these issues and her department’s new directions.

[PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Dr. Karen Hacker

was managed before was a very flat organization, and I get the impression that the director pretty much made most of the decisions. I get the impression that what I’m doing here is new to people.

YOU’VE WORKED IN THE PUBLICHEALTH WORLD IN A NUMBER OF CITIES. WHAT MADE YOU SEEK OUT A JOB WHERE PIEROGIES AND FRENCHTHERE ARE A HUGE NUMBER OF ISSUES FRY-LADEN SALADS ARE AMONG THE A HEALTH DEPARTMENT COULD TACKLE MAIN FOOD GROUPS? I’ll be honest: I just threw my résumé in. I — EVERYTHING FROM COMMUNITY didn’t think anything was going to happen. VIOLENCE TO SMOKING CESSATION. My experience has been many of these HOW DO YOU DECIDE WHERE TO START? The first thing I did was start looking at positions turn out to be political apthe data to get a familiarity with pointments and they’re not really what is going on the communilooking for other people. What ty. Very quickly I started talkAllegheny County offered was FULL W ing about obesity and physithis really interesting scenarINTERVIEE cal activity, health disparities io where you’ve got a county IN L N O . and the environmental ishealth department that is at wwwp a er sues. My first hire was the enboth the county and the city, pghcityp .com vironmental-health deputy, so you don’t have a competiand I hope that sent a message tion … you have a very progresto the environmental community sive executive and now a progressive mayor. So, from a political scenario, that I’m serious about this area, because it’s not an area in which I had a lot of experithere’s interest in moving this forward. ence. The thing about public health is you do your best to try to see into the future, OVER THE PAST 10 MONTHS, HOW DO but there are always going to be things YOU THINK THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT’S that crop up. So when we have a number of DIRECTION HAS SHIFTED? The first thing is we’ve added deputies, so heroin deaths, we have to jump in and deal we’ve actually added some infrastructure. with that. When we have a housing enviI spent the first six months basically just ronment that [is] unhealthy, we [have] to talking to as many people as I could [in- deal with that. cluding] a lot of people who are involved in sustainability efforts — which isn’t al- WHAT WAS THE DATA TELLING YOU? ways thought of as a public-health [issue]: Clearly — like you said with the French fries environment, trails and bikes and fitness and the salad — there are lots of organizafolks. The way that the [health department] tions that are trying to [address obesity and CONTINUES ON PG. 18

get your bike on

All of Port Authority’s buses are now equipped with bike racks. Whether it’s your everyday commute or a weekend ride we’re ready to help you get your bike on. Bikes may now be taken on Port Authority’s Light Rail System [T] and the Monongahela Incline seven days a week without time restrictions. There are no bike racks on the T or incline. Bikes must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces on the T and incline. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bicycles.

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ON THE RECORD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

East End Food Co-op 7516 Meade Street Pittsburgh, PA 15208 (412) 242-3598 Daily Hours: 8 AM - 9 PM www.eastendfood.coop

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ENTERTAINMENT

physical activity], but the numbers have not gone down for children and adults. But I think that there’s a new kind of feeling going on certainly in the Pittsburgh area, if not in the rest of the county, that’s really pushing this agenda. I think with the air issues — this is an issue that’s longstanding in this community — there is a very active environmental group focused on everything from coke plants to diesel fuel to fracking … they’re not going to tolerate complacency in this area. I’M INTERESTED IN YOUR PERSPECTIVE ON THE RISKS OF FRACKING. The data that I have and the research that we’ve looked at [suggest] the benefit likely outweighs the risk at this point in time. There are risks: They mostly have to do with what happens at the surface, and there are differences between dry and wet gas. The wet gas seems to be more problematic in terms of the exposure to benzene and other chemicals like that, which are the ones that are particularly related to cancer risk. But in general — and this is where it gets challenging — natural gas is helping to clean up our air. As many of these energy plants switch to natural gas, particularly in places we can’t control like Ohio, our air is getting better.

The Music of ABBA by Arrival from Sweden Sat., June 21 • 8:15 p.m. • Chautauqua Amphitheater

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HOW DO YOU ADDRESS CONCERNS THAT, BECAUSE THE COUNTY EXECUTIVE HAS A DRILLING-FRIENDLY POSITION, PEOPLE MIGHT NOT THINK THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IS AN INDEPENDENT VOICE [ON FRACKING]? We do have a board, and the board is appointed by the county exec. So, ultimately, we work together. But if I believed there was a really severe risk, I would say that. I’ve gone to many of the public forums on this. There’s a lot of storytelling, a lot of hearsay. One thing we’re doing at the airport is we’re monitoring. We’re doing the before-monitoring and we’ll do the aftermonitoring. We’ll be able to say what’s actually happening.

* Subject to availability. All information subject to change.

C H A U TA U Q U A I N S T I T U T I O N • C I W E B . O R G 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

ARE THOSE COMMUNITIES DRAWN ON RACIAL — OR SOCIOECONOMIC — LINES? Probably more socioeconomic. You can almost look at a strip that runs down the Mon Valley and if you look at those communities … they’re really blighted and they didn’t get the education, the hospital [economic] drivers, that the city itself got. And you go out there and they’re isolated, and their air is not so great and their property value is really low. And when you look at who’s in those communities, they have probably the highest proportion of minorities, but I would tell you that the non-minorities in those communities aren’t doing so well, either.

“THE THING ABOUT PUBLIC HEALTH IS YOU DO YOUR BEST TO TRY TO SEE INTO THE FUTURE.”

AND BY “BENEFIT” YOU MEAN PURELY THE PUBLIC-HEALTH BENEFIT? There’s the public-health benefit of natural gas. … But I think here there is certainly financial benefit, absolutely. Right now, the health costs of fracking — it’s very amorphous.

OPENING NIGHT

CONCERN TO YOU? The two that have just jumped out — you don’t need to be brilliant — are race and geography. Almost every single negative consequence that we have right now … blacks are more at risk than whites. But the other thing is we have a lot of disparities in our geography. We have communities that look dramatically different from other communities.

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH DISPARITIES IN THE COUNTY THAT ARE OF MOST

THE RESTAURANT GRADING SYSTEM IS ON THE TABLE AGAIN. Hopefully the horse is out of the barn. We’ve been doing everything we need to plan for it and we’ve been very methodical in our approach. I would find it very surprising if things shifted at this point. IS THERE EVIDENCE THAT RESTAURANT-GRADING SYSTEMS HAVE POSITIVE PUBLIC-HEALTH EFFECTS? The particular evidence they’ve seen in New York is less about, do they see less infectious diseases, for example, and … over time there are more and more “A’s.” I don’t know that there’s evidence right now that there’s fewer outbreaks. I do think the restaurant industry is correct that you go and do an inspection once a year, so you don’t know what’s happening every single day. But I think there’s an inherent incentive in there that I’m hoping will make a difference. YOUR PREDECESSOR [THE LATE DR. BRUCE DIXON] IN A 2009 PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE PROFILE SAID HE DIDN’T EAT FRUITS OR VEGETABLES BECAUSE “COWS EAT VEGETABLES. I EAT THE COW.” WHAT’S YOUR STANCE ON VEGETABLES? [Laughs] That’s an interesting comment. I love ’em! A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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BABUSHKAS, HARD HATS & CARRIE FURNACES TOUR Enjoy the magical mix of immigrants and industry! Tour highlights include a historic steel mill Pump House, a steel-heritage museum, awe-inspiring blast furnaces and much more!

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Nice Glass! ENJOY YOUR DRAFT AT THE FOLLOWING:

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THE MENU IS ORGANIZED BY THE REGIONS OF MEXICO: PUEBLA, JALISCO, MONTERREY AND SO ON

OLD-COUNTRY GARDENS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Severio Strati’s 300-by-30-foot garden boasts grids of peppers, garlic and eggplant, with 130 tomato plants. There’s a grape arbor, peach trees and a few figs that survived winter. “I cover good. That’s why I didn’t lose them,” he says. For 60 years, the Hazelwood resident — who spent most of his working life in J&L Steel’s warehouse division — has gardened beneath a power line, alongside what’s now the huge empty site of the former LTV Coke Works. Strati, 84, grew up in Reggia-Calabria during World War II — when “if you don’t grow something, you don’t eat” — and came to the U.S. in 1954. His story is part of The Italian Garden Project, launched five years ago by New Castle native Mary Menniti to document and celebrate a horticultural tradition. Menniti gardened with her immigrant grandfather. So far, in photos and videos, the former psychotherapist has documented two dozen gardeners in Pittsburgh (including Italian-American neighbors of hers in Sewickley), and more in Boston and New York City. Garden Project events, many at Pittsburgh Public Market, have included dinners, demonstrations and lectures. Strati saves seeds, cans tomatoes, hand-weeds, fertilizes with horse manure and extends the growing season with successive plantings. “These guys are so old-school they’re cutting-edge. They’re living the lifestyle we’re trying to get back to,” says Menniti. “My urgency is to capture their knowledge before it’s lost.” The Project’s next event is June 26’s FigFest, at Wigle Whiskey Garden. Learn more (and see videos) at www.theitaliangardenproject.com. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

Pittsburghers love their food, and Heinz History Center acknowledges this with Hometown Homegrown, its annual celebration of local fare. Cooking demonstrations from local chefs, cookbook exchange, food trivia, “pickle packing” and plenty of food samples. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., June 21. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. www.goodtastepittsburgh.com. $15

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MORE OF MEXICO {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

OME PEOPLE always order their favor-

ites from a menu; others like to try something new. Some people like to be regulars at their favorite restaurant; others like to try someplace new. Folks in the former category seek for every dining experience to be as good as ones they’ve enjoyed before, while those in the latter are willing to risk disappointment on the chance there’s a new favorite out there, waiting to be discovered. Yet, choosing a new restaurant can be a bit of a crapshoot. Reputation, buzz, a favorite cuisine or one you’ve never had can bring on the temptation to try some restaurants, while others send up warning flags. (Some patrons, for instance, avoid establishments without windows.) But that leaves the vast, uncertain middle. A recommendation to try Cinco, a Mexican restaurant in Painter’s Run valley in Upper St. Clair, came to us through word of mouth, and some online reconnaissance firmed up our resolve to go. Instead of a generic menu of food-court-familiar dishes, we were excited to find Cinco’s offerings organized by the regions of Mexico: Puebla,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

Enchiladas verde

Jalisco, Monterrey and so on. This approach suggested a deep familiarity with southof-the-border regional cuisines, which we hoped would translate to an authentic meal, even possibly introduce us to new favorites. Cinco occupies a stand-alone building whose interior — wood floors, ceiling beams and pale golden walls — has warmth but little overt character. The owners have

CINCO MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1600 Painter’s Run Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-319-7772 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.10 p.m.; Sat. noon-10 p.m.; Sun. 3-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $2-20; entrees $10-16 LIQUOR: Full bar

done their best to impart a Mexican flavor by hanging framed posters of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, and — yes — sombreros on the walls. There is a large, U-shaped bar in the main dining room, which is the focus of Cinco’s frequent parties; recent events have included Mother’s Day, the World Cup

soccer finals and, of course, Cinco de Mayo. Chips and salsa were not complimentary, but we were fine with that, because the ultra-thin, crisp triangles straight from the fryer were well worth paying for. We upgraded from the ordinary salsa rojo to choriqueso, a shallow crock filled with thin, white cheese sauce and savory, somewhat spicy chorizo, the flavor of which infused the cheese. It was utterly addictive. The starter list was brief and unremarkable, so we lingered only long enough to order Marqueza quesadillas, also known as empanadas. The corn-based crust was crispy, not flaky, and the filling was simply a salty white cheese, melty but not spilling out. Pico de gallo, crumbled queso fresco and a drizzle of crema made for an attractive presentation, but the one-dimensional filling stood between this dish and excellence. A big bowl of pozole, supposed to be pork and hominy in a savory, chili-infused broth, was also disappointing. In truth, we ordered it despite the server’s confession that it was “not his thing.” Salty and greasy, it turned out to be not ours, either. Our server also explained that Monterrey

represented the most familiar style of Mexican fare north of the border, i.e. tacos, burritos and their deep-fried brethren, chimichangas. And, indeed, tacos Cinco were filled with the taco-night staples: ground beef, lettuce, tomato, shredded cheese and sour cream. They were pretty forgettable, but tacos playa, fish tacos from Quintana Roo (on the Yucatan Peninsula) were much more memorable. Chunks of moist, tender tilapia were well balanced with crunchy shredded red cabbage, tangy pico de gallo and a homemade creamy sauce lightly spiced with chilies.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

GRIST FOR MILLVALE New brewery opens up just across the river from town Kyle Mientkiewicz and Brian Eaton, owners of Grist House Brewing, are hoping that there’s no truth to the old meme about Pittsburghers not crossing a river for an evening out. “Millvale is really just seconds away from Lawrenceville,” says Mientkiewicz. The two began drawing up the plans for Grist House nearly four years ago, after spending years brewing beer and attending festivals together. Mientkiewicz says the two of them felt their homebrew was at least as good as was being offered at the festivals — and besides, “Neither of us wanted to be desk jockeys our whole lives.” They’re still working their day jobs, but if the weeks since their brewery’s May 24 opening are any indication, it might not be too long before they can live their dream. “So far we’ve been slamming through beer,” says Mientkiewicz. The four current offerings (American red ale, session pale ale, brown ale, American wheat with apricots) are all highly drinkable; the brown ale is especially delightful. More styles are on the way, too; the roasty dark rye IPA looks quite enticing. Equally enticing is the space. The Grist House owners refurbished an old slaughterhouse — you can still see a meat hook on a line — into an inviting place to knock back a few with your friends. The mellow, park-like beer garden cozies up to Girty’s Run. On weekends, they’ll break out the old cornhole, a band or two might play, and there will be a rotation of food trucks. The brewers are currently selling pints and growlers only on site, but say they’ve been approached by a number of area bars. Once they settle into a steady production schedule, you can expect to see their beer on tap (with nifty tap designs by Red Star Ironworks) all around town. If everything goes as planned, Mientkiewicz says, “We’re going to need a lot more fermenters.” And maybe a conversation with their current employers.

“SO FAR WE’VE BEEN SLAMMING THROUGH BEER.” Cinco margarita

We returned to Quintana Roo for pescado Cancun, tilapia topped with a cilantrocream sauce alongside diced potatoes. The cream sauce was relatively thin, so it didn’t weigh down the other ingredients, and the cilantro flavor was bright and true. It was delicious with the simple but well cooked potatoes. But the fish — a deeply browned piece of tilapia — was inedibly salty, as if it had been salted, cooked, then salted again. Alas, no amount of cream or starch could counter the fish’s overwhelming saltiness. Our dining companions tried the chile relleno. Here Cinco far outstripped the typical Mexican-American restaurant version, with a batter that only just coated the poblano peppers, which retained their firmness and a clear, vegetal flavor. The chicken inside was moist, mildly seasoned and well proportioned to the pepper. But the rice and beans on the side were disappointing. Cinco’s broad and varied menu presents opportunities to revisit old favorites or sample new dishes from the regional traditions of Mexico. We had some that were expertly prepared, but Cinco hasn’t yet eliminated the risk of disappointment. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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10 E. Sherman St., Millvale. 412-447-1442 or www.gristhousebrewing.com

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BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163. A casual-chic burger-and-sandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty), four other sandwiches and eight beer-friendly “snacks” (from nuts to a charcuterie platter). Prices aren’t diner-cheap, but then some burgers come with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. KE

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BITES AND BREWS. 5744 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-4425. The concept is simple: 30 beers on tap, more in bottles, and two menu items — pizza and sandwiches. You construct your own creation using a checklist, and there is plenty of variety in ingredients and preparation. What the kitchen does, it does well, serving some of the best pizza and custom sandwiches in town. JE

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GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

Noodlehead {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and food good enough to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar (meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese) while applying upto-the-minute sensibilities to the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF

HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookishthemed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-3221106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night,

are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. www. noodleheadpgh.com. In a funky atmosphere, Noodlehead offers an elemental approach to the delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. A small menu offers soups, noodle dishes and a few “snacks,” among them fried chicken and steamed buns with pork belly. The freshly prepared dishes are garnished with fresh herbs, pork cracklings and pickled mustard greens. JF OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. 412-281-6595. You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE

Selma’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE

PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-7586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo mein, seafood hot pot, Thai curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE

NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side (412321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here

PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan Road, Cranberry. 724-776- 7675. This family-run BBQ joint does two things right: There’s a lot of smoke flavor in their meat, and the kitchen takes its rub seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper and intensely flavored with spices — spicy and crusty without, perfectly moist and CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-7818724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF

5380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamonbun pizza. KE

SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor suggests humble and down-home, but the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. www. per Best of all, each meat TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. pa pghcitym has its own custom 885 East Ingomar Road, .co rub and is dry-smoked Allison Park. 412-364for hours, then served 6622. Located on the unsauced so that diners can verdant edge of North Park, choose from the six different styles Tomato Pie is more than a on offer. KF pizzeria. It offers other simple Italian specialties including pasta THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. and sandwiches, and the chef Carson St., South Side. 412-431uses plenty of fresh herbs grown 4668. The Carson Street bar and on the premises. FJ nightclub offers a top-notch sandwich and salad menu, TSUKI JAPANESE RESTAURANT. by bringing creativity, quality 11655 Frankstown Road, Penn preparation and a knack for Hills. 412-242-0188. Most of the well-selected ingredients to the myriad sushi rolls on offer center burgers, sandwiches and apon just a handful of raw options, petizers. Options include: shrimp rounded out with traditional skewers with smoked peppers, cooked ingredients such as eel and corn-and-black-bean fritters and shrimp. The menu offers the full a roster of inventive sliders. JE gamut of maki, from classics like cucumber or tuna to truly original STEELHEAD BRASSERIE creations, some of them just short AND WINE BAR. Marriott City of gimmickry. KF Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In WAFFLES, INCAFFEINATED. this upscale hotel restaurant, 1224 Third Ave., New Brighton the straightforward menu (724-359-4841) and 2517 E. Carson promises that the aquatic name St., South Side (412-301-1763). holds more than brand value. The fresh-made waffles here are While entrées include seafood a marvelous foil for sweet and and other meat in almost equal savory toppings. Sweet options proportion, the soups and starters include the Funky Monkey are dominated by the former, with (chocolate chips, bananas, peanut old favorites like jumbo shrimp butter and chocolate sauce). cocktail matched with more The Breakfast Magic has bacon, contemporary offerings. LE cheddar and green onions inside, topped with a fried egg and sour STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight cream. Or customize your waffles Road, Ross Township. 412-369with a dizzying array of mix-ins. J

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LOCAL

“EVEN IF YOU’VE LOST QUITE A BIT OF HEARING, IT’S NEVER TOO LATE.”

BEAT

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

JAZZ AMBASSADORS

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH JAZZLIVE INTERNATIONAL. June 20-22. Multiple venues Downtown; outdoor stages: Penn at Eighth, Penn at Garrison. Free. All ages. www.pittsburghjazzlive.com

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CAN YOU

HEAR ME NOW? {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

C

HRIS FAZIO plays violin and trumpet

Dianne Reeves {PHOTO COURTESY OF JERRIS MADISON}

Jazz music has been closely connected to social change throughout its history, and this year’s Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival is no exception. The event, which runs June 20-22, coincides with the launch of ¡Hola Pittsburgh!, an initiative that promotes opportunities in health care, finance and technology to people in Puerto Rico who are considering a move to the U.S. “ImaginePittsburgh.com and the Allegheny Conference identified the jazz festival as an event that they wanted to support for this year and use it as a vehicle for promoting what they would like Pittsburgh to be: open, diverse, world-class metropolitan,” says Janis Burley Wilson, vice president of education and community engagement and director of jazz programs at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. With the backing of those organizations, the festival was able to book the salsa band El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico. Last year, the group’s 50th anniversary was noted by The New York Times in an article that ranked it in the company of the Rolling Stones, Beach Boys and Chieftains as influential groups that have reached the half-century mark. In that time, the group has sold over 150 million records. This connection with ¡Hola Pittsburgh!, means the weekend “is not just a music festival,” Wilson says. “It’s an economicdevelopment piece. But it’s also [about] tourism, employment. It’s promoting the whole region, not just here and not just in Puerto Rico, but internationally as someplace to be, and it’s using the festival as the centerpiece for that.” Naturally, music is still key in the fourth year of the festival, and Wilson focused on bringing up-and-coming acts as well as more established ones. Vocalist Gregory Porter represented the new acts a few years ago, and now the Blue Note artist is a headliner, as is vocalist Dianne Reeves. Wilson is excited to present Brandee Younger, who plays jazz harp, and vocalist Nancy Harms. Most of the performances are free and take place outdoors, with evening jam sessions indoors. Trust Vinyl, a pop-up record store, will be located at 820 Liberty Ave. for the weekend.

with local band The Hills and the Rivers now, but he’s played pretty much every instrument in his day, including drums, which he played in some loud bands as a kid. And while many musicians start to experience hearing problems later in life, it hit Fazio at age 16. “I remember the day,” Fazio says. “I was playing a loud show, playing drums, and after the show, I noticed my hearing was really muffled; I couldn’t hear people speaking very well. I had tinnitus afterward, and the tinnitus never really went away. It got a little better, but it didn’t go away.” If Dr. Catherine Palmer has her way, stories like Fazio’s will eventually be a thing of the past — because young people, especially young musicians, will be better educated on the risks presented by regular exposure to loud noise. Palmer, director of audiology at UPMC’s Eye and Ear Institute (and a professor at Pitt), heads up the Musicians’ Hearing Center, a UPMC unit focusing on preventing hearing loss and related symptoms in musicians. “We started the Musicians’ Hearing Center in 2003,” Palmer says, “with the goal of preventing hearing loss.” Musicians, unlike others who work in noise-heavy occupations, aren’t subject to workplacesafety noise regulations, she notes. And “musicians have a 100 percent chance of hearing damage,” she notes. Musicians can end up with hearing loss, but also a host of other symptoms including

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

UPMC’s Musicians’ Hearing Institute is bringing attention to an often-overlooked health concern.

tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and sensitivity to certain frequencies. The UPMC center is one of only a few of its kind, modeled partly on the Musicians’ Clinics of Canada, an educational and clinical institution begun in 1986 at McMaster University. Palmer works with school groups — mostly bands and orchestras — and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and gives educational lectures to music students at Carnegie Mellon University. “Vocalists always get vocal-health

education,” Palmer notes. “But instrumentalists in the past have rarely gotten any information about hearing health. CMU has been a leader in changing that.” Fazio says “there was nothing” in terms of education when he was coming up in middle- and high-school band. “I remember in high school looking at all the health books and there was nothing about protecting your hearing.” He attributes his failure to use hearing protection to being young and not knowing better. “I

just didn’t think it was that big a deal.” Musicians of all sorts — from concert bassoonists to screamo guitarists — are at risk for hearing loss and related afflictions like tinnitus, Palmer says. And for many years, musicians were paid little attention by the medical world. “For a long time, we had nothing to offer,” Palmer says. Musicians are unlikely to want to play with the cheap foam earplugs used by construction workers and insomniacs, because they mute pitches at different rates, distorting the sound of the musician’s instrument and those around her or him. It was only in the late 1980s when custom musicians’ earplugs were developed. “They take everything out equally,” Palmer says. “It still takes a couple of weeks for a musician to adjust to playing with them in, but they’re much better.” Bethany Berkstresser, of local indie-pop band Balloon Ride Fantasy, had her hearing checked at age 23 after years playing in a loud prog-rock band. “You don’t think about it when you’re young — you’ve never had any experience, you’ve never read anything about it. I think when I read Scar Tissue, by Anthony Keidis, is when I first became aware that you can develop problems later in life,” she says. In that 2004 memoir, the Red Hot Chili Peppers frontman recounts his developing issues with tinnitus. Berkstresser and her bandmate and boyfriend Phil Conley both had themselves fitted for custom earplugs. Customfitted plugs are the high-end products of the hearing-protection world, generally costing hundreds of dollars. At the Musicians’ Hearing Center, musicians can be fitted for custom plugs for $300. (A hearing test, necessary before any plugs are made, is generally covered by most insurance plans, Palmer says, but the plugs themselves are not.) Berkstresser feels the investment was worth it for custom plugs, because her role in her current band is supplying harmony

vocals; with cheaper plugs, it’s tough to hear well enough to sing harmonies on pitch. Fazio, who deals with both tinnitus and some perceived minor loss of hearing, uses plugs from Etymotic Research that are generally more in the $10-20 range. Palmer recommends that type of earplug — standard in fit, but geared toward musicians — for those not ready to drop the money for custom plugs. “Using the foam earplugs, you fail to hear intricacies in the music,” Fazio says. With the musician’s plugs, more of the music comes through clearly. Beyond musicians, Palmer notes that plenty of peripheral people need to think about hearing protection: sound engineers, recording engineers, lighting techs at live venues, even bartenders and wait staff at clubs. “Bartenders not only deal with the loud music; they have to strain to hear what everyone is ordering,” she notes. Musicians who have played for years with little or no hearing protection may think it’s a lost cause; not so, says Palmer: “There’s a level of hearing loss once you get below it, it’s harder and harder for us to help you, and you have much more difficulty. Even if you’ve lost quite a bit of hearing, it’s never too late to protect what you’ve got.” For musicians who are concerned about their hearing — and that ought to be all of them — the Musicians’ Hearing Center offers an opportunity to talk about solutions. The center sponsors a basic phone-based test (at 412-647-2400) to check for hearing deficiencies, and patients can schedule a hearing test at the center in Oakland, during which they can talk to doctors about their hearing-protection needs. (Hearing tests are available at other hearing centers that aren’t necessarily just geared toward musicians.) Both Berkstresser and Fazio agree that as musicians, it’s important to take hearing seriously. “Don’t worry about earplugs making you look silly,” says Fazio. “Take it seriously. Appreciate the hearing you have.” AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Black Flag (from left: Mike Vallely, Brandon Pertzborn, Tyler Smith and Greg Ginn)

THEIR WAR {BY IAN THOMAS} EVEN IN THE best of times, internal turmoil was implicit in the description of legendary hardcore outfit Black Flag. (See one-time frontman Henry Rollins’ essential tour diary, Get in the Van.) Given the band’s ramshackle legacy, which was marked by shifting line-ups, spitsoaked shows and even police surveillance, it should come as no surprise that the band’s 2013 reunion would be fraught with controversy. This time around, however, the issues at stake were decidedly less punk. Greg Ginn, Black Flag’s founder and arguably its leading creative voice since its inception, sought to bar former Black Flag singer Keith Morris (also known as the frontman for the nowdefunct Circle Jerks and Off!) and other former Black Flag members from using the Black Flag name and iconic black bars logo: They’d been promoting their own outfit, Flag, which also featured performances of Black Flag classics. In a move more befitting his age than his reputation, Ginn sought resolution through litigation. Over the latter half of 2013, the dispute played out publicly and in real time, as Ginn (via representation), Morris and bystanders with more opinions than skin in the game took to various media outlets to air their grievances. Like an aggro-Rashomon, accusations and insinuations abounded as the various stakeholders weighed in with their perspectives on the situation, revealing to a mainstream audience the gossipy side of the often-insular punk scene. April 2014 brought a rather anticlimactic culmination to the affair, as Black Flag

announced the suit brought by Ginn and his label, SST Records, was settled in an agreement signed by Ginn, SST Records, and former Black Flag singers Henry Rollins and Keith Morris. The settlement confirmed ownership of all Black Flag recordings and the Black Flag logo by Greg Ginn and SST Records, stipulating that Flag cease its use of the logo in promotion of Flag shows and releases.

BLACK FLAG

WITH HOR, CINEMA CINEMA 7 p.m. Wed., June 25. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20-25. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

Enter Mike Vallely. Though he’s best known for his almost-mythic skateboarding skills, Vallely’s varied résumé has also included work as a stuntman, a stint in the Federal Hockey League, and a music career dating all the way back to 1985, including a few one-off shows with Black Flag. In 2013, Vallely partnered with Ginn to form the punk outfit Just For You. Since Black Flag’s reformation, Vallely has been acting as a co-manager and publicist, helping Ginn to navigate the uncharted waters the band faced. The mid-show exit (or firing, depending on who you ask) of Ron Reyes in November left Black Flag without a singer. In January, Ginn announced that in addition to co-management duties, Vallely would assume vocal duties for Black Flag. Now that he is the mouthpiece for Black Flag both on- and offstage, Vallely has brought Black Flag closer to its aggressive DIY roots. He has no doubt about his choice to sign on as singer. “It was just the obvious thing to do,” he says. “Ron Reyes had quit the band. It was

do or die. Instead of letting the band and the music end on this unresolved, negative note, we chose to move it forward.” Despite his varied career history, which seems informed in equal parts by both opportunity and genuine desire, Vallely is focused on his new role. “It’s a fun opportunity, but I am also committed to this for the long term, no doubt.” Like Henry Rollins, Vallely was a fan of Black Flag long before he became involved with the band, and it affected him deeply. “1984, Trenton, New Jersey,” Vallely says. “It was an important night for me. I was 14 years old and it was the first live music I’d ever witnessed. The show, the music, the energy and intensity had a very profound effect on me. It was the moment when, in a way, I really began living my own life as I know it. It was a spark of true inspiration.” From Vallely’s perspective, his new role is a natural fit, stemming from the chemistry between him and Ginn. “We have a very strong friendship and partnership,” Vallely says. “There’s a lot of respect there, as well as simple, straightforward communication. Musically and creatively we are on the [same] page. My singing for Black Flag comes from a place of strength. There is nothing to disagree about. Just work to do. “With the lawsuit behind us, we can now just focus on putting the music first without any confusion about who or what Black Flag is.” Rosters aside, Black Flag’s initial run, from 1976 to about 1986, inspired a legion of fans. Many followed Black Flag’s war-like imperative to the letter, forming their own bands. Those who didn’t adopt Black Flag as a lifestyle still received its message of aggression against the status quo, a lesson they carried into the world at large. While it may be easy to dismiss the dispute between Black Flag and Flag as rock stars arguing about first-world problems, it’s important to note that during Black Flag’s initial storied run, life in the band was a grinding struggle, a constant fight for the rarest and most marginal of victories. Spoils of that fight are a long time in coming. It should come as no surprise that everyone who suffered for and in Black Flag should want a share. It’s hard to say whether the band’s influence was ubiquitous enough, its fans impassioned enough, to allow both Black Flag and Flag to co-exist profitably, but it isn’t implausible. For his part, Vallely seems determined to recapture Black Flag’s defining essence by any means necessary. When asked what Black Flag meant to him upon hearing the band for first time at 14, Vallely’s answer is unequivocal: “Freedom. Still does.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

NOT AFRAID TO CHANGE {BY IAN THOMAS} With three acclaimed albums already under her belt, it would have been easy for Sharon Van Etten to deliver her fourth, Are We There, in a similar vein — a move that would ensure the retention of her hard-won audience. Instead, for the follow-up to her 2012 breakout, Tramp, Van Etten chose to chart new territory, confirming herself as an artist here to stay.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DUSDIN CONDREN}

She’s arrived: Sharon Van Etten

To fill the technical gaps in the execution of her vision, Van Etten enlisted studio veteran Stewart Lerman as co-producer. That choice proves greatly beneficial, as Are We There puts on full display a dynamism to which she had only alluded on her previous efforts. Are We There is clearly the album Van Etten wanted to make from the very beginning, whether she knew it or not. Though she remains true to her roots as a singer-songwriter, Are We There is more expansive, musically, than that. Take, for example, the misty and obtuse “Our Love,” which hints at new-wave excess, subtly and artfully muted.

IT’S CLEARLY THE ALBUM SHE WANTED TO MAKE FROM THE VERY BEGINNING, WHETHER SHE KNEW IT OR NOT On Are We There, Van Etten gets hopelessly, gleefully lost. Much can be read into the omission of the question mark in the album’s title: It marks her as both established and arriving. For all the boldness of her choices, it’s hard to imagine that Van Etten is unaware of the risks she’s taking. Taken in a certain context, her lyrics seem to implore her audience that to take the leap with her is to be rewarded, that she shares the journey with her listeners. “I need you to be afraid of nothing,” she sings simply on the album’s opener. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SHARON VAN ETTEN with JANA HUNTER. 7 p.m. Thu., June 19. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $16-18. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

The best is yet to come: Counting Crows

PLAY IT AGAIN,

MARVIN! A MARVIN HAMLISCH CELEBR ATION WITH THE

SATURDAY, JUNE 28 – 8 P.M. KEVIN COLE, HOST • J. ERNEST GREEN, CONDUCTOR MARIA FRIEDMAN, VOCALIST • SYLVIA MCNAIR, VOCALIST BRIAN D’ARCY JAMES, VOCALIST

FOR TICKETS: 412.392.4900 OR PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG

MEDIA SPONSORS

NOT JUST HANGIN’ AROUND {BY ANDY MULKERIN} ADAM DURITZ IS the voice and mind behind

the 20-year career of Counting Crows. Before the band’s current tour, he spoke with CP about songwriting, the possibility of going back to a label, and the new album the band has yet to release. YOU’RE CLEARLY A SONGWRITER WHO VALUES LYRICS. SOME MUSICIANS AND CRITICS HAVE SAID LYRICS AREN’T REALLY VALUED RIGHT NOW. DO YOU FEEL LIKE LYRICAL SONGWRITING ISN’T IN FASHION? I’m not sure I can think of a time when there weren’t a lot of good songwriters around. They’re not always in the Top 40, but they’re still there. Anyway, with hip hop being as strong as it is, it’s hard to not have good lyrics. I was in L.A. [recently] rehearsing with the band — I was driving around L.A. and all I was listening to was this 100-plus-song funk playlist from years ago. I kept going back to listening to Naughty By Nature songs over and over, or Run-D.M.C. songs, those incredible Nelly songs with the Neptunes and all the Jay Z songs he did with them, and the Dre stuff with Snoop Dogg and with Eminem. I was flipping out about how good the writing was on some of them. I KNOW YOU GUYS HAVE BEEN WORKING ON A NEW RECORD; WHAT ARE YOU ABLE TO TELL ME ABOUT ITS STATUS? It’s done! It’s really cool. One of the things I was doing [in L.A.] was — we’ve been independent for a few years, but I was meeting with companies, because everyone wants to buy this record.

SO YOU’RE INTERESTED IN WORKING WITH A LABEL AGAIN? I’m not sure, entirely. The reason we left in the first place — that was just a really bad time for labels, six or seven years ago, because they seemed to be laboring under the misapprehension that the Internet did not exist. It made it really hard to work with them, because it was so frustrating all the time. I’ve really enjoyed being independent. But there are things you can’t do independently. You can’t promote the same way; you can’t get everyone to hear your record the same way. This record is really good. It’s not like anything we’ve made before. It’s some of the best songs I’ve ever written. So I do want people to hear it.

COUNTING CROWS

WITH TOAD THE WET SPROCKET 6 p.m. Fri., June 27. Stage AE Outdoors, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $37.50-40. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

WHAT MAKES THESE NEW SONGS DIFFERENT? I was talking to a friend who’s a songwriter who’s heard all of them, and I said, “At first I thought they were less personal, less about me in a way, because they’re less autobiographical.” And he said “No, it’s weird, they’re more personal. I feel like before, you were writing this long-form, epic tragedy about how fucked it is to be crazy, and live your life the way you want to live your life. But that’s not who you are all day every day. You’re an idiot. You’re funny. You say stupid shit. These songs have some humor in them; this is more like spending a day or two in your insane brain. For me, it’s actually closer to you than the other ones were.” A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

CRITICS’ PICKS S

Tegan and Sara

[BLUES] + SUN., JUNE 22

Tegan and Sara have that “chemistry” thing down. At age 15, the sisters Quin were already playing guitar and writing songs. Now, the indie pop/rock duo is playing festivals, headlining tours, and in the fall, will be opening for longtime supporter Katy Perry. The pair’s popularity had been building for years, but Heartthrob, their latest album, broke them into the mainstream. Synth-heavy and ’80s-esque, the album is a step away from their earlier guitar-driven material, but the term “selling out” is probably not Sonny applicable here. The Landreth band plays Stage AE tonight with My Midnight Heart and The Courtneys. Zach Brendza 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $35. All ages. 412-229-5483 www.stageae.com

The 63-year-old Louisiana native Sonny Landreth is an authority on blues and slide guitar. The Americana Music Association named him Instrumentalist of the Year in 2005. Hell, he even has a slide-guitar instructional video. But these things would mean nothing if he couldn’t still shred. And oh yes, he can. His last album, 2012’s Elemental Journey, was an instrumental venture featuring Joe Satriani and Eric Johnson, and the licks and guitar work are still on point. After 11 studio albums, it seems that his playing will not falter. Landreth plays Hartwood Acres tonight with Kevin Garrett. ZB 7:30 p.m. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. Free. All ages. 412-351-2528

[ALT-ROCK] + FRI., JUNE 20 Should we feel honored or a little scared? Those of us in our 30s now have multiple nostalgia package tours available each year. While one puts together party-rock bands with the likes of Sugar Ray and Smash Mouth, the Summerland Tour, which pulls through Stage AE tonight, is more the thinking man’s ’90s alt-rock nostalgia lineup. Founded by Art Alexakis, Summerland features his band Everclear, along with Soul Asylum, Eve 6 (“Inside Out”? OK, you’d know it if you heard it) and Spacehog. Extra bonus? You’re unlikely to be approached by any under-agers trying to get you to buy them beer at tonight’s outdoor show at Stage AE. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL NATKIN}

[INDIE POP] + THU., JUNE 19

[PUNK] + THU., JUNE 26

Thrash-punk legends D.R.I. (Dirty Rotten Imbeciles) had to take some time off a few years back, when guitarist and cofounder Spike Cassidy was struck with colon cancer. Between 2006 and 2008, he made a full recovery, though, and the band returned to the road — where it’s been at home for more than two decades. The cult favorite never reached the mainstream success of other thrash bands (like Metallica) or punk outfits (like Rancid) that were its contemporaries, but it was probably a favorite of the punkest kid you knew growing up. The band — both founders still included — plays the 31st Street Pub (the punkest bar you know) tonight. AM 9 p.m. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $12-15. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com

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YOUR CITY… YOUR STYLE! TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 19

PITTSBURGHSTEELROCKS.COM LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: Michael Wetmiller— DIY PIttsburgh At some point, and regardless of economic conditions, your home will need repairs or improvements. Don’t pay for professional services when you can Do-It-Yourself and save money. In this workshop, students will learn essential repairs and improvements through hands-on experience in basic home improvement skills.

BASIC HOME IMPROVEMENT AND REPAIR (PART 3) TUESDAY, JUNE 24 6:00 PM—7:30 PM

BASIC HOME IMPROVEMENT AND REPAIR (PART 4) THURSDAY, JUNE 26 6:00 PM—7:30 PM

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Lowdown Brass Band, C Street Brass. Strip District. 412-251-6058. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Danielle Ate the Sandwich. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CLUB CAFE. Sol Cat, Troxum, Charm & Chain. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Great Socio, Misaligned Mind. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Average White Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. Night Vapor, Broughton’s Rules, Dendritic Arbor. South Side. 412-431-5282. MELLON SQUARE PARK. Charm & Chain. Downtown. 412-665-3665. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Sharon Van Etten, Jana Hunter. Millvale. 866-468-3401. STAGE AE. Tegan & Sara,

My Midnight Heart, The Courtneys. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Pine Leaf Boys, Blind Owl Band, Slim Forsythe. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Mickey & The SnakeOil Boys. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. LOCAL. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. Benefit for Girls Rock Pittsburgh. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Norman BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL Nardini. Blawnox. CLUB. Very Be Careful. 412-828-2040. Strip District. NEW KENSINGTON CARNEGIE LIBRARY PARK. Jimbo & OF HOMESTEAD www. per the Soup Bones. MUSIC HALL. pa pghcitym New Kensington. .co The Fab Four: The RAMADA INN HOTEL Ultimate Beatles Tribute. & CONFERENCE CENTER. 412-368-5225. Loyal Hanna. Greensburg. CLUB CAFE. Bobby Long (Early) 724-552-0603. White Hinterland, ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Capsized. Charmaine Evonne (Late). 412-487-6259. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Michigan, GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Napoleon in Exile. South Side. Jon Autry & Naval Avionics, City 412-431-4668. Steps, Telephone Line. Garfield. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. 412-361-2262. Buckwheat Zydeco. South Park. GOOD TIME BAR. Lenny STAGE AE. Everclear, Soul Asylum, Smith & The Ramblers. Millvale. Eve 6, Spacehog. North Side. 412-821-9968. 412-229-5483. HAMBONE’S. Fifth On the Floor, TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Tony Janflone Jr. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Woody Pines, The Turpentiners. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. XLERATOR BAR & GRILLE. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver Falls.

FRI 20

MP 3 MONDAY MURDER FOR GIRLS

SAT 21

All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

LEADING SELLER OF HUMAN HAIR EXTENTION PRODUCT IN THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH FOR OVER SIX YEARS! Call now to schedule your appt. in our gorgeous private boutique

BEFORE

10AM - 4PM DAILY

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Each week we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from Murder for Girls; stream or download AFTER

AFTER

4707 LIBERTY AVE., SUITE B, PITTSBURGH, PA 15224 • 412.322.HAIR (4247)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

FULL LIST ONLINE

“Start Over” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

31ST STREET PUB. Bottle Rat, Substitute for Quality, The Danzas. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Masters of the Universe, B-Side Basterds, The Nightly Standard, Roma. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Albion Cross. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. Cruces, Rogue Signals, Dead River. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. The Marbits, The Hush Ravine. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Memphis Murder Men, Six Speed Kill, The Bestevers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Zero Fame, Carolyn Hock. 412-655-3553. MAD MEX. Lazy Samurai. Robinson. 412-494-5656. THE MCKEESPORT PALISADES. Sound Servent. McKeesport. 412-400-9977. MILLVALE RIVERFRONT PARK. Pandemic, Ben Shannon, Timbeleza, Nox Boys, Turpentiners, more. Millvale. NIED’S HOTEL. Austin Drive Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

WED, JUNE 18, 9PM HONKY TONK TEXAS SHOOTOUT WITH PETE FREEMAN, J I M R E L JA AND CHRIS PARKER THURS, JUNE 19, 9PM CAJUN/AMERICANA PINE LEAF BOYS PLUS THE BLIND OWL BAND, AND SLIM FORSYTHE FRI, JUNE 20, 9PM RAGTIME/COUNTRY BLUES/FOLK

WOODY PINES PLUS THE TURPENTINERS SAT, JUNE 21, 9PM

PIÑATA PROTEST (ACCORDION FRONTED PUNK ROCK BAND FROM TEXAS)

PLUS VIRA SAMBA SUN, JUNE 22, 8PM INDIE/FOLK

WILD CHILD & SHAKEY GRAVES MON, JUNE 23, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, JUNE 24, 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES

WITH CHRIS PARKER/

DAVID THROCKMORTON VENUE IS NOW NON-SMOKING 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017

7

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Switch. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Big Sam’s Funky Nation. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Shiva Stone, Verity’s Lie. South Side. 412-296-0523. ST THERESE’S RC CHURCH. The Holidays. 412-785-6882. STEEL CITY STEAKHOUSE. E-Z Action. Monroeville. 412-646-4695. TEDDY’S. King’s Ransom. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Piñata Protest, Vira Samba. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TIKI BAR. Patti Spadaro Band. Washington. 412-508-0200. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Bill Couch, Moose Tracks. West End. 412-458-0417. WATERFRONT TOWN CENTER. Chet Vincent & The Big Bend, Jester Jenkins. The Waterfront’s Summer Music + Marketplace Series. Homestead. 412-476-8889.

SUN 22

THE BEACH ROOM. E-Z Action. 724-348-8888. CATTIVO. Man With a Mission. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Braceface, Substitute for Quality, The Slobberknockers. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOT METAL DINER. The Tony

An Evening of Music JUNE 27

The Weathered Road w/Heidi Jacobs JULY 11

Brooke Annibale w/Jesse Lafser & Angela Mignanellie AUGUST 1

Charlie & The Foxtrots w/Science! Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

Janflone Jr. Duo. West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Hudson Falcons, Playoff Beard, Crooked Cobras. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Heather Kropf, Paul Tabachneck. Strip District. 412-566-1000. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. The Armadillos, Shelf Life String Band, Tom Moran/ Masudi. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. SMILING MOOSE. The Soft White Sixties. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Wild Child & Shakey Graves. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 23

Tomasz Skowronski. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

TUE 24

FRI 20

WED 25

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Snarky Puppy, Nate da Phat Barber, Line Dance Party. 9th Street Stage. Part of the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Downtown. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. Grandmaster Flash. Lawrenceville. 412-689-2802. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

ALTAR BAR. Alexz Johnson Max Schneider. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Bloomfield. 412-251-6058. Crazy Pills, Nox Boys, DIESEL. DJ CK. South Good Thing, Driven Side. 412-431-8800. Lifeless. Garfield. REMEDY. Push It! DJ . w w w 412-361-2262. Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasttypaper ci h g p GOOSKI’S. Molasses .com erchild. Lawrenceville. Barge, Orodruin, 412-781-6771. Gran Gila. Polish Hill. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 412-681-1658. Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. HEINZ HALL. The Turtles S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. (featuring Flo & Eddie), Chuck 412-481-7227. Negron of Three Dog Night, Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad, Gary Lewis & The Playboys, Mitch CABARET AT THEATER Ryder & The Detroit Wheels. SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Downtown. 412-392-4900. Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. REX THEATER. Joe Purdy, Brian 412-325-6769. Wright. South Side. 412-381-6811. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. ALTAR BAR. Blood On The Dancefloor. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Gemini Club, The Griswolds, Fiveunder. South Side. ALTAR BAR. OCD Moosh & Twist. 412-431-4950. Strip District. 412-263-2877. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra: The Music of Queen. Presented by WDVE. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOMEWOOD. Old School Band. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Homewood. 412-731-3080. Guerilla Toss, Lovely Little Girls, Radon Chong, Outlander. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 360. Scott Stapp. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MOONDOG’S. Joanne Shaw SMILING MOOSE. Step Rockets. Taylor. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 21

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 25

TUE 24

THU 19

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Detour Presents: Summer Solstice Party. w/

ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DOWNTOWN IRWIN. Irwin Art & Jazz Night. 412-877-2141.

FRI 20

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. 4th Annual Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Various locations. www.pittsburghjazzlive. com. Downtown. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band, Chelsea Baratz. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dave Crisci, Etta Cox. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Freddie Pugh & Friends. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 21

SUN 22

BLUES

THU 19

THU 19

SAT 21

WED 25

DJS

JAZZ

NIED’S HOTEL. Ron & The RumpShakers. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

FRI 20

ALTAR BAR. Black Flag. Strip District. 412-263-2877. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Rat Fist, Secret Tombs, Romantic States. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Begrime Extremus, Wrought Iron, Post Mortal Possesion. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Starve, Cryptic Yeast, Egality. South Side. 412-431-4668.

THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Pat Travers, Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295.

ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ortner/Marcinizyn Duo. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. 4th Annual Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Various locations. www.pittsburghjazzlive. com. Downtown. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Johnson III, Benny Benack III. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Jenny Wilson Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. RIVERVIEW PARK. Paul Thompson. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493.

HIP HOP/R&B

WED 25

SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

FRI 20

THE HOP HOUSE. The Blue Bombers w/Pat Scanga. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Tarentum. 724-226-3301. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. MOONDOG’S. John Nemeth. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Shot O’ Soul. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. 4th Annual Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Various locations. www.pittsburghjazzlive. com. Downtown. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Don Aliquo Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. NEMACOLIN CASTLE. The Bobby Reed Trio, Southside Jerry. 724-785-6882. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Eric Susoeff Joe Sheehan. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

EARLY WARNINGS

STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. The Flow Band. 724-423-5604. {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIUS HAUGE}

SUN 22

Sondre Lerche

PARADISE ISLAND. The Flow Band. Neville Island. 412-264-6570.

TUE 24

THU 19

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

CLASSICAL THU 19

ETHEL. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-624-4129.

TUE 24

SING A SONG OF SUMMERFEST. Selections performed by artists from the Opera Theater of Pittsburgh. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside.

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale {WED., OCT. 15}

J. Mascis

WED 25

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side

CELLO CELLO. Andys, Downtown. 412-773-8884.

{MON. OCT. 20}

Sondre Lerche

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. KATZ PLAZA. Reggie Watkins. Downtown. 412-456-6666. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series with Chris Parker/David Throckmorton. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 25

CJ’S. Fred Pugh Sandy Dowe. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM. Flat Earth Society, Scientific Soul. Oakland. 412-624-4125. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

ACOUSTIC THU 19

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS. The Roustabouts. Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Brian Belonzi. Robinson. 412-489-5631. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. John Marcinizyn. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 20

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Steve Katz. Harmony. 724-452-0539.

N E W S

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Songwriters in the Cellar feat. Tim Mulhern, Mike Marks, Chris Lohr, TJ Isenberg. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

FRI 20

MON 23

The Billy Price Band, 3:15 - 4:45 The Old E Allstars, 5:15 - 7:00

EatFeastival.com

McKees Rocks Municipal Lot Route 51 & Furnace St, 15136

SAT 21

HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra w/ Megan Hilty. Luck Be a Lady: Megan Hilty Sings Sinatra & More. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Peter Janson, Steve Davison. American Guitar Masters Series: Celtic to Contemporary. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0710.

HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra w/ Megan Hilty. Luck Be a Lady: Megan Hilty Sings Sinatra & More. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 25

SUN 22

You can feel it. A connection to something that’s bigger than you are. It’s a lifestyle, it’s art, it’s a way of thinking and seeing your community. And

HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra w/ Megan Hilty. Luck Be a Lady: Megan Hilty Sings Sinatra & More. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

of course, it’s music. You listen at home, at work, in the car, and you may even support us (thank you if you do). We’re WYEP.

MON 23

Celebrating 40 Years

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret Jazz Standards & Showtunes w/ Pianist Ian Kane. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

REGGAE FRI 20

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

SAT 21

THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. The Flow Band. Greensburg. 724-850-4676.

TA S T E

The Pawnbrokers, 1:45 - 2:45

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. The Lowdown Brass Band, Beauty Slap. Strip District. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra w/ Megan Hilty. Luck Be a Lady: Megan Hilty Sings Sinatra & More. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Johnny B. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181.

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An Eats & Beats Experience!

x15 Food Trucks xCraft Beer xLive Music xFamily Fun xAnd More!

THU 19

SAT 21

TUE 24

sweet STREET EATS

OTHER MUSIC

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

MON 23

celebration of

are you hungry? ?

COUNTRY

OK Go

2nd Annual

June 28, 12 - 7pm

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Ziggy Marley. 412-368-5225.

{SUN., SEPT. 21}

pittsburgh's

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of Music, Arts and Community.

WED 25

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.cultural district.org/event/3941/hellodonny-a-showtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

June 18 - 24 O.A.R. and Phillip Phillips STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

THURSDAY 19 Luck Be a Lady: Megan Hilty Sings Sinatra and more

HEINZ HALL Downtown. Tickets: 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org. Through June 22.

Sharon Van Etten MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-44447. With special guests Jana Hunter. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Erik Griffin IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through June 22.

Tegan and Sara

Ziggy Marley

com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

TUESDAY, JUNE 24 CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL

Urban Garden Party

Art in the Park 743 PENN AVENUE PARKLET Wilkinsburg. Every Thursday. Free event. Through August 21. PHOTO CREDIT: MALIA JAMES

WEDNESDAY 18

FRIDAY 20

Comedian Jody Kerns LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through June 21.

Buzz Poets & Gene the Werewolf

Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 7p.m.

STATION SQUARE. Free event. Over 21 event. For more info visit stationsquare. com/summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Summerland Tour 2014 with Everclear, Soul Asylum, Eve 6 and Spacehog

Pittsburgh Power vs. Iowa Barnstormers

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, CULTURAL DISTRICT. For more info visit trustarts.org/ jazzlivefest. Through June 22.

The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

MAX

MATTRESS FACTORY MUSEUM North Side. Over 21 event. Tickets: mattress.org.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Alexz Johnson. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

SATURDAY 21

TUESDAY 24

Luke Bryan Thats My Kind of Night Tour 2014

WWE Smackdown

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: HEINZ FIELD North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 7p.m. livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 6p.m.

SUNDAY 22

The Soft White Sixties SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

MONDAY 23

The Music of Queen performed by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7:30p.m.

Happy Together Tour

Ziggy Marley “The Fly Rasta Tour”

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org or 412-392-4900. 7:30p.m.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

877 IS THE PERFECT SHOE when there’s a long road ahead. WOMENS

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333

MENS 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH

TOGETHER, AGAIN

AS MUCH ABOUT THE PHILOSOPHICAL PURSUIT OF SELF AS IT IS AN ABSURDIST EXERCISE

{BY AL HOFF} If you’ve said, “What this summer needs is a nearly identical sequel to a previous bromance groaning with sight gags, vulgar jokes and self-referential winks that doubles-down on the meta-humor about being a bromantic sequel,” then you’re in luck. Phil Lord and Christopher Miller’s 22 Jump Street re-boots the undercover-cop duo portrayed by Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill in 21 Jump Street. (“Do the same thing as last time, and everybody’s happy,” says their boss.) So they enroll in college to bust a drug ring there, but mostly work on testing out the limits of their relationship, when Tatum’s character falls for an alpha-bro football player.

TWICE THE MAN

Work hard, play hard: Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill

Being self-aware of its own lack of originality helped lift 21 Jump Street above the f-bomb noise of most comedies. It’s still a funny idea, though not as clever a second time around, and too much of 21’s inferior material — the one-note Ice Cube, the chase scenes and profanity in place of wit — has been extended. But Tatum and Hill are a winning team, selling jokes that should be too dumb to work, and bickering with the melodic ease of a longsuffering-but-loving couple. (Though the Lucas Brothers steal the show with their beautifully timed simultaneous chatter.) And speaking of re-packaging an idea, be sure to sit through the credits for a bonus reel of the many many Jump Streets (and ancillary products) yet to come. It’s funny because it’s true. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE SIGNAL William Eubank directs this sci-fi thriller in which some college students try to track down a hacker at an abandoned building. Then, things go very weird. Brenton Thwaites and Laurence Fishburne star. Starts Fri., June 20. AMC Loews and Cinemark Robinson

{BY AL HOFF}

A

Mirrored man: Jesse Eisenberg as Simon James and James Simon

MAN ENTERS a subway train, and

tells its sole occupant: “You’re in my place.” That the seated man moves tells us much about Simon James, the protagonist of Richard Ayoade’s The Double. Simon (Jesse Eisenberg) is meek and easily cowed, even in the face of an outrageous demand. Arriving at his workplace — a cluster of dark, Victorian-like cubbies filled with gloomy scribes — Simon is further harassed by the other employees, and thwarted in his pathetic attempts to make contact with a young woman, Hannah (Mia Wasikowska). At night he watches Hannah, who also seems lonely and lives in the building across the street, through a telescope. It’s as if Simon barely exists, and might as well join the legion of suicides that occur in his neighborhood. Then a new employee shows up at work. His name is James Simon, and he looks identical to Simon. But James (also played by Eisenberg) is everything Simon is not: funny, persuasive, assertive.

Initially, Simon befriends James, as the more socially powerful man coaches Simon to take charge; James even subs for Simon on a date with Hannah, allowing the shyer man to woo Hannah by proxy. But James comes to dominate the bifurcated Simon/James, creating confusion, frustration and, eventually, anger for Simon. His life wasn’t much before, but now that it’s being usurped by James, ironically, it’s become worth fighting for.

THE DOUBLE

DIRECTED BY: Richard Ayoade STARRING: Jesse Eisenberg Starts Fri., June 20. Harris

CP APPROVED Ayoade’s dark comedy is based on a 19th-century novella by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and it’s as much about the philosophical pursuit of self as it is an absurdist exercise. Does Simon have a doppelganger? Or are the competing halves of his self temporarily operating inde-

pendently? Maybe he’s simply going mad. (See also, Fight Club.) Filmmakers love the imagery available with dual-nature themes, and Ayoade is no exception. The film opens with a close shot of Eisenberg’s face, as light from the subway car he’s riding flicks off and on; throughout The Double, we get mirrors, half-faces and characters positioned in opposite corners of the frame. Eisenberg does a fine job portraying the two identical men as separate entities, as their polar-opposite personalities allows for easily adjustable body language. (No disrespect to Eisenberg, but Tatiana Maslany, currently portraying nearly a dozen clones on TV’s Orphan Black, has really raised the bar on “acting double.”) The Double has a broody Brazil vibe, offering a dystopic retro-future, where a life of lonely drudgery is enclosed by dark corners, brick walls and exposed pipes. It seems like the sort of depressing world where the livelier half of one’s personality really might manifest itself into a separate being — just to stay sane. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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7 p.m. Thu., June 26. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

FILM CAPSULES CP

ON E FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S N EST. Jack Nicholson stars in Milos Forman’s 1975 adaptation of Ken Kesey’s novel. A rebellious man thinks he can cheat the criminal-justice system by pleading insanity and serving time at a mental institution. But things — including an insurrection against the asylum’s dictatorial Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) — don’t go as well as he hoped. 7:30 and 10:15 p.m. Fri., June 20; 7 p.m. Sun., June 22; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 25. Hollywood

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

JERSEY BOYS. Clint Eastwood directs this adaptation of the popular Broadway musical tracing the career of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Starts Fri., June 20. THE ROVER. Maybe it’s that vast and desolate outback, or being a continent on the edge of the world, or starting modern life as a penal colony, but Australia has a penchant for creating unsettling films that double-down on bleakness and violence. This one, directed by David Michôd (Animal Kingdom), takes place in the blistering heat and dust of “Australia, 10 years after the collapse.” The story is simple: An angry loner (Guy Pearce), doggedly and with casual violence, pursues the men who stole his car, with the reluctant aid of Rey (Robert Pattinson), the injured, simple-minded brother of one of the thieves. The landscape is harsh; the few people encountered are nearferal survivors; and moments of humanity are as rare as the much-desired gasoline. Yet somehow in this slowly paced tale with minimal dialogue, the two men find a connection — but it may prove as fragile as anything else decent in this lawless space. For fans of The Road, and similar spare existential tales of men wondering in apocalyptic landscapes. Starts Fri., June 20 (Al Hoff)

CP

THIN K LIKE A MAN TOO. The couples from the 2012 ensemble rom-com are back, and taking a fun trip to Las Vegas for a wedding.

CADDYSHACK. In 1980, Harold Ramis directed the greatest golf movie ever made, featuring the sublime melding of four idiosyncratic comedians: Bill Murray, Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield and Ted Knight. 10 p.m. Fri., June 20, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 21. Oaks

The Rover Cue the misunderstandings and mishaps! Tim Story directs. Starts Fri., June 20. WORDS AN D PICTURES. Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche star in Fred Schepisi’s romantic dramedy about two prep-school teachers whose bantering leads to a relationship. He teaches English, she teaches art, so early battle lines are drawn between which art form is the more effective communication tool. But beneath this playfulness are two more serious problems: his destructive alcoholism and her debilitating rheumatoid arthritis. It’s a nice change to see a film which recounts the emotional lives of middle-aged people, particularly those who are toting around some acquired baggage. But Schepisi can’t help but root for the proverbial happy ending, and the obvious scrambling to sort out all the hard issues the story raises undermines the film’s emotional impact. Owen and Binoche are good, as always, and viewers will certainly leave this film with their vocabulary increased. (AH)

REPERTORY Sunday, June 22 2pm

CIN EMA IN THE PARK. Iron Man 3, Wed., Jun 18 (Schenley Park), and Sat., June 21 (Riverview Park). Monsters University, Thu., June 19 (Brookline); Fri., June 20 (Arsenal); Sat., June 21 (Grandview);

Chiller Films and Horror Realm present: (2014) - 6/18 @ 7:30pm A group of friends is pursued by a blood-thirsty predator. Executive Produced by Drew Barrymore.

Animal

SPEEDY

Starring Harold Lloyd and Babe Ruth with live music by Daryl Fleming & the Public Domain

-Father - - - - -of- -the- - Bride -------------------------------Captain - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -of- -Leviathan ----------------------One- - -Flew- - -Z-Over&- The- - the- Terror - - Cuckoo’s - - - - - - -Nest- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Polyester -------------------------------------------------------------------------------(1950) - 6/19 @ 2:00pm

(2014) - 6/19 @ 8pm

(1975) - 6/20 @ 7:30pm

7 10:15pm, 6/22 @ 7pm

(1981) - 6/21 @6:00pm - John Waters classic with Mink Stole in person and original Odorama cards! Silents, Please featuring (1928) - 6/22 @ 2:00pm. - with live music by Daryl Fleming and The Public Domain

Speedy 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

and Sun., June 22 (Schenley). E.T. The ExtraTerrestrial, Tue., June 24 (West End/Elliot), and Thu., June 26 (Brookline). Gravity, Wed., June 25 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free PARTICLE FEVER. Mark Levinson’s documentary about the launching of the Large Hadron Collider and its use in searching for the Higgs (or “God”) particle is a lot more fascinating than 90 minutes spent with badly coiffed physicists would have you believe. Particle Fever is pretty hard science (with a dash of philosophy), but is quite accessible for the layman. In English, and several languages, with subtitles. Through Thu., June 19. Harris (AH)

CP

DARK GIRLS. Centuries of internalized racism come down to this: a young African-American girl telling the camera, “I don’t like to be called black.” Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry’s 2012 documentary dissects “colorism,” or prejudice against people with darker skin. It focuses on colorism within the black community, where to be “dark” is often to be seen as less attractive, less intelligent and simply less. A range of experts are featured, along with acclaimed stage and film actress Viola Davis and person-in-the street interviews. As its title indicates, the 70-minute Dark Girls emphasizes colorism’s effect on women: Historically, dark-skinned girls have been teased mercilessly by their peers — even devalued by their mothers — and evidence suggests that this remains “a huge issue.” Black males’ attitudes are explored as well. The filmmakers also analyze media’s influence, and note that colorism is a global problem, from

ANIMAL. Brett Simmons directs this new horror film in which a group of friends holed up in a cabin is pursued by bloodthirsty predator. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 18. Hollywood AN THOLOGY: LOCAL #471 MUSICIAN S’ UN ION . This hour-long documentary looks at Local 471, Pittsburgh’s African-American musicians’ union. A key factor in the establishment of Pittsburgh as a jazz center and an integral part of Pittsburgh’s black community, the union was eventually disbanded after such groups became integrated. Harry Clark, of the African American Jazz Preservation Society of Pittsburgh, will introduce the film, and lead a discussion after the screening. The film continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 19. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www.battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free CAPTAIN Z AND THE TERROR OF LEVIATHAN. In this locally produced adventure/comedy, directed by Steve Rudzinski, a powerful amulet can unleash the destructive “Leviathan.” The evil was thwarted in 1714 by Captain Zicari, but now, in the present day, the amulet is back in play — and in the wrong hands. Tonight is the theatrical premiere, with a Q&A after the screening. 8 p.m. Thu., June 19. Hollywood ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Stop Making Sense (1984), 5 and 7 p.m. Fri., June 21. Trading Places (1983), 11:30 a.m. Sun., June 22; 7 p.m. Mon., June 23; and 9:30 p.m. Wed., June 25. Citizen Kane (1941), 2 p.m. Sun., June 22; 4:30 p.m. Mon., June 23; and 4:30 p.m. Wed., June 25. Cool Hand Luke (1967), 4:20 p.m. Sun., June 22; 9:30 p.m. Mon., June 23; 7 p.m. Wed., June 25; and 4:20 p.m. Thu., June 26. Pulp Fiction (1994), 7 p.m. Sun., June 22; 4 p.m. Tue., June 24; and 9:10 p.m. Thu., June 26. Trainspotting (1996), 10 p.m. Sun., June 22; 9:30 p.m. Tue., June 24; and

Dark Girls Asia to Latin America, driving the $43 billion skinlightening industry. The screening, sponsored by the group Rights & Responsibilities, is followed by a panel and audience discussion featuring local educators and moderated by FashionAFRICANA founder Demetria Bocella, with a performance by spoken-word artist Vanessa German. 1 p.m. Sat., June 21. Carnegie Library East Liberty Branch, 130 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. Free. wrahsia@gmail.com (Bill O’Driscoll) POLYESTER. Suburban mom Francine Fishpaw (Divine) struggles to keep her troubled family together: What Francine needs is a romance. Enter Todd Tomorrow (Tab Hunter) — what a dreamboat. Straddling John Waters’ earlier grossout works and his soon-to-come mainstream efforts, Polyester (1981) is a luridly colored social satire — skewering the suburbs, the family ideal and Hollywood romance. To be screened in rare Odorama, in which viewers receive a scratch-andsniff card to be activated during select scenes in the film. Longtime Waters collaborator and actress Mink Stole will present the film. Polyester will

CP

tall 0-foot- x! 4 r u o a See Omnim n i s k r sha

Evergreen: The Road to Legalization be followed by a screening of Waters’ 1970 film Multiple Maniacs, starring Stole. The $25 VIP ticket includes a 5 p.m. meet-and-greet reception with Mink Stole and refreshments. 6 p.m. doors and signing with Stole in lobby; 7 p.m. screening. Sat., June 21. Hollywood. $15-25 (available at www.showclix.com) (AH) SPEEDY. Harold Lloyd’s restored silent classic follows the travails of a love-struck soda jerk (Lloyd) involved in a frantic public-transportation battle: trying to save a horse-drawn tram from the clutches of the railroad. This 1928 comedy also features lots of on-location color from New York City, with scenes shot at Coney Island and Yankee Stadium, and a cameo by Babe Ruth). With live musical accompaniment from Daryl Fleming and the Public Domain. 2 p.m. Sun., June 22. Hollywood

highlights in the 2014 reel are: an exercise tape called “Butt Camp,” obnoxious shopping-channel hosts and the recent “Chef Keith” prank. 8 p.m. Tue., June 24. Melwood. $12 EVERGREEN: THE ROAD TO LEGALIZATION. Riley Morton and Nils Cowan’s new documentary looks at Initiative 502, which in 2012 made Washington the first state to legalize the possession of recreational marijuana. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 26, and 4 and 7 p.m. Sat., June 28. Hollywood

Film sponsored locally by:

MODEL SHOP. A young man in Los Angeles finds a brief affair with a Frenchwoman helps give his directionless life some purpose. Jacques Demy directs this 1969 drama, starring Gary Lockwood and Anouk Aimée. The film continues a month-long, Sundaynight series of movies with connections to the TV show Mad Men. 8 p.m. Sun., June 22. Regent Square

“A MOST IMPRESSIVE

PIECE OF FILMMAKING.”

WILD STRAWBERRIES. Ingmar Bergman’s 1957 film about an elderly man reflecting upon his youth. The black-and-white cinematography is gorgeous. In Swedish, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Mon., June 23. Melwood. $2 FOUN D FOOTAGE FESTIVAL. The curators of odd and funny found videos return for an evening of laughs, as Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett show off their latest finds, gleaned from thrift stores and garages sales. This is the 10th anniversary of the Found Footage Festival, and screens as part of the Brooklyn Brewery MASH festival. Among the

“A GRIPPING MODERN WESTERN THAT EXPLODES THE TERMS OF GOOD AND EVIL. YOU’LL BE HOOKED.”

Found Footage Festival AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

“POWERFUL AND UNFORGETTABLE! A MUST-SEE!”

“BREATHTAKINGLY

REALIZED.” “DAZZLING. TREMBLES WITH WIT AND AMBITION.”

SCOTT MANTZ,

– Kyle Smith, NEW YORK POST

– Alan Scherstuhl, THE VILLAGE VOICE

JESSE EISENBERG MIA WASIKOWSKA

DOUBLE THE

A FILM BY

RICHARD AYOADE

MAGPICTURES.COM/THEDOUBLE

Pittsburgh EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT PITTSBURGH Filmmakers Harris Theatre STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 20 theaters.pittsburgharts.org N E W S

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[ART REVIEW]

SHAPING UP

“HEALTH CARE IS A HUMAN RIGHT.”

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

RESPONSE continues through July 12. James Gallery 413 S. Main St., West End. 412-922-9800 or www.jamesgallery.net

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[HEALTH CARE]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Scott Turri’s painting “When the Colors Change”

On one side of a freestanding wall at James Gallery, almost like an afterthought, hangs a small but bold blood-red piece by Carrie Seid called “Red Boba.” It’s easy to miss, but stand in front of it for a while to explore its charms. Made from oiled silk stretched over an aluminum understructure of curvy shapes, the piece resembles a microscopic view of sickle cells. Seid is interested in the tension between materials, and between geometric and biological forms. She combines color, shape and light to create a balance between surface and depth. While Seid’s piece vacillates between two and three dimensions, the rest of the abstract work in Response is more classically one or the other. At first glance, the exhibit seems a bit staid, but the work by 11 artists using a variety of media offers some interesting visual connections. Peter Deise’s “Circulatory Tether,” made of blood-red twisted steel, complements the organic shapes, themes and evocative color of “Red Boba” as well as the bright-red Aquaresin of David Henderson’s geometric wall piece “Re-Echo.” While shapes found in nature influence Seid and Deise, Henderson creates works that look organic but are made by manipulating more classic geometric forms. His two square wall works are constructed from waves of overlapping circles, and his three smaller bulbous-and-cartoony wall sculptures are morphs of the torus, a donut-like shape. Scott Turri’s paintings also use an abstract visual language of quirky shapes and colors. His flat surfaces stand out among the other painters, who vary in their pursuits of surface pattern and medium manipulation. But amidst the abstraction, images of trees are visible in Turri’s work, as they are in Warren Mather’s circular panoramas. Mather and Turri both use manipulated photographs as a means to translate the digital into the handmade. With their printing and coloring by hand on clay, Mather’s layered surfaces are ultimately about perception. Similarly, Stephanie Armbruster’s encaustic paintings are dense studies of transitional and liminal space, dreams and memories. But while Armbruster renders her impressions in muted tones, David Miller’s “Mindscape” paintings use whimsical shapes and colors to study the murky space between consciousness and the subconscious. Overall, Response reminds us that abstraction offers both artists and viewers endless possibilities to explore the rhythms and moods of a diverse range of materials, methods and subject matter.

Images from the Healthy Artists poster competition, held earlier this year at ModernFormations Gallery. Clockwise from upper left: Art by Doug Dean; David Bernabo; Andy Scott; Jasen Lex; Lizzee Solomon; Jenn Gooch; Seth Clark; Jim Rugg; Mundania Horvath; and Stephanie Armbruster

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April 30, according to federal statistics, about 318,000 Pennsylvanians acquired private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Among them was Gabe Felice, one of the artists profiled by Julie Sokolow in her online video series Healthy Artists. By spotlighting low-income artists, the series addressed the wider struggle for health-care reform in the U.S., the only developed nation without universal health coverage. At the time his segment was taped, Felice was thousands of dollars in debt after a bar fight landed him in the emergency room. (He says two guys jumped him.) The painter, then 32, hadn’t had health insurance since 1999. But after Sokolow told him about the ACA, Felice signed up. Today, he says, “I have an insurance plan that’s a reasonable rate, which is nice.” While he still owes about $2,000 for the ER visit (“That’s prob-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

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ably gonna haunt me for a while”), he did avail himself of the free annual checkup the ACA provides for. The ACA, a.k.a. Obamacare, is the biggest change in the health-care landscape since Sokolow launched Healthy Artists, in 2012. Sokolow, a musician and filmmaker, documented about 40 local painters, musicians and poets facing medical debt. She wanted to show how debt and health worries keep self-employed and underemployed people from realizing their creative potential and fully contributing to society. The project, backed by the nonprofit Health Care 4 All PA, also aided the Pennsylvania Health Access Network, an advocacy group that promotes the ACA. “We’ve shared their [Healthy Artists] stories to keep generating awareness,” says PHAN’s Erin Ninehouser. Healthy Artists inspired filmmaker Michael Moore to invite Sokolow to blog on his web site. And this

past February, The New York Times ran an article about the Healthy Artists poster exhibition at ModernFormations Gallery. While that exhibit and article capped phase one of Healthy Artists, Sokolow continues pursuing the bigger goal of singlepayer health care. Meanwhile, despite its infamously botched rollout last fall, the ACA’s online health-insurance marketplace has been a balm for local artists, including Felice. Take Daniel McCloskey, the comics artist who runs the Lawrenceville-based Cyberpunk Apocalypse writers’ project. After a face-plant bicycle accident last fall cost McCloskey three teeth, and left him with large unpaid hospital bills, Sokolow wrote about the uninsured artist on Moore’s website. The attention helped McCloskey, 27, exceed the Kickstarter goal for his latest comics project and pay down the bills. Financially, McCloskey says, he caught

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DARK LULLABY {BY STEVE SUCATO}

André Koslowski in Wiegenlied {PHOTO COURTESY OF VANESSA BRICENO}

a break when Allegheny General Hospital noted his low income and waived his nondental bill: The price of one night in the hospital had exceeded his annual income of well under $20,000. McCloskey also patronized a reduced-cost AGH dental program staffed by oral-sugery trainees. (His titanium screws are in, the new teeth to come.) Had McCloskey been stuck with full-freight bills, he says, he could have lost his house, where he’s hosted residencies for some 40 writers and comics artists, and countless readings and other literary events. Unfortunately, McCloskey didn’t acquire health insurance until after his accident. Having it now “makes me feel more secure,” he says. With ACA subsidies, he pays just $26 on a monthly premium of $160. “I don’t know that I would have been able to have insurance at all without subsidies,” he says. In Pennsylvania, 30 percent of those who’ve signed up for private health insurance under the ACA were between 18 and 34 — the age of many artists struggling to launch their careers. But some Healthy Artists profile subjects are coping in other ways. Laurie Trok’s main health issue is an autoimmune disease that had always ruled out affordable insurance. But while the ACA prohibits discrimination on the basis of pre-existing conditions, Trok, whose skills including jewelry-making and papercut art, hasn’t signed up. Instead, she says, she visits the East End Community Health Center, which charges on a sliding scale. Trok, 31, wants health insurance; trouble is, she doesn’t know exactly what her income is. That’s a common problem for all sorts of freelancers, whose income typically derives from multiple sources and can vary wildly year to year. Such coverage gaps — as with folks who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but too little to afford private insurance — are why for Sokolow, the ACA is merely “a step in the right direction.” She backs universal, single-payer coverage, a la Canada. That seems a long way off in the U.S. But Sokolow notes that Vermont has its own single-payer plan, set to take effect in 2017. In February, she blogged for Salon about Jon Stewart’s advocacy for singlepayer, and she believes a lot of millennials favor single-payer, too. Sokolow has also expanded her focus beyond artists. In May, her video about a UPMC employee who fasted to protest the low wages paid by the health-care giant was featured on the Huffington Post. And she’s allied with activist groups like Make It Our UPMC and Fight Back Pittsburgh. “Health care,” she says, “is a human right. No one should be left behind.”

This summer, the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater continues serving as one of the region’s leading incubators of new dance work and artist development with three installments of its East Liberty LIVE! series. Up first, former Dance Alloy dancer André Koslowski returns to Pittsburgh to further develop his Wiegenlied (“Lullaby”), an evening-length dance-theater piece exploring themes of loneliness and isolation. Koslowski and his Pennsylvania Dance Theatre showed excerpts of this workin-progress at the Kelly-Strayhorn’s 2013 newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival. The week-long residency and June 20 work-in-progress showing also marks the company’s transition from Pennsylvania Dance Theatre to TanzTheater André Koslowski. Koslowski, who has run the company since 2003, says the move reflects the State College-based troupe’s evolution from a repertory company to one showcasing his singular choreographic vision. During the residency, TanzTheater will create new material for the surreal Wiegenlied. Leonie Stein, former head of the Y Institute at Switzerland’s Bern University of the Arts, will act as dramaturg, helping to edit and sequence this series of character solos, which Koslowski says depict failed attempts at communication and expression. In one solo, dancer Jennifer Keller uses a leaf-blower to dry her hair while trying (unsuccessfully, because of the noise) to engage the audience in conversation. Set to an eclectic mix of music, from Ernest Bloch and Henry Mancini to a traditional Welsh lullaby arranged by composer Efraín Amaya, Wiegenlied will be dense with set pieces and props, like many of Koslowski’s pieces. “I don’t like to look at an empty stage,” says Koslowski by telephone from State College. “I think stage design grounds the work in real life, rather than being a complete abstraction of it.” The German-born Koslowski, 46, danced for the Alloy from 1995 to 2003, and his choreography has been presented internationally. At the June 20 showing, he says, he and the company will gather audience reaction and feedback before the work’s Pittsburgh premiere, in November. The remaining two East Liberty LIVE! residency/showcases will feature Philadelphia dancer/choreographers Gabrielle Revlock and Nicole Binder’s community-focused dance theater work I made this for you, on July 25 at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, and dancer/choreographer Marjani Forte’s work-in-progress showing of being Here… / this time, Aug. 15 at The Alloy Studios. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Tanztheater Andre Koslowski presents excerpts from WIEGENLIED. 8 p.m. Fri., June 20. Admission is pay-what-you-can. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

DEAD AGAIN {BY TED HOOVER} PEOPLE ARE funny. No Name Players pres-

ents Evil Dead: The Musical, and because of the amount of stage blood sprayed over the audience, the entire theater is covered in plastic. Plus, you must choose to either wear a provided plastic poncho or sign a waiver. And yet the place was packed — and practically shivering with anticipation! Evil Dead: The Musical isn’t meant for regular theater-goers. But as limbs were severed and heads hacked and chainsaws pressed into service, these audience members were having the time of their lives.

EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT NICKLOS}

David Bielewicz in No Name Players’ Evil Dead: The Musical

continues through June 28. No Name Players at Off the Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $15-20. www.nonameplayers.org

The script, with a book by George Reinblatt and music by Reinblatt, Christopher Bond and Melissa Morris, is a camptastic take on Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead trilogy — most specifically, Evil Dead 2, which, in case you missed it, is a shlocky gore-fest about five college kids in an abandoned cabin. Of course, zombies breach the timespace continuum and pretty soon there are dead, undead and soon-to-be-dead creatures all over the place. Evil Dead 2 was, in fact, Raimi’s parody of his The Evil Dead, and here comes Reinblatt parodying a parody. The whole thing’s just a big, lowbrow burlesque aiming to be as silly (and bloody) as possible. The fact that it’s a one-joke play — “here comes some more blood!” — is perhaps not a legitimate com-

plaint: Like most cult shows, you either love it totally or not at all. And — I can’t stress this enough — the audience went nuts. A huge hand for the design staff — Jesse Poole-Van Swol, Eve Bandi, Ryan McMasters, Beth Steinberg, Scott Nicklos, Steve Tolin, Dale Capellanio, Kyle Roberts, Mike Strapac, Heidi Nagle and Andrew Hosmer for their amazing theatrical knowhow — and for the crew that brings it to life. With the guidance of director Don DiGiulio, it’s a mammoth production which, not unsurprisingly for a company renting a space, could maybe use a few more run-throughs to polish things up and sharpen the focus. That this completely fearless cast — with especially funny performances by Julianne Avolio, Maggie Carr and Brad Stephenson — has managed to get this far is astonishing. By the time you

THE WHOLE THING’S JUST A BIG, LOWBROW BURLESQUE AIMING TO BE AS SILLY (AND BLOODY) AS POSSIBLE.

go, it’ll be the idiotically goofball production it wants to be. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

BLONDE AMBITION

Harvard Law School. After falling into depression and binging on Milky Ways, Elle decides to attend Harvard herself. Her application? A 8-by10-inch photo, résumé on reverse, and a video presentation. The admissions board (three horny men) is interested, and Elle is accepted — accompanied by Bruiser and so much pink clothing another student demands to know if wearing so much of that color is legal. Classmates find her a joke, Warner admits he is engaged to another student and Elle is tossed out of her first class. Then she meets The Hair Affair owner Paulette, under whose guidance Elle returns to school. To give away much more would ruin a plot that actually wants you to like it. And you will. Heather Hatch’s book and Laurence O’Keefe and Nell Benjamin’s music and lyrics fail to bore, but it’s not until Act II that the entire sugar-coated show finally pulls itself together like a tight-fitting pink teddy. There’s murder, gay people getting outed, a jailhouse exercise class that could be rated X, and a successful conviction by someone very legally blonde, who reveals a shocking blonde highlight.

LEGALLY BLONDE

{BY ALAN W. PETRUCELLI} GENTLEMEN PREFER blondes, the most famous fictional one being Lorelei Lee. In 2001, along came the next-most-famous, Elle Woods, in the film Legally Blonde, which was made into a Broadway musical six years later. A college senior and sorority president, Elle has a 4.0 in fashion merchandising. She lives in Malibu next door to Richard Simmons, has a rich tan, a richer bank account and a Chihuahua named Bruiser, who is so lovable he probably poops gold. And then there is Warner Huntington III, who Elle assumes will marry her. But one night he drops her, claiming he needs to become more serious since he’s off to

continues through Sun., June 22. Pittsburgh CLO at the Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-65.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.com

In the new Pittsburgh CLO production, Kathleen Elizabeth Monteleone makes Elle’s comical tragedies and triumphs so heartfelt that she never looks or comes across as foolish. The show, directed by Charley Repole, does feature two dogs: the Chihuahua (played by Chico) and Paulette’s English Bulldog Nellie (played by Rufus). Sadly, each dog has no more than one minute of stage time. Diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, but for Elle Woods, the due process is simply being yourself. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Friday, June 20 – 7:30 pm | Ninth Street and Penn Avenue – Cultural District

&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ͕ǀŝƐŝƚĚŝŐŶŝƚLJĂŶĚƌĞƐƉĞĐƚ͘ŽƌŐ ŵĂƟŽŶ͕ǀŝƐŝƚĚŝŐŶŝƚLJĂ Sponsored by UPMC N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.1906.26.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., JUNE 19 {WORDS}

{DANCE}

the string quartet which The New York Times called “indefatigable and eclectic.” The group performs Grace, its adaptation of Ennio Morricone’s moving, Oscar-

JUNE 19 ETHEL

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES EWING}

“Good poetry humanizes even when addressing the most despairing of subjects; it conveys the transcendent power of hope and resistance,” writes Martín Espada. The honored Massachusetts-based JUNE 21 poet reads tonight at Funnel Cakes the Human Equity Not Included Through Art Performance Series, which promotes social justice through art. Espada is joined by performance poet Vanessa German, known locally for her “Stop Shooting, We Love You” yard-sign campaign. This free New Hazlett Theater event starts early to accommodate poetry fans attending City of Asylum’s nominated score for the 1986 free 7:30 p.m. Cave Canem film The Mission, which is reading, just around the celebrated for its innovative corner. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. blend of European liturgical 6 Allegheny Square East, music, Brazilian drumming and North Side. Free ($5 requested Spanish-influenced guitars. donation). editors@heart Future performers in East onlinejournal.com Liberty LIVE! include genrehopping pianist David Cutler {MUSIC} and Carnegie Mellon’s own The Kelly-Strayhorn C Street Brass. Dan Willis Theater’s LIVE! summer 7:30 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East concert series begins tonight Liberty. $25-28. 412-363-3000 with a performance by ETHEL, or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

The Voyager spacecraft, with their golden records of images and sounds from Earth, are as far from this planet as any manmade object’s gotten, and they’re pretty high-tech. The Pillow Project’s new show, inspired by the “human signature” on those records and Carl Sagan’s classic TV series Cosmos, is both relatively low-tech and much closer to home. A Pale Blue Jazz features dancers Beth Ratas and Joshua Manculich and original music. Five days of late-night performances at The Space Upstairs are launched tonight. BO 10 p.m. Continues through Mon., June 23. 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. $10-15. www.pillowproject.org

+ FRI., JUNE 20 {OPERA} Composer Michael Ching’s Speed Dating Tonight is a one-act 2013 comic opera set in a bar on speed-date night. Microscopic Opera’s Pennsylvania-premiere production — staged in a private Shadyside garden costumed as a bar — is also the premiere of Ching’s full, small-group orchestration for the piece. While this isn’t participatory theater, it does seat audiences of up to 50 at café tables, and has them change tables when the bell rings, just like the singers will. Tickets include complimentary beverages and light snacks; the first of six performances is tonight. BO 7 p.m. Continues through June 29. 5 Shadyside Lane, Shadyside. $40. 412-580-9267 or www. microscopicopera.org

{COMEDY} Veteran local comic Gab Bonesso calls tonight’s Comedy for the People show “The Cheap Date Factory.” Actually, no dates (or figs) are involved — unless they’re in the sauce at Union Pig & Chicken, the downstairs neighbor of

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Free!Event What better way for Attack Theatre to kick off its year-long community dance project Remainder/Northside than with a free, family-friendly community day at the New Hazlett Theater? On Sun., June 22, the Pittsburgh-based, internationally touring troupe will launch the project and entertain audiences as only Attack Theatre can, with interactive movement activities, mini-performances, and games including life-size chess, Four-Square and Bag Attack Boogaloo. “We have had a longstanding relationship with the North Side, performing at the New Hazlett, The Andy Warhol Museum, the Children’s Museum, and teaching in its schools,” says Attack managing artistic director Michele de la Reza. “We wondered what it would be like to cultivate a more personal relationship with the residents of its 17 neighborhoods, listening to their stories and creating a work around those experiences.” The project builds on prior Attack Theatre community programs, such as Some Assembly Required and improvised performances at the Carnegie Museum of Art’s 2008 Carnegie International. “We are not looking to create a dance documentary of the North Side,” says de la Reza. “We are more interested in creating passionate portrayals of everyday life.” Two work-in-progress showings, in November and in February, preface the project’s final performance at the New Hazlett, next June. Steve Sucato Noon, Sun., June 22. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. Free. 412-320-4610 or www.attacktheatre.com

offer, too, like a Fred Rogers exhibit, a workshop for Eric Carle-style tissue collage, and its long-running exhibit XOXO, which explores themes of love and forgiveness through interactive multimedia art. DW 10 a.m.5 p.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. Free. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

JUNE 21

Artillery at the Forks

and a featured exhibit about the 1763 siege of Pittsburgh and the 1947 Hollywood film thereof. DW 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., June 22. 601 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. $6. 412-471-1764 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

{FESTIVAL} Beer and burgers. Beer and comedy. Beer and chefs. Beer and farms. Beer and beer. The theme to the Brooklyn Brewery Mash might be obscure, but it’s there. The venerable craft brewery’s touring show hits town starting tonight for eight days of talks, dinners and shows (many featuring Brooklyn Brewery chef Andrew Gerson). It’s an ad on wheels, sure, but it also features local talent, like star chef Justin Severino. Tue., June 24’s Brooklyn Ha Ha comedy showcase, in Lawrenceville, includes Pittsburghborn magician and comedian Lee Terbosic, plus Josh Gondelman and Jesse Popp; that night’s Found Footage Festival takes place at the Regent Square Theater. BO Continues through June 28. Times, locations and ticket prices vary. www.brooklyn brewerymash.com/pittsburgh

{PICNIC}

+ SAT., JUNE 21 {FESTIVAL} Families can kick off summer today with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh’s Community Day. Not only is the museum free and open for the public all day, but it’s also brought in special summery treats like wading pools, sprinklers, art-activity tents and performances by the Pittsburgh Banjo Club. The museum itself has plenty to

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{EXHIBIT} Today and tomorrow, a Fort Pitt Museum livinghistory program explores the importance of artillery in 18th-century warfare. And that means the cannons are going off. During Artillery at the Forks, the museum’s replica Revolutionary War-era cannon, which requires a six-person crew, will be fired at select times throughout the day, alongside various military artifacts, life-like figurines

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Tonight, Rum United and Pittsburgh Cocktail Week celebrate that most joyous of libations: rum. Their Rum-BQue takes place at the Bayardstown Social Club, a newer outdoor space that seeks to bring the spirit of the backyard to the Strip District. The cookout features various punches designed by local bartenders alongside locally raised, freshly roasted pork courtesy of Marty’s Market, and dessert from Friendship pop-up bakery The Pittsburgh Pie Guy. DW

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repertory program focusing on older film, says Row House general manager Geoff Sanderson, with themed weekly programs ranging in time from silent cinema through French New Wave, Kubrick and even ’80s action cheese. (That also makes Row House Pittsburgh’s first full-time rep house since the venerable Pittsburgh Playhouse series ended, way back when.) Though compact in size, Row House boasts digital projection, stadium seating — they took some flooring out — and a beer shop. (Yes, you can

5 p.m. 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. $30-40. 412-362-0201 or www.bayardstown.com

{SCREEN} Pittsburgh’s had screening series for years, but never the sort of full-time boutique cinema pioneered in the ’90s by Austin, Texas’s Alamo Drafthouse. That changes tonight with the grand opening of Row House Cinema. The 83-seat Lawrenceville venue occupies the old Star Discount Store, courtesy of developer Brian Mendelssohn. It plans a {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA RIAL}

Harvard & Highland. That’s the venue where Bonesso will headline, with WDVE’s Sean Collier as the featured comic, and host Jason Clark. But ordering any food or drink is truly optional — you can come just for laughs. BO 9 p.m. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-363-7675 or www.sousapgh.com

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take drafts or bottles into the theater.) The grand opening features a single screening of Pulp Fiction, but if you can’t make it, Tarantino’s cultural touchstone runs for a week, part of a first-week repertory that includes Trainspotting. BO 8 p.m. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com

{COMEDY} Deena Mendlowitz is living proof that laughter is the best medicine. Funnel Cakes Not Included, her series of darkly comic monologues about living with suicidal depression, premieres locally tonight at Arcade Comedy Theater. After honing her improv chops with Chicago’s Second City, Mendlowitz moved to Cleveland, where she founded the troupe This Improvised Life (which opens both showings of Funnel Cakes tonight), and debuted Funnel Cakes to a sold-out crowd. She brings the harsh yet uplifting show to Pittsburgh for one night only. DW 8 and 10 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. 412-339-0608 or arcadecomedytheater.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

KARAOKE THURSDAY Come sing your head off at the

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THEATER BROADWAY SHOW STOPPERS. Songs from Chicago, Phantom of the Opera, South Pacific, more. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru June 21. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. CINDERELLA. Presented by Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed, 11 a.m. Thru July 2. Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. THE CRUCIBLE. Presented by The Heritage Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 29. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL. Based on the cult classic films by Sam Raimi. Presented by No Name Players. www.nonameplayers.org Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 28. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. FOOTLOOSE. Presented by Pittsburgh CLO. June 24-27, 8 p.m., Sat., June 28, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., June 29, 2 & 7 p.m.

Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. IPHIGENIA & OTHER DAUGHTERS. A new look at the Orestes myth from Greek tragedy focusing on the women, those who were excluded from the wars, from revenge, & from history itself. Presented by Alarum Theatre. Thu-Sat, 7 p.m. Thru June 28. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. 814-715-2769. LEGALLY BLONDE: THE MUSICAL. Tue-Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 22. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. MURDER ON THE HIGH SEAS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., June 21, 5:30 p.m. Tambellini Bridgeville Restaurant, Bridgeville. 412-221-4202. MURDER ON THE MESA. Interactive murder mystery. Presented R-ACT Theatre Productions. June 20-21, 7 p.m. The Avenue Theater. 412-974-8049. NOISES OFF. A play-within-

a-play about a troupe of middling Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater British actors rehearsing & Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. performing a comedy. Presented SPEED DATING TONIGHT! by Pittsburgh Public Theater. World premiere orchestration Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., presented by The Microscopic Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Opera Company. 5 Shadyside Thru June 24. O’Reilly Theater, Lane, Shadyside. www.micro Downtown. 412-316-1600. scopicopera.org Fri-Sun, 7 p.m. ORLANDO. Adaptation Thru June 29. of Virginia Woolf’s VANYA & SONIA & novel. Presented by MASHA & SPIKE. Unseam’d Shakespeare When movie star Co. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. Masha unexpectedly and Sat., June 21, 3 & www. per returns & announces pa 8 p.m. Thru June 20. pghcitym to her adult siblings, .co Henry Heymann Theatre, Vanya & Sonia, her Oakland. 412-621-0244. plans to sell their family A PIECE OF CAKE. When farmhouse, the rug is pulled out Penelope Hart is suddenly from under their bucolic existence. let go from her job, she decides Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 28. to pursue her dream of opening a Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. cake shop. But she soon discovers 724-745-6300. that starting her own business WAITING FOR GODOT. Samuel is anything but a piece of cake! Beckett’s existential tragic comedy. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 21. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 21. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-831-8552. 412-561-6000. RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m.,

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PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MIRANDA SINGS. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. YOU CAN’T HANDLE THE TRUTH: LIVE. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

THU 19 - SUN 22

ERIK GRIFFIN. 8 p.m., Fri., June 20, 8 & 10:30 p.m., Sat., June 21, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., June 22, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 20

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. GAB BONESSO, SEAN COLLIER, JASON CLARK. Comedy For the People. 9 p.m. Harvard & Highland, East Liberty. 412-363-7675. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

MELLON SQUARE

“Chocolate Bunny,” by Tara Zalewsky-Nease, from Crayons, Cats, Dolls, and Monsters, at be Galleries, in Lawrenceville

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK

FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Affair w/ the Arts Part 2. Opens June 20. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. NEW CITY CHURCH. Layers. Paintings by John J. Donnelly. Opening reception: June 20, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-726-4217. SEWICKLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. Imaginary Miniature Elgin Park World. Recreations of everyday scenes from mid-20th century America by Michael Paul Smith. Artist talk: June 22, 2 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-6920. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. transformBECOME. Work by Elan Wojciechowski, Andy Scott, Stephanie Neary, Ron Hornbeck, Christina Labrise, Justin Hartman, Tyler Palladino, Jen Green, & Maura Doern Danko. Reception June 21 6-9 p.m. Braddock.

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Portraits of Air: Pittsburgh. Installation by Susan Goethel Campbell. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. 412-471-6070.

AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. ASSEMBLE. Transformed Linearities. Work by Julie Mallis. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. A Response to Life. Work by Mari Yobp & Daniel Yobp. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Crayons, Cats, Dolls & Monsters. Work by Tara Zalewsky-Nease. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Chasing the Sun. Work by Nadya Lapets, Vickie Schilling, & Gloria Tsang. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Nia Quilt Guild

Member Show. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by New Academy Press. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FRANK L. MELEGA ART MUSEUM. National Road Festival Juried Art Exhibition. Work by artists from Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland Counties. 724-785-9331. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Lucky After Dark:Gay & Lesbian Nightlife in Pittsburgh 1960-1990. Feat. photos, video & other artifacts from iconic clubs. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. With the Grain. Recent works by Ashley Jean Hickey. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures

SUMMER CONCERT S E R I E S

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REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FRI 20 - SAT 21

JODY KERNS. June 20-21, 8 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. DAVID KAYE, MIKE WYSOCKI, MATT WOHLFARTH. 6 p.m. Elizabeth Bingo Hall. 412-382-2922. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: MAKE NICE BOOM. 8 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-212-7061. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: MONDO! W/ ROB JOHNSTON. 9:30 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-212-7061.

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ERIK GRIFFIN. 8 p.m., Fri., June 20, 8 & 10:30 p.m., Sat., June 21, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., June 22, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 23

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

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ALWAYS 1/2 1/ OFF ADMISSION FOR SE SERVICE MEMBERS AND VE VETERANS WITH ID 50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

WHEN: Sun.,

June 15

The march was so much fun, and so colorful, too. Also I’m gay, so I really appreciated the message. Just seeing the diversity, seeing all those people embrace what they have and who they are, was really inspiring. The people from the haunted house [Lawrenceville’s ScareHouse] who marched were really interesting, visually. Also, it was good to see all these different organizations and companies supporting and sponsoring the march. I live here, and throughout the years, the gay-pride movement has grown so much. Not too long ago, there wouldn’t have been anything like this: Now it’s huge [and] draws people from all over the state and even the world.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, rare examples of pre World War II Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869. iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. COMEDY OPEN MIC. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s from the International Hall of Place, Mt. Washington. Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. 412-431-9908. DEPRECIATION LANDS STAND-UP COMEDY MUSEUM. Small OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. living history museum The BeerHive, Strip celebrating the District. 412-904-4502. settlement and history www. per pa of the Depreciation pghcitym .co Lands. Allison Park. AUGUST WILSON 412-486-0563. CENTER FOR AFRICAN FALLINGWATER. Tour the AMERICAN CULTURE. famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. 724-329-8501. Feat. imagery, film & oral history FIRST PRESBYTERIAN narratives to explore communities, CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany cultures, & innovations. stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-258-2700. Downtown. 412-471-3436. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic Unconquered: History Meets roll-played musical instruments Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original and music boxes in a mansion movie props, photographs, setting. Call for appointment. & costumes alongside 18th O’Hara. 412-782-4231. century artifacts & documents, CARNEGIE MUSEUM comparing & contrasting historical OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: events w/ Hollywood depictions. Are We So Different? Text, Reconstructed fort houses photographs, interactive museum of Pittsburgh history audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge circa French & Indian War and perceptions about race. Oakland. American Revolution. Downtown. 412-622-3131. 412-281-9285. UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru June 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 24

1/2 OSIFONF

34, a hair stylist from the North Side

SAT 21

SUN 22

CHATLINE

EVENT: Pride March and Pittsburgh PrideFest CRITIC: Igor Vavilov,

WED 25

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE

BY DAN WILLIS

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Duets. Harmonious couplings of botanical art w/ items created between the 16th & 21st centuries from the Hunt Institute collections. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to

flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

FESTIVALS THU 19 - SAT 21

WILKINS SUMMER FESTIVAL. Live music, car cruise, fireworks, more. www.wilkinstownship.com Thru June 21 Penn Center Blvd., Monroeville. 412-824-4523.

SAT 21 - WED 25

BROOKLYN BREWERY MASH. Traveling food, beer & arts festival. Various events & locations. BrooklynBreweryMash.com June 21-28

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

by Alexandre Arrechea. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. COLOR!!! Juried exhibition feat. regional artists. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Blind Intersections: Another Series of False Leads. Feat. work by Paul Paddock, Michael Matos, Thad Kellstadt, Terry Carroll, Dean Cercone, Keith Knight, Mark Lyons & Lara Lampenfield. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol R. Brode. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2:

DANCE FRI 20

WIEGENLIED. Dance performance by TanzTheater Andre Koslowski. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

SUN 22

WORLD KALEIDOSCOPE: LATINA PRODUCTIONS. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 20

PROVIDENCE CONNECTIONS BACKYARD BARBEQUE. Hosted by WPXI’s Brittny McGraw feat. hors d’ oeuvres, cash bar, silent auction, more. 5:30-9 p.m.

Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Small Works. Work by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Garfield. 412-328-4737. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company Part 2. Work by Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Savage Elements. Work by Nugent Kos. Lawrenceville. 412-728-4916. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003.

PNC Park, North Side. 412-766-3860. URBAN GARDEN PARTY: WILD WEST. Live entertainment, food & drink, silent auction, more. 7-11 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169.

SAT 21

6TH ANNUAL EVELYN PAIGE-PARKER SCHOLARSHIP BRUNCH. Hosted by Pittsburgh Black Nurses in Action. 11 a.m.2 p.m. Lemont, Mt. Washington. 412-758-0344. SHINE YOUR LIGHT - A BROADWAY CANTATA CELEBRATING FAITH, HOPE & LOVE. Feat. songs from Godspell, Ragtime, Les Miserables, more. Benefits Diakonia Ministries. 1 & 6 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-731-8037.

THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Psychic Panic. Feat. 25+ artworks by 9 artists working in a range of media. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Mythological Gestures. Drawings by Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-877-7394. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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SUMMER SOLSTICE YOGA FUNDRAISER. Benefits the Animal Rescue League. 4-5:30 p.m. Schoolhouse Yoga, Strip District. 412-401-4444.

SUN 22

THE BEN ROETHLISBERGER FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER. Live music, strolling dinner, live & silent auction, more. Benefits K-9 police & fire units & Make-A-Wish®. 6 p.m. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, Warrendale. 412-441-1077. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. FR STRONG CHARITY FUNDRAISER. 3 p.m. Carson City CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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Saloon, South Side. 412-741-6920. PEACE. LOVE. RUN 13.1 & 5K. Benefits Catholic Hospice & Palliative Services. 7 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 866-933-6221. PURSUER OF PEACE. Honoring Fred Rogers. Benefits Quest Camp & Circle Camp programs. 5 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

MON 23

THE BEN ROETHLISBERGER FOUNDATION GOLF INVITATIONAL. Benefits K-9 police & fire units & Make-AWish®. 10 a.m. Treesdale Golf & Country Club, Gibsonia. 610-906-7134. MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S REVELS. Dinner, silent auction, more. Benefits Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. 6:30 p.m. Piccolo Forno, Lawrenceville. 412-404-8531.

$2 WELL DRINKS 10PM-MIDNIGHT

2-4-1 LAP DANCES

TUE 24

THU 19

Celebrating 20 Years! Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

2 for 1 Tuesdays 2 FOR 1 ADMISSION

SHAKESPEARE READERS. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru June 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 24

GET YOUR WORKSHOP ON. Creative writing workshop. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru June 24 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 19

ATTACK THEATRE: WE’RE ON A BOAT. End of season celebration aboard Pittsburgh Luxury Cruises’ Fantasy, 23rd St., Strip District. 5:30 p.m. 412-281-3305.

LITERARY

MON 23

3D FOR KIDS. Ages 7+. 10:30 a.m. Jeannette Public Library, Jeannette. 724-523-5702. MUSICAL ADVENTURES. Join musician Barbara Lowenstein for a musical trip around the world. Share stories, songs, more. Ages 3-8. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

with other youth & Teaching Artists while participating in a variety of activities. 5 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

FRI 20 - SUN 22

ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Presented by The Theatre Factory KidWorks. 7:30 p.m. and Sun., June 22, 2 p.m. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200.

SAT 21

MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SPLASH! KICK OFF TO SUMMER COMMUNITY FREE DAY. Activity tents, bike-powered lemonade smoothie stand, live music, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 23

CFDP WORLD CUP FESTIVAL. Viewing of World Cup match & Wilkinsburg Street Soccer Tournament. 1-7 p.m. Wilkinsburg Boys

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. Every The American Cancer Society is seeking volunteers in other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru June 19 Allegheny County to help with various initiatives. These Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. include the Road to Recovery program, where volunteers BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. drive patients to and from appointments, and Look A Constellation of Vital Good Feel Better, which offers workshops on makeup Phenomena by Anthony Marra. and skin care, as well as help dealing with hair loss. 1 & 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Call 412-919-1100 or visit www.cancer.org. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CAVE CANEM POETS 2014. Reading & book signing w/ Patricia Smith, Tim Seibles, Lyrae Van YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages & Girls Club, Wilkinsburg. Clief-Stefanon. 7:30-9:30 p.m. 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for 304-281-5649. Alphabet City Tent, North Side. Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 MAGIC SHOW W/ TJ HILL. 4 p.m. 412-323-0278. TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. Mount Lebanon Public Library, THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY 412-366-3528. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. SUMMER READING CLUB Young writers & recent EXTRAVAGANZA. Crafts, maze, graduates looking for additional BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical face painting, more. Mount feedback on their work. swing set, sandbox, solar-powered Lebanon Public Library, Mt. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. instruments, more. Ongoing Lebanon. 412-531-1912. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Idea Bookstore & Cafe, North Side. 412-322-5058. Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades MARTÍN ESPADA, Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, VANESSA GERMAN. National Aviary, North Garfield. Poetry reading Side. 412-323-7235. presented by Human TAKING FLIGHT: Equity Through Art. AN AERIAL www. per pa RSVP at editors@ ADVENTURE. Rose pghcitym o .c heartjournalonline.com garden free-flight bird SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett show w/ live narration & 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Theater, North Side. music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. Oakland. 412-477-4677. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. LORI JAKIELA, ADAM XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. MATCHO, STEPHANIE BREA. LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Poetry reading, part of the Versify love & forgiveness through Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. Reading Series. 7 p.m. East End interactive experiences. Thru 412-963-6100. Book Exchange, Bloomfield. Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-224-2847. 412-322-5058. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Hang out Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE

THU 19 - WED 25

TUE 24

FULL LIST ONLINE

OUTSIDE TUE 24

SAT 21

WED 25

OTHER STUFF

FRI 20

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

52

(412) 771-8872

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

THU 19

[WORDS] UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL START-UP. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Hill House, Hill District. 202-321-0633. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: RISE OF THE DRONES. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, food, more. Ages 21+. Every third Thu, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 21 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SUMMER SOLSTICE RAIN PARTY. 8 p.m. Bar 11, South Side. 412-381-0899. WHY DID SKIN COLOR EVOLVE, & WHY DOES IT (CONTINUE TO) MATTER? Lecture w/ Nina Jablonski, PhD. Part of RACE: Are We So Different? 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

FRI 20

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. LINE DANCING WORLD RECORD. Ninth St. & Penn Ave. www.dignityandrespect.org/ take-a-healthy-step 7:30-9 p.m. 412-281-0995. PITTSBURGH WORLD REFUGEE DAY. Free, familyfriendly celebration of refugee culture feat. cultural foods, live performances, more. 11 a.m.2 p.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-422-7200. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 12-1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-391-2060 x 237. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. TRANS NIGHT W/ THE INITIATIVE FOR TRANSGENDER LEADERSHIP. Celebrating the trans youth & youth culture in Pittsburgh & beyond. Part of the Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography

N E W S

butchery, local beverage pairings, more. 8 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Legume Bistro, Oakland. 412-621-2700. SUNDAY NIGHT WORSHIP LAUNCH EVENT. 6 p.m. Upper Room Worship, Brookline. 412-502-5052.

feat. 30+ local artisans, farmers market, more. www. imadeitmarket.com Third Sat of every month, 2-7 p.m. Thru Aug. 16 Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-476-8889. PRIDE DRAG BOWL. www.dragbowl.com 7 p.m. Hollywood Lanes, Dormont. 412-586-4727. RUM B QUE. Rum punch challenge, hog roast, more. 5-9 p.m. Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. THE SANDBOX: ARCHIVES. Discussion w/ Kalev Erickson. Part of the Hillman Photography Initiative. 7-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

Workplace Post-it Note #51

WED 25

BACKYARD COMPOSTING. This workshop will cover the benefits of composting, the process of setting up a compost pile, & how to perform proper maintenance. Participants will receive an 80-gallon composting bin in the workshop & learn how to use the finished compost. Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-488-7490 x. 247. CENTER FOR INQUIRY LECTURE. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. AN EVENING W/ THADDEUS MOSLEY. Artist forum. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211 x 112. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. PGC LECTURE SERIES: ROSS RICHMOND, HOLLY COOPER, MATTHEW SZOSZ. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

SAT 21 - SUN 22

ARTILLERY AT THE FORKS. Learn how artillery affected 18th century warfare at Fort Pitt. June 21-22 Fort Pitt Museum, Downtown. 412-471-1764.

BY ADAM MATCHO

SUN 22 Adam Matcho reads with poets Lori Jakiela and Stephanie Brea, as part of the Versify

reading series at East End Book Exchange. 7 p.m. Sat., June 21. Free. 412-224-2847 or www.eastendbookexchange.com

exhibit. 7 p.m. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810.

FRI 20 - SUN 22

TRUST VINYL POP-UP RECORD STORE. 820 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Part of the Pittsburgh JazzLive Festival. June 20-21, 12-9 p.m. and Sun., June 22, 12-7 p.m. 412-456-6666.

FRI 20 - WED 25

HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223. NORTHSIDE SANDWICH WEEK. Participating locations at sandwichweek.pittsburgh northside.com June 20-26 201-669-9046.

SAT 21

BALKAN DANCE PARTY. Folk dance lessons, live music, more. Third Sat of every month, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 21 Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

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TA S T E

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CITY OF CHAMPIONS! THE PITTSBURGH SPORTS HISTORY TOUR. Begins at Duquesne Incline, 1220 Grandview Ave, Mt. Washington. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-323-4709. COMPASSION: THE NEXT LEVEL OF CONSCIOUSNESS FOR HUMAN EVOLUTION. An evening dedicated to activating the Web of Compassion w/ Matthew Fox, Vanessa German, & Kellee Maize. 6:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 412-681-4222. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 19 412-271-7660. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. I MADE IT! MARKET. Nomadic indie craft market

M U S I C

+

THE 33RD ANNUAL COUNTRY SHOWDOWN. Country music talent search. http://www.wbut.com/ W. New Castle St. Plaza, Butler. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. COMMUNITY GARDEN PARTY. Live music, screen printing, square dancing, mechanical bull, more. 1-5 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. THE FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL. Showcasing videos found at garage sales & thrift stores, in warehouses & dumpsters throughout North America. 8 p.m. Regent Square Theater, Regent Square. 412-682-4111. NATIVE PLANT GARDENING W/ NATIVE POLLINATORS. This program will discuss how to grow native plants and picking plants that benefit PA pollinators. Meeting at the Wildflower Reserve Interpretive Center along Route 30. 2-3:30 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611. REMAINDER | NORTHSIDE KICKOFF. Kicking off a year-long community performance project w/ interactive movement activities, games, more. 12-3 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-281-3305. SUMMER SOLSTICE PARTY. Workshops on gardening, country wines, bread baking,

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

AUDITIONS ALLSTAR REFJUDZI BAND. Seeking brass players for a parade, part of a City of Asylum event on June 28-29. Rehearsal June 21. Call for information. 617-642-5264. DAY ROOM WINDOW. Auditions for Day Room Window. June 24, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Call backs the following evening. Multiracial cast. Women ages 35-55. Men ages 35-60. Prepare 2 minute dramatic contemporary monologue. Bring head shot & resume. Equity & NonEquity actors welcome. Schedule audition w/ Kathryn Kelly at kskelly412@gmail.com. More info at www.dayroom window.com New Hazlett Theater, North Side. PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Auditions for Gilbert & Sullivan’s The Sorcerer. June 4 & 23. Prepare a song that best showcases your voice, either

+

E V E N T S

+

Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred), standard musical theater, or classical. Accompanist will be provided, no a capella selections. auditions@pittsburghsavoyards. org Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. THEATRE FACTORY KIDWORKS. Auditions for “A Kidsummer Night’s Dream.” June 27 & 28. Seeking males & females ages 10 +. Cold readings from the script, actors should bring 16-32 bars of a prepared song. Accompanist will be supplied. Bring a picture & resume. For an audition appointment e-mail tfauditions@gmail.com. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200.

SUBMISSIONS

GREENSBURG’S SUMMER IN THE CITY. Seeking artists, crafters & makers for the annual citywide outdoor festival. $15.00 for a 8’ x 17’ parking space to display & sell your work. For further information & application, call or email greensburgba.info@gmail. com 724-689-0040. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prize-forshort-fiction.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking crafters for the Summer Artisan Bazaar. All artwork & crafts submitted must be original, no kits or work produced from commercial patterns or manufactured pieces will be accepted. www.northhillsartcenter. org 412-364-3622. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com/ THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com SHALER GARDEN CLUB GREAT LOCAL GARDENER CONTEST. All types of gardens will be considered. Submit 5 photos of your garden w/ description of what makes it special. Registration forms available at Shaler North Hills Library. Deadline: July 8. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

C L A S S I F I E D S

53

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

I’ve always identified as a straight male into typical relationships. I’ve realized, after multiple unsatisfying long-term relationships, that monogamy isn’t for me. I would like to have a main, fulfilling and committed relationship without limiting myself sexually or emotionally. I don’t want to cheat on anyone. I just want the rules to fit me so that I don’t have to be considered a cheater. Do you think this is something I should disclose to family and friends? I feel like this is an issue that activism isn’t addressing, and while polyamory seems more common, I don’t see anyone who is “out.” PONDERING OVER LIFE’S YEARNINGS

If you’re not seeing anyone who is poly and publicly out, then you’re not watching Showtime, which broadcast two seasons of Polyamory: Married & Dating, and you’re not paying attention to poly activists who are out — like Diana Adams, an attorney (dianaadamslaw.net) who specializes in nontraditional family relationships. “I applaud POLY for considering boldly coming out as polyamorous,” said Adams. “We need more people to come out in order to destigmatize polyamory.” Adams recognizes that not all poly folks can be out — some work for conservative employers, some could lose custody of their kids. But “for those of us who have the privilege to be out, I encourage us to speak our truth, which will support a cultural understanding of healthy relationships beyond monogamy — and, of course, help us find likeminded partners. In POLY’s case, I urge him to learn more about poly first. Link up with groups like Loving More (lovemore.com) and Open Love NY (openloveny.com), and follow people like me on Twitter (@ dianaadamsesq), and he’ll get tuned in to the nationwide activism that’s happening. He’ll also get tapped into resources for creating successful poly relationships.” About those relationships: Just like successful monogamous relationships, poly relationships have limits — sexual and emotional. But instead of coming to an agreement with one partner about those limits, you have to hammer out agreements with two or more partners. “Poly may not be easier to maintain than his monogamous relationships,” said Adams. “Poly works for emotional ninjas who possess tremendous emotional awareness and communication skills to create their own agreements with their partner(s). If POLY is ready for that level of effort, poly may work for him so well that he’ll want to tell the world.”

If fantasizing about fucking someone else while you’re fucking your partner is cheating, then we’re all adulterers. It’s not a great sign that you’re doing it every time — you might wanna will yourself to focus on her at least every other time. As for telling her, that depends on how secure she is. If she’s realistic about the fact that you’re both attracted to other people, perhaps you can broach the subject — or even share your fantasies during sex. But that means you’ll have to hear about the baristas, flings and DILFs who turn her on, too. Which raises another question: How secure are you? In the wake of the killings at Isla Vista, and all the #YesAllWomen and #N otAllMen hashtag campaigns, I want a change in the dialogue. I want to hear the story of the man who warned a woman after he found out a friend planned on drugging her, the man who dropped a friend when he found out his friend had assaulted his girlfriend. Can you ask readers to send in stories that will give women hope that men understand and are standing up for us? ONE SAD WOMAN

The #YesAllWomen and #NotAllMen were not concurrent, complementary Twitter hashtag campaigns. After Elliot Rodger decided to murder the women who had rejected him, millions of women began tweeting under #YesAllWomen about the sexism, sexual violence and misogyny they experience on a daily basis. When some men began responding to those tweets with variations on “We’re not all like that!” the #NotAllMen hashtag was born, and it was a critique. As Phil Plait wrote at Slate: “Why is it not helpful to say ‘Not all men are like that’? For lots of reasons. For one, women know this. They already know not every man is a rapist, or a murderer, or violent. … Instead of being defensive and distracting from the topic [misogyny, sexism, violence], try … listening to what the thousands upon thousands of women discussing this are saying.” I’m hesitant to invite men to share their stories, because I agree with Plait: Maybe men should shut up and listen? It’s also possible for a guy to do the right thing on one occasion, and then turn around and do something deeply shitty. Men shouldn’t be encouraged to think that one noble act frees them from our collective responsibility to fight sexism and misogyny. (A quick note to my fellow faggots: What’s in fighting sexism and misogyny for us? Homophobes hate us because they perceive us to be like women — we’re effeminate, we’re cocksuckers, we’re penetrated. Homophobia is misogyny’s little brother, and a less misogynistic world is a less homophobic world.) But I’m running your letter, and inviting women to jump into the comment thread and share your stories about men who’ve done the right thing. This is not meant to exonerate men of their responsibility, or to minimize the problem, but to give men examples of what it looks like when a dude fights sexism and misogyny.

JUST LIKE SUCCESSFUL MONOGAMOUS RELATIONSHIPS, POLY RELATIONSHIPS HAVE LIMITS.

I’m a straight guy, and I’ve been in a monogamous relationship with an awesome girl for four years. Our sex life is healthy, although it has lost some steam since the first couple of years — but that’s normal, right? For the last year or so, every time we have sex, I find myself fantasizing that I’m with someone else. A cute barista, an old fling, that MILF on the bus — but never my girlfriend. Am I cheating on my partner? Is this a bad sign for our relationship? Should I admit this to my girlfriend? MIND FUCKING OTHER WOMEN

On the Lovecast, orgasm control and toe curling: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.18-06.25

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Nikhedonia” is an obscure English word that refers to the pleasure that comes from anticipating success or good fortune. There’s nothing wrong with indulging in this emotion as long as it doesn’t interfere with you actually doing the work that will lead to success or good fortune. But the problem is, nikhedonia makes some people lazy. Having experienced the thrill of imagining their victory, they find it hard to buckle down and slog through the gritty details necessary to manifest their victory. Don’t be like that. Enjoy your nikhedonia, then go and complete the accomplishment that will bring a second, even stronger wave of gratification.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts has a collection of Japanese art that is never on display. It consists of 6,600 wood-block prints created by artists of the ukiyo-e school, also known as “pictures of the floating world.” Some are more than 300 years old. They are tucked away in drawers and hidden from the light, ensuring that their vibrant colors won’t fade. So they are well-preserved but rarely seen by anyone. Is there anything about you that resembles these pictures of the floating world, Cancerian? Do you keep parts of you secret, protecting them from what might happen if you show them to the world? It may be time to revise that policy. (Thanks to Molly Oldfield’s The Secret Museum for the info referred to here.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

In the next two weeks, I hope you don’t fall prey to the craze that has been sweeping Japan. More than 40,000 people have bought books that feature the photos of hamuketsu, or hamster bottoms. Even if you do manage to avoid being

consumed by that particular madness, I’m afraid you might get caught up in trifles and distractions that are equally irrelevant to your longterm dreams. Here’s what I suggest: To counteract any tendency you might have to neglect what’s truly important, vow to focus intensely on what’s truly important.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Writing at FastCompany.com, Himanshu Saxena suggests that businesses create a new position: Chief Paradox Officer, or CPXO. This person would be responsible for making good use of the conflicts and contradictions that normally arise, treating them as opportunities for growth rather than as distractions. From my astrological perspective, you Virgos are currently prime candidates to serve in this capacity. You will continue to have special powers to do this type of work for months to come.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

In accordance with the astrological omens, you

get your yoga on!

are hereby granted a brief, one-time-only license to commit the Seven Deadly Sins. You heard me correctly, Libra. As long as you don’t go to extremes, feel free to express healthy amounts of pride, greed, laziness, gluttony, anger, envy and lust. At least for now, there will be relatively little hell to pay for these indulgences. Just one caveat: If I were you, I wouldn’t invest a lot of energy in anger and envy. Technically, they are permitted, but they aren’t really much fun. On the other hand, greed, gluttony and lust could be quite pleasurable, especially if you don’t take yourself too seriously. Pride and laziness may also be enjoyable in moderate, artful amounts.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Scorpio novelist Kurt Vonnegut rebelled against literary traditions. His stories were often hybrids of science fiction and autobiography. Free-form philosophizing blended with satirical moral commentary. He could be cynical yet playful, and he told a lot of jokes. “I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over,” he testified. “Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can’t see from the center.” He’s your role model for the next four weeks, Scorpio. Your challenge will be to wander as far as you can into the frontier without getting hopelessly lost.

you are at following through. The innovations you have launched in recent weeks need to be fleshed out. The creativity you unleashed must get the full backing of your practical action. You will be asked to make good on the promises you made or even implied. I want to urge you not to get your feelings hurt if some pruning and editing are required. In fact, I suggest you relish the opportunity to translate fuzzy ideals into tidy structures. Practicing the art of ingenious limitation will make everything better.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

It’s always important for you to shield yourself against our culture’s superficial and sexist ideas about sex. It’s always important for you to cultivate your own unique and soulful understandings about sex. But right now this is even more crucial than usual. You are headed into a phase when you will have the potential to clarify and deepen your relationship with eros. In ways you have not previously imagined, you can learn to harness your libido to serve both your spiritual aspirations and your quest for greater intimacy.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“Make a name for the dark parts of you,” writes Lisa Marie Basile in her poem “Paz.” I think that’s good advice for you, Sagittarius. The imminent future will be an excellent time to fully acknowledge the shadowy aspects of your nature. More than that, it will be a perfect moment to converse with them, get to know them better and identify their redeeming features. I suspect you will find that just because they are dark doesn’t mean they are bad or shameful. If you approach them with love and tenderness, they may even reveal their secret genius.

If you were alive 150 years ago and needed to get a tooth extracted, you might have called on a barber or blacksmith or wigmaker to do the job. (Dentistry didn’t become a formal occupation until the latter part of the 19th century.) Today you wouldn’t dream of seeking anyone but a specialist to attend to the health of your mouth. But I’m wondering if you are being less particular about certain other matters concerning your welfare. Have you been seeking financial advice from your massage therapist? Spiritual counsel from your car-repair person? Nutritional guidance from a fast-food addict? I suggest you avoid such behavior. It’s time to ask for specific help from those who can actually provide it.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Compose an exciting prayer in which you ask for something you’re not “supposed” to. FreeWill Astrology.com

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Pet mice that are kept in cages need to move more than their enclosed space allows, so their owners often provide them with exercise wheels. If the rodents want to exert their natural instinct to run around, they’ve got to do it on this device. But here’s a curious twist: a team of Dutch researchers has discovered that wild mice also enjoy using exercise wheels. The creatures have all the room to roam they need, but when they come upon the wheels in the middle of the forest, they hop on and go for prolonged spins. I suggest you avoid behavior like that, Capricorn. Sometime soon you will find yourself rambling through more spacious places. When that happens, don’t act like you do when your freedom is more limited. It’s transition time. We will soon see how skilled

“My music is best understood by children and animals,” said composer Igor Stravinsky. A similar statement could be made about you Tauruses in the coming weeks: You will be best understood by children and animals — and by all others who have a capacity for dynamic innocence and a buoyant curiosity rooted in emotional intelligence. In fact, those are the types I advise you to surround yourself with. For now, it’s best to avoid sophisticates who overthink everything and know-it-all cynics whose default mode is criticism. Take control of what influences you absorb. You need to be in the presence of those who help activate your vitality and enthusiasm.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

HELP WANTED

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57

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LOOKING FOR AN OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE WOMEN’S HEALTH?

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The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

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STUDIES

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www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

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located at the University of Pittsburgh Now Accepting Applications for the 2014-2015 school year!

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Want to work Steeler and Pitt games? Concerts? Landmark Event Staffing, an industry leader in event staffing and security, is looking to hire enthusiastic, customerservice oriented people to work events in and around the city of Pittsburgh. You must be at least 18 yrs. of age and able to pass a criminal background check. Veterans, students, retirees and those looking for an exciting first OR second income ome are ALL welcome to apply. Call our Pittsburgh office to set up an appointment.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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Looking for candidates with great customer service to join our team! Openings include cooks, bakers, food service workers, baristas, catering drivers, banquet servers and set up, and utility. We also are recruiting for bake shop and retail bakery supervisors, catering, culinary and retail dining supervisors.

We are accepting applications M-TH from 9:00am- 3:00pm in our HR office in McCormick Hall. Go to www.tour.pitt.edu/campus-map for campus map. A full listing of all postings is available in our office.

Please contact 412.624.2347 or sodexoupitt@gmail.com with any questions.

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Greater Johnstown Career and Technology Center Practical Nursing School Education Coordinator Primary responsibilities include: curriculum development and deployment, teacher supervision, and State Board reporting. Prior experience in nursing education required, Masters Degree preferred. Time will be shared between two campus locations, Johnstown and Monroeville.

Applicants shall submit cover letter, resume, credentials, references, and have Act 34, 151 and 114 clearances processed upon hiring. EOE. Send requested information to: HR Department GREATER JOHNSTOWN CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER 445 Schoolhouse Road, Johnstown, PA 15904 814-266-6073 info@gjctc.org

www.TheKAG.com

Application Deadline: Until Position is Filled

mainstaylifeservices.org

Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area!

RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW FOR NEXT MONTHS CAREER CORNER gjctc.org

ISSUE!

Company Drivers:

Owner-Operators:

• Competitive pay • Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans • Paid vacations & holidays • 401K with company match • Paid training on safe driving & product handling • Well-maintained equipment • Driver referral incentive pay • And so much more!

• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

800-871-4581

TheKAG.com

Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

SERVICES ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL

AUTO SERVICE

Rehearsal Space

Rent -A- Bay

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

HEALTH SERVICES

CLASSES

LOSE UP TO 30 POUNDS in 60 Days! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weight loss. 60 day supply - $59.95. Call 877761-2991 (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE JOBS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-2103935 (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

STORAGE

ABC SELF STORAGE 25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

EAST FOR RENT

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Sq. Hill Newly remod. lg. 3BR, eq. kit, combo l/r and d/r, laun, off str prkg, stor. Close to shop and trans. Avl July $1,065+g&e

Tony 412-849-8856 N E W S

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

AnExquisite Massage Licensed

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Massage Therapist CORAOPOLIS, PA. 15108

412-474-3236

www.anexquisitemassage.com

MASSAGE

massage

WELLNESS

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Downtown

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-441-1185

412-595-8077

Grand Opening

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Open 24 hrs

Chinese Bodyworks

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

322 Fourth Ave.

WELLNESS CENTER

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Xin Sui Bodyworks

MASSAGE

Therapeutic Massage

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

412-401-4110

Xie LiHong’s

MASSAGE

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.18/06.25.2014

SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION

JADE

LF SEAY P

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Wellness Center

PRIORITY OR RITY HEALTHCARE LTHCARE 412-681-1406 Positive Recovery Solutions

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

NOW TAKING PATIENTS

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 Recovery Without Judgement

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

www.myjadewellness.com

Now Open! 1295 Grand Boulevard Monessen, PA 15062

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Please Call: 724-684-4890 Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

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Let Us Help You Today!

Monessen Office

Help is Available!

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• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

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PROUD OCCASION {PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Pittsburgh’s 2014 Pride celebration took place just weeks after the state’s ban on same-sex marriage was overturned by a federal judge. No surprise, then, that on June 15, Downtown’s streets at times resembled a giant wedding party (with entertainment the night before provided by Chaka Khan); earlier that day, Mayor William Peduto presided over the wedding of some 19 couples. It wasn’t all marital bliss, however: One Pride participant was arrested under murky circumstances during an altercation involving anti-gay demonstrators and Pittsburgh police. That story was emerging as this issue was going to press: See our online coverage at www.pghcitypaper.com/blogs/Blogh.

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June 18, 2014