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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 04.02/04.09.2014

EVENTS 5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.9 – 5-10pm YOUTH INVASION 2014 Teens take over The Warhol! Tickets $5 students & adults/Members Free

5.17 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.18 – 12am-5pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMUNITY DAY In celebration of the kickoff of The Warhol’s 20th anniversary and American Art Museum Day, the museum will be open free to the public Tickets FREE

5.18 – 3pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: HOLY TERROR: ANDY WARHOL CLOSE UP BY BOB COLACELLO Tickets FREE

Sister Spit Co-presented with Trans-Q Television

5.30 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

4.11 – 8pm Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

The legendary, raucous, rowdy performance gang, Sister Spit, returns to The Warhol with a vanload of multimedia, queer-centric brilliance! Sister Spit is a multimedia explosion of taste-makers, novelists, luminaries, chanteuses, performance artists, poets and filmmakers. This multimedia program features host Ali Liebegot, along with authors Dia Felix (Nochita) and Beth Lisick (Yokohama Threeway: A Collection of Small Shames), slam poet and award-winning playwright Chinaka Hodge, fat activist Virgie Tovar, (one of the U.S’s leading experts on body discrimination), award-winning playwright and poet Lenelle Moise (Haiti Glass) and novelist Rhiannon Argo (Girls I’ve Run Away With).

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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CELEBRATING:

CIVIL LITIGATION

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Pittsburgh’S Finest 2014

ROBB LEONARD MULVIHILL LLP (RLM) is a premier Pittsburgh law firm

We present 100 Pittsburgh professionals who demonstrate excellence in the fields of law, healthcare, education, technology, social services & business for 2014.

CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY ATTORNEY RYAN M. TUTERA concentrates primarily in criminal defense,

429 Fourth Ave, #500 Law & Finance Bldg Pittsburgh (412)566-2660

with a strong emphasis on the trial phase of legal advocacy. As a former Assistant District Attorney (Allegheny County – 5 years), he is a true believer in due process of the law, the presumption of innocence, and the burden of proof resting squarely upon the government. He cares immensely about his clients and knows that he is their beacon of light in the storm. As a trial lawyer, Ryan’s philosophy is grounded in the strong belief that his clients should be fully informed about every aspect of their case as the case progresses. Areas of interest include homicide & all violent crimes, sexual assault, DUI & traffic violations, drug crimes, child abuse & neglect, white-collar crimes, armed robbery & burglary, domestic violence & assault and probation & parole violations. He defends both adults & juveniles in state & federal courts at the trial & appellate levels. For your initial consultation there is no charge. Visit: www.tuteralaw.com

ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEYS Attorneys Edward C. Wachter, Jr., Levi K. Logan and Thea G. Evankovich at MCCANN, GARLAND, RIDALL & BURKE strive to serve you & your family’s estate planning & probate needs. With more than 50 years of combined experience, they personalize each plan to best accomplish each client’s personal & professional objectives: wills, trusts & other estate planning documents. Ed, Levi & Thea emphasize that the decisions and plans that your family implements are absolutely critical to preserving your estate & assets. Good plans should reflect your specific values, allowing you, the client, to control the dispo11 Stanwix St, #1030 sition of your estate, while minimizing estate taxes & elder care expenses. Their Pittsburgh practice also includes general business law, equipment leasing, transactional (412)566-1818 practice, real estate, commercial litigation, creditors’ rights, corporate law, probate and estates and family business. Send name & email address to contactus@mgrblaw.com to receive their FREE bi-monthly informative newsletter “Insight on Estate Planning” or call them for any of your legal needs. Visit: www.mgrblaw.com

DIVORCE & FAMILY LAW ATTORNEY ATTORNEY SALLY THOMAS’ 10-plus years of experience in family law and related areas are indispensable to her divorce clients. She believes the first step is to protect & stabilize a family’s welfare. Whether by agreement or court order, everyone’s financial situation must be evaluated & protected within the resources available to them. Her clients often find that most issues can have an amicable and workable resolution that meets the needs of the parties with the utmost concern for the best interest of the children. When an agreement cannot be reached, her clients are confident in her representation during litigation. 310 Grant St, #1125 Sally concentrates in contested & uncontested matters, divorce, child custody, Pittsburgh support and maintenance. Her practice also includes estate planning, wills & (412)294-9994 trusts, probate and adoptions. Sally’s goal is to assist clients as they face the obstacles and questions that arise in their family matter. Free initial 30-minute telephone consultation. Complicated cases receive a reduced rate. Visit: www.sallythomaslaw.com

LET OUR FAMILY CARE FOR YOUR FAMILY CHARTIERS MANOR is a personal care residence that consists of people who care about people. Community-minded & possessing many years of experience, Administrator Jeff Krantz assures you will receive the quality services you deserve: warmth, friendliness, respect, & dedication. The caring and comprehensive philosophy of Chartiers Manor, with an emphasis on affordability, sets it apart from other personal care facilities. Chartiers Manor community is arranged into “neighborhoods,” all created to foster close friendships and a family-like atmosphere. In each “neighborhood,” 814 Chartiers Ave there is a focus on communal dining - in a bright & cheerful dining room - while McKees Rocks providing comfortable common areas where friends gather. Visit with family, (412)250-2020 chat with neighbors, watch a movie, or read a good book. If you like the outdoors, you’ll love lounging in the courtyard, gardens, porches, and patios. Chartiers Manor offers supportive hands-on personal care, assistance with medications, ambulation & transfers, light housekeeping, & meal preparation, shopping & errands, transportation and friendly companionship. Visit: www.chartiersmanor.aslci.com

~ WHERE HOPE IS BORN ~ For more than 125 years, the GLADNEY CENTER FOR ADOPTION has been a pioneer and leading voice for improving the lives of children, adoptive families and birth parents. With unwavering commitment, Gladney has focused on making a difference in the lives of birth parents, families and children here and around the world. Working with women facing an unplanned pregnancy, Gladney is able to help each create an individualized adoption plan. Some women choose to live in Gladney’s residential facility, while others receive 960 Penn Ave, #1002 Gladney’s expertise and services in the community program. Pittsburgh Gladney is also devoted to helping adoptive families fulfill their dream of par(412)281-1118 enthood through adoption. Their reputation for flexible, comprehensive services 800-GLADNEY is just one of the things that makes them an industry leader. Gladney believes each adoption, like each family, is unique. Choosing adoption is a lifelong journey. They’re committed to providing exceptional care and guidance before, during and after placement. Hope is built through a new future, a new family and a new generation. Visit: www.Gladney.Org

Shop Local and Support Small Businesses in Pittsburgh!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

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that concentrates in civil litigation throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia & Ohio. It has been said that great trial lawyers are born, not made. RLM’s goal is to hire lawyers who have an innate competitiveness coupled with intelligence, instinct and the skills to communicate with people from every walk of life. Members of their team have received prestigious recognitions by MartindaleHubbell, Best Lawyers in America® & Pennsylvania Super Lawyers®, along with regional distinctions. 500 Grant St, 23rd Fl For more than 72 years, RLM firm has concentrated in civil litigation. During BNY Mellon Cntr that time, their attorneys have used their individual experience to represent Pittburgh their clients in numerous state & federal courts in a variety of commercial & per(412)281-5431 sonal law suits. The firm’s attorneys have developed particular concentrations in business torts, contract disputes, general liability insurance matters, product liability injuries, fidelity & surety claims, employment discrimination complaints, toxic torts & personal injuries. Their objective is to provide aggressive, efficient & quality representation of their clients. Visit: www.rlmlawfirm.com

SERIOUS LAWYERS FOR SERIOUS PROBLEMS

515 Court Place Pittsburgh (412)281-6600

Brothers David M. Kobylinski & Peter T. Kobylinski at THE PRAETORIAN LAW GROUP represent persons and families who have suffered injuries due to the carelessness & negligence of others. Their areas of concentration include automobile accidents, maritime injuries, Social Security, truck accidents & workers’ compensation. David & Peter also have extensive experience in complex divorce cases, defamation, DUI, fair debt collection & complicated civil litigation. David & Peter ‘s firm handles all of the paperwork, follow-up and prosecution of all aspects of a client’s case. It is designed to provide high-quality, efficient and expeditious service. Here, cases move quickly and clients receive their compensation in a timely fashion. Your initial consultation is provided free of charge. If your case is accepted, it is generally done so on a contingent fee basis. Visit: www.prlawgroup.com

MEDIATION & ARBITRATION ATTORNEY HARRY M. PARAS is dedicated to providing arbitration and mediation services to clients seeking to resolve disputes. He works to build the parties’ capacity to communicate clearly and convert conflict into opportunities for mutual satisfactory resolution. He has 34 years of legal experience and is highly experienced in mediation, arbitration, alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and civil personal injury. Harry is a member of the Academy of Trial Lawyers of Allegheny County and was recently selected as a Super Lawyer (2014). 428 Blvd of the Allies Additionally, he is “AV Rated” by the prestigious lawyer rating firm Martindale#300, Pittsburgh Hubbell, their highest rating. (412)391-8100 Harry explains that the benefits of mediation include a high success rate, convenience, self-determined outcome because you are a decision-maker, cost-effectiveness, time saving and preservation of relationships. Arbitration is also effective when you want a third party to provide a swift, fair outcome based on the information presented and law. Harry will contact the other parties to schedule a session at a time convenient to both parties. Visit: www.harryparas.com

PREMIUM REPRESENTATION IN CRIMINAL COURT When choosing  a comprehensive and capable law firm that you can depend upon and look to for advice, you should definitely consider the personal service that you will get from DAFFNER & ASSOCIATES, PC.  Attorney Marc D. Daffner is well-known for offering conscientious legal representation and takes that “extra step” in working closely with his clients and successfully resolving those matters entrusted to him. Daffner & Associates concentrates in criminal defense, as well as credit lawsuit 429 Forbes Ave, #610 defense, family law, and commercial litigation. For over 20 years, Marc has repPittsburgh resented individuals and businesses in thousands of legal matters, in both State (412)281-5002 and Federal Courts, and at the trial and appellate levels. A former candidate for Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, he has been recognized as a Pennsylvania “Super Lawyer” (top 5% in the state), one of the “Top Attorneys in Pennsylvania,” and one of the “Top-100 Trial Lawyers” by the National Trial Lawyers. Free, confidential consultations. Visit: www.daffnerlaw.com

IMMIGRATION & FAMILY LAWYERS

6-8 East Main St Carnegie (412)276-2337

Kamana Mathur, founder of MATHURLAW, has unique expertise in both Immigration and Family Law. The firm’s attorneys work closely with individuals seeking a permanent or temporary visa to the United States or U.S. Citizenship. Attorney Mathur is a former Consular Officer and U.S. Diplomat, and is one of the few attorneys in Pittsburgh who have experience in both Immigration and Family Law. Custody of children when there is a non-U.S. citizen spouse can pose unique challenges. Attorney Mathur specializes in divorce and custody issues involving foreign nationals. Gay and Lesbian Couples: Due to recent changes in our laws, gays and lesbians are now eligible to sponsor their foreign national partners for permanent residency. The firm has helped such couples get a green card so that they can remain together in the United States. Adoptions: Attorney Mathur and her associates help adopting families get the appropriate visas for their internationally adopted children. Visit: www.mathurlaw.us

MARTIAL ARTS & SELF DEFENSE PROGRAMS For the ultimate in self-defense & physical conditioning, contact PKA KARATE ACADEMY. The academy places emphasis on training for the total person– mentally, physically & spiritually. Pittsburgh’s only age-specific, results driven & goal oriented martial arts academy offers five different age groups, targeting each stage in the development of the student beginning at the age of three. PKA Karate Academy’s co-ed instructors teach you in Pittsburgh’s newest, cleanest, state-of-the-art facility, at your own pace, and in a family-friendly atmosphere. Programs include Kenpo, Tai Chi, women’s self-defense, anti-bullying 5001 Curry Rd and corporate training. Various options are available from private to semi-private Pittsburgh & groups. The Mission of PKA Karate is to mentor people by positively impacting (412)653-0505 lives, instilling such core qualities as perseverance, knowledge and action, while continually growing and changing ourselves for the better in mind, body, and spirit; always developing additional leaders for generations to come. Visit: www.pkakarate.com

View the online version of this page @ TheProfileSeries.com/040214

04.02/04.09.2014

{COVER PH OTO

BY HEATHE R MULL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 14

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[MAIN FEATURE] vendors and fans have 18 Players, been gearing up for another season of Pirates baseball. See how ready they are in our Pirates Preview.

[NEWS] know what the technical 06 “We solutions are, but we can’t get to them if we don’t have a regional approach.” — John Schombert, of 3 Rivers Wet Weather, on the best approach to ALCOSAN’s stormwater management issues

[TASTE] has a ballpark-only burger 24 “BRGR called ‘Abso-Bac’n-Lutely,’ with bacon.” — Andy Mulkerin on new fare at PNC Park

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

of going night-to-night, 30 “Instead I believe the shortest we’ll be in a city is three days.” — Jasmine Tate on her unconventional tour with Joel Ansett

[SCREEN]

a popular Bible tale 37 “Itwithcombines the trappings of an epic dystopic actioner.” — Al Hoff on Noah

[ARTS] Bacharach sometimes 41 “While conjures conspiracies in Bend partly to mock them, not all are limned entirely in jest.” — Bill O’Driscoll on The Bend of the World, the Pittsburgh-set debut novel by local author Jacob Bacharach

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 +

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

NEWS

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

REAL FLAVOR. REAL FRESH.

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

The Carvery takes you to delicious new heights. This endless dining experience offers a full menu of comforting, mouthwatering favorites. It begins with an abundance of soup, salad, and antipasti. Then, visit our carver and choose from the finest slow-roasted rotisserie meats. Finally, you’ll complete your feast at the tastiest dessert station in town. The Carvery – it’s a culinary adventure like no other.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“WE’VE JUST GOT HISTORIC ISSUES OF BAD PLANNING OF HOW WE MANAGE WATER IN OUR REGION.”

As this issue was going to press, a jury handed down split verdicts in the federal civil trial brought by Homewood man Jordan Miles against three police officers accused of falsely arresting Miles and using excessive force against him in January 2010. The jury ruled in favor of Miles on the claim of false arrest but not on the claim of excessive force. The jury awarded Miles $101,016.76 in compensatory damages and $6,000 from each of the officers in punitive damages. City Paper will have more coverage of the case online and in print editions in the weeks ahead, but here are initial reactions from the parties in the case, compiled by CP reporter Rebecca Nuttall. “It’s a victory on my behalf … but it’s not over because God didn’t say it’s over.” — Jordan Miles

Jordan Miles {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

MILES VERDICT REACTION

“Jordan Miles did not care about the amount awarded today. The only thing he wanted to hear is that these officers did the wrong thing.” — Joel Sansone, attorney for Jordan Miles “The one thing this points out is that policing in a high-crime area is difficult to do.” — Bryan Campbell, attorney for officer Michael Saldutte “While monetarily we feel that this was really a verdict in favor of the defense, the officers are still disappointed that there was a determination that the arrest was illegal.” — James Wymard, attorney for officer David Sisak “Knowing these three police officers, we’ve talked about it, they’d do it all again. They did nothing wrong. They have nothing to be ashamed of.” — Robert Leight, attorney for officer Richard Ewing “We have brought to light in that courtroom, facts that should cause the authorities to look into whether or not these [officers] should be allowed to carry a gun and protect and serve our citizens. It is very clear that these defendants have not served us.” — Joel Sansone

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HENEVER THERE’S a public dis-

cussion of the county’s aging sewer infrastructure, the people you’re most likely to hear from are familiar names like Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. The two men represent the region’s largest governments, and they appoint the leadership of the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority (ALCOSAN), which handles wastewater from Pittsburgh and 82 other county municipalities. But ALCOSAN is facing a challenge that goes beyond any one official’s jurisdiction. And solving that problem will also lie with people like Mary Ellen Ramage, the borough manager for the tiny Allegheny River town of Etna. Like sewer systems in many older metropolitan areas, local sewer lines are stressed in periods of heavy rainfall or snowmelt. The system’s older pipes carry both waste and stormwater, and when they overflow, they often dump raw sewage into rivers and streams. Etna is a crucial connection in the sewer system: It’s where water from

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

northern suburbs is shunted into “trunk lines,” which carry it to ALCOSAN’s treatment plant on the Ohio River. The sewer system is “shaped like a funnel,” Ramage says — with Etna as the neck. But while the pipes carry stormwater and municipal sewage from upstream communities like Shaler and Ross, it’s Etna residents and businesses

Solving county sewer problems will require a regional approach, officials say {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} that suffer from basement back-ups when the system is overwhelmed. ALCOSAN’s current plan includes installing a second trunk line to share the flow — but Ramage says her working-class community can’t afford the $10 million it would cost her residents. That’s why, she says, ALCOSAN ought to take responsibility for the upgrade, by taking ownership of the pipe. “We’re a perfect snapshot of why [ALCO-

SAN] needs to be the entity that operates and manages that trunk line,” Ramage says. Many others, including environmentalists who favor green solutions to the overflow problem, agree that ALCOSAN should work as closely as possible with local governments. But it won’t be easy: The agency is scrambling to resolve a two-decade-old dispute with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the next few weeks. A more regional, cooperative approach “would be a good thing,” says Tom Hoffman of Clean Water Action, an environmentaladvocacy group. “The problem is, I don’t think it can happen tomorrow, and tomorrow is when we need to work with ALCOSAN on this.”

AN ‘INHERENTLY UNFAIR’ PRICE TAG For ALCOSAN’S approximately 320,000 ratepayers, the stakes of the debate became obvious last year, when ALCOSAN presented federal regulators its estimated $3.6 billion Wet Weather Plan. The plan was to resolve the EPA’s claim that the county’s “combined sewer overflows” CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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— in which overwhelmed sewers dump sewage into waterways — violated the Clean Water Act. In 2008, ALCOSAN entered a consent decree with federal, state, and local regulators to come up with a plan; each of the municipalities it serves is under a similar consent decree of its own. ALCOSAN’s plan involved massive infrastructure projects: building a new watertreatment facility along Chartiers Creek; digging huge underground tunnels to help store water until it could be treated; and expanding the treatment plant itself. ALCOSAN envisioned the work being completed by 2026, but it’s already begun hiking rates to pay for it: Rates jumped 17 percent as of Jan. 1, and are slated to increase by 11 percent each year until 2017. Mayor Bill Peduto says the funding mechanism for the project is “inherently unfair.” ALCOSAN serves a diverse swath of communities and ratepayers. In Fox Chapel, where some areas are served by ALCOSAN, the median annual household income is nearly $224,000; in Rankin, it’s just $17,600. Peduto worries that in poorer communities, “People’s cost of water and sewer bill would rise to a level that would be unaffordable, making properties non-salable and devastating communities just starting to rebound from 30 years of economic downturn.” “What we ask for is a chance to do it right,” he added. Peduto and other leaders got that chance in January: The EPA rejected ALCOSAN’s plan because it “does not demonstrate that full implementation will result in compli-

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ance with all the requirements.” ALCOSAN is not speaking to media while regulators are reviewing a new proposal, which the EPA says should be in place by the end of April. But other officials are welcoming the fact that EPA is “willing to entertain a new proposal,” as U.S. Rep Mike Doyle (D-Pittsburgh) puts it. “It’s nobody’s fault that the system is what it is,” Doyle adds. “It’s a health hazard, and we want to do this in a way that’s sustainable, and restructure the consent decree in order for us to mitigate the effect on ratepayers.” Doyle says some residents in his district could see as much as 8 percent of their incomes go toward water and sewage costs. And while he and U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy, a Republican who represents local suburban areas, began a campaign to offer low-interest loans for communities in dire straits, Doyle says deficit-cutting in Washington means there is little federal help available. Doyle notes that complying with regulations is easier in places like Philadelphia, where the city and county operate jointly. By contrast, Doyle says, “We’re trying to herd cats in Allegheny County, which makes this process a little more challenging.”

‘THERE NEEDS TO BE A PARTNERSHIP’ Economics are just one reason “there needs to be a partnership between [ALCOSAN] and municipalities where the pipes reside,” says Kathy Risko, executive director of the Congress of Neighboring Communities (CONNECT). The group advocates for public policy concerns shared by Pittsburgh in its 19 adjoining municipalities. Sewer pipes typically belong to the municipality where they lie, even if the water they carry comes from somewhere else. A community’s ability to pay for their upkeep varies. As Ramage, of Etna, notes, “It’s such a complex situation. You have wealthy communities, you have poor communities. You have upstream communities, downstream communities.” That’s one reason Risko thinks ALCOSAN should buy up “multi-jurisdictional trunk sewers” — those that carry water from multiple municipalities — and assume the cost of upgrading them. That way, she says, “The cost will be borne [by ratepayers] across all 83 municipalities. That’s where the economic-justice piece comes in.” Some officials want ALCOSAN to be more entrepreneurial in other ways. CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

Environmentalists want to see less investment in giant infrastructure projects — which they refer to as “gray solutions” — and more in green approaches. Such projects include rain gardens and green roofs, which capture rain, and pervious pavement that allows it to soak into the ground below. Such projects must be scattered across the whole region in order to work, but they are “really the only way to reduce raw sewage from going into our river,” says county executive Rich Fitzgerald. “ALCOSAN is probably in the most vulnerable position, if you will, because they’re at the end of the line. The important thing is what we do upstream, what the local authorities and local municipalities do.” The benefits of such projects can be widely dispersed as well, advocates say. “Operations and maintenance of green infrastructure” — keeping rain gardens healthy, for example — “can create job opportunities for local residents,” says Emily Alvarado, interim director of Clean Rivers Campaign. The group has been arguing for greener solutions for the past three years. Historically, though, ALCOSAN has been wary of such investments. The agency has argued that it can’t base its plan on sourcereduction efforts made by other governments, because it can’t promise anything on their behalf — and that the effectiveness of green approaches remains unproven. In past interviews, Tim Prevost, manager of Wet Weather Programs, expressed concern about the viability and cost-effectiveness of green infrastructure. “Change happens slowly, especially when you’re talking about public money. People want to see that it works.” “ALCOSAN has been saying all along, ‘We can’t do stuff in communities,’” says

Hoffman. But “we’ve worked with communities like Millvale and Homestead and they would love to do green infrastructure projects. The problem is they really need funding and support from ALCOSAN to make it happen. … ALCOSAN could go into communities and say, ‘If we were to put a lot of green infrastructure in this certain place, it would reduce the amount of flow. We want to make that project happen.’” Some observers say there’s a structural reason that makes it difficult for ALCOSAN to consider such investment: Those communities have little voice on its board of directors. By law, ALCOSAN’s board is comprised of three city appointments, three county appointments and one joint appointment. “For municipalities, it’s really important that the governance changes occur,” Risko says. “To get them to transfer trunk sewers [to ALCOSAN], municipal representation on the board of ALOSAN is needed.” Still, Hoffman and others say it’s a good sign that both Peduto and Fitzgerald, who make board appointments, support green approaches. Last month, Peduto nominated three new ALCOSAN appointees, including Brenda Smith, executive director of the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association, which encourages community-wide solutions to stormwater issues in Pittsburgh’s East End. While Pittsburgh City Council must approve the appointments, Hoffman says “nominating Brenda Smith, who’s done incredible work on Nine Mile Run [watershed] area, is just a really excellent signal” about how serious local leaders are about a green approach. “It’s really critical that the EPA sees Peduto really leading the charge on green CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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infrastructure so that they can trust him to put together a plan on green infrastructure,” Hoffman adds. Other local officials must buy in as well, says John Schombert, executive director of 3 Rivers Wet Weather, an organization that seeks to encourage a collaborative approach to stormwater issues. “This is an organizational and governance issue,” he says. “We know what the technical solutions are, but we can’t get to them if we don’t have a regional approach. Sometimes [the answer] will be green, sometimes it will be gray. But we don’t want to make those decisions town by town by town.”

A REGIONAL BAIL-OUT Environmentalists point to other areas — Cincinnati, for example — that have faced incorporated green infrastructure to massive sewer problems, despite having fragmented local governments. “They show that with proper leadership you can overcome that challenge,” Hoffman says. Local officials are beginning to coordinate their own efforts. Pittsburgh’s own sewage-treatment agency, the Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority (PWSA), is hoping to partner with nearby municipalities including Dormont and Green Tree to resolve overflows in the Saw Mill Run watershed along Route 51. City officials also hope their own efforts with developers serve as a model for other municipalities

to borrow from. “We’re working with PWSA and the city to create zero-runoff conditions with a combination of bioswales, rain gardens and porous pavement,” says Walnut President Todd Reidbord of the company’s Bakery Square 2.0 project. “This watershed drains into Washington Boulevard” — the site of fatal flash-flooding in 2011 — “and we want to do our best to mitigate that.” Other plans are also in the works. Ramage, the Etna borough manager, notes that she and officials from other northern suburbs have been coordinating their own source-reduction efforts. Etna, for one, has a “downspout disconnect” ordinance, in which residents get a $5 refund on their bimonthly sewer bills if they redirect their downspouts from the sewer system and into rain barrels or other diversions. Etna also just contracted to resurface a public parking lot with more porous material. Still, Ramage says concerted regional effort is needed. “We don’t want to be in a place where next generations are looking at the same problem because this was managed individually.” And Schombert, for one, says it’s going to take a lot of work for the region to bail itself out of the stormwater problem. “We’ve just got historic issues of bad planning of how we manage water in our region,” he says. “This was created in 150 years, and we can’t solve it in 10 or 15. I’m hoping the EPA recognizes that.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

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Incumbent Adam Ravenstahl faces suburban challenger, brother’s past in new 20th District {BY CHRIS POTTER} Harrisburg. While both men decry cuts stahl would figure to have an easy path to in education funding during the Corbett re-election: He’s the 20th district’s two-term administration, Michalow has a broader incumbent, and he has one of the most critique of education policy. He’s sharply critical of schools’ increasing reliance on notable names in local politics. On the other hand … he has one of the standardized tests, for example, and looks most notable names in local politics. And to Germany’s strong vocational programs as a model for American schools. the 20th is no longer the same district. Michalow lost a 2009 Allegheny County Ravenstahl’s opponent in the May 20 Council bid to incumbent Republican Democratic primary is teacher Tom Cou Matt Drozd — a defeat Michalow Michalow. But media coverage has M attributes to his previous vote sometimes made it sound like he’ss a for a tax increase in Avalon: “We running alongside his brother, her, fo had to either lay off police or controversial former Pittsburgh urgh ha balance the budget the hard way.” Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. When hen ba But he touts his experience at KDKA’s Jon Delano reported d B solving municipal problems, on Adam Ravenstahl’s reand working with nearby election bid on March 17, communities on zoning for example, he began by and other issues. saying “Call him the lessRavenstahl, meanwhile, er-known brother …” The notes that Republican story focused heavily on Adam Ravenstahl control of Harrisburg has the former mayor’s potential made it difficult to pass legimpact, even while Ravenstahl islation: “It’s very unfortunate, and Michalow were both quoted the lack of communication or even resaying Luke wasn’t an issue. The former mayor “is always going to spect.” More recently, Ravenstahl be my brother,” says Ravenstahl. “But we has been catching up on issues are different people.” He notes that he’s in the newly configured already reached out to Mayor Bill Peduto, district. Among them: his brother’s nemesis, on changing state chronic air-pollution conlaw to help local ride-sharing services — cerns at Neville Island’s a cause dear to Peduto’s heart. (Even so, Shenango coke works, Matt Merriman-Preston, Peduto’s longtime whose emissions are Tom Michalow political field general, has been consulting often carried into Avalon and other communities. for the Michalow campaign.) Tom Hoffman, of envi“People are judging Adam as Luke, and that’s a mistake,” says fellow state Rep. ronmental group Clean Water Dom Costa (D-Stanton Heights), who’s en- Action, says that Michelow “has dorsed Ravenstahl in the District 20 race. been an active supporter of our efforts for “He’s a hard worker and a good member of years.” But Hoffman also credits Ravenstahl for recently sending “a very the [county’s Democratic] strongly worded letter” delegation.” What’s more, urging the county Health Costa adds, “I’d hate to see a Department to police the city seat lost to the suburbs.” plant. (Clean Water Action The 20th includes Pittshas not yet made an enburgh’s northern neighdorsement in the race.) borhoods and extends Ravenstahl has been into Lawrenceville. But moving to new ground in after the 2010 Census, it other ways as well. was redrawn to encompass Michalow has long supported abortion portions of Ross Township and the Ohio River communities of Bellevue and rights and same-sex marriage. His 2009 Avalon, where Michalow has served as a county-council bid was backed by the Gertrude Stein Political Club, a strident advoborough councilor. “I don’t think [Ravenstahl] knows the cate of both causes. Ravenstahl is pro-life community as well as I do,” says Michalow. except in cases of rape, incest or danger to Michalow, who teaches history and the mother, and as recently as two years German in the Northgate School District, ago, he opposed gay marriage while supsays “education needs a direct voice” in porting civil unions for same-sex couples. IN MOST YEARS, state Rep. Adam Raven-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

“PEOPLE ARE JUDGING ADAM AS LUKE, AND THAT’S A MISTAKE.”

(Gay marriage, he told the Steel City Stonewall Democrats in 2012, was an issue “I do not believe is winnable in … a socially conservative state.”) Today, however, he says he’d vote for such a law. “You talk to people in this job, and meet new ones, and my mind has changed a little bit.” But perhaps the campaign’s highestoctane issue is how visible Ravenstahl has been. Michalow declined to criticize Ravenstahl during a City Paper interview, but Ravenstahl says, “I’ve already heard [accusations of invisibility] from my opponent.” That charge “always comes your way as an incumbent,” says Ravenstahl, partly because “We are in Harrisburg quite a bit.” But “I try to meet with everybody that I can,” and he touts his office’s record of constituent service. Ravenstahl has garnered backing from Costa and six other state representatives, as well as from the Pittsburgh Firefighters and other labor groups. Michalow has not received such support to date — elected officials are often reluctant to back challengers over incumbents — but if the Allegheny County Democratic Committee’s endorsement vote is any indication, the vote on Election Day could be tight. Weeks before party elders met March 9 to pick their favorite, Michalow predicted, “We’re going to make it close.” And he did: Ravenstahl edged him out with 76 votes to 65. (By contrast, in the area’s other high-profile legislative fight — between incumbent state representatives Harry Readshaw and Erin Molchany — Readshaw’s margin was 76-24.) Ravenstahl says he was “excited by the result” of the endorsement, given that Michalow is the head of Avalon’s Democratic committee. And political consultant Don Friedman says the numbers should favor Ravenstahl on Election Day: Based on voting trends, Friedman expects roughly 44 percent of the votes to be in the suburbs, where Michalow figures to be strongest. Still, Friedman says, Michalow could break out. “If I were doing this race,” Friedman says, “I’d go into the suburbs and say, ‘Isn’t it time we got our own representative?’ And I’d go into the city and say, ‘Aren’t you tired of the Ravenstahls yet?’” C P OT T E R@ P G H Y C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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As Pirates fans go, Demitrius “Fake Pedro” Thorn is the real deal

2014 P I R AT ES PREVIEW {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

FIVE TO WATCH The Pirates’ fortunes might depend on these X-factors Everyone knows that the Pirates season largely depends on superstars like Andrew McCutchen, Pedro Alvarez and Gerrit Cole. But here are five more Buccos who will need to excel to ensure the Pirates’ success:

Jose Tabata

I

F YOU REGULARLY attend Pittsburgh

Pirates games or catch them on TV, you’ve probably seen Demitrius Thorn in the stands. You may even have recognized him on the street. “People come up to me all the time and say, ‘Hey, you’re Fake Pedro!’” says the 36-year-old. “They don’t even ask my real name,” he adds. Thorn’s celebrity derives from his resemblance to Real Pedro: third-baseman Pedro Alvarez, who plays just a few yards away from where Thorn holds season tickets. The similarities are all the more striking during big home games, when Thorn dons an Alvarez jersey and baseball pants. But Thorn also has a lot in common with the fans around him: a sense of loyalty that survived a two-decade losing streak, and new anticipation for 2014 kindled by last year’s winning season. “Baseball is my game,” Thorn says. “And no matter what, this is my team.” Thorn’s love of baseball took root when he was 12 and his mother took him to his first Pirates game at Three Rivers Stadium. Thorn says he got caught embarrassing himself on the Jumbotron “doing the Curly Shuffle,” and also got hit in the leg by a foul ball off the bat of Sid Bream. (The woman

who retrieved the ball gave it to a sobbing Thorn; he still has it today.) “It was a bad day,” Thorn says with a laugh. “But that’s when I really fell in love with being at the ballpark.” He wouldn’t attend many games in the following years, however. His father wasn’t around, and his mother had health problems she didn’t conquer until 2009, when Thorn took her to a Mother’s Day game. The two have been ballpark regulars ever since.

Thorn’s “Fake Pedro” persona, meanwhile, is a more recent addition. Two years ago, he says, “My mom’s boss told me that I could be Pedro’s older brother and I said, ‘Yeah, I guess.’” Thorn says he originally ordered a jersey and some pants for future use around Halloween. But then he says, he “wondered how it would go over” at PNC Park, “so I wore it to a game one day.” “The players went bananas. [Andrew McCutchen] came running over and calling other guys over, and then Pedro came out. He couldn’t believe it. He laughed and gave me a ball, and that day he hit two home runs.” That was in August 2012. The next day, Thorn talked to Alvarez’s wife via Twitter; she told Thorn “that was funny,” and asked whether he’d do it again. Thorn obligingly wore the uniform to the next five games: Alvarez played well and the Pirates scored 20 runs over that stretch. “I thought, ‘Hey this is good luck,’” Thorn says now. “Plus, people really seemed to like it.” Thorn is predicting an 85-77 record this year. But win or lose, in the uniform or out of it, he says, “really all of this started for my mom. With or without the uniform is special, because I’m doing it with her.”

Tabata made a big splash when he joined 0 the team in 2010 and was given a lion six-year, $15 million extension. He’s mostly disappointed since, but began turning things around late last year. This spring, he once again showed signs of being a big-time player. He’ll start the year in right field, and his performance at the plate will determine how long he keeps the job — especially with top prospect Gregory Polanco waiting in the wings.

G Gregory P Polanco Po Polanco was im impressive th this spring, an and if he’s called up later this summer as ex expected, he’ll round out a Pirates outfield that figures to be one of the best in baseball. He’s developing power, and his speed rivals Marte’s: Polanco stole 38 bases in the minors last year. CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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FIVE TO WATCH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Charlie Morton Morton came to the Pirates ves from the Braves in 2009. Early on, ve he failed to live tions, up to expectations, with stints in the minors and, in 2012, Tommy John surgery on his elbow. But after returning last summer, he pitched well enough to secure a three-year, $21 million extension and has earned enough confidence to be installed as the No. 3 starter. The key for Morton will be staying healthy for a full season.

Ja Jameson Taillon T Ex Expectations are hi high surrounding this young pros prospect, especially t success after the of rookie Gerrit Cole last year. Taillon is currently shut down with elbow pain, but if all goes well, he’s expected to make his Pirates debut this summer. With the off-season departure of A.J. Burnett, Taillon will be crucial to the Pirates’ hopes of making another run at the postseason.

Ray Searage Affectionately called “Uncle Ray,” the Pirates pitching coach n might have been the team’s real MVP th the pastt few seasons. He seems to have a knack for getting the best out of his pitchers, having given new life to guys like Morton, Francisco Liriano and the now-departed Burnett. He’ll earn his money this year dealing with young guys like Cole and Taillon, helping Wandy Rodriquez come off a major injury and trying to engineer a reclamation project in Edinson Volquez. BY CHARLIE DEITCH

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{PHOTOS BY KEVIN TIGHE}

Pirates second baseman Neil Walker makes a head-first slide during an exhibition game against the Toronto Blue Jays in Dunedin, Fla., on March 5.

WELL SEASONED Questions remain after spring training, but veterans give Pirates reason for optimism {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

S

TANDING IN FRONT of his locker at

McKechnie Field in Bradenton March 10, Andrew Lambo was brimming with confidence. The young power hitter set the minor leagues on fire last year, belting 32 home runs and 99 RBI. He didn’t put up such numbers when he reached the big leagues late last summer, but coming into spring training, expectations were high. Lambo was being groomed to platoon at first base with Gaby Sanchez, and despite anemic numbers for the spring — four hits in 42 at bats — Lambo was feeling optimistic. “I feel good,” he said. “I’m not getting many hits, but we’re not going to hang our hats on getting hits at spring training. First base is getting really comfortable. Everything’s going fine.” Fifteen days later, Lambo was sent back down to the minors … an apt example of how the Pirates, while managing to hold onto the nucleus of last year’s breakaway success, have done little in the off-season to fill gaps in their roster.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

Pirates left fielder Starling Marte hopes to build on his 2013 success.

Expectations are high for the Buccos after last season’s 94-win season and first post-season appearance since 1992. Centerfielder Andrew McCutchen was named

league MVP, and manager Clint Hurdle was named National League Manager of the Year. But as Hurdle himself acknowledges, the Pirates still have some of the same holes

— namely in first base and right field — they started 2014 with. The situations at right and first base, Hurdle said in early March, “were question marks before spring training and they’re questions we’re still trying to get answered now.” Heading into the home stretch last year, the Pirates tried to patch the holes, acquiring outfielder Marlon Byrd and first-baseman Justin Morneau. Both are gone now — Byrd to Philadelphia and Morneau to Colorado. The plan this season is for a platoon at each position. As of this writing, since the end of the Lambo experiment, Sanchez was slated to share time with light-hitting free-agent acquisition Travis Ishikawa. In right field, it will be Jose Tabata likely splitting time with Travis Snider — a tradedeadline acquisition from 2012 who has done little to win the job outright. Tabata, on the other hand, started to show signs of life late last season after an injury and a stint in Triple A. Tabata hit .312 over his last 39 starts, according to cbssportsline.com, and said he’s confident going into the season. “I’ve been working hard to get back this season and I feel like I’ve had a pretty good spring,” Tabata said, adding that he can’t worry too much about the amount of playing time he gets, or perceptions that the Pirates need help in right field. “My plan is to be ready whenever [Hurdle] needs me and go out and do the best I can. “My goal every day is to go out and be better than last year.” But it’s hard to find fault with a team that won 94 games, broke a 20-year losing streak and went to the playoffs last year. Especially when you don’t need to make many changes to your scorecards for this year’s campaign. The spot-on bullpen, known last year as The Shark Tank, is largely intact and led by closer Jason Grilli and set-up man Mark Melancon. And despite losing pitcher A.J. Burnett in the offseason, most of the Pirates starting rotation should be as strong as it was year, with leadership from veteran Francisco Liriano and second-year hurler Gerrit Cole. Charlie Morton is also looking to build off his success after returning last summer from Tommy John surgery. The biggest question on the mound is off-season acquisition Edinson Volquez. Despite a standout season in 2008, Volquez has since ranged from mediocre to terrible. And while pitching coach Ray Searage has managed to work wonders in the past, helping Volquez — who posted a spring training ERA of 9.60 — may be one miracle too many. Meanwhile, although right field remains a question mark, McCutchen and left-fielder Starling Marte are coming off

BEER PITCHER You won’t see Gary Hall on the field, but no one at PNC Park trains harder {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Sooner or later, it comes for every Pirates veteran: the moment you realize you aren’t as young as you used to be. For Gary “Lefty” Hall, the realization hit home about 14 years ago. “I bent down to pick up a case of beer and just felt something go in my back,” says Hall, a 66-year-old PNC Park vendor. “I had some pain, but I continued to work. The next morning when I tried to get out of bed, I couldn’t move.

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Spring training: Gary Hall

“It was right at the beginning of the season and I realized I was not prepared as I should have been. And from that point on I made sure I was in shape for the job.” Hall has been on the job since 1971, when he had a day job teaching science for the Quaker Valley School District. Hall had been working a second job at J&L Steel to make ends meet, but got laid off that year. “My brother-in-law said, ‘Hey, Lefty, come on down to the ballpark, they’re hiring beer guys,’” Hall remembers. “I was 22 years old and sold beer on my very first day. I remember looking down at the money I had made at the end of the night and I couldn’t believe it. It was way more money than I could make from a day of teaching.” That, he says, is when it occurred to him: “Wow, I need to hold onto this job!’” And he has, even after he retired from teaching in 1999. Today, he’s the fourth-oldest vendor on PNC Park’s seniority list, and the job isn’t any less strenuous. In fact, he says, beer “was actually easier to sell at Three Rivers,

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Like the rest of the team, Hall heads down to Bradenton each year to begin his own off-season conditioning program. Last November, he began swimming daily, working up to about 200 laps in a 90-minute session. In February, he began hiking and weightlifting. As part of his training regimen, he stacks 60 pounds of weight in a milk crate to duplicate his beer bin. He then lifts the crate up, swinging it out 40 times to mimic the movements he’ll make over the course of the Pirates season. Hall’s been making the trip to Florida from his Beaver County home since 2000. A former college pitcher — that’s where the nickname came from — he says “baseball is in my blood” and he likes seeing the team in the off-season. Although being a vendor is a lot of work, especially for a guy in retirement, Hall plans to continue until “I physically can’t do it anymore.” “I love baseball and I’ve rooted for the Pirates my entire life,” Hall says. “And last year when the Pirates were in the postseason, it was an unbelievable scene to be a part of. “There aren’t words to describe what it was like to be a part of last season, especially that wild-card game against Cincinnati,” he says. “I’ve seen this team in a lot of great games, but there was just a feeling in the air that left me breathless. “So I want to keep up the conditioning so I can keep doing this job and hopefully be a part of a lot more great memories just like that.”

great years. As good as McCutchen was in 2013 — .317 batting average, 21 home runs, 27 stolen bases and 84 RBI — Hurdle said there is plenty of room for him to get better. “Sure, he can improve,” Hurdle said. “He’ll be the first to tell you that. He didn’t have a career year offensively. There’s still more growth there. We want to work on his ability to drive more runners in, and I think his stolen-base game still has room for growth. “And he knows better than anybody else that if he can get a little bit better, then this team is going to get better.” For his part, Marte said he too can get better and improve on last year. In 2013 he hit .282 and ranked third in the National League in stolen bases and second in triples. He missed nearly a month with a hand injury. “My goal is to get on base more,” said Marte, who says he has been “working on getting better pitch to pitch, waiting for the pitch I want.” “I put in my mind what I want to accomplish and I’ve been working hard to get there.” There are strengths in the infield, too. The Pirates will be looking for another strong performance from third-baseman Pedro Alvarez, who became an All-Star with 36 home runs and 100 RBI. He shared the National League home run title with Arizona’s Paul Goldschmidt. Catcher Russell Martin is better known for his work behind the plate than at it, but if this spring is any indication, he could make a big splash for the Pirates offensively. Martin hit .333 with four home runs and 10 RBI in just 11 games. Defensively, there weren’t many catchers better. The 29 runners he caught stealing last season led all major-league catchers. Hurdle said Martin’s intangibles could be huge for the Pirates this year. “Russell has worked very hard to get healthy in the off-season,” Hurdle said. “He’s throwing the ball dynamically from behind the plate and … he seems more focused offensively. He’s been a really good player for us and when he feels healthy, I think it’s just going to help our all-around game.” Still, as those lingering questions at first and right field suggest, the team can’t afford to take anything for granted. And going into the regular season, they’re pledging not to. “Last year was a good year and if you look at the makeup of this team, it’s a lot of the same guys who are now a year stronger,” said utility infielder Josh Harrison. Still, he added, “What happened last year doesn’t affect this year. It’s a clean slate and we just need to focus on getting better every day.”

because PNC has a lot more steps and they’re a lot steeper.” Between the weight of the ice and the beer itself, “You have 50 pounds that you carry up and down the stairs for three hours a night. When you’re a young guy, that’s not so bad. But as I got older I realized that I have to be wellconditioned to be prepared for the rigors of a long season.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

WELL SEASONED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

{PHOTO BY KEVIN TIGHE}

Waiting for his turn: Josh Harrison

ROLE MODEL You never know where Josh Harrison will pop up next {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} ASK PIRATES utility infielder Josh Harrison about his expectations for the coming season, and you get the answer that fans have come to expect from professional athletes: “I’m taking it day by day,” says the 23-year-old Cincinnati native. But for Harrison, the team’s most prominent utility player, that’s more than a cliché; it’s practically a job description. Harrison made his major-league debut for the Bucs on May 31, 2011, after posting impressive numbers at the Pirates’ TripleA affiliate in Indianapolis. He assembled an eight-game hitting streak before being sent back to Indy in June. By 2012, which Harrison spent entirely in Pittsburgh, he’d seemingly become the Pirates’ go-to guy off the bench. But in 2013, he made five round trips between Pittsburgh and Indianapolis: Although he was the Pirates’ most-used pinch-hitter, he was also the first guy sent down when the team needed space on its 25-player roster. “I can’t afford to look too far ahead, or get caught looking behind me at how

things have gone in the past,” Harrison said prior to an exhibition game against Baltimore this spring. “I just have to work on getting better every day. … I’m one play away from being an everyday starter.” Harrison will start the season in Pittsburgh, as he did last year, but it’s anyone’s guess how long he’ll remain — or what position he might end up playing next. Last year, Harrison hit .250 in 60 games, while compiling a decent highlight reel. In a July 25 game against Washington, he went three-for-five with four RBI and a home run. During an Aug. 6 game against Miami, he hit a pinch-hit, walk-off home run to win the game. And just three days later, he even appeared on the mound, making his major-league pitching debut. During an Aug. 9 game against Colorado that the Pirates were on their way to losing 10-1, manager Clint Hurdle decided to spare his bullpen by having Harrison pitch in the bottom of the eighth. Harrison forced the lone batter he faced to fly out. That willingness to go wherever he’s needed is the essence of Harrison’s game plan this year. “All I can do is do my part to help the team, and if [Hurdle] sees fit to give me more playing time, then that’s his decision,” he explained. “Anybody in my position wants to play more, but until that time comes I just have to play my role.”

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THE MENU WAS AN INTRIGUING DEPARTURE FROM SPORTS-BAR CONVENTION

BEYOND HOT DOGS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} With an all-star closer nicknamed “Grilled Cheese,” it was only a matter of time: The folks at the Rivertowne Brewing Hall of Fame Club in PNC Park came up with a lights-out sandwich to rival Jason Grilli’s lights-out performances in the ninth. The Closer — a sandwich special costing $14.50 — is a quadruple-decker grilled-cheese sandwich with apple-leek compote and candied bacon. What kind of cheese? Provolone, and mozzarella, and parmesan, smoked gouda, cheddar, pepper jack, Swiss, bleu and feta: nine cheeses, symbolizing the number of innings, or perhaps the number of pitches Grilli needs to mow down three batters in an ideal final side. While The Closer is the marquee addition at the Hall of Fame Club, there are other changes. “Tatchos” are tater-tot nachos. A Maine lobster BLT alludes to executive chef Dave Artiano’s roots at his last ballpark — Boston’s Fenway. Elsewhere, BRGR, which brought the gourmet-burger craze to town in 2010, has a new stand near section 116, with several burgers and shakes, including a ballpark-only burger called “Abso-Bac’n-Lutely,” with bacon. The “California Lovin’” turkey burger is on the menu; a veggie patty can sub in on any style of burger. The park’s most pervasive change: Coca-Cola takes over the soda fountains. Last week, those Pepsi-bottle display lights over right field were being plastered over, not with Coke logos, but Highmark ads. The health-care wars, at least in Pittsburgh, are the new cola wars. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FriedFish

Report

ST. JOSEPH 825 Second St., Verona 412-795-5114 4-7 p.m. Fridays during Lent, including Good Friday, except April 4 Two sizes of fish dinner, for those who don’t need a superduper-whopper-of-a-cod every week. Full complement of sides, including mac-and-cheese and haluski, plus some weekly specials (last week: vegetable soup).

A GOOD PLAY {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

O

NCE, WE HAD very low expectations

of bar food. If it was greasy, salty and meaty, it was doing its job, which was, essentially, to support the consumption of the bar’s primary commodity: beer. Not anymore. These days, beer-drinkers can be expected to have a sophistication about food, and any new bar had better have a menu that, if not actually ambitious, at least shows an awareness of post-1995 food trends. Unfortunately, that frequently means little more than adding a few “updated” dishes to the tired, albeit tasty, trinity of wings, burgers and pizza. Thus jaded, we didn’t rush to BZ Bar, in the old Firewaters space across from PNC Park. Sure, the website promised “twisted American,” but words are cheap. Still, with baseball season approaching and an extra hour of daylight inviting us to stroll along the river, BZ’s location was strategically convenient, its promise of better bar food appealing. The space, sized for a game-night crowd, could perhaps best be described as “sports bar plus.” The electric-blue and black palette

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

The Turducken Burger is a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula.

was a bold break from the usual Pittsburgh sports scheme, and oversized, black-andwhite photos of local architecture seemed to acknowledge that BZ’s patrons might even have more on their minds than sports. Ultimately, though, it was the phalanx of flat-screen TVs that dominated the space.

BZ BAR AND GRILL 140 Federal St., North Side. 412-323-2924 HOURS: Mon.-Sun. 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, pizza $6-12; entrees $15-26 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED The menu was a much more intriguing departure from sports-bar convention. In addition to a handful of truly distinctive items, like turducken burger and pear-andbleu-cheese pizza, there were many more options that promised real attention to detail, from gremolata in the bleu-cheese dressing to pickled red onions on the Cuban sandwich. If a good menu is one that offers so many tempting dishes that it’s hard to

choose, this one met the test. Brisket sliders made a promising start. Toasted buns held mounds of shredded, not pulverized, beef that was lightly sauced and tasted mostly of smoke, while sweet caramelized onions and morsels of tangy bleu cheese rounded out these satisfying little sandwiches. Angelique followed these with a full-size burger that, as far as we know, is unique to BZ: the turducken. The turkey burger alone would have been excellent, with a robust, meaty texture, plenty of moisture and good (if somewhat over-salty) seasoning. But then it was topped with duck confit — saltcured dark meat that has been slow-cooked in its own rendered fat — and, in case that wasn’t rich enough, a fried egg. A handful of arugula seemed more like a symbolic nod to healthful eating, though in theory its peppery taste should have stood a chance; the flavor of sage aioli, meanwhile, was completely overwhelmed by the decadence of the turducken. Swooning from the turducken, we passed on the marvelous-sounding duck CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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pizza (with confit, chevre and arugula) and went with the pork-forward “racy swine.” We liked its thin but chewy crust and its ample meat coverage of crumbled chorizo, standard pepperoni and chewy bacon; there was enough cheese to have a presence without drowning the slices in greasy goo. Truffle fries were almost delicious, but too much salt and not enough wellbrowned tips left them merely tasty. A lemon “aioli” instead was thick like compound butter. Macaroni and cheese — an upscale four-cheese blend with gemelli pasta, herbs and a toasted panko-crumb topping — was somehow not salty enough, and ultimately bland.

BZ offers draft beers and cocktails, such as the blue chocolate martini (pictured).

Jason’s buffalo-chicken sandwich boasted well-charred yet moist meat, a slightly chewy bun and a wonderful topping of thinly sliced cucumber and radish; it was more like a Thai salad than a mere garnish. Unfortunately, the piri-piri hot sauce was too runny, and not quite fiery enough. But sides of a very good vinegar slaw and, improbably, a quinoa pilaf, made for a sophisticated plate. We also ordered an a la carte side dish of roasted vegetables, and were pleased to see that each vegetable had been cut into a different shape, a sign that the kitchen was aware of their various starch and moisture contents and how they would affect cooking. Alas, the whole dish was woefully underdone: A few more minutes in the oven might have yielded roasted vegetables near perfection. BZ Bar and Grill is one of a select few sports bars that really does deliver aboveaverage food. Some of it was way above average, all of it was thoughtfully conceived, and where the execution didn’t quite match the ambition, we saw plenty of evidence that the kitchen is capable of upping its game. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

RAISING THE BAR Landmark pizza house opens full-service bar One thing hasn’t changed since Mineo’s Pizza House first fired up its Squirrel Hill gas oven in September 1958. “It’s the exact same pizza recipe my dad” — Giovanni “John” Mineo — “used when we opened,” says owner Dominic Mineo. What has changed are the extras: the famed rivalry with Murray Avenue neighbor Aiello’s that began in the 1970s; ice cream, introduced in the late 1990s; and takeout beer service that began four years ago. This month, Mineo’s introduces what might be its biggest change so far: a full-service bar. “This is something we’ve had in the plans for years,” says Dom. He built the bar in the adjacent storefront that formerly housed Engel’s Market. It’s anchored by a granite-topped horseshoe bar framed by two elevated tables lofted with wine barrels.

“IT’S A WHOLE NEW DIMENSION FOR US.” Spirits and mixed drinks are available, but the neighborhood bar is focused on wine- and beer-drinkers, since wine and beer are better friends to pizza than a craft cocktail. There are twelve taps. Guinness, Stella, Miller Light and Yuengling are fixtures, and the other eight taps will feature a rotation of craft and imported brews. The wine list, meanwhile, is Italian-only: “My family was born in Sicily and I want to support Italian wines,” Dom explains. Wines are available by the glass and bottle, and cover a broad range of both price and quality. Not surprisingly for a bar attached to a pizza joint, it’s a great place to watch a game, and boasts one 52-inch and two 65-inch TVs. Dom says that there will be beer specials all summer long ($2.50 Bud Lights) during Pirates games. Along with the recent opening of nearby Independent Brewing Company, Mineo’s bar is another addition to the increasingly diverse drinking scene in Squirrel Hill. And for an established local favorite with a rich history, it’s a nod to the future. “It’s a whole new dimension for us,” says Mineo. “We’re taking it all to another level now.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2128 Murry Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-9864 or www.mineospizza.com

Grandma Rose’s CATERING & PASTRY

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-940-7777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several apple-based dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J

Wood-fi W d fired d Flatbread Pizza, Sandwiches, Soup & Salad Mon – Fri 7AM – 3PM 3PM

El Burro Comedor {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} a variety of tacos, burritos and Cal-Mex specialties, such as carne asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles (a homey casserole). Tacos are come with a variety of fillings, including mahi mahi and shrimp, and burrito fillings run from standard to breakfast and French fries and steak. JF

FULL LIST ONLINE

EL BURRO COMEDOR. 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412904-3451. A casual Southern California-style taqueria offers

Tusuki {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GREEN FOREST. 655 Rodi Road, Penn Hills. 412-371-5560. Tucked into a nondescript office plaza is this churrascaria — a Brazilian all-you-can-eat restaurant. Servers pull barbequed meats right off the rotisserie grill and present them at your table, ready to carve off as

much freshly cooked meat as you like. There are hot and cold buffets as well, but savvy diners load up on the juicy meats. KE HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffet-style restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard Chinese-American fare, but also sushi, hibachi-style Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and roast Peking duck, and even frog legs. KF JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-andtrue breakfast-and-lunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruitfilled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412381-6000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/steakhouse, and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knifewielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-935-9870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a well-curated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-andcheese, made with Buffalo hot CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-2575150. This casual eatery GRAN CANAL offers an unassuming www. per CAFFÉ. 1021 N. menu of pizzas and a p ty pghci m Canal St., Sharpsburg. pasta that are prepared .co 412-781-2546. The with a commitment menu here is classic coastal to fresh ingredients Mediterranean. Even dishes and an open-minded, rarely seen at other Italian thoughtful approach to flavor restaurants — such as snails and profiles. For instance, pizzas range penne stuffed with seafood — are from traditional tomato and traditional, not made up to satisfy cheese to arugula and prosciutto eclectic contemporary tastes. The to the adventurous rosemary and cannelloni alone merits a visit to pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familygreen olives. KF friendly dining rooms. KE CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellowfin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE

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RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 Washington Pike, Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers a modern yet comfortable take on seafood, offering distinctive appetizers and a few signature entrées. There is also a build-yourown entrée option, in which a dozen fish and shellfish (plus a few meat options) can be combined with interesting sauces, starches and vegetables to create a custom dinner, whether your tastes run to truffle jus or mac-n-cheese. LE

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RE-STORING THE NORTH SIDE War Streets regain corner market

STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE TABLES ON THE GREEN. 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955. A golf course east of town may not be where one would expect to find refined Cajun and Creole cuisine, but that’s exactly what this clubhouse restaurant offers. The menu offers Louisiana bayou classics such as shrimp, grits, gumbo and blackened fish in an authentic and well-prepared manner. In a nod to Pittsburgh, steaks and Italian pasta dishes are also offered. LE TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. 4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-4029522. A repurposed, elegant 19thcentury bank offers craft cocktails and inventive small plates, focused on organic, sustainable, fresh and local cuisine. The bar food is mainly finger foods and/or plates seemingly intended for sharing. Besides fancified bar snacks such as potato chips, deviled eggs and popcorn, there are oysters, burgers and even desserts. KE TSUKI JAPANESE RESTAURANT. 11655 Frankstown Road, Penn Hills. 412-242-0188. Most of the myriad sushi rolls on offer center on just a handful of raw options, rounded out with traditional cooked ingredients such as eel and shrimp. The menu offers the full gamut of maki, from classics like cucumber or tuna to truly original creations, some of them just short of gimmickry. KF

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sauce. Well-prepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

URBAN TAP. 1209 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-7499. Though it’s wallpapered in giant TVs, the menu here is mostly devoid of sports-bar clichés. Instead, there is duck-confit poutine, mac-and-cheese with smoked Gouda, a burger topped with pork belly and even aged rib-eye steak. With top-notch service and excellent food, Urban Tap elevates tavern dining. KE

Produce for sale at Allegheny City Market {PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT COLLINS}

savor authentic flavors

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

THE BUILDING at 1327 Arch St. has been a corner grocery store since 1895. In fact, the original sign is still bolted to the North Side property’s wall. But in early December 2013, Robert Collins heard that Doug’s Market — the most recent grocer to occupy that address — was closing. “I really had no intention of opening up another store,” says Collins, who owns the Bryant Street Market in Highland Park. “[But] I walked out that day with pretty much a handshake deal to take over.” The Allegheny City Market was born. Collins has been in the grocery business since he was 17 years old, and opened the Bryant Street location in 2010. When he moved to the North Side a year ago, he realized how difficult it was for residents to buy the type of goods he sells in Highland Park. “The food options were limited to the Cedar Avenue Giant Eagle and that was it,” he says. Knowing that the Garden Theatre Project, an urban-redevelopment plan for the historic North Side building, was about to get underway, Collins recognized that it was an opportune moment to open a store in the Mexican War Streets. Carrying stock similar to that offered in the Bryant Street store — a mix of conventional, organic, all-natural, gluten free and local products — Collins’ new venture opened March 22, offering everything from fresh produce and a large Boar’s Head deli to an assortment of personal-care items. Over 200 customers showed up for the opening weekend. “People were really excited to finally have some place to walk or bike to get what they need,” Collins says. For Collins, it’s encouraging to see neighborhood stores, which were crushed by big-box stores in the ’80s and ’90s, making a comeback. “People are really tired of corporate America and the greed that comes with it [and are] returning to buying local,” he says. Collins plans to run a sale every other Friday. He says, “I am just hoping to fill a need in the neighborhood by doing what I love.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Happy Hour M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227 ibizatapaspgh.com

HAPPY HOUR AT BZ’S

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 5pm-7pm Wednesday Hump Day 5pm-9pm Friday Early Recess 3p-5p

Award Winning Cuisine

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*Game Day Happy Hour starts at first pitch or kick off and runs for its scheduled duration

MONDAY: FREEE TTAPAS APAS

$10 value with purchase of a bottle of wine TUESDAY: Buy 1 flight of wine get 2nd 50% OFF of equal or lesser value

SEASONAL CRAFT AND MICROBREW ON TAP

Join us Sunday’s starting at 10 am during all home games for Kids Day! Special kids menu and activities.

HAPPY HOUR

UPCOMING EVENTS:

MON-FRI 5-7PM HALF OFF APPETIZERS $1 off drinks and all 33 drafts

THURS, APRIL 10 Dark Horse Brewing Wild Game Dinner 4 Course Meal with Beer Pairings $50 per person

412-488-1818

SATURDAYS: Breakfast and Famous Bloody Mary Bar 8am-noon

FRI, APRIL 18 & SAT, APRIL 19

STEAK DINNER NY STRIP, S

Award-winning artist Chris Shutters 10:30 pm – Close • No Cover

Served w/ salad, vegetable S

TTBONE and FILET MIGNON & choice of potato.

BZ Bar and Grill

mallorcarestaurantpgh.com

S SUNDAYS: B Breakfast 8am-noon

140 Federal Street (next to PNC Park) 412-323-BZBG(2924) • bzbarandgrill.com

2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge)

SMOKE HOUSE SUNDAYS S IIn house smoke meats and BBQ Noon-1am N

M MONDAYS: T The Ultimate Surf and Turf

A YOU CAN EAT ALL CRAB LEGS C AND PRIME RIB A 4-11PM 4

Free local delivery service to the following areas:

Thick cut dinner served w/salad with hush puppies, french fries & cole slaw

WEDNESDAYS: W

W WING NIGHT 7PM-1AM

Greentree, Mt. Lebanon, Dormont, Carnegie, Heidelberg and Presto.

.35 ¢ Wings

Breakfast Specials Mon-Fri 7-11 am LLunch Specials Mon-Fri 11 am- 3 pm

Find our online menu at www.osakapgh.com or order online at www.beyondmenu.com

Dinner Specials 3pm- 1am D 1 10% OFF ENTIRE MENU Sun-Thu 10PM-1AM S

2101 Greentree Rd. (next to Applebee’s in Scott Towne Center)

Like us on facebook

412-279-8811 www.osakapgh.com

For directions, hours & more visit us online.

CainsSaloon.com

3239 West Liberty Ave. • Pittsburgh, PA 15216 • 412.561.7444

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LOCAL

“MY FRIENDS AND FAMILY KEPT HAVING DREAMS OF ME PLAYING GUITAR AND SINGING.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

COAST TO COAST

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LAURA B. AND THE OFF LABELS with ROCK PITT. 9 p.m. Fri., April 4. Hambone’s Pub, 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-681-4318 or www.hambonespittsburgh.com

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JASMINE’S

FATE

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

I

T’S A WEDNESDAY night, and Jasmine

Laura B. with her new band

When Laura Baricevic (a.k.a. Laura B.) talks about the early ’90s, she can’t help but get a little nostalgic. And who could blame her? Around 1989, the singer and guitarist — who had “escaped to L.A.” after finishing high school in New York — started an alternative band called They Eat Their Own. Signed to a small label, the band found success on college and modern-rock radio, and scored a hit with “Like a Drug,” an angsty, aggressive track that put the band firmly in line with (and even slightly ahead of) the female-fronted alt-rock boom. They found themselves on tours with bands like Goo Goo Dolls and Smashing Pumpkins. Their video was on MTV. “It was great,” Baricevic recalls. “It was a whirlwind of activity for a couple of years. It was a really high point in my life.” Then, as the band began preparing to release its second record, things took a turn. “We got an offer from Geffen Records and of course we jumped at it. We thought we were going to be big rock stars,” Baricevic says. The deal fell through — Baricevic offers two pieces of advice to young musicians: keep persevering and get everything in writing — and in 1994, the members went their separate ways. Baricevic bounced around the country for a few years and ended up in Pittsburgh. “I came to visit and basically never left,” she says. “I never thought of Pittsburgh as a thriving little city [but] I just kind of fell in love with it.” These days, Baricevic has a new band, The Off Labels, with whom she plays TETO songs, as well as new stuff. She’s also released a compilation of songs she’d written over the last decade, The Off Labels EP1. It’s a solid collection that brings to mind bands like The Breeders and Hole. Baricevic is also planning to release a collection of unreleased TETO demos. “There’s a lot of what I think is great stuff in the archives,” she says. “I just need to get this They Eat Their Own stuff out there, get it out of my system.”

Tate hits the stage at Eclipse Lounge’s open-mic night wearing a sweatshirt that simply says: “Genius.” On some it might seem like hubris, but on Tate it seems fitting; the 22-year-old is quiet and unassuming, but commands the healthy crowd with her confidence, pipes and courageous and clever songwriting. Tate is young, but used to being in the spotlight — just not always for her music, though. “I came to Robert Morris on a full basketball scholarship,” the Columbus, Ohio, native explains. She played parts of all four years, but faced injuries in her junior and senior years; she graduated last year, but had already grown into her new passion, music. “It was a completely new deal,” she recalls. “I’d moved to Pittsburgh to study corporate communications, and media and the arts have always been my thing; I’ve been really passionate about it. My freshman year, my friends and family members kept having dreams — they’d have dreams of me, on a stage, playing guitar and singing. They kept telling me, it kept happening, and I’d say, ‘I don’t really know what to tell you; I don’t play an instrument, I don’t even like the sound of my voice, so, that’s just not gonna happen.’” She has had multiple experiences, she says, wherein she’d be at church — different churches — and be singled out to sing. It all kept pointing to something. “That kind of stuff just kept happening,” she says. “Finally, four years ago this month, I was with my mentor, she’s a lawyer, and she told me: ‘Jasmine, you can either say yes to God — because clearly there’s some weird God thing going on here — and he’ll show you how to do it, prob-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

Not afraid of the deep stuff: Jasmine Tate

ably, or you can say no, and he’ll probably find someone else to do it.’ And I thought, that’s so lame! I don’t want somebody else to get it because I’m scared and don’t know how to do it!”

JASMINE TATE CD RELEASE

WITH JOEL ANSETT 8 p.m. Fri., April 4. 720 Music, Clothing and Café, 4405 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. All ages. 412-904-4592 or www.720records.com

So Tate — with no real music training, learning by ear — set out to start playing in public, first at open-mic nights at Robert Morris, then eventually at bigger venues in the city. She drew from singer-songwriter traditions as well as hip hop; she notes Tracy Chapman and Lauryn Hill both as major inspirations, and those do shine through. As she built her repertoire, she began to build a network as well. “Not being from here, I had to find a way to get connected to everybody,” she says. Outside of college, she started playing a café in Grove City, where she lived during the

summer. Then she took her show to venues in town, hooking in with artists and scene fixtures like Jacquea Mae and Nate Mitchell, from 720 Music, Clothing and Café. She eventually developed a close bond with singer-songwriter Joel Ansett, with whom she’s about to kick off a tour that’ll go a little different from most artists’ tours. “We didn’t set out to do something different — it’s not like we woke up and said, ‘Let’s come up with a new model!”’ she says with a laugh. “But we both carry similar hearts behind our music: love, and hope. We want people to know there’s more than just this 9-to-5 thing people get so stuck in. And we felt like the normal model for [touring] was not congruent to the message we had. We want to talk about loving people; both of us are very relational.” “Relational” is a word Tate uses a lot — not as a fallback, but as a central tenet of her music and life. To her, making a one-night stop in a town doesn’t help her relate to the people there, or vice versa. Stopping for a week at a time in each city? That’s relational. “Instead of going night-to-night, I believe the shortest we’ll be in a city is three days, all the way up to two weeks — I think our trip to Minnesota is our longest one,” she says. “In every city, we’ll do a regular venue, a house show and something like a high school or church or nursing home — something like that. “We’re doing it that way because we obviously want to hit a regular venue for people who enjoy coming out to a show, but we wanted to do a house show as well, because a lot of time people invite friends and family to a house show — we want to build those relationships.” The tour is called Life and Love, named for the new album Tate releases with a show Fri., April 4, at 720 Music, Clothing and Café; it’s her first full-length. It’s a fully orchestrated set of songs with a social conscience; Tate, even with her effervescent personality, isn’t afraid to take on topics that are difficult to listen to. (One of her best-known songs, “Believer,” is about the sexual assault of a child; as she began to describe it before the Eclipse open-mic, host Henry Bachorski chimed in to note that it made him cry the first time he heard it.) “I have this conviction that people are wired for depth,” she says. “We all try to stay at this shallow place, typically, but if you really cut to the chase, everybody’s looking for depth in life. You can sit at a bar and talk to somebody and people will pour out their life story. I want to talk about the things that nobody else wants to talk about. If you can reach into that core, I think you can really inspire somebody, compel them to love, open up their ability to receive love.” AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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TRIAL BY FIRE {BY JULIA COOK} WITH KINETIC performances that have

been the stuff of Pittsburgh legend, White Like Fire has expanded its reach beyond the Steel City. But as the band gears up for the release of its LP, Apocalypstic, bassist Tyler Clawson, guitarist Blake Clawson and drummer Joe Killian are reminiscing as well as looking forward. At the band’s conception, “The scene wasn’t very accepting,” Blake Clawson recalls. “People didn’t really like us. It was good, though; it was sort of a trial by fire.” He also points out how much the band has grown in the past two years: “Having to stick up for each other and tough out lots of disappointment together. At some point, you’ve got to say ‘Fuck it,’ and look to the guys that are right there beside you, up onstage.” Preserving Tyler Clawson’s feverish vocals, White Like Fire takes a more ambient approach to its instrumentals on Apocalypstic. The listener is treated to several moments that work — such as the bridge bass line on “Don’t Care, I’m Not Sorry” — and channel the energy toward a new maturity in composition. More than ever, the guitar riffs confidently

{PHOTO BY JULIA COOK }

Sticking up for each other: White Like Fire

move through drum lines and hand claps, making White Like Fire sound more like a fuller band, without losing any of its rock heritage. Much like the band’s video for the song

“See How Far,” each performance feels black-and-white, stripped down and unabashedly emotional — on purpose. “We try to be as rowdy as possible, to keep the crowd involved,” Blake Clawson explains. “We have music ADD; we’re paranoid about making people bored. It happens so easily in Pittsburgh. People get so bored so fast, so we’ve had to do everything in our power to keep people’s attention.” Toward that end, the band focuses on particular moments in individual songs for inspiration. Killian cited “Bovine Public,” by The Cribs, “Lust for Life,” by Girls, and “Away From You,” by Oberhofer, with whom the band has played previously. “The important thing for us,” Tyler Clawson says, “is to not get lost in the technical aspect of the music. It’s more of the emotion that’s elicited by us as a band, and as friends. It’s really whatever you’re weaving into that moment, or feeling, that’s important.” With their integrity, White Like Fire members carry a vision of what they don’t want to be. “Not that we have anything against laptops, but we like drums and guitars,” Blake Clawson explains. “People that cut records in studios in L.A. with laptops, I’m not gonna feel anything from that.” “It’s like glorified karaoke,” Tyler adds. “There are a lot of performers who do that, and we made a decision to stay away from that sort of thing.”

“THE IMPORTANT THING FOR US IS TO NOT GET LOST IN THE TECHNICAL ASPECT.” Killian jumps in: “When we write our songs, we’re trying to channel an experience we’ve had before, where we did get into a bar fight or something, so we’re trying to emulate that anger we had.” What does the band want fans to take from Apocalypstic?

PATTON PATTON (SELF-RELEASED)

Hard-rock EP from a “concept band” made up of ex-personnel of Long Time Darlings. The idea: dirty riffrock based on Gen. George Patton, utilizing samples from the famous 1970 biopic. Hammering drums and wailing guitars rule here; the only vocals come from the man himself. (Well, at least from George C. Scott as the man himself.) The riffs are heavy and infectious, taking up where Long Time Darlings left off, but with a more sinister vibe, given the subject matter. A pretty damn clever concept, well executed. PATTON EP RELEASE with ELSINORE, BEN HARDT. 10 p.m. Fri., April 4. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com THE SQUIRREL HILLBILLIES GOODY SHOES (SELF-RELEASED)

“I want them to forget about college, and people around them, and whatever else they’re going through,” says Tyler Clawson, “and feel like they’re riding a motorcycle in the summer, through the desert, and they’re wearing a leather jacket, and it’s on fire.” Killian’s vision is more simple: “I want them to form a band, and play with us.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MORE ON WWW.WHITELIKEFIRE.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

What’s striking about the new full-length from The Squirrel Hillbillies is the amount of thought that clearly went into every aspect of it. From the art and liner (which is more substantial than most you get from local bands) to the well-crafted tunes and spotless recording, it’s all done with an extra measure of care. Is there something slightly, well, nerdy about acoustic folk and blues played by a duo named after a comfy East End neighborhood? Maybe, but it’s endearing, too, and this album is made with both talent and love.

WHITE LIKE FIRE

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NEW RELEASES

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TIMOTHY SACCENTI}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Phantogram

[INDIE POP] + FRI., APRIL 04 Indie-pop duo Phantogram has had a busy 2014 so far, largely stemming from the release of the band’s second studio album, Voices. The pair, originally called Charlie Everywhere, has been making moves in the hip-hop scene as well: Big Boi, of Outkast, has become one of their frequent working partners. Most recently Big Boi released a song featuring the duo called “Lanes,” which was a mash-up of their previous collaboration “Lines” with A-ha’s ’80s hit “Take on Me.” Even if you don’t think you know the band, you probably have heard it — it’s had music featured in several TV shows, including Law & Order: SVU, Shameless, Teen Wolf and The Originals. Phantogram plays tonight at Stage AE along with guest Jagwar Ma. Kayla Copes 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $22.50. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[INDIE POP] + SAT., APRIL 05 Great Caesar is a chamber-pop outfit from Brooklyn, but its biggest impact so far may be from a video, not a song. “Don’t Ask Me Why,” a tune off the band’s band s self-titled self titled EP from last fall, got the video treatment after a Kickstarter campaign last year, and went viral early this year because of its take on relationships, connecting LGBT rights with the fight for civil rights for people of color, and lauding universal love. The band plays a headlining Great Caesar show tonight at the Pittsburgh

NEWS

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Winery; read an interview with them on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. Andy Mulkerin 8:30 p.m. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15. 412-566-1000 or www.pittsburghwinery.com

[ELECTRONIC] + SAT., APRIL 05 Pegboard Nerds have been making waves across the United States this year. The duo — the name of which was constructed from an anagram of the members’ names — is very much inspired by video-game sounds mixed with electronic dance music. The headlining tour the two are currently on takes them a long way from their homeland of Norway; if 8-bit dance music is up your alley, check them out tonight at the Rex Theater. KC 9 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. 412-3816811 or www.rextheater.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., APRIL 08 On first glance, you might assume that Harrison Hudson was one person — but in fact it’s a two-piece band, one member of which is named Harrison Hudson. Following? Regardless, the Nashville band has a p pop-rock appeal,, though p app g in its song “Hard “Ha ard to t Say” you yo can a hear some som me electronic electron influences seeping through. The latest album is Curious, s released last fall; fal check the group grou out tonight at The Smiling Moose along with guests gu Addison Steele Steel and Thrift. KC 6:30 p.m. p.m. 1306 E. Carson C son St., Car Stt., South Side. $10. $ All ages. 41241 122 431-4668 431 1-4668 or www.smilingwww.sm mili iling moose.com moo ose. se com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 03 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BRILLOBOX. Jakeisrain and the C Street Brass, Middle Children, Raw Guru. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Kwesi K, Gene Stovall, Circles & Squares. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Triangle & Rhino, Pond Hockey, Lizard Police. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Working Poor, Anita Fix, John Craig, Kevin Finn. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 04 31ST STREET PUB. Six Speed Kill, The Filthy Lowdown, Substitute for Quality. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 565 LIVE. Be’same. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. CLUB CAFE. Crystal Bowersox (Early) Elsinore, Patton, Ben Hardt (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. FRIDAY FAITH CAFE. Chalice. Washington. 724-222-1563. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Horse Drawn Death Machine, Egaity, Resin. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Juggling Suns, theCAUSE, Sandoz, Fourth River Revival, Dizzy Woosh, Rusty Haywhackers, Patti Spadaro Band, Grooveshifter, more. pUNKapalooza. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Skero & Jingles. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Finally Free. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. SuperMonkey, The Chris Matthews Band. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Phantogram, Jawgar Ma. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Big Mean Sound Machine, Genome. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 05 ALTAR BAR. Mercury, The Clintones. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARSALA’S BAR AND GRILLE. EZ Action. West Mifflin. 412-466-3337. CLUB CAFE. Wakey!Wakey!,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

Jillette Johnson, Casey Shea. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELWOOD’S PUB. Wendy & The Merc Trio. 724-265-1181. GOOSKI’S. Atlantic Thrills, The City Buses. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARVEY WILNER’S. Max House & the Perculators. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Red Western, Impossible Colors, Will Simmons & The Upholsterers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LOWER BURRELL MOOSE LODGE 53. The Dave Iglar Band. MOONDOG’S. Juggling Suns, theCAUSE, Sandoz, Fourth River Revival, Dizzy Woosh, Rusty Haywhackers, Patti Spadaro Band, Grooveshifter, more. pUNKapalooza. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Daley, Cait Cuneo. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OAKMONT TAVERN. The Turbosonics. Oakmont. 412-828-4155.

RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Fonic. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. The Truth Band. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. SMILING MOOSE. Daisyhead, Cove, Nest King Parrot, Vannet Viskar, Vaporizer. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jones for Revival, KR-3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 06 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Carolina Chocolate Drops, Birds of Chicago. 412-368-5225. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Vinegar Creek Constituancy, Shelf Life String Band. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Creative. Life.Support & Phat Man Dee Present Sunday Phunday. A live video podcast shoot featuring jazz vocalist Kenia. (Enter from the door on Butler St between Lincoln &

MP 3 MONDAY ESSENTIAL MACHINE

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Essential Machine, whose new EP, Underneath the Earth, came out April 1. Stream or download “Road Trip” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

Evergreen). Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Awkward Friend Dave. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 07 THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Onward Progress, Yeesh. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Langhorne Slim & the Law, The Felice Brothers. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Oceano. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Carcass, Black Dahlia Murder, Gorguts, Noisem. North Side. 412-229-5483.

TUE 08 CLUB CAFE. Chris Pureka. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Trappers Harp, King of Prussia, Case Conrad. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Harrison Hudson. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jon Langford & Skull Orchard. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 09 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Jeff Miller. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. Patrick Sweany, The Weathered Road. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Close Your Eyes I’m Changing, Truck Stanley’s Night Dream, Flesh Control, Wasp Nest Head Dress, Satyr/Elfheim. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Protomartyr, Ne-Hi, Spray Paint, Ouais, Dumplings. Bloomfield. 412-682-9320. SMILING MOOSE. Down With Webster. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 03

SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Jerry Don O’Neal. Washington. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Tim & John. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Kim Richey, Stevie Ann. Harmony. 724-452-0539.

@TeamMateBand (TeamMate)

TUE 08 SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Daddy gets high but daddy handles business

THU 03 SMILING MOOSE. Fortified Phonetx, Plutocrat Noose, Apostropheus, Gene Stovall, Middle Name Danger. South Side. 412-431-4668.

@MacMiller (Mac Miller)

BLUES

Fuck Cell Phones.

THE BRONZE HOOD. Sweaty Betty Sweaty Betty. Robinson. 412-787-7240. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Billy Price & The Lost Minds. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

ALLEGHENY WINE w paper MIXER. J. Malls. pghcitym .co Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. 412-687-2555. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Downtown. 412-392-2217. Balkan Showers. Pandemic Pete, DJ Stefan the Mad Serb. ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. 412-773-8884. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. James Hovan, Rino Calandra. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. South Side. 412-431-2825. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. The Family Peck. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals Downtown. 412-392-2217.

JAZZ

THU 03

FRI 04

FRI 04

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DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Del Ray. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Bobby Pinson & Trent Tomlinson. Washington.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PALACE THEATRE. United States Army Field Band Jazz Ambassaors. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

TUE 08 AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Robert Glasper. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Michele Bensen. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Sean Jones Quartet. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

WED 09 ANDYS. Charlie G Sanders. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Sandra Dowe. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604. LITTLE E’S. Laura Wiens Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

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MUSIC

FRI 04 720 RECORDS. Jasmine Tate, Joel Ansett. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Ronni Weiss. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622.

SAT 05 BADO’S PIZZA GRILL & ALE HOUSE. Lenny & Jeff. Mt. Lebanon. 412-563-5300. THE BEER MARKET. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. North Side. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. The Steel Wheels. Oakland. 413-361-1915. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. 10 String Symphony, Tattletale Saints. Harmony. 724-452-4238. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. John Galt Theory. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SCREEN

HEINZ HALL. Mandy Patinkin w/ Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Downtown. 412-392-4900. KEYSTONE OAKS HIGH SCHOOL. Dave Wickerham. Playing the Mighty Wurlitzer Pipe Organ. Dormont. 412-571-6000. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Dancing Queen. 724-789-7858.

MON 07 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing- Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 09 DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Electronic Ensemble. Uptown. 412-396-6000. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

SAT 05

THU 03

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BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Grand Bon Rien. West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181. PALACE THEATRE. Mel Tillis. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. The Joseph Sisters. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808.

ACOUSTIC

MON 07

SAT 05

FRI 04

NINE ON NINE. Dane Vannatter & Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

SAT 05

COUNTRY

FRI 04

SAT 05

OTHER MUSIC

WORLD

@wizkhalifa (Wiz Khalifa)

HIP HOP/R&B

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6000.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage w/ Cherylann Hawk & The Live to Love Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WED 09 SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

TUE 08

WED 09

You know you’re in Pennsylvania when you see an Amish couple using a turnpike callbox.

SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400. THE R BAR. John Stangry. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

CHORAL EVENSONG. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Pieces by Ravel & Debussy, feat. Juraj Valuha, conductor & Stefan Jackiw, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 08

SUN 06

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

NEWS

LOCAL TWEETS

& Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. DJ Orion, Pandemic, Ed Um. Lawrenceville. 412-251-6059. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

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OBEY HOUSE. The Shiners. Crafton. 412-922-3883.

WED 09 ALTAR BAR. Texas Hippie Coalition. Strip District. 412-263-2877. LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

CLASSICAL FRI 04 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Pieces by Ravel & Debussy, feat. Juraj Valuha, conductor & Stefan Jackiw, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Songwriters IN THE CELLAR

APRIL 4

SAT 05 BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside. BIG BAND BRASS. River City Brass Band, Downtown. 800-292-7222. CHATHAM BAROQUE. Synod Hall, Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-621-6204. COMBINED CHOIRS. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-279-4030.

SUN 06 CHATHAM BAROQUE. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

ARTS

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EVENTS

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Mike Medved, Joy Ike, Judith Avers and Clinton Clegg HOST

Brooke Annibale $10.00 8:30pm showclix.com/event/3809140

2815 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT Phone 412.566.1000 CLASSIFIEDS

35

What to do April

IN PITTSBURGH

2-8

WEDNESDAY 29 Skaters

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Team Spirit & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Lez Zeppelin

ZOSO- The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Tommy Magik and the Wonderfulls. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

Daley

Cher - Dressed to Kill Tour Phantogram CONSOL ENERGY CENTER with Jagwar Ma Downtown. With special guest Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 30 Grounded

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Mandy Patinkin

Big Mean Sound Machine

LESTER HAMBURG STUDIO, CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through May 4.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 41

B.U.S. 9 - Bricolage Urban Scrawl Annual Fundraiser

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa 8p.m.

BRICOLAGE & NEW HAZLETT THEATER. For more info & tickets visit bricolagepgh.org. Through April 5.

Comedian Gene Renfroe

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER FRIDAY, APRIL 4 IMPROV

La Bohème BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. Through April 6.

Cedric the Entertainer IMPROV Waterfront. Over

21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through April 5.

SATURDAY 52

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

Mercury / The Clintones ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

No Bad JuJu

SUNDAY 63

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. No Cover. 9:15p.m.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC

Carolina Chocolate Drops

HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7p.m.

MONDAY 74

Langhorne Slim & the Law / The Felice Brothers MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-4683401 or ticketweb.com opusone. 8p.m.

Liz Callaway CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org/cabaretseries. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 85 Harrison Hudson

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX.6:30p.m.

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Spring 2014

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THE KAYENTA $79.95 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

WATERPROOF PERFORMANCE SANDALS

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

BUSTED {BY AL HOFF}

NOAH CONTAINS THE PROVERBIAL BOAT-LOAD OF INTERESTING IDEAS

In 2012, director David Ayer made the kinetic, amusingly profane cop-shopper, End of Watch. But his latest, Sabotage, pretty much just lives up to its name. It’s meant to be a kinetic, amusingly profane actioner, but it’s undermined throughout by incoherent plotting and video-game dialogue. (If you just want a loop of hollered curses and gruesome deaths, though, it’s serviceable.)

STORM

WARNING

He’s back: Arnold Schwarzenegger

Sabotage is buttressed with one huge star — Arnold Schwarzenegger — and a complement of recognizable planets (Sam Worthington, Mirelle Enos, Terence Howard) orbiting that fading sun. (Say what you will about the 66-yearold former governor, but the audience ate up his familiar quippy macho-man performance with relish.) Schwarzenegger plays Breacher, the leader of a special-ops DEA task force whose members, when not busting down cartel doors, get rad tattoos, booze and make a lot of off-color sex jokes. In other words, they’re a family — at least until the $10 million they stole goes missing, and they tear each other apart looking for the traitor. This brings in the Atlanta PD and its no-bullshit homicide detective (Olivia Williams) who, in some of the film’s best scenes, butts heads with Breacher. (This is also the film’s only female role that isn’t a stripper, bar girl, victim or highly sexualized DEA agent.) Somewhere in Sabotage are the bones of a better film, one of those darkly comic early-’90s pieces where groups of criminals self-destruct. But like Sabotage’s $10 million, any decent aspects have disappeared down the sewer. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ALPHAVILLE Jean-Luc Godard’s 1965 vision of a dystopian Paris of the future — here known as Alphaville — stars Eddie Constantine and Anna Karina. This newly restored version features a new translation and subtitles. Starts Fri., April 4, at Regent Square

{BY AL HOFF}

We’re gonna need a bigger boat: Russell Crowe as Noah

W

ARNING: This review will discuss how Noah ends. If the tale of Noah and his ark is new to you, stop reading now, and check out Genesis 6-9. A brief recap: Earth has been ruined by man’s industrial exploitation, but one keeper of the old ways, Noah, last of Seth, lives in peaceful harmony with the land. (He refuses to kill a scaled dog, a creature that must have missed the Call to the Ark.) Then Noah (Russell Crowe) receives a vision: that the Creator will destroy the world with a great flood, and that he, his small family and two of every innocent beast and bug will be saved in an ark. Then, Noah and Co. will repopulate the planet and hopefully propagate a better batch of humanity, more respectful of Edenic values. Darren Aronofsky’s big-budget film is decidedly ambitious: It combines a popular Bible tale, the trappings of an epic dystopic actioner and about a year’s worth of discussion regarding man, God, good

vs. evil, how we got here, where we’re going, environmental stewardship, religious mania, paternalism, vegetarianism, selective infanticide, how lions sail with lambs without eating them and more.

NOAH DIRECTED BY: Darren Aronofsky STARRING: Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly, Ray Winstone

While Noah contains the proverbial boat-load of interesting ideas, the film’s allegorical myth-making is often in tension with its literalizing of the same. It wants the majesty of the divine combined with the banality of existence. So a fantastical scene in which all the serpents of the world slither up to the ark in pairs finds Noah’s family wrinkling their noses with disgust because snakes. (Snakes: friendless from Day One!) Watching a CGI forest grow from a single seed Noah plants is mesmerizing and awesome, like a

sped-up nature film. But watching CGIcreated giant rock men (it’s a long story; see Book of Enoch) log that same forest inspires laughter. And with such sprawling ambitions and its jumble of story-telling techniques, Noah is bound to annoy everybody somehow. I found parts of it silly and clichéd, but was also intrigued by some of the big messy ideas Aronofsky dragged on board. This is old-school Old Testament — dark, vengeful, blood-soaked — shot through with contemporary controversies about creationism, climate change and exceptionalism. It’s flawed, but it gets points for trying. And despite the sunshine-y (literally) last shot, I’m not sure it’s a hopeful or inspiring tale, though it is explicitly cautionary. Noah is left broken by the mission. And despite the global cleansing — spoiler alert — Noah’s progeny will struggle to live harmoniously with each other and the natural world. Time to get a really big boat? Discuss. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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“A RAMBUNCTIOUS CAPER

BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH QUICK WIT, FAMOUS FACES, AND WES ANDERSON’S PATENTED AESTHETIC DELIGHTS.”

FILM CAPSULES CP

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER. Crime-fighter Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), a.k.a. Captain America, goes up against an old Soviet enemy, The Winter Soldier. It’s the New Cold War! Anthony and Joe Russo direct this actioner adapted from the Marvel comic. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., April 4. CHEAP THRILLS. Two friends compete in a series of increasingly crazy dares, in this new dark comedy from E.L. Katz. Fri., April 4, through Sun., April 6. Hollywood ENEMY. Denis Villeneuve adapts Jose Saramago’s 2002 novel, The Double, in this thriller about a man who pursues his look-alike after spotting him in a film; Jake Gyllenhaal stars. Starts Thu., April 10. Hollywood FRANKIE & ALICE. Halle Barry stars in this bio-pic about a go-go dancer who struggles with multiple-personality disorder; Geoffrey Sax directs. Starts Fri., April 4. AMC Loews LE WEEK-END. A middle-aged English couple (Jim Broadbent, Lindsay Duncan) celebrates their wedding anniversary in Paris, hoping to recapture the excitement of their long-ago honeymoon. But the weekend proves to be a mixed bag — the food is grand, but the hotel they booked is “too beige,” and the fissures in their long relationship make the journey with them. Roger Michell’s dramedy, written by Hanif Kureishi, straddles the line between charming and painful to watch. Longevity is both the strength and the undoing of the couple, as the sharp script

CP

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CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES & SHOWTIMES

Visitors (Koyaanisqatsi, Powaqqatsi and Naqoyqatsi), nonnarrative films that combine visual images with music to create provocative or contemplative states. Reggio’s latest film — made again with collaborators Philip Glass (composer) and Jon Kane (editor) — is perhaps even more stripped-down and basic. It’s about us — humans — and is composed of only 74 high-contrast black-and-white shots. Close-ups of faces (most staring directly into the camera) are intercut with images of buildings, hands, swamped trees, a shuttered amusement park. The images are gorgeous, and Reggio’s technique (long holds or very slow zooms) allows some images to transform before us. For instance, what initially looks like a spaceship turns out to be an Art Deco office building shot from an unusual angle. But what one makes of the man laughing, or the gorilla’s intent stare, is open to interpretation. Fri., April 4, through Mon., April 7. Melwood (AH)

REPERTORY

Le Week-end veers from the easy companionship the two share to the long-simmering grievances and disappointments that erupt. Things come to a head at a painfully funny dinner party hosted by a long-ago American friend (Jeff Goldblum) the pair serendipitously encounters on the street. Viewers will smile and cringe, but it is always a pleasure to watch these two acting pros tackle the bittersweet stuff of everyday melodrama. Starts Fri., April 4. Manor (Al Hoff) THE UNKNOWN KNOWN. Filmmaker Errol Morris sits down with former Secretary of the Defense Donald Rumsfeld for a conversation about his career, from his time in Congress in the 1960s, through to the Iraq war. Starts Wed., April 9. Manor

CP 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

VISITORS. Director Godfrey Reggio is best known for his Qatsi Trilogy

JFILM. The festival continues with the following films: The German Doctor (5:15 p.m. Wed., April 2), a drama about escaped Nazis in Patagonia; Blumenthal (7:30 p.m. Wed., April 2), a comedy about a break-up; Aftermath (5 p.m. Fri., April 4), a Polish thriller about long-hidden secrets; The Jewish Cardinal (7 p.m. Sat., April 5), a doc about the Jewish-born head of the French Catholic Church; Next Year Jerusalem (1 p.m. Sun., April 6), a doc about elderly Jews who plan a trip to Israel; The Zigzag Kid (3:30 p.m. Sun., April 6), in which a boy on the eve of his bar mitzvah takes off on an adventure; and It Happened in St. Tropez (7 p.m. Sun., April 6), a French domestic comedy about two brothers. All films at Manor. www.JfilmPgh.org CINEASTES. In this new documentary from Julie Gayet, 20 French women filmmakers (including Agnès Varda, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Rebecca Zlotowski, Valérie Donzelli, Céline Sciamma, Julie Delpy and Mia Hansen Love) discuss their profession, particularly in reference to their gender. Do women make different films from men? In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., April 2. Oaks CMU INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: FACES OF WORK. Recent films screening this week include: Madame Presidenta: Why Not U.S.? Vamos Menimas!, a locally produced profile of Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff, and the broader issue of

April 27, 2pm

Afternoon Delight women leaders (7 p.m. Wed., April 2); Women’s Day, a Polish feature about the struggles women face in low-paying retail jobs (5 p.m. Thu., April 3); Trapped, an Iranian drama about the lives of two young female roommates in contemporary Iran, (7 p.m. Thu., April 3); At Berkeley, a look at the University of California school, from documentarian Frederick Wiseman (4:30 p.m. Fri., April 4); and Sweet Dreams, a doc about women in Rwanda who open an icecream shop (6:30 p.m. Sat., April 5). All screenings at McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. For more info, see www.cmu.edu/faces. BRAVE MISS WORLD. Director Cecilia Peck’s new documentary follows Miss World 1998, Linor Abargil, as she confronts the man who raped her years earlier. Today, Abargil works to raise awareness of rape and help other victims to heal. Abargil will speak after the screening. In English, and Hebrew and Italian, with subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Thu., April 3. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $50 (film and 5:30 p.m. VIP reception); $10 film only. www. JfilmPgh.org E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL. See this muchloved, feel-good alien story about the greenishbrown space traveler who befriends some suburban kids on the big screen. Steven Spielberg directs this 1982 film starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore and a wrinkly, long-fingered dude from space. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 3; 3 p.m. Sat., April 5; 3 p.m. Sun., April 6; and 7:30 p.m. Wed. April 9. Hollywood

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL. The annual touring film festival is back, with two programs of short films celebrating the natural world, unique habitats (of man and beast) and plenty of extreme adventure and sporting. This is your one-stop for daredevil skiers, white-water rafters, rock-climbers and BASE jumpers. 7 p.m. Sat., April 5, and 5 p.m. Sun., April 6. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $10-20 at www.showclix.com. www.ventureoutdoors.org AFTERNOON DELIGHT. Kathryn Hahn plays Rachel, a “JCC mom,” who is bored and frustrated with her comfortable Los Angles life and her workaholic husband. So she strikes up a relationship with a young stripper, even taking her into her home and letting her sort of be the nanny. Things will most definitely not go smoothly in Jill Soloway’s dark comedy, but Hahn owns this film, fully committing to its cringe humor and fleshing out Rachel’s affluenza-driven problems. 9 p.m. Sat., April 5. Manor (AH)

The Butcher Boy with Buster Keaton and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, plus more short films. Live accompaniment on piano by Tom Roberts.

$8, $6 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/piccadilly

H O L LY W O O D T H E AT E R 1 4 4 9 P o t o m a c Av e n u e , D o r m o n t 412.563.0368

THE MARCHERS. In this drama from Nabil Ben Yadir, inspired by real events in 1983, a group of young people, angered by perceived mistreatment, walk from Marseille to Paris, collecting supporters along the way. In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sun., April 6. Oaks FATHER OF THE BRIDE. The luminously youthful CONTINUES ON PG. 40

BALANCING ACT. In this 2012 drama from Ivano de Matteo, a man’s life unravels after a critical mistake. Screens as part of the ongoing Italian Film Festival. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., April 4. Frick Fine Arts, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org THE BEST OFFER. An antiques auctioneer finds a new passion when he is tasked with overseeing the sale of a beautiful heiress’ estate. Giuseppe Tornatore directs this 2011 film. Screens as part of the ongoing Italian Film Festival, and presented in English. 7 p.m. Sat., April 5. Carnegie Museum of Art Theater, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org HEROES BEHIND THE BADGE: SACRIFICE AND SURVIVAL. Directed by Wayne Derrick, this new documentary looks at several law-enforcement officers, either killed on the job or severely injured and struggling with comebacks. Featured is Clairton police officer James Kuzak, who was shot on the job in 2011 and is now paralyzed. Proceeds benefit the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. 7 p.m. (6 p.m. doors), Sat. April 5. West Club Lounge, Heinz Field. $10 in advance (www.ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-fly-tix); $15 at door. www.druskyentertainment.com

NEWS

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E.T. - The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

4/3 @ 7:30, 4/5 @ 3pm & 7pm, 4/6 @ 3pm

Cheap Thrills (2014)

4/4 @ 7:30pm & 10pm, 4/5 @ 10:30pm, 4/6 @ 7:30pm

Two friends are roped into a series of dares, with each challenge upping the ante in both reward and boundaries. A very dark comedy.

RANGOS OMNIMAX THEATER

Lemonade (2014) 4/5 @ 7pm

Free premiere screening of the short film Lemonade. www.facebook.com/lemonade2014

SPONSORED LOCALLY BY:

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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Elizabeth Taylor stars as the bride, whose upcoming nuptials throw the household — dad Spencer Tracy and mom Joan Bennett — into a tizzy, in this lighthearted 1950 comedy from Vincente Minnelli. The film opens a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about brides. 8 p.m. Sun., April 6. Regent Square FILM KITCHEN. A clever exploration of a problematic Hollywood icon highlights this installment of the series for local film and video. “Chan(geling)” is tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE’s 30-minute video essay on Chinese screen detective Charlie Chan, as played by Warner Oland in 16 hit films in the 1930s. While racism gave the Swedish-American Oland a role that might have gone to an Asian actor, what’s perhaps surprising is how respectfully Chan is portrayed, even to the disadvantage of bigoted white foils onscreen. (Oland’s other “Asian” roles are more fraught.) The clips from nine Chan films excerpted are mostly delightful — save for the portrayals of black characters, whom tENT reminds us were then unbearably caricatured. (“Chan(geling)”’s bizarre soundtrack, which includes a W.C. Fields impersonator singing “Mama Told Me Not to Come,” is eventually explained.) The April 8 Film Kitchen also includes an excerpt of “Chapter 96: The Try-Works,” Andrew Nelson’s video juxtaposing skateboarders and BMX bikers honing their skills with audio and images from the film version of Moby-Dick. And Hayley Notter’s “Heaven Can’t Wait” is an early-2000s film, made by kids, that Film Kitchen curator Matthew Day says stood out at a screening of international and local avantgarde shorts. 8 p.m. Tue., April 8. Melwood. $5. 512-682-4111 (Bill O’Driscoll) SINGING IN THE RAIN. Hollywood’s transition from silent film to talkies is lovingly skewered in this rousing musical from Stanley Donen. The

Film Kitchen 1952 film stars Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor, Pittsburgh’s own Gene Kelly and a very important lamppost. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 9. AMC Loews. $5 WHEN COMEDY WENT TO SCHOOL. Ron Frank and Mevlut Akkaya take an affectionate look back at the Jewish vacation resorts in the Catskills Mountains, and the role they played in nurturing several generations of comedians — from vaudevillians to standup provocateurs. Narrated by Robert Klein (a former Catskills busboy), the film taps archival footage, as well as more contemporary reminiscences of Catskills alum such as Jackie Mason, Jerry Lewis, Mort Sahl, Sid Caesar and Jerry Stiller. It was make ’em laugh, or die trying, but tough live audiences forged great performers who took their influence far beyond the New York mountains. 4:45 p.m. Thu., April 3. Manor (AH) THE WOMEN WORKERS’ WAR. Massimio Ferrari’s recent documentary recounts two stories from the factories: in one, a women owner encourages cultural growth among her workers, and in the other, a woman leads a lengthy sit-in protest. Screens as part of the ongoing Italian Film Festival. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., April 10. Room 24, Cathedral of Learning, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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LOVE STORIES {BY STEVE SUCATO}

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Sean Dorsey Dance performs THE SECRET HISTORY OF LOVE 8 p.m. Fri., April 4, and 8 p.m. Sat., April 5. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave, East Liberty. $15-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kellystrayhorn.org NEWS

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BEND TIMES [BOOK]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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Sean Dorsey’s The Secret History of Love {PHOTO COURTESY OF LYDIA DANILLER}

The rights of the LGBT community have been in the news, with state courts and legislatures extending or denying those rights to residents. But no matter where you fall on such issues, the human desire for love remains a universal truth which binds us all. That is the subject of choreographer Sean Dorsey’s 2014 Isadora Duncan Dance Award-winning work The Secret History of Love, presented by the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater April 4 and 5. Recognized as the nation’s first out transgender modern-dance choreographer, Dorsey has received honors including a San Francisco Bay Guardian “Goldie Award,” two Isadora Duncan Dance Awards (Izzies) and a 2010 spot on Dance Magazine’s prestigious 25 to Watch list. The 75-minute The Secret History of Love is performed by Dorsey’s San Francisco-based Sean Dorsey Dance along with guest singer/ songwriter Shawna Virago. The dance-theater work was inspired by real-life stories collected during a two-year national LGBT Elders Oral History Project. The work mixes audio recordings of personal stories from some 10 LGBT seniors ranging in age from 55 to 85 along with full-throttle, athletic modern-dance choreography and a musically diverse original soundtrack from seven composers to create what the Miami Herald called “an epic work … powerful, moving, hilarious.” “What is nice is that the audience gets introduced to some of these elders in the work first through stories of their first crush or the first time they fell in love, and then they get to know them through other stories of hardship and throughout the work,” says Dorsey, by phone from San Francisco. Dorsey says it was important that the choreography for himself and the work’s three other dancers correspond directly to the elder’s stories: “It is important to me that the audience can not only understand what is going on in the work, but can personally relate to it.” The troupe’s performances at the Kelly-Strayhorn are part of a 20-city U.S. tour, one that Dorsey says is for audiences of all stripes. “This is LGBT history and it is also American history,” says Dorsey. “The work reveals the strength and resiliency of the human heart. Even after so much suffering over the years, [the LGBT] community has endured and we have been able to find love.”

ACOB BACHARACH is publishing his first novel. The Bend of the World, he quips, is “a coming-of-age story in which no one comes of age.” Set in Pittsburgh, the book is a rollicking, occasionally mad blend of dark workplace comedy and crooked love triangle(s), improbably suspended in a web of conspiracies and conspiracy theories involving, variously, UFO sightings over Mount Washington, time travel, a corporate takeover, Bigfoot, secret chambers beneath the Point, Nazi ancestors and plenty of drugs. The narrator is Peter Morrison, age 29, with a fateful 30th birthday party looming. Bend of the World, out April 14 on W.W. Norton imprint Liveright Publishing, is already getting national press. And the real-life story of a young Pittsburgh arts administrator with no publishing credentials getting a hardcover deal might inspire some conspiracy theories itself — save for the strange power of the Internet. Though his father’s family has roots in Point Breeze, Bacharach grew up mostly in Uniontown, then studied English and creative writing at Oberlin University. “I spent my last couple of years there when I should have been thinking about going to graduate school mostly hanging out in a big house on North Main Street, … smoking weed and watching cooking shows,” says Bacharach, who at 32 is tall, thin and boyish. Shortly after returning to Pittsburgh, in 2003, he was hired by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, which in 2008 gave him his current position as operations manager at the

M A I N F E AT U R E

[PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Booked: Jacob Bacharach

Benedum Center. (An oenophile, he’s also a popular host for the Trust’s Wednesday Wine Flights.) He’d always wanted to publish his first book by 30, but for years his only writing for public consumption was as the pseudonymous blogger IOZ. The persona, named for a 1990s Saturday-morning cartoon, was “this character who was this wild, radical, drugaddled anarcho-capitalist humbugger who mostly wrote about politics,” says Bacharach. IOZ had a cult following. “He is knowl-

edgeable on any subject, he darts from religion to politics to sex to the arts,” wrote an online admirer in 2007. “He’s outrageous. He’s unique, he’s dazzling …” Before Bacharach retired the persona, he’d acquired fans and correspondents including one Will Menaker. “He occupied a corner of the political blogosphere that positioned himself against everyone,” recalls Menaker today. “His commentary and his point of view was just so razor-sharp that it was hard to argue with him.” CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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BEND TIMES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

BRICOL AGE URBAN SCRAWL

ANNUAL FUNDRAISER 6 NEW SHORT PLAYS CREATED IN 24 HOURS TICKETS START AT $40

APRIL.4-5.2014 Main Event at The New Hazlett Theater

DON’T MISS THE BUS!

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The Dirty Ball Infamous Attack Theatre performances. Art installations, interactivities, dance-offs and fashion throwdowns. Food trucks, local fare and libations. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party bringing the beats. Pirates vs. Robots.

Saturday, April 12th, 2014 Jane Street Warehouse, 2120 Jane Street, Southside TICKETS: www.attacktheatre.com/TDB14 or call 1.888.71.TICKETS Ages 21 and over only Made possible in part by:

Berger Investment Group

Image Design: Rob Henning, Photo: Jonathan Greene

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After Menaker was hired at Liveright, he asked Bacharach about a book his blog had hinted he was writing. That book wasn’t actually finished, but with Menaker’s prodding, by late 2012 Bacharach completed the first draft of Bend. Menaker said this out-there novel by an unpublished author wasn’t as hard to place as he’d feared: “The originality of his voice and the quality of his writing stood out from the first page.” In Bend, UFO sightings have Pittsburgh buzzing. But cynical protagonist Peter’s world is unhinged mostly by two friends. His boyhood pal Johnny, a drug addict and champion conspiracy-theorist, is disappearing into obsession with the sightings and with a mysterious local cult author named Winston Pringle. Meanwhile, Peter’s employer, Global Solutions, is acquired by Dutch conglomerate Vandevoort, embodied by a seductively reptilian lawyer named Mark who unexpectedly begins grooming Peter for corporate overlordship. Bacharach, who lives in Lawrenceville, comes by his attraction to conspiracies honestly, from a childhood obsession with secret histories to an abiding love of Philip K. Dick. Bend also includes some amusingly acerbic commentary about the local contemporary art scene (where Bacharach has plenty of friends); witty badinage, perhaps especially from Peter’s WASP parents and aged grandmother; and a notably disconsolate undercurrent about addiction, especially in the cases of Johnny and Mark’s artist girlfriend, Helen. The book jacket’s blurbs are impressive: Critic James Woolcott (an IOZ fan) chipped in, as did names like Gary Shteyngart and Bacharach’s old Oberlin instructor Dan Chaon. Advance reviews range from positive (Booklist: “inarguably amusing”) to dismissive: “As with many postmodern novels for lads, the author simply can’t decide what story he wants to tell,” wrote Kirkus Reviews. Inevitably, given the book’s setting and coming-of-age arc, there’ll be comparisons to The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, with its own love triangle, outlaw buddy and menacing demimonde; even Liveright’s publicity references Michael Chabon’s iconic 1988 debut novel. But Bacharach eschews the comparison, and not just because Chabon’s subsequent career sets such an intimidating standard. He says Bend is more like Joshua Ferris’ 2007 ad-industry satire Then We Came to the End, or even Chabon’s Wonder Boys. While Bacharach sometimes conjures conspiracies in Bend partly to mock them, not all are limned entirely in jest. For one thing, he says provocatively, “[A]ll stories are conspiracies”: Life is plotless, and “narrative is the application of conspiracy theory to life as it is lived.” For another, Vandevoort’s sinister leveraged buyout and

plunder of Global Solutions is Bacharach’s satiric “critique of late capitalism,” a system whose only real product is profit. Even the so-called coming-of-age is ambivalently rendered. “I wanted the book to have a sense in which adulthood is a sort of conspiracy against youth,” says Bacharach. “I think of the book as being about the false allure of [a certain kind] of adulthood — having the important job in the corporation, being able to fire people, making a bunch of money, driving the nicer car — all of these things as being enticements from the darker world of adulthood as our society conceives of adulthood, against the admittedly problematic and drug-addled youth that [Peter] was escaping from.”

The Bend of the World LIVERIGHT PUBLISHING CORP. By Jacob Bacharach EXCERPT: Peter Morrison describes

his job. So I was the manger of customer analysis and spend processes, which meant about as much to me as it does to you, at a company called Global Solutions, whose remarkable slogan was, Solutions for a Global World. Actually, I was one of many managers of customer analytics and spend processes, and while this bothered some of my more, uh, career-oriented colleagues, I figured it was for the best, since it meant that I didn’t have to manage anything. Look, people will tell you that corporate America is an insatiable elder god, an implacable, amoral Mammon into whose gaping, bestial jaws flows the life and blood and spirit and dreams and democratic aspirations and so on and so forth of everyone and everything on this not-sogood and no-longer-green earth, but let me tell you, if what you really want is to read blogs all day and occasionally take the back stairs down to the largely vacant twenty-third floor to take long, private shits in the single, lockable handicapped restroom and to get paid, like, sixty-five grand for the trouble, then good God, there is not more perfect job. No, I am serious: the office only crushes your soul if you’re dumb enough to bring it to work.

Meanwhile, don’t take Peter for Jacob. Unlike his protagonist, Bacharach is gay, and that’s just one of their differences in this quite unautobiographical first novel. “I didn’t want to write myself too much in the story in part because I’m kind of boring,” says Bacharach. “I like to cook and play with my dog and ride bikes and do stupid homeimprovement projects. … My friends and acquaintances are much more interesting than I am. I figured I would just steal their lives and write about them instead.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

FINAL WEEKEND!

[ART REVIEW]

PROJECTIONS

ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST BELOVED OPERAS – and the inspiration for the Broadway smash hit RENT

Blaine Siegel describes himself as a storyteller. His 709 Penn Gallery exhibit Dream Body, which incorporates video with sculptural elements, offers viewers two accounts, and the choice to read them as tales separate or connected. Either way, a clear narrative of loss and longing, regret and remorse, is palpable, while the details remain ambiguous. On one wall of the exhibit, faces of men are projected, one after another. In extreme close-up, but upside-down, they occupy the entire surface. As we watch each man, his expression shifts slowly, oddly, distorted both by the immense scale and the unaccustomed orientation. Every pore and pockmark, each hair and any scar, is potently visible, magnified into absurdity. The enormity of the person before us both amplifies the emotion represented and muddies it; we can sense anguish, pain, distress, but can’t get as clear a bead as if we were face to proportionate, upright face. This portion of the installation is inspired by the tarot card of “The Hanged Man,” its figure suspended by tied-up foot. And while the video’s imagery recalls the fortune-teller’s cards, the projector itself is also evocative. It sits upon a platform in a contraption resembling the hook from the game of Hangman. Meanwhile, for the video works projected on another wall, the projector rests on an artificial boulder. In contrast to the larger-than-life faces, these projections reduce the scale, presenting two views of the same room, side by side, at different points in time. In the first, the plain room is unoccupied and dulled, with light shining through large windows, some plants, towels and bath toys littering the floor around a covered, sunken tub. In the second, the pool has been exposed, the open water bubbling and popping, the only perceptible motion in either depiction. The light has changed slightly, the objects on the ground shifted. Eventually drawing your eye is the figure of a child, or doll, prone along the pool — small, naked, head submerged. It’s immensely disturbing and provokes an almost physical response, its impact not lessened but heightened by the image’s subtlety. The stories, sharing a corner on adjoining walls, could be independent. But a deflating beach ball has drifted to the men’s side of the room, as if it somehow escaped the scene depicted on the facing wall. Siegel tells multiple possible stories.

Puccini’s ini’s

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Original photo: David Bachman

laine Siegel’s Dream Body {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

APRIL 4 and 6 Benedum Center Tickets $12 and up 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org

75th anniversary season: Opera for a new age

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UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD!

DREAM BODY continues through April 13. 709 Penn Gallery, 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org NEWS

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English texts projected above the stage.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROCKHAN PHOTOGRAPHY}

Peter Matthew Smith (left) and Brady Patsy in Pittsburgh Musical Theater’s Les Misérables

[PLAY REVIEWS]

DREAM SATURDAY, APRIL 19 • 3 & 6PM • BENEDUM CENTER A {BY ALAN W. PETRUCELLI} TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456 - 6666 • G ROU PS 10+ TICKETS 412-47 1 - 6930

DO YOU HEAR the people sing!

Singing the song of angry men? I heard them loud and clear hours after the Pittsburgh Musical Theater/ Robert Morris University production of Les Misérables had ended. Angry? I was basking in delight, especially since I was afraid that this was going to be as bad as the mess recently staged at the Benedum.

WITH THE PBT ORCHESTRA

APRIL 11-13, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER

TICKETS: 412.456.6666 666 ONLINE: PBT.ORG

GROUPS OF 10 OR MORE : 412.454.9101 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

ARTISTS: CHRISTINE SCHWANER & ALEXANDRE SILVA // PHOTO: DUANE RIEDER

LES MISÉRABLES continues through Sun., April 6. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $24.7544.75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Jean Valjean is sentenced to prison for 19 years for stealing a loaf of bread. He’s caught, but through the kindness of a bishop from whom he was stealing, Valjean reinvents himself as a successful businessman and mayor. For every step Valjean takes, one is taken by Javert, the police inspector who haunts his life, bent on hunting him down. Perhaps this is the first production I have seen directed by PMT’s Ken Gargaro, and it is without flaw, streamlined but seamless as just about any show (yes, professional) that I have seen since 1969. Boublil and Schönberg’s cautionary tale of theocracy is populated by whores, illegitimate children, oppressed masses, overweight innkeepers, drunks, pimps and crowds of shady characters and dirty

denizens who take to the sewers of Paris faster than any phantom could. Space forces me to dole out praise sparingly, but Victoria Buchtan, as Eponine, gives a characterization as fresh and warm as this morning’s croissant. Some will argue that bearish Brady Patsy’s hold on “Stars” is mightier than all else. Maybe. But Peter Matthew Smith’s Valjean is a portrayal that deserves time on Broadway; vocally and dramatically, he underscores the power and importance of individual responsibility. I refuse to believe that Donovan Smith, as Enjorias, is a 21-year-old student at Carnegie Mellon – he owns not a voice but a powerhouse that will make him a legendary opera singer. And Tim Hartman as Master Thenardier? I’m starting to fall in love with his acting and antics ... could anyone adjusting his privates make me laugh harder? Kim Brown’s stunning costumes have been plucked from either Spotlight Costume archives or lifted from historical archival pages and recreated. Brava! The fight choreography by Shaun J. Rolly might require a cast count after each performance. The shootings and stabbings are as real-looking as the blood. C’est merveilleux! I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

LIVE WIRES {BY F.J. HARTLAND} COMBINING RAP music with Latin rhythms, the Tony Award-winning musical In the Heights bursts onto the stage

of the Charity Randall Theatre as the current offering from the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Theatre Arts. Written by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara Alegria Hudes, the show receives a colorful and lively production, directed by Lisa Jackson-Shibetta. Set in the barrio of New York City’s Washington Heights neighborhood, the musical examines the lives — and dreams — of its residents. The Rosarios have sent their daughter Nina off to Stanford University in hopes she will make a better life for herself — and not end up with dispatcher Benny. Vanessa, one of the stylists at Ortega’s Beauty Salon, dreams of moving downtown. Usnavi, who is secretly in love with Vanessa, runs the corner bodega. And watching it all from her front stoop is Abuela Claudia, the neighborhood sage. Choreographer Staycee Pearl has done a mesmerizing job with the cast dancing on all three levels of Gianna Downs’ spectacular set. Adding to the physical production is the perfect lighting of Annmarie Duggan, which is highlighted by a most impressive fireworks display. While their rapping is sometimes unintelligible, Mike Magliocca, as Usnavi, and Rocky Paterra, as Benny, bring incredible

charm and vitality to the production. The voices of Arianna Kraiman, as Nina, and Chelsea Faber, as Vanessa, soar to the rafters of the auditorium. Also making a powerful vocal impression is Tim Kaniecki as the Piragua Guy. Jenna Michelle Simmons as Abuela Claudia shines during her number “Paciencia y Fe.” Bringing just the right comic touch to In the Heights are Molly Balk and Gabrielle Cuadra as the wise-cracking hair stylists Daniela and Carla.

THE

IN THE HEIGHTS continues through April 6. Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $12-25. www.play.pitt.edu.

PLAYBOYOF THE

WESTERN WORLD

The entire cast is to be saluted for their high-energy performances: They not only sing, dance and act, but also climb ladders and move scenery. The band, under the baton of Douglas Levine, is outstanding. You’ll want to join the cast and dance in the aisles! It’s a shame the sound system fails this show, either by crackling through group numbers or going out entirely on individuals.

BY JOHN MILLINGTON SYNGE DIRECTED BY KIM MARTIN

APRIL 11-19

Ronald Allan-Lindblom artistic director • Earl Hughes producing director

412.392.8000

PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust presents

TRUST

Cabaret Liz Callaway Monday, April 7 • 7:30pm Cabaret at Theater Square TrustArts.org/CabaretSeries

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

{ART} Sweetwater Center for the Arts is promoting its “wild things”-themed summer in a big way. The Sewickley mainstay commissioned U.K. street artist Luke Egan (a.k.a. Filthy Luker) and Pedro Estrellas to adorn its landmark, classically styled headquarters with 30foot-long inflatable tentacles. Tonight, the illumination of the sculpture coincides with the opening of Wild Things, a 45-artist group show of 2-D, 3-D and kinetic artworks juried by artist Cynthia Shaffer, whose own work employs things like bugs and bones. The reception includes live music and performance art. Bill O’Driscoll 6-9 p.m. 200 Broad St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-4405 or www.sweetwatercenter.org

events only. BO 7-9 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., April 5 (6:30 p.m. VIP reception). $40-150. www.bricolagepgh.org

Hakan has created Pittsburgh Festival Nouveau, a weekend of belly-dance and circus performances and workshops at Bloomfield’s Pittsburgh Dance Center. The shows start with tonight’s evening of aerials and sideshow acts with visiting performers like belly-dancer Madam Onça and internationally known jester Paolo Garbanzo. Saturday night spotlights world dance, including salsa, bhangra and Filipino, and belly-dance headliner Maria Hamer. Saturday and Sunday lectures and workshops for professional performers focus on dance and comedy. BO Performances: 7 p.m. ($15). Also 8 p.m. Sat., (Saturday show: $20; $35 with VIP dinner). Workshops: $20-40. 4765 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. www.hakandances.com/pfn {PHOTO COURTESY OF EDNA O’BRIEN}

+ FRI., APRIL 04

APRIL 05 Edna O’Brien {SHOWCASE} Hakan Dances bills himself as “Pittsburgh’s only professional male belly-dancer,” and you know, that’s probably true. But he’s not stopping there.

{ART} They’re preparing to frack for

Art by Rachel Dawn Renaudin

{STAGE} As fundraisers go, Bricolage Urban Scrawl is a highwire act. Each year, Bricolage Production Company invites six playwrights to each take a city bus ride and write a 10-minute play inspired by it … then challenges six directors and their actors to mount those spanking-new plays within 24 hours. For the ninth B.U.S., the adventuresome company that brought you STRATA and Midnight Radio corralled writers like Gab Cody, Vanessa German and Martin Giles, and directors including Sheila McKenna and Cameron Knight. Tonight, at Bricolage, watch it all start to come together with a VIP reception and actor parade. The performances proper (plus an after-party) are tomorrow night, at the New Hazlett Theater. Tickets are for either both nights or Saturday’s

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

APRIL 04 Wild Things

Free!Event

natural gas under the airport, rt, and county officials want to o lease Deer Lakes Park for the he same purpose. Add some 100 local artists to the long list of folks saying g “no” to the latter. Tonight, t, Garfield Artworks opens Pittsburgh Artists Againstt Fracking, a group exhibitt featuring the likes of Rick Bach, Gabe Felice, Carolina LoyolaGarcia, Laura Jean McLaughlin, James Simon and David Pohl. The opening reception is part of the Unblurred gallery y crawl; a portion of proceeds benefits the group Protect Our Parks. BO 7-10 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. rfield. Donation requested. d. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.org orks org

{STAGE} Juggling family and career is a dilemma for many women. But what if your job involves controlling drones in Afghanistan? Grounded, a 2013 play by George Brant, is a one-woman show starring Kelly McAndrew, last seen at City Theatre in 2011’s Precious Little. McAndrew plays a fighter pilot whose career is derailed by a surprise pregnancy; when she returns to the workforce, she controls drones from a Las Vegas trailer while navigating the turbulence of motherhood. Directed by Jenn Thompson, the show opens tonight. Angela Suico 8 p.m. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

APRIL 04 Pittsburgh Artists Against Fracking

Art by y David Pohl

Last July, city firefighters saved most of Penn Avenue’s mural-highlighted Bride Row houses from a blaze. Christine Bethea’s Geek Art/ Green Innovators Festival is saying thanks, partly by giving this eco/art/tech street fair’s fifth annual incarnation the theme “Earth, Wind and Fire.” The “fire” part includes actual firefighters, who on Fri., April 4, will be out on Penn offering fire-safety info (and seeking recruits, too) alongside fire-wielding performers from the Pyrotopia festival (pictured) and local troupes like Steel Town Fire and Sirkus Daze. GA/GI, which coincides with this month’s Unblurred gallery crawl, features events at dozens of venues including: Hotter Than Hell, a fashion show celebrating firefighters, at Pittsburgh Glass Center; a flame-shooting “fire piano,” also at PGC; and outdoor raku pottery firings. At Most Wanted Fine Art, famed balloon-sculptor Brian Kane does his thing alongside TED-style tech talks about apps. At Assemble, two Chatham grad students offer The Drop Project, an interactive installation educating visitors about water in the region. At the newly merged GBBB/Edge Studio, see “Pi Guy” Louis Boston’s art from mathematical equations and anomalies. Or, at Verde, try El Bombero (“the fireman”), a flaming cocktail sold to benefit GA/GI, which is produced by Passports: The Art Diversity Project and the Penn Avenue Arts Initiative. Bill O’Driscoll Starts 6 p.m.; closing times vary by venue. 4800-5500 Penn Ave., Bloomfield, Garfield and Friendship. Most events are free. www.gagifest5.blogspot.com

APRIL 05 “Questions We Ask” at Banff Mountain Film Festival

{TALK} {TAL In h honor of the 10th anniversary of its ann master’s program in ma creative writing, Carlow cre University hosts a talk U by b one of Ireland’s most celebrated authors. c Edna O’Brien’s first E novel, 1960’s The Country n Girls, Gi was infamous for depicting female sexuality in depi small Irish town. The book a sma banned by the governwas b ment. Her husband at the time ment told her, “You can write and I will never forgive you.” But the prolific O’Brien went on to win the Irish PEN Lifetime Achievement Award. AS 7:30 p.m. Antonian Theatre, 3333 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $15 ($5 for students). 412578-6120 or www.carlow.edu

in Ecuador and consider the Colorado River — all from the comfort of your seat. The annual touring Banff Mountain Film Festival returns with two programs of short films, packed full of extremesport action, environmental messages and gorgeous scenery. Look for: profiles of

+ MON., APRIL 07 {TALK} “If you never, ever talk to people and you meet all your needs on the Internet, you wake up one day and you’re the Unabomber,” Ann Patchett told Stephen Colbert in a 2012 interview about opening her bookstore in the

Amazon age. Patchett, a New York Times best-selling novelist and nonfiction writer, discusses her new essay collection This Is a Happy Marriage at Carnegie Music Hall tonight. She appears for the Monday Night Lecture Series, presented by Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. The talk is sold out, but you can try the waiting list. AS 7:30 p.m.

sp otlight The LGBT movement has sparked legal and cultural change that would have seemed unfathomable just a few years ago, from last year’s Supreme Court’s ruling against federal bans on gay marriage, to opinion polls that suggest growing tolerance. Still, there remains a great deal of stigma — within the LGBT community and without — about transgender people, or those who feel their gender identity doesn’t match their biological sex. On Tue., April 8, Janet Mock, a transgender activist who did not publicly talk about being transgender until 2011, speaks at Carnegie Mellon University about her new book, Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. The increasingly prominent Mock has talked about growing up in poverty, getting gender-reassignment surgery in Thailand, being a sex-worker in her teens and coming to terms with her parents — and herself. Her story has been featured in several national news outlets, and in 2012 she started the #GirlsLikeUs campaign, which “encourages trans women to live visibly.” CMU hosts a reading and moderated conversation about her book. Alex Zimmerman 7:30 p.m. Tue., April 8. Porter Hall, Carnegie Mellon University campus, Oakland. Free. www.janetmock.com

+ SAT., APRIL 05 {SCREEN} Climb mountains, harvest ice

NEWS

athletes and ad adventurers; heroes, such as the unsung heroe 90-year-woman who has 90-year-woma Himalayan journeys recorded Him and even a tiny since 1960; an American tree toad. South Ameri Al Hoff 7 p.m. p. Also 5 p.m. 6. Soldiers & Sailors Sun., April 6 Hall, 4141 Fifth Memorial H Ave., Oakland. $10-20. Oakla www.ventureoutdoors.org www.ve

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4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-40. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

+ THU., APRIL 10 {MUSIC} Continuing his residency at Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Iranian Music, Turkish musician Önder Özkoç celebrates his country’s sonics with a recital tonight. Özkoç is a man of many talents; using the guitar, mandolin and his native country’s instruments, his work dips into Turkish folk, rock and jazz. His recital includes five folk and contemporary selections. Accompanying him is a chamber ensemble led by Daniel Nesta Curtis, the School of Music’s contemporary-music ensemble director, and conducting and composition student Erberk Eryilmaz. AS Kresge Recital Hall, CMU campus, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 860-838-1991 or www. centerforiranianmusic.org

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THEATER BY THE WAY, MEET VERA STARK. Satire of race in the glamorous days of Old Hollywood, presented by The REP. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 6. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. DEADLY LESSONS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Every other Sat. Thru April 19. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 724-344-2069. GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS. David Mamet’s drama about the desperate world of boiler room real estate. Presented by the Indiana Players. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru April 6. Philadelphia Street Playhouse. 724-464-0725. GROUNDED. One-woman show following a gutsy fighter pilot whose unexpected pregnancy puts her career on hold. Sun, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m.

and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 4. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. AN ILIAD. A new adaptation Homer’s epic poem. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru April 6. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. IN THE HEIGHTS. Story of a vibrant community in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood. Presented by University of Pittsburgh Dept. of Theatre Arts. Tue-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 13. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-7529. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The courtroom of Judge Jackie Justice is now in session w/ “real” cases involving zombies, spaceships, furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

LA BOHÈME. Presented by the coming-of-age in urban America. April 4-5, 8 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera. Fri., April 4, and Sun., April 6, 3 p.m. 8 p.m. and Sun., April 6, 2 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 800-838-3006. 412-456-6666. STRINDBERG ONE ACTS. THE MUSICAL OF Feat. two plays by August MUSICALS (THE MUSICAL!). Strindberg. Presented by the Five musicals within one show. Red Masquers. April 9-12, Presented by Stage Right. 8 p.m. Peter Mills Theater Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru April 12. (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall), Boyd Community Center, Uptown. 412-396-6429. O’Hara. 412-228-0566. A VERY POTTER SHREK THE MUSICAL. MUSICAL. Benefits the April 9-12, 7 p.m. American Alliance for Baldwin High School. Theater & Production. 412-885-6767. April 3-5, 7:30 p.m. SOUTH PARK University of Pittsburgh www. per THEATRE. Children’s a p ty at Greensburg. pghci m Theatre Auditions for .co 724-837-7040. 2014 Season. April 12. WHAT’LL WE Cold readings from script. DO ABOUT SUE? Play Those interested in performing chronicling the meeting of in a musical will also be asked to Trude & Buddy as they discuss sing a little of a favorite song. the passing of a mutual No appointment necessary. Bring acquaintance & their past photo & resume. Thru April 12. relationships. Presented by Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. the Pittsburgh New Works STRAIGHTENING COMBS. Festival. Sun., April 6, 3 p.m. One-woman show written Andrew Carnegie Free & performed Kim El about Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 1-888-718-4253. A WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE. Comedy by Oscar Wilde. Presented by the hobnob theatre company. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru April 5. Butler Art Center, Butler. Art Center.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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COMEDY THU 03 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru April 24 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 04 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 30 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. PAUL MARTINO CHARITY COMEDY ROAST. 9:30 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-481-7625. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

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ASSEMBLE. The Drop Project. Interactive exhibit designed by Kristen Reynolds, Ann Payne, & Molly Mehling to personify aquatic ecosystems in order to create relatability to our everyday lives. Opening reception: April 4, 6 p.m. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BOKSENBAUM FINE ARTS GALLERY. Final Show at the Morrowfield. Paintings by Steve Boksenbaum, Lorin Boksenbaum, Danielle Robinson, & ceramics by Sandy Smith. Opening reception: April 5, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1960. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Hot Paint & Cold Glass. Multimedia exhibit by Patti & Al Middlemiss. Opening reception: April 5, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. IMAGE BOX GALLERY. Diametric Forces. New work by Matt Gatto. Opening reception: April 7, 7-9 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-0930. MINE FACTORY. Nine at the Mine. Point Park Senior Thesis show. Opening reception April 4, 6-10 p.m. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. STRUCTURE. Work by Ron Copland, Steve Ehret, Megan Herwig, Joseph Mruk, Gian Romagnoli, Andy Scott, & Megan Shalonis. Opening reception: April 4, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more.

Opening reception: April 4, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. MASH: Mansion Apartment Shack House. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Opening reception: April 4, 6-10 p.m. Bloomfield. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. April 4, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. 19th Century Photographs in the USA. Showing the largest collection on display feat. Civil War, historic persons, Cowboys & Indians. North Side. 412-231-7881. SEWICKLEY GALLERY. Recent Works by Joyce Werwie Perry. Opening reception: April 4, 6-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-5858. SHAW GALLERIES. Historic Pittsburgh. Photographs by Mark Muse. Opening reception: April 4, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Auction Preview Exhibition. Preview of work being sold in the 2014 Benefit Auction. Opening reception April 4, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Waterworks 2014. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society annual member show. Opening reception: April 5, 5-8 p.m. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Opening reception:

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Porous Sediments. Installation by Haylee Ebersole. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Dream Body. Video installation by Blaine Siegel. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. You Can’t Be Serious. Abstract minimalist paintings by Rose Duggan. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Flow: Recent Iterations in Clay. Work by Laura Jean McLaughlin & Kevin Snipes. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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VISUAL ART

SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SHAWN BLACKHAM, JOE EBERLE, DAN BROWN. 7 p.m. Arnold Volunteer Engine Co. 2 Social Hall. 724-681-2207.

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AARON KLEIBER, ANDY PICARRO, MOLLY SHARROW, BRYSON TURNER, RAY ZAWODNI. Benefits the National Parkinson Foundation, Western PA chapter. 8 p.m. Rivers Casino, North Side. 412-837-2542. CHRIS DUBAIL, JOE EBERLE, DAN BROWN. Monessen VFD. 724-470-8913. MIKE EAGAN, ANDY BENINGO, DAVID KAYE. 6:30 p.m. East Butler Fire Hall, Butler. 724-822-0461.

SUN 06 POETRY.COM LIVE: POETRY HIGH ROLLERS. Where poetry meets comedy. Hosted by Mike Dean & Ezra. 7 p.m. The Lounge on Verona, Verona. 412-871-5521.

TUE 08 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 09 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

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baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Between Abstraction & Realism. Work by Bettina Clowney. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Tin Can Tramp Folk Art. Mixed media by Steph Neary. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. extremely rare examples of 412-258-2700. pre World War II iron-making BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. technology. Rankin. Large collection of automatic 412-464-4020 x.21. roll-played musical instruments CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL and music boxes in a mansion HISTORY. Explore the setting. Call for appointment. complex interplay between O’Hara. 412-782-4231. culture, nature and CARNEGIE MUSEUM biotechnology. Open Fridays OF NATURAL HISTORY. 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & RACE: Are We So Sundays 12-4. Garfield. Different? Text, 412-223-7698. photographs, COMPASS INN. interactive audiovisual Demos and tours components, & www. per with costumed related artifacts pa pghcitym guides featuring this challenge perceptions .co restored stagecoach about race. Oakland. stop. 724-238-4983. 412-622-3131. CONNEY M. KIMBO CARNEGIE SCIENCE GALLERY. University of CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Digital Dome (planetarium), Memorabilia & Awards from Miniature Railroad and Village, the International Hall of Fame. USS Requin submarine, and more. Oakland. 412-648-7446. North Side. 412-237-3400. DEPRECIATION LANDS CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are MUSEUM. Small living

FULL LIST ONLINE

GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Don’t Shoot the Bunny. Metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Positive Space. Juried art & design student showcase. Wexford. 412-367-9300. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Recent Work by Lindsay Dill & Aldona Bird. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando,

history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

Frank Pahl. OJanine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Lossless. Carnegie Mellon School of Art’s MFA Thesis Exhibition feat. large-scale installations, video & generative sound art. Oakland. 412-268-3618. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Plume. Installation by Ian Brill. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

HARMONY MUSEUM. Out of the Attic. Furniture, clothing, photographs & artwork from collections rarely or not previously displayed. Opens April 4. Harmony. 724-452-7341. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Duets. Harmonious couplings of botanical art w/ items created between the 16th & 21st centuries from the Hunt Institute collections. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MCKEESPORT REGIONAL HISTORY & HERITAGE CENTER. The Civil War in Pennsylvania. Feat. 4 life size figures that help tell the story of how people from Western Pennsylvania became involved in the war effort, either as soldiers, factory workers, or eye witnesses. McKeesport. 412-678-1832. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays,

walking tours, gift shop, picnic Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: area and Trolley Theatre. Western PA Sports Museum, Washington. 724-228-9256. Clash of Empires, and exhibits on PHIPPS CONSERVATORY local history, more. Strip District. & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 412-454-6000. Spring Flower Show. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Showcase of musical genres Features 5,000 relics through whimsical sculptures of Catholic saints. North Side. made out of up-cycled 412-323-9504. instruments alongside ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN thousands of vibrant tulips, CATHOLIC CHURCH. daffodils, hyacinths & other Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th seasonal favorites. 14 indoor century murals depicting war, rooms & 3 outdoor gardens social justice and the immigrant feature exotic plants and experience in America. Millvale. floral displays from around 421-681-0905. the world. Garden Railroad. SWEETWATER CENTER Dinosaur-themed train display. FOR THE ARTS. Art Blooms. Oakland. 412-622-6914. Flower show presented PITTSBURGH ZOO by The Village & PPG AQUARIUM. Garden Club of Home to 4,000 animals, Sewickley. Sewickley. including many 412-741-4405. endangered species. . w w w WEST OVERTON Highland Park. r citypape h g p MUSEUMS. Learn 412-665-3639. .com about distilling and RACHEL CARSON coke-making in this HOMESTEAD. A pre-Civil War industrial village. Reverence for Life. 724-887-7910. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits UKRAINIAN EASTER on the Homestead Mill. Steel EGG WORKSHOP. 12 p.m. industry and community artifacts SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian from 1881-1986. Homestead. Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-464-4020. 412-527-5359. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s

FULL LIST E N O LIN

HOLIDAY SAT 05

FESTIVALS SAT 05

PITTSBURGH’S TARTAN DAY CELEBRATION. A family oriented Scottish festival. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Bethel Presbyterian Church, Bethel Park. 724-742-2725.

DANCE FRI 04 - SAT 05 THE SECRET HISTORY OF LOVE. Performance revealing how people in the LGBT community survived tremendous obstacles & found love. Presented by Sean Dorsey Dance. April 4-5, 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

FRI 04 - SUN 06

$3 Straub Lager Bottles all day, every day Sample Straub’s all malt craft Maibock and IPL Thursday, 4/3 from 8-10 PM

PITTSBURGH FESTIVAL NOUVEAU. World dance & circus performances & workshops. info@HakanDances. com. April 4-6 Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield.

FUNDRAISERS THU 03 BREWS FOR VIEWS: A CRAFT BEER TASTING. Benefits Scenic Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. The Society for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. 412-956-2990.

FRI 04 BREWER’S BALL. Food & beer pairings, auctions, more. Benefits

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 7-10:30 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-321-4422. B.U.S. 9 VIP RECEPTION & ACTOR PARADE. Part of Bricolage’s signature fundraiser. 7-9 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. PULSEATIONS: BIG TOP. Silent auction, cocktails, more. Benefits Pittsburgh Urban Leadership & Service Experience. 7-10 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-361-0124. TOTALLY FIERCE 80’S PROM DRAG & BURLESQUE SHOW. Benefits the International Queer Burlesque Festival. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

SAT 05 B.U.S. 9. A large cast of playwrights, actors, directors, & tech crew are asked to write & stage 6 brand new 10-min. plays in just 24 hours, for Bricolage’s signature fundraiser. 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-471-0999. HEROES BEHIND THE BADGE. Screening of the follow-up documentary to the original “Heroes Behind the Badge,” highlighting the story of Clairton Police Officer James Kuzak Jr. Benefits the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial. 7 p.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-401-2165. LET THEM EAT CAKE. Cake decorating & tasting contest. Benefits the Midwife Center. 7:30-10 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-321-6880 x 208. NEW DENIM & DIAMONDS GALA. Hors d’oeuvres, food stations, live music, auctions, more. Guests are encouraged to dress in jeans & jewels. Benefits the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra. 6:30 p.m. Greensburg Country Club, Jeannette. 724-837-1850.

SUN 06 7TH ANNUAL GREATER PITTSBURGH LITERACY COUNCIL TRIVIA BOWL. 3 p.m. St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Oakland. 412-393-7632. APRIL FOOL’S MUD RUN CHALLENGE. Benefits the Pittsburgh Harlequins Youth Rugby Mentoring Program. 9 a.m. Founders Field. 412-687-8429. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. CAMPUS SUPERSTAR. American Idol-like singing competition.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Benefits The Edward & Rose Berman Hillel Jewish University Center. 7 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-621-8875. CELEBRITY PASTA DINNER. Buffet-style pasta dinner served by Mayor Bill Peduto, actor David Conrad, singer Slim Forsythe, more. Benefits North Hills Community Outreach. Payment must be made by March 14. 4-7 p.m. Sieb’s Pub & Restaurant, Ross. 412-408-3830.

EVENT: Uncumber Theatrics’ Her

Things, An Interactive Estate Sale, at ModernFormations, Garfield CRITIC: Cynthia Closkey, 47, a web

TUE 08

consultant from Butler

READY..SET..RACE! Hors d’oeuvres, raffles & cash bar. Benefits Susan G. Komen Pittsburgh. 6-8:30 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. 412-342-0500.

WHEN: Thu.,

March 27

POLITICS

I guessed it would be a little bit like Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding, but with spookiness and held at an estate sale instead of a wedding. That was wrong, because it’s more of a puzzle. It’s more like a role-playing game, where some people have characters, and everybody else is themselves. I don’t know if there’s a solution to be found or not, and maybe that’s part of the puzzle of it. In the notes, it says the first line and the last line are scripted and everything else is improvised. So that’s a really hard thing for them to play, but it’s also hard for us to understand. And clearly, some of the stuff was really old things that were repurposed in new ways, and some of the stuff was original and created for this. It was hard to tell which was what.

SAT 05 LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR CANDIDATES FORUM. Presented by Shadyside Democrats & the Pitt Law Democrats. Email Ian.Everhart@ gmail.com to RSVP. 3 p.m. University of Pittsburgh Law Building, Oakland. 412-648-1413.

LITERARY THU 03 AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. Every other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru April 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DAVID WITOSLAWSKI & BRITTNEY HOWE. Authors of Great Pennsylvania Amusement Parks Road Trip. University Bookstore. 12 p.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-624-4141. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafter happyhour.wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. JEFF SHARLET. Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SAT 05 AN EVENING W/ EDNA

B Y ANGE L A SU IC O

O’BRIEN. Irish writer & author of Country Girl. 7:30 p.m. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-578-6120. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LITANALYSIS: READING FICTION W/ FREUD. The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. READINGS FROM THE EDGE OF THE EARTH. Feat. Ed Murray, Ziggy Edwards, Ed Bortz. 2 p.m. AF Booksellers, Edgewood. 412-735-6756.

MON 07 - WED 09 PITT-GREENSBURG WRITERS FESTIVAL. Feat. Terrance Hayes, Joy Katz, Julie Sokolow, Michael Cox, Deb Olin Unferth, more. April 7-11 University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MT. LEBANON WRITER’S GROUP. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

ANN PATCHETT. Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures Monday Night Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. SAMUEL HAZO PRESENTS: POETRY & PUBLIC SPEECH. 6-8 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SHAKESPEARE READERS. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

FRI 04 EGG HUNT EXTRAVAGANZA. Egg hunt, face painting, games, more. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211 x 116.

FRI 04 - SUN 06 CHARLOTTE’S WEB. Based on the book by E.B. White. Presented by The Theatre Factory KidWorks. Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri., April 4, 7:30 p.m. Thru April 6 The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200.

SAT 05 CARKIDS: MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG. Explore the Frick family carriages & cars & make a travel game to take on your next journey. Ages 4-8. 11 a.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. YOUTH NATURALIST INSTITUTE: TROPICAL TREK. Investigate diverse tropical ecosystems & learn about conservation efforts using museum dioramas & collections. Ages 10-13. Sat. Thru May 10 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

SAT 05 - SUN 06

TUE 08

MON 07

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

KIDSTUFF THU 03 - WED 09 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing

ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru April 27 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

TUE 08 KENDAMA, PILL & YO YO -SKILL GAMES. For middle & high school students. Tue, 3:15 p.m. Thru April 15 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MOVE W/ ME. Ages 3-4. Second Tue of every month, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-2:30 p.m. Thru May 13 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. TUESDAY CRAFTERNOONS. Ages 4-8. Tue. Thru April 8 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT TAP SYSTEM SOCIAL HOUR: MONDAY- FRIDAY 6 - 8pm 1$ OFF ALL CRAFT BREWS! 3$ HOUSEMADE LIQUOR INFUSIONS

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WED 09 BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April 30 Brookline Community Center, Brookline. 412-571-3222. L & J MATH CLUB. For students in grades 4-7. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru April 30 Mount

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We ran out of money and at last we came home. I was eighteen. That’s the whole story.

TUE 08 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 09 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF

FROM REVOLUTION: THE YEAR I FELL IN LOVE AND WENT TO JOIN THE WAR , BY DEB OLIN UNFERTH

Deb Olin Unferth headlines the 14th

Annual Pitt-Greensburg Writers festival, which also features appearances by Terrance Hayes, Joy Katz, Jim Daniels and others. 7 p.m. nightly, Mon., April 7, through Fri., April 11. 150 Finoli Drive, Greensburg. Free. Call 724-836-7481 or visit www.greensburg.pitt.edu.

THU 03

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MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. April 4-5, 6:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. April 4-5, 7:50 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

2X2. Musical event feat. Patchwork & Directions Duo. 8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOOKLOVERS BASH: FIRST ANNIVERSARY PARTY. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE IMPORTANCE PLANNING FOR END OF LIFE MEDICAL CARE. w/ Rodney L. Rutkowski, MSW. 6-7:30 p.m. UPMC St. Margaret, Sharpsburg. 412-784-4022. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: HOW TO GET AHEAD AT WORK. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PECHAKUCHA NIGHT. A dynamic presentation style where presenters have 6 minutes & 40 seconds to pair words & images. Presented by AIA Pittsburgh.

7 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-471-2027. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPRING RENEWAL & REJUVENATION SERIES W/ JIM DONOVAN. Thu. Thru May 1 The Center of Harmony, Harmony. 724-400-6044.

involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

THU 03 - SUN 06

SHRINE CIRCUS PROTEST. 6-7 p.m., Sat., April 5, 1:30-2:30 p.m. and Sun., April 6, 1-2 p.m. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 412-651-8995.

21ST ANNUAL JFILM FESTIVAL. Jewish Film Festival. Presented by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Thru April 6 Manor Theatre, Squirrel Hill. 412-992-5203.

FRI 04 FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay

FRI 04 - SAT 05 GEEK ART/GREEN INNOVATORS FESTIVAL. Local artists & green innovators examine the intersection of art, technology & ecology. Part of Unblurred. April 4-5 Penn Avenue Arts District, Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7.

FRI 04 - SUN 06

SAT 05 7TH ANNUAL BUTLER PARANORMAL CONFERENCE. Feat. Paul Johnson, Fred Saluga, Patty A. Wilson, more, plus raffles, door prizes, food. Bring a non- perishable item to donate to the Great Pittsburgh Area Food Bank. Tanglewood Event Center, Butler. 724-287-0021. AYURVEDA & WELLNESS FESTIVAL. Feat. presentations on wellnessthemed topics, family-friendly discovery & activity stations, Indian-inspired food tastings, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914.

THE CIVIL WAR LETTERS SPANISH CONVERSATION OF CPL. JOHN STRATHERN. GROUP. Friendly, informal. Part of the The Civil War At the Starbucks inside Target. In Pennsylvania traveling Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, exhibit. 7 p.m. McKeesport East Liberty. 412-362-6108. Regional History & SWING CITY. Learn & practice Heritage Center, McKeesport. swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. 412-678-1832. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. CIVIL WAR LIVING 412-759-1569. HISTORY DAY. Feat. special exhibits, re-enactors SPRING WORKSHOPS: encampment & drills, tours GLASS FLOWERS. Sat, Sun, of Chartiers Cemetery, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat., May 3, live music, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Thru Andrew Carnegie Free Library May 11, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Thru Music Hall, Carnegie. April 6 Vessel Studio Glass, 412-276-3456. South Side. 412-721-7812. DIY VINTAGE WEDDING WORKSHOP. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Pat Catans, Ross. 20TH ANNUAL MGA 412-758-9720. SPORTS MEMORABILIA EMPATHY FIRST. AUCTION SUNDAY. Benefits A compassionate the Myasthenia Gravis communication & conflict Association of Western PA. transformation study group 3 p.m. The Club at Nevillewood. based on the work of peace 412- 276-1000. activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL First Sat of every month, HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. 2 p.m. and Third Sat of Weekly letter writing event. every month, 2 p.m. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Thru May 17 412-271-7660. Oakland. 412-683-3727. JOHN DILWORTH. ARGENTINE TANGO Lecture w/ the creator of CLASSES. Sun, 5 p.m. Courage the Cowardly Dog. Thru April 6 Wilkins School 5:30-6:30 p.m. Point Park Community Center, Swissvale. University, Downtown. 412-661-2480. 412-392-4313. CHINESE II. First and Third KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie Carnegie Library, Oakland. Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those CONTRA DANCE. Carnegie who already have a basic Alliance of Traditional & Social understanding of Korean Dance. 5-8:30 p.m. Carnegie & are interested in Mellon University, increasing proficiency. Oakland. 412-506-7998. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. ESSENTIALS OF Carnegie Library, A BELLYDANCE Oakland. DRUM SOLO. Intensive 412-622-3151. . www per dance workshop. Sun. LADIES DAY OUT. a p ty ci pgh m Thru May 18 Fitness Vendor show .co with a Twist, South Side. feat. businesses & 412-225-3302. organizations catering I MADE IT! HITCHBURGH. to women. 12-6 p.m. Butler Nomadic indie craft marketplace Intermediate High School, feat. wedding vendors & artists. Butler. 724-214-3400. info@imadeitmarket.com PENGUIN BOOKSHOP 12-4 p.m. Wigle Whiskey GRAND RE-OPENING Barrel House, North Side. CELEBRATION. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. KEYSTONE CANINE Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. TRAINING CLUB 412-741-3838. OPEN HOUSE. 1-4 p.m. THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: Keystone Canine Training Club. USE ALL THE CRAYONS! 412-833-2211. THE COLORFUL GUIDE TO LITTLE SLICE OF HEAVEN SIMPLE HUMAN HAPINESS. SERIES: BARBARA 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, JOHNSTONE. An afternoon Oakland. 412-622-3151. w/ the Carnegie Mellon SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA University professor who CRAZE. Free lessons, followed specializes in Pittsburghese. by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. 1-2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. District. 412-224-2827. 412-708-8844. OPEN MIC & CRAFT SCOTTISH COUNTRY BEER SWAP. Every other DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., Sun, 6:30 p.m. Thru April 6 social dancing follows. Bridgeville Public Library, No partner needed. Mon, Bridgeville. 412-812-2262. 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. OVERVIEW OF THE Grace Episcopal Church, EXQUISITE ZODIAC & Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. HOLOGRAPHY. w/ Rick SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE DiClemente. Theosophical CLUB. Free Scrabble games, Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. Mount Lebanon Public Library, 412-462-4200. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

MON 07 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MURRAY AVENUE APOTHECARY’S ANNUAL SEXUAL HEALTH SEMINAR. 6-8:30 p.m. The Well, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4996. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Call for reservations. Mon. Thru April 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SLOVAKIA: WHO, WHY & WHERE. Presentation by John Righetti clarifying the misconception about why people came from Eastern Slovakia & why they settled where they did. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION GROUP. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

SAT 05 - SUN 06

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TUE 08 BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. Every other Tue, 7 p.m. Thru April 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. END-OF-LIFE CARE PANEL LECTURE. Part of the Dr. Bernard Cobetto Lecture Series on Contemporary Ethical Issues. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-836-9911. THE HISTORY OF THE NATIONALITY ROOMS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. w/ Michael Walter, Nationality Rooms Tour Coordinator. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. LOW INCOME TAXPAYER CLINIC. 10-11:30 a.m. and Thu., April 10, 10-11:30 a.m. Jewish Family & Children’s Service, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7200. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING Applications & full detail ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL available at www.aapgh.org COMPANY. Auditions for The Ice House Studios, Lawrenceville. Sound of Music. May 17-18. 412-682-0348. Seeking principal roles, von BOYD COMMUNITY Trapp children, & male/female CENTER. Seeking vendors for ensemble. www.centerauditions. Gardenfest & Artist Market. org Lincoln Park Performing Arts info@boydcommunitycenter.org ADDING VALUE TO Center. 724-259-6443. O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. OUR LOCAL FOOD SYSTEM. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking Danielle Roberts of Republic Ongoing auditions for actors ages performers & artists to participate Food Enterprise Center is 18+ for murder mystery shows in First Fridays - Art in a Box. creating value-added products performed in the Pittsburgh area. For more information, email by utilizing “second-grade” 412-833-5056. thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. produce that would otherwise MONYOUGH COMMUNITY 412-403-7357. be wasted. 6:30 p.m. East End SINGERS. Seeking singers of GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Food Co-op, Point Breeze. all ages, especially baritones & Seeking art work for the juried 412-242-3598. basses. www.mycsingers.com exhibit Color. Entry deadline BEREAVEMENT 814-460-1731. May 3. Visit greensburgartcenter. SUPPORT GROUP. PITTSBURGH org for information. For Widows/ PLAYWRIGHTS Greensburg. 724-396-6699. Widowers over 50. THEATRE COMPANY. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY . Second and Fourth Auditions for the HOUR REVIEW. Seeking www per a p ty ci Wed of every Pittsburgh Pride pgh m submissions in all genres for o .c month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Theatre Festival. fledgling literary magazine Sebastian Church, Ross. April 13. PPTF13@gmail. curated by members of the 412-366-1300. com Pittsburgh Playwrights Hour After Happy Hour BIENVENIDO: HAVE Theatre, Downtown. Writing Workshop. FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK 412-256-8109. afterhappyhourreview.com. SPANISH. Every other Wed, SEWICKLEY AREA THEATRE THE NEW YINZER. Seeking 7 p.m. Thru April 23 Mount COMPANY. Auditions for Little original essays about literature, Lebanon Public Library, Shop of Horrors. April 6-7. Men/ music, TV or film, & also essays Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. women, prepare 16-32 bars of a generally about Pittsburgh. To DETROIT STYLE URBAN musical theatre uptempo song/ see some examples, visit www. BALLROOM DANCE. ballad & a 1-min. contemporary newyinzer.com & view the 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. monologue. Accompanist will current issue. Email all pitches, Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. be provided. St. James Parish, submissions & inquiries to 412-242-4345. Sewickley. 412-879-0355. newyinzer@gmail.com. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Persad Center, which provides counseling and other Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, resources to the LGBT community, is seeking volunteers Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW for two upcoming events: the Underwriters Circle OFFS. A meeting of jugglers Party, on April 10, and its signature fundraising auction & spinners. All levels and party, Art for Change, on May 12. Help is needed welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. with setup, security, registration and more. Email Union Project, Highland Park. bmcgrogan@persadcenter.org or visit www.persadcenter. 412-363-4550. org for information. URBAN HOMESTEADING SERIES: PRESERVING THE HARVEST. 7 p.m. STEEL CITY IMPROV. Auditions OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Mount Lebanon Public Library, for spring 2014 long form Seeking vendors to sell plants Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. improv house teams. April 6. & products at the annual WEST COAST SWING Recommended min. Garden Mart. For more info WEDNESDAYS. Swing completion of SCIT Level & registration, call or email dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. Two Improv or equivalent. c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. The Library, South Side. steelcityimprov.comauditions/ 724-266-4500 x 114. 916-287-1373. 2014improv/ Steel City Improv PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR Theater, Shadyside. SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International 412-404-2695. DAY ROOM WINDOW. Aqueous Open exhibition. www. Day Room Window at The New pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com Hazlett Theater. 6 Allegheny ART ALL NIGHT: THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY Square, North Side. March 31 LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit FOUNDATION’S TEENS 4 & April 3 from 4:30-8pm. one (& only one) piece of Multiracial cast of women ages CHANGE GRANT PROGRAM. artwork or sign up to perform. 15-25. Prepare 2 minute dramatic Accepting proposals for youth-led Registration & other info at contemporary monologue. projects or projects designed http://www.artallnight.org/ Bring head shot & resume. specifically for youth that 412-235-1950. Actors will be paid. Schedule promote social change including ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF audition w/ Kathryn Kelly disability rights, LGBTQ rights, PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBER at kskelly412@gmail.com. peace/human rights, racial justice, SCREENING. Open to artists Information: www.dayroom more. Grants will range from 18 or over working & living window.com New Hazlett $250-$2,000. trcfwpa.org/grants/ within a 150-mile radius of Theater, North Side. grant-applications 412-243-9250. DISCOVER ME! Seeking 2 Pgh. Applications for video, VERONA CREATIVE caucasian women & 2 caucasian installation, & other large-scale MARKETPLACE. Seeking vendors men age 18-30 for the movie works must be submitted for marketplace in June. Space is production Discover Me! by 4pm, April 3 to Unit 102, limited. Call for more information. Call Robert at 412-209-9868. 100 43rd Street, Lawrenceville. 412-721-0943. URBAN POWER TO PROSPER PROGRAM: SALES STRATEGIES, RESOURCES & SYSTEMS. 5:45-8:45 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-624-1544.

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56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.02/04.09.2014

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My boyfriend of three months, “Marcus,” told me last week that he is a trans man. He has performed oral sex on me and fingered me, but he never let me reciprocate and told me he didn’t want to have penis-in-vagina sex yet because to him that was a large commitment. We go to college in a conservative part of the country, and almost no one here knows. He worried that if I found out, I would expose him to our friends and peers and perhaps even press charges (because we had sex when I did not know he was trans). Had I known, I don’t think I would have had sex with Marcus. Before I found out he was trans, I was falling for him. Now, I no longer feel those things and do not know if I can continue dating him. I feel like a small-minded bigot that my romantic feelings are based on something as randomly distributed as a penis. Marcus wants to continue to date and to have sex to see if my feelings can change. I don’t think they will. But I’ve never been in this position before. Am I being a bigot?

people to love you for who you are. All of you. There are many people out there who think trans men are the ideal guys. Don’t waste your time on anyone else.” Let’s say you’ve explored your feelings and decided you don’t want to keep seeing Marcus. Does that make you a bigot? “It’s OK to have a preference,” said Levasseur. “If trans guys are not her thing, no harm done. I would just hope she is kind when she lets Marcus go. It sounds like he wants to convince her to want him or love him, and no one should be in the business of doing that. Everyone deserves to be loved because, not although.” Levasseur wanted to close with a message to any trans men reading this: “To the Marcuses of the world who will read NCA’s letter and see it as another message of rejection to add to a daily list of transphobia and internalized self-loathing that fuels the staggering trans suicide attempt rate: Don’t go there. Trans men deserve to be loved for the amazing men they are. They did not have their masculinity handed to them. They earned it — often through journeys that take unbelievable resilience and courage. And we deserve not to settle for someone who doesn’t appreciate our bodies or our histories. Find someone who wants the full you.” Follow M. Dru Levasseur on Twitter @DruLawyer. Learn more about the Jim Collins Foundation at jimcollinsfoundation.org.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

TRANS MEN DID NOT HAVE THEIR MASCULINITY HANDED TO THEM. THEY EARNED IT.

NO CLEVER ACRONYM

“NCA is clearly struggling,” said M. Dru Levasseur, a trans activist, attorney and cofounder of the Jim Collins Foundation, which funds gender-confirming surgeries for trans people. But before you dump Marcus — if you dump Marcus — Levasseur recommends exploring your feelings. “Does NCA not see Marcus as a man now? Is she sure he doesn’t have a penis? Trans guys have amazing dicks that are different from cis guys’ dicks (surgery or no surgery) — how does she know she won’t like it or even prefer it? Is she afraid of social rejection? If she wants to explore this, she could talk to a therapist, read some books, or join a support group online (where she won’t risk outing Marcus). Who knows, Marcus could be the best sex and biggest love of her life.” My two cents: You’re also struggling with the fact that you had sex — oral and fingering count — with someone you might not have had sex with if you had known this detail in advance. I believe Marcus should have told you he was trans before you hooked up. But messing around with someone you wouldn’t have if you had known [insert relevant detail here] is a pretty common experience, and there are far worse forms of nondisclosure. While trans, poly, kinky and poz folks are all pressured to disclose, the world would be a much happier place if abusers, users, assholes and Fox News “personalities” were the ones who had to disclose. “There is absolutely no legal duty to disclose trans status,” added Levasseur. “A person’s trans status is ‘excruciatingly private’ and constitutionally protected information. There are lots of reasons why trans people might be stealth (or not out) like Marcus — for example, the terrifying rate of violence against trans people or the overwhelming statistics of discrimination. But I think disclosure is a good idea early on because it allows

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

I’m a 32-year-old pansexual woman. I have recently started seeing a 22-yearold het male. The thing is, he’s in a serious (but open) relationship with a 26-year-old woman. He’s asked me if I’m into playing around with both of them. I’m into it on principle (who wouldn’t want to fuck a girl and a guy at the same time?!?), but I’m not sure if it’s a good idea. I don’t want to deal with the awkwardness around it, let alone have their relationship suffer (and mine with the guy). What do you suggest? TORONTO POLY VIRGIN

Who wouldn’t want to fuck a girl and a guy at the same time? I wouldn’t, as I’m gay, gayer, gayest. But I don’t see why you — pan, panner, pannest — wouldn’t jump at the chance. (After you’ve met the other girl in person, established a mutual attraction and negotiated the terms.) Could this three-way end awkwardly? Of course. But billions of two-ways have ended awkwardly over the centuries, and that didn’t stop you from having a two-way with this 22-year-old male, right? The addition of a third person might mean a 50 percent greater chance of someone feeling awkward after the three-way, and that isn’t awesome. But there is a 100 percent chance of having a three-way, and that is awesome. This week on the Lovecast, how to come out as polyamorous to your children: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.02-04.09

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In his novel The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera says that the brain has “a special area which we might call poetic memory and which records everything that charms or touches us, that makes our lives beautiful.” In the coming days, it will be especially important for you to tap into this power spot in your own grey matter, Aries. You need to activate and stir up the feelings of enchantment that are stored there. Doing so will make you fully alert and available for the new delights that will be swirling in your vicinity. The operative principle is like attracts like.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Our ancestors could see the Milky Way galaxy spread out across the heavens on every clear night. Galileo said it was so bright, it cast a shadow of his body on the ground. But today that glorious spectacle is invisible to us city-dwellers. The sky after sundown is polluted with artificial light that hides 90 percent of the 2,000 stars we might otherwise see. If you want to bask in the natural illumination, you’ve got to travel to a remote area where the darkness is deeper. Let’s make that your metaphor, Taurus. Proceed on the hypothesis that a luminous source of beauty is concealed from you. To become aware of it, you must seek out a more profound darkness.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Dear Gemini: I don’t demand your total attention and I don’t need your unconditional approval. I will never restrict your freedom or push you to explain yourself. All I truly want to do is to warm myself in the glow of your intelligence. Can you accept that? I have this theory that your sparkle is contagious — that I’ll get smarter about how to live my own life if I can simply be in your presence. What do you say? In return, I promise to deepen your appreciation for yourself and show you secrets about how best to wield your influence. —Your Secret Admirer.”

CANCER

(June 21-July 22):

The Cancerian artist Rembrandt became one of the world’s greatest painters. It was a struggle. “I can’t paint the way they want me to paint,” he said about those who questioned his innovative approach. “I have tried and I have tried very hard, but I can’t do it. I just can’t do it!” We should be glad the master failed to meet his critics’ expectations. His work’s unique beauty didn’t get watered down. But there was a price to pay. “That is why I am just a little crazy,” Rembrandt concluded. Here’s the moral of the story: To be true to your vision and faithful to your purpose, you may have to deal with being a little crazy. Are you willing to make that trade-off?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Indian spiritual teacher Nisargadatta Maharaj offered a three-stage fable to symbolize one’s progression toward enlightenment. In the first stage, you are inside a cage located in a forest where a tiger prowls. You’re protected by the cage, so the tiger can’t hurt you. On the other hand, you’re trapped. In the second stage, the tiger is inside the cage and you roam freely through the forest. The beautiful animal is trapped. In the third stage, the tiger is out of the cage and you have tamed it. It’s your ally and you are riding around on its back. I believe this sequence has resemblances to the story you’ll be living in the coming months. Right now you’re

inside the cage and the tiger is outside. By mid-May the tiger will be in the cage and you’ll be outside. By your birthday, I expect you to be riding the tiger.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): What is “soul work,” anyway? It’s like when you make an unpredictable gift for someone you love. Or when you bravely identify one of your unripe qualities and resolve to use all your willpower and ingenuity to ripen it. Soul work is when you wade into a party full of rowdy drunks and put your meditation skills to the acid test. It’s like when you teach yourself not merely to tolerate smoldering ambiguity, but to be amused by it and even thrive on it. Can you think of other examples? It’s Soul Work Week for you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Are you close to anyone who is a catalytic listener? Is there a person who tunes in to what you say with such fervent receptivity that you get inspired to reveal truths you didn’t realize you knew? If so, invite this superstar out to a free lunch or two in the coming days. If not, see if you can find one. Of course, it is always a blessing to have a heart-to-heart talk with a soul friend, but it is even more crucial than usual for you to treat yourself to this luxury now. Hints of lost magic are near the surface of your awareness. They’re still unconscious, but could emerge into full view during provocative conversations with an empathetic ally.

clucking voices in your head: Give them milk and cookies, but don’t pay attention to their cautious advice. You need to be free of the past, free of fearful influences, and free of the self you’re in the process of outgrowing.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For the foreseeable future, I urge you not to spend much time wrangling with bureaucrats and know-it-alls. Avoid frustrating projects that would require meticulous discipline. Don’t even think about catching up on paperwork or organizing your junk drawer or planning the next five years of your career. Instead, focus on taking long meandering walks to nowhere in particular. Daydream about an epic movie based on your life story. Flirt with being a lazy bum. Play noncompetitive games with unambitious people. Here’s why: Good ideas and wise decisions are most likely to percolate as you are lounging around doing nothing — and feeling no guilt for doing nothing.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Are you waiting? Are you wondering and hoping?

Are you calculating whether you are needed, and if so, how much? Do you wish the signs were clearer about how deeply you should commit yourself? Are you on edge as you try to gauge what your exact role is in the grand scheme of things? I’m here to deliver a message from the universe about how you should proceed. It’s a poem by Emily Dickinson: “They might not need me but — they might — / I’ll let my Heart be just in sight — / A smile so small as mine might be / Precisely their necessity.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You will soon get a second chance. An opportunity you failed to capitalize on in the past will re-emerge in an even more welcoming guise, and you will snag it this time. You weren’t ready for it the first time it came around, but you are ready now! It’s probably a good thing the connection didn’t happen earlier, because at that time the magic wasn’t fully ripe. But the magic is ripe now! Choose one area of your life where you’re going to stop pretending. Report results to FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): On my blog, I quoted author Ray Bradbury: “You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.” I asked my readers what word they would use in place of “writing” to describe how they avoided being destroyed by reality. Popular responses were love, music, whiskey, prayer, dreams, gratitude and yoga. One woman testified that she stayed drunk on sexting, while another said “collecting gargoyles from medieval cathedrals,” and a third claimed her secret was “jumping over hurdles while riding a horse.” There was even a rebel who declared she stayed drunk on writing so she could destroy reality. My question is important for you to meditate on, Scorpio. Right now you must do whatever’s necessary to keep from being messed with by reality.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Does your mother know what you are up to these days? Let’s hope not. I doubt if she would fully approve, and that might inhibit your enthusiasm for the experiments you are exploring. It’s probably best to keep your father out of the loop as well, along with other honchos, cynics or loved ones who might be upset if you wander outside of your usual boundaries. And as for those

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Call For Artists Craftsmen’s Guild Of Pittsburgh. A Fair In The Park 45th Annual Fine Art And Craft Show. Applications Available Online At afairinthepark.org Application Deadline 4/10/14 New Members Screening April 5th, Pittsburgh Center For The Arts. Visit craftsmensguild.org For Information.

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Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Africa, Brazil Work/ Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter. org (AAN CAN)

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Senior Landman

Network Radio Company Seeking PT Sports Anchor Broadcasting Experience Pro and College Sports Knowledge Required Send Demo, Resume and Contact Info to: tmiller@sbnol.com

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

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Talisman Energy USA Inc. Warrendale, PA.

Responsible for tasks relating to land activities in the Columbia, Troy and Wells development areas of Pennsylvania. Prioritize lease targets based on Tier structure and drilling schedule. Direct land brokerage firm on leasing targets. Manage capital budget for acquisitions. Oversee the negotiation and acquisition of oil and gas leases. 10 to 15 % domestic travel.

Reference job 140614

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Send resume to April Spencer Talisman Energy 2445 Technology Forest Blvd., The Woodlands, TX 7738

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

ECM Transport is NOW HIRING Regional Road & Local Drivers (10) Local Driver Positions at $19 per hour (20) Regional Road Positions at .50CPM Excellent Home Time, Benefits, 401k

Apply online at ecmtransport.com or call us at 800-548-7379, ext. 7506

• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance.

Act 235 Courses Basic Class: May 17, 18, 22, 21, 23 and 24, 2014 Renewal Classes: May 22, 2014 www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required

Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

“ Everybody can be great... becuase anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS -WILL YOU ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE? 10-month Public Allies program runs from 9/2014 - 6/2015 Must be at least 17 years old by September 2, 2014 Possess a high school diploma/G.E.D. by September 2, 2014 Passionate about the issues facing Southwestern PA

BENEFITS TO PUBLIC ALLIES

$1,400/month Living Stipend Health Care Coverage Childcare Reimbursement Training and Professional Development Opportunites $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of program

APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014 www.publicallies.org/apply

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 60

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LIVE

STUDIES

REAL ESTATE SERVICES 20 Acres. $0 Down, Only $119/mo. NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas. Beautiful Views! Money Back Guarantee 866-8825263 Ext.81 www. sunsetranches.net (AAN CAN)

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STORAGE

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

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ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

HIGH CHOLESTEROL? CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

SOUTH FOR RENT

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

AUTO SERVICES

ADOPTION

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

CLASSES EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2014. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

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REHEARSAL

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Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

A loving, financially secure, safe happy home awaits your newborn.

1-877-492-8811 Expenses Paid Karen

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on April 29, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • District Wireless Equipment Installation at Various Schools Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on March 26, 2014, at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

Newly renovated Apartment in Mount Washington

overlooking city. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen, w/d hookups. Stove and refrigerator. $1,800 per Month gas and water included. No pets. Call John 412-580-6550

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MIND & BODY

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896 STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Xie LiHong’s

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

412-401-4110

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor) Open 24 hours/7 days a week

Chinese Bodyworks

Learn do Aiki Beginner’s classes T, Th 7-8 pm (16 yrs or older) For more information go to

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MIND & BODY

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Aming’s Massage Therapy

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-441-1185

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation

massage BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

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7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Cranberry Office Now Open!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9

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Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

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Call Erin at:

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Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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OVER $20K DRAWINGS

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GIVEN AWAY EACH SATURDAY IN APRIL! GRAND FINALE

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SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

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April 2, 2014