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WITH DOCS AND DRAMAS, PITTSBURGH’S 28TH ANNUAL GAY/LESBIAN FILM FESTIVAL GETS REEL 38

EVENTS

Jenny Hval, with special guest, The Garment District

10.9 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: BILL CALLAHAN, WITH SPECIAL GUEST LONNIE HOLLEY Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Tickets $18/$15 Members & students

11.1 – 8pm Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

10.18 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: THE MONKEY TALKS, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10/FREE for the first 50 Members who register

11.7 – 5-8pm ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE TICKETS Tickets $10/FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Future Islands 11.15 – 8pm

11.8 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: SPECIAL DELIVERY, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10

Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

11.23 – 4pm IN DISCUSSION: THE WORK OF YASUMASA MORIMURA WITH ERIC SHINER, NICHOLAS CHAMBERS, CINDY LISICA AND CHARLES EXLEY Co-presented with the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and the Asian Studies Center, University Center for International Studies, University of Pittsburgh Free with Museum admission/Members Free

Nellie McKay 12.12 – 8pm Tickets $20/$18 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

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{EDITORIAL}

10.09/10.16.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers LAUREN DALEY, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ALLISON COSBY, BRETT WILSON

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 41

412-683-5992 44TH AND BUTLER ST.

AL bowl.com ARSEN

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{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS]

08

“We have about a 99 percent rate of machines being in use problem-free.” — Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie on the rollout of new transit pay stations

[VIEWS]

15

“Public despair is possible and it is good politics.” — The mantra of GOP governance, as explained to Lincoln Steffens

just want to make good, clean, fresh 23 “We beer.” — Steve Sloan of Roundabout Brewery, one of two new beer-makers in Lawrenceville

[MUSIC]

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carnegielibrary.org

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

dressed as drag star Divine, 38 “When Harris Glenn Milstead didn’t care

{PUBLISHER}

what society thought.” — Al Hoff, reviewing I Am Divine, part of ReelQ film festival

STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] very important to note that the 42 “It’s main character is hip hop, and all of these people are just little bits to create the whole.” — Cartoonist Ed Piskor on his new book The Hip Hop Family Tree

[LAST PAGE] has not been kind to the once 63 “Time ubiquitous — and useful — pay phone.” — Photos reveal the sad state of pay phones

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 19 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 +

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Not your a’s Grandm Library!

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

HOURS: Tue-Thu: Noon-8pm Fri: Noon-9pm • Sat: 10am-10pm Sun: Noon-7pm

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Now you can add Stored Cash Value to your ConnectCard. Get a ConnectCard at most Giant Eagle locations.

ConnectCard.org N E W S

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“OVERALL, WHAT WE’RE FINDING IS THAT THE SYSTEM SEEMS TO WORK.”

INCOMING Re: Adjunct Margaret Vojtko’s death raises questions on college campuses all across Pittsburgh (Oct. 2) “The Margaret Mary story struck a chord with part-time faculty across the nation because it is a fair description of the reality on the ground for many of the new faculty majority, give or take a few dollars and varying effects of regional economics! ‘There but for fortune,’ we have been muttering under our breath.” — Web comment from “Jean Waggoner” “[T]eaching as a part-time or adjunct faculty person was/is never supposed to be a full-time job; or one that provides health/retirement benefits, as most parttime jobs do not provide such benefits. Adjunct faculty are employed semester by semester, depending on need, enrollment, etc. ... [T]here is no reliable guarantee of part-time employment as those things change constantly. … Securing a full-time and/or tenure-track faculty position is very competitive. If that is someone’s desired career path, they should be willing to apply and move anywhere in the country where those opportunities may be.” — Web comment from “Pgh_CD”

FARING WELL

“Hopefully this information will disabuse the public of the notion that the professoriate is some kind of privileged elite looking down from its ivory tower. That has been less and less the reality since the 1950s until it is now merely a caricature. … The reality today is that educational institutions are no longer about education. They are businesses driven by financial concerns.” — Web comment from “Last of Dying Breed”

Happy Buctober, everybody!

Important to note that I am equally excited for Soxtober. Though most excited about adding prefixes to ‘tober.’ — Oct. 1 tweets from comedian and Pittsburgh sports fan Seth Meyers (@sethmeyers)

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{PHOTO BY EMILY DEMARCO/PUBLICSOURCE}

Fifty-nine pay stations have been installed in Allegheny County since 2012. One of the machines at the East Busway’s Negley Station did not print receipts during a recent field test.

A

LLEGHENY COUNTY’S 59 new pay stations at light-rail platforms and bus stops have been performing well, with the exception of some along the East Busway. PublicSource recently tested 54 of the pay stations operated by the Port Authority of Allegheny County and found few problems with the machines along the West Busway and light-rail lines. But nine of the 14 machines along the East Busway had one or more deficiencies. Half of the East Busway’s machines could not print receipts. One didn’t accept coins. Four of the machines’ robotic voices were broken. The pay stations, installed last year, are part of a 2009 agreement to spend $33 million updating the county’s farecollection system. They allow passengers to use “smart cards” that eliminate the need for books of paper tickets or cash.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

Transit riders can buy weekly and monthly tickets at the machines and add money to their plastic ConnectCards, which look and feel like credit cards. The pay stations cost about $46,000 each to purchase and install, Port Authority records show.

Most Port Authority pay stations functioning, with some notable exceptions {BY EMILY DEMARCO, PUBLICSOURCE} New pay stations, fare boxes and ConnectCards are all part of an ongoing Port Authority of Allegheny County project being handled by Scheidt & Bachmann USA, a German company. Five other regional transit authorities

are part of the agreement with the company, including those serving Westmoreland, Fayette, Washington and Butler counties. Riders will be able to use their ConnectCards to travel among these neighboring transit systems, although the lion’s share of the smart-card technology will be in Allegheny County. The Port Authority serves about 210,000 passengers daily. Some of them, along the East Busway, seemed to be losing patience with the pay stations. “I was using my [credit] card, and I tried using money and it wouldn’t take either,” says Felisha Robinson, 30, at the Wilkinsburg Station on the East Busway. Neither of the two machines at the stop was working, she says. Robinson called the Port Authority to report the problems; the authority told her it’s been having issues with the machines

at the Wilkinsburg Station, she says. Frustrated, Robinson now uses paper tickets or cash for bus fares instead of her ConnectCard, she says. A few miles away, the pay stations at the Swissvale Station were not printing receipts. This is a problem for Roxanne Williams, 32, who needs the receipts for tax purposes, she says. Transit riders also can add money to their ConnectCards in local grocery stores or in the Downtown Port Authority Service Center, but Williams says the pay stations are more convenient. “It has its ups and downs,” she says of the new pay-station machines.

PRESENTS:

{PHOTO BY EMILY DEMARCO/PUBLICSOURCE}

Felisha Robinson, 30, at the Wilkinsburg Station on the East Busway

‘System seems to work’ Scheidt & Bachmann, which won the contract for Allegheny County through competitive bidding in 2008, supplies, installs and repairs the pay stations. The company responded to 68 problems with the county’s pay stations in August, Port Authority records show. John vonGoeler is the U.S. spokesman for the company. He is not allowed to discuss the region’s system unless the Port Authority allows him to, he says via phone. “Generally, our equipment has very high reliability rates. It’s substantially higher than the industry average,” vonGoeler says. However, he did not respond in that phone conversation or by email about what the company’s actual reliability rates are, or what the industry average is. Jim Ritchie, the Port Authority’s spokesman, says it is normal for new pay stations to have some problems. “Overall, what we’re finding is that the system seems to work. We have about a 99 percent rate of machines being in use problem-free,” Ritchie says.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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FARING WELL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

HAUNTING

The

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{SOURCE: PUBLICSOURCE REPORTING}

For tickets and info www.eatdrinkmurder.org NOW BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES The contract with Scheidt & Bachmann is still open, so any problems with hardware or software will be fixed before the contract closes, he says.

Self-reporting machines According to the Port Authority’s contract, the pay-station machines should accept credit and debit cards, paper money and coins. They should provide audio instructions for riders with disabilities and print receipts of transactions. The machines should also self-report problems to the transit agency. When there is a problem with the machines, such as a coin jam or no receipts, a light flashes on a computer screen in

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the Port Authority’s Downtown Pittsburgh office, says Ritchie. “It’s something that we check regularly. We can come in every morning, we can look at the screen and tell where we have issues with our ConnectCard machines. … Sometimes, Scheidt & Bachmann is responding to that machine the same day,” he says. The agency knew about most of the issues PublicSource reported at the pay stations along the East Busway, Ritchie wrote in an email. Difficulties with the machines’ audio are identified when transit riders report them or when they are checked by Scheidt & Bachmann workers, he wrote. He added that the pay stations do not always self-report when they are out of receipt paper, and the Port Authority is working with the company to correct the failure. PublicSource found more problems at the East Busway’s pay stations because more people use those machines, according to Ritchie. And the East Busway’s pay stations were the latest ones installed. “There are bugs here and there, which we’re addressing. … The most important thing is how we address the issues that we find and ensuring that they’re resolved before moving forward,” he wrote.

{SOURCE: PUBLICSOURCE REPORTING}

About $30.3 million in Federal Transit Administration funds were left over from a West Busway project that did not get off the ground. Congress authorized the Port Authority to redirect the leftover money into the smart-card project, Ritchie says. Scheidt & Bachmann is one of the largest fare-collection providers in the country, with Denver, Phoenix and Boston using its systems. CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

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FARING WELL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

The company has had its share of problems. In Boston, the Massachusetts state auditor general found in 2012 that about $101 million collected on buses and trolleys was unaccounted for during the previous five years. The city “has been fighting with the German firm for six years to provide a ‘software patch’ to correct the accounting snafu,” according to the Boston Herald. There have also been software and hardware problems in Long Island, Phoenix and Ottawa, Ontario, according to newspaper reporting in those locations. (The problems in these other regions are unrelated to the pay stations.) VonGoeler, Scheidt & Bachmann’s spokesman, did not return telephone calls in response to questions about the fare-collection systems in other regions.

Some like it Not every rider has problems with the smart-card systems. Tamara Gibson, 42, was getting on the bus with her daughter, Avani, at the Negley Station. “It’s very nice. I like it,” she says. “Even when you go and pay for your card, it’s really easy. It doesn’t take but five minutes.” Felisha Robinson, the commuter who talked with PublicSource at the Wilkinsburg Station, says she would consider trying the pay stations again if they worked better.

{PHOTO BY EMILY DEMARCO/PUBLICSOURCE}

Tamara Gibson, 42, was taking her daughter, Avani, 9, to the hair salon from the Negley Station. She said she is happy with the new machines and ConnectCards.

“If it went faster, I would, but right now, I’ll stick to the paper bus passes or money,” she says. “But it’s too slow for me right now.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Researcher Margaret Krauss also contributed to this report. PublicSource, a nonprofit investigative news group in Pittsburgh, is a news partner of City Paper. Learn more at PublicSource.org.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

Watch Championship Chase on the Pittsburgh Cable News Network (PCNC). Ty Miller, Tom Pungin, Brian Cook and Dee Thompson give a different perspective on your Steelers and other NFL teams. Liz Costa, Michele Newell and Jonas Chaney provide feature reports and interviews with players and in-studio guests. Championship Chase airs on PCNC Fridays @ 7:30pm, Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ Noon

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GOP intransigence pollutes political, natural environment {BY CHRIS POTTER} WANT TO KNOW how out-of-control Penn-

sylvania’s natural-gas industry is? Even the most ambitious proposal to curb “fracking,” a measure proposed by state Sen. Jim Ferlo, would allow the number of active wells to increase by nearly 100 percent. Which just goes to show: Even for progressive champions, it’s hard to protect the environment when you’re fighting against a toxic political climate. Ferlo’s Senate Bill 1100 would create a Well Drilling Study Commission to review the environmental dangers of “fracking,” a drilling technique that releases gas from rock deposits by injecting chemicals underground at high pressure. The state would issue no further drilling permits until the commission reported on those dangers and made recommendations. The goal, Ferlo explained to reporters in a conference call last month, would be to “let science be our guide, and put public-health protection first.” Adam Gerber, the Philadelphia field director of advocacy group PennEnvironment, agreed, calling the measure “probably the best chance Pennsylvania has to halt the dangerous expansion of fracking.” Except fracking will expand even with Ferlo’s bill. The measure would “grandfather in” wells for which drilling permits have been issued, even if they haven’t been dug yet. Once granted, Ferlo explained, a permit confers a “legal right that’s equivalent to a contract,” and the state cannot rescind it. How many Marcellus Shale wells have permits that could be grandfathered in? About 7,000, Ferlo said — almost the same number of wells currently in operation. So even if the legislature passed Ferlo’s bill and Gov. Tom Corbett signed it next week, we could see twice as many wells a few years from now as we do today. The fact that so many permits have been issued is not Ferlo’s fault. It’s largely the fault of Harrisburg Republicans who have already prostituted themselves, and much of the state, to drillers. And while Ferlo voiced hopes that his measure would garner bipartisan support, the Republican response was predictable. “It’s alarming that extreme liberals like Jim Ferlo and Allyson Schwartz will not hesitate to crush Pennsylvanians to cater to the extreme left-wing of their party,” said state Republican Committee Chair

Rob Gleason in a statement. Gleason’s statement raises some questions. The first is … Allyson who? Schwartz, a Philadelphia-area Congresswoman, has nothing to do with Ferlo’s proposal. (She favors levying a tax on drilling, not trying to suspend it.) Gleason is simply trying to link her name to the phrase “extreme leftwing” anywhere he can, because she’s a leading Democratic contender to challenge Corbett’s 2014 re-election bid. Which raises another question: If Ferlo’s bill is merely a sop to “the extreme left-wing,” then how come a Muhlenberg College poll this May showed 58 percent of residents support a moratorium? Are there that many lefties in Pennsylvania? And if so, shouldn’t I be getting more fan mail? But Republicans aren’t actually very interested in what most of us think. In Harrisburg and in Washington, D.C., the GOP is bent on ignoring the voters they can’t reach, and subverting the institutions they can’t control. Most people favor keeping the federal government open, and you can see where that got us. O n t h e s u r f a c e , i t might seem crazy for a political party to deliberately thwart the will of voters. But as a Philadelphia Republican once told muckraking journalist Lincoln Steffens, the GOP has long known that “[P]ublic despair is possible and that [it] is good politics.” Flaunting the public’s will, showing open contempt from the very platform they put you on, is as likely to induce paralysis as outrage. Ferlo, a veteran of many social-justice campaigns, acknowledges the challenge. “Nothing happens without a movement,” he told reporters, and SB1100 could be a cause for practicing the kind of “in-yourface” advocacy that changes politics. Not everyone thinks SB1100 is the best flag to rally around. Given Republican opposition, some environmentalists privately tell me, SB1100 seems to ask supporters to deliver the impossible, while offering a relative pittance in return. But if nothing else, Ferlo’s bill has already demonstrated the scope of what we’re up against. It’s not just the threat of leaking gas fumes. It’s that for the past several years, we’ve had too many politicians running around with open flames.

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for raising the Jolly Roger and our spirits. At PNC Bank, we’re as proud as ever to be the official bank of the Pittsburgh Pirates. Your performance this season has been nothing short of historic. From one Pittsburgh organization to another, you have our support and we look forward to being there for your next achievement. pnc.com

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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Which is more characteristically American — that a Texas company could invent an ordinary rifle that mimics a machine gun or that America’s incomparable legal minds could find a loophole in existing anti-machinegun laws to permit it to be manufactured and sold? The Slide Fire company’s weapon can spray bullets “like a fire hose” from a legal, semiautomatic gun by simple application of muscle, yet an official opinion of the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives acknowledges that the agency is powerless to regulate it because of the wording in 1934 and 1986 legislation that otherwise restricts private ownership of machine guns. One gun-shop owner told London’s Daily Mail in September that the Slide Fire rifle is “not as easy” to use as a machine gun, but still, “[I]t’s fairly idiot-proof.”

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Fine Points of the Law: (1) In July, a New York City judge tossed out Joseph Lozito’s lawsuit against the police — even though two officers had stood by in February 2011, out of harm’s way, while a man attacked Lozito as part of a four-murder crime spree. The judge ruled that it was not clear enough that Lozito was in danger when the officers began to ignore him (while they were inside a subway motorman’s booth). (2) In September, a federal jury in New York City upheld an employment-agency worker’s claim that she (an African American) was racially harassed by her boss. The supervisor, Rob Carmona, had insisted that he could not be liable for race-based harassment because, he, too, is African American and thus entitled to use the “n-word.”

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In separate incidents on successive September days, people dressed as Batman and Captain America rescued a cat from a burning house in Milton, W.Va., and Superman came to the aid of Wonder Woman in Hollywood, Calif. (The West Virginia pair were performing at a function when they noticed nearby smoke, and Superman and Wonder Woman were posing for tourists’ tips when a passerby got belligerent.) In July, another Superman tackled a shoplifter on the streets of Sheffield, England, where he was appearing at a fundraiser. (However, less elegantly, two Captain Americas and a SpiderMan brawled briefly in May over access to a contested, lucrative Hollywood street corner.)

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The training-technology company Mindflash recently revealed a feature for iPads that prevents student inattentiveness during an online course. Facial recognition software notices a user looking away (or, worse, falling asleep) and thus pauses the course at that point until the eager learner re-engages the screen. (Mindflash assured reporters that the program has more serious uses, such as treatment of autism and Alzheimer’s disease.)

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For people who believe that “rave” parties’ music is too faint, an August event at England’s Liverpool International Music Festival offered a solution: The DaDaFest program featured an ear-crushing sound level especially staged for deaf people’s dancing — since they can “hear” only by the vibrations saturating their bodies; the non-deaf should

bring earplugs. Among the performers: deaf DJ Troi “Chinaman” Lee, who claims he easily feels distinctions in his mix of hip hop, R&B, reggae, dance and electro swing.

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In an epic failure, according to Madrid’s El Pais newspaper, a 20-story condominium building (“InTempo,” likely the tallest residential edifice in the European Union) in the resort town of Benidorm, Spain, was hastily upsized to a planned 47 stories, but a series of architectural mistakes and developer bankruptcies has left it limping, still 65 percent unsold. Most notably, El Pais discovered in 2012 that the then-current design made it impossible to build an elevator shaft to go past the 23rd floor because of space limitations. (The architects resigned, and unconfident developers were forced to turn to financing from one of the shakier banks in the country’s feeble economy.)

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A 36-year-old patient is suing California’s Torrance Memorial Medical Center, claiming that anesthesiologist Patrick Yang decorated her face with stickers while she was unconscious and that an aide took photos for laughs, later allegedly uploading them to Facebook. Dr. Yang and the aide were later disciplined but remained in good standing. Some hospitals (not Torrance Memorial yet) prohibit cell phones in operating rooms at all times.

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According to his road manager, pioneer 1970s musician Sly Stone (of Sly and the Family Stone) has a lot of “real interesting ideas,” including once trying to hire “ninja chicks and clowns” for his security entourage.

Stone’s latest brainstorm, reported London’s The Guardian in August: form a musical group of albinos, which Stone says “could neutralize all the racial problems” that plague society. “To me,” he said, “albinos are the most legitimate minority group of all.”

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Klaus Eder, a 25-year veteran team trainer for Germany, working its World Cup soccer qualifier match with Austria on Sept. 8, had a rough time despite the players’ 3-0 win. Rushing onto the pitch during the game to treat player Marcel Schmelzer, Eder first tore a muscle in his left leg and then, as he fell to the ground, broke a finger. (Schmelzer’s injury was comparatively minor.)

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Dallas police officer Antonio Quintanilla was the victim in an August incident, but handled it by the book — even though what the perp had done was urinate off a balcony at 3 a.m., onto Quintanilla’s head. (Because the bladder-reliever did not know that Quintanilla was a cop, he was given a non-arrest citation.) Quintanilla also calmly helped a colleague investigate the crime scene — locating the “wet and humid areas where the urine had fallen,” according to the police report.

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A 35-year-old man was charged with sexual assault in Solvesborg, Sweden, in July, for allegedly following a 50-year-old woman home, apparently intending to flash her. After she made it safely inside before he could expose himself, she noticed some noise at the front door and found that the man had stuck his penis through the door’s mail slot.

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A TRADITIONAL CROQUE MADAME IS SATISFYING, BUT THIS WAS SUPERB.

FRESH PASTRY {BY AL HOFF} In Squirrel Hill, there is always room for more dessert: A French bakery, Gaby et Jules, has recently opened near the intersection of Forbes and Murray. Its red-lacquer exterior is reminiscent of a jewelry box, and the interior feels equally luxe: Staff wear beribboned branded aprons, while patrons peer over a rope at the exquisite pastries ensconced in a long glass case. The rear wall features a picture window into the kitchen. The patisserie is co-owned by David Piquard, a master French pastry chef, and Lori and Frédéric Rongier. (Piquard made the desserts at Rongier’s East Liberty café, Paris 66.) On offer are a dozen or so pastries, including classics like fruit tarts, éclairs, napoleon and opera cakes. The treats are artfully decorated with bits of fruit or candy discs bearing the store’s logo — a sunburst of macarons. Also available are French-bakery must-haves such as baguettes, croissants (plain, chocolate, almond) and palmiers. There’s no missing the selection of brightly hued macarons. This is not the coconut cookie known as a macaroon, but rather a delicate, chewy meringueand-almond-powder confection with a buttercream or ganache filling. Traditional flavors (lemon, chocolate, vanilla, raspberry) are represented, with more exotic flavors for the adventurous. I lingered over salted caramel macaron, and pondered one with basil, but ultimately succumbed to seasonal pumpkin. It was perfectly crisp, moist and airy, the filling reminiscent of a fancier pumpkin pie with just the perfect French note of anise. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5837 Forbes Ave., Squirrel rel Hill. 412-682-1966

the

FEED

People often celebrate te

Columbus Day (Oct.. 14) with Italian food, but why not reverse the trend and d eat as he did on his journey y to the Americas? Go “Caribbean bean Columbus,” and savor avor pineapples, papayas, avocados, ados, peppers, squash (including uding pumpkins), tropical fish pum ish and maize. Such foods were then unknown to Europeans, the but these and others made the journey back.

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NORTHERN

LIGHT

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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MAGINE AN ancient fieldstone farmhouse in the French countryside. It was long ago emptied of its original treasures, but savvy designers have enhanced its rustic charm with new furnishings, simply created from items found in and near the kitchen: a chandelier of colored-glass wine bottles, butcher-block tabletops and banquettes upholstered in what appear to be large linen dish cloths. The palette is neutral, with a variety of rich textures standing in for color. Outside is a private terrace, festooned with flowering vines and fountains, and magically illuminated by strings of twinkling lights and a real fireplace. Now imagine this exists in a suburban strip mall outside of Pittsburgh. It does, and its name is BOhèm (short for “Bohemian”) Bistro. The strip mall in which it is located, in Seven Fields, may be the prettiest strip mall anywhere. Like all strip malls, it sits behind a parking lot off the highway, but shapely architecture, lush flower gardens and pergolas trailing grapevine do much to ameliorate the anonymous strip vibe. Best of all, BOhèm’s space opens

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Brussels sprouts

to that pretty courtyard in the rear whose irregular shape and deep balcony along one side create intimate outdoor nooks, even as they cunningly obscure the fact that you’re sitting between two parking lots, just 50 yards from a busy road.

BOHÈM BISTRO 530 Northpointe Circle, Seven Fields. 724-741-6015 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads 4-15; tartines, crepes, and flatbreads $13-15.50; entrees $15-19.50 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Such lovely surroundings would flatter any meal, but BOhèm’s kitchen has ambitions of its own. Chef Scott DeLuca’s aim is to create small, sophisticated dishes to be shared, as the name suggests, in an informal atmosphere. The sophistication is in the execution, with comfort foods and peasant fare — deviled eggs, pulled pork, roast chicken — taking center stage, and boutique-ier items like pancetta, smoked

onions and andouille sausage deftly employed to inflect certain flavors and subtly mute others. BOhèm’s preparation of Brussels sprouts, for instance, is one our server boasted has converted many a diner to the charms of this much-maligned vegetable. No wonder: The sprouts’ flavor was all but obscured under a sweet balsamic glaze, with salty-smoky pancetta and nutty parmesan underscoring the impression of Italian antipasti. The sprouts’ outer leaves were deliciously charred, but they might have benefited from being cut in half before roasting; we found them too firm inside. Steak carpaccio — almost translucent, tissue-thin slices of raw filet — was prepared classically with arugula and shaved Parmesan, plus a pickled shallot for both oniony astringency and vinegary tang. The beef was so barely-there that these accompaniments were almost too much, but with attention to proportions, the flavors held together. In the middle of the menu, any of five items are available as tartines, crepes or

flatbreads. Angelique could not imagine a croque madame, that classic hybrid of grilled ham-and-cheese and French toast, as a flatbread, but BOhèm showed how it can be done: with ingredients (including whole-grain mustard béchamel and pea shoots) spread judiciously atop the chewy, yeasty bread, and a slightly runny, “dippy” fried egg on top. A traditional croque madame is satisfying, but this was superb. Mac-and-cheese may be close to the end of its run as the It Dish of gourmet comfort foods, so it’s just as well that BOhèm transformed it even more than we’re used to. When the menu mentioned spinach, we expected some leaves threaded amongst the noodles and gooey cheese, but instead the dish was more like pasta Florentine, lightly creamy and thoroughly infused with spinach’s earthy, mineral notes.

Executive chef Mark Thompson

The menu doesn’t claim to be seasonal, but most of the items evoked the onrushing fall. An exception was swordfish in a citrus-basil beurre blanc, redolent of Mediterranean climes, on a bed of autumnal beet spätzle together with springlike petite haricots vert. Confounding or not, the flavors worked together (perhaps united by preserved lemon’s unique profile), but with two flaws. The spätzle was under-salted and, like any boiled starch, it was hard to correct at table, and the fish itself was just a touch overdone. Swordfish is always firm, but it usually retains juiciness; in this case, it seemed that a smaller piece — for which we praise the kitchen, as proteins are too often oversized — had simply cooked through too quickly. The far North Hills have become the region’s second hotbed of excellent dining, with suburban outposts of many successful city restaurants and others that follow their lead. In this context, BOhèm Bistro’s approach isn’t uncommon, but it is appealing and worthwhile, and its space, indoors or out, is among the finest in the region. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

HEAD TO HEAD Two new breweries open, blocks apart, on Butler Street Matt Gouwens, owner of Upper Lawrenceville’s just-opened Hop Farm Brewing Company, decided to become a brewer in 2005 while he was living in Germany. “I noticed every town had its own little brewery,” he recalls. “I decided that’s what I wanted to do.” In 2009, he enrolled in a year-long training course with the American Brewer’s Guild. After several years of working as an apprentice brewer for Delawarebased Iron Hill, he felt ready to open his own brewery. Although it took several years to get the brewery up and running, Gouwens says it was worth the wait to brew in the right space. And he’s capitalizing on the farm-to-bottle trend by growing his own hops. He currently has more than 125 plants at his house, and has contracted with a farmer to expand the operation to more than 1,000 plants at a new hop farm, located just off the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Cranberry. Just a few blocks down Butler Street is monthold Roundabout Brewery, owned by veteran brewer Steve Sloan. Sloan has worked for corporate giants (Coors) and local favorites (Church Brew Works), but this is the first time he’s run his own show. “It’s a pretty old-school approach,” he says of his bare-knuckles operation that uses an open fermenter and some used dairy equipment. “We’re not trying to wow anyone” with newfangled approaches, he says. “We just want to make good, clean, fresh beer.” Because he’s brewing in such small quantities, Sloan is able to experiment with a diverse array of styles. The Oktoberfest is a particular standout on the current menu of top-notch beers. Gouwens says that camaraderie is the name of the game between the owners of the two new breweries. The good feelings were evident when he and Sloan recently had lunch down the block at beer-heavy Industry Public House. “He’s the veteran brewer, and he’s been really helpful,” he says.

CAMARADERIE IS THE NAME OF THE GAME BETWEEN THE OWNERS OF THE TWO NEW BREWERIES.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Hop Farm Brewing, 5601 Butler St., Lawrenceville. www.hopfarmbrewingco.com Roundabout Brewery. 4901 Butler St., Lawrenceville. www.roundaboutbeer.com

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ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-2814670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J

Savoy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a CAFÉ VITA. 424 few options in each Allegheny River Blvd., category: starter, main Oakmont. 412-828www. per pa (raw), main (hot) and 5506. Embracing the pghcitym .co sweet. Some dishes inherent dichotomies were frankly salads, of brunch, this while others were raw, restaurant offers both vegan adaptations of cooked traditional Italian, complete comfort foods. (Chicken can be with panini, pasta, ratatouille added to some dishes.) There and eggplant parmesan; and is also an extensive menu of classic breakfast fare, such as omelets and French toast. Italian freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF notes pervade some of the breakfast options, too: You’ll find French toast made with focaccia, and omelets served with Tuscan toast. JF

FULL LIST ONLINE

CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard ChineseAmerican menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE ECHO. 1740 Route 228, Cranberry. 724-779-3246. The menu at this sophisticated restaurant offers a tour de force of modern American cuisine. It focuses on central ingredients and adds layers of flavor, sometimes in unexpected forms, such as a purée of tuna alongside grilled steak, or golden trout served on a bed of orzo with a fennel-cream sauce. But even a simpler dish, such as fettuccini Alfredo, is perfectly executed. LE

LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a familyfriendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor patio along lively Carson Street. KE OISHII BENTO. 119 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-687-3335. Bamboo walls and a low counter with colorful cloth cubes for seating denote a place for moderately priced Japanese food, including sushi. Oishii also adds a few Korean dishes for variety and spice; those seeking a little heat might consider bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF

China Star {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill (with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE

SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-6834575. Casual elegance is the byword at this neighborhood venue, where the fare is inspired by Northern California cuisine, with seasonal ingredients combined into New American and Continental dishes. The preparations vary widely, from ultra-traditional offerings like crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant updates like duck with orange-apricot balsamic glaze. LF

offMenu

SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-0660. The Strip District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross between current fine-dining culture (locally sourced foods, sous vide meats), lounge favorites (sliders and fish tacos) and Southern comfort (chicken with black-eyed peas and greens, watermelon salad). LE

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

SPANISH ACCENT An annual event celebrates the cuisine, and community, of Spanish immigrants

SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-7419457. At this revamped hotel, the offerings reflect a balance between time-honored dishes such as turtle soup and more modern fare, like a crabmeatstuffed quesadilla. Steak-lovers will be pleased, but adventurous burger fans should check out the Light Up Night burger, topped with blue crabmeat, bacon, avocado and pepperjack cheese. LE

EIGHT YEARS AGO, Aitor Coca moved to Pittsburgh and

STATION STREET. 6290 Broad St., East Liberty. 412-365-2121. A neighborhood hot-dog joint with exotically dressed dogs, including: chili cheese (with curds), Hawaii (pineapple and bacon), kimchi, sweetbreads and “devil” (egg salad, Tabasco and potato chips). Also offers tacos. JF TABLE LAKESIDE BRICK OVEN AND BAR. 200 N. Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. 724-746-1126. Perched on the edge of manmade lake, this clubby restaurant offers casual American cuisine, with outside dining in season. A brick oven produces a variety of “phatbreads” topped creatively, such as the “lawnboy,” with prosciutto, tomatoes and wilted arugula. Burgers, chops, seafood and pasta dishes round out the menu. KE THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the casual, no-nonsense and no-frills member of Pittsburgh’s Thai restaurant club. The prices are on the low end, but the food quality is high and the portions are huge. The decor mixes Asian themes with diner kitsch in a delightful way. JF

Helena Knorr and her “empanadas con amor” (empanadas with love) {PHOTO BY JESSICA SERVER}

SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-3625656/412-362-6198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different menus in the same building. Soba offers pan-Asian fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and Vietnamese hot-and-sour shrimp) in a minimalist yet elegant restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial finalist in City Paper’s “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE

searched, in vain, for traditional Spanish jamón serrano (cured ham). But what Coca, a native of Bilbao, Spain, did find were other Spaniards also homesick for ham — a social group called “Los de Patanegra,” named after the “best” jamón, made from pata negra pigs. Last Saturday, he was among those honored by 60 people who flocked to Frick Park for the 10th annual Patanegra tapas competition. In typical Spanish style, the party started late, lasted hours, and featured flavorful food. Akin to an all-out family reunion, the competition awarded four prizes: best tapa, runner-up tapa, best presentation and best dessert. But don’t let the homemade trophies and quirky characters fool you — this was a serious competition focused on food. “Spanish people — and Basque people, and Catalan people — love food,” says Ariana Font, a participant since year one. “These people are creative, homesick, and really want to do their best. You’ll taste the best tapas you’ve tried, ever.” This sentiment was echoed throughout, even in the kickoff speech, where Patanegra co-found Eliot Kennedy told the few English-speaking guests, “You’ll never eat as well as you do today.” The crowd descended on three picnic tables laden with everything from “Pittsburetas” (a cheese-andseed “lollipop” which won best presentation) to empanadas and classic tortillas. This year’s best tapa winner was Coca and his “Pinxto-Pote” team, who served two types of croquetas, fried on the scene, accompanied by Spanish wine. “I added a touch of the Basque Country,” says Coca, explaining that the dish mimics a current trend there to serve a happy-hour pintxo (Basque for tapa) with a glass of wine, all for a single Euro. “You can’t beat that,” says Coca. While long-time participant Fernando de la Torre admits that he can now purchase traditional Spanish sausages on Amazon.com, the event offers a shared experience that money can’t buy. In Spanish culture, community and food are inextricable. “My heart is Spanish,” de la Torre says. “It’s going to be hard to change that.”

1120 East Carson St. South Side Sangria & Cerveza Happy Hour Daily 4 to 6

Yes...That Bob’s Sub! D COME EAT A LEGEN AT ONE OF OUR 3 NEW LOCATIONS!

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INDIANA

NEW KENSINGTON

550 PHILADELPHIA ST. (724) 471-2127

87 TARENTUM BRIDGE RD. (724) 335-0900

WWW.BOBSSUB.COM

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH 215 SMITHFIELD ST. (412) 594-3686

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LOCAL

AT THE DUO’S BEST, IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO DISTINGUISH THE TRIUMPHANT FROM THE TRAGIC

BEAT

{BY ALLISON COSBY}

Alt-country singer-songwriter Hallie Pritts had a few questions as she stepped off a plane in Berlin last December: “I was like, ‘Is this insane? What am I doing?’” She was meeting a friend from college, a French electronic musician and producer named Jules Etienne, to write and record an album. She had nothing but a head full of songs and an address scribbled in her notebook. Pritts, the frontwoman for Pittsburghbased alt-country band Boca Chica, had reached out last fall to Etienne, whom she met years ago while studying abroad at Philipps-Universität Marburg. (He lives in Germany.) The two agreed to work on a project together under the name Winter Wedding Party. She had written most of the songs for the album in the month leading up to her trip, but with Etienne’s background in electronic music, the details of the collaboration were very much in question. Fast-forward 10 days and Pritts is on her way home and the album is done. In that short time, the duo had found a way to deconstruct the folk songs she had written. Experimenting with Etienne’s collection of vintage synths and jamming at all hours of the day and night, the two ended up with nine playful and compelling tracks that reflect a wide range of influences. At one particularly surprising point about halfway through the album, a slower folk track fades out and strong Italo-disco beats come in totally out of left field. “I remember, Jules asked me, ‘How do you feel about Italo-disco?’” recalls Pritts. “And I was like, ‘I have no idea what that is.’” But the song fits in seamlessly with the rest of the album, and highlights the playful openness of the musicians. “I think it is perfectly possible to make folk songs and/or nu-disco tracks without any artistic contradiction,” Etienne said in an email to CP. This record is proof of that, with every song sounding different than the one before it, but all working together to create an engaging snapshot of those 10 days. The future of the project remains unclear. “I feel like it’s a miracle that we even got together to make this album,” says Pritts. But, as was the case with the production style of Winter Wedding Party, she’s not ruling anything out. More at: www.facebook.com/ winterweddingparty

Party-starter: Hallie Pritts {PHOTO COURTESY OF BEA CHIAPPELLI}

AMERICANA GONE EURO

OUT OF THE BLUE {BY IAN THOMAS}

A

S THEIR VARIOUS projects mount

in scope and ambition, the days of production team Blue Sky Black Death responding to their own band emails directly are surely waning. At the moment though, the duo consisting of Kingston Maguire, who produces under his first name only, and Ian Taggart, who produces under the name Young God, share the duty. This simple gesture speaks volumes about their approach to production: They like as much control as possible. Kingston and Young God have collaborated in various capacities since 2003, making their partnership official for 2006’s A Heap of Broken Images. Since then, they’ve released four instrumental albums, including the brand new Glaciers, and a number of collaborations with hip-hop and indie-rock artists, many of which they’ve shrewdly released for free on their website. Blue Sky Black Death take their eminently Googleable name from a skydiving term describing the narrow line

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THEO CONSTANTINOU}

Eyes to the skies: Blue Sky Black Death

that separates the feeling of freedom and openness that the upward rushing sky evokes, and the totality — and fatality — of a misstep. The name also describes the duo’s career to date very well. Through business acumen and a diligent hustle, Kingston and Young God have managed to sidestep most of the pitfalls to which growing artists fall prey.

BLUE SKY BLACK DEATH

WITH SISTER CRAYON, MELODIQ 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

For 10 years, Blue Sky Black Death, or BSBD, has built a steadily increasing fan base in the trend-heavy, often fickle landscape of hip-hop and electronic production. The pair has done so

by crafting an intelligent sound as distinctive as their moniker, and by going so far as to develop a visual aesthetic to match. Each has also benefitted from building an implicit trust in the other’s understanding of the Blue Sky Black Death sensibility. “We do quite a bit of stuff on our own,” Young God says. “If Kingston and I [each] make a separate beat, we may not collaborate a lot on it, but it’ll still be under the BSBD name.” This trust effectively doubles the potential BSBD output. It also increases the ease with which they can work remotely. Currently, Kingston resides in Seattle, Wash., while Young God is in Oakland, Calif. Though their music is all over the map, their marketing approach is squarely in the hip-hop camp. Kingston and Young God treat BSBD as a brand. The identity of that brand includes more than just the BSBD sound. There is also the imagery which is street-brandstandard: skulls, occult symbols and

sepia washes. Kingston guides the visuals and directs the videos under the “They Shootin’ Films” moniker. “I started filming our videos out of necessity. We couldn’t afford videos for those projects, so I bought a camera and taught myself how to film/edit/direct as well as storyboard the videos,” Kingston explained to CP via email. “As far as Ian’s role in the visual aspect, he always has input into the imagery or direction, but for the most part trusts my vision.” You can see similar imagery in Kingston’s clothing line, Life of Villains. The recognizable quality and reach that the BSBD name provides has allowed the team to take equal billing with the hip-hop artists with whom they collaborate, a parity that is somewhat rare for producers. One of the most successful examples of this model, BSBD’s 2012 collaboration with Seattle rapper Nacho Picasso, Lord of the Fly, was billed as Blue Sky Black Death & Nacho Picasso. “If we’re going to put all this work into it, and not just musically—we recorded him, we sent it [to press contacts] — it would seem like kind of a waste not to put ourselves on equal billing,” Young God says. “For the past couple of years, we’ve been working with people that aren’t as established [and] it’s more fun that way, they’re more open to trying new things.” The BSBD sound takes cues from early-’90s hip hop, which often featured sped-up soul music samples and dramatically sweeping strings. BSBD ups the ante by layering those components in increasingly complex ways to textured, dense and dreamlike results. Their true skill, though, is their employment of samples. On “Sleeping Children Are Still Flying,” from 2011’s Noir, they sample the classic ’80s friendship flick Stand By Me. In the sample, the boys from the movie discuss dreams and stolen cigarettes against a backdrop of haunting strings and whistling winds. The feelings brought to bear by these and other BSBD compositions are as varied as the myriad sources from which the samples are drawn. That’s what keeps the music so compelling for play after play after play. At BSBD’s best, it’s impossible to distinguish the triumphant from the tragic, and the sound becomes a cipher for what the listener is feeling, serving only to amplify the emotions with which the listener arrives. In this way, the best BSBD compositions might be compared to literature or cinema of the thoughtful variety: While the sound is always affecting, it requires some analysis on the listener’s part to realize exactly how. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

ON THE RECORD

with Mr. Fine Wine {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Mr. Fine Wine

Mr. Fine Wine (real name: Matt Weingarden) is the host of the longrunning Downtown Soulville show on New Jersey’s famous WFMU radio station. He’ll guest at the fourth anniversary of Title Town, the monthly soul-and-funk dance night at Brillobox. YOU GREW UP IN DETROIT? Yeah. I grew up in Detroit and I moved to New York about 25 years ago. I was always collecting records, but I started DJing when I moved. DID YOUR DETROIT UPBRINGING INFORM YOUR MUSICAL TASTES? Yeah. I went to school with the children of David Ruffin and Eddie Kendrick and people like that; there was just music everywhere. My uncle owned a small label that put out a variety of music, from folk music to soul music to jazz. And he was a very in-demand local guitar teacher who taught people from John Lee Hooker to Don Was.

11/01 BUTCH WALKER 11/11 BUILT TO SPILL 11/12 91.3FM WYEP PRESENTS JOHNNY MARR

SOUL NIGHTS HAVE SEEN SOMETHING OF A REVIVAL SINCE YOU STARTED. WHEN DID THAT REALLY TAKE OFF? In the last 10 years or so, you can hear soul records practically any night of the week [in New York City]. Not that the parties are all necessarily any good.

10/10 THE TONTONS 10/11 DENISON WITMER (EARLY) 10/11 THE SEMI-SUPERVILLAINS

ALBUM RELEASE SHOW! (LATE)

10/12 CHORO NO VINHO (EARLY) 10/12 FLEXURE ('INSERT TITLE HERE'

WHAT MAKES ONE NIGHT GOOD AS OPPOSED TO ANOTHER? It’s taste, I guess. I can be perfectly happy with one other person in the bar as long as the DJ has taste in music. It doesn’t even have to be rare stuff.

10/17 10/18 10/19 10/22 10/23

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TITLE TOWN SOUL AND FUNK PARTY FOURTH ANNIVERSARY with MR. FINE WINE. 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $6. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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VINYL LP RELEASE SHOW) (LATE) EZRA FURMAN THOSE DARLINS THE MEN w/PURLING HISS SHEL AMERICAN BABIES

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD

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A state of symbiosis: Freya String Quartet (from left: Jason Neukom, Ashley Buckley, Jason Hohn, Katya Janpoladyan)

STRINGING ALONG {BY ANDY MULKERIN} THE MEMBERS of Freya String Quartet have

always seen a lot of things to value in Pittsburgh’s chamber-music community. “We’re all big fans of Pittsburgh — all of us are transplants, and have made our homes here in the past seven years,” says Jason Hohn. “But we [felt] a need for Pittsburgh to have its own string quartet.” And in 2009, the four players — Hohn (viola), Jason Neukom (violin), Ashley Buckley (violin) and Katya Janpoladyan (cello) — decided to take matters into their own hands, creating a string quartet devoted first and foremost to Pittsburgh. (Hohn, Neukom and Buckley all studied at Carnegie Mellon University; Hohn and Neukom grew up together in North Dakota.) The quartet, which begins its 2013-14 season with performances on Fri., Oct. 11, and Sun., Oct. 13 at First United Methodist Church in Shadyside, focuses largely on contemporary composers, performing some commissioned work. “We feel very passionate about working with young composers and with new music,” Hohn says. “We love the challenge of being able to have a close collaboration with living composers, and to work closely with them to realize their vision — to really be able to pick their brain and find out exactly what they want to do.” To that end, Freya was the quartet in residency at the Charlotte New Music Festival this past year, working with young composers on new works. And the first program of the group’s new season, “Fresh Voices,” features works by young composers: Hong-Da Chin, Matthew Peterson, Elizabeth Kowalski, Chung Eun Kim and Zachary Albrecht. The rest of Freya’s new season stretches

through the winter, with performances at various venues. The second program, at Bricolage Theater, will feature works by Richard Neukom and Sean Neukom, commissioned for the quartet. The third, at Wood Street Galleries, will be amplified string-quartet music, including Steve Reich’s legendary “Different Trains.” The quartet is using rotating venues, Hohn explains, partly to showcase the city’s performance spaces, and partly to fit the room to the music being performed. Beyond being a performing group — and the members all perform with other orchestras and chamber groups — Freya has an educational element. The members all teach performance, and Freya collaborates with composer Sean Neukom under the umbrella of Symbiotic Collusion, a group that provides educational services and seeks to find sustainable ways to fund arts groups. (For example, Symbiotic Collusion organizes musicians, including the members of Freya, to provide music for events.) Freya is also recording an album, Snapshots, to be released next spring.

FREYA STRING QUARTET PRESENTS

FRESH VOICES 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11, and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. First United Methodist Church, 5401 Centre Ave., Shadyside. $8-15. www.freyaquartet.com

First and foremost, though, Freya is about bringing chamber music to Pittsburgh using a native string quartet — something the city had been missing for some time. “We worked with the Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society,” says Hohn. “And the groups that they bring in are all world-class, but we feel strongly that to have a quartet that lives and works and is embedded in the community is a real asset.” A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

CRITICS’ PICKS BUY TICKETS NOW AT JERGELS.COM

Hugh Laurie

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY MCCARTNEY}

[HIP HOP] + THU., OCT. 10 Los Angeles-based rapper and member of the Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All (OFWGKTA) crew Earl Sweatshirt has had a career defined by mystery. After releasing a popular mixtape in 2010, the rapper disappeared. It was later discovered that his mother had sent him to a Samoan boarding school, but when he returned to L.A. at age 18, he also returned to his rapping. Since his re-emergence, Earl Sweatshirt has been featured as a guest on albums like Frank Ocean’s channel ORANGE, and this summer he released his own debut album, titled Doris. The alt-rap star will perform at Mr. Small’s tonight with special guest Vince Staples. Allison Cosby 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

’90s, re-formed with most of its original members. The four-piece helped pioneer the visceral, deep-in-the-gut style of slow, plodding metal that took early Black Sabbath to its logical conclusion. Tonight, the band plays the Rex Theater along with Pallbearer, The Hookers and locals Lady Beast. AM 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $16-20. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., OCT. 15 Making its Pittsburgh debut, Vancouver quintet The Belle Game brings its no-frills indie rock to the Smiling Moose tonight. Guided by singer Andrea Lo’s powerfully honest voice, the band builds layered tracks with diverse instrumentation, often involving trumpet, violin and piano. The musicians draw heavily on other indie rock

The Belle Game

$1000

1ST PLACE Forget happy hour today and head for Mind Cure Records for record hour. Besides the usual selection, the Polish Hill shop plays host this evening to the Third Man Rolling Record Store, a project of Third Man Records, the Nashville-based store started by Jack White. The store-on-wheels has been in commission for two years now, and is on a U.S. tour that brings it to Pittsburgh for the first time today. Andy Mulkerin 3-8 p.m. 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. All ages. 412-621-1715 or www.mindcurerecords.com

[DOOM] + SAT., OCT. 12 Long before Southern Lord began to bring doom and sludge into a hip, almost mainstream spot, there were a few originators; chief among them was St. Vitus. The L.A. band formed in the late ’70s, spent time on Greg Ginn’s SST label in the ’80s and, after a dormant period in the late

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favorites (think Broken Social Scene, Arcade Fire, Feist), but the familiarity of the band’s sound doesn’t ruin it, and the music has a subtle darkness that sets the act apart. AC 7 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

GREAT PRIZES FOR BEST DRESSED COSTUMES! Tickets won’t last, order now at jergels.com/tickets

[BLUES] + THU., OCT. 17 It’s been a couple of years since House became a piano man, at least professionally. But if you had your doubts at the time about how long Hugh Laurie’s music career would last, perhaps he quieted them with this year’s Didn’t It Rain, the full-length follow-up to 2011’s Let Them Talk. TV star Laurie plays piano blues from W.C. Handy to Dr. John on the new album; his live show (with full band) is renowned, so a trip to see him tonight at Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead would be a good bet. AM 8 p.m. 510 E. 10th St., Munhall. $55-95. All ages. 412-368-5225 or www.librarymusichall.com

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THIS WEEK

[RECORDS] + FRI., OCT. 11

Wed 10.9 SHARI RICHARDS // no cover, 8:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Thu 10.10 GOOD BROTHER EARL // no cover, 8:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fri 10.11 DANCING QUEEN // $7 charge // open at 8:00 // 9:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sat 10.12 VELVEETA w/PSU Homecoming Promo Night // $7 charge // open at 8:00 // 9:00 start time

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

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LIVE JAZZ & BLUES MUSIC EVERY WEEKEND

TUESDAYS $

3.25

Blue Moon Season and Blue Moon Drafts 7 pm to midnight

FOLLOW US ON

LIKE US ON

422 FORELAND STREET, NORTH SIDE 412-904-3335

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 at Mullens Northshore

“TAUK” LIVE! THURS/OCT 10/10PM BOO-LESQUE BURLESQUE SHOW

TUES/OCT 15 SQUIDLING BROTHERS SIDESHOW DUMPLINGS, BRAZILIAN WAX, DEAD BATTERIES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

ATLAS, HOUSEHOLD STORIES, MATT KILROY

at Kaufman Center

ullens M Bar & Grill N O RTH

S H O R E

( A C R O S S F R O M P N C PA R K )

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THURS/OCT 17/10PM

at JT’s in Monroeville LYNDSEY SMITH & THE SOUL DISTRIBUTION BAND

THE FLO WILSON BAND all tickets available at showclix.com stonecoldgroove.net Find us on Facebook at StoneColdGrooveProductions

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Pearl Jam. Uptown. 412-642-1800. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Jel, Sole, Serengeti, Joey Smooth, Stillborn Identity. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Greg Felmley, Ryan Taylor, Betsy Roberts & Tom Strasbaugh, Ghost Estate, Chuck Owston, Kacey Comini-Sherrod, Jenda Domaracki, Dean Krimm. 22nd Annual Celtic Harvest Concert. www. per Lawrenceville. pa pghcitym 412-681-4318. .co THE HANDLE BAR & 31ST STREET PUB. 3 GRILLE. Tony Janflone, Jr. Bad Jacks, The Legendary Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. Hucklebucks, Crooked Cobras. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dirty Strip District. 412-391-8334. Charms, Patton, South Side Allstars. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Hugh Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Laurie. Munhall. 412-368-5225. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. CIP’S. The Dave Iglar Band. MEADOWS CASINO. Airborne. Dormont. 412-668-2335. Washington. 724-503-1200. CLUB CAFE. Denison Witmer, MR. SMALLS THEATER. Sleep Experiments (Early) Liz Berlin, Hellfire Club, Jupiter The Semi-Supervillains (late). Vinyl, Nick Marzock, Polina Album release show. South Side. Kourakina, Freddi Price. 2013 412-431-4950. Revival Series. Drowning Clowns. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Hamilton Ave. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. PALACE THEATRE. Dave Mason. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. Selena Gomez. Oakland. 412-648-3054. SMILING MOOSE. Evil Empire, AMRCN Dreams Plutocrat Noose, Kid A, Lazy JP. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Life In Color, R3hab, Carnage. North Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Turkuaz, Lazlo Hollyfield. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Highway 4. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Mark Shuttleworth Band. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 11

AMBITION

presents

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7

Big World Ten. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Stephen Roth, Modern Nature, Wizard Bomb (early) The Calamity Cubes, The Armadillos (late). Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

LEVELS. Matt Barranti & Bill Ali. North Side. 412-231-7777. MEXICO CITY. Detroit Party Marching Band, Lungs Face Feet, Pandemic Pete. Downtown. 412-251-6058. SMILING MOOSE. Foreshadow, Horrid Ordeal, Altar of Eden, The Second Chapter. South Side. 412-431-4668. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

MP 3 MONDAY

STONE COLD GRO0VE PRODUCTIONS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS theCAUSE Tickets also available at Dave’s Music Mine

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

Jazz Jam Every Tuesday ROCK/POP Swing Dance Every THU 10 Friday 8pm-12am ALTAR BAR. Turquoise Jeep. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF 150+ Craft Beers HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Steve Hackett. Genesis Revisited. 412-368-5225. “Jazzed” Up Comfort Food Munhall. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. Open Daily at 11am 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Tontons, Wreck Loose, Influx. South Side. Happy Hour 5-7pm 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Johnson, Butterbirds, Private Space Available Jillette Jupiter Vinyl. Garfield. 412-361-2262. For Your Next Event HARD ROCK CAFE. A Great www.jamesstreetgastropub.com

2001 E CARSON STREET • SOUTH SIDE • (412) 431-6757

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SAT 12

THURS/OCT 24/10PM $2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Ambition; stream or download

“Salute” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

ALTAR BAR. Joe Grushecky. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CAFE SUPREME. Antz Marching. Irwin. 724-861-0990. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Aurical. Harmony. 570-294-6450. CLUB CAFE. Flexure. Record release show. Choro No Vinho, The Flying Dutchman (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Ray Lanich Band. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. The Tones, Chopper Pilot. Aliquippa. 724-378-7669. CONTINUES ON PG. 35

Cheeseman - Fright Farm

all of our attractions and activities. www.cheesemanfarm.com

The tractors are warmed up and the ghosts and ghouls have arrived to put a chill in the night air. Be warned this is a physically demanding attraction that will assault your senses with intense audio and visual effects. Your heart will quicken and your skin will crawl... As always, parking is free and your admission price includes

Demon House Demon House is the Haunted Experience of a Life Time...Journey into the realm of fear - experience the terror that lives within this 140 year old stone mansion. Plenty of activities to keep you occupied on our haunted grounds. Demon House, the ONLY Real Haunted Attraction. DemonHouse.com for more info.

Fright Farms/Rich Farms Rich Farms presents A Victorian Nightmare, the theme for its twenty-fourth

year of Fright Farm Productions. Fright Farm is Pennsylvania’s largest haunted attraction, growing every year since its inception. So come on out andjoin the many people who have made Fright Farm an annual Halloween season tradition. For more information visit: www.frightfarm.com

Haunted Hills Estate Haunted Hills Estate is celebrating their 10th year of FEAR! We have 3 original and unique Haunted Adventures! Take the one hour Challenge Trail! Be patient and visit the Old Medical Research Center and

PUMPKIN PATCH Y TROLLEY Friday F rid ida through Sunday und day October 4-6, 11-13, 18-20, 25-27 1 Museum Road Washington, PA 16301 724-228-9256 Advance Tickets Available at

patrolly.org

Ghost Hunts And Tours, Flashlight Tours The Asylum Ball (Costume Party), Aberration (Our Haunted House)

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum 71 Asylum Drive, Weston, WV www.TALAWV.com 304-269-5070

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become part of the Legend. Stagger through the Dead Chambers and see if you can come out with all your flesh flags, the Zombies are waiting‌ For more info visit: www.hauntedhillsestate.com.

Haunted Hills Hayride Haunted Hills Hayride and the Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (14th Annual): A free live band, karaoke, and a DJ every Friday and Saturday night. Climb aboard a tractor-pulled hay wagon, enter the castle gates and brace yourself for the scariest ride of your life. Save some scares

for the Walking Trail filled with Halloween horrors. Call for group reservations at (412) 823-4813. Benefits The Autism Society of Pittsburgh and The Spectrum Charter School. www.hauntedhillshayride.com

Hopewell Windmill Haunted Mini Golf Haunted Mini Golf with glow in the dark balls. The scariest game of golf you will ever play, guaranteed. Open daily thru November 2nd. Five years of frights in Hopewell PA, close to Pittsburgh. 724-375-5350. www.hopewellwindmill.com

One spooky Saturday FREAKY! HAUNTED! PETRIFYING!... One spooky Saturday in North Park. Saturday, Oct. 26. Events start at 9:00 a.m. Register today for the 5th annual Oxford Athletic Club Freaky 5K, Massage Envy Haunted Hill 10K, Petrifying Pet Walk and the NEW Trick-or-Treat Trot! You don’t want to miss out...it will be a scream! Freaky5K.org

PA Trolley Museum Leap into fall with the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum’s annual Pumpkin

Zombie Fest 2013 Saturday, Oct. 12 Join the Zombie Bar Crawl starting at dusk in

Official post-party hosted h ho ostted db by y Ca Cat Catt Cattivo ttiv ttiv tti tt ivo ivo Look for Straub Specials at these p participating p g locations:

Belvederes Thunderbird Cafe Franktuary Hambone’s

Climb aboard the Terror Trolley and hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh including the story of

“the most haunted house in America” 7PM and 9PM Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday throughout October and Halloween Night.

CALL 412-391-7433 IF YOU DARE! 125 W. Station Square Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15219

www.MollysTrolleysPittsburgh.com A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

Unlike any other Haunted Attraction

The Secret is OUT… thee t th uut aboout ingg ab kking lkin talk is tal NE is YOONE YON ERRYON ERY VER EEVE EV s ure ent BEST Haunted Adv

• • • •

Zombie Shoot Corn Maze Ghost Stories Food & Fun

Your Halloween Destination!

724-775-6232 Patch Trolley in Washington PA, which runs Friday through Sunday, October 4-6, 11-13, 18-20, and 25-27. Visitors will take a ride on an antique trolley to the pumpkin patch where children get to select their pumpkin and then decorate it. Pumpkin Patch admission includes unlimited rides on trolleys and tours of 30 trolleys. Tickets can be purchased in advance at www.patrolley.org or 724-228-9256

Pittsburgh Terror Trolley Climb aboard the Terror Trolley and hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh in-

cluding the story of “the most haunted house in America”. Pittsburgh Terror Trolley tours depart from Station Square every Thursday, Friday and Saturday throughout October at 7pm & 9pm. Call 412-391-7433 if you dare! mollystrolleyspittsburgh.com

$2 off with this ad

ScareHouse ScareHouse is ranked as “One of America’s Scariest Haunted Houses” by Travel Channel, USA Today, and Haunted Attraction Magazine. Reduce your wait and reserve your time to enter when you buy tickets in advance from www.scarehouse.com. Free parking

HAUNTED HILLS TH 4 1 NUAL HAYRIDE AN and the

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL Oct 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 30, 31 - Nov 1, 2

OCTOBER IN PORTERSVILLE, PA

HAUNTED HAYRIDES AT DARK

Open 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday; 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays. LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE - ALL FREE! Admission Only $12 to Each Attraction or $17 for Both • FREE PARKING 412-823-4813 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com • See website for $3 OFF Coupon

Off US Rt. 19 on Cheeseman Rd. Near McConnell’s Mill for futher directions, call 724-368-3233

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) • North Versailles, PA

www.cheesemanfarm.com

1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart Group rates & private campfire sites available

Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh.

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

and shuttle service from the Pittsburgh Zoo. The Bunny is Back!

ASYLUM AFTER DARK Visit Weston, WV this October for ASYLUM AFTER DARK. Every year the asylum builds a haunted house that makes people pee. This fall, the Asylum presents Aberration: a frightening live haunted attraction. The asylum also offers Flashlight tours. Open Wednesday through Sunday. For more information visit www.theasylumwv.com.

West Deer Nightmare The West Deer Nightmare is a high

scare volume, intense haunted attraction not designed for the weak. Come tour the possessed house of Noah Hobbs and experience all the horror and terror that Noah’s evil mind committed. Come and experience the legendary West Deer Nightmare! www.westdeernightmare.com

Zombie Bar Crawl This year, Zombies will invade Lawrenceville in Pittsburgh for a full day of undead fun. AT NOON, thousands of the walking dead will converge on Arsenal Park for live bands, over 40 vendors, and crazy crowd participation events. Meet Abby from WXDX radio

12-2 PM. AND THEN at sundown, the mass of thirsty corpses will shamble down Butler Street for the first annual Zombie Bar Crawl. This is a free event.

Zombies of the Corn Coming weekends in October, a unique haunted attraction unlike any other! Board our “Zombie Fighting Vehicle” & shoot paintballs at “Live Zombies” that can’t shoot back! The adventure continues as you find your way through our Corn Maze with Lurking Zombies & More! Every Thursday – Friday – Saturday in October 7pm till Midnight. Call 724-775-6232 Today for Reservations and Tickets! zombiesofthecorn.com

year.... Our 5th

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October 26th 10PM to Midnight Top 3 b T bestt d dressed d wi win prizes i

$2 coors light

September 21 thru November 2 2142 BROADHEAD RD. • HOPEWELL 724-375-5350 • www.hopewellwindmill.com A D V E R T I S I N G

.25

bottles

3386 William Penn Hwy, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 S U P P L E M E N T

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

HAMBONE’S. Jeremiah Clark Jeremiah Clark, Erin Dawes. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARMONY RIDGE. Silkwood Shower. Ambridge. 724-266-2414. HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Wake Island, The Triggers, School of Athens, How Sad. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE KICKSTAND. The Dave Iglar Band. Elizabeth. 412-384-3080. LEMONT. Mark & Donna Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. THE MCKEESPORT PALISADES. Little Isidore & The Inquisitors. McKeesport. 412-370-2971. MEADOWS CASINO. Tres Lads. Washington. 724-503-1200. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Citizen Cope. Millvale. 866-468-3401. MULLEN’S BAR & GRILL. TAUK. North Side. 412-231-1112. NIED’S HOTEL. The Nied’s Hotel Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PALACE THEATRE. The Clarks, Gene The Werewolf. To benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Laurel Region. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. REX THEATER. Saint Vitus, Pallbearer, Hookers, Lady Beast. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Wax Cylinders. Shaler. 412-487-6259. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting Hay Bale Happy Hour feat The Armadillos, Elliott Sussman, Zach Schmidt. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. THE SHOP. Jay Arner, hBar, Ouroborean Piss, Brian DiSanto, Satyr/Elfheim, Holocene Extinction, DJ Blandy Scott. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Lovebettie. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 13 CARSON CITY SALOON. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. South Side. 412-481-3203. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Cobalt Cranes, Diva 93, KFMD, Stranded Aliens. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PALACE THEATRE. Mary Chapin Carpenter & Shawn Colvin. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SMILING MOOSE. Rah Rah, Poor Young Things, The Lucky Strikes The Tones, Chopper Pilot. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 14 CLUB ZOO. AFI. Strip District. 412-201-1100. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Chris Trapper, Nick Young. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

TUE 15 31ST STREET PUB. The Spits, Useless Eaters, Activations, Porno Tongue. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BRILLOBOX. Jaill, Caleb Pogyor & the Talkers, ex.planets. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Carolina Story, River Daughters, The Educators. South Side. 412-431-4950.

N E W S

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Corina Corina, Johnny October, Bobby Jealosy. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. The Belle Game. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 16 CLUB CAFE. Blue Sky Black Death, Sister Crayon, Melodiq. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Arbor, The F*ckies, South Seas Sneak, Satyr/Elfheim. W/ films by Broken Machine. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Bella Russia. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Baton Rouge. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. Taking Back Sunday, Polar Bear Club, Transit. North Side.

WED 16

SAT 12

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

HIP HOP/R&B

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Kenny Powell W/ Etta Cox, Red Velvet. Midland. 724-643-9004. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ortner/Marcinizyn Duo. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tubby Daniels Band, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Three Erics. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Skip Peck Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RESTAURANT ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 724-779-3246. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

THU 10 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Earl Sweatshirt, Domo Genesis, Vince Staples. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

SUN 13 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Cordell Gibson, A’leighsha Gibson, Yung Bru & Fatal, Hiesman, Mark Samuels, Johnny Bianco, Charlie Slum, more. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

FULL LIST E ONLwIN w.

DJS THU 10

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. DJ Desus. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

w paper pghcitym .co

BLUES THU 10

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DRUM BAR. VDJ Dave Ott. North Side. 412-231-7777. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 12 BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Adam Miller. North Side. 412-231-7777. LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City Shake. Motown & funk dance party w/ DJ Soulful Fella. South Side. 814-746-5060. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 13 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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TUE 15

REX THEATER. Blockhead, Little People. South Side. 412-381-6811.

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THE BULLPEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Avella. 724-356-3000. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Seth Walker. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

JAZZ THU 10

FRI 11 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. GRANDVIEW GOLF CLUB. The N-Motion Band. Braddock. 412-719-4120. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Velvet Heat. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Bridgette Purdue. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Take 6. North Side. 412-322-1773. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SUN 13 EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roby Supersax Edwards. 412-904-3335. Troy Roberts & Nu-Jive 5, Kinetic. North Side. 412-904-3335.

MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mark Lucas. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 14 MONROEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Henry Shapiro & Lou Schreiber. Monroeville. 412-372-0500 x 4. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Savoy Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-0660. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 15 ANDYS. Teddy Pantelas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeff Bush. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 16 ANDYS. Kelly DeFade & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

ACOUSTIC THU 10 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

FRI 11 FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. Gary Belloma, The Blue Bombers. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Jimmy Adler Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. MOONDOG’S. Jake’s Blues. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Billy Price & the Lost Minds. Shaler. 412-487-6259.

SAT 12 BALTIMORE HOUSE. Churchview Saints. Pleasant Hills. DORMONT BUSINESS DISTRICT. King’s Ransom. Dormont. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE HOP HOUSE. The Blue Bombers, Gary Belloma. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. KEAN THEATRE. Billy Price. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. MIKE’S PUB. Sweaty Betty. Irwin. 724-864-0444. THE R BAR. The Muddy Creek Blues Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Jefferson Hills. 412-233-9800. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

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Be immersed in a live laser light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! DON’T MISS THESE LASER SHOWS:

Justin Bieber • Beatles • Pink Floyd • SkrillStep Laser Halloween & Laser HalloScream start Oct. 11!

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

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65:(3,56>‹65,50./;653@‹65:(3,56>

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

EARLY WARNINGS

PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610.

Telegraph, London

¸<UPX\L6ULVM[OL-VYLTVZ[*VTPJZVMOPZ.LULYH[PVUš SF Weekly

FRI 11 ELWOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MARIOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610.

WESTBETH ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT

SAT 12

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dylanmoran.com K`SHUTVYHUVÉ&#x2030;JPHS

westbethent.com

WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM

/westbethent

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Ploughshare Poets, Todd Burge. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB. John Farley. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. LEVELS. Bill Young. North Side. 412-231-7777. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. OLIVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POURHOUSE. Mark Cyler Duo. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. WILKINS SCHOOL COMMUNITY CENTER. Dan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cool Hand Ukeâ&#x20AC;? Scanlon. Swissvale. 412-770-8588.

{FRI., NOV. 01}

Dr. Dog Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {TUE., NOV. 19}

K Michelle

HAMBONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th St., Munhall

TUE 15

{TUE., DEC. 10}

PAPA Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

Moistboyz (featuring Dean Ween)

WED 16

REGGAE SAT 12

on Penn Avenue for a College Football All Day Celebration Saturday, Oct. 12. Starts at Noon.

Dr. Dog

MON 14

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG. Jeff LeBlanc. Greensburg. 724-837-7040.

Join Yuengling and 93.7 The Fan at Social at Bakery Square

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NICKY DEVINE}

¸(4HZ[LY*SHZZ0U:[HUK\W*VTLK`š

BREWSTONE. The Flow Band. Wilkins Twp. 412-825-6510. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. Light. Bridgeville.

Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

FRI 11 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Music by Dvorak & Mozart feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Yulianna Avdeeva, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RIVER CITY BRASS. Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-643-9004.

SAT 12

BROWN BAG CONCERT. Feat. Pittsburgh Opera Resident Artists. Pittsburgh Opera, WILLOW ROOM. Strip District. The Flow Band. Belle 412-281-0912. Vernon. 724-379-5666. . w w w PITTSBURGH paper pghcitym SYMPHONY .co ORCHESTRA. Music by Dvorak & Mozart feat. Manfred Honeck, OBEY HOUSE. Mo Nelson Band. conductor & Yulianna Avdeeva, Crafton. 412-922-3883. piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. WINTZELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OYSTER HOUSE. 412-392-4900. Dallas Marks Band. West Mifflin. STILE ANTICO. The Phoenix 412-650-9090. Rising. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Mavens. Lawrenceville. CARNEGIE MELLON 412-682-0177. PHILHARMONIC. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-2383. FREYA STRING QUARTET. First United Methodist PITTSBURGH OPERA RESIDENT Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. ARTISTS. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511. 412-223-7873.

SUN 13

FULL LIST E N O LIN

COUNTRY FRI 11

SAT 12

SUN 13

Register to win a Wii U video game consol from 1-3 with 93.7 The Fan and lots of other cool Yuengling tailgate and football related prizes. Play tailgate games and drink Yuengling $2.00 drafts and $2.00 cans on special all day.

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

CLASSICAL THU 10

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Music by Dvorak & Mozart feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Yulianna Avdeeva, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

MON 14 THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY. Benefits the Pittsburgh Foundation. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 11 CLUB COLONY. Groove Doctors. Scott. 412-668-0903. LEMONT. NiteStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LEVELS. Juan & Erica. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 12 CLUB COLONY. The Soiree Band. Scott. 412-668-0903.

SUN 13 HAMBONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Ukulele Group Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MON 14 HAMBONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do WEDNESDAY 95 Poets Saeed Jones & Terrance Hayes

NEW HAZLETT THEATER Allegheny Square. 412320-4610. Presented by HEArt Performance Series.Tickets: heartjournalonline.com/event. 7:30p.m.

Savoy ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Sean216 & Keeb$. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-8774-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

It’s Dark Outside TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 12.

THURSDAY 10 Turquoise Jeep

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests T-Real, Mike Jack & more. All

ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

PILLOW PROJECT ARTIST ZËK STEWART PHOTO CREDIT: JOAN HEINEMAN

IN PITTSBURGH

October 9 - 15

THE PILLOW PROJECT PRESENTS THE JAZZ FURNACE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 CARRIE BLAST FURNACE

Earl Sweatshirt - The Doris Tour MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. With special guest Vince Staples. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Steve Hackett Genesis Revisited CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

ReelQ.org. Through Oct. 19.

Ten (Pearl Jam Tribute)

Life in Color - Rebirth Tour

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Over 17 show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

FRIDAY 11

Pearl Jam

Reel Q Pittsburgh LGBT Film Festival HARRIS THEATER Downtown. 412-471-9702. Tickets:

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. 412-642-1800. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

more info visit thejazzfurnace. com. 12p.m. & 7p.m.

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike

burg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

OTEP

CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Nov. 3.

An Intimate Solo/ Acoustic Performance by Citizen Cope

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Stolen Babies, New Years Day & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

MONDAY 14

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Over 21 show. Parachute Tickets: 866-468-3401 or HARD ROCK CAFE Station ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m. Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guest Rising Regina. Joe Grushecky Over 21 show. Tickets: and the Houserockers ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412- ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY263-2877. With special guests TIX. 7:30p.m. The Igniters & Wreck Loose. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m. Ill Nino

SATURDAY 12

Chili with the Works Arts & Chili 2013 Fall Festival SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Chili tasting tickets required. For more info visit southsideworks. com. 2p.m.

TUESDAY 15

SUNDAY 13

The Pillow Project presents The Jazz Furnace

An Acoustic Evening with Mary Chapin Carpenter & Shawn Colvin

CARRIE BLAST FURNACE Rankin. Tickets: $15 general admission, $10 student. For

THE PALACE THEATRE Greens-

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Sunflower Dead & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

FALL / WINTER 2013 COLLECTION

at the Waterfront TOTAL MOTION SLIP ON

TOTAL MOTION PUMP

Black, British Tan Widths & Sizes: Med 7-12,13,14, Wide 6½-12,13

Coach, Black, Cordovan Widths & Sizes: Med 5-10½,11 Wide 5-10

108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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DANGEROUS SEAS

AS DRAG STAR DIVINE, HARRIS GLENN MILSTEAD DIDN’T CARE WHAT SOCIETY THOUGHT

{BY AL HOFF} Captain Phillips recounts the real-life events of 2009, when the American cargo ship Maersk Alabama was hijacked by Somali pirates off the coast of Africa. On board are the titular captain (played by Tom Hanks), two dozen sailors and no defenses: The crew is largely helpless when only four armed Somali pirates seize control. “No Al Qaeda — just business … we want money,” explains the pirate leader, Muse (Barkhad Abdi)

A GAY TIME Under the gun: Tom Hanks as Capt. Phillips

CP APPROVED

Director Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Ultimatum) delivers a gripping docu-drama, a high-seas thriller that draws some of its thoughtfulness from the story’s economic and globalization context. (Jobs and the lack of economic opportunity matter for all parties.) We also watch events unfold from both sides, and spend enough time with the pirates to understand their actions. (Phillips: “There’s got to be something besides fishing and kidnapping people.” Muse: “Maybe in America.”) The film depicts how the deteriorating situation forces both leaders out their depths, and it’s fascinating to watch Phillips and Muse react to changes, and to see the shifting power balances. I recalled everything about how this event played out, and yet never once during the film was I not riveted. This is on Greengrass and his cast and crew, who put us right in the unfolding events, in that life-or-death struggle on a claustrophobic lifeboat and in the film’s emotionally wrenching denouement. Starts Fri., Oct. 11. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

¡Machete! The bad-ass Mexican known as Machete began his cinematic career “starring” in a trailer for a fake film in 2007’s Grindhouse. Not only did Machete become a real feature, but now it’s spawned a sequel, Machete Kills. Directed by Robert Rodriguez, and starring Danny Trejo, plus loads of A-list cameos.

Starts Fri., Oct. 11.

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{BY AL HOFF}

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HE 28TH annual Pittsburgh International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival is now known as Reel Q, but it features the same line-up: 15 narrative and documentary films, three programs of shorts, and opening- and closing-night parties. The festival begins Fri., Oct. 11, and runs through Sat., Oct. 19. Opening-night is a double-header with a party in between screenings. First up is Reaching for the Moon (7 p.m.), a Brazilian docudrama about the longtime — and tumultuous — mid-century relationship between prize-winning American poet Elizabeth Bishop and Lota de Macedo Soares, an architect and urban planner who helped to create Rio’s famed beachfront park. The melodrama is a trifle soapy — there is alcoholism and a nervous breakdown, and Lota keeps a former lover close by — but the story is interesting. A deeper film might have made a more rigorous

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

Playing at Reel Q: Heterosexual Jill (top) and Interior. Leather Bar

examination of class and wealth, both of which seem to insulate the relationship from prevailing societal prejudices.

REEL Q All films screen at Harris Theater, Downtown. Single tickets are $9. Opening night is $25 for one film and party; $30 for both films and party. Closing night is $15 for film and party at ToonSeum. Passes and student discounts are also available. See www.reelQ.org for complete schedule and more information.

When dressed as drag star Divine, Harris Glenn Milstead didn’t care what society thought. I Am Divine (9:30 p.m.), the new documentary from Jeffrey Schwarz (Wrangler: Anatomy of an Icon), recounts the life of the bullied, gay fat kid from the Baltimore suburbs who rose to fame in John Waters’ films, from the filth queen of Pink Flamingos to the sweet-sad mom of Hair-

spray. Friends and colleagues (including Waters) weigh in on this aspect of Divine’s life, but there’s also plenty of material documenting her nightclub acts, recording career and the struggle to find acceptance as an actor who wasn’t wearing a dress. A rousing and bittersweet portrait as rounded as Divine herself. Other films previewed include Interior. Leather Bar (9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12), a collaboration between filmmaker Travis Mathews and actor James Franco that documents the making-of some of the lost homoerotic footage from the 1980 Al Pacino film Cruising. I’m not sure how real that project is, but the shaggy, hour-long film does raise issues of masculinity and roleplaying. (With explicit content, though not of Franco.) Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth (7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18) is a documentary portrait of the well-known African-American writer

who rose from a sharecropping farm in Georgia to winning the Pulitzer Prize for her 1982 novel, The Color Purple. The film recounts her life in letters (novels, poetry) as well as her lifelong civil-rights activism and her myriad personal relationships, with both men and women. Walker is extensively interviewed, and helps draw parallels between her own experiences and her work.

Paints By Kait

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NEW VIOLA. In writer-director Matias Piniero’s loosely plotted tale, a group of Buenos Aires actresses performs Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night (on stage, in rehearsal, and in one instance, simply reciting a section over and over) while also ruminating on relationships and their craft. Another woman works delivering packages (they seem to be music or movies copied to discs) and this leads to encounters with some of the actresses, as well as with a man who might factor into some of their romantic relationships. Frankly, I had trouble following along with the minimal things that were happening; it didn’t help that the actresses looked so similar, though given the slippery nature of real-life-vs.-acting here, that may have been intentional. At 65 minutes, Viola is not very long — and even ends with a seemingly improvised song — but it’s a film for those who prefer the oblique over the obvious. In Spanish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Oct. 11. Regent Square (Al Hoff)

Contact for commissioned art!

Viola of Hoverla, the Ukrainian-American Film Festival. 5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www.ucowpa.org. $10 ($15 for double-feature); full-time students with ID, free.

FRANKENSTEIN. James Whale’s 1931 adaptation of Mary Shelley’s story is a sublime exercise in filmmaking and acting. The sets are fantastic, the black-and-white photography deeply evocative, and Boris Karloff’s creature is surely the most sympathetic of monsters. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 10. Oaks

THREE STORIES OF GALICIA. This 2010 documentary from Sarah Farhat and Olha Onyshko profiles three individuals who before, during and after World War II risked their lives to keep people safe in a “region trapped between Stalin and Hitler.” Screens as part of Hoverla, the Ukrainian-American Film Festival. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www. ucowpa.org. $10 ($15 for double-feature); full-time students with ID, free.

THE MONKEY’S PAW. Brett Simmons directs this new adaptation of W.W. Jacobs’ classic horror story about a man unlucky enough to find a “lucky” monkey’s paw. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. Hollywood

ALICE SWEET ALICE. When a young girl is found murdered right before her First Communion, suspicion falls on her odd, withdrawn 12-year-old sister. Alfred Sole directs this 1976 horror thriller. 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Hollywood

THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Barry Sonnenfeld directs this big-screen 1991 adaptation of the popular 1960s TV show (itself adapted from Charles Addams’ cartoons) about an amusingly macabre family. Anjelica Huston, Raul Julia and Christopher Lloyd star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. AMC Loews

BLACK SUNDAY. Barbara Steele stars in Mario Bava’s 1960 horror film about a vengeful witch trying to take over the body of a beautiful young descendent. 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Hollywood

REPERTORY

Throughout the month of October, 10% of all purchases from www.paintsbykait.com will be donated to Susan G. Komen, Pittsburgh.

Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth

ReelQ wraps up Sat., Oct 19, with a screening of G.B.F. (8:30 p.m.), followed by a party. The acronym stands for “gay best friend,” and that’s the hottest accessory at one high school, with three queen bees (drama, super-bitch and goody-two-shoes) vying for one accidently outed young man. The ensemble cast has a blast snarking through this comedy-with-a-message. The script was written by Pittsburgher George Northy, who will attend the screening.

Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?

Also screening during the festival: Heterosexual Jill (3 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12), a comedy about lesbian actors — and cats; Will You Still Love me Tomorrow? (5 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13), a Taiwanese comedy; Ian Harvie Superhero (4 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19), a profile of the transsexual comedian; and Shorts Programs for men and women.

WILD STYLE. It’s words and pictures as local cartoonist Ed Piskor reads from his new booklength comic, The Hip Hop Family Tree, followed by a screening of Charlie Ahearn’s 1983 film Wild Style. The film — a love story wrapped in a documentary — is often cited as the first feature to explore the burgeoning graffiti and hip-hop scene in New York City. 8 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.) Thu., Oct. 10. Hollywood. $10. Tickets at door and www.showclix.com I WILL FOLLOW YOU INTO THE DARK. Mark Edwin Robinson directs this recent supernatural thriller about a troubled young woman and the spooky high-rise she decides to explore. Mischa Barton stars. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11; and 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. Hollywood BEETLEJUICE. Alec Baldwin, Geena Davis and Michael Keaton star in Tim Burton’s 1988 comedy about a haunted house, and the aggrieved ghosts who live there. 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11, and 10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Oaks THE SOVIET STORY. This 2008 documentary from Edvins Snore tells the story of how the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany shared some ideologies and strategies, particularly regarding actions taken to control citizenry. Screens as part

POLTERGEIST. In Tobe Hoper’s 1982 thriller, a family is initially amused by the presence of ghosts in the home … until somebody disappears. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 12. Manor POTEMKIN. Its story is certainly of CP BATTLESHIP interest: a recreation of a 1905 historical event in which sailors aboard the Russian ship Potemkin revolt. Their mutiny spurs the citizens of Odessa to rally in support, only to be brutally beaten back by the czar’s troops. But rightly so, Sergei Eisenstein’s 1925 silent masterpiece has also been celebrated for its dramatic editing and cinematography, much of which laid the groundwork for cinematic language still in use today. With live musical accompaniment from the Andrew Alden Ensemble. 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. Hollywood (AH) THE SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS. Though director Alexander Mackendrick was best known for his British comedies, in 1957 he brilliantly steered the adaptation of Ernest Lehman’s short story about the underbelly of New York City press relations into one of the darkest, most cynical, acidetched works of the decade. (Lehman and Clifford Odets co-wrote the biting screenplay.) Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis turn in memorable performances — Lancaster forgoing his easy charm to portray the malevolent, despotic newspaper columnist J.J. Hunsecker, while Curtis sweats and flails as the desperate, weasely press agent Sidney Falco. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films

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Frankenstein

FINAL 2 WEEKS!

focusing on disillusion with the American Dream. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. Regent Square (AH)

DRAG HIM TO A SHOW HE'LL ACTUALLY ENJOY!

STEEL CITY SHORT FILM SCREENINGS. Local filmmaker Nick LaMantia presents his short-film anthology Self Obscurities, consisting of three dramas: “Soliloquy,” “Assertions” and “Confessional.” The films were produced and cast locally, and were shot in Wilkinsburg and East Liberty. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 14. Hollywood. Free

Broadway’s Smash Comedy About the Sexes Written by Rob Becker

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OKLAHOMA! OCTOBER 18 - 27 RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN’S

OKLAHOMA!

MUSIC BY RICHARD RODGERS BOOK AND LYRICS BY OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II BASED ON THE PLAY “GREEN GROW THE LILACS” BY LYNN RIGGS

ORIGINAL DANCES BY AGNES DE MILLE

DIRECTED BY PATRICK CASSIDY

RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES, PRODUCING DIRECTOR

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

(Jason Patric), he runs afoul of a trio of pint-sized vampire hunters (including the two Coreys, Feldman and Haim). Directed by Joel Schumacher, it all ends in a bloodbath of unholy proportions — as it should. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16. AMC Loews (AH)

FAST FOOD NATION. Richard Linklater’s ensemble drama — adapted from Eric Schlosser’s nonfiction best-seller — rips the bun off the patty, and shoves our heads behind the shiny plastic curtain of fastfood marketing so we can see the real costs wrought by those millions of Big Macs and Whoppers. Fast Food offers interconnected fictionalized stories designed to illustrate and humanize aspects of the book’s sweeping exposé, though often the melding of drama and information makes an awkward marriage. The 2006 film continues a mini-series, “Fight Back: Global Politics of Resistance,” presented by Point Park University. In English, and some Spanish with subtitles. 6 p.m. Wed., Oct 16. University Center (Room 212), 414 Wood St., Downtown. www.pointpark.edu. Free (AH) WILD AND SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL. This national touring program offers four hours of short films addressing the theme “A Climate of Change,” designed to educate and inspire activism. The event is sponsored locally by the Allegheny Defense Project. Film topics include: good soil, diminishing glaciers, the Colorado River delta and oyster farming. 6 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16. Phipps Conservatory, Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free (suggested donation $10). www.wildandscenicfilmfestival.org. 13 GHOSTS. William Castle directs this 1960 spooker in which a family inherits a haunted house, complete with ghosts that viewers can see with the use of special glasses. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Oaks THE LOST BOYS. This 1987 MTV-style twist on vampires — it’s as if an ’80s hair-metal band turned to blood-sucking and remade Rebel Without a Cause — holds up as a decent goof and even has a few creepy moments. Keifer Sutherland heads a crew of punky vamps who hang out at the beach boardwalk and generally seem to relish being night freaks (“sleep all day, party all night”). When Sutherland tries to recruit the new kid in town

“Soliloquy,” from Self Obscurities THE GODFATHER. Catch one of the most enduring and influential American films of the late 20th century on the big screen, where Francis Ford Coppola’s multi-generational 1972 mafia family drama and perversion of the American Dream writ large belongs. To be followed by a discussion. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Melwood BIG SUR. This new drama from Michael Polish recounts the three trips that Beat writer Jack Kerouac made to the Big Sur region of California after publishing On The Road. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

[DANCE]

“THE ART IS IN PICKING THE MOMENTS THAT YOU CHOOSE TO COVER.”

AMIDST ASHES {BY STEVE SUCATO}

[BOOKS] The Pillow Project’s Taylor Knight at the Carrie Furnaces {PHOTO COURTESY OF JORDAN BUSH}

Call it site-specific dance on a gargantuan scale. The Pillow Project takes its improvisational “Postjazz” movement style and video wizardry to a whole new level when it invades the Carrie Blast Furnaces, in Rankin, on Oct. 12, for a daylong extravaganza titled The Jazz Furnace. Built in 1907, the Carrie Furnaces number 6 and 7 tower 92 feet over the Monongahela River. Until 1978, these were literal giants in the production of iron, at their peak turning out 1,000 to 1,250 tons a day. Now one of the few non-operative blast furnaces in the area still standing, the former U.S. Steel site will come to life once again — repurposed as an arts venue where a dozen dancers and as many musicians, along with poets, illustrators and graffiti artists, will transform the vast empty site into a multimedia happening. (The show follows Alloy Pittsburgh, an unrelated art-installation project at the site.) Three years in the making, The Jazz Furnace, funded by a grant from The Pittsburgh Foundation, consists of two events. From noon to 5 p.m., patrons will be free to explore nearly the entire Carrie site, taking in what Pillow Project artistic director Pearlann Porter calls “mini-sitespecific installations,” with performers and artists scattered throughout. “The place is epic and the dancers and musicians will be using it as an instrument ‘to play the furnace,’” says Porter. The evening session runs from 7 p.m. to midnight, in the facility’s hangar-sized powerhouse building. It will feature, on the hour, roughly 20-minute excerpts in-the-round from such past Pillow Project works as Backlit in a Whole New D, The Green Swan and Twenty Eighty-Four, re-imagined for the Carrie site along with live video, multimedia installations and performances by local bands Blue Redshift and Chaibaba. “The place was hell with the lid off when it was going,” says Porter of the Carrie site, now overseen by the nonprofit Rivers of Steel Heritage Corp. “We are using that to influence The Jazz Furnace. Dust and ash will fly. The Green Swan will become the dirty swan.” For Porter, this year’s The Jazz Furnace is just the beginning. “We want to turn this into an annual festival,” she says. “Something unique to Pittsburgh, honoring the history of the Carrie Furnace and Pittsburgh’s steel industry.”

ED PISKOR’’S WILD STYLE

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Breaking good: Russell Simmons (in hat) and Kurtis Blow (right) celebrate an early hip-hop hit in Hip Hop Family Tree.

S

OME M 40 YEARS ago, hip hop was born of house and street parties in the South Bronx. parti Pittsburgh-based Pittsburgh h-b base cartoonist Ed Piskor tells the story stor ory y in The Hip Hop Family Tree, his new large-format large-form 112-page comic from Fantagraphics Bo Books. ooks Piskor begins with DJ Kool Herc’s firstt break beats and continues bre e through key fi gures figure r s like Grandmaster Flash, Kurtis Blow, Russell and Sugar Hill Russse s ll Simmons S Records’ Sylvia Robinson. The sprawling, fastRobi biin paced book ends in 1981 — the year hip hop 1 erupted consciousness. Four erup pted into national nation n more volumes are planned. plan Piskor is known for fo his critically acclaimed computer-hacker epic Wizzywig, and for collaboW rations with the late Harvey Pekar including The Beats, which Piskor partly illustrated. Hip Pis Hop Family Tree — Piskor’s first book in full color — paints a big bi picture, from the music to the graffiti and more that comprise hiphop culture. “It’s very important to note

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE PILLOW PROJECT THE JAZZ FURNACE Noon-5 p.m. and 7 p.m.– midnight Sat., Oct. 12. Carrie Furnace site, Rankin. All-day pass $10-15. www.pillowproject.org N E W S

that the main character is hip hop, and all of these people are just little bits to create the whole,” says Piskor, 31, a lifelong hip-hop fan.

ED PISKOR BOOK EVENT AND WILD STYLE SCREENING 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 10. Hollywood Theater, 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $10. 412-563-0368 or www.thehollywooddormont.org

Family Tree actually debuted as a weekly serial, starting Jan. 1, 2012, on web blog Boingboing.net. That exposure didn’t just garner the Munhall native a book contract; it has also gotten him featured on Time.com and earned admiring quotes from hip-hop icons like

Ed Piskor {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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ED PISKOR’S WILD STYLE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

Biz Markie, who says, “This is the comic of all time.” Piskor — lately in demand at events like the Brooklyn Book Festival — launches his book locally with an Oct. 10 appearance at the Hollywood Theater. (Piskor cautions that supplies of the book might still be limited at this event.) The event includes a screening of the landmark 1983 film Wild Style. Piskor recently spoke with CP. A longer version of this interview is available at www.pghcitypaper.com. HAS HIP HOP ALWAYS BEEN WITH YOU? I was one of the only white kids in my neighborhood. My house is in between several playgrounds. On [one] playground, there was a very prominent “Homestead” graffiti burner, and the “o” in Homestead was an eight-ball. And I would just draw that endlessly. There are two hoops at the playground, so when guys are waiting around for next opportunity to play, they’re just in a circle, forming a rap cipher. It was just always there. It was like the air, you know? WHY THE LARGE FORMAT, A LA THE OLD COMICS “TREASURY EDITIONS”? That was a very important format for the time that the story’s constructed [for titles

hard-to-shelve book for stores. And Fantagraphics, they never said no to anything.

out. So it was very important to show this passing of the guard.

PEKAR’S THE BEATS IS ALSO A CULTURAL HISTORY. DID DOING THAT BOOK INFLUENCE THIS ONE? The structure that Harvey put together is what I used for this project. In most comics, the panel-topanel transition is like a moment-to-moFOR THE BOOK’S ment thing. But in The CONTENT, YOU Beats, years can travel CREDIT SOURCES between panels, and INCLUDING DAN it’s like the art is in CHARNAS’ BOOK THE picking the moments BIG PAYBACK AND that you choose to INTERVIEW ARCHIVE cover. Also, The Beats, THAFOUNDATION. it’s an ensemble cast, COM. WHAT ABOUT and how Harvey kinda VISUAL REFERENCES? juggled all of these There was a great Afrika Bambaataa holds forth. components is somephotographer during thing that I keep in that period covering this stuff. His name’s Joe Conzo. So he has mind while constructing this comic. this great archive of visual references that I can pull from. There’s a photographer DO YOU KEEP UP WITH HIP HOP? named Martha Cooper who documented I don’t know anything about modern rap, the New York scene in depth. [And] basi- really. I feel like lawyers killed rap in the cally my favorite period of filmmaking is way that I know and love it [when DJs simthose gritty New York films of the ’70s. I ply looped existing records]. Now it’s more love Scorsese, I love French Connection, lyrically based, and the production is kind of Pelham One Two Three. When I’m work- weak, to me, on almost everything. ing, those flicks are going on in the background [on his laptop]. YOUR COLOR PALETTE IS ALSO 1970SERA. YOU HAND-DRAW, THEN DIGITALLY SAMPLE COLORS? I spend a significant amount of time on the computer to make it look like it’s not done on the computer.

M.C. Ricky D of The Kangol Crew

including DC’s 1978 classic “Superman vs. Muhammad Ali”]. I just wanted to give it that vibe of those old-time comics. WHY FANTAGRAPHICS? I had offers from New York — big-time book publishers. I took a substantial pay cut to get this vision across. I chose based on format. Because it’s a weird size, it’s a

WHAT ABOUT HIP-HOP HISTORY SHOULD PEOPLE KNOW BETTER? The importance of the downtown New York City hipster art scene was crucial to the development and the propagation of hip hop. … It could have just been this very niche thing that just happened in the projects. But it was discovered by people like Debbie Harry, Malcolm McLaren. [Graffiti artist and future MTV host] Fab Five Freddy was like the bridge who introduced that Bronx uptown to the downtown art world. And that’s where graffiti really plays in. The bourgeoisie, they sort of nurtured it and allowed it to grow in the city, because they started bringing people like Afrika Bambaataa into these downtown clubs. WHY SPEND FOUR PAGES ON THE EMCEE BATTLE BETWEEN KOOL MOE DEE AND BUSY BEE STARSKI? It’s a battle between the old generation and the newer. Busy Bee represents the old, and Kool Moe Dee represents the future. Busy Bee is simply about getting the crowd in a frenzy, saying stuff in a call-and-response fashion to excite people. And Kool Moe Dee’s stuff is content-based. That has won

Kool Moe Dee prepares for rap battle.

HOW FAR WILL YOUR FIVE-VOLUME HISTORY GO? Say I’m inspired to take it to the end of my interest [in hip-hop history]. I would take it to 1993 [and] Wu-Tang Clan. I’d end with the Wu. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

THE GRANDEST OF ALL GRAND OPERAS RETURNS

[ART]

BODY PARTS

OPENS SATURDAY! Watch for CHARLIE BATCH (10/12) and FRANCO HARRIS (10/18) in the famous Triumphal Scene!

It’s been more than 20 years since Janine Antoni arrived with a splash, combining performance and sculpture in works to which the artist’s body was central — chewing up chocolate and lard in “Gnaw” or using her hair as a paintbrush in “Loving Care,” both in 1992. These and later artworks by Antoni helped revitalize installation art, providing fresh alternatives to sculpture’s tradition of monoliths-andmonuments. Curated by Margery King and occupying most of the Mattress Factory’s Monterey Street townhouse, Antoni’s interventions and displays (all from 2013) exist somewhere between a conventional one-person exhibit and a buildingwide installation. Entering the groundfloor gallery, we’re faced with “Graft,” two large tree stumps with roots intact. Close examination reveals that the stumps were previously joined and have been cut apart. Theatrically positioned as objects of contemplation, one stump is suspended with its trunk extending into a hole in the ceiling and the other sits on the floor; coiled at its base, somewhat inexplicably, is a casting of two entwined spinal cords. Heading up the stairs to the second floor in search of interpretive cues, we encounter the top of the tree trunk, from which “grows” a wood table displaying cast body parts. The body parts are sculptures in their own right, illogical combinations of elements: an arm holds a heart in the crook of its elbow; a head has sections of pelvic bone attached to it, looking like parasites; a section of neck empties into a cup-like cast of a breast. The female body here appears — albeit in fragments — as natural, sculptural, wondrous and subject to alteration, much as a tree can be formed into a table. In another room, raku bowls with pelvis-bone feet invoke the ancient trope of body as vessel. And upstairs, in “Crowned,” a rough-hewn crown molding looks as if it could have been original to the room, except that it culminates in yet more castings of pelvic bones, which were used to sculpt the shape of the molding. At the end of the line is “Honey Baby,” a video produced in collaboration with choreographer Stephen Petronio. A back-lit male figure heavily coated with honey slowly tumbles in a space that initially appears gravity-less but turns out to be a tunnel, or canal, providing necessary support, tethering consciousness to corporeal reality.

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Original photo: David Bachman.

Janine Antoni’s “Graft” (detail: first floor view) {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATTRESS FACTORY}

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

Verdi’s V erd di’ss

OCT 12, 15, 18, 20 Benedum Center Tickets $12 and up 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org

75th anniversary season: Opera for a new age

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UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD!

JANINE ANTONI: WITHIN continues through March 30. Mattress Factory, 1414 Monterey St., North Side. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org N E W S

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Buying or selling a home? Choose a pro who lives and works in the city. Call today for a consultation: Rick Schweikert Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 5887 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217

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Rick Schweikert rick.schweikert@pittsburghmoves.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER}

Erin Lindsey Krom and Patrick Cannon in the Public’s Our Town

[PLAY REVIEWS]

WHERE YOU LIVE {BY TED HOOVER}

THERE’S A DANGER in presenting a theater

classic — the temptation to play it as an Important Work or, worse still, the need for directors to use the script as a mere jumping-off point for somewhat questionable interpretations. Thorton Wilder’s 1938 Pulitzer Prizewinning Our Town faces those dangers, only doubled. If ever a script seemed vulnerable to reinvention and/or ponderous exaltation, this minimalist play about the absolute “ordinary-ness” of life is it. And it’s a big relief to congratulate director Ted Pappas for steering well clear of both traps in this latest production at Pittsburgh Public Theater. Set in New Hampshire at the beginning of the 20th century, Our Town plots a dozen years in the life of tiny Grover’s Corners. A character known as The Stage Manager acts as our tour guide, introducing the people, places, facts and history of the story, and we follow the Gibbs and Webb families through weddings, deaths, first love and heartbreak. It’s Wilder’s design that the play is performed without sets or props — just tables, chairs and ladders — forcing our attention to his story and his writing. I’m probably not smart enough to understand everything Wilder is saying; maybe it’s that the insignificance of living is matched only by the imperative to live. But I do know something about writ-

ing, and what the Public does is present Wilder’s script in all of its genuine brilliance, with the company giving great voice to glorious poetry he creates from simplicity. How a play this unadorned can be so richly textured is nothing short of a miracle.

OUR TOWN continues through Oct. 27. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

Pappas neatly moves the play along without calling attention to the pace. There’s some subtext that might have gotten lost in the shuffle (and the sit-comstyled second act feels forced). But that’s infinitely preferable to leaden, portentous productions I’ve seen elsewhere. A subtle and nimble 24-person cast is lead by an affable, expository Tom Atkins. And I want to make special mention of Bridget Connors, Cary Anne Spear, John Shepard and Marc Epstein as the various parents, and of Daniel Krell’s sad turn as Stimson. But mostly, I want to thank the Public for this clear and precise production of a theater classic.

WHAT THE PUBLIC DOES IS PRESENT WILDER’S SCRIPT IN ALL OF ITS GENUINE BRILLIANCE.

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

TWISTS OFF {BY F.J. HARTLAND}

A TWIST makes a martini better. And a

twist makes a play better.

and tireless ensemble! They all do an admirable job, with Bisbee as a standout. Bender has little to do in Act I, but she blossoms in Act II. Again, it’s impossible to say much more without ruining the show for future audiences. I can say that this show is so demanding (and physically exhausting) that the program also lists two understudies — Paul DelGatto and Julie Crede. Kudos to director Jena Oberg for making sense of this script. I give her points for being able to understand this complex script on the page — let alone the ability to bring it to the stage.

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

ZIMMERMANN & DE PERROT

IT PUSHES THE OUTERMOST BOUNDARIES OF THE AUDIENCE’S “WILLING SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF.

ACCOMPLICE continues through Sat., Oct. 12. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

And hats off to designer Martha Bell and technical director Michael Hornak for creating some impressive special effects that look quite believable. The set is simple, but manages to meet

4 STARS. Boisterous, off-the-wall humour and fizzy, rollickingly good entertainment. – The Times

TICKETS START AT $19

OCT 16, 2013 OCT 17,, 20 2013 OCT 18, 2013 O OC CSTO L18 1 , U20 2 T0! 13 D O

WED FRI

WHERE DANCE, THEATER & CIRCUS COLLIDE

Accomplice, by Rupert Holmes, is the current offering at Little Lake Theatre, and it’s crammed full of twists. Too many, perhaps. There are so many twists, in fact, that it’s virtually impossible to describe the plot without giving them away. But it’s safe to say that this thriller begins with two British couples meeting for a weekend in the country. And you’ll never believe where that journey ends. Along the way, there are some clever tricks, but by two hours in, the plot is beyond convoluted. It pushes the outermost boundaries of the audience’s “willing suspension of disbelief.” On the plus side, the plot is so outrageous that no one will be able to figure out what’s going to happen next. Also in the “plus column,” Accomplice pokes fun at the four-actor-two-act-four-scene thriller, and is filled with inside jokes that theater folks will love. The small cast consists of Charles Brown, Tammy Tsai, Dan Bisbee and Deborah Bender. What a hard-working

TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666

8 PM

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

AUGUST WILSON CENTER

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

The most important exhibition of new INTERNATIONAL art in the US happens in Pittsburgh.

Oct. 5, 2013–Mar. 16, 2014

Sponsored by

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART? TOURS DAILY.

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PLAY REVIEWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN}

CMU Drama’s The Crucible

all the quickly changing demands of the play. Twists are good. But there can be too much of a good thing. In the case of the Accomplice script, less would have been so much more. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

WITCHING HOURS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

JUST WHAT spirits are aligned so that the federal “shutdown” should occur just as Carnegie Mellon University School of Drama opens a play about theocratic officials abusing their power? Gee, Arthur Miller’s 1953 witch-hunt classic is ever timeless in its portrayal of paranoia manipulated for selfish ends: sexual, financial, whatever. Director Tony McKay, associate professor of acting at the drama school, dampens the individual drama of one farmer trapped by the local hysteria into a stylized Greek-like tragedy. This shifts more of the focus onto the true tragic hero brought down by hubris: the Rev. Hale (a sympathetic John Garet Stoker as the would-be villain). Miller’s protagonist is, after all — spoiler alert for anyone who managed to avoid the American high school chestnut or its hotter movie versions — redeemed at the end. While the story-telling is still central, this production evokes a pageant of moods, lights, sounds and use of color among the overwhelming grays. Electric is the only way to describe the moment when Proctor (a stoic Brian Muller), decrying lead witchaccuser Abigail as a whore, pulls off actress

Taylor Rose’s cap to reveal a flame of red hair. Rose leads the passion parade, with Mary Nepi as her co-conspirator-cum-victim and Bridget Peterson as her implacable target, Proctor’s wife. The individual performances are largely trouble-free despite obvious age disparities between the student actors and some roles. But the performances are less remarkable than is the ensemble filling the stage in seamlessly coordinated movement and sound: McKay conducts his cast like an orchestra, with coaches Catherine Moore (movement) and J.M. Feindel (voice). Jared Patrick Gerbig’s towering, angled planks prove to be a quite versatile set as forest, farm, courtroom, prison, etc., with the help of Jordan Harrison’s media design and Jackson Gallagher’s lighting. Lizzie Donelan’s historically realistic costumes add depth to the monochromatic look. Credit, also, to sound designer Rebecca Stoll, stage manager Shannon Henley and dramaturg Emma McFarland.

DIRECTOR TONY MCKAY CONDUCTS HIS CAST LIKE AN ORCHESTRA.

THE CRUCIBLE continues through Sun., Oct. 13. Philip Chosky Theater, Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2407 or www.drama.cmu.edu

It’s not difficult to argue that The Crucible is timeless and a classic, but its overfamiliarity with audiences does, unfortunately, provide uncomfortable chuckles and guffaws. Launching its own centennial celebration, CMU’s drama school updates a well-worn vehicle. (Crucible/CMU trivium: The original John Proctor on Broadway in 1953 was Arthur Kennedy, class of ’34.) I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

EVERYONE REMEMBERS THEIR FIRST. THIS WEEK! OCT 9-12 SOL

SOL

D OU

D OU

T!

THE PIGEONING

T!

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DARK OUTSIDE

NEXT WEEK: OCT 16-18

ZIMMERMANN & DE PERROT AUGUST WILSON CENTER | 8PM

Seven performers inhabit a topsy-turvy world where, at any moment, the ceiling can become a floor, a floor can become a wall, and a door can become a chasm.

Never before seen artists and performances.

TrustArts.org/first

A PROJECT OF

THROUGH OCT 26 Supported by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, two anonymous donors, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the Carol R. Brown Performance Fund, the Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments, the Hillman Foundation, the Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.1010.17.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

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{ART}

{WORDS} What a résum�� has Anne Waldman. Born in New Jersey, in 1945, the much-honored poet grew up on the Beats and jazz; in the ’70s, she cofounded, with Allen Ginsberg, Colorado’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, and was poet-in-residence on Bob Dylan’s legendary Rolling Thunder Revue tour. The New York- and Colorado-based Waldman, who’s published more than 40 books, is known for her performative readings. Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers series hosts her tonight, at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium. Bill O’Driscoll 8:30 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. 412624-6508 or www.pgh writerseries.wordpress.com

+ FRI., OCT. 11

Wednesdays - 5pm to 8pm Thursdays - 5pm to 8pm Fridays - 4pm to 6pm

{COMEDY} It’s National Coming Out Day. Even if coming out isn’t on your to-do list this week, the holiday’s a good excuse

OCT. 17 John Lawton

to visit Arcade Comedy Theater for Coming Out for Comedy, tonight’s celebratory line-up of LGBTQ performers. Arcade regular Mike Buzzelli presents talent including Chrissy Costa, Abby Denton, Brian Edward, Ian Insect, Stacy Keene, Christine Marie, John Pridmore and Carl Schimmel. BO 8 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. www. arcadecomedytheater.com

DRINK SPECIALS $1 off all Beers $2 off all Mixed Drinks $2 off all Champagne Cocktails $2 off all Wines by the Glass

$1 each

25 Market Square perlepgh.com 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

{COMEDY} Six regulars on the local improv scene have teamed for two nights of sketch comedy called Rein in the People. The show, at Steel City Improv Theater, features “obnoxiously eccentric characters, wildly uncomfortable group situations and sage-worthy words of wisdom from taxidermy animals …” The nine sketches, plus songs and music, are by Ben Amiri, Nicole Antonuccio, Dillon Diatlo, Greg Gillotti, Tessa Karel and Travis Koury. BO 10 p.m. Also 10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $7. www.reininthepeople.com

+ SAT., OCT. 12 {ENERGY}

OCT. 12 Aida

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BACHMAN}

CHEF’S SELECTION PALATE PLEASERS

Calling all college students: Take a break from Supercuts and get a free haircut for a reason by visiting Daniel Allende at his two-day popup hair salon, Gloryhair. As a member of San Franciscobased collective Future Farmers, this Carnegie Mellon grad student has exhibition credits at venues including the Guggenheim. Tonight and tomorrow only, Gloryhair offers hairstyles that flirt with the line between conformity and nonconformity, while drawing inspiration from the political and stylistic aspects of hair. Brett Wilson 10 p.m. Also 1-6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12 (DJ set at 10 p.m.). 5139 Penn Avenue, Garfield. Free. www.danallende.com

Our political leaders might be fiddling while the planet burns. But some folks have boldly pursued renewable energy. On today’s 2013 Pittsburgh Solar Tour, the group PennFuture showcases 22 properties that have gone solar. Buildings on the free tour are mostly in and near Pittsburgh; other communities include Moon Township, Rochester and Bentleyville. Start the self-guided tour at any property. One stop includes activities for kids;

Sheila McKenna (on left), Helena Ruoti and Harry Bouvy {PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE DEL GAUDIO}

sp otlight

City Theatre artistic director Tracy Brigden and playwright Christopher Durang go back to Brigden’s days with the Manhattan Theatre Club. When she came to City, one of her first initiatives was to feed Durang the commission for a Christmas Carol spoof that became Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge. The play world-premiered here in 2002 and is still produced around the country. Brigden’s appreciation for Durang as a seasoned comic playwright with something to say convinced her to book his latest, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, even before the hit comedy won its 2013 Tony for best play. City’s season-opener depicts a madcap, weekend-long family reunion: Middle-aged siblings Vanya and Sonia, who stayed in the family home in Bucks County, Pa., to care for their nowdeceased parents, are visited by their movie-star sister, Masha, and her much younger boyfriend, Spike. Brigden directs a top-shelf cast including local favorites Helena Ruoti (as Masha) and Sheila McKenna (as Sonia) alongside Harry Bouvy and Karl Glusman. As the character names impishly suggest, the play explores Chekovian themes of family. So while Vanya and Sonia is full-blooded comedy, “It’s not just fluffy farce,” says Brigden. “It has things to think about and characters you care about.” Bill O’Driscoll First performance: 5:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Continues through Nov. 3. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

{ZOMBIES}

{OPERA} Verdi’s masterpiece Aida opens the 75th season of the

{ART BY ELEANOR RAY}

Will you survive the zombie apocalypse? World Zombie Day, part of the 2013 Pittsburgh Zombiefest, is your

“Zombie Walk,” a bar crawl around Lawrenceville. Since you zombies don’t need the food, bring by some nonperishable food items for donation to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. BW Noon. Arsenal Park, 39th Street, Lawrenceville. Free. www. pittsburghzombiefest.com

Gloryhair Gl l h

chance to find out. The event will include: The Zombie Olympics; a “Brain Eating” contest; an “ugly pageant”; and a “Best Scream” contest. The undead will also attempt to capture the world record for largest gathering of zombies, and festivities culminate in a

{STAGE} Following a 17-city tour of its show Tonight a Clown Will Travel Time, Miniature Curiosae returns with its biggest production — and some of its smallest sets. Birds of America is the puppet troupe’s “horror play” about a bird scholar and his wife, inhabiting a lonely house on a seaside cliff. Birds employs three puppeteers, two actors and three big screens fed by video cameras cinematically navigating tiny sets. The show — part of the New Hazlett Theater’s subscription-based CSA Performance Series (but open to the public) — sprang from writer Murphi Cook and director Zach Dorn’s love of movies like Rosemary’s Baby and The Birds. “It’s gonna be spooky-scary,” promises Cook. BO 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20 ($100 for CSA share). www.newhazletttheater.org

{SCREEN}

Pittsburgh Opera. The production is led by tenor and Aida veteran Carl Tanner and soprano Latonia Moore, also hailed for her past work in this opera. With musical direction by Antony Walker and stage direction by Crystal Manich, this opera will be sure to open

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OCT. 11

directed by Lisa Ann Goldsmith, opens tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 31. Munhall. Brisbanemanagement-group.com

the season at the Benedum Center on a note as big as the Nile. BW 8 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 15; 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18; and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 20. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $12.75-179. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org

The touring Wild & Scenic Film Festival makes its Pittsburgh premiere at Phipps Conservatory. The short-film festival, sponsored tonight by groups including Allegheny Defense Project and the Sierra Club, means to inspire activism; this year’s theme is “A Climate of Change.” Shorts include: “Second Nature: The Biomimicry Revolution,” about South African Janine Benyus’ efforts to get engineers,

{ART} {PHOTO COURTESY OF MINIATURE CURIOSA}

another offers free electricbike rides. Another new wrinkle is a ticketed, guided cycling version of the tour. BO 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (Bike tour starts at 10 a.m., at Point State Park). Free (Bike tour: $10). www.pennfuture.org

musical. The location details for the 12 performances, in Munhall, will be kept secret until you buy a ticket. The production company, Brisbane Management Group, is run by area native and theater veteran Kelly Brisbane; the show,

chemists and architects to think more like nature; “The Soil Solution,” about nurturing the soil to combat climate change; and “The Water Tower,” which uses mountainclimbing in Kenya to explore threats to the he glaciers supplying the he nation’s water. BO 6-10 p.m. m. Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free ree (suggested donation: $10). www. wildandscenicfilmfestival.org nicfilmfestival.org

The 2013 Carnegie International just opened; tonight’s your chance to corner at least one of the exhibition’s three curators and learn the thinking behind this massive show, featuring 35 artists from 19 countries. At the Culture Club event, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, sign up to join a small-group discussion of selected works, starting at either 6 or 6:45 p.m., with Dan Baumann, Dan Byers or Tina Kukielski. There’s also a cash bar, and the galleries stay open late. BO 5:30-9 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10 (includes drink ticket). 412622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

{WORDS} {WORD

British au author John Lawton made his name with his Inspector Troy series of mysterbooks like Black Out and ies — boo Riptide, sset at mid-century, World War II or Cold War with Wor backdrops. Lawton set Troy backdrop aside for his latest historical fiction. The T amoral protagonist of Then We Take Berlin T (Atlantic (Atlant Monthly Press) is Joe Wilderness, a Cockney W war orphan turned Cold o War Wa spy. Lawton, who’s now garnering comparisons to LeCarre and pa Graham Greene, takes G his h five-city U.S. tour to t Mystery Lovers OCT. 10 10 Bookshop tonight. Anne Waldman BO 7 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 412828-4877 or www. {PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK mysterylovers.com GREENE/THE ROSE WENT

{STAGE} Enduring cult ult classic The Rocky Horror ror Show w gets another twist: wist: A local stage production features multiple venues (“a mobile audience experience”) ”) and encourages audience nce members to join in singing nging “The Time Warp” and other songs from Richard O’Brien’s campily ghoulish

LOVELY PHOTOGRAPHY}

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

the Red Masquers. Thu-Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Peter Mills Theater (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall), Uptown. ACCOMPLICE. A wife and her lover who are plotting to murder her stuffy husband. The murder ensues .. and then the husband reappears. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. AIDA. Presented by Pittsburgh Opera. Sat., Oct. 12 and Tue, Fri, Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. COLORADO. Dark comedy about the disappearance of a teenage beauty queen. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. COTTON PATCH GOSPEL. Retelling of the life of Jesus in modern day, rural Georgia. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Saltworks Theater Company, Oakland. 412-621-6150 x 201.

Duke’s UPPER DECK CAFE

Pittsburgh Hockey Special

$3.50 Coors Light 20 drafts oz

during all Pittsburgh hockey games 122 West 8th Avenue Homestead, PA 412-461-8124 www.dukesupperdeck.com

DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DON’T DRESS FOR DINNER. Confusion arises as Bernard plans a weekend w/ his mistress, sends his wife to her mother, hires a cook to prepare gourmet delights, & uses his best friend to provide his alibi. Presented by Stage Right. Thu-Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. 412-228-0566. GOD OF CARNAGE. Two sets of parents get together to discuss the trouble that occurs when their young children are in an altercation at school. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES. Adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s thriller. Thru Oct. 12. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. IT’S DARK OUTSIDE. Puppetry, mask, animation, live performance & an original music score by

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

the award-winning composer Rachael Dease, are intertwined to create an epic Western about redemption & dementia. Thru Oct. 11, 9 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. MENOPAUSE THE MUSICAL. Musical parody staged to classic tunes from the ‘60s, ‘70s & ‘80s. Tue., Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. OLIVER! Presented by the Heritage Players. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. OUR TOWN. Thornton Wilder’s classic play about a small, early-20th century community. Thru Oct. 27. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE PIGEONING. A full-length puppet play using Bunraku puppetry, video, & original music to explore the ideas of obsessive compulsion, safety, & order in the context of the end of the world. Thru Oct. 12, 7 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

PUBLICNOTICES P UB L I C NOT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER 3PENNY OPERA. Presented by

PRINCESS IDA. Prince Hilarion sneaks into a women’s university to win the love of his betrothed. Presented by Pittsburgh Savoyards. Fri-Sun and Thu., Oct. 17. Thru Oct. 20. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. Presented by Brisbane Management Group. Location released after ticket purchase. brisbane-management-group.com Wed-Sat. Thru Oct. 31. SOLD: RENN WOODS IN CONCERT. An autobiographical tour de force written by & starring Renn Woods. Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. SOLDIER’S HEART. Play by Tammy Ryan about the struggles women face in the military. Presented by The REP. Thu-Sun. Thru Oct. 13. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE. Vanya & his sister Sonia tolerate a mediocre life until their movie-star sister Masha returns w/ her boy-toy Spike. Tue-Sun. Thru Nov. 3. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. YOU BELONG TO ME. Short play addressing teen dating violence. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Tue., Oct. 15, 10 a.m. CCAC Boyce Campus, Monroeville. 724-773-0700.

COMEDY THU 10 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 11 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BILLY ELMER. 9 p.m. Nied’s Hotel, Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. DOC DIXON, DAVID MICHAEL, JOE EBERLE. Sokol Club Gymnastics Program Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Sokol Club, South Side. 412-760-2377. THE DRAFT. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DUO SHOW: IMPROV COMEDY TWO AT A TIME. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. JOKETOBERFEST COMEDY REVUE. 7 p.m. Bauerstown Fire Hall, Millvale. 412-821-1894.

FRI 11 - SAT 12 REIN IN THE PEOPLE. Oct. 11-12, CONTINUES ON PG. 51

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Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome HARLAND WILLIAMS. 8 & (planetarium), Miniature 10 p.m., Sat., Oct. 12, 7 & 9 p.m. Railroad and Village, USS Requin and Sun., Oct. 13, 7 p.m. The submarine, and more. North Side. Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely DAVID KAYE, AUGGIE COOK, rare examples of pre World War II LISA DAPPRICH. Haiti Clean iron-making technology. Rankin. Water Project Funny Fundraiser. 412-464-4020 x.21. 7 p.m. Bower Hill Community COMPASS INN. Demos and tours Church, Mt. Lebanon. with costumed guides featuring 412-341-0291. this restored stagecoach stop. DAVON MAGWOOD, MARIO Ligonier. 724-238-4983. FUSCA, MICHAEL REID. 10 p.m. DEPRECIATION LANDS Smiling Moose, South Side. MUSEUM. Small living history 412-431-4668. museum celebrating the THE LUPONES: MADE UP settlement and history of the MUSICALS. Sat. Thru Oct. 12 Steel Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-486-0563. 412-404-2695. FALLINGWATER. Tour the MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. 9 p.m. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. Steel City Improv Theater, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. THE SCIT SOCIAL 412-471-3436. . w w w IMPROV JAM. Mon, FRICK ART & typaper ci h g p 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 4 Steel HISTORICAL CENTER. .com City Improv Theater, Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. with classes, car & carriage TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. museum. Point Breeze. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel 412-371-0600. City Improv Theater, Shadyside. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the 412-404-2695. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto includes jade and ivory statues & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. from China and Japan, as well Smiling Moose, South Side. as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 412-612-4030. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes CAROL PENNINGTON. 8:30 p.m. open for tours, lectures and more. Peter B’s, Sarver. 724-353-2677. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. more than 600 birds from over Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 200 species. With classes, lectures, 412-431-9908. demos and more. North Side. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN 412-323-7235. MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 Strip District. 412-904-4502. rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY 412-624-6000. HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church artifacts and exhibits on the features 1823 pipe organ, Allegheny Valley’s industrial Revolutionary War graves. Scott. heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. 412-851-9212. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY An eclectic showroom of fine MUSEUM. Trolley rides and art sculpture & paintings from exhibits. Includes displays, walking emerging artists. North Side. tours, gift shop, picnic area and 724-797-3302. Trolley Theatre. Washington. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR 724-228-9256. AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor Feat. imagery, film & oral history rooms & 3 outdoor gardens narratives to explore communities, feature exotic plants and floral cultures, & innovations. displays from around the world. Downtown. 412-258-2700. Oakland. 412-622-6914. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural Arabia: Archaeology & History imagery in lampworked glass. of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Archaeological materials Friendship. 412-365-2145. exploring the cultural history PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG of the Arabian Peninsula. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 Ongoing: Earth Revealed, animals, including many 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 11 - SUN 13

SAT 12

VISUAL

ART

“Men,” by Claire Hardy, from Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars at Galerie Werner

NEW THIS WEEK AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Finnish & Jewish. Photographs by Dina Kantor. Opens Oct. 14. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. CAVO. Encompass. Local artist showcase feat. Elizabeth Rudnick, Lynn Ratkovich, Andrew Tischler, Laura Petrilla, Shane Pilster, more. Opens Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Strip District. 412-918-1068. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Paintings by Joyce Werwie Perry. Opening reception: Oct. 10, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-392-8090. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. The Sacred Feminine. The Works of Cydra Vaux. A Pop-Up Exhibition at Westmoreland Museum of American Art’s temporary location. Salon Oct. 24, 6-7 p.m. Latrobe. 724-837-1500.

ONGOING 3RD STREET GALLERY. 2013 Aqueous Open. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society presents its 67th Annual International Exhibition. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. HOLDUP in the HOOD. Multimedia work by Francis Crisafio. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Proud to be an American? Photographs

by Bea Chiappelli. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ASSEMBLE. F O R T R E S S. Installation by Sophie Bachelor & Cheryl Spencer. Garfield. BE GALLERIES. Deliberate Voyages. Paintings by Wesley Smith. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BFG CAFE. New Artists Showcase. Group show. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Barbara Miller, Frank Bruno. Feat. watercolors & photography. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Fragmentation. New Works by Seth Clark. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Threaded: A Glass Exhibition. A collection of contemporary glass and mixed media works by five Pittsburgh-based artists: Jason Forck, Elizabeth Fortunato,

FULL LIST E N O LIN

MON 14

Theo Keller, Matt Eskuche, & Jarrod Futscher Artist reception Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m.; also open Oct. 19 during the BrewHaHa, noon-midnight. Email or call to view the exhibition by appointment. South Side. 843-469-8342. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. The Workers. A photo study of the 18-foot tall public art piece The Workers, by Andy Prisbylla. Hunt Library. Oakland. 412-268-2000. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Zivi Aviraz, Matthew Spangler, Avery Pratt. Group show. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Marsha’s Peace Art; Abstract & Pointillist. Work by Marsha Lee Moore. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Christopher Ruane. Photography exhibit. East Liberty. 412-441-3800. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European CONTINUES ON PG. 52

TUE 15

WED 16

EXHIBITS

endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY THU 10 - WED 16 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE/ VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Live bands, karaoke, & DJs every Friday & Saturday. Benefits The Autism Society of Pittsburgh & The Spectrum Charter School. hauntedhillshayride.com Thru Nov. 2 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. THE SCAREHOUSE. Haunted house open select dates through Nov. 2. Etna. 412-781-5885.

SPECIAL THU 10 - WED 16 RADICAL DAYS. Dozens of cultural establishments will offer free admission on designated days. Visit radworkshere.org for full schedule. Thru Nov. 10

FESTIVALS SAT 12 OKTOBERFEST. German food, beer, live music, more. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500.

DANCE SAT 12 THE JAZZ FURNACE. Presented by The Pillow Project. pillowproject.org 12 & 7 p.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin.

WED 16 HANS WAS HEIRI. Performance by Zimmermann & de Perrot. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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51

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Part of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. Oct. 16-18 August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

THUR, OCT 10 • 8PM AMERICANA/BLUES FROM AUSTIN TEXAS

10/31/13

Halloween

Scary-aoke party Sing, drink & be scary

.25

Prizes & Giveaways for best costumes

$ 2 All Yuengling bottles 9:30-1:30am ALL DAY EVERY DAY 5 $ 1.7PBR Drafts 1314 EAST CARSON ST. S OUTHS I D E POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

SETH WALKER AND BAND FRI, OCT 11 • 9PM HONKY TONK/ WESTERN SWING

THE MAVENS SAT, OCT 12 • 9PM R&B/FUNK

TURKUAZ AND

LAZLO HOLYFIELD MON, OCT 14 • 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH SGD

TUES, OCT 15 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

BOOK EXCHANGE OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

FUNDRAISERS THU 10 35TH ANNIVERSARY ART AUCTION. Feat. 50+ original works by established & emerging artists. 6 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. 5TH ANNUAL HEROES FOR AUTISM BENEFIT: ART W/ HEART. Dinner, live entertainment, auctions, more. Benefits Parents in Toto. 6 p.m. Lemont, Mt. Washington. 724-473-0990. COPS IN COUTURE. Fashion show feat. 70 police officers & K9 Units. Benefits the Law Enforcement Officers Memorial of Allegheny County. copsincouture.com 6 p.m. Mall at Robinson.

FRI 11 59TH ANNUAL DIAMOND HORSESHOE BALL. Cocktail reception, live performances, silent auction, more. Benefits Pittsburgh Opera. 6:30 p.m. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-456-6666. SALLY HAAS MEMORIAL GOLF OUTING. Benefits the Sally Haas Endowment Fund. 10 a.m. Chartiers Country Club, Crafton. 412-264-6270. SHAKE IT UP. Vendors, martini tastings, more. Benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 7 p.m. S Bar, South Side. 412-607-4540. WISHLIST FOUNDATION PEARL JAM FAN PRE-PARTY FUNDRAISER. facebook.com/ events/193754017453019 1-4 p.m. TGI Fridays, Downtown. 412-841-3548.

SAT 12

Catch All Sporting Events Here… 18 Flat Screen TV’s 10 foot HD TV on the Patio College & Pro Football Games All Pens Games

All Day

Saturday 5 for $9 COORS LIGHT BUCKETS

2314 East Carson Street • Southside • 412-431-9691 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

101+ BOWELS FOR CREATIVITY. Soup in ceramic bowls created by Susan Giles Ireton, entertainment, more. Benefits Center for Creative Arts Expressions. 1201 7th Ave., Beaver Falls. 6 p.m. 724-847-5640. 4TH ANNUAL DR. REED’S RUN. Benefits the Brain Aneurysm Foundation. 8:30 a.m. BONE BASH GALA. Strolling dinner, silent auction, costume contest, photo booth, live music, more. Benefits the Arthritis Foundation. bonebashpittsburgh. com/ 6-11 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. FOCUS ON RENEWAL’S 44TH ANNIVERSARY GALA. 7 p.m. Father Ryan Arts Center, McKees Rocks. 412-771-6460 x 305. A NIGHT OF HOPE. Hors d’oeuvres, live music, guest speaker, Chinese auction, more. Benefits Hamptons Heroes of Hope. hamptonsherosofhope. org 7 p.m. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 412-642-1800. A NOVEL AFFAIR: THE GREAT GATSBY. Live music, food, more. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Reception Oct. 18, 6-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars. Work by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Text meets Texture. Work by Nancy McNary-Smith & David Montano. Art Walk: Oct. 4, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Raw Images. Photographs by Jill & Flannery Joyce. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Remaining Nameless. Work by Nick & Noell. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Different Dimensions: The “Unpainting” Exhibit. Group show feat. mixed media, wall ceramics, fiber, sculpture, mosaics, more. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434. THE INN. Dos Solos. Emerging Artist Enterprise Series, Vol. II. Feat. new work by Gianna Paniagua & Alex Hamrick, curated by Nikkia Margaret Hall. Lawrenceville. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists III. Group

OUT OF THE DARKNESS COMMUNITY WALK. Benefits the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Highmark Stadium, Station Square. 412-260-0789. RACE FOR PACE. 5K run/walk & 1-mile fun walk/dog walk. 9 a.m. Pace School, Forest Hills. 412-342-4302.

show feat. all media. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Necessary Fictions. Work by Patricia Bellan-Gillen. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Idiosyncrasy. Work by Carolyn Alexandra Frischling. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. SIX ROOMS. Charlotte Dumas, Ed Panar, Gregory Halpern, Melissa Catanese, Todd Hido, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Disappearing City: New Works About Old Things. Work by Paulette Poullet. Things Are Looking Up: Abstract Tourist & Architectural Photography. Work by Kurt Garrison. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Sanctuary. Multimedia exhibit by members

A TASTE OF AFRICA. Live music, authentic food, live auction, more. Benefits the Cameroon Football Development Program. cameroonfdp.org/taste-of-africa/ 6-11 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. XTREME BINGO: ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Benefits the Delta Foundation of

of the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman, Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Oasis. Paintings by Leslie Ansley. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Duck! Showcase of original animation art, comic art & artifacts of some of cartooning’s most iconic quackers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Coffin Cuties Art Opening. Photography by Mike Hearse. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. With Things Inside. Installation by Carolina Ramos & David Lasky. Braddock. 415-518-9921. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. 365 Critters. Animal illustrations by Jeff Brunner. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

Pittsburgh & the ACLU of Pennsylvania. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-322-2800.

SUN 13 3RD ANNUAL TASTE OF BRIGHTON. Benefits Friends of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh – Woods Run. 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Woods Run. 412-761-3730.

student, Squirrel Hill

JENNY HAN & SIOBHAN VIVIAN. Presentation & O&A w/ authors of the YA series, Burn for Burn. 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. ROCK BAND! Open stage for teen singers, songwriters & instrumentalists to play w/ Emma Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented by Hope Academy. Fri, 5:30-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 27 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 43.

WHEN: Sat.,

SAT 12

EVENT: VIA

Music Festival, East Liberty CRITIC: Louis Lamanna, 21,

Oct. 05

WED 16 TASTE! Wine tasting, hors d’oeuvres, & silent auction. Benefits The Extra Mile Education Foundation. 6-9 p.m. Reed Smith LLP, Downtown. 412-456-3103.

I was super-happy with the festival. There were a lot of lights and people screaming, and the music was mostly house and techno but lots of different styles that you could do the same dance moves to in your favorite outfit. The atmosphere of the festival was very intimate, and you can tell that a lot of artistic thought and hard work went into it. Jimmy Edgar was who I was most looking forward to, and he played on Thursday; he was great. Container played Wednesday and his set was my favorite of the festival, and on Saturday I was most excited for Vessel, who was also great. The venues were also all close to where I live, which is awesome, and all of the artists did really amazing jobs of making the spaces their own. The set-ups at Rex Theater and the pop-up venue on Baum Boulevard were really fantastic.

POLITICS THU 10 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

FRI 11 LESSONS FROM SOCIAL MOVEMENTS FROM ABOLITIONISTS TO CIVIL RIGHTS TO OCCUPY. w/ Chris Crass. 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 937-269-5455.

LITERARY

of Alternate Histories of the World. Proceeds benefit Animal Friends. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Wildcard, Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

ANNE WALDMAN. Poetry reading, part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-6508. LUIS CARLOS MONTALVÁN. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK Book signing & talk w/ author of CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. & the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him. 4 p.m. Westminster Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Presbyterian Church, Upper Public Library, Mt. St. Clair. 412-835-6630. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. KAREN DIETRICH. Reading & signing her 12 STEPS TO PEACE: book, The Girl Factory. www. per pa USING CREATIVITY TO 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble pghcitym .co TRANSFORM ANXIETY. Settlers Ridge, Robinson. Writing & discussion group. SPANISH Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Nov. 25 CONVERSATION CLUB. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. Second and Fourth Thu of every 412-337-4976. month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SUN 13

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 14

TUE 15

FRI 11 LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. YA NOVELISTS JENNY HAN & SIOBHAN VIVIAN. Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures Kids & Teens series. 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

SAT 12 MATTHEW BUCHHOLZ. Book signing & trunk show w/ author

JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

WED 16 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. JANE WEITZMAN. Signing by

SAT 12 - SUN 13

KIDSTUFF

MON 14

THU 10 - WED 16 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE IN THE MAKING: WATCH US BUILD IT! Watch the museum staff build a new art installation made of entirely of packing tape. Thru Oct. 17 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 11 GIRL SCOUT MOVIE MAKING NIGHT. Learn the movie making process while contributing to a special Girl Scout film. Girl Scouts only. 5-9 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 12

THU 10

MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by The Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 6:45 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Frazier. 724-224-2510.

CELEBRATE! AUTUMN. Leaf-hunting, veggie-picking, create spooky Halloween crafts, more. Ages 4-9. 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. MAKE IT!: HANDSEWING/ MACHINE SEWING/PAPER. Ages 10-14. makeitsoftmaterials-eorg. eventbrite.com 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: NEEDLEPOINT POETRY W/ MEG PRALL & THE LAB. Ages 5-10. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. TOUR YOUR FUTURE: VALSPAR CORPORATION. Learn about chemistry in everyday things & tour one of the largest global coatings manufacturers in the world. Ages 9-17. Barbuton@carnegiesciencecenter.org 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Valspar Corporation, North Side.

the author of Art & Sole. 5 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Louise Silk reviews Tents of Protection. 10:30 a.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

OTHER STUFF

SAT 12 - SUN 13 KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

SUN 13 FALL FOLIAGE WALK. 2-3:30 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

TUE 15 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 16 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

10TH ANNUAL GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL FAIR. Feat. representatives from 35 schools & programs. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-837-7040. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FEMINIST VISION & ACTIVISM FOR MEN. Workshop for men/ transmen only. 6:30-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-482-0041. GALLERY TALK: LESLIE ANSLEY. Open discussion about the Hill District’s historic legacy. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

LIGHT & SHADOW. Learn how the use of value can help develop drawing or painting skills. Oct. 12-13 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

EAST END • STONE BREWING • MAGIC HAT • YARDS

ART & ROBOT THERAPY CLASS. For parents & children on the Autism Spectrum. Ages 6-16. Call to register. 4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-432-9559. LITTLE SPROUTS: WE LOVE CRITTERS. Basic introduction into the world of gardens & the critters that live within. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. MUNCKIN MONDATYS: BUILD IT! Ages 2-6. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. PRESCHOOL ADVENTURES: LIL’ ENGINEERS. Ages 3-5. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. TOUR YOUR FUTURE: PPG INDUSTRIES. Tour for students ages 9-17 who have an interest in chemistry. Barbuton@carnegie sciencecenter.org 1-3 p.m. PPG Industries - Monroeville, Monroeville.

OUTSIDE THU 10 T’AI CHI IN MELLON PARK: RECONNECT W/ NATURE. Thu, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Thru Oct. 24

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BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 47 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. MATTHEW TEMBO SOCCER TOURNAMENT. Benefits Gateway Rehabilitation Center. 9 a.m.5 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 626-678-5538. SCOPE IT OUT 5K RUN/WALK. Benefits the Chris4Life Fund. chris4life.org 9 a.m.-12 p.m. North Shore Riverfront Park, North Side.

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HOMOSEXUALITY & THE POST-WORLD WAR II URBAN CRISIS. Speaker: George Chauncey. 4:30-6 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MAKENIGHT. Melt & mix your own custom crayons, sample light fare & cocktails, more. more. Ages 21+. 6-9 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Doors open at 7:15, seating ends at 8 p.m. 7:30 p.m. and Thu., Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-420-5826. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MONSTER A-GO-GO DANCE PARTY. 1960s monster mash music, sci-fi film clips, more. Presented by Matthew Buchholz & Alternate Histories. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. MUSIC 101: MICHAEL RUSINEK ON “CLARINET COLORS”. Pittsburgh Symphony Association’s lunch time lecture series. Dorothy

Parker Simmons Regency Rooms. 12:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-361-3346. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. UNDERSTANDING OBAMACARE: SMALL BUSINESS OWNER EDITION. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 11 CREATING HEALTHY CULTURE TO BUILD HEALTHY MOVEMENTS WORKSHOP. 12-2 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 937-269-5455. THE HISTORY OF PITTSBURGH HOSPITALS & MEDICAL SCHOOLS. Speaker: G. Alan Yeasted, M.D. 8 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 412-536-1216. MAIN STREET WALKING TOUR: BROOKLINE BLVD. 12-1 p.m. Saint Mark Evangelical Lutheran Church, Brookline. 412-471-5808. ODYSSEY DAY. Alternative fuel & advanced technology vehicle showcase. 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. CCAC West Hills Center, Oakdale. 412-735-4114. PURELY PITTSBURGH. Community conference celebrating local business, education, recreation & social service. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Hyatt North Shore Hotel, North Side. 412-735-0947.

In the Burn for Burn trilogy — Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian’s best-selling young-adult series — three friends plot revenge against their bulling peers … and things begin to get a little out of hand. Friday, Han and Vivian bring their talk

“Friendship & Revenge” to the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. As as part of Pittsburgh Art & Lectures’ Authors. Stories. You. series, they’ll discuss their books, answer audience questions and more. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10. Call 412-622-8866 or visit www.pittsburghlectures.org.

GYPSY NIGHT. Feat. Gypsy music by Jon Banuelos, tarot card art exhibition w/ Melissa Von Underwood, psychic readings, more. 7 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. HOVERLA: UKRAINIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26. 412-302-5223. PROPTOBERFEST. Sale of props KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean & furniture used onstage in grammar & basic conversation. Sat, Pittsburgh Public Theater’s plays 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. & musicals. Oct. 11-12, 9 a.m.412-622-3151. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Public KOREAN II. For those Theater Scene Shop, Point who already have a Breeze. 412-316-8200. basic understanding of Korean & are interested . w w w in increasing proficienCABARET OF THE paper pghcitym cy. Sat Carnegie Library, DEAD. Zombie burlesque .co Oakland. 412-622-3151. performances, drag show, OUTRAGEOUS BINGO: vendors, more. 9 p.m. HALLOWEEN EDITION. Benefits Belvedere’s, Lawrenceville. Gay & Lesbian Community Center 412-687-2555. of Pittsburgh & Shepherd DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S PITTSBURGH. Dance classes Wellness Community. 6:30 p.m. designed for people w/ Parkinson’s Rodef Shalom Congregation, Disease to explore the art of dance Oakland. 412-422-0114. & live music. Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. PITTSBURGH SOLAR TOUR. 16 Thru Nov. 23 Pittsburgh Ballet open houses in & around Pittsburgh, Theatre, Strip District. 412-387-2542. Mt. Lebanon, Aspinwall, Saxonburg, DEAD COCKTAIL PARTY. Music Cheswick, more. pghsolartour.org by DJ Zombo. 9 p.m. Allegheny 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wine Mixer, Lawrenceville. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: 412-252-2337. ALLEGHENY CEMETERY. AN EVENING IN HAUNTED 12 p.m. Allegheny Cemetery, HARMONY. Speakers, walking Lawrenceville. 412-391-2060 x 237. tours, more. 4-10 p.m. Harmony SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA Museum, Harmony. 412-953-9555. CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by

FRI 11 - SAT 12

SAT 12

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FULL LIST E N O LIN

dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SOUTH PARK WOMEN’S CLUB CRAFT SHOW. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Allegheny County South Park Fairgrounds, South Park.

SAT 12 - SUN 13 ART UNDER GLASS. Craft & food vendors, live music, pumpkin patch, corn maze, more. Sat, Sun. Thru Oct. 27 Bedner’s Farm & Greenhouse, McDonald. 724-926-2541. MAKE YOUR OWN GLASS PUMPKIN. Sat, Sun, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-779-2471.

SUN 13 47TH ANNUAL DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE FAIR. 1-3 p.m. A.J. Palumbo Center, Uptown. 412-396-6222. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly

letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. BEING THE LIGHT. w/ Etta Fink. Theosophical Society in Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. 6 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117.

MON 14 AGING IN PLACE DISCOVERY CONFERENCE. Feat. the region’s top businesses & organizations professionals that focus on senior citizen care. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sheraton Station Square Hotel, Station Square. 412-341-1756. BRYAN FAZIO CONGO DRUMMING: BASICS & BEYOND. Music workshop, ages 14+. Mon. Thru Oct. 21 Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATIVE HERBACEOUS PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. Mon, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 21 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

TUE 15 BASIC FLORAL DESIGN: INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN GEOMETRIC ARRANGING. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 19 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CLAYTON’S ORCHESTRION: MEET THE EXPERT. w/ Durward R. Center, Historical Instrument Restoration Expert. 6-8 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. STEELTOWN SPOTLIGHT SERIES: LAUREN MORELLI. Discussion feat. writer from the TV show Orange is the New Black. 7 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-251-0890.

WED 16 DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENERGY AUDITS: THE PATH TO A SAFE, HEALTHY & COMFORTABLE HOME. Discussion w/ conservation consultants. 7 p.m. Peters Township Public Library, Peters. 724-941-9430 x 327. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru

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Oct. 30 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. INTRODUCTORY LEVEL SCOTTISH GAELIC CLASS. Wed. Thru Nov. 6 Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your best poems, no themes or restrictions. cathleenbailey. blogspot.com/2013/08/insistentlight-first-annual-poetry.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature,

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

BEAUTIFICATION SATURDAYS

If you want to make Downtown a better place to be on Monday mornings, join the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership for Beautification Saturdays. From 10 a.m.2 p.m. each Saturday, participants help with various upkeep projects, such as weeding, trash clean-up, painting over graffiti and landscaping. Email rdethlefs@ blockbyblock.com for information.

WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373. WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL. Film screenings & celebration of local efforts to combat climate change. 6 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-320-0739.

AUDITIONS LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER STUDENT COMPANY. Auditions for Stage Door. Nov. 4-6. For more information: centerauditions.org or auditions@lppacenter.org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-259-6443. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER SECOND STAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for Shrek the Musical. Oct. 20-21. 5th-12th graders only. Prepare 16 bars of music& be ready for dancing/cold readings. mckeesportlittletheater.com McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking

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music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. . PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Seeking young composers to submit new works for annual Reading Session. pso. culturaldistrict.org/event/6236/ 10th-annual-reading-session Thru Nov. 8. 412-392-4828. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 14. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to silvereye.org/f14-submit. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for information. 412-431-1810. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Seeking artisans for annual Holiday mART. Dec. 1-8. Areas include jewelry, ceramics, glass, more. sweetwaterartcenter.org/ call-for-artists/ 412-741-4405. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

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advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

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BOBblehead n. A person who moves their head up and down to the music of BOB FM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.09-10.16

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The advice I’m about to dispense may have never before been given to Libras in the history of horoscopes. It might also be at odds with the elegance and decorum you like to express. Nevertheless, I am convinced that it is the proper counsel. I believe it will help you make the most out of the highly original impulses that are erupting and flowing through you right now. It will inspire you to generate a mess of fertile chaos that will lead to invigorating long-term innovations. Ready? The message comes from Do the Work, a book by Steven Pressfield: “Stay primitive. The creative act is primitive. Its principles are of birth and genesis.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Two years ago, a British man named Sean Murphy decided he had suffered enough from the painful wart on his middle finger. So he drank a few beers to steel his nerves, and tried to blast the offending blemish off with a gun. The operation was a success in the sense that he got rid of the wart. It was less than a total victory, though, because he also annihilated most of his finger. May I suggest that you not follow Murphy’s lead, Scorpio? Now is a good time to part ways with a hurtful burden, but I’m sure you can do it without causing a lot of collateral damage.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Grace has been trickling into your life lately, but I suspect that it may soon start to flood. A spate of interesting coincidences seems imminent. There’s a good chance that an abundance of tricky luck will provide you with the leverage and audacity you need to pull off minor miracles. How much slack is available to you? Probably as much as

you want. So ask for it! Given all these blessings, you are in an excellent position to expunge any cynical attitudes or jaded theories you may have been harboring. For now at least, it’s realistic to be optimistic.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn innovator Jeff Bezos built Amazon.com from the ground up. He now owns The Washington Post, one of America’s leading newspapers. It’s safe to say he might have something to teach us about translating big dreams into practical realities. “We are stubborn on vision,” he says about his team. “We are flexible in details.” In other words, he knows exactly what he wants to create, but is willing to change his mind and be adaptable as he carries out the specific work that fulfills his goals. That’s excellent advice for you, Capricorn, as you enter the next phase of implementing your master plan.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s the horoscope I would like to be able to

write for you by the first week of December: “Congratulations, Aquarius! Your quest for freedom has begun to bear tangible results. You have escaped a habit that had subtly undermined you for a long time. You are less enslaved to the limiting expectations that people push on you. Even your monkey mind has eased up on its chatter and your inner critic has at least partially stopped berating you. And the result of all this good work? You are as close as you have ever come to living your own life — as opposed to the life that other people think you should live.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “It’s an unbearable thought that roses were not invented by me,” wrote Russian poet Vladimir Mayakovsky. You’re not as egotistical as Mayakovsky, Pisces, so I doubt you’ve ever had a similar “unbearable thought.” And it is due in part to your lack of rampaging egotism that I predict you will invent something almost as good as roses in the coming weeks. It may also be almost as good as salt and amber and mist and moss; almost as good as kisses and dusk and honey and singing. Your ability to conjure up long-lasting beauty will be at a peak. Your creative powers will synergize with your aptitude for love to bring a new marvel into the world.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sometimes you quit games too early, Aries. You run away and dive into a new amusement before you have gotten all the benefits you can out of the old amusement. But I don’t think that will be your problem in the coming days. You seem more committed than usual to the ongoing process. You’re not going to bolt. That’s a good thing. This process is worth your devotion. But I also believe that right now you may need to say no to a small part of it. You’ve got to be clear that there’s something about it you don’t like and want to change. If you fail to deal with this doubt now, you might suddenly quit and run away somewhere down the line. Be proactive now and you won’t be rash later.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Jugaad is a Hindi-Urdu word that can be translated as “frugal innovation.” People in India and Pakistan use it a lot. It’s the art of coming up with a creative workaround to a problem despite having to deal with logistical and financial barriers. Masters of jugaad call on ingenuity and improvisation to make up for sparse resources. I see this as your specialty right now, Taurus. Although you may not have abundant access to VIPs and filthy riches, you’ve nevertheless got the resourcefulness necessary to come up with novel solutions. What you produce may even turn out better than if you’d had more assets to draw on.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In accordance with your current astrological omens, I authorize you to be like a bird in the coming week — specifically, like a bird as described by the zoologist Norman J. Berrill: “To be a bird is to be more intensely alive than any other living creature. Birds have hotter blood, brighter colors, stronger emotions. They live in a world that is always present, mostly full of joy.” Take total advantage of the soaring grace period ahead of you, Gemini. Sing, chirp, hop around, swoop, glide, love the wind, see great vistas, travel everywhere, be attracted to hundreds of beautiful things, and do everything.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The nonexistent is whatever we have not sufficiently desired,” wrote Nikos Kazantzakis in his book Report to Greco. I’m hoping that when you read that statement, Cancerian, you will feel a jolt of melancholy. I’m hoping you will get a vision of an exciting experience that you have always wanted but have not yet managed to bring into your life. Maybe this provocation will goad you into finally conjuring up the more intense desire you would need to actually make your dream come true.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “It is truly strange how long it takes to get to know oneself,” wrote the prominent 20th-century philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. “I am now 62 years old, yet just one moment ago I realized that I love lightly toasted bread and loath bread when it is heavily toasted. For over 60 years, and quite unconsciously, I have been experiencing inner joy or total despair at my relationship with grilled bread.” Your assignment, Leo, is to engage in an intense phase of self-discovery like Wittgenstein’s. It’s time for you to become fully conscious of all the small likes and dislikes that together shape your identity.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I’d rather be in the mountains thinking of God than in church thinking about the mountains,” said the naturalist John Muir. Let that serve as your inspiration, Virgo. These days, you need to be at the heart of the hot action, not floating in a cloud of abstract thoughts. The dream has to be fully embodied and vividly unfolding all around you, not exiled to wistful fantasies that flit through your mind’s eye when you’re lonely or tired or trying too hard. The only version of God that’s meaningful to you right now is the one that feeds your lust for life in the here and now. What good old thing could you give up in order to attract a great new thing into your life? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

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ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

Studio Booth

Act 235 Courses November 16th,17th and 21st-23rd Renewal Classes: November 21st

an upscale salon & spa in Pittsburgh’s East End, is hiring for:

Hair Stylist Spa Esthetician Requirements: Must be experienced, licensed cosmetologist or esthetician with a clientele.

• Prior/related experience • Excellent communication skills necessary to address member service needs via various channels • Ability to cross-offer products, services & solutions to members

www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required

Full & part time positions are available. At Studio Booth we offer career opportunities, growth potential & advanced education for all our employees. Please email all resumes to justi@ studio-booth.com or call 412-362-6684

724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS

MIND & BODY

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

WLTJ – Q92.9FM Is Looking For Our Next Middayy Announcer! A minimum of three years on-air experience is a must. Duties include commercial production, show preparation, on, remote broadcasts and personal appearances at both client and charity events. Working knowledge of broadcast equipment is required,, including computer software for audio editing. Please email resume and demo to: Q929fmjobs@steelcitymedia.com Steel City Media is an equal opportunity employer 60

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Shadyside Location

Xin Sui Bodyworks

call 412.316.3342

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE!

TIGER SPA

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

412-441-1185

724-519-7896

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

Therapeutic Massage

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

Chinese Bodyworks

with this ad

412-595-8077

$50/HR Free Table Shower

Xie LiHong’s

$10 Coupon

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

China Massage

WELLNESS CENTER

GRAND OPENING!

$40/hr

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Judy’s Oriental Massage FULL BODY MASSAGE

412-319-7530

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

Therapy

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

(across from Eat n’ Park)

Superior Chinese Massage

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

STAR

massage

MIND & BODY

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Credit Cards Accepted

get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

No Start Up Fee

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

J&S GLASS

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Health Services

JADE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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LOCATIONS IN:

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

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Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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STUDIES

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

SERVICES

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLASSES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

CONSTIPATION?

BIRTH CONTROL?

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

GENERAL FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) 2006 JOHN DEERE 4320 with loader, 48HP, 3-point hitch, nice tractor, price $9,500 berym9@hushmail. com, 267-223-7952

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions.

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367 62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.09/10.16.2013

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

A DO P T I O N Nurturing family awaits 1st baby. Fashion Designer, Unconditional LOVE, Financial security. Expenses Paid Claudine

1-800-989-8921

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

HEALTH SERVICES Can’t lose weight? Always tired? NutritionalGain.com has the top three weightloss supplements in the industry. Go to NutritionalGain.com to order your life changing bottle today! Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

VOLUNTEERS Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both When I know I have ke. evo they e ons resp the subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City age group, I immediately thin Paper. — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

DO NOT

CALL

Time has not been kind to the once ubiquitous — and useful — pay phone. Those left languish in various states of disrepair, attracting more trash and graffiti than callers. {BY AL HOFF}

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Play our Cash Bash Kiosk Slot Game for FREE and a chance to win $10,000 CASH! Don’t miss out! Sign up today! Visit Rush Rewards Players Club or RIVERSCASINO.COM for complete details.

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October 9, 2013