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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

EVENTS 7.27 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: HE, SHE, IT, THEY, YOU AND ME WITH MICHAEL DAVID BATTLE AND EVELYN PAVOLVA Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.16 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3 New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

8.17 – 2pm ARTIST TALK: GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

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is almost impossible to meet an 06 “ItAfrican-American person in this country who has not experienced racial profiling.” — David Harris, University of Pittsburgh Law Professor on the state of police/community relations

[VIEWS] “It’s a ‘Get Out of Jail Free’ card … with Pittsburgh as the jail.” — Chris Potter on police efforts to escape the city’s residency requirement

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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

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the Trayvon Martin case, which 38 “Like shares similarities with Oscar Grant’s story, the bitter end is already written.” — Al Hoff, reviewing the film Fruitvale Station

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image of the iconic Caucasian Jesus 41 “An with breast implants added is presumably an unfriendly amendment in the eyes of the Vatican.” — Robert Raczka describes one work in art exhibit Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: S/HE IS HER/E

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flies like a cement truck without 63 “Itpower steering.” — Bryan Wyatt on what it’s like to pilot a B-17 bomber

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 56 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 57 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“DON’T LET PEOPLE TELL YOU THAT IT CAN’T CHANGE.”

INCOMING RE: Softball Questions: Community wondering whether axing a successful sports program was the right play at struggling Sto-Rox (July 17) “If one-tenth the outrage aroused by these cuts had been directed at state officials and lawmakers who have persistently undermined districts like Sto-Rox, things might not have come to this. This never happened. People talk as though slashing education spending is an annoyance and cutting spring sports is an atrocity. This persistent mentality shows the warped perspective. For decades, too many have refused to unite … while they relentlessly squabbled over trivia.” — Web comment from “Larry Conley” “Bad move. We need to teach everyone how to play well with others. Otherwise, violence and a decay of society occurs. Rather, the program should have expanded and [been] made to pull its own weight.” — Web comment from “Rauterkus”

RE: One-Way Trip: A federal lawsuit may complete the inevitable, if arduous, journey for marriage equality (July 10) “Sorry, I subscribe to the concept that a marriage is to be between a man and a woman. You look at nature, and that’s just what you come away with. I think that’s what Pennsylvania’s law does. It’s not bigotry; it just defines what marriage is. States are entitled to do that. We are a nation of laws and definitions. We’ve had it right for centuries; I can’t understand how logic has become so twisted. … I think most people and most states do have it right. It’s really pretty simple, a marriage is meant to be between a man and a woman. Let’s not try to twist it any further.” — Web Comment from “The Sharp Edge of Logic”

RE: Kraus proposes legislation for equal benefits among city contractors (July 17, online only) “This is a positive step. In November of this year, the Human Rights Campaign will issue the second edition of their municipal equality index — that’s going to be a great tool to help our region identify concrete measures that are doable on the municipal level.” — Web comment from “PGHlesbian”

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{PHOTO BY DAN SLEVA}

A crowd of about 300 protested racial profiling by law enforcement at a July 20 rally Downtown.

SINGLED OUT F

REDDY JONES SAYS he has been

the victim of racial profiling his whole life. “The police are extremely aggressive to African Americans. They approach us or pull us over, and when we ask why, we have to worry if it will get us beat up.” Jones, 33, of the North Side, says that he has been pulled over while driving on the South Side because police said he fit the description of a shooting suspect, and that they searched his car. He says he has also been approached by undercover police officers in unmarked cars as he walked down the street, and been forced to answer questions about what he was doing there. “I’m always let go. That shows that I am doing nothing wrong,” he says. “But it

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

is a hassle. “The police treat me like I’m scum. But I am not that.” Jones says these experiences are what motivated him to attend the “Rally Seeking

Trayvon Martin case raises issues of local racial profiling again {BY DAN SLEVA} Justice for Trayvon Martin and All Victims of Profiling” in front of the William S. Moorhead Federal Building, Downtown, on Sat., July 20. He was joined by about 300 others at the event organized by the Alliance for Police Accountability (APA).

The rally was one of about 100 held in cities across the country one week after George Zimmerman was acquitted of all charges for the killing of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin, in Sanford, Fla., last year. Jones was one of many people at the rally who recounted their experiences of racial profiling, and the fear of what it could mean for themselves, their children and their grandchildren, unless something is changed in Pittsburgh and around the country. “Don’t let people tell you that it can’t change,” Brandi Fisher, president of the APA, told the crowd. “It has changed from the ’50s to now, and it will change from now to tomorrow. Rallies work. Protesting works.” CONTINUES ON PG. 08

July 25-28

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SINGLED OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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BEFORE TRAYVON MARTIN was killed in Florida, the Pittsburgh region had its own recent high-profile case of alleged racial profiling. On Jan. 12, 2010, a 17-year-old CAPA High School student named Jordan Miles was stopped by three white undercover police officers who, he says, failed to identify themselves. Miles was badly beaten by the officers, who put the blame on the teen, saying that he was acting suspiciously, ran from them and had a “bulge” in his jacket. The officers did not face criminal charges. A civil trial last year ended with a hung jury, and partial exoneration for the officers for alleged malicious prosecution. A new civil trial is scheduled for November on the more serious allegations of false arrest and excessive force. Miles’ name was brought up frequently at Saturday’s rally. His civil attorney, Joel Sansone, even called Miles “Pittsburgh’s Trayvon Martin.” But those in attendance say profiling in the city is happening far more often than a few high-profile cases. Rapper and activist Che Smith, who performs under the name Rhymefest, says “everyone has been the victim of profiling. Black people are profiled as criminals, as the cases of George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin show. But, there is also profiling of white people, gay people and women.” Fisher echoed that point, saying that white people have been stopped by police while driving through neighborhoods like Homewood, because it is assumed they must be buying drugs. Still, Terence Campbell, 24, of the Hill District, believes that profiling of African Americans is the major problem. He says that officers are “aggressive towards us. I don’t feel like it is fair to be stopped and searched when I am doing nothing wrong.” Campbell, who works at South Side Steaks and will attend CCAC in the fall, says he has been stopped and searched while walking because his hands were in his

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{PHOTO BY CHRIS POTTER}

Protesters speak to mayoral staffer Jim Sheppard during a demonstration outside the mayor’s office in the wake of the George Zimmerman verdict.

pocket, and police said that made him look suspicious. “You don’t see that happening to white men,” Campbell says. Smith says controversial laws like “Stand Your Ground,” which was cited in the Zimmerman trial, must be changed because they are “open to interpretation ... [and] end up being interpreted against people of color.”

“AFRICAN AMERICANS’ REALITY WITH POLICE IS SIMPLY DIFFERENT THAN THE MAJORITY COMMUNITY.”

UNIVERSITY OF Pittsburgh law professor David Harris, who studies racial profiling and wrote a book on the subject, says the encounters Jones and Campbell say they’ve

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had with police are not unique. “It is almost impossible to meet an African-American person in this country who has not experienced racial profiling.” “African Americans’ reality with police is simply different than the majority community,” Harris explains. “They’ve experienced profiling firsthand and heard about it for years. This cannot help but to create a different attitude toward police.” Harris says this experience can lead to a less-safe society. “It is not a matter of bruised feelings,” he continues. “It is a matter of public safety. Good police work is built on trust-based relationships between the police and the community they serve.” Pittsburgh Police Chief Regina McDonald did not return requests for comment. Many who attended the July 20 rally said they were concerned about the situation worsening. Barbara Beckham, of the North Side, says she fears for the safety of her 17- and 19-year-old sons, and often worries whether they’ll make it home. “I talk to them [about these issues]. I fear for them, but I can’t make them stay in the house,” Beckham says. “You see these cases, here and around the country, and you hope that the reason for them is not CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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SINGLED OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

{PHOTO BY CHRIS POTTER}

Pittsburgh City Council President Darlene Harris speaks to demonstrators about their concerns after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

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race. But in some circumstances, you cannot ignore it. How are we supposed to feel when there are no other reasons given that make sense?” Harris says that for things to change, society as a whole will have to examine underlying racial attitudes. “Not all police officers [racially profile],” he says. “For the most part, it is not conscious. It is not overt prejudice, hatred or racism like it may have been in the past.

Rather, it comes from implicit beliefs.” And the only way to stop it from happening, Harris says, is to “drag these issues into the light.” That’s why Freddy Jones, who has a master’s degree in social work from the University of Pittsburgh, was sweating in 90-degree heat at Saturday’s rally. “I’m here hoping something can get better,” Jones says. “Through hope and action, I think things can improve.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

IDIOTBOX

RUSTED OUT Rustbelt Radio goes off the air {BY LAUREN DALEY} INDIGENOUS STRUGGLES in Mexico; the beating of Homewood teenager Jordan Miles; the closing of Braddock Hospital; election fraud; and from the War in Iraq to the 2009 G-20 conference — Rustbelt Radio has always prided itself on covering “news from the grassroots that the corporate media overlook,” in Pittsburgh and beyond. But after nine years and more than 300 episodes, the independent-media program is off the air while organizers deal with low volunteer capacity, and assess whether the program has a future and what that future should look like. “We’re taking stock right now,” says Jessica McPherson, a longtime contributor from Garfield. “We’re asking the community if this is something they think is useful and what their needs are. Then we will try to figure out how to proceed.” Rustbelt Radio stopped producing new episodes on May 20. The program launched in 2004 as a project of the Pittsburgh Independent Media Center. The Media Center was founded in 2003 as an opensource publishing website that allows users to post their own web stories. (McPherson says the website still exists but “there is not a lot of publishing activity” on it right now.) The one-hour, show aired weekly on Carnegie Mellon’s WRCT 88.3 FM, other independent radio stations across the region and online at radio.indypgh.org. It’s a volunteer-based operation, which McPherson and other contributors say played a part in why it’s off the air for now. Ideal volunteer staffing is 10 to 15 contributors to cover rallies, conduct interviews and produce the program, among other tasks. The show can be produced with as few as 5 to 7 volunteers. But in the past few months, “it’s down to a small handful,” says contributor Carlin Christy. There’s no background or journalism experience required to be a contributor at Rustbelt. “That was always part of the point — putting it in the hands of the people,” explains McPherson. Other contributors and volunteers provide free training on the equipment, and the program has its own editorial process for covering social-justice and grassroots issues, as well as attending rallies, trials and lectures. “People aren’t asked to commit,” for any specified time period, adds contributor

Lizzie Anderson, of Polish Hill. “It’s easy to come and go. It’s an awesome thing if you have enough people to sustain it. “We wouldn’t have gotten nine years out of the project without volunteers willing to contribute.” While Rustbelt is technically a 501(c) (3) group under the umbrella of an independent-media collective in Chicago, and is supported in part by the Sprout Foundation, Christy and McPherson say the Pittsburgh outfit has no real budget and very low overhead since it’s volunteer-driven. But that’s also part of its mission: Since the program isn’t beholden to advertisers, corporations or other interests, “It can promote a dialogue and some of the resistance happening,” says Christy. “Not everything comes with a paycheck. It’s a labor of love.” But it also makes the program victim to its own processes in a way. “It’s very difficult for any all-volunteer organization to maintain momentum,” says Rob Bellamy, a professor in Duquesne University’s Journalism and Multimedia Arts department. And with socialmedia sites providing more free outlets to distribute information and stories, Bellamy says it’s inevitable that there has “been some impact on Rustbelt and the independent-media community.” Bellamy notes that the city “remains in decent shape in terms of points of view,” but he hopes that Rustbelt comes back on the air. “It’d be a shame to lose them,” he says. “When it comes to alternative voices, the more voices the better.” The website that hosts Rustbelt’s broadcasts and archived episodes is via a server that doesn’t collect addresses — to protect its contributors and activists. But that also means that contributors have no way of running analytics to see how many listeners tune in to the broadcast. Regardless of volunteer-capacity issues, Anderson says it’s healthy for any organization to step back and evaluate its work and value. Current organizers are hoping to determine by the fall — when they will have to commit to air time at WRCT — whether to continue with the project. Community input is being collected online through the program’s Facebook page, and via radio@ indypgh.org.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

HITTING HOME Police seek to distance themselves from the community they protect {BY CHRIS POTTER} VERY OFTEN THE BEST police work is the

PAUL GREEN

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

kind in which nobody gets arrested. The kind where a situation is resolved with everybody going home. And sometimes, perhaps, that outcome is more likely if everyone’s homes aren’t so far apart. Take the night of July 14, when demonstrators voiced outrage at George Zimmerman’s acquittal in fatally shooting black Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. When two dozen demonstrators held a sit-down protest in the middle of Centre Avenue in the Hill District, it seemed the demonstration — which was born out of frustration with the justice system — would end in frustration as well. But the police commander called to the scene was Rashall Brackney. Like those leading the protest, Brackney is a black woman, and as she spoke with demonstrators, other connections became apparent. Several protesters and observers knew Brackney personally. (“I took hip-hop aerobics with you,” one said, prompting some laughter.) Brackney told her officers to back off, rerouting some Sunday-night traffic patterns and, perhaps, the evening’s outcome. Shortly after 11 p.m., the protesters left without incident. Centre was reopened, and if police/community tensions hadn’t been healed, at least they hadn’t gotten any worse. I don’t know how things would have gone had Brackney been a white male, as the vast majority of city police are, or more removed from the protesters’ daily lives. But her ties clearly helped defuse tensions on Centre Avenue that night. Yet even as she and the protesters spoke, the city’s police union was trying to make such ties easier to dissolve. Until last year, state law required Pittsburgh police to live within city limits, but Harrisburg eased the requirement last October — saying only that the city may require residency. Police, who have long bridled at the requirement, are now challenging it in arbitration, a closed-door process for handling labor disputes. The Fraternal Order of Police says lifting the requirement will make it easier to recruit, and retain, quality officers. Maybe. It’s certainly not as if residency is a cure-all: The police accused of beating Homewood teen Jordan Miles, after all, were city resi-

dents. Even City Councilor Ricky Burgess, who has proposed holding a citywide referendum on residency this November, admits there are “not a lot of officers” in the black neighborhoods he represents. But tensions in those neighborhoods, Burgess predicts, “will be exacerbated by waiving residency.” And when council held a July 18 public hearing on Burgess’ referendum proposal, the police were nowhere to be seen, other than a brief moment when FOP President Mike LaPorte appeared at the door. It was as if the police have withdrawn from the community. The irony is that the police could get their way even the help of arbitrators. The city’s likely next mayor, Bill Peduto, has signaled a willingness to waive residency, in exchange for concessions on other issues, like policies governing promotions and discipline. Such a deal could bring police and residents closer together, while allowing officers to live where they choose. Winning in arbitration, though, means police won’t give up anything in return. It’s a “Get Out of Jail Free” card … with Pittsburgh as the jail. So they pursue a closed-door labor proceeding, with little apparent regard for public opinion — the sort of approach that only creates more community distrust. The day before Burgess’ hearing, in fact, the Centre Avenue demonstrators returned — this time to City Hall, with an agenda for racial justice they hoped to present to Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and other officials. Ravenstahl did not meet with them, though, and so after holding an overnight sit-in outside his office, they went to his Fineview home at 6 a.m., taping their demands to his door. Ravenstahl had custody of his son, Cooper, that night, and mayoral spokesperson Marissa Doyle says Cooper “was frightened by strangers at his home.” Police now say they are stepping up security around Ravenstahl’s house. A situation that could have been handled with five minutes of dialogue, in other words, now requires added police security on yet another city street. Which just goes to show: If you ignore the community you’re sworn to protect and serve, frustrations have a way of striking close to home. At least for the people who pay your salary.

IT’S AS IF THE POLICE HAVE ALREADY WITHDRAWN FROM THE COMMUNITY.

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S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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At a June hearing, a Philadelphia judge became so exasperated at defendant Robert Williams’ seeming cluelessness about his need to keep his probation appointments that she ordered him to take “etiquette” classes before returning to court. Williams, a rap singer and budding music mogul under court supervision on gun and drug charges from 2008, cavalierly defended his inability to find time for his probation officer by explaining that he was a busy man, working with seven “artists,” with a demanding travel schedule, and uninhibitedly using social media (creating posts that, allegedly, led to threats against the probation officer).

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An atheist “church” in Lake Charles, La., run by lapsed Pentecostal Jerry DeWitt, conducts periodic services with many of the trappings expected by the pious — except for the need to believe in a supreme being. Such “churches” (reported The New York Times and Washington Post in coincidental stories the same day in June) can help soothe the “biological” needs for survival and avoidance of loneliness by congregational rituals (such as celebrating a sabbath) and in helping find meaning “in something other than [oneself].” For example, atheist Sigfried Gold praised a “rigorous prayer routine” (beseeching a “vivid goddess he created”) in overcoming his weight problem.

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In June, fighting in the Syrian civil war spread to its west, threatening archaeological digs and already recovered artifacts near the ancient city of Hamoukar — which is the site of history’s earliest known urban warfare (about 5,500 years ago).

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The business website Quartz reported in June that a popular consumer item in North Korea’s perhaps-improving economy is the refrigerator, made in China and increasingly available as a reward to stellar performers among civil servants and other elites. The appliances, however, cannot reliably store food because the country’s electric grid is so frequently offline, and are mostly just status symbols. One item Quartz says often gets displayed in the refrigerator: books.

committed the act only to “save” her, since he had discovered her “cold” and unconscious. He had violated her body only “to try and get her temperature up,” according to the police report. (2) The low-price air carrier GoAir of New Delhi announced in June that in the future it would hire only females for the cabin crew — because they weigh less than men (and expects eventually to save the equivalent of $4 million annually in fuel).

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In May, former schoolteacher Kathleen Cawthorne, 33, of Rustburg, Va., successfully negotiated a reduction in her 11-year sentence for having sex with an underage student. Cawthorne’s punishment was set at only four months in prison when she presented the judge with a clinical diagnosis of “hypersexuality,” supposedly showing that she had little ability to control her desire to seduce the boy.

Robert Dugan, 47, a full-time patrolman for the Delaware County (Pa.) Park Police, was charged in June with illegally impersonating a police officer. According to authorities in Brookhaven, Pa., Dugan had accosted a woman double-parked outside her home to pressure her into moving the car, but she refused. Dugan allegedly claimed he was an Upland Borough police officer (with authority to write parking citations and make arrests, which he did not have).

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Shower rooms are slippery, but Marc Moskowitz, 66, cited the one at the Bally Total Fitness gym on East 55th Street in New York City as especially dangerous, according to his recent lawsuit to recover expenses for a broken shoulder suffered in a fall. Moskowitz claimed that so much gay male sex was occurring in the shower and locker-room area (unsupervised by Bally) that he had probably slipped on semen.

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Lame: (1) Rodger Kelly was arrested in St. George, Utah, in June for rape of a female neighbor, but he told police that he

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

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Floridians Standing Their Ground: In May, a jury in Tampa decided that Ralph Wald, 70, was not guilty of murdering a 32-year-old man he had shot in the back three times. He said he had caught the man having sex with his wife (successfully claiming that he thought the man was a dangerous intruder). However, Marissa Alexander, 34, of Jacksonville, was sentenced last year to 20 years in prison for “aggravated assault” for merely firing a warning shot during an altercation with her estranged husband. The man, Rico Gray, is a serial domestic abuser and admitted that he was threatening Alexander that night and that she

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never actually pointed her gun directly at him. However, the judge denied Alexander use of the “stand your ground” defense because she had declined to simply walk away from Gray.

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Fetishes on Parade: (1) According to Chicago police, Gerardo Perez, 50, broke away while on a tour in May of the Chicago Animal Care and Control Facility because he had been struck with a sexual attraction. He was discovered minutes later on his hands and knees beside a pit bull, “appearing to have just had sex with the animal,” according to a report on WMAQ-TV. (2) Shaun Orris, 41, was charged with disorderly conduct in Waukesha, Wis., in June after raising a ruckus outside the Montecito Ristorante Lounge, harassing passersby by loudly expressing his “constitutional right” to have sex with goats.

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Not Well-Thought-Out: (1) A 64-year-old man was arrested in Geelong, Australia (near Melbourne), in June after carjacking a 22-year-old woman’s vehicle. He was still onscene when police arrived, as it took him time to load his walker into the car, along with several bags he had nearby when he decided to commandeer the vehicle. (2) A well-dressed, 5-foot-10 man bailed out of an attempted robbery in May of a New York City Bank of America when, after handing a teller his holdup note, the woman panicked, began screaming “Oh my God!” and ran to the other side of the bank, diving under a counter. According to a witness, the robber stood in silence for a few seconds before fleeing.

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Borderline Personality Disorder The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder.

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To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMĂ„J\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUĂ…PJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y` Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z :VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490

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EASIER Get a ConnectCard at most Giant Eagle locations. Load up to $200 of Stored Cash Value. Forget about exact change.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

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“LUCCA PIZZA,” WITH BASIL PESTO, TOMATOES, MOZZARELLA AND ARUGULA, WAS PRACTICALLY PERFECT

MILKY SWEET {BY LAUREN DALEY} Josephine Oria’s grandmother, Dorita, never let her write down recipes. So when it came time to replicate Dorita’s dulce de leche, it took a year and half to get the recipe right. “She’d always say, ‘Just be patient. Once you get it, you know,’” says Oria, of O’Hara Township. “I can’t tell you how many pots of burnt milk I had.” Argentina-born Oria came to the U.S. at age 2. When she married an Argentine, she wanted to continue grandmother’s culinary tradition, after she couldn’t find a comparable version of the thick caramel sauce in stores. “It’d be $11 for a cup, or expired,” she says. Her version is made from locally sourced raw milk and natural vanilla. It became so popular among her friends and family that “We ended up saying, ‘Maybe we should sell this.’” In 2009, she and her husband, Gaston, created La Dorita, in honor of her grandmother, and began making batches of dulce de leche in their home commercial kitchen. (They recently moved to a bigger space in Sharpsburg.) The spread is available in Whole Foods, Giant Eagle Market District, McGinnis Sisters, smaller local shops and online. There’s also a dark-chocolate version. “In the United States, dulce de leche is thought of as a dessert,” Oria says. But in Argentina, “It’s considered a spread for the breakfast table.” And soon, it may be an addition to the bar: In August, a La Dorita dulce de leche liqueur — distilled with Boyd & Blair vodka — will hit state stores. LDALEY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412-350-3052 or www.ladorita.net

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Just in time for the blazing mid-summer er heat, Klavon’s, in n the Strip, has re-opened. d. The old-fashioned d soda fountain (and former drug store) closed d earlier this year after the death of its owner. But now there are new owners — and nd a new ice-cream supplier, Penn enn State Creamery. Klavon’s iss the only location in the city ty to serve the popular mid-state confection. confection 2801 Penn Ave., Strip District

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AN ITALIAN CLASSIC {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

F

OR A CITY whose dining scene was

once distinguished principally by an over-stuffed sandwich, Pittsburgh has come a long way. Chefs have filled delicious ethnic niches from African to South American, endeavoring to use authentic ingredients and techniques. The only dining experience still on serious shortage is outdoors. Even in Pittsburgh’s iffy weather, outdoor dining is glorious. Lucca, an Italian institution on South Craig Street, sets a marvelous example. Its raised terrace, ornamented with wrought-iron work, mosaics and founttains, offers some of the most gracious dining in the city. And with the addid tion of heat lamps in cooler temps and ti a deep awning to shelter diners from sun and rain, its pleasures are almost su weather-proof. we In this little paradise, Lucca’s menu features an updated, pan-Italian selection fea focused on pastas and seafood, with very focu little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Caprese salad with Spring Valley Farm arugula and fresh mozzarella

Beef carpaccio, a timeless dish of paper-thin raw beef tenderloin lightly dressed, was both simple and sophisticated. Meltingly tender meat was enriched with olive oil, dappled with nutty shaved parmesan and brightened with just a sprinkling of capers, while peppery baby arugula provided some counterpoint.

LUCCA

317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310 HOURS: Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; dinner Mon.-Sat. 5-9:15 p.m.; Sun. 4:30-9:15 p.m. PRICES: Antipasti and salads $5-12; pasta $18; entrees $24-36 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Tuna tartare, however, was less carefully prepared. The buttery tuna was of very high quality, but the sweet “tomato oil” that was drizzled on the plate reminded a dining companion of ketchup. Salads were sized to share — larger than typical sides, but smaller than might satisfy for an entrée. Again, we found the

quality of ingredients excellent, but the dressings less satisfactory; this time, the problem was in the amounts. A simple arugula salad had so little garlic oil that it was almost dry, while a field-greens salad was nearly drowned in a jammy berry vinaigrette. Despite this, this salad’s crisp, tart apple and sweet, crunchy pecans balanced each other well. “Lucca pizza,” topped with basil pesto, plum tomatoes, mozzarella and arugula, and offered as an appetizer, was practically perfect. The crust was chewy without a hint of sogginess, and the pesto bold beneath a suitable layer of creamy cheese, sweet-tart tomatoes and a mound of spicy greens. About half of Lucca’s dozen or so entrees appear under the “Pasta” heading, but only two of the “Piatti Principali” actually feature noodles. One was the frutti di mare con penne. Unlike the more typical pot of myriad shellfish known as frutti, this dish limited itself to plump, firm shrimp and shredded crab over penne in a spicy basil-tomato sauce. The sauce

had just enough kick to play nicely with the seafood, and the sweet crab offered some counterbalance. Goat-cheese ravioli were sold out, so we chose instead salmon over linguine in pesto. The pesto itself was superb — vibrantly green, herbal and garlicky — but the salmon, which appeared to have been broiled, came already broken up and tasted a touch overdone. Whether it had broiled too long or got an unwelcome reheat when tossed with the pasta, it was an unfortunate misstep in an otherwise sound dish.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

BICYCLE BUILT FOR BOOZE Pittsburgh Party Pedaler allows patrons to work up a thirst The Pittsburgh Party Pedaler — a bicycle-mounted barroom pedalled by its own patrons — came to Pittsburgh the long way around: from a Steelers bar in Minneapolis. That’s where Susan Joseph saw a similar contraption. “My husband was working there and I was up for the weekend,” she recalls. “I heard all this party music, with people laughing. I saw this bike and I thought, ‘I want to ride on that.’”

The Pittsburgh Party Pedaler at Brentwood’s Fourth of July parade {PHOTO BY CHRIS POTTER}

Chef Eric Hansen

Pappardelle with sweet sausage and fresh peas in a tomato-basil cream sauce showed off both the fresh produce of the season and Lucca’s house-made pasta. These pappardelle were perfectly, tenderly al dente. They were the ideal vehicles for the mild yet deeply flavorful combination of ingredients in the sauce. Such a traditional Italian meal called for a traditional dessert: tiramisu. There are probably as many different recipes for this Italian classic as there are Italian kitchens. Lucca’s was in the firm camp, with cakelike ladyfingers and sturdy custard. With tables this inviting, not to mention a location in the beating heart of Oakland’s university and museum district, Lucca could probably get away with a workmanlike rehashing of the Italian-American cuisine of yesteryear. But Lucca’s simple menu is both classic and up-to-date, its preparations are most frequently skillful, and even its interior dining room is lovely on those nights when Pittsburgh winters must drive us indoors. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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That was about all it took for the Josephs to decide to become a licensee of PedalPub, which has pioneered the concept in America, and to bring the Party Pedaler home. “It definitely gets more jovial as the night goes on. As the ‘fuel’ intake goes a little bit high, it gets more fun,” says Bryan Joseph. When Bryan rings the bell from his driver’s seat, up to 16 passengers start pedaling the bike along. “It’s kind of like a little parade,” he says. The Joseph family’s two Dutch-made bikes have a bar, LED party lights and a digital music hook-up. But because of local open-container laws, party bikers can’t take advantage of the 53-gallon keg and tap system mounted on the front of the bike — at least not just yet. “We tried for a variance, but without a specific date or place we couldn’t get that,” says Bryan Joseph. So while the Josephs work with their lawyers to legalize on-bike revelry (“We want to do this the right way,” says Susan Joseph), the Pittsburgh Party Pedaler operates as a pedal-powered pub crawl. There are currently two tours (Strip District/ Downtown and North Shore). Clients can also book a bike for special events. “We’re hoping that this season we’ll be able to show we have a track record of safety,” says Bryan Joseph. To that end, he offers some advice to passengers: “Don’t show up drunk. We’re trying to have a good time, but we don’t want to cause any commotion on the street.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.pittsburghpartypedaler.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

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AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE BARLEY’S & HOP’S. 5217 Library Road, Bethel Park. 412854-4253. This celebration of all things beery is tucked into a retail slot at South Park Shops. You’ll find a huge and eclectic selection of imported beers and microbrews, all fortified by a light German-inspired menu. It’s a casual, personable place where the beer is always flowing, and the game is always on. JE BRIDGE TEN BRASSERIE. 20 S. 10th St., South Side. 412586-5033. This brasserie mines the rich core of sophistication in everyday French fare. The menu offers familiar dishes such as steak frites, escargot and cassoulet made distinctive with regional French inflections. Add a well-trained staff and a lovingly curated wine list for a fine-dining experience. LE

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Pastitsio {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} BURGATORY. 932 Freeport Road, The Waterworks, Aspinwall. 412-781-1456. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE

Burgatory {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412-338-9100. This dark, clubby restaurant excels at VIP service, and offers a menu highlighted by steaks, chops and seafood, with sophisticated but straightforward preparations such as crab cakes with added lobster, or steak encrusted in Kona coffee beans. Also, the Grille employs its own butcher (for cutting and dry-aging), and desserts are made on site. LE

classy modern space, to be complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-andcheese is a classic. JE

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

CURE. 5336 Butler w St., Lawrenceville. MONTEREY BAY paper pghcitym 412-252-2595. FISH GROTTO. 1411 .co Charcuterie specialties Grandview Ave., Mount are just part of the locally Washington (412-481inspired menu at this rustic4414) and 146 Mall Circle chic Lawrenceville restaurant. Drive, Monroeville (412-374A short menu offers seasonal 8530). Because fish lends itself specialties (wild onions in to endless preparations and spring), often combined with dressings, the menu here is pork, but vegetables get a copious (and that’s not including spotlight in dishes such as risotto the daily specials). The Mount with local mushrooms. LE Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland is a popular venue for special Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, occasions, out-of-towners and cozy brunch spot has expanded, anyone who loves fish. KE adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., recipes through the prism of Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. the contemporary American This tiny storefront café boasts kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). a Greek deli, complete with a It’s as elemental as cannellini steam table and a display cooler beans with red-pepper flakes, or with salads. Its namesake bakedas elaborate as seared scallops noodle casserole is a winner, but with butternut-squash mash, much of the menu changes daily fried leeks and Portobello, and according to what’s fresh. J truffled pumpkin seeds. KF ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Strip District. 412-201-5656. Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412This multi-leveled venue (with 823-4003. This Forest Hills venue balcony) perched on the edge offers straight-up Southern of The Strip is noted for its barbecue of chicken, beef and innovative, contemporary pork, with all the sides you’d American cuisine. Dishes are expect, such as greens (cooked prepared with fresh, local in pork broth), mac-and-cheese ingredients and served in a and corn-filled corn bread. Get CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-247-4848. A neighborhood pizza place and more, Salvatore’s offers something even rarer than good pizza: fast food of the finest quality. “Fresh” is the watchword, and the large, full-color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. Shellfish are prominently featured, and worth trying. K

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VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-2818881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring rolls, such as whole quail with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, featuring elegantly simple preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms with gorgonzola or scallops with blood-orange sauce. Flavorings such as lemon, garlic and fennel reflect the kitchen’s Mediterranean heritage. LE THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique décor you can buy and a massive, convivial Sunday brunch make this a vegan/ vegetarian hotspot. For the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ

offMenu {BY AMYJO BROWN}

FLOWER DEVOUR Annual event features edible flowers incorporated into a full meal {BY AMYJO BROWN} “DESSERT IS — OF COURSE — rose-petal ice cream,” Denise Schreiber announced. She was speaking to a room of 176 people, who had joined her at the Buffalo Inn at South Park one recent weekday evening, for a meal that incorporated edible flowers into every dish. Such an undertaking makes it easy to conjure images of white-lined tables, dainty china, wellcoiffed ladies and natty gentlemen. But there was nothing fancy about this dinner: Schreiber also announced that guests would get “dime bags,” or grab bags, to take at the end of the meal. Schreiber, the greenhouse manager for Allegheny County Parks, where she has worked for 22 years, eschews the “fancy” stereotype edible flowers and good food can evoke. Hoping to make such components more accessible, she has hosted the edibleflowers dinner annually for 13 years.

“I PUT A SPOONFUL INTO MY MOUTH AND DISCOVERED HEAVEN ON EARTH.” — DENISE SCHREIBER, IN HER BOOK, EAT YOUR ROSES “I’m a cook,” she says, adding that it’s easy to “add something [to a dish] and make it good.” That said, she is quick to explain that she, too, can be picky: “I’m not big on vegetables. I don’t eat green.” Except for avocado — “I eat a lot of avocado.” Her passion for incorporating flowers — roses, lavender, nasturtiums, lemon verbena — into her meals began on a 1999 trip she took to England to tour its famous gardens. At one of the stops, she tasted rose-petal ice cream for the first time. “I put a spoonful into my mouth and discovered heaven on Earth,” she wrote in her book, Eat Your Roses, a collection of descriptions of edible flowers and related recipes, which she published in 2011. This year’s meal, served buffet style, included about a dozen dishes she concocted, including: beef with rose chutney, chicken with lavender honey, a spring-greens salad with lavender-blueberry vinegar dressing, and orange-rosemary pasta. And — of course — the rose-petal ice cream. As the meal came to a close, Schreiber took to the microphone again: “We’re going to bring out dessert now, so don’t be running out the door,” she commanded. A B OW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LOCAL

“I LOVE COMING BACK TO SEE MY FAMILY — MY BLOOD FAMILY AND MY MUSICAL FAMILY.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

MODULAR (SYNTH) HOME

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More on Pittsburgh Modular: www.pittsburghmodular.com

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BACK WITH A

SAX

Circuits freak: Richard Nicol

When Richard Nicol started building modular synthesizers in his basement about two years ago, his plan was to sell two or three a month, to offset the cost of equipment he wanted to build for himself. From there, he says with a chuckle, “it started spinning out of control.” In the first month, he sold 50 systems. Before long, his basement was so crowded with parts and works-in-progress that he couldn’t reach the washer and dryer to do laundry. It was time to move to a new space. Last July, Pittsburgh Modular moved to a maze-like warehouse in Point Breeze. In a boxy, pleasant room with big windows and lots of natural light, Nicol — a former software designer — and his three employees build analog modular systems. Analog modular synths are built with separate modules (self-contained assemblies of circuitry), connected through patch cords. Pittsburgh Modular’s models range from the simple (its website describes the Cell [48] System 1 as “a great entry point into modular synthesis”) to the tremendously complex (the Cell [90] Foundation Desktop Complete is, they say, “a true beast”). The former is especially popular with artists who have experience with virtual synthesizers, like iPad apps, and want to graduate to something more tangible. “You can’t form a relationship with an iPad app,” Nicol says. What sets Pittsburgh Modular apart from many other manufacturers is the care Nicol takes in making his designs visually appealing. He emphasizes that these systems are, above all, instruments. “If you’re in a room full of guitars, you’re going to gravitate towards the one that catches your eye,” Nicol says. “It’s important to get people interested in playing it.” Trent Reznor and Deadmaus are among the artists from all over the world using equipment from Pittsburgh Modular. “The people that use this stuff have very specific ideas of what they want,” Nicol says. Many artists send sample videos — sometimes it’s 25 minutes of “mind-grating noise.” (“I don’t really get the noise scene,” Nicol admits — he’s more into industrial music). Sometimes it’s a song by a traditional singer-songwriter which just happens to include an unexpectedly “blistering” synth solo. Regardless of the music they’re making, most artists are just excited to use Nicol’s products. “You can just tell through the email,” he says, “they have a big smile on their face.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

C

HELSEA BARATZ grew up in Upper St.

days, and it was Sean. I ended up going to my first jam session at the Crawford Grill when I was, I think, 13. And I was just blown away. I met Alton Merrill that night, I met Sean, I met Roger Humphries, I met Dwayne Dolphin, Lou Stellute, Howie Alexander, James Johnson — all that night, when I was 13. And I played my first jam session. I’ll never forget, standing up on that stage and thinking, “This is HOW DID YOU COME TO PLAY AROUND what I’m going to do for the rest of my life.” TOWN AT SUCH A YOUNG AGE? I came up through Upper St. Clair’s music program, which has some great teachers CHELSEA BARATZ 7 p.m. Sat., July 27. Riverview Park, who would introduce me to the jazz scene Riverview Avenue, Observatory Hill. in Pittsburgh — Glenn Whalen, a tromFree. All ages. 412-255-2493 bonist, who taught at Fort Couch [Middle or www.pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks School], and Frank Eisenreich, a trumpet player, who taught — still teaches — at Upper St. Clair High. Frank introduced me HOW DID YOU END UP IN NEW YORK? to Sean Jones; not personally, but he put I went to Slippery Rock University first, me onto his playing. I had never really been studying saxophone performance. And I’d into Downtown Pittsburgh to check out live come down and sit in with Sean every Tuesjazz when I was 13 or 14, and he told me day at [the now-closed Dowe’s on Ninth]. about this hot, young trumpet player who And through Sean and his band, I got a lot was playing at the Crawford Grill on Tues- more into composition, writing my own Clair, and as a teenager played with some of Pittsburgh’s greats at the city’s jazz venues in the early 2000s. The saxophonist lives in New York City now, where she is a composer and bandleader, in addition to being a session musician. She talked to CP via phone in advance of a return to town this weekend.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

Sax and the city: Pittsburgh-born Chelsea Baratz

music, and Sean would let the young musicians come and rehearse with his band at [the Afro-American Music Institute], and perform them with him at Dowe’s. So I decided in 2005 that I was going to apply to the New School, to transfer and move to New York. HOW OFTEN DO YOU COME BACK TO PLAY IN PITTSBURGH? I’d say about three to five times a year I come back. I’ve felt welcomed with open arms to always come back and play at James Street [Gastropub & Speakeasy]. I’ll come back to town to do special events with other people or do a concert; then I’ll book small performances around town. It takes work to set up in another city as a bandleader and book shows like that; it’s not an effortless process. I love coming back to see my family — my blood family and my musical family. HOW DO YOU BALANCE YOUR WORK AS A BANDLEADER AND COMPOSER WITH DOING SESSION WORK? CONTINUES ON PG. 28

BACK WITH A SAX, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

The way I compose, I compose by playing and recording, kind of like sculpture. I’m not sitting down with a pencil and paper; it’s more with my instruments. So it’s a very dynamic process for me, but when recording work comes, you take it and you do that. It’s really a hustle and a grind; you do everything that comes at you. It’ll balance itself out. It’s pretty non-stop. As long as I’m performing and playing, though, I’m happy. HOW MANY INSTRUMENTS DO YOU PLAY? I’ve got the tenor saxophone, that’s my main axe, and then soprano sax, that’s another B-flat horn. Alto saxophone, flute, clarinet, then a little bit of drums and keys — enough to produce and record. Then I dabble with guitar a little. IS THAT IMPORTANT AS A BANDLEADER, UNDERSTANDING SO MANY DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS? Definitely. It’s so much more clear and easy to run a rehearsal when you know how to talk their language. But also from a compositional standpoint, when you can understand the role that each musician and instrument plays in the music, you can record a clearer piece of music. Some of the songs I’ve written for my next album, I started writing from the drum set. Because I already heard the melodic elements; I thought, “Let me put this rhythm down.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

NEW RELEASES {BY IAN THOMAS}

DEMON QUEEN EXORCISE TAPE RAD CULT

DO YOU PLAY NON-JAZZ STUFF? DO YOU LIKE DOING POP MUSIC, TOO? Oh, yeah! Absolutely. That’s a big passion of mine. Beyond that, it’s a passion to incorporate it into my music. I don’t want to play dinner music. When I first moved to New York, I started doing a lot of session work with Maurice Brown, and he brought me in to record with Aretha Franklin when I was 21. And I realized not just how musically gratifying the experience was, but how naturally gratifying it could be. And that got me focused on — what are you going to make a living doing? That helped get me into using recording as a means of composing as well. Jazz gets a negative rap in certain lights, with certain people. Either it’s the selfgratifying musician who’s playing soulless, overly technical, boring music, or it’s the jazz musicians playing the humdrum dinner music. That’s not what I’m about. I started singing a couple years ago, so I’m incorporating that into my music, and my whole thing is strong melodies, infectious rhythms, different elements of different genres, performed by a live band where everybody’s improvising. I’d like to think that’s jazz.

Exorcise Tape, a collaboration between Tobacco (of Pittsburgh’s Black Moth Super Rainbow) and Tucson hip-hop artist Zackey Force Funk, recorded under the moniker Demon Queen, is the natural result of what seems like a wholly unnatural union. The chemistry between the two, coupled with the behind-the-scenes chemistry employed by Tobacco in the album’s production, yields a bold, complex result. Exorcise Tape is an investigation of tawdry excesses, from strip clubs as adult playgrounds to exotic cars as the means of transportation to transcendence. It is also a by-the-book hip-hop party record designed to get things moving on the dance floor. That it can be both without irony, or even conflict, is a testament to the strength of each artist’s creative voice and his willingness to let it merge and meld with the other’s. Continuing in the vein of last year’s Cobra Juicy, the soundscapes provided by Tobacco are dreamy pop syrup, alternating between the sounds of warm keyboards and warring ray-gun effects, set to a constant stir. It is often difficult to tell where Tobacco’s purring vocoder mandates end and Zackey Force Funk’s R&B-tinged crooning begins. Tobacco imbues each track with the same underlying hum of energy, facilitating multiple listenings with infectious ease. Exorcise Tape is like the soundtrack to a hip-hop-themed Ralph Bakshi film or an NSFW version of Gorillaz. Thanks to the lyrical assistance from Zackey Force Funk’s Machina Muerte crew, Exorcise Tape feels like a fully realized hip-hop album and not just one-off collaboration. In merging their voices, Tobacco and Zackey Force Funk have shone a light on new facets of their respective personae on Exorcise Tape. Given their past work, that they have done so in service to a Demon Queen is fitting.

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF EMMA GARR}

Ask your father: Josh Tillman, a.k.a. Father John Misty

WHAT’S IN A NAME? {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

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THERE ISN’T MUCH that’s Shakespearean about Josh Tillman’s 2012 album Fear Fun, released under the moniker Father John Misty, but questioning the importance of a namesake is certainly a theme. In the final track, “Every Man Needs a Companion,” Tillman discovers the trouble with projecting an honest version of himself: “I got hung up on religion, though I know it’s a waste / I never liked the name Joshua, I got tired of James.” Yet, “Father John Misty” is less of a replacement and more of what Tillman sees as a natural artistic progression. “Father John Misty, that’s just something to put on a marquee,” Tillman admits. “It’s kind of a sick joke to toil for 10 years, putting everything you have into something, and by the time you reach this new artistic plateau, it’s under a different name.” This “new artistic plateau,” for Tillman, was attained by merging three mediums. A painter, fiction-writer and songwriter, Tillman’s quest for a comfortable narrative voice came to fruition within a space shared by those three pursuits. Indeed, one can hear the novel-like voice in Fear Fun. Where conventional songwriting may suggest quick, concise thoughts wrapped up after a bar or two, Tillman stretches a single thought across as many as 17 measures, and often doesn’t seem to find rhyming all that necessary. Ironically, the most songlike track on the album is entitled “I’m Writing a Novel,” in which Tillman sardonically asserts that he’s doing so “because it’s never been done before.”

There doesn’t seem to be any hierarchy to Tillman’s artistic exploits: No one medium is more important to him than another. Be it fiction, songwriting or painting, the idea is the same, projecting himself — a skill he admits was something that had to be learned. “I know what I sound like when I talk, and I know how I think, and I knew where my sensibilities were,” he says. “I think I got to this very singular instance where I asked why nothing that I made resembled that. By asking myself this question, I gave myself license to start writing, singing and painting like myself.”

FATHER JOHN MISTY WITH NIGHT MOVES

8 p.m. Tue., July 30. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $17. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Despite the fact that this self-realization resulted in abandoning the name Josh Tillman on stage, Tillman doesn’t see it as an abandonment of self. In fact, with a new professional name came a more honest and genuine performer. “The things that you see on stage — the dancing and the joking — those are aspects of my personality that I hid for a long time.” In the end, Fear Fun is not about a name. Tillman is sure that after three or four more albums, the name will come to mean nothing at all. Father John Misty is about seeking one’s self and, when finding it, being honest enough to project what is found. “A lot of the album is about not what you call yourself,” he says. “Just calling yourself by your name doesn’t mean you’re being yourself.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Get down tonight to none other than Thao and the Get Down Stay Down, on tour in support of its new album, We the Common: The self-reflective album hits a sweet spot with thoughtful lyrics and catchy, folky beats. Indie darling Lady Lamb the Beekeeper and local folk-rock band Gypsy and his Band of Ghosts will join Thao Nguyen for a festive night of feel-good music. Kira Scammell 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[MUSIC & ART] + SAT., JULY 27 Lately it seems like there are “happenings” happening more and more around here — case in point, tonight’s L2D2 event at MostWanted Fine Art Gallery. A follow-up to last month’s Live and Direct art-and-music show at Evolver Tattoo, L2D2 throws musicians and visual artists together in what organizers Julie Mallis Bunjie and D.S. Kinsel (a.k.a. Magic Organs) call an “action mixtape.” Musicians at tonight’s edition include everyone from DJ Nuke Knocka to vocalist Angwenique and MC Jack Wilson. Artists include: Apex, Vie Boheme and Jordan C. Taylor, among others. If you needed more incentive: It’s free, and there’ll be food trucks! Andy Mulkerin 5 p.m. 5015 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. All ages. 412-328-4737 or www.most-wantedfineart.com

[PUNK] + SAT., JULY 27

Old heads will remember Bunjie Jambo: The ’90s party-ska-punks were ubiquitous at one time, opening for some of the biggest names

of the era, and specializing in wild and sometimes ridiculous live shows. Now they’re a little older — as frontman Mike “Walt” Waldo puts it, “We grew up and had a lot of babies.” But they’re still playing out every now and again, and tonight is one of those times. They play the Smiling Moose — owned by one of the members of the band — to commemorate the group’s 23rd anniversary. AM 9:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[DJ] + THU., AUG. 01 U.K. DJ and producer Simon Green, a.k.a. Bonobo, will be making a stop at the Rex Theater tonight to spin some carefully

Jambo

composed ambient pop beats off his latest album, The North Borders. Luckily for us, Green has made time for a set in Pittsburgh between shows in Los Angeles, Dublin and Liverpool. And who knows when the Brit will be back, so be sure not to miss him when he passes through. KS 7 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $22-26. 17 and over. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

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CROWN OF PHANTOMS

DEAR MISS LONELYHEARTS

TWELVE REASONS TO DIE “THE BROWN TAPE”

JOE

MR. 305 FEATURING

PHILIP H. ANSELMO

INTERNATIONAL TAKE OVER

& THE ILLEGALS

RONALD ISLEY

DOUBLEBACK EVOLUTION OF R&B

WALK THROUGH EXITS ONLY

THIS SONG IS FOR YOU

STAR & DAGGER

IN TECH N9NE

THE WINERY DOGS

WE CAME AS ROMANS

TOMORROWLAND BLUES

SOMETHING ELSE

THE WINERY DOGS

TRACING BACK ROOTS

PITBULL & FRIENDS

E STOR

7/30

SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 25 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. North Side. 412-322-1850. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Chris Pureka, David Ramirez, Tim Ruff. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Gnawed, J. Lexso, Requiem, Burnout Warcry. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Nine Days. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARMONY INN. Kardaz Band. Harmony. 724-452-5124. LAVA LOUNGE. Frizz, Heaven, The City Buses. South Side. 412-431-5282. NOBLESTOWN ROAD. The Dave Iglar Band. Oakdale Street Fair. Oakdale. PENN AVENUE PARKLET. The Loose Change Connection. Wilkinsburg. 421-244-2900. SMILING MOOSE. Delicate Steve, Dazzletine. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Flow Tribe. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

a different artist each week. North Side. 412-224-2273. REX THEATER. Sister Hazel, Joe Bachman. South Side. 412-381-6811. THE SHOP. Bunny Five Coat, Crooked Cobras, Thunder Vest, The Bestevers. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Fight Machine, Bless the Child, Outlined In Blood, Burnicide. South Side. 412-431-4668. ST. BASIL CATHOLIC PARISH. Gone South. St. Basil Parish Festival. Carrick. ST. CLAIR PARK. Guggenheim Grotto. Greensburg. 724-838-4324. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Adams Ale. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Tom Panei, Kid Icarus, Fonzi. Butler. 724-256-5769.

SAT 27 31ST STREET PUB. Tim Barry, Cory Branan, Des Ark. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Oleander. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRUSTER’S REAL ICE CREAM. Griffin Donley, Raven Clifton, Geoff Bland. Ross. 412-366-9899. CLUB CAFE. Sean Rowe, Todd Edwards (Early) Blackbird Bullet,

FRI 26

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

MP 3 MONDAY THUNDER VEST {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER LOPES}

31ST STREET PUB. Motorpsychos, Scent of Remains, Iron Crown. Strip District. 412-391-2334. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Noble Hunter. Harmony. 724-272-3901. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Gene Stovall Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Donald Quincy, Brendan Cope, Gabe Wolford (Early) The Long Knives, Don Strange & the Doosh Bears, Southside American (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Anatomy of Frank, Left & Right, Low Man, Ben Cormier. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Baby in a Cage, Leslie Addis & Water Brother. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Suavity’s Mouthpiece. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3040. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. SHADE, Red Western, Claire With The Turban Millvale. 412-821-4447. PARK HOUSE. Coronado. Record release residency, feat.

The Seams (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB COLONY. Five Guys Named Moe. Scott. 412-668-0903. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Electric Lunch. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Wendy & The Lost Boys. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Paradox Please, Can’t Dance, Harikiri, Inirie. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. FOLI’S PLACE. E-Z Action. Braddock Hills. 412-371-4122. FOURTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Melanie Penn, Kelly Jones. Friendship. 412-661-7414. GRANT AVE. The Bessemers, The Pressure. Millvale. 412-215-5532. THE HOP HOUSE. The Dave Iglar Band. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. HULA BAR. Crossfire. Verona. 412-272-1792. MOONDOG’S. Cal Tucker & the Kickbacks. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, Lady Lamb The Beekeeper, Band Of Ghosts. Millvale. 866-468-3401. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe w/ the Turbosonics. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. SHERADEN VETS CLUB. Moose Tracks. Sheraden. 412-331-9149. THE SHOP. Ghastly City Sleep, Insect Factory/Public Speaking,

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes

Thunder Vest; download

from

“All About Me” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

Onodrim, Ivory Weeds. Bloomfield. 724-989-6058. SMILING MOOSE. Born Cages (early) Bunjie Jambo (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Funktapuss. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. THE WOODEN NICKEL. John Sarkis. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SUN 28 ALTAR BAR. Texas Hippie Coalition, Eve to Adam. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Tom Watt & the Fruitcakes. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. BELVEDERE’S. Drose, Murderedman, Microwaves, T-tops. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Ecstatics, CBJ, Dead Batteries, The Fuckies. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HENLE PARK. Daniels & McClain. Leetsdale. IRWIN PARK AMPHITHEATRE. The Jaggerz. Irwin. 724-864-3100. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. Moldies & Monsters, Vertigo Go, Arlo Aldo. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. SMILING MOOSE. Mrs. Skannotto. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Gogol Bordello. North Side.

MON 29 PALACE THEATRE. Whitesnake. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

TUE 30 CLUB CAFE. Andrew Belle, Trent Dabbs, Sol Persona. South Side. 412-431-4950. FRANKIE’S. The House Band. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Tiny Moving Parts, Frameworks, Perhaps, Ronnie Dobbs, Homies. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Father John Misty, Night Moves. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 31 AVONWORTH COMMUNITY PARK. Donna & Mark Groom. Ohio Township. 412-766-1700. BRILLOBOX. Houndmouth, Wreck Loose. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Patrick Sweany, Shane & Madi. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Machine (Pink Floyd tribute). Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE SHOP. Nic Lawless, Other Colors, FKT. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ryan Dillaha & The Miracle Men, Dan Getkin & The Masters of American Music. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 25 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

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PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 26 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Summer Fling Fridays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Salsa Friday. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Reggae Fridays. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DRUM BAR. DJ Scottro. North Side. 412-231-7777. JT’S. DJ Rick the Ruler. Old school R&B, line dancing, & Motown. Monroeville. 724-307-8688. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 27 BELVEDERE’S. Down n Derby w/Jx4, Dj McFly. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777. LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City Shake. Motown & funk dance party w/ DJ Soulful Fella. South Side. 814-746-5060. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 28 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Open Turntable Night. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

WED 31 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. When Life Gives You Lemons.DANCE. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ

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HIP HOP/R&B FRI 26 BELVEDERE’S. Youngsta, Mr. Owl, Depth One. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Darryl & Kim. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

BLUES

CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. Dave Crisci. Scott. 412-668-0903. CRANBERRY COMMUNITY PARK. Big Fat Jazz. Cranberry. 724-776-4806. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

paper pghcitym .co

THU 25

THE BULLPEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Avella. 724-356-3000. THE PITTSBURGH WINERY. Melinda, Chris Yakopcic. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

FRI 26 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. GOOD TIME BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Millvale. 412-821-9968. MOONDOG’S. The Sauce Boss. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MUGSHOTS CAFE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Crafton. 412-921-7474. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. North Side. 412-231-7777.

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FRI 26

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Stranger Convention. Downtown. 412-325-6769. ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 412-370-9621. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Pete Hewlett. Wexford. 724-935-7550. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Chelsea Baratz. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Maria Sargent & Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 27 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Flying Dutchmen. Downtown. 412-363-7326. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Wexford. 724-934-2110. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ECHO. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Cranberry. 724-779-3246. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Poogie Bell Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE MODERN CAFE. Susanne Ortner-Roberts & John Marcinizyn Duo. North Side. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Eric Darius. Shadyside. 412-292-1753. RIVERVIEW PARK. Chelsea Baratz. North Side. 412-255-2493. STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Acme. 724-423-5604. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mark Flaherty. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 29 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Interval Jazz Mondays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

TUE 30

ANDYS. Scott Elliott. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. KATZ PLAZA. Salsamba. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Parker/ Throckmorton/McDonald. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 31

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Michelle Benson. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

ACOUSTIC

SUN 28

THU 25

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Reggie Watkins. North Side. 412-904-3335.

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

SAT 27 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Sweaty Betty. North Side. 412-904-3335. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Ron & The RumpShakers. Baldwin. 412-655-3553. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & Blues Attack. Shaler. 412-487-6259. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. The Eldorado Kings. Bridgeville. 412-221-1543. ST. BASIL CATHOLIC PARISH. Jimmy Adler Band. St. Basil’s carnival. Carrick.

SUN 28 BROOKLINE PUB. Jimmy Adler Band, Dave Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899. MINERAL BEACH. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Finleyville. TUGBOAT’S. Craig King & King’s Ransom w/ Tim Woods & Guitar Zack. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

WED 31 THE R BAR. Ron & The RumpShakers. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Jimmy Adler Band. Oakland. 412-621-6566.

TUE 30

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Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

Be immersed in a live laser light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for shows and times.

JAZZ

BACK BY POPULAR DE MAND —

THU 25

Beatles, Queen, and Sublime!

AMBRIDGE SONS OF ITALY. Jazz Jam Night. Ambridge. 724-266-3991. ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

LUNCHTIME

LIVE AT

SCHENLEY PLAZA

BROUGHT TO YOU BY 96.9 BOB FM, Q929, AND PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

EARLY WARNINGS

DOBRA TEA. Tom Moran. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARD ROCK CAFE. Corey James, Nine Days. Station Square. 724-579-4571. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 26 BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Lenny & Jeff. Wexford. 724-934-2110. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Dixie Doc & the Pittsburgh Dixieland All-Stars. North Side. 412-904-3335.

Built to Spill

{THU., SEPT. 12}

Mission of Burma

SAT 27

LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Butterflies & Rocks. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CLARKS RESTAURANT. Rick Revetta. Moon. 412-269-2400. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

TUESDAY JULY 30

WED 31

PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Mark Dignam. North Side. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD THU 25

FOR MORE DETAILS:

WWW.BOBFM969.COM WWW.QBURGH.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

{FRI., NOV. 15}

Pat Benatar

Palace Theater, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg

PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-237-9400. WATERFRONT TOWN CENTER. Ras Prophet. Homestead. 412-860-9600.

& FLAUTIST ROGER CAZDEN. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

SUN 28

FRI 26

PARADISE BEACH. The Flow Band. Neville Island. 412-264-6570.

MON 29 PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

FULL LIST ONLINE

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. AquiTango. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337.

www. per pa pghcitym .co

SAT 27 UNION PROJECT. Sara DeRoy, Amethyst, Anjali Soi. Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

REGGAE FRI 26

COUNTRY THU 25

PALACE THEATRE. Gary Pratt. Greensburg. 724-836-1123.

FRI 26 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. The Early Mays. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. MEADOWS CASINO. Smoke n Guns. Washington. 724-503-1200.

ALTAR BAR. Tribal Seeds. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BNY MELLON. The Flow Band. Downtown. 412-913-4852. SHARON VFW. The Flow Band. Sharon. 724-734-9005.

SAT 27

SAT 27

CLASSICAL

GRAND CONCOURSE RESTAURANT. The Flow Band. Station Square. 412-867-0150.

36

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

TUE 30

Lunchtime Live is a FREE, acoustic concert from Noon to 1 pm under the tent in Schenley Plaza. Grab your lunch to go and enjoy live music from local artists!

{MON., NOV. 11}

Built to Spill

MON 29

NOON TO 1PM

Nick Marzock

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

MEADOWS CASINO. Smoke n Guns. Washington. 724-503-1200. ST. ELIZABETH ANN SETON PARISH. Steeltown. Carnegie. 412-276-1011.

SUN 28 ORGANIST MARISA CAZDEN

OTHER MUSIC CITY THEATRE. Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. South Side. 412-431-2489. CLUB COLONY. Mark Venneri. Scott. 412-668-0903. LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 27 CITY THEATRE. Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. South Side. 412-431-2489. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Jeremy Franz. Wexford. 724-935-7550.

MON 29 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 31 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CLUB COLONY. Hewlett Anderson. Scott. 412-668-0903.

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

July 24 - 30 WEDNESDAY 24 Under the Sun Tour

STAGE AE North Side. Featuring Sugar Ray, Smash Mouth & Gin Blossoms. With special guests Vertical Horizon and Fastball. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers with special guests Lilly Wine Affair. All ages show. Free event. 6:30p.m.

CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412431-4950. With special guests The Wheeler Brothers. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 25 Nine Days

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests WOJO, Corey James & O.W.S. Limited all ages. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Free Summer Concerts BESSEMER COURT Station Square. Featuring

We Don’t Even Know Our Real Names THE NUIN CENTER Highland Park. Tickets: 412-654-5770 or Judith.merritt05@gmail.com. 6:30p.m.

Flow Tribe THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

SATURDAY 27

ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY & MUSIC HALL Carnegie. Over 17 show. Tickets: stage62.com or 412-429-6262. Through July 28.

FRIDAY 26

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. With special guests Radio Tokyo & Donora. Free event. 7p.m.

PITTSBURGH SUMMER BEERFEST FRIDAY, JULY 26 STAGE AE

Oleander 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Tickets: pittsburghzoo.org. 6:30p.m.

Adelaide in Autumn

Fourth Annual Rib and Wing Festival

Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT. 800-452-2223. Tickets: available at entrance. For more info visit 7springs.com. Through July 28.

STAGE AE North Side. Over 21 event. For more information visit pittsburghbeerfest.com. 7:30p.m. Through July 27.

Summer Safari

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests The YJJS. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM Highland Park. 412-665-3640. Over 21 event.

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Steve Hawk, Shawn Mehaffey & more. Limited all ages. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Tribal Seeds Sister Hazel REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Descendsion, Blood Union & Driven Lifeless. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Funktapuss THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Thao & the Get Down Stay Down MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With

special guests Lady Lamb The Beekeeper, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 28

Texas Hippie Coalition

Jam on Walnut

Avenue Q Bob Schneider

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Even to Adam, Homicide Black & I Claim As Mine. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

MONDAY 29 Lord Huron

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

TUESDAY 30 Father John Misty

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Night Moves. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

Gordon’s BOARDWALK BASH and SIDEWALK SALE

4 DAYS ONLY! Thurs. July 25 th - Sun., July 28 th SPIN THE WHEEL to receive up to $36 off your purchase of shoes!

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS!

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37

WRONG STOP {BY AL HOFF}

THE FILM IS MOSTLY AN EDIFYING LECTURE AND STROLL THROUGH SOME INTELLECTUAL HISTORY

Ryan Coogler’s docudrama Fruitvale Station recounts Dec. 31, 2008, the last day of Oscar Grant’s life. By the next day, the 22-year-old Oakland resident would be dead, an unarmed black man shot by a transit cop. Community outrage followed, but Coogler’s film focuses on the hours prior, when Grant (Michael B. Jordan) is simply going about his life. He argues and makes up with his girlfriend (Melonie Diaz), plays with their young daughter, runs errands and eats dinner with his mom (Octavia Spencer).

HISTORY ON TRIAL

Oscar Grant (Michael B. Jordan) is detained by BART police.

CP APPROVED

Fruitvale suffers a bit from earnestness, and compressing multiple aspects of Oscar’s life into such a short time undercuts the work’s looser dayin-life vibe. But Jordan’s engaging, soulful performance, as a complex young man shifting between good and bad instincts, transcends the film’s occasionally clunky mechanics. The film opens with the actual grainy cell-phone footage of the chaotic scene at the BART station in which Grant is shot. Yet when Coogler restages this scene — a late-night fight on the train that spills out onto the platform — viewers may still hope for a better outcome for Grant. But like the Trayvon Martin case, which shares similarities with this story, the bitter end is already written. Fruitvale is another tab in the ongoing national debate about how to script better outcomes. Starts Fri., July 26. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Logan (Hugh Jackman), a.k.a.

The e Wolverine e, journeys ourneys to Japan, but only finds trouble: an alien culture, crime bosses, deadly dly ninjas and problems ms with immortality. James mes Mangold directs this actioner ctioner based ed on the he Marvel vel comic. mic. In 3-D, D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., July 27.

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{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

A

S A RULE, journalists are never as

interesting as what they write .about, and if they are, they should find a better story. Perhaps that’s true of Hannah Arendt, German director Margarethe von Trotta’s drama about the influential German-American political theorist. Arendt (Barbara Sukowa) covered the 1960 trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem for The New Yorker and then wrote a book about it, and one element of the conclusions she drew provoked a blitzkrieg of angry responses. Arendt’s insights on Eichmann led her to coin the phrase “the banality of evil” when she realized that “the unspeakable horror of the deeds” conflicted with “the mediocrity of the man.” This line of thinking got her in trouble when she concluded that the Holocaust was not as much about anti-Semitism as it was about power and bureaucracy. She doesn’t seem to acknowledge that it could have been about both, and she fur-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

Holding court: Hannah Arendt (Barbara Sukowa)

ther complicates her life when she comments on Jewish leaders’ acquiescence in Nazi Germany. When she finally says her famous phrase — in a classroom lecture — it’s the dramatic high point, sort of like when Hamlet says “to be” etc., etc.

HANNAH ARENDT DIRECTED BY: Margarethe von Trotta STARRING: Barbara Sukowa, Janet McTeer In English, and German, with subtitles Start Fri., July 26. Regent Square

One character in Hannah Arendt says that the youth of today (i.e. 1960) don’t want to remember their past, and that a trial like Eichmann’s can educate them. So can a film like von Trotta’s. Still, to enjoy it, you need to like your drama slow and talky: Even the trial, which is more about the Holocaust than what Eichmann himself did, has nothing new to say in the copious canon of Holocaust cinema.

Von Trotta — who first worked with Sukowa in Marianne and Julianne (1981) — presents the trial by seamlessly mixing color scenes that she filmed with black-and-white historic footage of Eichmann testifying, a technique that underscores just how much of a bureaucratic stiff he was. “An oath is an oath,” he says, explaining why he blankly followed orders, and why he saw no conflict between duty and conscience. Sukowa has grown from beautiful in her youth to handsome in her seniority, and her leathery voice gives the chainsmoking Hannah an air of wizened wisdom. There are plenty of debates between Hannah and her friends on weighty issues, and occasionally tempers flare. But only occasionally, for Hannah Arendt is mostly an edifying lecture and stroll through some intellectual history worth remembering, presented at a pace that suits its mature characters and creators. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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THIS SUMMER’S ‘LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE’.”

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

-Claudia Puig,

NEW

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A BAND CALLED DEATH. If you dug last year’s Searching for Sugarman, be sure to check out this similarly themed doc, from Mark Christopher Covino, about another “lost” and re-discovered musical act from 1970s Detroit. In 1975, three young African-American brothers, calling their group Death, recorded an album of driving, garage-y rock (a.k.a. proto-punk). Black and white audiences alike were confused, but hit-maker Clive Davis was interested, if the group changed its name. The Hackney brothers said no, and, thus, faded back into regular lives. Until 35 years later, when one of the few 45s they pressed — “Politicians in My Eyes” — resurfaced in the world of obsessive vinyl-collectors. Like Sugarman, this is a real-life tale with twists and turns, crazy coincidences and ahead-of-theirtime musicians who took both their early rejection and later re-discovery with class. It’s also fairly poignant as a story of a tight-knit family weathering life’s trials. One brother, the soul of the group, died in 2000, but never wavered from his conviction that “one day the world is going to come looking for this Death stuff.” He missed that day, but his brothers kept the faith. Fri., July 26, through Sun., July 28. Melwood (Al Hoff)

A Band Called Death

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BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME. Drew DeNicola and Olivia Mori’s documentary recounts the highs and lows of Memphis cult band Big Star. The highs are obvious: The band, fronted by Boxtops star Alex Chilton, released a trio of mid-1970s LPs, brimming with forwardthinking rock and pop, which influenced scores of bands to come. (Few 1980s and ’90s indie band failed to namecheck Big Star.) But despite critical acclaim, the band sold few records, and broke up amid the usual dramas (personal conflicts, record-label woes). The film lays out the tale in a straightforward manner, incorporating lots of archival footage and interviewing dozens of people — from surviving band members and family to journalists and latter-day fans. There’s a fair amount of post-mortem about why the band failed to click during its brief lifetime, and some wistful pondering of paths not taken. But perhaps the band was meant to exist apart from the noisy churn of ’70s rock, and its recognition delayed until the world could appreciate its talents. Robyn Hitchock describes the band’s trajectory from unheard to beloved in terms of a letter mailed in 1975 that took decades to be delivered. Hear all about here. 7 p.m. Fri., July 26; 9:30 p.m. Sat., July 27; and 3 p.m. Sun., July 28. Hollywood (AH)

A JOYOUS MOVIE, THE BEST ONE I’VE SEEN IN A VERY LONG TIME.” -Joe Morgenstern, Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me THE CONJURING. If I were a ghost who worked in horror films, I might be frustrated that I always got cast in the same role: creaking doors, stopping clocks, tossing china, whispering to kids and appearing in mirrors. James Wan’s spooker about a haunted house certainly doesn’t break any new ground for spectral performances, nor does it for the freaked-out humans plagued by the unwanted visitors. Wan does bring in some decent actors — Lili Taylor and Ron Livingstone as the home-owners, and Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga as the real-life paranormal investigators. (This tale is adapted from an actual incident.) And Wan, who also gave us Saw, deserves credit for turning in a mostly old-fashioned, leisurely paced, things-thatgo-bump-in-the-night thriller, without much gore or modern shock tactics. It’s easily 20 minutes too long, and story grows less satisfying toward the conclusion, but if you need a few chills in the heat, it should suffice. (AH) REDS 2. The retired spies are back, and in pursuit of a Cold War-era WMD. The first Reds had the novelty of seeing older, name-brand actors wield lethal weapons. But this sequel, directed by Dean Parisot, has all the hallmarks of a lazy sequel. The stars are back — John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Bruce Willis and Mary-Louise Parker (upgraded from girlfriend to action star); so are the predictable jokes, glaringly obvious product placement and the non-stop stream of doesn’t-count violence. (Your PG-13 ticket buys hundreds of violent deaths, but no blood or real consequence.) The one bright spot is the addition of Anthony Hopkins as a dotty old weapons scientist, but that’s only because Hopkins is such fun to watch. There’s still that rustling noise behind the exuberant gunfire and snarky quips; it’s the sound of checks being cashed by actors who should aim higher. (AH)

STEVE CARELL TONI COLLETTE ALLISON JANNEY ANNASOPHIA ROBB SAM ROCKWELL MAYA RUDOLPH AND LIAM JAMES Reds 2 R.I.P.D. Um, Robert Schwentke’s sci-fi action comedy is bad. Bad in ways too numerous to recount here, but here’s a few thoughts. (1) Not every comic book makes a convincing leap to the big screen. This tale of dead cops chasing down other dead people (who appear to be living) in order to prevent lots of actual dead people from falling from a giant fan in

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Sat., July 27. Hollywood. $10

the sky will convince you that story-telling is dead. At best, R.I.P.D. is like a knock-off Men in Black, cast with Ghostbusters extras. (2) Poor Ryan Reynolds. Look, he’s not a great actor, but it must be doubly painful to spend the whole movie paired with the scene-stealing hambone that is Jeff Bridges playing a wise-cracking Old West marshal. (3) The special effects look especially dated. Ooooh, ominous dark swirling cloud. (4) If you make it to the end, there is a scene lifted from Ghost. That is not a good thing. (5) Jeff Bridges, let us never speak of this again. In 3-D, in select theaters. (AH)

ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Transvestite Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry) is so busy seducing a couple of naïve stranded guests (Susan Sarandon and Barry Bostwick) that he fails to notice his colleagues from outer space are planning a coup. With lots of singing and dancing, and everybody wearing underwear! Jim Sharman directs. Until the theater gets a digital projector, this 1975 cult classic can’t be screened regularly. Catch this 35 mm screening while you can. Midnight, Sat., July 27. Hollywood. Advance tickets at www. showclix.com

THE SMURFS 2. The blue creatures are back, and teaming up with humans to find Smurfette, who has been kidnapped. Raja Gosnell directs this animated comedy. Starts Wed., July 31. THE TO-DO LIST. A teen makes a list of things to accomplish before heading off to college. Aubrey Plaza (Parks and Recreation) stars in this comedy written and directed by Maggie Carey. Starts Fri., July 26. UNFINISHED SONG. After his wife (Vanessa Redgrave) dies, a grumpy Englishman (Terence Stamp) joins a choir in her honor. Paul Andrew Williams directs this sentimental comedy. Starts Fri., Aug. 2. Manor

The Conjuring THE ARTIST AND THE MODEL. An elderly artist living away from the worst of World War II in the south of France finds himself reinvigorated by the arrival of a beautiful young Spanish refugee. Fernando Trueba directs this new film. In French, Spanish and Catalan, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 24. Hollywood RASHOMON. Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 film tells the story of a brutal 12th-century crime in the woods — but five different times, each from a different perspective. Toshiro Mifune made his name portraying the mercurial accused bandit. But the real stars are Kurosawa and his crew: Starting with the rainstorm pounding a grandly ruined city gate that opens the film, the beautifully incisive framing and continuously moving camera are viscerally satisfying. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., July 24. Melwood. $2 (Bill O’Driscoll)

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REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Tuskegee Airmen, Wed., July 24 (Schenley) and Sat., July 27 (Riverview). Finding Nemo, Thu., July 25 (Brookline); Fri., July 26 (Arsenal); Sat., July 27 (Grandview); and Sun., July 28 (Schenley). ParaNorman, Tue., July 30 (West End/Elliott Overlook). The Hunger Games, Wed., July 31 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks.net. Free

Every Tues, Wed & Thurs at 10am in July & Aug Different FREE family G & PG films each week! FREE Admission Movies Start at 10 AM. Doors open at 9 AM

North Versailles

Chartiers Valley

1701 Lincoln Hwy, North Versailles

1025 Washington Pk, Bridgeville

412-824-9200

412-914-0999

Stadium 18

Tue, Wed & Thu

July 23 - 25

Seating Limited to Capacity

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Stadium 18

PG Movies

G Movies

Puss in Boots

African Cats

Jul 30 - Aug 1 Hotel Transylvania

Chimpanzee

Aug 6 - 8

Rango

Rugrats: The Movie

Aug 13 - 15

Hop

Rugrats in Parisats

Aug 20 - 22

Mr. Popper’s Penguins Space Chimps

Aug 27 - 29

Yogi Bear

Ramona & Beezus

www.PhoenixBigCinemas.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE. Nicholas Ray’s landmark 1955 film brought to the previously marginalized exploitation topic of juvenile delinquency top-notch big-screen production values and a talented young cast. A suburban kid from a nice if emotionally distant home — James Dean, linked forever with his bad-boy red jacket — finds a new family with two other disillusioned teen-age souls (Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo) over a tumultuous 24 hours. 2 p.m. Thu., July 25. Hollywood (AH) THE CRISIS IN CONGO: UNCOVERING THE TRUTH. The Democratic Republic of Congo suffers from the so-called “resource curse” — in this case, a great mineral wealth that only further destabilizes the long-fractious African country. The 30-minute film examining how ongoing genocide in Congo is neglected by international media will be followed by a discussion. The film screens as part of the Battle of Homestead Foundation’s monthly film series, featuring works related to labor and economic issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 25. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871 APARTMENT 1303. An American remake of a 2007 Japanese thriller about a mother and daughter who move into a haunted apartment. Michael Taverna directs; Rebecca DeMornay and Mischa Barton star. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 25, and 10 p.m. Fri., July 26. Hollywood FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF. A teen bunks off school; crazy stuff happens. Matthew Broderick stars in this beloved 1986 comedy from John Hughes. 10 p.m. Fri., July 26, and 10 p.m. Sat., July 27. Oaks THE CRAFT. Witchcraft in high school! Robin Tunney, Neve Campbell and Fairuza Balk star in Andrew Fleming’s 1996 horror melodrama. This So Bad It’s Good screening comes with live comedy courtesy of improv group Frankly Scarlett. 7 p.m.

BEST OF THE 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT. It’s now a summer tradition: Form a film-production team; be assigned a genre, prop or character and a line of dialogue; and write and shoot a short film in just 48 hours. Pittsburgh’s teams have finished their films, and they’ve been presented to the judges. Tonight, the finalists screen and the winner is announced. 7 p.m. Sun., July 28. Hollywood JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS. Don Chaffey’s 1963 adventure film recounts the Greek myth about the journeying Jason and his search for the Golden Fleece. It also features the stop-motion animation (a.k.a. army of skeletons, multi-headed beast) of Ray Harryhausen. The film wraps up a month-long tribute to the late animator. 8 p.m. Sun., July 28. Regent Square

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CITY LIGHTS. Charlie Chaplin’s 1931 feature is a self-described “comedy romance in pantomime” that finds The Tramp falling for a blind flower girl and setting about earning the funds for an operation to restore her sight; his turn as a prize-fighter is especially hilarious. A subplot about The Tramp’s friendship with a millionaire — who recognizes Charlie only when he’s drunk, and spurns him when sober — offers some sharp social commentary. This poignant, beautifully realized film, which even takes time to make fun of the talkies, is among Chaplin’s best. Mon., July 29, through Thu., Aug. 1. Harris (BO) FREAKS. Time has made pale many shocking films of yore, but Todd Browning’s lurid 1932 melodrama of life on the midway can still raise an eyebrow. Notably, Browning cast real “freak” performers, including Siamese twins the Hilton Sisters; Johnny Eck (no torso) and Randian (no arms or legs); and the “pinhead” Schlitze. To some degree, their presence is exploitive, but Browning also grants them the dignity of off-stage lives and, ultimately, of the power of community and self-determination. The screening is a benefit for a film about local gothic neo-vaudeville showcase the Atrocity Exhibition, includes an auction and live performances. 7 p.m. Tue., July 30. Hollywood. $10 (AH) ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

[BOOK REVIEW]

SEX REPEATEDLY APPEARS AS A VEHICLE FOR TRANSCENDENCE

CROSSINGS

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

The title of local author Lori Jakiela’s latest memoir is a wryly veiled suicide reference, about a bridge people have leapt from. But honestly, things never get quite that bad in The Bridge to Take When Things Get Serious (C&R Press). In this darkly comic, sort-of coming-of-age book, set when Jakiela is in her 30s, the memoirist is too busy jousting with her mother, her lovers, her friends and, mostly, herself, to contemplate ending it all. Bridge to Take follows Jakiela’s fine 2006 memoir, Miss New York Has Everything, about her days as a flight attendant. As Bridge begins, she’s still technically in the trade, but has returned to her childhood home, in Trafford, to care for her widowed mother, who has breast cancer and heart ailments. Meanwhile, her mother — who’s often manipulative, belittling and just plain mean — seemingly does her best to undermine what little self-esteem Jakiela has. During the eventful couple of years that follow, Jakiela will also launch her teaching career, meet her future husband (the writer Dave Newman) and have her first kid. Along the way there are plenty of brightly sketched characters, from wacky South Side neighbors and various medical personnel to Jakiela’s best friend, Gina, who’s full of helpful suggestions like psychic readings and ear-candling. Jakiela, who directs the writing program at the University of PittsburghGreensburg and teaches at Chatham University, is a Hemingway disciple who gets maximum emotional charge out of short words, short sentences, short paragraphs, short scenes and short chapters. Here, in sequence, are three entire paragraphs from one scene, quoting her mother answering the phone: (1) “She said, ‘Lori?’” (2) “She said, ‘Is that you?’” (3) “She said, ‘Where are you?’” Bridge’s 280 pages are divided into 89 chapters; you could probably read them all in an afternoon. Jakiela excels at framing random phrases to give them two meanings: one that’s banal, and one that resonates emotionally. When her mother, teaching her to make bread dough, says, “You just know … You can feel it,” it becomes a metaphor for their often-unspoken love. There’s also her happy courtship with Newman; Newman reacting to news of Jakiela’s pregnancy by vomiting; a Vegas wedding; and her mother assaulting the author in the author’s postnatal hospital bed. Jakiela’s gradual growth out of her sense of disconnection from her parents (she was adopted) and pretty much anyone else makes Bridge a span worth taking.

Happy together: “Doppelgangered,” by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

[ART REVIEW]

DIS/ORIENTATION {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

T

HINK YOU’VE seen all museums

have to offer? Well, maybe not. The artist, musician and provocateur known as Genesis P-Orridge (it probably sounds better in Britain) and Lady Jaye Breyer, reacting against perceived limitations of traditional love, attempted to merge their identities in a manner that many would consider extreme. (They’re the subject of the 2012 documentary The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye.) In the process, they became BREYER P-ORRIDGE, and from that union issued most of the 100-plus works in Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: S/HE IS HER/E, an exhibit at The Andy Warhol Museum. Genesis P-Orridge was a pioneer with the industrial-music band Throbbing Gristle and later the punk-ish Psychic TV. He was also a member of COUM Transmission, a controversial art collective known for its early contributions to performance art in the 1970s. In addition to photo documentation of performances by COUM Transmission, the exhibition includes works created by Genesis P-Orridge working solo in the ’80s and early ’90s. These include examples of mail art, an anticommercial movement that developed out of Dada-inspired Fluxus in the ’60s, wherein artists created an international network by sending mostly postcard collages to one

“English Breakfast,” by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

another, sometimes testing the limits of postal services. Genesis P-Orridge thus ran afoul of British authorities, who charged

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE: S/HE IS HER/E continues through Sept. 15. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

him with mailing indecent and offensive material — charges that ultimately led Genesis to flee to New York City, where s/he now lives. Genesis and Lady Jaye met in 1993, and the exhibition pivots on their radical “Pandrogyne Project,” in which they sought to merge their identities through plastic surgery, hormone therapy, cross-dressing and altered behavior, so that they might become the pandrogynous creation BREYER PORRIDGE. The Pandrogyne Project appears to be driven by idealistic desire rather than a felt need for gender reassignment. Pandrogyne, or all-inclusive sexuality, is theorized as akin to positive androgyny or hermaphrodism, according to the indispensible wall labels and video featuring BREYER P-ORRIDGE. The exhibition calls for backstory and explication, if only to sort out the shifting names and ambiguous pronouns, including the exhibition title, which conflates Genesis P-Orridge and BREYER P-ORRIDGE into GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE. The bulk of the exhibition consists of “cut-ups,” collages inspired by William S. Burroughs’ revival of the surrealists’ technique, which in BREYER P-ORRIDGE’S hands are both a metaphor and a medium to explore transformation and reconstitution. The collages combine fragments of

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

GAME TIME {By Colette Newby}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PENN HILLS GAME EXCHANGE}

THEY SOUGHT TO MERGE THEIR IDENTITIES THROUGH PLASTIC SURGERY, HORMONE THERAPY, CROSSDRESSING AND ALTERED BEHAVIOR.

[GAMING]

Some of the merchandise at Penn Hills Game Exchange

photographs, found images and text in ways that appear variously controlled or happenstance, but always freely experimental. In some cases, the cut-ups seem to intentionally stop making sense, though in others there is a clear erotic or political intention. Works such as “Thee Mad Hatter, from the Royal Ascot Series” (2010), disrespect the Queen, the Union Jack and even the traditional English breakfast. (Though Lady Jaye died in 2007, later works continue to be credited to BREYER P-ORRIDGE.) Blasphemy is a recurring presence, including a set of altered “holy cards,” which are mass-produced devotional pictures. “Transgen Sacred Heart” (2003) is an image of the iconic Caucasian Jesus with breast implants added, presumably an unfriendly amendment in the eyes of the Vatican. A series of sigils, or seals, use collage and assemblage to create works that aspire to magical powers related to shamanism. “Burns Forever Thee Light” (1986) is structured around radial symmetry with plenty of human figures and ancient references. Some, such as “P-Androgeny Sigil” (1995-2001), have reliquary aspects, including fetishistic strings of hair and mystical overtones. Sex repeatedly appears as a vehicle for transcendence, with collage being a perfect medium for piling up bodies in orgiastic scenes. There’s a strong thread of religious imagery running through the exhibition, including shamanistic religiosity and even blasphemy, which in its way takes religion seriously. More recent digital montages, such as 2008’s “Snoflakes DNA (Clouds),” sacrifice gritty immediacy in favor of polish, while a gallery of Polaroids are generally simple and direct, more studies than opuses. Whatever your thoughts on Genesis POrridge and Lady Jaye Breyer’s idiosyncratic pursuit, this is not a referendum on unconventional sexuality or elective cosmetic surgery, though it can be described as a celebration of difference and self-determination. While transgender has been increasingly visible and vocal in public life, the fact that the Pandrogeny Project is apparently not based upon a compelling need for gender reassignment is what’s surprising. Rather, BREYER P-ORRIDGE were driven by an extreme form of idealistic romanticism. Which means that this vigorous and challenging exhibition is actually about love.

The Penn Hills Game Exchange is a labor of love: The staff are all volunteers who can talk your ear off about your favorite games, and close a sale as well. The unassuming store inhabits the first floor of a former house on Rodi Road. Lending nerd-legitimacy are walls covered with everything from Japanese Sega Saturn controllers to a poster for Chrono Trigger. While it’s the only import video-game store this side of Allentown, the Game Exchange was conceived as an arcade. A second room is filled with pinball tables and standing arcade cabinets, with more planned pending renovations. To Anna Hegedüs, who founded the Game Exchange (www.pennhillsgames.com) in February, the arcade atmosphere is crucial. Growing up in the 1990s, near Mercer, her local arcade was one of the few places her friends could escape middle-school cliques. She saw kids who could barely socialize light up in front of a Dance Dance Revolution cabinet. As arcades got stereotyped as dens of iniquity, however, many towns made it harder to run coin-operated machines through taxes and other legislation. In fact, Hegedüs says, she met similar prejudices in various communities where she proposed starting the Game Exchange, before settling in Penn Hills. The Game Exchange is open weekday evenings and all day Saturday and Sunday. Hegedüs runs the arcade with an hour of free-play for a flat rate. It’s not uncommon to walk in and see her tinkering with an arcade board on the counter, servicing or modifying it to work with a wall-projection setup. The stores does console modifications, too — simple tasks like getting an American SNES to play Japanese games, and unusual ones like making Atari 2600’s video output compatable with modern televisions. Hegedüs, an IT consultant by day, says her first console mod, as a kid some 20 years ago, was adding LED lights to the inside of a Nintendo console, so she could see what game was inside. Although the store attracts many hardcore import-gaming hobbyists, the staff always enjoy teaching newcomers each item’s history, or looking up information on their big-screen computer monitor. The pricing on items for sale, and even on purchases from visitors, is based on average prices on eBay and similar sites — which staffers look up in right front of you. “In the end, it makes us less money,” Hegedüs admits, “but it’s easier on my conscience.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ORGANIZED BY

On View Now! Open your eyes to the cultural history of the Arabian peninsula. Explore 200 PRINCIPAL CO-SPONSORS OF THE US TOUR

archaeological objects only recently available for view in North America.

FURTHER GENEROUS SPONSORSHIP

SPONSORED LOCALLY BY

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is organized by the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ExxonMobil and Saudi Aramco are gratefully acknowledged as principal co-sponsors of the tour of Roads of Arabia in the United States. Sponsorship is also provided by The Olayan Group and Fluor Corporation.

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

RIGHT ON Q {BY TED HOOVER}

THE GREAT NEWS about Stage 62’s Avenue Q is that I left the theater thinking, “I’m so old.” Avenue Q is the 2004 Best Musical Tony winner (with music and lyrics by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, and a book by Jeff Whitty). In a nutshell, it’s Sesame Street for grown-ups. Featuring a cast of actors and puppets, Avenue Q takes place in a rundown New York neighborhood that specializes in offering coping lessons for adult life. And don’t let the word “puppet” fool you: This is a show about, among other things, pornography, closeted homosexuals, racism and loud, sweaty sex. Now usually I’m one of the youngest people in an audience, and that’s depressing. My spring-chicken days are over: If I’m the youngest, where’s the next generation of theater-goers? But the Stage 62 audience was packed with twentysomethings, who were loving the production every bit as much as I did. It’s thrilling to think that, having seen this show, they might consider seeing another piece of theater in the future. And I hope it’s just as terrific. Music director Erich Lasceki and orchestra bring huge energy to the bouncing, contemporary score. The entire design team has striven to create the perfect visual Avenue Q world, where an extraordinary cast get to astonish. I don’t see how Matt Augustyniak and Laura Barletta, playing the romantic lead puppets Princeton and Kate Monster, could have been bettered — singing, acting, puppeteering. Augustyniak and Barletta are superb performers. Joey Frollo and Joey Moser, as “Bert and Ernie” doppelgangers, provide huge laughs, even when tripped up slightly by the performance space’s weird acoustic properties. Natalie Hatcher sings with a powerful set of pipes. Sara Barbisch, Jessica Whittington and Rob James supply their own big laughs. And Becki Toth and Chad Elder are a hoot as the Bad Idea Bears, who have their own delightfully wicked party onstage.

AVENUE Q continues through Sun., July 28. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-18. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.com

I find myself singing his praises so often people are gonna think I’m on his payroll, but once again Stephan Santa raises the artistic level of Stage 62 several notches with

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC SMITH}

Kyle Bogue (left) and Philip Anthony Wilson in “Defense of Marriage,” part of the Pittsburgh Pride Theater Festival

his completely on-point and ruthlessly professional direction. He’s the reason this show is the knock-out success that it is. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PRIDE ON STAGE {BY ROBERT ISENBERG}

AFTER FIVE YEARS of dormancy, the Pitts-

burgh Pride Theater Festival has awoken for two weeks of “best of” revivals. The festival showcases local playwrights and LGBT themes, and despite its brevity (four one-acts in total), it couldn’t come at a better time, given recent courtroom events. The festival is uneven, but Pittsburgh Playwrights is, as ever, an incubator of talent, and there’s a lot to enjoy.

ACTING OUT! continues through Sat., July 27. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. 412-256-8109 or www.pghplaywrights.com

“Is That a Gun in Your Pocket?” Adam owes money to a kingpin, and he can’t pay it. When hit man James arrives, Adam pleads for his life. Yet as James prepares to execute Adam, their conversation turns intimate, and they redefine the long kiss goodnight. Carol Mullen’s play is a witty noir, and Monteze Freeland directs a sharp production. Kevin Donahue and Billy Mason are positively adorable as the starcrossed lovers: Their chemistry alone offers a wonderful opening to the festival. “The Session.” In Dr. Proctor’s demented mind, secretaries are sluts, lesbians are trashy bitches and office sex is standard fare. But is this Dr. Proctor’s daily life, or a gross fantasy that occurs in his homophobic dreams? Wali Jamal’s

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

think piece is surreal and confusing, and last weekend’s performance struggled from line-drops and sluggish pacing. But given how many shrinks once diagnosed homosexuality as a “mental illness,” I suppose the profession deserves a potshot. “Sibling Rivalry.” There’s nothing Lisa does that her sister Denise doesn’t mimic — so when Lisa comes out as a lesbian to her mother, so does Denise. Kathryn Miller Haines’ script is already funny, particularly Denise’s distinct impressions of what a lesbian should act like. And as the competing siblings, Sarah-Ann Paulson and Ellen Michelle make the play even funnier. And fancy that: They actually look like sisters. “Defense of Marriage.” I caught “Defense” at the 2004 festival, and I was fascinated to see how Jeffrey M. Cordell has updated his script to incorporate the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling. The play — a realistic dialogue between a fastidious young man, Timothy, and his drag-queen partner, Joshua — is very long, and their fight about marriage and gender roles gets repetitive. But Cordell ends the festival with prescient thoughts and sophisticated characters. “Defense” is a fine reminder that theater, like life, is an ongoing conversation. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEBES OUT LOUD {BY F.J. HARTLAND}

ONE THING CAN BE SAID for Throughline

Theatre Company’s production of Oedipus Rex: It sure is LOUD! Did director Liam Macik instruct his actors to re-create the oratorical style of classic Greek theater? Or are these poor

cast members simply trying to make themselves heard over the production’s highvolume soundscape? Either way, it’s LOUD! Sophocles’ most famous work about the King of Thebes (translated here by Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald) tells the simple tale of boy gets parents, boy loses parents, boy gets new parents, boy kills biological father and marries biological mother. Yeah, that one. It seems an odd choice for summer-theater fare. The problem with Greek tragedy (and we have Aristotle to thank for this) is that all the “good stuff” happens offstage or — worse — before the play begins. And the audience hears about it only secondhand. Meanwhile, not only is the volume knob in Oedipus Rex turned to full, so is the emotional one: It starts high and stays there. After 90 minutes, it’s too exhausting. Joseph Ryan Yow looks quite kingly as Oedipus, but this production makes it difficult to feel emotionally connected to him. Two cast members are stand-outs. As she floats about the set, Lauren Connolly epitomizes regal grace playing Queen Iocaste. Also quite good is Peter Fedyshin, who cuts a dashing figure as her brother Creon.

OEDIPUS REX continues through Sat., July 27. Throughline Theatre Company at Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. 888-718-4287 or www.throughlinetheatre.org

The hard-working chorus (every Greek tragedy has one) rarely leaves the stage. Choreographer Katie Trupiano keeps them from being static, but one wishes they were a little more synchronized vocally. The set, by Elliot Gardner, is beautifully simple. Not only does it fit perfectly in the space at the Grey Box Theatre, it perfectly fits the script. One thing director Macik has done well is move his cast of 13 seamlessly on this lovely playing space. The blocking of the production flows effortlessly. To Throughline Theatre’s credit, it doesn’t make the easy choices. And — on Saturday night, at least — it managed to draw a decent-size crowd. Even for Greek tragedy. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

ON THE RUNYON {BY F.J. HARTLAND}

DAMON RUNYON SPECIALIZED in writing

sentimental tales of lovable mugs, gam-

blers and gangsters — as perhaps best seen in Guys and Dolls, the musical based on several of his short stories. His style even earned an adjective: “Runyonesque.” A Slight Case of Murder, which Runyon wrote with playwright Howard Lindsay, is a Runyonesque take on former bootlegger Remy Marko, who’s turned post-Prohibition brewer in an effort to go “legit” for the sake of his daughter. The transition isn’t easy, and Marko has to leap such hurdles as possible bankruptcy … and four murdered poker players in his guest bedroom.

A SLIGHT CASE OF MURDER continues through Sat., July 27. The Summer Company at Duquesne University, Duquesne campus, Uptown. $10-15. 412-243-6464

But in this production from the Summer Company, it’s Runyon’s particular style that’s missing. Too few of the cast achieve the charm that makes his characters so memorable. There are notable exceptions. In the role of Marko, Frank Schurer expertly channels Edgar G. Robinson and William Powell. (He sounds like Robinson and looks like Pow-

ell.) Also, Schurer fully captures the gauche “new money” gangster. Tim Syciarz is nothing less than delightful as State Trooper Chance Whitelaw. (Naturally, Remy Marko hates police officers. Imagine his thoughts when he finds out his daughter is engaged to Whitelaw!) The expressions on Syciarz’s angelic face elicit gales of laughter from the audience. In addition, he plays physical comedy very well. A few members of the ensemble also manage to capture Runyon’s style: Nick Osbourne, as Singer (who also sings and plays the piano); Matthew Rush, as the cook, Guiseppe; and Anthony Chase, as Kirk, are standouts. Overall, the show moves at a brisk pace. But while director Jill Jeffrey has the challenge of herding a large cast (22 in all), she doesn’t fully succeed. Too often there are awkward stage pictures, blurred focus in scenes, and actors upstaging each other. The party scene in Act II is particularly unfocused. Many things are happening, but Jeffrey doesn’t always lead the audience’s eye where it should be to catch important plot points. Finally, this past Friday night, there were some distracting problems with the lighting. Hopefully, those will be repaired before the show re-opens this week.

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

WHAT A GREAT RACK! Help decide which bike racks designed by local artists will appear in the Cultural District streets. To Vote: Visit the Bike Rack Contest link under the Promo Tab on pghcitypaper.com One voter will win a bike-themed prize pack including admission tickets to Carnegie Science Centers BIKES: Science on Two Wheels Exhibit

Voting Ends: August 7, 2013 N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN KAHLE}

JULY 27 Fourth Annual Steel City Mods vs. Rockers Rally

+ THU., JULY 25 {ART} Ever wonder what’s the deal with those six stone chairs all facing each other on Grant Street? Or those poles shooting fog behind the Children’s Museum? Pittsburgh Art in Public Places: Downtown Walking Tour knows. The third edition of the Office of Public Art’s free guidebook gets its launch party tonight. The 185pager is written by the OPA’s Renee Piechocki and Laura Zorch, with most photos by frequent CP contributor Renee Rosensteel. The Wood Street Galleries event includes artists represented in the book, and attendees get cake, champagne … and a free copy. Bill O’Driscoll 5-7 p.m. 601 Wood St., Downtown. Free. RSVP at www.pittsburghartscouncil.org

sions of Jay-Z, Denzel, Michael Jackson, De Niro, Pacino, Schwarzenegger and drunk white people. Olivia Lammel 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., July 28. 166 E. Bridge St., Homestead. $22. 412-462-5233 or pittsburgh.improv.com

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After all the time he spends trying to freak you out with gore and mayhem, go figure why you’d want to spend time with Tom Savini. But here’s your chance. Tonight, the Shaler North Hills Library’s weekly discussion series Art and Inspiration With William Rock hosts the cult-favorite actor, filmmaker and specialeffects master whose résumé includes Dawn of the Dead and two installments of Friday the 13th. Hear the local-ladmade-good-and-bloody talk about his work; add to the discussion yourself; and stick around for the reception. BO 7 p.m. 1822 Mount Royal Blvd., Glenshaw. Free. 412-486-0211 or www.shalerlibrary.org

+ FRI., JULY 26 {ART}

{COMEDY}

Tonight, Aries Spears performs the first of his six shows this weekend at Pittsburgh Improv. This Chicago native has decades of experience, including a long stint as a principal cast member on Fox’s Mad TV and a role in Jerry Maguire. He is perhaps best known for the impressions he’s been cultivating since childhood family dinners. His standup routines include ver-

{TALK}

JULY 25

Aries Spears

The Silk Road exhibit is partly the story of Virginia and Alban Curtze, a cosmopolitan couple from Erie, Pa. The show at Point Park University’s Lawrence Hall Gallery draws from a collection of 1,286 color Kodak slides the couple took in the late ’60s and early ’70s, when they visited Nepal, India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, along the ancient Silk Road trade route. One photo shows a large stone Buddha that was demolished by the Taliban in

sp otlight

A group of 25 will hike through McConnells Mill State Park this Saturday on Venture Outdoors’ day-long Waterfall Hike. The group will tackle the 6.2 rocky miles of the Slippery Rock Gorge trail that tracks Slippery Rock Creek. Dramatic sloping mountainsides frame the trail and descend to the creek, which gives way to rapids and waterfalls; while attempting to conquer the trails, hikers will look down on white-water rafters. The group will move at a steady pace through a rocky terrain, so prior hiking experience is required. A Venture Outdoors guide will lead the hike, stopping along the way to discuss the natural history of the land, dating back 300 million years to the bedrock that formed and then eroded to create the park’s rugged landscape. The group will stop along the way for brown-bag lunches. Once the Slippery Rock Gorge Trail is conquered, those who haven’t seen enough of the gorge, the waterfalls and the trails will take Hells Hollow Trail, a short path that follows one of the creek’s tributaries to Hells Hollow falls. The trip totals 7.2 miles. Olivia Lammel 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., July 27. 2697 McConnells Mill Road, Portersville. $10. Register by 5 p.m. Fri., July 26, at 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org.

2001. Somewhat of a time capsule, this unique collection, owned by Point Park University photography instructor Chris Rolinson, is on exhibit two more weeks. OL 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Aug. 9. 212 Wood St., Downtown. Free. www.pointpark.edu

+ SAT., JULY 27 {EXHIBIT} Each summer, the National Historic Landmark known as the Carrie Blast Furnaces relives its past as a world-class industrial behemoth with guided tours by the River of Steel National Heritage Area. The site that once produced iron for U.S. Steel’s Homestead Works is now a historical touchstone and often a film set … with a solar-powered visitor center. Today is Carrie

BO Rankin. 412-464-4020 or www.riversofsteel.com

JULY 27

{STAGE} It starts with a round of drinks at the bar. (Always a good idea.) Then Pearlann Porter, of the ever-experimental Pillow Project, persuades a diverse group of musicians, visual artists and dancers to wield each other’s tools of the trade: pianist dancing, dancer drumming, etc. Out of all this eventually develops a performance with everyone back doing what he or she does best. Out of Elements, at the loungey Space Upstairs, features musicians James Andrezj Rushin, David Bernabo and Colin Pinto-Martin; dancer Porter; and visual artist Jordan Bush. BO 10 p.m. 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. Suggested donation: $10. www. thespaceupstairs.org

Carrie Blast Furnaces tours

{STAGE}

violence with good-natured competition. For the first time, this rally rolls over to Millvale, where vintage bikes and scooters will be judged in a handful of categories. There will also be the traditional pin-up contest, and DJ Ian will provide the background music. Two bands perform: The Pressure, a local reggae/ska act, and rock group The Bessemers. OL Noon-5 p.m. Grant and North avenues, Millvale. $5. www. steelcitymodsvsrockers.com

JULY 27 Midnight Radio Jr.

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{RALLY} In 1960s England, suit-jacketed scooter riders clashed with leather-jacketed motorcyclists. The Fourth Annual Steel City Mods vs. Rockers Rally recreates this youth-subculture rivalry, but swaps the streets of southern England for the streets of Western Pennsylvania, and replaces the

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{SCREEN} Birds of a feather, as they say: Pittsburgh’s sideshow-inspired Kabarett Vulgare, the gothic Atrocity Exhibition showcase and Most Wanted Fine Art gallery are showing Todd Browning’s Freaks. The unnerving 1932 cult classic — set in a circus sideshow,

Bricolage launches its second season of Midnight Radio Jr. — the kid-friendly version of its popular “live radio” series. This weekend and next, take an Underwater Voyage, as the cast uses voices and live sound effects to summon mermaids, sunken ships, coral reefs, Dragon Kings and the adventures that develop. The program includes live music by The Josh and Gab Show. Kids are invited to stay afterward to learn some tricks of the radio trade in a 45-minute hands-on Foley sound-effects workshop. BO 2 p.m. Also 2 p.m. daily Sun., July 28, and Aug. 3 and 4. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $8-15. www.bricolagepgh.org

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Few ’50s rockers were as seminal as Buddy Holly: The Stones’ first U.S. single was Holly cover “Not Fade Away,” and The Beatles named themselves in homage to his band, The Crickets. In 2011, a tribute album featured covers by the likes of The Black Keys, Modest Mouse and She & Him. Buddy — The Buddy Holly Story, one of the first jukebox musicals, premiered in 1989 and ranks among the longest-running London musicals. From “That’ll Be the Day” to “Rave On,” the show remains a crowd-pleaser.

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{STAGE}

Blast Furnaces Community Day, with free tours every half-hour from 9-10:30 a.m. for residents of neighboring ZIP codes 15120, 15218 and 15104. Ticketed tours for anyone ($25, with student and senior discounts) continue today and at 10 a.m. every Friday through August and Saturdays through October.

and cast with real performers — screens at the Hollywood Theater to benefit production of another film, Brian Cottington’s documentary House of Oddities: The Story of the Atrocity Exhibition. Expect live performances from members of the local vaudevillian set, plus thematically appropriate vendors. If it’s not an actual circus, it’s at least a carnival. BO 7 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $10. www. thehollywooddormont.org

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Starting tonight, Pittsburgh CLO hosts eight performances of a touring production featuring Andy Christopher and Kurt Jenkins alternating in the title role. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 4. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-75.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghCLO.org

{WORDS} The two months of Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series conclude with a bang tonight. The longrunning poetry-series-in-a-bar wraps up with its traditional all-star Grand Finale. Featured poets include Nikki Allen, Marilyn Bates, Jason Irwin, Amanda Reynolds, Alicia Salvadeo, Kayla Sargeson (who curates CP’s online feature “Chapter & Verse), Scott Silsbe and Bob Ziller. Rounding out the line-up is Jimmy Cvetic, the famed local character (and occasional CP contributor) who co-organizes the series. BO 8 p.m. 3911 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. JBauer103w@aol.com

Photo by Virginia and Alban Curtze

JULY 26 The Silk Road

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 10-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL.

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DIY community theater event. 3577 Bigelow Blvd., Polish Hill. Sun., July 28, 3 p.m. 412-302-0248. AVENUE Q. Adult-themed spoof on Sesame Street. Presented by Stage 62. Thu-Sun. Thru July 28. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. BOEING, BOEING. A bachelor is dating 3 stewardesses at the same time, unbeknownst to them. When the airport shuts down, all 3 women are in town, thinking they’ll stay w/ him. Fri, Sat. Thru July 27. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. EXPRESS BURLESQUE. Presented by RED Productions. Sat. Thru Aug. 3. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. HERITAGE PLAYERS ADULT ACTING CLASS RECITAL. Feat. short plays & monologues. Fri., July 26, 8 p.m. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. LADY WINDERMERE’S FAN. Oscar Wilde’s comedy,

presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thru July 27. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. THE LOVE LIST. Leon & Bill concoct a list of attributes for their ideal woman, but when she actually arrives on the scene, the men learn that the list could use a few revisions. Thu-Sun. Thru Aug. 3. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. MNEMONIC. Play examining the understanding of time, the capacity to interpret history, & attempts to retell the past. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sun. Thru July 28. Kirkwood Building, East Liberty. 412-362-1713. OEDIPUS REX. Tragedy by Sophocles. Presented by Throughline Theatre. Thu-Sat. Thru July 27. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. 4 1-act plays by local writers. Thu-Sun. Thru July 27. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown.

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SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM: Butler Community College, Butler. 724-285-5610. A MUSICAL CELEBRATION. SWEET CHARITY. A musical Collection of songs from Comabout a dance hall hostess pany, Follies, A Little Night who falls in love too easily. Music, A Funny Thing Fri-Sun. Thru July 28. New Happened on the Way Castle Playhouse, New to the Forum, more. Castle. 724-654-3437. Wed-Sun. Thru Aug. VIVA LOS 18. Cabaret at Theater www. per pa BASTARDITOS!. An Square, Downtown. pghcitym o .c original rock musical 412-325-6769. comedy by Jake Oliver. SISTERS OF SWING: THE Presented by No Name Players. STORY OF THE ANDREWS Thu-Sat. Thru July 27. Off the Wall SISTERS. Story of the WWII-era Theater, Carnegie. 1-888-718-4253. entertainers. Thu-Sun. Thru July 28. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. A SLIGHT CASE OF MURDER. A farce about a reformed bootlegTHE BUTTERFLY EFFECT: ger who gets mixed up w/ 4 dead CHAOTIC IMPROV. 9 p.m. Steel mobsters & a state trooper. PreCity Improv Theater, Shadyside. sented by The Summer Company. 412-404-2695. Thu-Sat. Thru July 27. Peter Mills COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK Theater ( Duquesne, Rockwell MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Hall), Uptown. 412–243-6464. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412SUDS: THE ROCKIN’ 60S 681-4318. MUSICAL SOAP OPERA. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Presented by the Butler Musical Thu, 10 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Cabaret Theatre Guild. Fri, Sat and Sun., at Theater Square, Downtown. Thru July 28. Succop Theater, 412-325-6769. RUCKUS. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SHITZ N’ GIGGLZ. Open-mic comedy night hosted by Brad Ryan. 8 p.m. Obey House, Crafton. 412-922-3883.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

COMEDY THU 25

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

THU 25 - SUN 28

ARIES SPEARS. July 25-28 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 26 BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL COMEDY SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BLUE STOCKING BABES. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DAHRI FERKS PRESENTS: THE DECONSTRUCTION. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. IMPROV W/ SHEETCAKE. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MONTANA MARIE GETS GUNNED DOWN AT THREE. Presented by Mystery’s Most Wanted. 8 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE TREEHOUSE LOUNGE: A SWINGIN’ IMPROVISED VARIETY HOUR. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

“Life to the Seas,” by Bradley Brunstetter, from Impressions of a Dream, at Shaw Galleries

VISUAL

ART

VISUAL ART NEW THIS WEEK SHAW GALLERIES. Impressions Of A Dream. Paintings by Bradley Brunstetter. Closing reception: July 27, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SLAUGHTERHOUSE GALLERY. Pittsburgh: Two Perspectives. Photography by Garth Jones & Megan Nagy. Opens July 26, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-782-6474.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Chris McGinnis: The Productive Machine. Multimedia exhibit. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Art for a Hire Purpose. The Pittsburgh Society of Illustrators Exhibition Illustration Show. Downtown. 412-263-6600. ASSEMBLE. Sesli/Sessiz: Voiced/Unvoiced. Work by Chris Williams, focusing on exposing the American public to firsthand written accounts

of the current protests in Turkey. Closing reception: July 27, 5-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BE GALLERIES. Summertime. Work by Atticus Adams. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Multi-media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Trips To Italy. Work by Pat Nigro & Ilona Ralston. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Mythical Tales, Flight Paths, & Figures of the Sky. Mixed media works by John Humphries. Artist reception: July 27, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Seven Degrees of 7. Work by Distillery 7 Program artists Alexis Roberto, Cara Livorio, Crystala Armagost, Josh Mitchel, Elizabeth Brophy, Kate Hansen & Terrence M. Boyd. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Playground Project. A richly illustrated exhibition exploring the history of postwar playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Off the Wall. Work by Marco Brun, Alice Winn, David Passafiume, Christopher Sprowls. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography

by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. By appointment. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Foto Focus Five. Work by David Tufino, Brian Sesack, Michael Goswell, Melissa R. Aronson, & Susan Hale Kemenyffy. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Kawaii Wa. New works by HIROMI. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Prelude & Fugue (A Game of Pairs). Photography by Richard Stoner. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Norwin Art League Annual Membership Show. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Low Tides & Bucolic Daze. Hand painted photography by Rosemary Pipitone. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. The New Art of Wen Gao. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. JAMES GALLERY. Graphically Popular. Wood panel paintings by David Wallace. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Remembering Glen Whittaker (1950-2013). Shadyside. 412-361-8664.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 51

N E W S

THE BEACH CLUB SUMMER DECK PARTY

OPEN STAGE

oove productions Like us @ Stone Cold gr e Pack Follow us @ Rocking th

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

SAT 27 THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. Sat, 9 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DINNER W/ THE NOLENS IMPROV SHOW. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. IMPROV W/ PLAYER ONE & RUCKUS. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 323-401-0465. THE WRITERS ROOM & DE LE CRÈME. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

MON 29 808 & WELL KNOWN STRANGERS. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PANIC & HOTEL NOWHERE. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

RECRUITING ALL ATHLETES NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED Practice starts July 30th at 6:30pm at Founders Field, Pittsburgh, PA Welcoming International Head Coach:

Coqui Moreno

TUE 30 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

www.PittsburghHarlequins.org 50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

Polish Hill CRITIC: Coco Lee, 25, a server from Polish Hill WHEN: Sun., June

21, 2013

It’s pierogies and art. It’s just super unique: There’s some old people, there’s some hippies, there’s some trust punks, and then there’s these adorable grandmas making pierogies and stuffed cabbage, and we’re all enjoying today. I hit up Root 174, a super-cool new restaurant in Regent Square. They’re doing vegetarian falafel today. And there’s all this amazing art from people that live here. I’ve hit up a few art booths. Nothing’s come home just yet, but I’m sure my hands will be full by the time I leave. There are a lot of really neat Pittsburgh-based things — like I’m definitely going to buy something called Yinzer Bingo. I’ve also seen a couple neat prints that I might take home, just some really crazy abstract modern stuff. Round one is for shopping, and then I’m going to take all my stuff home, and come back for music because this goes until 9 p.m. BY OLIVIA LAMMEL

WED 31 STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry pieces. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology & History of ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ArHERITAGE MUSEUM. Military chaeological materials exploring artifacts and exhibits on the the cultural history of the Arabian Allegheny Valley’s industrial heriPeninsula. Ongoing: Earth Retage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. vealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. A Stitch in Jewish Time: ProCARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. vocative Textiles. Group exhibition BIKES: Science on Two Wheels. feat. contemporary artists from Feat. hands-on activities, the United States & abroad. demonstrations & a collection of Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. historic, rare, & peculiar bicycles. AUGUST WILSON CENTER Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN (planetarium), Miniature CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Railroad and Village, Reclaim, Renew, Remix. USS Requin submarine, Feat. imagery, film & and more. North Side. oral history narratives 412-237-3400. to explore comwww. per a p CARRIE FURNACE. munities, cultures, & pghcitym o .c Built in 1907, Carrie Furinnovations. Downtown. naces 6 & 7 are extremely 412-258-2700. rare examples of pre World BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. War II iron-making technology. Large collection of automatic rollRankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. played musical instruments and FORT PITT MUSEUM. music boxes in a mansion setting. Reconstructed fort houses Call for appointment. O’Hara. museum of Pittsburgh history 412-782-4231. circa French & Indian War and BOST BUILDING. Collectors. American Revolution. Downtown. Preserved materials reflecting the 412-281-9285. industrial heritage of SouthwestMCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY ern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. LOG HOUSE. Historic homes CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. open for tours, lectures and more. The Playground Project. Survey Monroeville. 412-373-7794. exploring the history of post-war OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church playground design & highlighting features 1823 pipe organ, important examples of playRevolutionary War graves. Scott. grounds from the 20th century. 412-851-9212. Oakland. 412-622-3131. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF MUSEUM. Trolley rides and NATURAL HISTORY. BugWorks. exhibits. Includes displays, walking Feat. beautiful photography of

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST E N O LIN

For more information contact Recruiting@PittsburghHarlequins.org

EVENT: Polish Hill Arts Festival,

tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS THU 25

ART IN THE PARK. Food, music, vendors, more. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

THU 25 - 27 GREENSBURG SUMMER IN THE CITY FESTIVAL. Live music, art, food, more. July 25-27 Downtown Greensburg, Greensburg. ST. ATHANASIUS PARISH FESTIVAL. Farmers’ market, games, Chinese auction, more. July 25-27 St. Athanasius Church, West View. 412-931-4624.

FRI 26 - SUN 28 SEVEN SPRINGS RIB & WING FESTIVAL. July 26-28 Seven Springs, Champion. 1-800-452-2223.

WED 31

ST. ALEXIS FESTIVAL. Games, skating rink, flea market, live entertainment, beer garden, more.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Dear Universe: New Encaustic Works by Benedict Oddi. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. No Future. New work by Gena Salorino. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company. Group show feat. Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, & Susan Sparks. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Civil War. A collection of rare and historic images printed from original glass plate negatives that survived the harrowing travels of Civil War Photographers. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go!. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition

July 31-Aug. 3 St. Alexis Catholic Church, Wexford. 724-935-4343.

DANCE SAT 27

THE AIR MASTERS. Ariel silks performance. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

SUN 28 WORLD KALEIDOSCOPE: THE FILIPINO AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH DANCE TROUPE. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 26 3RD ANNUAL PITTSBURGH PUP CRAWL. Dog walk, contests, more. Benefits Animal Friends, Animal Rescue League Shelter & Wildlife Center, & the Western PA Humane Society. 7:45 a.m. Clemente Bridge, North Side. 412-321-4625 x 248. SUMMER SAFARI. Live entertainment, food stations, more. 6:30-11:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-665-3640.

FRI 26

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

SAT 27

Wind Up wednesdays

$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL til 11pm with purchase

PALS BOOK CLUB. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. Summertime Art Show & Sale. Presented by South Arts. Bethel Park. 412-835-9898. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE TOONSEUM. Juice Box Memories: The Best of Boy Mayor. Editorial cartoons by Rob Rogers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Residual Conditions: Impressions from Anatomy, Industry & Ecology. Work by Christopher Cassady, Gianna Paniagua, & Ben Quint-Glick. By appointment. Braddock. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. data.tron. Installation by Ryoji Ikeda. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL til 11pm with purchase ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

LIGONIER VALLEY WRITERS’ CONFERENCE. Workshops for published & emerging writers. 8:15 a.m.-5:45 p.m. Westmoreland County Community College, Youngwood. 724-593-7294.

Thirsty thursdays

SUN 28

MON 29

THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings of screenplays written by local screenwriters. Every third Mon, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 19 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

TUE 30

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!. Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. POET’S CORNER. Poetry openmic. 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

WED 31

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am

JULY 25

BILL SHUTE, JIM D. DEUCHARS. Poetry reading presented by Kendra Steiner Editions. 2 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-969-0283.

Christmas in July Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

HEAVEN (NYC) THE CITY BUSES

07.25 Giveaways, Holiday Drinks & More

07.27 (main level) Retro Night

AUGUST 1 BURLESQUE SHOW

70s, 80s & 90s Dance Party $2 well drinks 9-11pm NO COVER

AUGUST 8

07.27 (lower level) Hanging Garden

STEVE THOMPSON & THE PROFESSIONALS, ABACUS JONES, THE LEAFS

Goth/Industrial Night 9-2am

08.03 Roxxxy Andrews Tickets on Sale NOW

$2 PBR Drafts

www.brownpapertickets.com

Everyday 9-11

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

$5 PBR Drafts & Fireball Shot All Day ‘till Midnight

BEING OURSELVES IN OUR POETRY. Poetry reading feat. 7 African-American workshop writers. Presented by Cave Canem. 6:15 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. 412-392-4400. CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

KIDSTUFF

SUN 28 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. STEEL CITY SCAVENGER HUNT. Benefits the Persad Center. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 1-888-873-7723.

MON 29 - WED 31

MYLAN CLASSIC. Golf tournament benefiting regional charities. July 29-Aug. 4 Southpointe Golf Club, Canonsburg. 412-771-6460 x 305.

LITERARY THU 25 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

THU 25 DOG DAYS OF SUMMER W/ WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA HUMANE SOCIETY. Learn about therapy dogs. 1 & 2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. WOODCUT MURAL MAKING. w/ Tugboat Printshop. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 25 - FRI 26 A PRINTER, A BAKER, A HISTORY MAKER: AN INTERACTIVE CAMP. Explore 19th century life. Ages 6-12. Thru July 26 and Thru Aug. 2 Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 110. STORYTELLER’S STUDIO. Collaborate on a group story & adapt it into plays, songs/raps, & comics. Ages 11-13. Thru July 26, 3-6 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-206-6290.

THU 25 - WED 31 ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

YOUNG THE GIANT

NEXT WEEK: XXX Star & Extreme Pole Dancer

Christina Aguchi

PLUS MORE!

JULY 30-AUG. 3

Visit PROMO tab at pghcitypaper.com for your chance to WIN PRIZES!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

Hint: Find the Left side of the Bottle

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 28

FRI 26

MON 29

COOK IT!. Interactive cooking demos w/ Chef Angelo. Fri, 1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. FRIDAY NIGHT ROLLER DISCO. Roller party in the library parking lot, including music, glow crafts, costume contest, more. For students in grades 6-12. 7-9 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920.

FRI 26 - WED 31 CHARLIE & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY. Presented by Little Lake’s Looking Glass Theatre. Wed, Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 3 Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

SAT 27

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

M3: FOUND & MANUFACTURED W/ ASHLEY ANDRYKOVITCH & ASHLEY ANDREWS. Create real life versions of web-based games & memes. Ages 8-10. 12-3 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

SAT 27 - SUN 28 MIDNIGHT RADIO JR.: UNDERWATER VOYAGE. Live sketch/variety show for kids ages 6-12. Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 4 Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999.

PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 29 - WED 31

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 30

SAT 27

SAT 27 - SUN 28

SUN 28

TUE 30

WED 31

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

THU 25

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon CARTOON PREP COLLEGE ART of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra CAMP. Create your own comic Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. strip. Ages 13+. The ToonSeum, MAKESHOP: CATAPULTS. Use Downtown. 412-232-0199. recycled materials to create a CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. catapult that launches a ping Second Thu of every month, pong ball. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, every month Carnegie Library, North Side. 412-322-5058. Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3116. PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE THE DEN: A SPECIAL HANDBUILDING TABLE. PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR Ages 3+. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art 412-322-5058. projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland, A PRINTER, A BAKER, Oakland. 412-622-3151. A HISTORY MAKER: AN AN EVENING W/ TOM SAVINI. INTERACTIVE CAMP. Explore 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, 19th century life. Ages 6-12. Thru Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. July 26 and Thru Aug. 2 Old Economy Village, Ambridge. FINDING JOY IN 724-266-4500 x 110. RECOVERY. ClinicalSUCCEED 2013. Summer community psychology program on climate discussion w/ Brent change & energy for Robbins, Ph.D. 6-9 p.m. 9th & 10th graders. Point Park University, . July 29-Aug. 2 Carnw Downtown. ww per a p ty egie Mellon University, ci h pg 412-392-3480. .com Oakland. 412-268-2670. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural ROBOTS W/ THE CARNEGIE club of American/international SCIENCE CENTER. Learn about women. Thu, First Baptist robots, make liquid nitrogen ice Church, Oakland. cream, more. 1:30 p.m. Mount iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. Lebanon Public Library, MEDITATION & WHOLE Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Doors open at 7:15, FREE KAYAK & STAND-UP seating ends at 8 p.m. 7:15 p.m. PADDLE BOARD DEMOS. Winchester Thurston, Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Upper School, Shadyside. 12-2 p.m. Thru July 27 North Park, 724-420-5826. Allison Park. 412-318-1200. PITTSBURGH ART IN PUBLIC ORIENTEERING WORKSHOP. PLACES LAUNCH PARTY. Learn the basics of reading Release of the 3rd edition of topographical maps, orienting a compass, more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. the walking tour guidebook. Raccoon Creek State Park, 5 p.m. Wood Street Galleries, Hookstown. 724-899-3611. Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. PLUM FARMER’S MARKET. Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Plum Senior KAYAKING DISCOVERY Community Center, Plum. COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. 412-795-2339. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. Learn a variety of dances from 412-318-1200. the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. ECO-TOUR W/ VENTURE OUT412-567-7512. DOORS. Paddle tour. Ages 12+. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. 9-11:30 a.m. Moraine State Park, Group acupuncture & guided Butler. 412-255-0564. meditation for stress-relief. Thu, DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 WEST COAST SWING. Swing p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 412-477-4677. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WILKINSBURG FARMERS’ WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. MARKET. 732 Ross Ave., Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Wilkinsburg. Thu, 3-6 p.m. Thru Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. Nov. 21 412-727-7855. 412-963-6100.

OUTSIDE

52

OTHER STUFF

FRI 26 23RD ANNUAL ADA CELEBRATION. Guest speakers, raffle, more. 1-4 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-219-3290. SOCIAL Q. Pre-performance happy hour networking event. Presented by Quantum Theatre. 6:30 p.m. Kirkwood Building, East Liberty. 412-362-1713. TCHAIKOVSKY: HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Multi-media lecture on the life & music of Peter Tchaikovsky. 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WINE TASTING. 6:30 p.m. Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 412-355-7980.

FRI 26 - SUN 28

STEEL CITY CON. Toy, comic & pop culture convention. Special guests: Tracey Gold, Ernie Hudson, Marina Sirtis, Theodus Crane, more. July 26-28 Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. TAKE EVERY THOUGHT CAPTIVE TO CHRIST. Conference hosted by Christians for Biblical Equality. July 26-28 Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 612-972-6898.

SAT 27 4TH ANNUAL STEEL CITY MODS VS. ROCKERS. Vintage motorcycle & scooter rally. Live bands, food & arts vendors, pin up contest, more. 12-5 p.m. Grant Ave., Millvale. 412-215-5532. THE ARTFUL GARDEN CRAFT SHOW. Handmade jewelry, paintings, photography, fabric & paper crafts, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 17 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622. BEYOND THE BIG HOUSE KITCHEN: A CULINARY HISTORY OF AMERICAN SLAVERY. Presentation w/ historian Michael W. Twitty. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Meadowcroft Museum of Rural Life, Avella. 724-587-3412. BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS & BLOCK PARTY. 10 a.m. Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church, Regent Square. 412-731-2511. CARRIE BLAST FURNACE COMMUNITY TOURS. Feat. free tour tickets for those who reside in the zip code areas of the former Homestead Works. 9-10:30 a.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 32. CIVIL WAR ENCAMPMENT. Demos of drilling, marching, more by the 40th Pennsylvania Volunteers. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. CREAM SODA TASTING. Register at cream@villagecandy.com. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Village Candy, Sewickley. 412-741-1490. DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat. Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. HE, SHE, IT, THEY, YOU & ME. LGBQT-themed gallery talk w/ Michael David Battle & Evelyn

Pavolva. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. THE HISTORY & IMPACT OF FINANCIAL POWER: THE VAMPIRIC RISE, FALL & RISE AGAIN OF FINANCIAL CAPITALISM. Interactive program comparing the Great Depression to the Great Financial Crisis of 2008. 1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEGROWN HEROES. Presentation by Steven Anderson about local Civil War stories. 10-11:30 a.m. The Old Stone House, Slippery Rock. 724-738-4964. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAGIC ORGANS PRESENTS: L2D2. Salon-style exhibition feat. art, music, food, more. 5-9 p.m. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. NEW RIDER PROGRAM. Safety seminar for new & returning motorcyclists. 10 a.m. West Hills Honda, Coraopolis. 412-262-2200. ONE WHIRL YOGA FEST & HEALTHY LIFESTYLE EXPO. Health experts, classes, vendors, more. Presented by WHIRL Magazine. 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-431-7888. OPEN HOUSE & IMPROV/ OPEN-MIC NIGHT. 6 p.m. R-ACT Theatre Productions, Robinson. 724-775-6844. PARK & PICNIC DAY. A park area will be set up outside the store for picnic food, children’s activities, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Ten Thousand Villages, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2160. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat,

[YOGA]

Come See

Ladies of Golf the

and meet

Playboy Playmates!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIDGETT KAY PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC}

The idea of a yoga competition might sound oxymoronic — and bring to mind images of coconut-water-drinking contests and races to inner peace. But competing in the USA Yoga Asana Championship is more like running a marathon: Your only real competition is yourself. Saturday, check out the PA/NJ Regional Championship, happening at the One Whirl Yoga Festival and Health Expo, at Point State Park. The all-day event also features dozens of workshops, vendors and more. 6 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat., July 27. Downtown. $35. Visit www.whirlmagazine.com/yogafest.

3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

SAT 27 - SUN 28

MON 29

OPEN STUDIO & ESTATE SALE. July 27-28 Boksenbaum Fine Arts Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-3212.

DISTRIBUTION HAPPY HOUR. Release of the 2013-14 Greater Pittsburgh Black Business Directory & Resource Guide. 4-7 p.m. Savoy Restaurant, Strip District. 412-400-8809. GARDENING THYME: PRESERVING FOOD- THE BASICS OF CANNING, DRYING & FREEZING. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. LEGO ARCHITECTURAL STUDIO WORKSHOP. Ages 14+. 6 p.m. Barnes & Noble - Waterworks, Aspinwall. 412-781-2321. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru July 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

SUN 28 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun. Thru Aug. 11 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. CANONSBURG SUNDAY CAR CRUISE. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 22 The Handle Bar & Grille, Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. CONCORDIA SUMMER FESTIVAL. Concordia Lutheran Ministries, Butler. 724-352-1571 x 8266. STOP SMOKING/LOSE WEIGHT. Hypnosis group. 11 a.m. & 3 p.m. SpringHill Suites, Pittsburgh Mills, Tarentum. 724-884-3307. UNA BELLA FESTA. An evening of Italian music & food. 5 p.m. Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-576-4644.

Ciara Price

Beth Williams

MISS NOVEMBER 2011

MISS AUGUST 2012

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

MON 29 - WED 31 THE ARTFUL GARDEN CRAFT SHOW. Handmade jewelry, paintings, photography, fabric & paper crafts, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 17 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

TUE 30 NEW AGE PANENTHEISM WEEKLY DISCUSSION/LECTURE. Call Jim Arnold to register & for location info, etc. Tue. Thru July 30 Friendship, Friendship. 412-404-8717. NHCO NORTH BOROUGHS OPEN HOUSE. 3-6 p.m. NHCO North Boroughs, Bellevue. 412-487-6316 x 3112. PORKY OLDIES DANCE. First Thu of every month and Last Tue of every month Brentwood VFW Post 1810, Brentwood. 412-881-9934.

WED 31

Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

AUDITIONS APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for A Little Family Business. July 28. Men/women age 25-50, cold readings. http://.applehillplayhouse.org. Delmont. 724-468-5050. FASHION OUT LOUD. Seeking models, fashion designers, & actors for Fashion Kamp (TM). July 27. Call for more information. http://.wearefol.com. 412-667-6741.

submissions for Volume 3, Issue 3. Theme is “prized possessions,” tangible or otherwise. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems.

GIRL SCOUTS WPA

When you think of the Girl Scouts, the first word that comes to mind (after “Samoas”) might be “troop.” But some girls prefer to participate in Girl Scout activities without joining a troop. Volunteer Indie Girl Coordinators are needed for the Individually Registered Girl Scouts program to help support, motivate and assist Indie Girls in achieving their scouting goals. Email dhazlett@gswpa.org or visit www.gswpa.org.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

SUBMISSIONS BLAST FURNACE. Seeking

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. GEMINI THEATER COMPANY. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. Auditions for Little Mermaid. July 412-422-7878. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). 29-30. Adults & students ages 10+, 1-2 min. a cappella song & cold Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon readings. Gemini Theater, Point Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Breeze. 412-243-6464. 412-531-1912. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. AudiFARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ tions for Oliver! Aug. 3-4. Ages market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. 10+, cold readings & song of your Thru Oct. 30 Phipps Conservatory choice. www.heritageplayers.org. & Botanical Garden, Oakland. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel 412-622-6914. Park. 412-254-4633. FITNESS CONSULTATIONS. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN Wed RDL Fitness, McCandless. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. 412-407-0145. Fall auditions for talented LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!. Practice 8th grade-12th grade singers conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. for the 2013 season. Aug. 26Carnegie Library, Oakland. 27. Email or call MaryColleen. 412-622-3151. mcseip@themendelssohn.org. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER Westminster Presbyterian SUMMER LECTURE SERIES. Church, Upper St. Clair. Theo Keller & Erika Tada. 6-8 p.m. 724-263-5259. Pittsburgh Glass Center, MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Friendship. 412-365-2145. Ongoing auditions for actors THE PITTSBURGH SHOW ages 18+ for murder mysOFFS. A meeting of tery shows performed in jugglers & spinners. the Pittsburgh area. All levels welcome. 412-833-5056. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union MCG JAZZ. Auditions Project, Highland Park. www. per pa for a 2-show live 412-363-4550. pghcitym o .c concert appearance at TAROT CARD MCG Jazz. July 1-Aug. 1. LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Young male jazz vocalists, Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. ages 18-35. Submit video 412-449-9833. online via YouTube, email URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna to kfriedson@mcg-btc.org, House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. or send a DVD. Details at VETERANS SUPPORT EVENT. http://mcgjazz.org/_wp/mcg-jazzPresentation on opportunities searching-for-the-next-jazz-superto support veterans needs in star. 412-322-0800. housing, employment, more. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF 10:30 a.m. Eastside Neighborhood PITTSBURGH. Fall auditions for all Employment Center, Garfield. voice parts. Aug. 14-15. Those in412-362-8580. terested in scheduling an audition WEST COAST SWING should review the audition criteria WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance at www.themendelssohn.org. lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, Email MaryColleen at mcseip@ South Side. 916-287-1373. themendelssohn.org or call. Third YOGA FOR YOU. Wed, 7 p.m. Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon 724-263-5259.

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SOUNDS OF PITTSBURGH CHORUS. Auditions for new members to perform in 4-part harmony at a Pirates game & at the annual Christmas concert. July 29. Call for more information. Coraopolis United Methodist Church, Coraopolis. 412-279-6062.

http://blastfurnace.submittable.com THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking non-traditional 2-D & 3-D work for upcoming juried art exhibit Different Dimensions: The Unpainting Exhibit. CD submissions only. Prospectus at http://.greensburgartcenter.org/. 724-837-6791. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Online magazine seeking book reviewers, writers & artists to submit original essays, fiction, poetry, artwork, & photographs as well as pitched ideas for possible contributions. Visit www.newyinzer.com for current issue. Email all submissions/inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’ve been mostly happily married for 15 years. I’m a straight man. I love my wife. But after many years, our sex life is unsatisfying. While my wife was barely GGG at the beginning, now she will not go down on me ever. We do have sex four to 10 times a month, but it is always vanilla. I went on Craigslist to look at the “casual encounters” ads, and I replied to some. My only response admitted to being a man pretending to be a woman. Long story short, I let him blow me. I didn’t touch him. I just watched some straight porn while he blew me. I have done this a few times with different guys. I am not turned on by men, but I do enjoy the enthusiastic BJs when combined with straight porn. I can’t tell my wife, as it would end an otherwise good marriage. Questions: (1) Does this make me gay, bi or neither? (2) Do I have to stop? I have been careful to keep it pretty safe, and I am not attracted to or interested in these guys. I’m pretty sure if I found a woman interested in an affair, it would be a much riskier emotional tightrope. (3) What should I do? BLOW JOB SECRETS

(1) I wouldn’t call you gay or bi, seeing as you’re concentrating on straight porn during those blowjobs. What you describe sounds like a mild case of “situational homosexuality” — something otherwise straight men are sometimes forced to do “for gratification or release in a single-sex environment,” as the sex-ed website SexInfoOnline puts it. You’re not locked in prison or sweltering away in a shithole like Saudi Arabia, places characterized by “the prolonged absence of partners of the opposite sex.” You’re just a blowjob-deprived married man who realized that accepting blowjobs from gay or bi men is cheaper than paying female sex workers, and less entangling than an affair with a woman. But you probably don’t want to describe yourself as “situationally homosexual,” as that sounds pretty gay, so let’s go with “opportunistically heteroflexible.” (2) Yes, you have to stop. I would be inclined to give you a pass if you were not having sex with your wife at all — or having sex with her once or twice a year — but you and the wife are having quite a lot of sex. If you were to contract gonorrhea or syphilis from one of your male sex partners, you would almost certainly pass the infection on to your wife before you became symptomatic and got treated. (Unless you’re using condoms during those blowjobs, they’re not “safe.”) If telling your wife about the blowjobs now would end your marriage, imagine telling her after you’ve passed along a sexually transmitted infection. (3) You should get your wife’s permission — maybe she’d be down with outsourcing oral duties, or like to have an adventure or two of her own — or you should knock it the fuck off.

I have broken up with him repeatedly, when I become so soul-crushed by our sexless relationship that I have to end it, but we always end up back together. He is possibly asexual, my attraction to him is limited, and he is crap in bed when we do have sex. But I love him, treasure our history and would love for our families to merge. I had the opportunity recently to get sexual attention outside the relationship, and I can see living with my partner while having a sex life that involves other people. This is something he would never agree to. I am currently examining my morals to see if I can be OK with this arrangement. It is the only thing I can think of that will allow me to stay with him. WONDERING IF FAITHFULNESS ENDURES

Would it be a good idea to marry a possibly asexual man you don’t find attractive because you could see yourself being happy with him … so long as you can wrap your morals around lying to him for three or four decades? Don’t do it. The amount of stress that will pile up over the years will soon outweigh the stress of one honest conversation about the role of sex in your marriage. But instead of saying, “I’ll marry you, but only if I can fuck other people,” go with this: “Sex has never really been important to us as a couple. It doesn’t define our connection, and it never has.” Then tell him that you won’t consider sex outside the marriage — so long as it is safe and discreet — grounds for divorce. Hopefully he’ll agree. If not, don’t marry him.

UNLESS YOU’RE USING CONDOMS DURING THOSE BLOWJOBS, THEY’RE NOT “SAFE.”

I am a straight woman who has been with my fiancé off and on for 12 years.

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In your response to FURFAG last week, the guy who has been in an online relationship with a guy he has never met, you focused on their need to meet in person before moving across the country to be with each other. I believe you focused on the wrong part of FURFAG’s letter. His real problem was revealed in the last part: “Sex doesn’t hold a big interest for me, and porn doesn’t do ANYTHING for me — gay, straight, it’s like watching a sweaty, breathy anatomy class. I’ve never even masturbated.” That just screams POSSIBLE MEDICAL ISSUE. A 21-year-old man who is not aroused by visual stimuli and has never masturbated? This man needs to see his doctor and get referrals to an endocrinologist and a urologist. (I know asexuals will skewer me for this, but until someone has explored all possible medical and psychological explanations for a disinterest in sex, I have to disagree.) The likelihood of FURFAG having a spark with his online boyfriend is nil if he didn’t find that spark with a gym sock at age 12. GET THAT CHECKED

Listen in as Dan gets drunk with NPR White House correspondent Ari Shapiro at Town Hall in Seattle: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.24-07.31

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I was 6 years old when my parents told me that there was a small, dark jewel inside my skull, learning to be me.” So said the Leo science-fiction writer Greg Egan in his story “Learning to Be Me.” Let’s pretend that you, too, have a small dark jewel inside your skull that’s learning to be you. It’s a good metaphor for what I believe has been happening all these years: You have been gradually mastering the art of being the best Leo you can be. It hasn’t been easy. You weren’t born knowing how to be your beautiful, radiant, courageous self, but have had to work hard to activate your potentials. Now you’re moving into an especially critical phase of the process: a time when you have the chance to learn how to love yourself with greater ingenuity.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Dear Astrology Guy: Please tell me why I have to work so hard — meditate, reflect, read, analyze, poke, prod, investigate — to discover truths about myself that must be obvious to others. Why is it so hard for me to see where I need healing and where I need to let go? Why is it such an ordeal to grasp what is interfering with my wholeness when I can quickly pinpoint what other people’s issues are? — Overworked Virgo.” Dear Overworked: I’m happy to report that you Virgos will soon be offered a gush of revelations about who you are, how you can heal and what strategies will best serve your quest to minimize your anxiety. Are you prepared to absorb some intense teachings? For best results, make yourself extra receptive.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): One of the world’s best race-car teams is McLaren. It wins about 25 percent of the events in which it competes. Its skilled drivers account for much of its success, but its technicians are also pretty sensational. During a pitstop in the middle of a race, they can change all four tires on the car in less than three seconds. Do you have helpers like that, Libra? If you don’t, it’s time to intensify your efforts to get them. And if you do, it’s time to call on them to give you an extra boost.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let’s try an experiment. It’s risky, but I’m hoping you will do it with such flair that there will be no karmic blowback. What I propose, Scorpio, is that you have fun expressing more confidence than usual. I invite you to strut a bit, even swagger, as you demonstrate your command over your circumstances. Enjoy acting as if the world is your plaything … as if everyone around you secretly needs you to rise up and be a bigger, bolder version of yourself. The trick, of course, will be to avoid getting puffed up with grandiose delusions. Your challenge is to be more wildly devoted to embodying your soul’s code without lapsing into arrogance.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I suspect that you are longing to take a quantum leap of faith, but are also afraid to take that quantum leap of faith. You sense the potential of experiencing a very cool expansion, while at the same time you hesitate to leave your comfort zone and give up your familiar pain. In light of the conflict, which may not be entirely conscious, I suggest you hold off on making a gigantic quantum leap of faith. Instead, experiment with a few bunny hops of faith. Build up your courage with some playful skips and skitters and bounces that incrementally extend your possibilities.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hoaxes exposed! Bluffs called! Secrets revealed! Whitewashes uncovered! Curses banished! Taboos broken! Those are the headlines I expect to see emblazoned in your Book of Life during the coming weeks. Can you handle that many holy disruptions? Will you be able to deal with the stress that might come from having so much raucous success? These are important questions, because if you’re not up to the challenge, you may scare away the transformations. So steel your resolve, Capricorn. Mobilize your will. Do what’s necessary to harvest the unruly blessings.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The French novelist Flaubert declared that if you hope to write a book, you should first read 1,500 books. A Roman author named Petronius believed that the imagination does not work at its peak power unless it is inundated with reading material. I suggest you adopt their advice and apply it to your own field, Aquarius. Whatever skill or subject you want to master, expose yourself lavishly to the efforts of other people who have already mastered it. Flood yourself with wellcrafted inspiration.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Is there a message you’ve wanted to deliver for a long time but haven’t been able to? Are you bursting with thoughts or feelings that you’ve been longing to express but can’t find the right way to do so? Have you spent months carrying around a poignant truth that you have felt wasn’t ripe enough to be revealed? If your answer to any of those questions is yes, I believe the time will soon be at hand to make a move. But it’s important that you’re not impulsive or melodramatic as you initiate your breakthrough

communications. For best results, be full of grace and balance.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Bees and other insects can see ultraviolet light, which is invisible to humans. When they look at flowers, they detect designs on the petals that you and I cannot. For example, the evening primrose appears completely yellow to us, but it calls seductively to bees with a flashy star pattern at its center. Many of the secret signs that flowers offer the pollinators are meant to guide them to where the pollen and nectar are. Let’s use this as our metaphor of the week, Cancerian. I am not predicting that you will be able to perceive a broader spectrum of light. But I do believe you will discern cues and clues that are hidden from most people and that have been imperceptible to you in the past. What do you want so badly that you’re driving it away? How can you fix the problem? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

Pittsburgh Lawyers

Should you be worried that a venomous spider has crawled into your shoe while you were sleeping? Just in case, should you flip your shoe upside-down before putting it on each morning? My studied opinion: hell, no. The chances of you being bitten on the foot by a venomous spider lurking in your shoe are even less than the possibility that you will be abducted by an alien who looks like Elvis Presley and forced to sing a karaoke version of Beyonce’s “Single Ladies” at an extraterrestrial bar. And if you are going around filled with delusional anxieties like that, you will definitely interfere with life’s current predilection, which is to give you a cleansing respite from your fears as well as immunity from harm.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I have tried in my way to be free,” sings Leonard Cohen in his song “Bird on a Wire.” In other words, he has done the best he can to liberate himself from his unconscious patterns, bad habits and selfdelusions. He hasn’t been perfect in his efforts, but the work he has done has earned him a measure of deliverance from his suffering. I recommend you follow his lead, Aries. Do your best to bring more relief and release into your life. Get rid of things that hold you back. Overthrow a pinched expectation and ignore a so-called limitation or two. By this time next week, I hope you will be able to say sincerely, “I have tried in my way to be free.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “There are some things you learn best in calm, and

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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some in storm,” wrote the novelist Willa Cather. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Taurus, you’re in a phase of your cycle when stormlearning isn’t your priority. The educational experiences you need most will unfold when you’re exploring the mysteries of peace and serenity. In fact, I suspect that the deeper you relax, the more likely it is that you will attract life-changing teachings — lessons that can transform your life for the better and fuel you for a long time.

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Order of Court And now, this 17th day of June, 2013, it is hereby Ordered that an argument/ hearing shall be conducted on July 31, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. The parties shall file and serve on opposing parties and counsel any briefs five (5) days prior to the argument/ hearing date

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

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DO YOU HAVE A CHRONIC COUGH, SHORTNESS OF BREATH, OR DIFFICULTY BREATHING? Have you been diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) A research study is being conducted in your area for an investigational inhaled medication for COPD. If you are a current or ex-smoker and 40 years of age or older you may qualify to participate. All study-related care is provided at no charge, including physical exams, lab tests, and study medication. Compensation for time and travel may be available for those who qualify.

PLEASE CALL

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

412.650.6155

STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

VAGINAL DRYNESS CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Female Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol & Smoking Research Lab is looking for women who currently smoke to participate in a research project.

You must:

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

• Be 40-60 years old, in good health, and a Native English speaker • Be willing to fill out questionnaires • Be willing not to smoke for 5-hours before the session

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Earn $60 for participating this study.

HIGH CHOLESTEROL CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

For more information, call

412-624-8975

! ! ! R E M M U S H CAS IN ON

Novum Pharmaceutical Research Services, one of the leading research companies in the testing of generic medications, has a GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU to earn up to $600 just by participating in our Outpatient Research Study!

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IF YOU ARE: • At least 18 years of age • In general good health • Drug-Free • Willing to make short visits to our facility (no overnight stays)

CALL OUR RECRUITING DEPARTMENT TODAY AT

5900 Penn Avenue // Pittsburgh, PA 15206

Learn more at www.GoNovum.com 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

1.800.586.0365

WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street (Lawrenceville)

412-621-3300

MIND & BODY

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

massage Therapy

330-373-0303

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

724-519-7896

TIGER SPA

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

(1st Floor)

Superior Chinese Massage

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

$50/HR Free Table Shower

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

STAR

China Massage

MIND & BODY

412-401-4110 $40/hr

Chinese Bodyworks

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MIND & BODY

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Credit Cards Accepted

GRAND OPENING!

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

(across from Eat n’ Park)

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

412-319-7530 (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

724-519-2950

412-595-8077

Accepting All Major Cards

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

412-316-3342

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Judy’s Oriental Massage Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

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SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Health Services SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

EAST FOR RENT Wilkinsburg/Regent Sq- 1BR, furnished, 2nd flr, near Busway. Avail Aug 1 $595+util 412585-2227

SQ. HILL- 2BR hse, renov. bath & kitch, fresh paint, wood flrs, w/d, gar, $1,295+ 703899-5246 Pics www. skrents.com Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper TODAY! Point Breeze Townhouse with grg 2 BR, 1.5 BA, C/A, Dishwasher, Laund, HW Floors $1295 412-393-9910

SOUTH FOR SALE South Side Slopes2624 Mission, 3 BRs, 2.5 baths, views, total remodel with six (6) parking spaces! $239,900 412-352-3417

EAST FOR SALE Bloomfield- 4814 Sciota, 3 BRs, 1.5 baths, near Liberty & Millvale Avenues, large garage, fenced yard. $219,000 412-352-3417

HOUSES FOR SALE

Montour School District $239,900— Kennedy Twp. Gorgeous 4-BR, 1.5 BA, log Cabin. Located in a very private setting. Comes with 3 extra lots. 25+ acres. Completely updated. MUST SEE. Call George E. Lucas! 412-771-8400 Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116 62

EAST FOR RENT

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.24/07.31.2013

FANTASTIC HOME! $249,900 South Fayette, GorgeousOne year young, stone & vinyl, bi-level home, located in a great school district. Features large BRs, 2 full BA’s, lovely eat-in kitchen and game room. Beautiful bamboo hardwood floor w/carpet and tile. Must see! Call George E. Lucas Today! 412-771-8400

Sq. Hill- 6364 Caton. Beaut. 3BR brick. Fresh paint, Powder room 1st floor, formal DR, E-I-K, bay window in LR, finished gameroom, Integral gar, Covered side/front porches. $235,000 Phil 412-337-9494

HOUSES FOR SALE

Special Price! $174,900— Kennedy Twp. Gorgeous— 2-story, brick, 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with formal dining room. Lovely game room and a huge level lot. Convenient location, walk to bank, restaurants, drugstores and shopping. Call George E. Lucas today! 412-771-8400

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

get your yoga on!

IN PLANE VIEW

Flying over Pittsburgh, and into history, aboard a WWII bomber. {BY CHRIS POTTER} I’M NOT going to lie. As I looked down into the Monongahela River from the bombardier’s seat of the B-17 bomber, it did occur to me that World War II-era aircraft occasionally end up beneath its muddied waters. They’re still looking for the B-25 that crashed into it that winter night in 1956, actually. And copilot Bryan Wyatt’s description of the B-17’s handling — “It flies like a cement truck without power steering” — also instilled some ambivalence … even if Wyatt, who flies passenger jets for a living, spoke with the laconic humor of a guy who knows exactly what he’s doing. It was also slightly disconcerting to be sharing the flight with several local TV journalists, who are never far from disaster scenes. We’d all come to the Allegheny County Airport to ride the “Memphis Belle,” a restored bomber flown around the country by the Liberty Foundation. Now, up in the air, one TV intern was all but unable to extract herself from the canvas seat. But this was a Flying Fortress, a heavy bomber whose durability was legendary. “If you give her any chance at all, she’ll bring you home,” we’d been told before the flight by George Cahill, who’d

Yet I also felt a bit of sorrow up in the gray-clad sky. Down below was the Edgar Thomson Works, almost the last remnant of an industrial district that once sprawled all along the river. When B-17s crowded the skies of Europe, the mills of Homestead and Duquesne and McKeesport produced enough military tonnage to earn the nickname “Victory Valley.” The Homestead Works is now a mall; the nearby Carrie Furnaces are now a life-size museum display. A similar fate is in store for the B-17 bomber. There will come a day, Wyatt told me, when no B-17 will be able to leave the ground — for lack of parts, perhaps, or because they stopped making the 100-octane aviation fuel a B-17 consumes at 200 gallons an hour. Already, an aircraft that once braved clouds of flak and swarms of Messerschmitts must today give wide berth to rain showers. Our memories too have been consigned to a warehouse, and maybe the strongest lesson you learn from flying a B-17 is simply how unimaginable fighting in it would be. Perhaps we’d prefer not to imagine it. “Six miles from earth, loosed from its dream of life /

“IF YOU GIVE HER ANY CHANCE AT ALL, SHE’LL BRING YOU HOME.” sat in the bombardier’s chair himself on 28 missions between 1944 and early 1945. The Mount Lebanon resident had, in fact, once been on a mission where three out of his B-17’s four engines had been knocked out — with the fourth dying just as the aircraft settled on the runway. The Memphis Belle itself was commissioned too late to be in combat, though it was used in a 1990 film about a famed World War II bomber with the same name. Even so, from the ground, it was hard to see how it stayed aloft at all: At 75 feet long and with a wingspan of more than 100 feet, it travels at about 130 miles an hour — slow enough that it almost seems to be hanging in the air. Inside the aircraft, though, you feel the speed much more than in a commercial jet traveling several times faster. You are pummeled by wind from the doors once used by the waist gunners. You are surrounded by the clatter and roar of engines, the tang of engine exhaust. You can stick your head out the overhead window once used by the dorsal gunner, and appreciate the altitude much more than you would at 30,000 feet, where the earth below is just an abstraction.

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I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters,” is how poet Randall Jarrell described the perspective of a ball-turret gunner, who sat slung beneath the B-17’s belly. “When I died,” his poem concludes, “they washed me out of the turret with a hose.” Thanks to the conveniences of modern life, it’s easy to distance ourselves from wars even while they are still going on; Increasingly, we fight our air campaigns the same way we do everything else: alone in a room somewhere, sitting before a TV screen. But the B-17 reminds us of the time that wasn’t an option, a time when the 10 men crammed inside its narrow confines were joined in life and death, even if they had to use radios to hear each other over the wind. Flights on the Memphis Belle are available to the public July 2728; you can find details at www.libertyfoundation.org and book a reservation at 918-340-0243. It isn’t cheap: A 25-minute flight will run you $450. But someday you won’t be able to do it for any price. And there was a time when flying a B-17 could cost you much, much more.

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CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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July 24, 2013