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March . April 2010 / Vol 1 / Issue 1

A G U I D E T O R O O F I N G , I N S U L AT I O N A N D S I D I N G I N T H E C A R O L I N A S

BACK IN BUSINESS: ROOFS PROTECT THE CAROLINAS’ ECONOMY

high-performance roofing:

SENSIBLE SOLAR news in the carolinas:

CRSMCA MID-WINTER EXPO RECAP member minute:

DAN POPE T H E O F F I C I A L M A G A Z I N E O F T H E C A R O L I N A S R O O F I N G A N D S H E E T M E TA L C O N T R A C T O R S A S S O C I AT I O N

CARLISLE’S

RG ROOFGARDEN

A

vailable in shallow, medium and deep assemblies, Carlisle SynTec’s Roof Garden Systems are easily installed over our time-tested EPDM and TPO membranes. Roof Garden Systems from Carlisle help improve air quality and aid in storm water management. Through constant innovation, Carlisle offers not only the most dependable roofing products, but also the most environmentally friendly. For more information, contact your local Carlisle representative.

Investing in Roofing Solutions for Over 45 Years 800-4-SYNTEC • P.O. Box 7000 • Carlisle, PA 17013 • Fax: 717-245-7053 • www.carlisle-syntec.com Carlisle is a registered trademark of Carlisle. © 2010 Carlisle.

The The Coolest Coolest Roofing Roofing Products Products Under Under The The Sun. Sun. We are proud to introduce several new products that help manage the effects of light and heat on a roofing system, ™ We are proud introduce several new help manage the effects of light heat membrane, on a roofingthe system, TPO cooland roofing new thereby saving to energy and keeping thingsproducts cool. In that addition to our UltraPly ™ ™ ™ ™ TPO™ cool membrane, the new thereby saving energy and keeping things cool. In addition to our UltraPly EPDMroofing increase roof reflectivity, and UltraWhite Modified Bitumen Capsheet and new RubberGard EcoWhite Platinum ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ Modified Bitumen Capsheet RubberGard EcoWhite Platinum EPDM increasedome roof reflectivity, and UltraWhite Daylighting Systems allowand fornew greater light transmission when compared to standard skylights. The new SunWave allow isfor greater light savings transmission when new SunWave™ Daylighting Systems end result a tremendous in energy andcompared resources.to standard dome skylights. The end result is a tremendous savings in energy and resources. For information on these products or any of Firestone’s complete line of environmentally conscious solutions, visit us at IRE booth #2039! For information on these products or any of Firestone’s complete line of environmentally conscious solutions, visit us at IRE booth #2039!

inside CAROLINAS ROOFING

MARCH I APRIL

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Features 24  BUSINESS SENSE

How you communicate and how you are heard can impact every individual you work with and individuals you hadn’t considered.

27 SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS PROJECTS Innovative roofing projects in the Carolinas protect the region’s and nation’s economy.

34 SAFETY MATTERS

37 HIGH-PERFORMANCE ROOFING

Understanding photovoltaic basics will ensure you are well positioned as more clients request rooftop solar arrays for their projects.

41 TECHNICAL POINT

Discover the necessary steps that should precede design of low-slope cool roof systems in the Carolinas.

The Metal Construction Association provides an excerpt from its Single or Dual Level Roll Former Operation and Maintenance Manual.

Carolinas

Roofing Vol. 1 No. 1, is published bimonthly by HRT Publishing LLC, 4711 Hope Valley Road, Box 202, Durham, NC 27707. Telephone (919) 593-5318. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Carolinas Roofing, 4711 Hope Valley Road, Box 202, Durham, NC 27707.

Carolinas Roofing is published six times per year: January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October and November/December. The magazine is written for the building professional concerned with the design, specification and application of roofing. Issues with bonus distribution at national, regional, state and local roofing and construction conventions and trade shows occur regularly throughout the year.

The Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association Mission Statement: To promote and safeguard the common business interest of its members and to improve conditions by educating all persons concerning the roofing and sheet metal business and industry. To work for the development and progress of the roofing and sheet metal business industry and to work with individuals, organizations and governmental agencies toward the achievement of a stronger profession of the roofing and sheet metal industry.

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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inside CAROLINA'S ROOFING

MARCH I APRIL

Carolinas Roofing unravels, investigates and analyzes how to properly design, install and maintain a roof system in the Carolinas and beyond.

2010  VOLUME 1 NO. 1

D E PA R T M E N T S

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  ON THE COVER

 Marriott Surfwatch Condominiums, Hilton Head Island, S.C. PHOTO PROVIDED BY PETERSEN ALUMINUM CORP.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE ASSOCIATE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE CRSMCA MAGAZINE COMMITTEE CHAIR RAISE THE ROOF NEW & NOTABLE

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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NEWS IN THE CAROLINAS EVENTS TOOL REVIEW MATERIALS & GADGETS AD DIRECTORY MEMBER MINUTE

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HILTON HEAD MARRIOTT RESORT AND SPA, Hilton Head Island, S.C. / The Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association will hold its ANNUAL MEETING AND SUMMER CONVENTION June 24-27.

Sentrigard™ Metal Roofing Systems allow you to approach each job with a greater range of profiles combined with the advantages of on-site fabrication.

Better product. Better process. Better results.

Our system features Sentriclad™ Architectural Metals in an exceptional range of colors and finishes to satisfy the demands and preferences of an increasingly sophisticated market. We offer a proven record of performance, technical support and on-time delivery that spans more than a century.

an N.B. Handy Company

To learn more visit us online or call today. www.sentrigard.com 877-495-7663

Innovation in contractor-manufactured metal roofing systems.

Carolinas

president s message

Roofing March . April 2010 / Vol 1 / Issue 1

MAGAZINE STAFF PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF SALES

GREY PARDUE   B.E.S.T. Inc.   CRSMCA 2009-10 President

BARRETT HAHN barrett@carolinasroofingmag.com CHRISTINA KOCH christina@carolinasroofingmag.com BARRETT HAHN PETER LEVITON peter@carolinasroofingmag.com

CRSMSCA STAFF

I would like to express my appreciation to all associates, exhibitors and especially to Gayle Love, Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association’s executive director, and Carla Blanton, CRSMCA manager of membership/communications, for putting together such an outstanding Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo in January. The new location at the Marriott Raleigh City Center, Raleigh, N.C., definitely created buzz. That just goes to show how upbeat and exciting things can become when there is something new thrown into the mix. The same thing can happen with the association, in general. We want people to get involved and stir things up. The Carolinas Contacts magazine is a perfect example. As you can see, we are trying something new by updating the old formula. So far, the new version of the magazine, Carolinas Roofing, looks fantastic! You may not recognize our association magazine at first, but I assure you it contains all the information you’re used to from Carolinas Contacts. Once again, the association office is on top of things for us. The spring district meeting schedules are out, so mark your calendars. (See the dates on page 19.) CERTA Train the Trainer Reauthorization and For Foreman Only training sessions are available. Visit the CRSMCA Web site, www.crsmca.org, for registration information. The way the weather has been, there should be plenty of opportunity to review your safety and training procedures. Several contractors received their Safety STAR award from the association at the expo. (See page 18.) This status confirms your business is in compliance with most of the U.S. Department of Labor requirements for safety training and record keeping. If you have any doubts about your current policies being sufficient, you should contact the association office or a CRSMCA Safety STAR committee member to enroll as a Working STAR. In closing, I wish the best to all our members, associates and contractors alike. There have been many changes in the roofing industry recently, and rumors about the state of the industry continue to circulate. At least we are starting to see some variation in the outlook instead of all agreeing on the negative. Please don't let the desperation of the times force you to compromise the standards that CRSMCA is trying to promote.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MANAGER OF MEMBERSHIP/ COMMUNICATIONS

GAYLE LOVE gruss@crsmca.org CARLA BLANTON cblanton@crsmca.org

CRSMCA MAGAZINE COMMIT T E E CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE

DAN BUCKLE CRS of Monroe Inc., Monroe, N.C. MARK CAMERON Henry Co., Fort Mill, S.C. MELVIN LAMBE CRS of Monroe BILL LANEY Murr-Laney Inc., Pineville, N.C. FERNANDO OSTREA ABC Supply Co. Inc., Charlotte, N.C. MIKE TENOEVER CSC Sheet Metal, Durham, N.C.

CRSMCA OFFICERS

GREY PARDUE B.E.S.T. Inc., Raleigh, N.C. BEN GRIFFITH 1ST VICE PRESIDENT Spann Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Inc., Conway, S.C. P. SCOTT BAXTER 2ND VICE PRESIDENT CRS of Monroe Inc., Monroe, N.C. SECRETARY/TREASURER RICK O’CONNOR Watts & Associates Roofing Inc., Columbia, S.C. JIM PICKENS IMMEDIATE PAST Pickens Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc., TREASURER Spartanburg, S.C. PERRY SAFRAN GENERAL COUNSEL Safran Law Offices, Raleigh PRESIDENT

CRSMCA ASSOCIATE GROUP OFFICERS PRESIDENT 1ST VICE PRESIDENT 2ND VICE PRESIDENT SECRETARY-TREASURER PAST PRESIDENT

FARLEY SMITH Atlantic Roofing Distributors, Charleston, S.C. HENRY SACKETT N.B. Handy Co., Greensboro, S.C. ED BENSON Johns Manville, Charlotte, N.C. TERRY SILFER Premier Building Products Inc., Charlotte HANK BONNEY Bradco Supply Corp., Charlotte

Carolinas Roofing welcomes letters to the editor.

Letters must be signed and include a return address/ e-mail and telephone number. Carolinas Roofing reserves the right to edit letters for clarity and length. Send letters to christina@carolinasroofingmag.com. Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association Inc. P.O. Box 7643 / Charlotte, NC 28241-7643 Telephone: (704) 556-1228 / Fax: (704) 557-1736 / www.crsmca.org

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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associate  group president s   message FARLEY SMITH   Atlantic Roofing Distributors   CRSMCA

Greetings to all! I would like to thank everyone who attended the 2010 Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo in Raleigh, N.C. I am happy to say we had a strong associate group turn out. Booth sales were up compared with the previous year with 12 new exhibitors. In addition, 298 associates were in attendance. Everyone I spoke with enjoyed the location and asked that we bring the event back to Raleigh as soon as possible. I would like to personally thank all the sponsors of this year’s show. The sponsors play a vital role in helping to minimize the cost

2009-10 Associate Group President

of this annual event. The next time you run into an individual from one of the companies listed on page 16, please thank them for their support. For this association to continue to thrive, we must increase our membership. I am proud to announce that we gained 10 new associate group members in 2009 and, since the show, we have two more members. CRSMCA has a strong history and is clearly well respected within the roofing community. Please help me in welcoming the following companies to our association. Adco Products  Ahern Rentals  APOC  Decra Roofing Systems     Duradek Mid-Atlantic Inc.      Duro-Last Roofing Inc.    Easy Crane LLC  Fiberweb    GenFlex Roofing Systems

  Lifting Equipment Solutions    Pro-Active

Sales and Marketing Inc.   Riverbend Nursery Please mark your calendars for this year’s Annual Meeting and Summer Convention being held at the Marriot Resort and Spa, Hilton Head, S.C., June 24 - 27. More information about the convention is available on page 20. I hope all our members and their families will attend this fun-filled event. In conclusion, I would like to thank all our Associate Group members for their support. I also would like to congratulate Kris Locke with B&L Distributing on his nomination and election to the CRSMCA Associate Group Board of Directors. Kris is an active member of this association and will do a fantastic job serving as 2010-11 secretary/treasurer.

OneName.

Reeves.

Many Tools.

Powerful, dependable, user friendly.

Reeves.

All You Need. P.O. Box 720 Helotes, Texas 78023 800-383-3063 www.reevesequipment.com

Distrib uted b y: Distributed by: Roofing Tools & Eqpt. 800-682-6906 mrcaad.p65 10 C A R O L I N A S R O O F I N G I M A R C H . 1A P R I L 2 0 1 0

3/20/03, 11:58 AM

crsmca magazine

committee chair DAN BUCKLE   CRS of Monroe Inc.

The magazine you’re holding in your hands marks a sea change in the Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association’s publishing endeavors. I’m sure you noticed the exceptional art and editorial, the new layout, professional photography, feel of the pages and overall tone of quality throughout this edition. CRSMCA and HRT Publishing have entered into a preliminary contract for producing Carolinas Roofing, The Official Magazine of the Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association. We expect this partnership to be mutually beneficial now and in the years to come.

Our goal is to increase the quality and distribution of the magazine, raise the bar of profes-

sionalism, expand awareness of CRSMCA and create opportunities for our members through publicity about our generational commitment to excellence in the roofing industry.

HRT Publishing, under the direction of Barrett Hahn, publisher, and Christina Koch, editor

in chief, will be responsible for production of the magazine. Hahn and Koch have years of experience producing well-known construction trade magazines. The magazine committee is looking forward to their expert contributions to our efforts.

That said, the association will retain final editorial rights and direct the content presented

with continued emphasis on our membership and region. HRT Publishing personnel will attend magazine committee meetings and coordinate with committee members. HRT Publishing will be in charge of obtaining photography, reporting, editing, production and circulation. This will eliminate CRSMCA’s publishing costs while allowing the association to enhance its reputation within the roofing community. Beginning with this edition, the circulation will expand to architects, roofing consultants and general contractors. This increase will undoubtedly result in greater interest in our association and interaction with those involved in designing, overseeing and hiring for roofing projects.

As committee chair, I am excited about the possibilities Carolinas Roofing will bring to our

association. I am anxious to hear your ideas for articles for the new magazine. Please also send in comments, complaints, suggestions and observations about the change. This is our opportunity to create a sounding board for CRSMCA and move us into a new era of group communication. Send letters to the editor to christina@carolinasroofingmag.com.

I’d like to personally thank Carla Blanton, CRSMCA manager of membership/communica-

tions, who makes my job much easier. Her contributions to the magazine are only part of the many tasks she oversees to keep the association running for us. I’d also like to thank Riana Smith of Safran Law Offices for her sage advice, as usual. CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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raise

the roof CHRISTINA KOCH   Editor in Chief

A wise person told me a long time ago that once you get involved with roofing, you never leave. Turns out, he was right. This year marks a decade that I have written for, edited and thoroughly enjoyed publications that focused on all types of roofing. And who wouldn’t enjoy working on roofing publications? If you had asked me that question 10 years ago, I might not have answered as passionately as I do today. However, during my career, I’ve learned how complex and interesting roofing can be. Roofs can be effective with the simplest of materials as long as they are properly constructed and meet the needs of the geographic location. In today’s world, a roof isn’t just about keeping the elements out of a building. Roofs have been recognized as under-utilized space and often host HVAC equipment, cellular antennae, solar modules and vegetation. They even serve as recreational space for building owners and tenants. Because of these diverse uses, there is much more to think about in terms of roofing materials, codes and green-building guidelines, climatic conditions and owner’s requirements. For example, in this issue Thomas Hutchinson, principal of Hutchinson Design Group, explains how taking shortcuts when designing low-slope, cool roof systems for ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through

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7 can result in condensation, interior moisture penetration, mold and loss of thermal value. (The Carolinas are within these climate zones.) Learn the steps you should take when designing these roof systems in “Technical Point,” page 41. Solar modules are another hot topic for today’s roof designers and installers. Scott Kriner, president of Green Metal Consulting, breaks down the basics of the two primary types of solar cells— crystalline and thin film—within siliconbased photovoltaic systems in “High-performance Roofing,” page 37. Each issue of Carolinas Roofing will feature what I call “news you can use,” including safety information—this issue focuses on portable roll formers, “Safety Matters,” page 34; new products you should consider specifying and using, “Materials and Gadgets,” page 50; and much more. And, of course, there always will be plenty of innovative roofing project examples from the Carolinas. Check out the business buildings on page 27. Although roofing is not new to me, specifically focusing on the Carolinas is. Therefore, I look forward to the guidance of the Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association, as well as your input. What would you like to see in this publication? Please share your comments and feedback about this issue and future ones. It’s only with your input that Carolinas Roofing can be a successful publication. I look forward to “raising the roof” in the Carolinas!

FIND US ON:

@carolinasroofng

New

notable &

EAGLEVIEW TECHNOLOGIES ANNOUNCES TEXT ALERTS Bothell, Wash.-based EAGLEVIEW TECHNOLOGIES, a remote aerial roof-measurement-reporting company, now provides free text alerts on your mobile device (carrier charges may apply). The alerts may contain information about order-delivery status and basic report details, such as total roof area, pitch values, eave, rake, etc. EagleView Technologies’ patent-pending system uses satellite and aerial images to provide roof measurements from a single address inputted on its Web site, www.eagleview.com. From this technology, customized reports are generated, including complete measurements, accurate calculations and property information used by insurance companies, insurance adjusters and roofing contractors to quickly provide estimates and insurance-claim submittals. Sign up for text alerts at www.eagleview.com/features.aspx.

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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Don’t let anyone tell you it doesn’t hurt! Every hole you put in your standing seam metal roof voids your manufacturer’s warranty and risks leaks.

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Attach almost anything to standing seam roofing without piercing the panel.

To learn more about the entire S-5!® line of attachment solutions visit us at www.S-5-Clamps.com/cr or call us at 888-825-3432

METAL-ERA INC., Waukesha, Wis., has released the Metal-Era Widget, which bundles the company’s online calculators into a quick-access, offline version. The

M E T A L D E C K S U P P L Y. C O M YO U R O N E - S TO P M E TA L D E C K S H O P !

widget includes the following calculators: • Wind Calculator: Determine the ANSI/SPRI ES-1 design pressure needed to be compliant with the International Building Code. • Net Free Area Calculator: Find the NFA for a project and the necessary vent width for Metal-Era ridge vents or vented

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• Ventilated Roof System Calculator:

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

Learn how key variables interact and impact commercial ventilation and use the graphed results to determine the ideal airspace relative to a project's ventilation needs. In addition, the widget includes printable reports of the calculation results. The Metal-Era Widget is available for free download at www.metalera.com.

W.R. GRACE SETS ENERGY-REDUCTION GOALS W.R. GRACE & CO. has targeted reducing the energy intensity of its operations by 20 percent per pound of production by 2017 as part of its overall sustainability goals. The company will use 2007 as the base year against which it will measure progress. In that year, it produced nearly 2 million tons of products and had carbon-dioxide-equivalent emissions (a common measurement that converts all emissions into the equivalent of CO2 based on their greenhouse-gas intensity) of 1.1 million tons. To achieve its goal, W.R. Grace needs to have emissions at or below 2007 levels in 2017 while meeting business-growth strategies. "This new component of our sustainability strategy makes good business sense,” says Fred Festa, W.R. Grace's chairman, president and chief executive officer. “As a company, we are constantly striving to be as productive as possible. Improved productivity helps keep our cost structure competitive while delivering improved products to our customers to help them enhance their competitiveness. Clearly, this is a stretch goal, but I am convinced the drive to achieve it will make us more innovative, more efficient and enhance our stewardship of the environment." For more information, visit W.R. Grace's Web site, www.grace.com.

News watch

1 New York-based McGraw-Hill Construction reported construction starts in February dropped 8 percent from the previous month. Nonresidential building continued its downward slide, and public works slipped back after rebounding in January. Meanwhile, residential building in February showed some improvement after a very weak January. .

2 Nine proposed addenda are available for public review regarding ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007, “Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.” Addendum f sets requirements for high-albedo roofs. To read the addenda or comment, visit www.ashrae.org/publicreviews.

3 Standard 189.1, “Standard for the Design of High-Performance, Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings,” has been published by the Atlanta-based American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The standard intends to set the foundation for green buildings through its adoption into local codes. For complete information about the standard, including a readable copy, visit www.ashrae.org/greenstandard.

4 A new Web site, www.chemicalrecyclingsolutions. com, allows industry and manufacturers to recycle unused, discarded chemicals and save money with disposal and purchasing costs. The assortment of surplus chemicals a company can post is almost limitless. Arrangements, pricing and transportation are strictly negotiated between the two parties, and no fee is paid to the Web host.

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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news in the carolinas

I

ASSOCIATION IN ACTION G AY L E L O V E    CRSMCA Executive Director

hope you were able to make it to the 2010 Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo held in Raleigh, N.C. Our General Session opened with Perry Safran, CRSMCA’s general counsel, and Steve Smith from law firm Smith, Parsons & Vickstrom PLLC. They discussed the importance of project documentation to minimize your risks. Copies of the presentation are available with sample letters for extension of time for delays and confirming change directives, etc. I would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors. We could not have had the caliber of trade show and educational sessions without their support.

 ABC Supply Co. Inc., Platinum Sponsor  ATAS International Inc., Goodwill Sponsor  Bradco Supply Corp., Wednesday Lunch and

Audio/Visual Sponsor  Carlisle SynTec, Goodwill Sponsor  CityScape Roofing Inc., Goodwill Sponsor  Davis-Garvin Agency Inc., Lanyards Sponsor  Fabral, Goodwill Sponsor  Fleetmatics, Wednesday Reception Sponsor  GAF Materials Corp., Silver Sponsor  Greenville Contractors Inc., Bronze and Goodwill Sponsor

 Henry Co., Opening Reception Sponsor  Hunter Panels, Wednesday Reception Sponsor  Johns Manville, Gold Sponsor  N.B. Handy Co., Opening Reception Sponsor  Petersen Aluminum Corp., Bronze Sponsor  Quest Construction Products/Hydro-Stop,

Goodwill Sponsor  Spann Roofing & Sheet Metal, Wednesday Lunch Sponsor  TAMKO Roofing Products, Wednesday Lunch Sponsor  Triad Roofing Co. Inc., Goodwill Sponsor  Watts Roofing & Associates, Goodwill Sponsor

Mark your calendars for the 2011 Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo in Winston-Salem, N.C., Jan. 18-20. On behalf of all of CRSMCA, we hope to see you there.

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

WRAP UP

2010 CAROLINAS MID-WINTER ROOFING EXPO The Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association Inc. has held more than 50 Mid-Winter Roofing Expos in various Carolina locations since the organization was founded in 1943. The 2010 Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo had excitement in the air because of a new venue with new surroundings. The Raleigh Convention Center allowed ample space for the vendors to set up and visitors to browse the trade-show floor. More than 500 people from across the U.S. attended. Opening entertainment included joint efforts by a local church choir and Shaw University’s choir. Attendees had a variety of events to participate in on the trade-show floor, including the inaugural CSC Sheet Metal Corn Hole Tournament; exhibitor presentations on the center stage; and a special appearance from Vitor Meira, the ABC Supply-sponsored AJ Foyt Racing Team Indy Car driver.

Among the notable speakers during the expo was Michael Walden, consumer economist with North Carolina State University, Raleigh. Walden explained that even though we have begun to climb out of the “mineshaft,” we still have a lot of climbing to do before we get back to where we started our decline. For example, in 2009, North Carolina lost 250,000 jobs and has since recovered only 40,000 jobs, meaning

there still is a deficit of 210,000 jobs. At that rate, Walden noted, we are looking at a recovery of six to eight years to return to where the regression began. Another notable speaker was Jim Kirby, AIA, associate executive director of Technical Communications for the National Roofing Contractors Association. Kirby noted that vegetated roofing and photovoltaics may seem to be in direct conflict with our core roofing values of keeping the roof surface clear and watertight. However, these systems are a commodity that we can use to up-sell our jobs. Kirby also discussed preparing addenda to contracts limiting or excluding the cost and responsibility of removal of vegetated medium or PV equipment for maintenance or repair work. CRSMCA hopes you had the chance to attend and visit with your fellow friends in the roofing industry.

By Wanda Hilton, Kanoy Construction Inc., Thomasville, N.C.; Carla Blanton, CRSMCA manager of membership/communications; and Dan Buckle, CRS of Monroe Inc.

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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news in the carolinas

Safety Leaders are Recognized During the 2010 Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo, CRSMCA recognized roofing contracting companies for excellence in safety.

NOMINATIONS OPEN FOR SERVICE AWARD Eddie Lloyd Jr., the 2010 Distinguished Service Award Committee Chair, is requesting nominations for the 2010 Gordon M. Waters Distinguished Service Award recipient.

The following companies achieved Safety STAR Contractor status for the year 2009: 

The following companies are participating in the CRSMCA Safety STAR Program to become a CRSMCA Working STAR Contractor:

ALLIED ROOFING CO. INC.

B.E.S.T. INC.

New Bern, N.C.

Kernersville, N.C. 

Raleigh, N.C.

Nominees must meet the following criteria.

BAKER ROOFING CO.

Please provide a brief description about why your nominee deserves this award and fax your submission to CRSMCA at (704) 557-1736 or mail it to P.O. Box 7643, Charlotte, NC 28241.

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

BAKER ROOFING CO.

COASTAL COMMERCIAL ROOFING CO. INC. Conway, S.C.

CURTIS CONSTRUCTION CO. INC. Kinston, N.C.

TRIAD ROOFING CO. INC.

GASTONIA SHEET METAL WORKS INC. Gastonia, N.C.

Greensboro, N.C. 

CITYSCAPE ROOFING INC. Claremont, N.C.

Raleigh

• Good business model • Community leader • Good moral character • Proven service and leadership to the association • Proven service to the industry • CRSMCA board service • Respect of the membership • Responds positively when asked to serve • Passion for the association • Long-standing member • Mentor • Should be living

R.E. BENGEL SHEET METAL CO. INC.

HAMLIN ROOFING CO. INC. Garner, N.C.

SERVICE ONE INC. Fletcher, N.C.

TRIANGLE ROOFING SERVICES INC. Zebulon, N.C.

WAYNE ROOFING & SHEET METAL CO. INC. Goldsboro, N.C.

Winston-Salem, N.C.

To learn more about the CRSMCA safety program, visit www.crsmca.org or call the association at (704) 556-1228.

Most Valuable Employees for the Carolinas are Named During the 2010 Carolinas Mid-Winter Roofing Expo in January, CRSMCA named FEDERICO ARIAS CASTILLO, foreman for Coastal Commercial Roofing Co. Inc., Conway, S.C., Most Valuable Employee for South Carolina and MIKE HARDIN, senior service technician with The Ray Co. Inc., Charlotte, N.C., Most Valuable Employee for North Carolina. Castillo has been employed by CCR for about five years, during which his seven-man crew has tackled the toughest and most demanding projects. Castillo has a strong safety commitment; his crew has had no OSHA Mike Hardin (left) and Federico Arias Castillo violations or lost time for accidents in three years. Recently, Castillo and his crew finished a large school project on time and within budget. Consequently, the roofing consultant commended Castillo, explaining the roof was one of the best projects he had completed within the school district. CCR notes there are numerous projects during which this type of professionalism and quality has been displayed by Castillo. Castillo lives in Conway with his wife, Delia, and his children, Brenda and Gabriel. Hardin has held several positions, including roofing worker, supervisor, mechanic, truck driver and service technician, during his 40-year career. At The Ray Co. he has provided on-the-job training to new and existing employees; those who adhere to his direction often become roofing foremen. Hardin quickly rose to senior service technician because of his customerservice skills, ability to locate and repair leaks, and capability of working with all types of roof systems. As a testimony to the great service he provides, Hardin often is the only one requested from The Ray Co. to repair leaks on certain buildings or for certain customers. Hardin is active in his community where he has been a resident for more than 40 years.

spring

DISTRICT MEETINGS

CRSMCA’s District Meetings are held in the spring and fall throughout North and South Carolina. Members and non-members are invited to a presentation about the latest topics in the roofing industry. The meetings include lunch or dinner and sometimes feature a round of golf. Visit www.crsmca.org for registration information.

  Already

Held District 1

  April

22 District 6

  Already

Held District 2

  April

29 Districts 7 & 8

  April

1 District 3

  May

13 District 9

  April

8 District 4

  May

20 District 10

  April

15 District 5

DATES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

19

CRSMCA 67th Annual

MEETING AND SUMMER CONVENTION JUNE 24-27, 2010

THE TENTATIVE AGENDA IS AS FOLLOWS: THURSDAY, JUNE 24 10:30 a.m. – noon Associate Group Board and Liaison Meeting Noon – 6 p.m. Registration Desk open 12:30 – 3 p.m. Executive Committee Meeting 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. Board of Directors Meeting 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Welcome Reception/Prize Giveaways/ Special Children’s Area

SATURDAY, JUNE 26 9 – 11 a.m. Registration Desk open 9 – 10:45 a.m. Keynote Speaker 10:50 – 11:20 a.m. Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors-Self-Insurers Fund Update 11:25 a.m. – noon Closing General Session 1 p.m. Tennis Tournament Motorcycle Ride 6:30 – 11 p.m. Children’s Entertainment 6:45 – 7:30 p.m. Evening Reception 7:30 – 9 p.m. Dinner • Golf and Tennis Awards • Passing of Gavel/Installation of New Officers/Gordon M. Waters Award • Special Entertainment by Three on a String

FRIDAY, JUNE 25 8 – 8:30 a.m. Associate Group Meeting 8:30 – 11 a.m. Registration Desk open 8:45 – 11 a.m. Opening General Session/NRCA Update/Speaker Noon Golf Tournament 6 – 7:30 p.m. Evening Reception

RESERVATIONS AT THE HILTON HEAD RESORT AND SPA MUST BE MADE BY FRIDAY, MAY 21, TO RECEIVE THE GROUP RATE. • Island view: $199 per night • Ocean view: $219 per night • Ocean front: $229 per night

The Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association will hold its annual meeting and summer convention June 24-27 at the Hilton Head Marriott Resort and Spa, Hilton Head Island, S.C. The event offers existing, new and prospective members the opportunity for education, networking and socializing in a beautiful setting.

Call (800) 228-9290 and mention the group code, CRSCRSA, or visit www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/ hhhgr-hilton-head-marriott-resort-and-spa. The hotel features Spa Soleil, which offers facials, hand and foot care, massage and body treatments. Contact Carla Blanton, CRSMCA manager of membership/communications, by May 21 to learn about pricing and reserve your appointment. She can be reached at cblanton@crsmca.org or (704) 556-1228. PHOTOS COURTESY OF HILTON HEAD ISLAND VISITOR AND CONVENTION BUREAU

20

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

67th Annual th

67 Annual Meeting & Summer Convention MEETING AND SUMMER CONVENTION June 24 – 27, 2010 JUNE 24-27, 2010

Hilton Head Marriott Resort & Spa    One Hotel    Circle, Hilton Head Island, S.C. (843) 080-8400 One Hotel Circle, Hilton Head Island, SC ~ (843) 686-8400 Hilton Head Marriott Resort & Spa

CRSMCA would like to thank you for your consideration in purchasing a sponsorship. All sponsorship purchases are applied to the advancement of education to the CRSMCA membership.

The following sponsorships are available for purchase:  $5,000 PROFESSIONAL SPONSOR ONE complimentary couple registration; ONE complimentary golf registration; signage at the convention; listing in the Carolinas Contacts, Annual Program, Banquet Program and CRSMCA website CRSMC Self-Insurers Fund

$3,000 DIAMOND

$1,500 GOLD

(One complimentary couple registration; signage at the convention; listing in the Carolinas Contacts, Annual Program, Banquet Program and CRSMCA website)

(Signage at the convention; listing in the Carolinas Contacts, Annual Program, Banquet Program and CRSMCA website)

 Annual Meeting T-Shirts

 Keynote Speaker  Hospitality Golf Cart

$2,000 PLATINUM

$1,000 SILVER

(One complimentary golf guest; signage at the convention; listing in the Carolinas Contacts, Annual Program, Banquet Program and CRSMCA website)

(Listing in the Carolinas Contacts, Annual Program and Banquet Program)

   

 Thursday Reception  Friday Reception  Saturday Dinner 

$ 500 BRONZE

Thursday Entertainment Saturday Entertainment Audio Visuals Children’s Activities

 $150 GOODWILL

(Listing in the Annual Program and Banquet Program)

$150 - Golf Sponsors    

   

Driving Range Practice Green Hole 1 Hole 2

Hole 3 Hole 4 Hole 5 Hole 6

   

Hole 7 Hole 8 Hole 9 Hole 10

   

Hole 11 Hole 12 Hole 13 Hole 14

   

Hole 15 Hole 16 Hole 17 Hole 18

Method of Payment: Amount Enclosed or to charge $________  American Express

 Bill Me

 MasterCard

 Check Enclosed Visa

Company Name: ____________________________________________________ Name (as it appears on the card): _______________________________________ Acct. No.___________________________________ Exp. Date _______________ Signature____________________________________ Date _________________

Please send the form with payment information to the following address or fax number. Thank you for supporting your Association by th sponsoring an event at the 67 Annual Meeting & Summer Convention. Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association, Inc. P O Box 7643 ♦ Charlotte, NC 28241-7643 704.556.1228 ♦ Fax: 704.557.1736 **Please return by May 14, 2010 to be listed in the Annual Meeting & Summer Convention Program**

**PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR COMPANY LOGO VIA EMAIL TO CBLANTON@CRSMCA.ORG TO BE PRESENTED DURING GENERAL SESSIONS

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

21

REGISTRATION FORM REGISTRATION
FEES:
 


MEETING AND SUMMER CONVENTION JUNE 24-27, 2010 Hilton Head Marriott Resort & Spa / One Hotel Circle, Hilton Head Island, S.C. / (843) 080-8400

CRSMCA
Member
(per
couple)


REGISTRATION
FEES:


67th Annual









Non‐Member
(per
couple)
 
 
 CRSMCA
Member
(per
couple)
 





 
 
 Children
ages
3
–
12
 
 
 Non‐Member
(per
couple)
 
 
 
 
 Children
ages
3
–
12
 
 
 PLEASE
SELECT
YOUR
EVENT(S):
 
 



 
 



 



 


$495



$595
 $495

 FREE
 $595
































FREE


Friday,
June
25,
2010:
 Golf
Tournament
at
Palmetto
Dunes
 PLEASE
SELECT
YOUR
EVENT(S):
 
 Tee‐Off
times
begin
at
12:30
p.m.
 Friday,
June
25,
2010:
 □
 Golf
Tournament
Golf
Tournament
at
Palmetto
Dunes
 
 with
registration
 
 $
120
 Tee‐Off
times
begin
at
12:30
p.m. 
 □
 Golf
Tournament
ONLY
 without
registration
 $
200 


□
 Golf
Tournament
 
 with
registration
 
 $
120
 □
_______________________________________________________
 Golf
Tournament
ONLY
 without
registration
 $
200 
 



 


Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 _______________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 _______________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 _______________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 _______________________________________________________
 Saturday,
June
26,
2010 :
 Tennis
Tournament
at
Palmetto
Dunes
 Name
 
 
 
 
 
 Handicap
 



 Time:
1:30
p.m.
–
4:30
p.m.


Saturday,
June
26,
2010 :
 Tennis
Tournament
at
Palmetto
Dunes
 □
 Tennis
Tournament
 






(S)
$35
Single

 (C)
$50
Couple




 Time:
1:30
p.m.
–
4:30
p.m.
 
 



 
 □
__________________________________________



 Tennis
Tournament







(S)
$35
Single

 (C)
$50
Couple

 Circle
One



S


C
 
 


Name __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 Name Name __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 Name Name __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 Name Name __________________________________________



Circle
One



S


C
 Saturday,
June
26,
2010
 Riding
Roofers
Run
‐
Motorcycle
Ride
 Name 
 





Time:

12:30
p.m.
–
p.m.


□
Yes,
I
wish
to
participate

FREE
OF
CHARGE



 ______________________________________________________
 
 COMPANY
NAME
 
 ______________________________________________________
 ______________________________________________________
 COMPANY
NAME
 
 ADDRESS
 
 
 
 CITY
 STATE
 
 ______________________________________________________
 ______________________________________________________
 ADDRESS
 
 
 
 CITY
 STATE
 
 PHONE
 
 
 
 EMAIL
 
 ______________________________________________________
 List
first
and
last
names,
as
they
should
appear
on
the
name
badge.
 PHONE
 
 
 
 EMAIL
 
 Please
check
the
box
if
you
are
a
first
time
attendee.
(First
time
attendees
 List
first
and
last
names,
as
they
should
appear
on
the
name
badge.
 receive
a
$25
DISCOUNT!)
 
 (First
time
attendees
 Please
check
the
box
if
you
are
a
first
time
attendee.
 COUPLE
1
 receive
a
$25
DISCOUNT!) 
 
 


COUPLE
1
 □ ____________________________________________________
 
 





Name
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 □
 ____________________________________________________
 




____________________________________________________
 





Name
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 
 





Guest
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 




____________________________________________________
 □XL □ 2XL
 





REQUESTED
ADULT
SHIRT
SIZES
□ L 





Guest
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 I/We
will
be
attending
the
following
receptions/dinner:
 □ L □ XL □ 2XL
 





REQUESTED
ADULT
SHIRT
SIZES
 





□ Thursday
Reception □Friday
Reception □ Saturday
Banquet
 
 I/We
will
be
attending
the
following
receptions/dinner:
 □ Thursday
Reception □Friday
Reception □ Saturday
Banquet
 





COUPLE
2
 
 


COUPLE
2
 □ ____________________________________________________
 
 





Name
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 □
 ____________________________________________________
 




____________________________________________________
 





Name
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 
 





Guest
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 




____________________________________________________
 





REQUESTED
ADULT
SHIRT
SIZES
□ L □XL □ 2XL
 





Guest
 
 
 
 
 City/State
 I/We
will
be
attending
the
following
receptions/dinner:
 





REQUESTED
ADULT
SHIRT
SIZES
 □L □XL □ Saturday
Banquet
 □ 2XL
 





□ Thursday
Reception □Friday
Reception I/We
will
be
attending
the
following
receptions/dinner:
 □ Thursday
Reception □Friday
Reception □ Saturday
Banquet
 





**Please
indicate
any
food
allergens:
 




____________________________________________________
 
 **Please
indicate
any
food
allergens:
 Payment
Information:
 




____________________________________________________
 


Saturday,
June
26,
2010
 Riding
Roofers
Run
‐
Motorcycle
Ride
 Total
Couple
Fee:

 $
____________
 Payment
Information:
 
 Time:

12:30
p.m.
–
p.m.
 □
Yes,
I
wish
to
participate

FREE
OF
CHARGE
 ________________________________________________________
 Total
Individual
Fee:
 $
____________
 Total
Couple
Fee:

 $
____________
 Name ________________________________________________________
 Total
Golf
Fee:
 
 $
____________

 Total
Individual
Fee:
 $
____________
 ________________________________________________________
 Name Total
Tennis
Fee
 $
____________
 Name Total
Golf
Fee:
 
 
 $
____________

 ________________________________________________________
 GRAND
TOTAL
 
 $
____________
 ________________________________________________________
 Total
Tennis
Fee
 
 
 $
____________
 Name 
 Name Method
of
Payment:
 GRAND
TOTAL
 
 
 $
____________
 ________________________________________________________
 
 ________________________________________________________
 □ 
 Bill
me
 □ 
Check
Enclosed
 □
VISA/MC/AMEX
 Name Method
of
Payment:
 
 Name ________________________________________________________
 □

____________________________________________________
 Bill
me
 □
Check
Enclosed
 □
VISA/MC/AMEX
 Saturday,
June
26,
2010
 
 Children’s
Night
Out

 
 Account
Number

 
 
 
 Exp.
Date
 Name 
 Time:
6:30
p.m.
–
11:00
p.m.
(Complimentary
dinner
included)
 
____________________________________________________
 Saturday,
June
26,
2010
 
 Children’s
Night
Out

 
____________________________________________________
 Account
Number

 
 
 
 Exp.
Date
 Time:
6:30
p.m.
–
11:00
p.m.
(Complimentary
dinner
included)
 ________________________________________________________
 
 Name
(as
it
appears
on
card)
 Signature
 
 
____________________________________________________
 Name
 
 
 
 
 Age
 Shirt
Size 
 ________________________________________________________
 Name
(as
it
appears
on
card)
 Signature
 CANCELLATION
POLICY:

All
requests
for
refunds
must
be
made
in
writing
 ________________________________________________________
 
 Name
 
 
 
 
 Age
 Shirt
Size prior
to
May
14,
2010
for
a
50%
refund.

No
refunds
will
be
accepted
after
 
 Name
 
 
 
 
 Age
 Shirt
Size
 CANCELLATION
POLICY:

All
requests
for
refunds
must
be
made
in
writing
 May
14,
2010.
 ________________________________________________________
 prior
to
May
14,
2010
for
a
50%
refund.

No
refunds
will
be
accepted
after
 REFUNDS
WILL
BE
ISSUED
AFTER
EVENT
 Name
 
 
 
 
 Age
 Shirt
Size
 
 May
14,
2010.
 
 



 



 



 


REFUNDS
WILL
BE
ISSUED
AFTER
EVENT
 


22

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

events

ď ˇ

D AT E S A R E T E N TAT I V E A N D S U B J E C T T O C H A N G E .

MARCH /29

A P R I L / 1

6

INTRODUCTION TO GREEN BUILDINGS & SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION, Live Web Training / ASHRAE www.ashrae.org/education/page/1623

PERSONAL-PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, Live Web Training / N.C. Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

HEAT STRESS, Raleigh, N.C. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION, Raleigh RECORDKEEPING, Raleigh / N.C. Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

8

9

15

HEAT STRESS, Charlotte, N.C. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION, Charlotte RECORDKEEPING, Charlotte / N.C. Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

FOR FOREMAN ONLY, CRSMCA office, Charlotte / National Roofing Contractors Association cblanton@crsmca.org

RETROFITTING WITH METAL ROOFS AND WALLS, Live Web Training / The Metal Initiative www.themetalinitiative.com/content/ education/webinars.cfm

16

20

21

FALL PROTECTION, Live Web Training / N.C. Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

HEAT STRESS, Winston-Salem, N.C. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION, Winston-Salem, RECORDKEEPING, Winston-Salem / Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

NRCA/MRCA CERTA TRAIN-THE-TRAINER (Reauthorization training only), CRSMCA office, Charlotte / National Roofing Contractors Association cblanton@crsmca.org

22

23

28

HEAT STRESS, Asheville, N.C. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION, Asheville RECORDKEEPING, Asheville / N.C. Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

MATERIALS HANDLING, Live Web Training / N.C. Department of Labor www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/training_ calendar/march.html

PROFITABILITY THROUGH EFFECTIVE SAFETY PROGRAMS, Raleigh / NRCA University www.nrca.net/nrcauniversity

29

M AY / 1 2 - 1 4

13

ROOFTOP PHOTOVOLTAICS: ENERGIZING YOUR BUSINESS, Raleigh / NRCA University www.nrca.net/nrcauniversity

CONSTRUCT AND THE TFM SHOW, Philadelphia / Hanley Wood and CSI constructshow.com / thetfmshow.com

BUILDING GREEN WITH METAL, Live Web Training / The Metal Initiative www.themetalinitiative.com/content/ education/webinars.cfm

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

23

BUSINESS SENSE

blah blah blah

ENHANCING INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS CAN LEAD TO EFFECTIVE TEAMWORK

WRITTEN BY DANA BOROWKA

24

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

how someone is thinking or approaching things. If your company does not do in-depth personality or work-style assessments, talk with your management team about incorporating some type of assessment during the hiring process so the information can be used in managing individuals. An in-depth personality and work-style assessment will help determine how someone solves problems, deals with stress and thinks through situations. You can literally see how someone processes information and shares ideas, as well as other ways he or she communicates. THERE ARE TYPICALLY FOUR STYLES OF MISCOMMUNICATION: • Avoidance of issues. • Pretending conflict doesn’t exist. • Giving in or going along with others. • Using criticism, insults, manipulation or name calling.

A CLIENT MADE AN INTERESTING COMMENT ONCE ABOUT INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION: “IT’S NOT WHAT YOU SAY; IT’S WHAT THEY HEARD.”

In the business world, how you communicate and how your communications are heard can make a huge impact on every individual you work with and individuals you hadn’t even considered. TO IMPROVE INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS, THERE ARE THREE STEPS YOU SHOULD CONSIDER: 1. Know your participants. 2. Understand different viewpoints. For example, some employees need a step-by-step process for completing a task. Of course, this can be frustrat-

ing to the employee and manager. However, the employee needs the process and probably won’t move forward because they are concerned about doing it wrong, getting yelled at or costing the company money. 3. Work from a vision. Know where you want to go with an individual. If you don’t know, how will they know? If your organization does any kind of in-depth personality or work-style assessments, it is always helpful to review the data to understand or empathize with

DO YOUR TEAM MEMBERS DISPLAY ANY OF THESE STYLES? Consider the following for effective one-on-one communication, especially when dealing with a heated or recurring issue: 1. Do have respect for the other person, even if you don’t agree. 2. Don’t take the conflict personally. 3. Avoid interrupting; ask questions only when the other person has finished speaking. Interrupting can be inter - preted as being disrespectful. 4. Pay attention to body language; sometimes it is more important to “hear” what isn’t being said. 5. Actively listen. Paraphrase what you think the other person is stating and ask them whether you are correct. If not, have him or her restate the issue and then paraphrase again to make sure you’ve got it right. Use “I” statements when you are discussing the topic, such as “I believe it is not constructive when you speak to me in that manner because it feels like you are being disrespectful.” Try this formula for success: •State your feelings clearly without attacking the other person. •Focus on the problem, not the person. •Look for common ground. •Uncover hidden agendas. Is something bothering the person that might be feeding into the problem?

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

25

PROBLEM SOLVING SHOULD BE FAIRLY SIMPLE IF YOU’VE LISTENED WELL AND IF THE OTHER PERSON FEELS HEARD.

•Take time outs to keep a conflict from escalating. Unless a situation is life threatening, consider revisiting the topic several hours later or the next day. ONCE YOU’VE TALKED THE SITUATION THROUGH, YOU CAN MOVE INTO PROBLEM SOLVING. Warning: if you jump to problem solving and haven’t really heard the person, the issue will keep coming up. Problem solving should be fairly simple if you’ve listened well and if the other person feels heard. HERE ARE FOUR STEPS FOR PROBLEM SOLVING: 1. Set an agenda—Define the top three to five items on which you want to focus. Don’t try to solve everything at once. Typically if you solve a couple issues, the other items will take care of themselves 2. Brainstorm—Write the ideas down. Do not disregard any suggested ideas. 3. Sort through the ideas—Pick several ideas or rank them based on which seem most promising. 4. Evaluate your options—After selecting a couple ideas, ask the following questions: •What will happen if we do this? •How will it impact others? •Will everyone get what they want? Come to a conclusion to try the ideas. Then set a follow-up date. If this step isn’t taken, the task will not be completed and the situation will not be resolved.

JOHN MARSHALL OF HAMILTON, ONTARIO, CANADA-BASED DOFASCO STEEL, ONCE SAID: “PEOPLE SPEND SO MUCH ENERGY ON THINGS BEYOND THEIR CONTROL. I constantly ask people, ‘What do you have control over? What don’t you have control over? What can you influence? Who can you go to that has some influence?’” You now have the tools to improve interpersonal communications. Remember what is most important is that you are teaching someone else how to constructively deal with a situation and come up with a solution. The goal is to allow ideas to be shared to create a safe and productive work environment.   DANA BOROWKA is with Lighthouse Consulting Services LLC, Santa Monica, Calif., www.lighthouseconsulting.com.

Nailed down. From the ground up. When it comes to roofing, we’ve got it nailed. Bradco offers a full line of commercial and residential products in every style and material. But just as important, we deliver. On the ground or ten stories up, we’ll be there with exactly what you need, when you need it. So you can stick to a tighter schedule. And pound more out of every job.

BradcoSuppl y.com roofing | siding | windows | doors | decking

26

Charleston, SC 843-971-4236

Charlotte, NC 704-599-3402

Columbia, SC 803-771-0388

Greensboro, NC 336-664-6888

Greenville, SC 864-234-5671

Myrtle Beach, SC 843-236-3244

Newport News, VA 757-874-4500

Norfolk, VA 757-852-3600

Raleigh, NC 919-255-1185

Wilmington, NC 910-251-2290

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

SPOTLIGHT

Back in Business

When the going gets tough, business owners must innovate. In today’s difficult economy, many business owners are looking for ways to improve their bottom lines. Some are streamlining processes. Others are improving their building’s energy efficiency. Still others are finding ways to enhance their building’s aesthetic to attract customers. An investment in a new roof has helped the business buildings on the following pages thrive in today’s uncertain times and ensure a successful future. I 

28

MARRIOTT SURFWATCH CONDOMINIUMS

29

WALGREENS PHARMACY DISTRIBUTION CENTER

PHOTO ABOVE OF MARRIOTT SURFWATCH CONDOMINIUMS PROVIDED BY PETERSEN ALUMINUM CORP.

30

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK

31

ENERGIZER BATTERIES

32

BRIDGE STREET PIER

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

27

Marriott Surfwatch Condominiums HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C.   TEAM DESIGNER: NCG Architects Inc., Atlanta, www.ncgarch.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Hardin Construction Co., Atlanta, www.hardinconstruction.com ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Southern Roof & Wood Care Corp., Hilton Head Island, www.southernroof.com METAL ROOFING MANUFACTURER:  Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill., www.pac-clad.com

ROOF MATERIALS More than 134,000 square feet of Petersen PAC-CLAD aluminum roofing was installed on the condos. Approximately 88,000 square feet of the total square footage was 0.032 aluminum

Snap-Clad panels and 46,000 square feet was 0.040 aluminum flat sheet for flashing material and custom detail work, including finials and parapet-wall louver vents. The materials were finished in custom color Charlotte slate.

ROOF REPORT This luxurious condominium resort offers elegantly appointed two- and three-bedroom villas with upscale indoor and outdoor amenities. The metal roof panels were utilized on five individual condominium buildings, a central facilities building, guardhouses, beach-bar pavilion, restroom buildings and equipment structures. According to Jim Carson, project principal and lead designer with NCG

Architects, the design intent was to manipulate the building massing, architectural detailing and color palette to harmonize with the natural features of the sites. “The exterior materials, including stucco and the standing-seam roof, lend variety to the façade and are reflective of the island character,” he says. “The natural color scheme further reduces the visual impact of the buildings.” Although this was the first time his firm had specified PAC-CLAD material, it uses aluminum exclusively for projects in coastal regions because of aluminum’s corrosion resistance and color consistency in applications where salt spray is an issue.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY PETERSEN ALUMINUM CORP.

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

PHOTO PROVIDED BY CARLISLE SYNTEC

Walgreens Pharmacy Distribution Center A N DERSON, S.C.   TEAM 

ROOF CONSULTANT: RRK Associates Ltd., Gurnee, Ill., www.rrkassociates.net ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Peach State Roofing, Lawrenceville, Ga., www.peachstateinc.com ROOFING MANUFACTURER: Carlisle SynTec, Carlisle, Pa., zwww.carlisle-syntec.com ROOFING DISTRIBUTOR: N.B. Handy, Greenville, S.C., www.nbhandy.com

ROOF MATERIALS Peach State Roofing mechanically attached two layers of Carlisle’s poly-

isocyanurate insulation with Carlisle’s HP-X Fasteners to the building’s 700,000-square-foot steel roof deck. The second layer was offset from the first to eliminate thermal bridging and enhance the energy-efficiency of the building’s rooftop. Carlisle’s 60-mil, non-reinforced EPDM membranes were rolled out in 20- by 100-foot sheets and fully adhered using Carlisle’s bonding adhesive. The membranes were seamed together using Carlisle’s Factory-Applied Tape, which provides uniform adhesive width and thickness and reduces the risk of human error during seam installation. Penetrations were flashed with Carlisle’s pressure-sensitive accessories.

ROOF REPORT As the nation’s largest retail pharmacy chain, Walgreens has placed an emphasis on its distribution network. The new center, which sends shipments to the Southeast, is expected to be 20 percent

more efficient than the company’s previous generation of distribution centers thanks to a state-of-the-art computer-automated logistics system. The computer system’s installation required the warehouse to be built in sections. A portion of the system was installed and then contractors erected the building around it on a daily basis so it would remain protected from the elements. Because the roof was installed in sections during an 11-month time period, the job-site delivery service from distributor N.B. Handy’s nearby warehouse provided Peach State Roofing with enough material to continue working without overloading the site with materials that would not be installed for months. “On a job like this, job-site delivery is key to keeping the costs to a minimum and production high,” explains Dave Schmitt, Peach State Roofing’s vice president.

Indicates CRSMCA contractor members I  Indicates CRSMCA associate members   CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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Federal Reserve Bank CHARLOTTE, N.C.   TEAM 

ROOF CONSULTANT: REI Engineers, Charlotte, www.roofengineering.com ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Tecta America Carolinas, Indian Trail, N.C., www.tectaamerica.com

ROOF MATERIALS Because the building featured two different roof-deck types, self-adhered PVC single-ply and three-ply modified bitumen systems were installed, as well as various separation layers, drainage panels and rigid-insulation

components. About 50,000 sedum plugs were planted in 4 inches of lightweight engineered soil contained by stainless-steel angles and concrete paver walkways. A drip-irrigation system with rain sensors and timers was installed to help with the initial establishment of the vegetation. An electric-field-vector-mapping leakdetection system also was installed.

ROOF REPORT This 18-year-old facility had been leaking since it was built. REI

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY TECTA AMERICA CAROLINAS

Indicates CRSMCA contractor members I  Indicates CRSMCA associate members   30

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

Engineering concluded that 72,210 square feet of roofing needed to be replaced along with the renovation of the through-wall flashing system behind the granite panel system. This project was designed with green roofing as the base bid and conventional roofing as alternate bids for each roof area. It was determined that for an additional 25 percent in costs, the owner could install a system that benefits the environment and lasts twice as long as a conventional roof system. Because of the high security and the logistics of a busy, downtown location, the roofing team closely coordinated with the bank and city officials to overcome challenges and complete the roof replacement in 2008.

Energizer Batteries A S HBORO, N.C.  

TEAM  ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Tecta America Carolinas, Indian Trail, N.C. DAYLIGHTING-SYSTEM MANUFACTURER: Orion, Manitowoc, Wis., www.oriones.com

ROOF MATERIALS One-hundred-ten Orion Lightpipes were installed on Energizer’s warehouse facility. An interior lighting-control system turns off one bulb at a time where there is enough natural light coming into the building. The system will save Energizer almost 50 percent on its lighting costs.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY TECTA AMERICA CAROLINAS

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

ROOF MATERIALS Approximately 4,500 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s SnapClad panels finished in silver metallic were utilized on the project.

ROOF REPORT This historic city pier closed after hurricane damage and required a $2.2 million renovation before reopening. The 650-foot pier features the popular Rotten Ralph’s restaurant, which was reopened; a fishing kiosk; harbormaster’s office; and restrooms with showers.  Indicates CRSMCA contractor members    Indicates CRSMCA associate members

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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SAFETY MATTERS

ROLL-FORMER SAFETY AN EXCERPT FROM THE METAL CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION’S SINGLE OR DUAL LEVEL ROLL FORMER OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

: THIS DOCUMENT   PROVIDES GENERAL GUIDELINES

for the operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of roll-forming equipment in the manufacture of building wall and roof panels. In no case, however, are these guidelines intended to supersede any specific recommendations or instructions from the roll-forming original equipment manufacturer, or O.E.M.

B ADAPTED FROM CONTENT WRITTEN BY THE MCA ROLL FORMING COUNCIL

efore initial start-up, all personnel should be thoroughly instructed about the operation, maintenance and safety precautions of this machine. Adequate training greatly enhances the safety of all operations.

ON THE JOB

Operator trainees should be instructed while on the job. Trainees should be initially assigned to work with an experienced and qualified operator or under the direct supervision of a knowledgeable person(s) until the trainee has gained sufficient familiarity to work independently.

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

Operator trainees and maintenance personnel must observe all safety signs and procedures. All safety signs and procedures are for their protection and must be read, understood and taken seriously. To familiarize the trainee with the equipment, the following procedures should be followed. TEACH THE OPERATOR TRAINEE: Provide for adequate opportunity to instruct the trainee through verbal and written procedures. SHOW THE OPERATOR TRAINEE: Have the trainee observe a qualified operator operating the equipment. LET THE OPERATOR TRAINEE DO IT: Under close supervision, let the trainee operate the

PHOTOS BY METALFORMING INC., PEACHTREE CITY, GA.

equipment. Make any necessary recommendations or corrections. BEHAVIOR: There is one very important procedure that operators and service personnel should always follow: Whenever there is a problem or the potential for a problem, stop the equipment first, then solve the problem using only safe procedures. This may require the operator or service personnel to stop and ask for help from someone who knows what to do. It could also require referral to the manual or calling the factory for help.

INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE

The customer is responsible for the inspection and proper maintenance of this machine to ensure that all units, auxiliary equipment and parts are in safe operating condition. Only qualified electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic or mechanical personnel should work on this equipment or its circuitry. Absolutely no welding should be done on the equipment without first contacting the O.E.M. Some welding may be authorized in certain areas (the outside of the roll-former base); however, it is strongly recommended you contact the O.E.M. to ensure welding or extreme heat does not jeopardize the design integrity of the equipment. Only with O.E.M. approval can personnel perform any welding. No welding should be done without first opening all electrical disconnect(s) and firmly affixing the welder ground lead near the welding area. Keep welding to a minimum.

GUIDELINES

The operation of this machine can vary depending on what is being processed through it and what type of peripheral equipment is used in conjunction with it. The range of material being processed also affects the safety of operation. It must be understood that these guidelines are general in nature and should be used as a basis for preparing specific operating procedures relating to this machine. In addition, hazards may be associated with any of the following topics. Guards/Barricades All safety guards and barricades must be secured in place before the start-up of the machine. When any guards or barricades are removed for inspection, adjustments or maintenance purposes, make sure they are replaced before resuming operation. Never place fingers or hands under or behind the guards or barricades. Note that additional point-of-operation

Operator trainees and maintenance personnel MUST OBSERVE all safety signs and procedures. All safety signs and procedures are for their protection and must be read, understood and taken seriously. guarding, barricading or supplemental safety precautions may be deemed necessary by conditions unforeseen by the O.E.M. in the design and manufacture of the equipment. Personnel Never operate this machine or any peripheral equipment until it has been established that no one is working on, removing material from or standing near the equipment. Ensure that all personnel are in a safe location during system operation. Accidental actuation of any piece of equipment could cause bodily injury or death. Work Area Make sure the area around this machine is free from work hazards (parts or lubricant on the floor, waste build-up in operating areas, blocked emergency stop push/pull buttons, etc.). Make sure there are no wrenches, tools or pieces of material lying on the machine before start-up. Working Pressures The maximum anticipated working pressures in any pneumatic system (should they be present on the equipment) shall not exceed safe working pressures as recommended by the manufacturer of any components used in that system. Foundation Fasten/bolt all units securely to the foundation before loading or using. The customer is responsible for the integrity of the foundation and hold-down hardware. Electrical Close all electrical panels during machine operation to avoid possible shock or component damage. All wiring and connections must meet national and local electrical code standards that apply. Capacity Operate this machine within its designed/ rated capacity. Do not overload. Shutdown Turn off the main power disconnect (usually located on the right-hand side of the

motor control center) prior to performing any maintenance, adjustments or repairs. Follow the zero energy “Lock Out/Tag Out� procedures of this manual and additionally as defined by your employer and/ or local electrical safety code. On/off Procedures Know the location of all operator controls used to start this machine to avoid accidental actuation. When leaving the work area unattended, turn off all equipment controls so the machine cannot be accidentally actuated. Attire Do not wear clothing/jewelry that could cause a hand, arm or any part of the body to be dragged into moving machinery. Machinery Noise Unnecessary or irregular noises usually indicate that the machine or a component of the machine is out of adjustment or has worn, loose or broken parts. Repair or replace before operating again. Rotating Components Gears, shafts, roller die tooling, chains and sprockets can present hazardous areas. Ensure that all guards are in place and secure prior to operation. Modification Never modify, alter or change the design of this machine without first contacting the O.E.M. If the machine does not meet your requirements, discontinue its use immediately and contact the O.E.M. or another reputable manufacturing equipment service company. Stop Circuitry Know the location and operation of all normal stop procedures. Small stop pushbuttons de-energize the individual circuits only. Emergency Stop Know the location of all emergency-stop controls and know all emergency-stop procedures. Emergency-stop red mushroom push/pull buttons (and any

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

35

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCE should an operator go beyond the point of a barricade or fence when power is supplied to the machine, neither during normal operation or when the machine is paused.

emergency-stop limit switches or cables) will interrupt power to the system and stop all motion of the machine when actuated. However, control power is still present in the motor-control center and individual components.

SAFE OPERATION CAUTIONS

It is important to know the workings of this machine and why precautions (from physical guarding to knowledge of safe operating procedures) must always be observed. On-machine Guarding Guarding is provided on this machine and any peripheral items to protect operators and other personnel from possible pinch and crush areas. Under no circumstance should a guard be removed and the machine operated. If maintenance must be performed and the removal of a guard is necessary, maintenance personnel should follow the zeroenergy procedures, so the machine cannot be inadvertently actuated. Barricades Barricades and on-floor fences (if present) are used to cover large areas of the machine and protect the operator or maintenance personnel from possible crush areas that can injure. Under no circumstance should an operator go beyond the point of a barricade or fence when power is supplied to the machine, neither during normal operation or when the machine is paused. If maintenance must be performed and the removal of a barricade or fence is necessary, maintenance personnel should follow the zero-energy procedures, so the machine cannot be inadvertently actuated. Exposed Moving Parts Moving parts, such as rollers, are used to process the material. Never use these surfaces as steps, and always be aware of their operation while standing near. Do not go past a barricade or fence.

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

Sensor Controls and the Machine The main-line controller controls this machine. When the line (as a whole) is put into “line run” operation, this roll former will start. It stops only when the line is taken out of “line run” operation. Although the line might not be in “line run” at the end of a batch when the last part is made and the line is automatically taken out of “line run” operation by the line controller, this machine usually still runs until a timer counts down. Also, if a mastic system is used with this machine there is usually a reflective photo eye mounted on the unit that controls the mastic applicator according to the leading and trailing ends of the panel. Be aware that if a mastic applicator is used, any interruption at the photo eye will cause the applicator to run. Never be on this machine or performing maintenance without following the zero-energy procedures. Electrics and Enclosures This machine has enclosures that house electrical items and a supply source. Never open an electrical enclosure or perform electrical maintenance without first following the zero-energy procedures.   THE METAL CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION , Glenview, Ill., is an organization of manufacturers and suppliers whose metal products are used in structures throughout the world. Download the complete Single or Dual Level Roll Former Operation and Maintenance Manual for free at www.metalconstruction.org/pubs.

HIGH-PERFORMANCE ROOFING

SENSIBLE SOLAR UNRAVEL THE DETAILS ABOUT SOLAR POWER

OLAR POWER IS A HOT TOPIC IN THE WORLD TODAY.

Not only are many states offering incentives for building owners to integrate solar into buildings, but they also are mandating buildings achieve net-zero-energy goals. Net-zero energy refers to buildings that produce as much energy as they consume and, therefore, have no demand for fossil fuels. ¶ The California Public Utilities Commission, San Francisco, recently announced a challenge to builders to construct all new commercial structures to be net-zero energy by 2030. Other states, such as Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey and New Mexico, have passed legislation or are seriously considering legislation that would require the construction of net-zero-energy buildings. It won’t be long before the Carolinas also will consider such mandates. WRITTEN BY SCOTT KRINER, LEED AP

PHOTO BY HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP, BARRINGTON, ILL. CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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There are two primary types of cells within silicon-based PV systems: CRYSTALLINE (mono and poly) and AMORPHOUS. To achieve net-zero-energy buildings, significant conservation of energy and improvements to energy efficiency will be required. Renewable-energy sources, like solar-power systems, also will be necessary to generate on-site electricity. Therefore, it is important you understand the details of photovoltaics as more clients request rooftop solar arrays for their projects.

CRYSTALLINE AND THIN-FILM PV

Rooftop-mounted photovoltaic, or PV, systems are a passive-renewable-energy source for converting sunlight into electricity. The generation of electricity from PV-based technology is possible through

the interaction of sunlight with certain “doped� semi-conductor materials. Electrons are released from these materials, resulting in a current. That direct current is then converted to alternating current with an inverter and provides electricity to power a building. The most prevalent material used in the production of photovoltaic arrays is silicon. The basic building block of PV technology is called the solar cell. There are two primary types of cells within silicon-based PV systems: crystalline (mono and poly) and amorphous. Crystalline PV systems currently represent 80 percent of the market. The crystalline PV wafers are typically 0.2- to 0.4-mm thick.

However, once packaged in metal and glass, they are approximately 0.25 to 1 inch in total thickness and require 20 kg of silicon per 1 kilowatt of PV. Crystalline PV is rigid and brittle and must be housed sufficiently to maintain its single-crystal nature and avoid shattering. Conventional crystalline-silicon PV cells are connected to form a PV module, and many modules are linked together to form a PV array. The modules consist of an assembly of silicon wafers sandwiched between two layers of glass in a metallic frame. These panels are relatively heavy but can be mounted to metal roofing with fastening devices that do not penetrate the metal roof surface. One typical 4-inch

PHOTO BY ENERGYPEAK, MOON TOWNSHIP, PA.

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

PHOTO BY HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP

crystalline PV materials still is typically 15 to 20 percent. The conversion efficiency of thin-film PV systems is typically less than 10 percent, but thin-film amorphous-silicon PV cells offer outstanding power-generation characteristics at higher temperatures. Multi-junction amorphous-silicon PV cells collect more efficiently during low-light (diffuse) conditions. Each amorphous silicon layer in a multi-junction cell is doped to absorb red, green or blue light and layered accordingly within the cell. The nature of this thin-film PV structure means the specific angle of inclination

silicon solar cell can produce about 1 watt of direct current electricity. Depending on the size of the rooftop array, these cells can produce thousands of watts of DC electricity that is then converted to AC electricity for use inside a building. An alternative to crystalline-silicon PV modules is thin-film amorphous silicon products. The thin-film PV layers are less than 2-microns thick (0.12-inches thick with a fully encapsulated module) and are flexible and semi-transparent. These systems use 0.067 kg of silicon per kW. Amorphous silicon is deposited from silane gas; therefore, it is not subject to the polysilicon shortage in the crystalline PV industry, which causes crystalline PV to be more expensive. Amorphous-silicon products with multijunction cells are the typical composition of thin-film PV products. They are produced by depositing films of doped silicon-germanium alloys onto a thin sheet of stainless steel and then encapsulating them with a flexible, light-transmissive top-layer. The PV material then can be laminated to a low-slope membrane roof or the flat-pan section of a standing-seam metal roof surface, for example.

PV POWER GENERATION

has much less effect on the generated electricity output than crystalline PV. As a result, amorphous-silicon PV modules can generate more power per annum than crystalline PV modules of identical rated output. In addition, the content of the solar spectrum can change continuously as the climate conditions change. Because amorphous-silicon thin-film PV systems produce more energy under low light levels (compared to crystalline-silicon modules) and are more efficient for greater amounts of time under variable spectrums of light, they generate more

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SEAMLESS

Chicago Heights, IL

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The actual net power balance generated by any installed PV system is affected by the overall integrity of the roof, size and efficiency of the PV system, local climate conditions (driving total solar irradiance) and wind conditions. Crystalline PV’s efficiency can be limited because of several factors. The cells only produce energy during times of direct sun exposure. If a crystalline panel is not oriented appropriately toward the sun, it will not efficiently produce electricity. In addition, the energy of photons decreases at higher solar-energy wavelengths. Solar radiation with higher wavelength causes the solar-cell surface temperature to increase, which affects the conversion of sunlight into electric current. However, the electricity conversion efficiency of CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

39

actual power per (installed) watt. They also retain their efficiency twice as well as crystalline-silicon PV modules at elevated temperatures. This means more actual power is being generated during peak sun hours when the surface temperature is above ambient.

GOING SOLAR

The benefits of solar energy to a building owner are not only related to the energy loads being met, but also to the financial advantage of replacing electricity from the grid. Depending on the local utility rates, the installation of a rooftop solar-energy system may or may not have an attractive return on investment. It is important to do this calculation with data from the utility provider before making a decision about solar. Then, a building owner can take advantage of the many ways to overcome the initial installation cost. Incentives from the utility; local-, state- or federal-tax

breaks; and power-purchase agreements can significantly shorten the payback of this type of installation. In addition, it is extremely important that the energy consumption of a building be reduced as much as possible before even considering renewable sources of energy. Well-insulated buildings and new buildings that are already energy efficient are prime candidates for rooftop solar arrays. A building-integrated PV system also

would be beneficial for reroofing projects where insulation is brought up to or in excess of code, HVAC equipment is improved and/or lighting efficiencies are increased. Only with these types of improvements can a building meet net-zero-energy goals. ď ˛ ďƒ¨ SCOTT KRINER is president of Green Metal Consulting, Macungie, Pa., www.greenmetalconsulting.com.

Amorphous-silicon thinfilm PV systems produce more energy under low light levels compared to crystalline-silicon modules.

PHOTO BY ENERGYPEAK

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

TECHNICAL POINT

NO SHORTCUTS PART

DESIGNING LOW-SLOPE COOL ROOF SYSTEMS FOR THE CAROLINAS REQUIRES SIGNIFICANT PLANNING

I

CONCERNS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

in concert with legislative and code mandates have been the drivers for massive changes in the roofing industry. Consequently, the use of cool roof membranes, which are defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR program as roof covers with an initial solar reflectance of 0.65 or greater, has become the preferred choice of many architects when designing low-slope roof systems.

As with any roof-cover material, the appropriate design and use of the material is required to achieve long-term success and a truly sustainable roof system. Unfortunately, major proponents of cool roof systems have failed to inform and/or educate the design community about appropriate cool roof system design, which has resulted in condensation, resultant interior moisture penetration, mold and loss of thermal value. We know roof-system design is equal in importance to structural, mechanical, plumbing and electrical design. Therefore, it is imperative that designers who utilize cool roof

EDITORS NOTE: This is the first article in a two-part series about planning and designing low-slope roof systems for ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through 7. South Carolina falls within ASHRAE Climate Zone 3, and North Carolina falls within zones 3, 4 and 5. The second part will appear in the May/June issue.

systems in the Carolinas, which fall within ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through 7, take extra care to achieve a properly functioning and sustainable low-slope roof system.

INVESTIGATE AND ANALYZE Prior to the design of a cool roof system, a complete investigation of the climatic conditions and related building components and systems that affect the roof system must be undertaken. The intended roof and interior building use must be understood, and the roof-system designer should also have solid knowledge of the HVAC system and its impacts on the roof system. The designer should understand these conditions and be designing to prevent potential problems.

WRITTEN BY THOMAS W. HUTCHINSON, AIA, CSI, RRC, FRCI CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

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For example, when designing a roof system over a high humidity space, a prudent designer would understand the potential for reaching dew point within the roof system exists and would incorporate a vapor retarder into the roof system. The following components and related questions must be considered when designing new or replacement low-slope roof solutions: Geography/climatic conditions: What is the climate? Is the roof located in an urban or rural area? What types of wind can be expected? What substances will come in contact with the roof system from adjacent buildings or airplanes? Building-construction-sequencing considerations: When will the roof be installed in relation to adjacent windows and/or metal panels? How are the roof areas laid out? Will any specific roof areas require priority over other areas, such as high roofs before low roofs? Roof deck: Metal, concrete or wood? Which is appropriate for the expected wind-uplift pressures, anticipated dead and live loads, and interior building conditions? Parapets and adjacent masonry walls: How is through-wall flashing integrated with the roofing? Do the parapet coping stones have through-wall flashings below?

 Inappropriate roof system design when

  Appropriate roof system design utilizing

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utilizing cool roof membranes can result in unintended results, such as condensation, mold growth and interior moisture penetration.

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

cool roof membranes can result in roof systems whose potential to achieve sustainable results is high.

Will the roofing be integrated into the coping? Building and roof expansion joints: Are the expansion joints properly located? Is the height proper? How will expansion joints terminate at walls and roof edges? Penthouse walls and base flashings: Metal siding on penthouses often is low to the roof membrane. Because the new roof system may rise higher than the bottom of the siding, the siding support system must be identified. Roof drains: What are their sizes, types and locations? Are there sufficient roof drains to adequately and quickly remove water from the roof? Can additional drains be installed and/or moved to facilitate efficient tapered-insulation layouts? Gutters: If utilized, determine their size, expansion joint and downspout locations and select their material type and gauge. HVAC systems: The type and operation of HVAC systems, as well as their location in relationship to the roof, is critical. Recent emphasis on “positive building pressure” has tremendous implications in regard to the roof systems. It is wise to provide roof details to the HVAC engineer for inclusion into his or her drawings/specifications.

 All HVAC-related items, such as flues

and curbs, need to be designed into the roof system.

PHOTOS BY HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP, BARRINGTON, ILL.

HVAC equipment, curbs, associated piping types and penetrations: Are there multiple pipes penetrating through a single location? Can any roof penetrations be located in a wall? How is the HVAC unit supported? Who is providing the curb? Are the curb heights correct for the intended tapered insulation? Are there any “hot” pipes? Cooling towers: How are they supported? Will any associated piping penetrate the roof membrane? Is the piping grouped together? Cables, conduit and pipes: Will IT cabling, tower conduit and refrigerant piping cross the roof? Are they properly supported? If the roof slope is greater than 2:12, will sliding snow affect the piping and supports? Can piping be brought up through roof curbs and separated from the roof? Traffic: What will rooftop maintenance traffic patterns be? Will there be any skylights? If so, will traffic patterns be near them? How often will there be traffic? Is it foot or mechanical? Roof access: What is the access to the roof from the building’s interior? Do scuttles or ladders provide access to the higher roofs? Air intakes: Will fumes during installation of the new roof system enter the

Roof use: Beyond water repelling, will the roof provide a working surface or be used by tenants/owners for recreational activities? Snow loads and dropping icicles: In ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through 7, snow and ice are common occurrences that can negatively affect the roof-system performance.

with roof-system design. Although manufacturers can provide a great deal of information about their products, it ultimately is within the architect’s “standard of care” to design a roof system appropriate for the specific building. Effectively, manufacturers produce, architects design and contractors install. Failure to understand and follow this

Effectively, manufacturers produce, architects design and contractors install. Failure to understand and follow this truism can result in costly litigation, ruined reputations and unhappy clients. building’s air circulation systems? Note: Low-VOC and water-based adhesives are available, but weather and construction conditions may affect their use. Moreover, their long-term performance has not been confirmed. Interior conditions: Determine the interior occupancy, climate conditions and space use to understand how they will affect the roof’s design and/or performance. Will increased rooftop energy efficiency affect the interior HVAC air balancing?

SELECTING ROOF-SYSTEM COMPONENTS

After the results of the climatic investigation and building-element and systemimpact assessment, an analysis of the potential roof-system components can be undertaken. This decision must be based on sound engineering principles so longterm roof system service life, which is the essence of a sustainable roof system, can be attained. This will place a burden upon architects to become more acquainted

truism can result in costly litigation, ruined reputations and unhappy clients. When selecting components, a roof-system designer must consider the following:   Which cool roof system assembly should be specified: fully adhered, mechanically fastened or ballasted? Recent concerns with condensation in ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through 7 with mechanically attached cool roof membranes suggest they are not an appropriate roof

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 Note the vapor retarder to the right.

It is recommended that roof system designers thoroughly investigate and determine whether a vapor retarder is required to ensure cool roof system performance. In ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through 7 a vapor retarder will enhance the long-term performance of the cool roof system.

 The use of high-density coverboards to pro-

tect the thermal insulation integrity and enhance the boundary of the cool roof membrane to the roof substrate is recommended.

 Fully adhering roof base flashing to roof

curbs and walls, such as this parapet wall, prevent the inflow of air behind the cool roof membrane and potential for condensation.

The roof is part of the building envelope and should be considered the fifth façade after the walls. system for most buildings, and a fully adhered system is the system of choice. [To read more about this, see RCI Interface, “Condensation Problems in Cool Roofs,” August 2009 issue, page 11.]   What is the availability of local, knowledgeable installers? This may determine what type of roof system is installed.   The appropriate insulation type and method of attachment must be investigated. What are the owner’s energy-efficiency requirements? The required R-value should be accomplished in a minimum of two layers to prevent thermal shorts, energy loss and air infiltration to the underside of the membrane.   Be aware of insulation types and densities. If the roof deck is structurally sloped, tapered insulation saddles should be designed; the slope of the taper must be twice the roof-deck slope to direct water to the roof drains. If the structure is flat, consider using tapered insulation to remove water from the roof quickly. Foam insulations have a propensity to 44

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

shrink, opening up joints and facilitating air movement. Stone-wool insulation is dimensionally stable and can result in tight joints. Additionally, consider the use of high-density coverboards to protect the thermal insulation integrity. The use of hydroscopic insulations or coverboards (that absorb water) is discouraged.   Do the roof-drain locations facilitate the layout of tapered insulation? If not, you may wish to relocate some drains. Consideration should also be given to the type of appurtenances required by the drains, including sump pans, extension rings and under-deck clamps. It is good practice to provide the plumbing engineer roof-to-plumbing element details for inclusion on his or her drawings.   Consider how the disbursement of water at grade will affect the surrounding area during the various seasons. Do not install downspouts to sidewalks or driveway locations when icing may be an issue. The appropriate method of downspout support should be determined and proper

downspout materials should be specified to protect against vandalism.   If gutters are utilized with roof slopes above ½:12 in areas that receive snow, be cognizant that snow and ice will slide off the cool roof membrane. In this design, snow fences at the eave may be required.   In snowy geographic locations, the use of low-profile gravel stops may be a concern because high winds can blow large sections of snow and ice off the roof.   The dew point must be calculated to determine whether to use a vapor retarder. It is almost mandatory to include a vapor retarder in cool-roof assemblies in ASHRAE Climate Zones 3 through 7 to prevent the migration, pushing up and/ or suction of warm moist air into the roof system where it will condensate below the membrane.   The roof is part of the building envelope and should be considered the fifth façade after the walls. The interface of the walls and roof system must be

understood. For example, is there an air barrier in the wall construction into which the new roof air or vapor retarder should be incorporated? How will the roof vapor barrier transition at roof edges, penetrations and roof drains and roof curbs?   What is the building’s expansion and contraction requirement across the roof? Are expansion joints required?   Plan for future reroofing with copings and counter flashings that can be screw fastened to facilitate future removal and reinstallation.   Consideration should be given to the required sheet-metal details. I prefer the use of prefinished or natural metals, such as copper, instead of bare, galvanized materials.   Think about the time of year in which construction will occur and how climatic conditions will impact the roof installation. Using water-based adhesives during a winter installation is counterproductive in most of the continental U.S. Are the materials available during the time of the year when the roofing will be completed?

  Consider construction sequencing. Will heavy equipment be utilized on the roof to install other building components? If so, a temporary roof, such as a vapor retarder, should be designed so the roof proper can be installed after all other construction work is complete.   All roofs require maintenance. When designing a roof replacement, an opportunity exists for minimizing the required maintenance. This means the installation of maintenance-free components, such as prefinished sheet metal, should be considered. All roof base flashings at walls and curbs should be fully adhered to prevent air inflow and moisture accumulation, as well as damage caused by wind.

PLANNING MAKES PERFECT

Roof-system design, in general, brings with it many challenges, including code compliance, construction sequencing, thermal-efficiency attainment, reduction of the building’s carbon footprint and

achievement of long-term service life (defined as at least 30 years). Designing to use a cool roof membrane also includes the challenge of the unknown. Although the use of cool roof membranes has grown rapidly, they have not yet weathered the test of time, which often leads to unintended consequences. The design and ultimate installation of a roof system without giving consideration to the results of the investigational analysis, code review and the owner’s goals may lead to roof-system selection that does not provide a long-term, sustainable design solution and results in premature failure. By taking the time to complete these first steps, you are well on the way to designing a successful, long-term, sustainable low-slope roof system.   THOMAS W. HUTCHINSON is principal of Hutchinson Design Group, Barrington, Ill., www.hutchinsondesigngroup.com.

STAY TUNED FOR PA R T I I

(80 0 ) 84 5 -316 3

www.davisgarvin.com

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

45

TOOL REVIEW

RE V I E W E R 

TO O L NAME 

MANUFACTURER 

RYAN SCHAEFER, foreman with Century Slate Co., Durham, N.C., www.centuryslate.com

WUKO UNI BENDER II 2202

WUKO TOOLS

WHAT IS THE TOOL’S SIZE? WEIGHT? The tool is 5¾ by 3 by 9½ inches and weighs 3 ½ pounds, making it lighter than other brands.

WHAT IS THE COST OF THE TOOL? Retail cost is $565. There is a similar tool in the marketplace that is less expensive but it is not as versatile.

HOW LONG HAS THE TOOL BEEN ON THE MARKET? Approximately 10 years.

WHAT IS THE TOOL USED FOR? Bending flat sheets of metal from 0 to 90 degrees. The Uni Bender can form

46

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

Ryan Schaefer demostrates the Wuko Uni Bender II.

PHOTOS BY CENTURY SLATE CO.

Less = More.

Less Mor

RhinoBond® is an alternative method for RhinoBond® is an installing TPO and PVC membranes that installing TPO and lets you do more with less. The RhinoBond lets you do more w System provides enhanced wind performance System provides e with fewer fasteners and fewer seams. with fewer fasten And since there are no seam fasteners to And since there a penetrate the membrane, there’s no potential penetrate the mem point of entry for moisture. RhinoBond is point of entry for Factory Mutual-approved and available Factory Mutual-ap through most roof system manufacturers. through most roof

Less really is more with RhinoBond. Less really is m Call 800.633.3800 to schedule your Call 800.633.380 FREE demonstration. FREE demonstra

800 . 633 . 3800 WWW.rHINoBoND.coM RhinoBond® is a registered trademark of OMG, Inc. Copyright © 2010 OMG, Inc. All rights reserved. RhinoBond® is a registered trademark of OMG, Inc. Copyright © 2010 OMG, Inc. All rights reserved.

800 . 633 . 380 WWW.rHINo

TOOL REVIEW continued from page 46

straight bends, as well as inside and outside radius bends on metal. It has a maximum 8-inch and minimum 0.2-inch bending depth. The four roller stops make it easier for handling and provide better guidance, especially on outside radius. The outside radius is unlimited while the inside radius minimum is approximately 6 inches. This model has a bending capacity up to 0.8 mm (0.031 inch); WUKO Tools has another model that can handle heavier gauges. I find the Uni Bender invaluable in the field. It fits in my tool belt, and I don’t have to worry about carrying a bulky field brake, particularly in tight spaces. I recently was completing a job in New Orleans and most of the equipment had been sent back to the office in North Carolina. One of the standing-seam panels was damaged, so I had to make a panel on-site. With the Uni Bender it was no problem. It saved thousands of dollars of potential downtime while trying to find somewhere to get a panel made. I regularly use the Uni Bender for chimney flashings or small detail work. In a few minutes, I can create a radius cap flashing for round windows that looks like it came from the manufacturer. — RYAN SCHAEFER

“The Uni Bender comes fully assembled. You just set the back  gauge and go. It also has a built-in measuring guide.”

Leland goes to great lengths with

GUTTER SCREWS! Leland’s gutter screws come in #10 and #12 diameters – and in super tough #14 diameter up to 8” long ! You can choose hex washer, pan or oval head styles. All manufactured in North America – and available for timely delivery -- no hold-up “waiting for the boat”. All Leland gutter screws come plated with JS500 for long, rust-free life. Powder coated heads are available to match gutter colours. And we also offer pancake head sell drilling or self-tapping screws for fast installation of gutter covers! Leland goes to great lengths for you! Call today for details.

www.lelandindustries.com

1 800 263-3393 #0810-1_2

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

Demand North American Quality!

The tool can also be used for valley flashings, radius metal panels, double radius panels like you would find on a dome—just about any metal work that you can find on a roof . HAVE YOU USED THE SAME TOOL MADE BY ANOTHER MANUFACTURER? No, but I know another brand has a maximum bending height of 6 inches rather than the 8 inches with the Uni Bender. The other brand also is larger and would have to be carried rather than placed in a tool belt. However, the other brand would be good for straight runs and some outside radius work. IS THE TOOL EASY TO SET UP AND USE? The Uni Bender comes fully assembled. You just set the back gauge and go. It also has a built-in measuring guide. Instead of having to mark your metal as you would on a sheet-metal brake, you just set your guide at the proper dimension and go.

ATLANTIC ROOFING DISTRIBUTORS We Pride Ourselves On Superior Quality And Service A Complete Line of Commericial/Residential Roofing Materials And Accessories • Metal / Copper Roofing • Copper Coils / Flat Sheets / Gutter • Asphalt Shingles • Built Up / Modified • Single Ply

IF SOMEONE IS PICKING UP THIS TOOL FOR THE FIRST TIME, WHAT SHOULD HE/SHE KNOW ABOUT IT? Just the technical information to be sure that it suits his/her needs. There are some other models available that allow for different capacities.

• Commercial Insulation • Specialty Roofing • Artificial Slate • Full Line of Accessories • Full Line of Waterproofing Products

*Roof Top and Job Site Delivery 2 Locations To Better Serve You

Fair Bluff, NC 28439 – 910-649-7317 / 888-240-1234 Charleston, SC 29415 – 843-308-0040 / 800-767-1995 SC Distributor.eps

2/25/2010

10:43:23 AM

C

HOW LONG WILL THE TOOL LAST? I’ve owned the tool for more than six years. It’s been heavily used and I have not had any problems. The manufacturer provides a one-year warranty for defects.

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

WHY DO YOU RECOMMEND THIS TOOL? It is an easy-to-use, lightweight, versatile tool. 

CMY

K

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

49

M A T E R I ALS & G A D G ET S

GACOSIL S-20

Gaco Western has introduced its solvent-free, eco-friendly silicone coating for commercial roofs. The single-component, moisture-curing silicone rubber roof coating is designed for use on sprayed-in-place polyurethane foam, metal, concrete, aged asphalt, composite, wood, built-up and most single-ply roofs. The product is an example of Gaco Western’s commitment to improve the life cycle of its products and implement ways to reduce its environmental footprint.

 (800) 331-0196 www.gaco.com

SECUROCK

USG has released its SECUROCK glass-mat roof board for use with mechanically attached, fire barrier and thermal barrier applications. It enhances the durability of single-ply, mechanically attached low-slope commercial roof systems and is moisture and mold resistant. The tighter mat creates less itchiness during installation and protects the roof system from foot traffic and hail. Its mat-to-core tensile bond strength reduces the risk of delamination when cutting. The product scores and snaps cleanly and easily.

 (800) 950-3839 securockroofboards.com

ENHANCED PERFORMANCE ROOF HATCH

Bilco Co. has made available its thermally enhanced hatch that features a fully insulated cover and curb and 2-inch ozone-friendly polyisocyanurate thermal insulation board with an R-value of 12. The specially designed EPDM finger-type gasket ensures a positive seal between the cover and curb to reduce air permeability and ensure superior energy performance. In addition, the hatch has a high solar reflective index. These characteristics achieve 48 percent more energy savings than standard roof hatches.

 (203) 934-6363 www.bilco.com

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

FLASHMATE BRUSHABLE SEALANT

Berger Building Products Inc. has released its FlashMate brushable sealant in a convenient quart-size can. The professional-grade sealant can be used for flashing applications in all weather conditions because it will not freeze. The sealant withstands water contact immediately to stop leaks while staying flexible and crack free. Available in a clear color, it is VOC compliant, mildew resistant, paintable and prevents rust on any metal surface.

 (800) 523-8852 www.bergerbuildingproducts.com

ACCUSEAM SYSTEM

OMG Roofing Products’ AccuSeam System is designed to automate seam fastening on mechanically attached PVC and TPO roofs. The lap plate is placed in position by the tool as the laborer drives the fastener, eliminating the need for a second laborer, thereby increasing productivity. The depth-adjustment ring eliminates over and under driving of fasteners while providing consistent vertical alignment, maximum thread engagement, pullout performance and a consistent surface for heat welding of membranes.

 (800) 633-3800 www.olyfast.com

ROOFCLAMP

Action Manufacturing LLC has introduced the RoofClamp for attaching equipment to standing-seam metal roofs without penetrating the roof system. The RoofClamp RC works on most snap-lock and seamed-together roofs while the RoofClamp RCT works on bulb-shaped and T-shaped panels. The clamps are made of durable 6061-T6 aluminum and incorporate three rounded 1¼- by 3/8-inch stainless-steel cupped nose set screws. RoofClamp is rated for 600 allowable pounds using a safety factor of three.

 (717) 697-1900 www.roofclamp.com

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

51

RESISTA POLYISO INSULATION BOARD

Firestone Building Products Co. has made available its Resista Polyiso Insulation Board that is manufactured with a heavy-duty, double-coated, non-organic glass facer. The board is compatible with all fully adhered and mechanically attached single-ply, cold-applied and self-adhered modified bitumen membranes. With thicknesses varying from 1 to 4 inches, Resista Polyiso uses Firestone’s proprietary IsoGard foam technology to create impressive insulating value per inch, which can translate into significant energy savings.

 (317) 575-7000 www.firestonebpco.com

COMPUTER INTEGRATED ROOF MANUFACTURING

Metalforming Inc. has introduced CIRM for its Quadro Cinco roll former. CIRM produces precise machine-cut and -­ angled roof panels directly from site-verified dimensions, using TopView 3-D roof-design software. All roof panel data is loaded directly into the touch-screen controller, where dimensions can be edited in real time. The notcher and angle cutter finish the panels before roof installation. CIRM can be added to existing Quadro roll formers.

 (770) 631-0002 www.metalforming-usa.com

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CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

SHOCK TAPE ELECTRIC BIRD DETERRENT

Nixalite of America has announced the Shock Tape Electric Bird Deterrent system, which gives birds a harmless shock that sends them back into the air. The Shock Tape, which installs easily on a variety of surfaces, has a pressure sensitive adhesive on the bottom and two flat aluminum wires on top. DC pulse power comes from 110 VAC, solar- or battery-powered UL-listed line chargers. The flexible Shock Tape ribbon closely follows surface curves and contours.

BUSY? You Must Be Doing Retrofit!

NEW METAL ROOF

FLORID

A PROD

UCT APP

 (800) 624-1189 www.nixalite.com/shocktape.aspx

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SPACE FOR OPTIONAL INSULATION AND SOLAR EQUIPMENT

PURLIN

ROOF HUGGER

OLD ROOF

Roof Huggers Can Help Grow Your Business Even More! ■ NO LABOR COST TO TEAR OFF OLD ROOF ■ NO DUMPING OF OLD ROOFING MATERIALS ■ NO DISRUPTION OF YOUR BUSINESS ■ MANY SYSTEMS AVAILABLE FOR FEDERAL AND LOCAL TAX INCENTIVES ■ INCREASE WIND OR PURLIN CAPACITY TO MEET ALL NEW CODES ■ EASY UPGRADE TO STANDING SEAM ROOFS ■ INCREASE INSULATION FOR GREATER ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ROOF HUGGER ® Patent #5,367,848

The Leader in Energy Efficient Retrofit Re-roofing Systems

3:38 PM Page Or 1 fax us at: 877-202-2254 800-771-1711

Inland Coatings Call: 5/1/06

Visit our website at:

WUKO SUPER MINI BENDER

NA Bocker has made available its WUKO Super Mini Benders 2020 and 2050 for super-tight inside radius bends. The 2020 has a bending depth of ¾ inch while the 2050 has a bending depth of 2 inches. The products, which have a compact, ergonomic design, bend flat sheet up to 90 degrees. They have a 22-gauge capacity and exceptional minimum inside radius capacity. The benders are safe for painted or patinated metals.

www.roofhugger.com

INLAND RC 2000 Roof Rubbercoating

 (800) 624-8076 www.nabocker.com

Versatile Inland Rubbercoatings provide waterproofing, energy savings and corrosion protection on interior & exterior roofs and walls. Thermally Efficient RC 2000 is highly reflective, providing dramatic summer surface temperature reductions. Superb Adhesion RC 2000’s superior chemistry provides excellent adhesion, even over tight rust. Seals and Waterproofs RC 2000 features 1,500 lbs. tensile strength with 500% elongation and low permability. Extended Application Season Work can be performed even during colder winter months and RC 2000 is impervious to rainfall after only a minimal drying time. Fire Resistant RC 2000 features a Class A fire rating. Weatherability RC 2000 Rubbercoating has excellent longterm weather resistance.

1-800-456-8467 E-MAIL: info@inlandcoatings.com WEB: www.inlandcoatings.com P.O. Box 247, Adel, IA 50003 Phone: 515-993-4251 FAX: 515-993-4324

CAROLINAS ROOFING I MARCH . APRIL 2010

53

AD DIRECTORY

ABC SUPPLY CO. INC. Page 59 (919) 836-9950 www.abcsupply.com

CSC SHEET METAL INC. Page 57 (919) 544-8887 www.cscsheetmetal.com

LELAND INDUSTRIES Page 48 (800) 263-3393 www.lelandindustries.com

ROOF HUGGER Page 53 (800) 771-1711 www.roofhugger.com

A.C.T. METAL DECK SUPPLY Page 14 (865) 988-3325 www.metaldecksupply.com ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL SHEET METAL Page 39 (708) 756-4890 www.advarchsm.com

DAVIS-GARVIN Page 45 (803) 732-6331 www.davisgarvin.com

METRO ROOF PRODUCTS Page 9 (866) 638-7648 www.metroroofs.com

ROOFING TOOLS & EQUIPMENT INC. Page 49 (252) 291-1800 www.roofingtool.com

DAVIS ROOFING & SHEET METAL INC. Page 56 (803) 773-9391 www.davisroofingand maintenance.com

MURR-LANEY INC. Page 55 (704) 597-7020 www.murr-laneyinc.com

AMSI Page 52 (800) 943-9771 www.amsisupply.com AQUA SEAL MANUFACTURING & ROOFING INC. Page 55 (864) 834-5144 www.aquasealroofing.com ATLANTIC ROOFING DISTRIBUTORS— CHARLESTON Page 49 (843) 308-0040 BAKER ROOFING CO. INC. Page 55 (919) 828-2975 www.bakerroofing.com BEST DISTRIBUTING CO. Page 60 (919) 735-1651 www.bestdistributing.com BRADCO SUPPLY CORP. Page 26 (919) 255-1185 www.bradcosupply.com CARLISLE SYNTEC Page 3 (800) 4-SYNTEC www.carlisle-syntec.com

EAGLE METALS MANUFACTURING INC. Page 12 (864) 595-1702 www.eaglemetalsmfg.com FIRESTONE BUILDING PRODUCTS Page 4 (800) 426-7737 www.firestonebpco.com FORT ROOFING & SHEET METAL WORKS INC. Page 56 (843) 572-3490 www.fortroofing.com GLASGOW ROOFING CO. INC. Page 55 (864) 246-4141 GREENVILLE ROOFING CO. INC. Page 56 (864) 269-6645 GSSI Page 33 (800) 288-9489 www.gssisealants.com INLAND COATINGS Page 53 (800) 456-8467 www.inlandcoatings.com

C.E. BOURNE & CO. INC. Page 56 (704) 283-8556 www.cebourne.com

J.A. PIPER ROOFING CO. INC. Page 56 (864) 963-7784

CRS OF MONROE INC. Page 55 (843) 744-8188 www.crsrfg.com

JVS INC. Page 55 (704) 643-7121 www.jvsinc.com

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NA BOCKER Page 13 (919) 832-8481 www.nabocker.com N.B. HANDY CO. Page 7 (770) 667-0463 www.nbhandy.com OGLESBY CONTRACTING INC. Page 55 (864) 246-7207 www.oglesbycontracting.com OMG ROOFING PRODUCTS Page 47 (800) 633-3800 www.olyfast.com PALMETTO STATE ROOFING & SHEET METAL CO. INC. Page 56 (919) 682-5702 www.palmettostateroofing.com PETERSEN ALUMINUM CORP. Page 2 (704) 807-1205 www.pac-clad.com PICKARD ROOFING CO. INC. Page 56 (704) 392-0850 www.pickardroofing.com RADCO CONSTRUCTION SERVICES INC. Page 55 (828) 684-5860 www.radcoconstruction.com REEVES ROOFING/ROOFING TOOLS EQUIPMENT Page 10 (817) 598-1174 www.reevesequipment.com

S-5! Page 14 (888) 825-3432 www.s-5.com SERVICE ONE INC. Page 56 (252) 291-4436 www.serviceonenc.com SNOBAR Page 31 (800) 711-9724 www.snobar.com SNOJAX-SNOBLOX Page 11 (800) Snojax-1 www.snoblox-snojax.com STATE WIDE SHEET METAL & ROOFING INC. Page 56 (704) 289-6404 www.statewideroofinginc.com USP UNDERLAYMENTS Page 32 (267) 263-2308 WEATHERGARD INC. Page 55 www.weathergardnc.com ZIMMERMAN METALS Page 16 (303) 294-0180 www.zimmerman-metals.com

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CSC Sheet Metal is a full-service metal manufacturing and distribution facility. We offer a wide variety of products from complete drainage systems and metal roofing panels to dormers, collector boxes, finials, chimney caps, and even custom work. We stock many types of metal including Copper, Lead-Coated Copper, Zinc, Terne Coated Steel, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, and Galvalume. Get a FREE 2010 CSC POSTER Just call us or email us at: info@cscsheetmetal.com

MEMBER MINUTE

Dan Pope

OWNER AND VICE PRESIDENT Statesville Roofing & Building Restoration STATESVILLE, N.C. / DIRECTOR OF DISTRICT 3 FOR CRSMCA

WHO ARE THE MEMBERS OF YOUR FAMILY?

WHAT IS THE BEST ADVICE YOU’VE RECEIVED IN YOUR CAREER?

My wife, Connie; sons, Isaac, age 9, and Zachary, age 7; and daughter, Lily May, age 2.

“Surround yourself with the best people you can possibly find in your business.”

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A BEGINNING ROOFING OR SHEET-METAL WORKER?

WHO STARTED STATESVILLE ROOFING & BUILDING RESTORATION? Our company was started in 1938 by my grandfather C. David Pope.

Research the company you plan to work for and ensure it is a top performer. Take advantage of all training opportunities.

WHEN AND HOW DID YOU CHOOSE THIS CAREER?

WHO IS THE PERSON YOU MOST ADMIRE? I admire my Grandfather

I was more or less born into the career. Even my earliest jobs were associated with roofing. I remember as a kid making gutter spike ferrels from copper on a machine in the shop while my dad was in the office for a while on Saturday. After college, I formally decided to join the company.

Black who was a man with high morals and great leadership ability. I also greatly admire my father who has taught me many life lessons through his direct, non-sugar-coated approach to teaching.

WHAT DID YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU WERE GROWING UP?

It may sound cliché but my children and my great relationship with my wife.

A professional motorcycle racer.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE ITEM IN YOUR OFFICE? My computer. I remember

sharing one with another coworker in the late ’80s. It is a bit unbelievable we operated in such a fashion.

HOW HAS THE ROOFING PROFESSION CHANGED SINCE YOU’VE BEEN INVOLVED?

The profession has definitely become more technical.

WHAT IS THE MOST UNUSUAL PROJECT YOUR COMPANY HAS COMPLETED?

For many years, a project called Showplace, High Point, N.C., has been our most unusual project. The project was completed in 2000. The structure is a well-known architectural icon of the High Point area. Because of the sweeping curves of the structure, safety became a greater challenge than the roofing-system work itself.

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE CHANGED TO MAKE THE ROOFING AND SHEET-METAL INDUSTRY BETTER? I would like to see a formal apprentice program that would develop new sheet-metal and roofing technicians for our industry for the future.

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WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER YOUR GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT?

WHAT IS ONE OF YOUR PET PEEVES?

Ignorance. It is out of style, according to David Pope, my father.

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR RELAXATION?

I am an avid mountain-bike rider. I also enjoy hiking.

WHAT WOULD PEOPLE BE SURPRISED TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I graduated from the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, with a degree in psychology and a degree in geology.

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU EVERY DAY? My family. 

Surround yourself with the best people you can possibly find in your business.”

World-Class Service

ABC’s Promise To You

It’s one thing to promise world-class service, and another to deliver it. That’s why ABC developed the Customer Service Delivery System (CSDS) – A standardized, disciplined series of practices and procedures designed to ensure accuracy and minimize errors. CSDS begins with precise, comprehensive order taking. If you are picking up an order, we’ll have you loaded and back to your job site promptly. You can schedule your crews with confidence, because we’ll plan deliveries around your needs, double-check every load, call when it’s complete, and even document the delivery with digital pictures. We stake our reputation on service. Experience the CSDS difference at ABC Supply.

Roofing • Siding • Windows • Tools Gutter • Accessories • and More

North Carolina Locations Charlotte 704-394-9100 Conover 828-466-1036 Durham 919-688-4320 Fayetteville 910-435-0918 Greensboro 336-855-5030 Greenville 252-353-5473 Raleigh 919-836-9950 Swannanoa 828-298-0171 Wilmington 910-343-4380 Winston-Salem 336-767-2374

South Carolina Locations Charleston 843-529-1584 Columbia 803-771-4402 Easley 864-220-2556 Florence 843-667-1837 Greer 864-877-0780 Myrtle Beach 843-626-4663

Your Commercial Roofing Headquarters Since 1880 A Beacon Roofing Supply Company

21 Locations To Choose From

• Tapered Insulation Design

Richmond Roanoke

Statesville Asheville

Raleigh

Greenville

Goldsboro

Charlotte Monroe

Greenville

• Educated Commercial Staff

Wilmington

an

Columbia Charleston

O ce

La Vergne

Greensboro (East) Greensboro (West)

ic

Nashville

Knoxville

• Custom Metal Fabrication

Virginia Beach

At la nt

Clarksville

• On Time Jobsite Delivery

Find A Best Location Near You Visit Us Online At BestDist.com


Carolinas Roofing