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Table of Contents Message from the President ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Mission, Vision, and Core Values .............................................................................................................................. 5 The College’s Strategic Plan....................................................................................................................................... 9 The Strategic Plan, 2010-2015....................................................................................................................... 9 Perpetual Improvement Model .................................................................................................................. 13 Strategic Priorities - Goals and Accomplishments....................................................................................... 15 President’s Objectives ................................................................................................................................. 20 The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Foundation – Progress Summary ............................................ 24 College Data ............................................................................................................................................................. 27 Student Enrollment and Demographics ...................................................................................................... 27 Annual Enrollment ................................................................................................................................ 27 Unduplicated Headcount ...................................................................................................................... 27 Credit Enrollment by Semester ............................................................................................................. 27 Student Demographics ................................................................................................................................ 28 Gender .................................................................................................................................................. 28 Ethnicity ................................................................................................................................................ 28 Age ........................................................................................................................................................ 28 County of Residence ............................................................................................................................. 28 Program Enrollment .................................................................................................................................... 29 Program Headcount and FTEs............................................................................................................... 29 Program Type ........................................................................................................................................ 30 Graduates .................................................................................................................................................... 30 Degrees/Awards by Program ................................................................................................................ 30 Degrees/Awards by Program Type ....................................................................................................... 31 Institutional Resources ............................................................................................................................................ 32 Employee Data ............................................................................................................................................ 32 Category and Employment Status ........................................................................................................ 32 Gender and Ethnicity ............................................................................................................................ 32 Facilities Data .............................................................................................................................................. 32 Finance Data ................................................................................................................................................ 33 Revenues and Expenses ........................................................................................................................ 33 Operating Fund Sources........................................................................................................................ 34 Tuition and Fees .......................................................................................................................................... 34

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Message from the President

Dear College Community: As we begin a new academic year, we also begin a new phase in the College’s growth and development. Our Board of Trustees has approved moving forward with an additional location in Blair County and has allowed me to continue conversations with interested parties in Mifflin County to determine whether we could establish a successful center there. We have some re-organization with several departments getting shifted to new areas: Security has moved to Finance and Administration, the additional locations now report to the president, and EMS training has returned to Continuing Education. We’ve dropped a vice president position and regrouped academic affairs and students services under one vice president who will be assisted by five deans: a Dean of Faculty, a Dean of Teaching and Learning Resources, a Dean of School Partnerships, a Dean of Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, and a Dean of Enrollment Services and Registrar. Our three additional locations appear to be poised for a great year, in which they become fully selfsustaining operations with opportunities to add new positions and increase enrollment over the next few years. We are entering our second year with a student serving as both student government president and a member of our Board of Trustees and this has been a great addition to the Board with the County appointed trustees very accepting of having the student on board. We have also elected new Board members from Huntingdon and Somerset Counties to serve the interests of our non-sponsored regions. Financially, our situation is not as good as it could be, but we have managed to keep our operations strong despite weak funding from the state. We are hopeful that as we grow enrollments here and at our additional locations with the addition of Blair County that we can grow to become the second smallest community college in Pennsylvania and, thus, be able to leverage funding more adequate to our size. Sincerely,

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Mission, Vision and Core Values of Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Mission Pennsylvania Highlands Community College provides quality, affordable opportunities for learning that meet regional needs in a supportive, student-oriented environment.

Vision Pennsylvania Highlands Community College will be a nurturing, dynamic center for teaching and learning. We will be a model for individual development and a catalyst for regional renewal.

Core Values Pennsylvania Highlands Community College strives to be a community of learners where every student, employee and community member is respected and supported. As such, the College is deeply committed to the following values:

Student Success Creating a student-centered environment where individuals are challenged, encouraged, and supported to achieve their educational, professional and personal goals while developing a spirit of intellectual curiosity and a commitment to lifelong learning.

Quality and Accountability Establishing performance standards throughout the institution, developing measures to document effectiveness and committing to continuous improvement in pursuit of excellence.

Integrity and Ethics Holding each member of the organization to high professional and personal standards. These principles are also embodied in the Statement on Professional Ethics adopted by the College’s Faculty.

Collaboration and Collegiality Informing and involving members of the College community in discussion and problem solving at all levels in an atmosphere marked by civility and cordiality conducted with respect for personal and professional differences remember as well the value of humor and humility.

Responsiveness to Diverse and Changing Community Needs Developing innovative and creative responses to the region’s dynamic economic, workforce and social needs based on interactions with all segments of the community.

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The Strategic Plan, 2010-2015 The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College has been using various strategic planning processes since its inception in 1994. Each strategic planning process has involved various levels of interactivity on behalf of the Board of Trustees, administration and staff. Over the years several key elements have been difficult to incorporate into the planning process; the use of measurable institutional data to gauge results and tying the planning process to the institution’s budget.

In 2009-2010, a five-year strategic plan will be developed by the President’s Cabinet with input from each of the Board Committees. The five-year plan will serve as the basis for the development of the annual action items which will support the goals and objectives of the plan. The following are the Priorities, Goals, and Objective for FY 2012 to FY 2015. •

Priority: Assess Institutional Effectiveness o Goal: To improve the overall institutional effectiveness assessment plan and implement the plan based on assessment data o Goal: To determine student satisfaction  Establish a schedule to survey students once every three years beginning in FY2012 o Goal: To determine employee satisfaction  Establish a schedule to survey employees every three years beginning in FY2012 o Goal: To provide professional development opportunities to non-faculty employees  Develop and implement a new employee orientation program by fall 2012  Hire a professional development coordinator by FY2013 o Goal: To determine the effectiveness of College regionalization  Conduct first five-year comprehensive review of all additional locations in FY2015 o Goal: To assure the quality of academic programs  Full implementation of comprehensive academic assessment plan by FY2012  Achieve National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation by FY2013

Priority: Achieve Regionalization o Goal: To build and pursue the multi-campus map for regionalization  Hire full-time director for Huntingdon additional location by FY2012  Decide whether to add Clearfield to College’s service area by end of FY2012  Full implementation of regional political support plan by FY2012  Lease facility and hire staff for Blair County additional location by FY2014 o Goal: To leverage diverse workforce needs in program development in the College’s service area

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Develop marketing plan to disseminate information on workforce training options across the 6-county region by FY2012  Locate training sites in all service area locations by FY2013  Implement workforce training marketing plan by FY2013 o Goal: To establish community relationships throughout College service area  Increase involvement with municipal leadership in all locations by FY2012  Have 100% involvement of cabinet-level staff on external boards in our service areas by FY2013 Priority: Improve Academic Services o Goal: To improve academic programs.  Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three additional programs by fall 2012  Implement new program in engineering technology by FY2012  Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three additional programs by fall 2013  Create two single-semester certificate programs each year for five-years. o Goal: To increase first-time/full-time retention fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring  Revamp current FYE curriculum to adhere to nationally-recognized FYE programs by FY2012  Develop a career development office by FY2013  Add two new 200-level general education courses each year for five years  Build a Fine Arts Department and Fine Arts (A.A.) program by FY2015 o Goal: To increase the matriculation rate of part-time to full-time students  Eliminate incentives that allow part-time students to remain in part-time nonmatriculated status by FY2012  Redesign catalog to optimize transfer options within General Studies and Liberal Arts areas by FY2012  Provide training to all academic advisors on transfer flexibility of College’s programs by FY2013  Redesign catalog to optimize search-ability through online content by FY2013 

o o

o

Goal: To improve course/program transferability  Produce a partnership catalog by FY2012 Goal: To increase number of specialized accreditations of College programs  National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation by FY2013  Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accreditation by FY2014  National Association for the Education of young Children (NAEYC) accreditation by FY2014 Goal: To improve developmental education  Create a developmental department by FY2012 [10]

Develop and implement course alignment between developmental courses and 100level courses by FY2013 o Goal To increase and improve continuing education offerings and associated revenues  Hire a Dean of Continuing Education by FY2013  Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years Priority: Strengthen Fiscal Stability and Remain Affordable o Goal: To develop and implement the five-year financial plan for expansion  Identify staffing needs for each additional location over the next five-years by FY2012 o Goal: To develop and implement a comprehensive facilities master plan  Identify and hire a firm to produce the facilities master plan by FY2015 o Goal: To develop and implement a five-year staffing plan o Goal: To achieve permanent ownership of a main campus facility 

The accomplishments of various departments are outlined beginning on page 15.

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Objective

Lead Officers

Status

Priority: Assess Institutional Effectiveness Goal: To provide professional development opportunities to non-faculty employees Develop and implement a new employee orientation program by the fall of 2012

AVP of Human Resources

Research has begun through SHRM and CUPA for best practice orientation program inclusions and design.

Goal: To determine student satisfaction Establish a schedule to survey students once every three years beginning in FY2012

VP of Academic Affairs; Institutional Effectiveness Office

Institutional Research will conduct Student Satisfaction/Engagement Surveys according to the following schedule; Student Surveys- Fall FY12 (completed), Spring FY15, Spring FY18

Goal: To determine employee satisfaction Establish a schedule to survey employees every three years beginning in FY2012

VP of Academic Affairs; Institutional Effectiveness Office

Institutional Research will conduct Employee Satisfaction Surveys according to the following schedule; Employee Surveys- Feb/March FY12, Feb/March FY15, Feb/March FY18

Goal: To assure the quality of academic programs Full implementation of a comprehensive academic assessment plan by FY 2012

VP of Academic Affairs; Special Assistant to the President

Plan was developed, endorsed by Faculty Senate, and approved by the Board at its February 28th meeting. Full implementation in place

Priority: Achieve Regionalization Goal: To build and pursue the multi-campus map for regionalization

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Hire full-time director for Huntington location by FY2012

President; Executive Cabinet

Marissa Gracey was hired as the Director, Huntington Center and began her employment in July 18, 2011

Decide whether to add Clearfield to College’s service area by end of FY2012

President; Executive Cabinet

Senator Wozniak has been speaking with Lock Haven President about a meeting to discuss Penn Highlands sharing space on the Clearfield campus of Lock Haven U. Any decision to add Clearfield is dependent on the budget.

President; AVP for External Relations

Working with local and state government entities to share our efforts and concerns via meetings and other media; identifying changes in districts for state legislators. Held our 2nd legislative reception in March 2012.

Full implementation of regional political support plan by FY2012

Goal: To leverage diverse workforce needs in program development in the College’s service area Develop marketing plan AVP of Marketing now assigned to Associate Vice to disseminate continuing President for External Relations effective July information on workforce Education; VP of 2012 training options across Student Services the 6-county region by FY2012 Goal: To establish community relationships throughout College service area Increase involvement with municipal leadership in all locations by FY2012

President; AVP for External Relations

Obtaining schedules and developing talking points prior to meetings; identifying local boroughs and townships and creating talking points. Identifying the leaders on these councils.

Priority: Improve Academic Services Goal: To improve academic programs

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Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A.) versions of 3 additional programs by the Fall of 2012

Vice President for Academic Affairs; Student Services and the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning

Prepared five (Accounting, Business, Communication, Criminal Justice, and Professional Pilot) for fall of 2011; Early Childhood Education begins fall of 2012.

Implement new program in engineering technology by FY2012

Vice President for Academic Affairs; Student Services the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning

Pre-engineering transfer program was approved at the May 2012 Board meeting. Admissions can begin recruiting this cycle for a 2013 start.

Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A.) versions of 3 additional programs by the Fall of 2013

Vice President for Academic Affairs; Student Services and the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning

Environmental Science (A.S.) and Computer Science (A.S.) are under development.

Create two singlesemester certificate programs each for 5 years

Vice President for Academic Affairs; Student Services the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning

Child Development Certification and CDA Credential are approved, Customer Food Service Certification is under development, and Food Service Certification is under consideration.

Goal: To increase first-time/full-time retention fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring Revamp current FYE curriculum to adhere to nationally recognized FYE programs by FY2012

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services; the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning

Completed 2010-2011. Title III funds will be used to develop a plan and implement a strategy during 2012-2013 for a more fully integrated FYE program in collaboration with the Gardner Institute.

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Add 2 new 220-level general education courses each for 5 years

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services; the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning

Completed FY 2010-2011 ENG 250 Women and Literature ENG225 Literature for children/adolescents HIS 200 American Immigration HIS 205 American Popular Culture HUM225 Business Ethics MAT 205 Applied Calculus PSY 220 Introduction to Counseling REL 205 Death and Dying REL 235 Philosophy of Religion HUM 111 to PHI 200 Intro to Ethics MAT 143 to MAT 203 Ends Higher Math

Goal: To increase the matriculation rate of part-time to full-time students Eliminate incentives that allow part-time students to remain part-time nonmatriculated status by FY2012

Vice Last step needed is a credit limit on nonPresident for matriculation. This last piece is to be Academic presented to AA/SS and Board for action at Affairs and their June meetings. Student Services Redesign catalog to Vice Completed. Areas of interest were added to optimize transfer options President for online version of the 2011-12 catalog and within General Studies Academic included in other formats the 2012-2013 and Liberal Arts areas by Affairs and version. FY 2012 Student Services Goal: To improve course/program transferability Produce a partnership catalog by FY2012

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services

Online catalog completed. Transfer and partnership agreements outlined in dedicated sections.

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Goal: To improve developmental education Create a developmental department by FY2012

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services and Coordinator of Developmental Studies

Chris Lint is the developmental coordinator. Developmental Department is complete.

Goal: To increase and improve continuing education offerings and associated revenues Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for 5 years

AVP of Continuing Education

10 classes offered in Ebensburg; 10 offered in Somerset; 2 classes offered in Mifflin County; 3 offered at an off-site or alternate location.

Priority: Strengthen Fiscal Stability and Remain Affordable Goal: To develop and implement the five-year financial plan for expansion Identify staffing needs for each additional location over the next five-years by FY2012

President; Executive Cabinet

Executive Cabinet has submitted their request to HR. 1:45 FTE for full-time faculty for a specific major, 1 FT employee per 15 FTE students.

President’s Objectives Completion of the Huntington facility with the new director on board and all classes offered on sire in the new building

President; Executive Cabinet

Both Huntington and Somerset operations showing balanced budgets for FY2013 when presented at the April

President, Executive Cabinet, Directors of the Somerset and

Classes began in the new facility Fall 2011.

2012-13 budgets prepared for both locations show slight operating deficits. Both sites are currently ahead of pace to reach Fall 2012 enrollment goals and should be able to generate sufficient revenue to operate in the [19]

2012 Board meeting

Huntington Campuses

"black" for 2012-13.

All current construction projects at Richland campus completed

Vice President of Finance and Administration

Completed October 2011

Business Plan for Blair County campus ready for Board approval by June 2012 meeting

Vice President of Finance and Administration

In progress

Increase enrollment by 5.8% over FY2011 numbers

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services

As of October 4, 2011, core credit enrollment for FA11 is down 0.7% in total headcount, up 3.9% in FT headcount, and up 4.1% in total credits sold.

Add a Career Development Office

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services

Office is staffed and functional.

Have engineering technology program ready for Board approval by the February 2012 meeting

Vice President for Academic Affairs; Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning

Pre-engineering transfer program was approved at the May 2012 Board meeting. Admissions can begin recruiting this cycle for a 2013 start.

Have a comprehensive academic assessment plan ready for Board approval by the October 2011 meeting

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services

Plan was developed, endorsed by the Faculty Senate, and approved by the Board at its February 28, 2012 meeting. Full implementation in place.

Get Workforce Education Department running in the black by June 2012.

President; the AVP of Continuing Education

Intent to reduce 2010 deficit.

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Revitalize Workforce Education into a more comprehensive department

President; the AVP of Continuing Education

President provided a new vision for the Workforce Education Department at a Board retreat in August/ Grace Markum hired as AVP for Continuing Education.

Conduct search for 2 new faculty positions for fall 2012 start.

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Services

Physical Sciences faculty member hired January 2012. FT temporary Criminal Justice/Social Science faculty member to continue through 2012-2013. Computer Science faculty search to begin this summer.

Increased annual giving AVP of External by Foundation and Relations Trustee Board members to 90% of total membership

Have instituted separate pledge form for Board members to better track and address; Currently 19 of 25 Board members have made personal pledges to the annual campaign.

Increase Foundation assets to at least $555,000 by June 30, 2012

President; the Increased employee giving for this years AVP of External campaign. Working on regional development. The annual campaign pledges and donations Relations

Implement and complete Bodolosky auditorium fundraising campaign with between $50,000 and $100,000 in pledges and contributions

President; the This campaign has stalled. We may need to AVP of External rethink our completion date and change our approach. Currently we are trying to engage a Relations

Implement and complete the first year of the Title III grant project

President; the Implemented processes to comply with Vice grant financial reporting requirements Presidents; The Associate Vice Presidents; et al

total $49,321 as of May 14, 2012. Total assets as of April 30, 2012 were $504,808.60.

committee of interested participants and this has not worked well.

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Add annual meeting with county commissioners in Somerset and Huntington counties to the list of permanent political events

President; the The president continues to meet with Cambria AVP of External Commissioners quarterly. He has met with both the Huntingdon and Somerset Relations

Restore annual meeting with U.S. legislative leaders during the legislative summit in Washington in February to promote support for community colleges in general but to also solicit support for any federal grants we might be pursuing.

President; the AVP for External Relations has met with AVP of External Congressman Shuster's District Director Jim Frank and Senator Toomey's District Director Relations

Commissioners during the first quarter of 2012 and will meet with them again in the fourth quarter.

John Frick and will schedule meetings with the President and these Legislators.

Build support for Blair President; the Beginning to attend Chamber meetings, as County Campus through AVP of External well as, Altoona-Blair County development conversations with Blair Relations events. County political and business leaders.

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The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Foundation Progress Summary, 2011-2012 Government Relations The support of legislators has been critical to the continued development and regionalization of Penn Highlands. We value the relationships we have developed with these individuals and work closely with them on projects related to funding, facilities and legislation impacting higher education. Annually, we invite our legislators to a reception to discuss the many issues impacting the College’s work. We also maintain contact with them through our monthly newsletters and special interest projects. As the commonwealth prepares for redistricting, we will have the opportunity to engage more of our legislators in our efforts. Community Relations The College maintains active participation in community and civic events. Students, faculty and staff volunteer on a regular basis assisting local organizations with fundraising, awareness and service activities. We are also working to increase the opportunities for groups to utilize our facilities by hosting educational and entertainment events at our various locations. Exposing more potential students to our facilities is a great way to increase awareness throughout the community. Marketing and Media Relations The College continued to receive very positive press during the past year. We have worked diligently to ensure a presence in print media that provides positive exposure for our students, faculty and staff. This concerted effort has led to a better understanding in the community regarding Penn Highlands’ purpose and capabilities. As we build on these opportunities, our marketing strategies will reflect a more focused approach highlighting specific programs of study and sharing stories from our students, faculty, staff and alumni.

Foundation The PHCC Foundation continues to work toward providing meaningful financial assistance to the development of the College. Working with a Board of Directors, the Foundation has set a goal of obtaining $1 million in assets by the end of the 2016 fiscal year. These assets are garnered through annual campaign donations, special fundraising events and the development of scholarship funds for our students. This years’ annual campaign raised just over $50,000 with our fundraising events bringing in an additional $14,000. The Foundation has also benefited from the College’s Title III grant that was awarded in September 2012. This grant includes an opportunity for the Foundation to raise funds that will then be matched by the grant. During the first year of the 5 year grant award, the Foundation received $15,000 in matching funds. The remaining four years should bring in an additional $172,000 in grant and matching funds. These funds will be

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placed into an endowment that will be held by the College and utilized to further development academic programs and enhance professional development opportunities for faculty and staff. We are excited about our efforts in Huntingdon County as we are working with our Huntingdon County Advisory board members to visit local business owners and engage them in the continued development of that campus through our annual campaign. This is an approach that will be utilized in Somerset and other regional locations. Designations

Amount

Unrestricted

$32,419.36

One Book

$4,668.80

Asonevich Scholarship

$3,412.00

Mangarella Scholarship

$1,000.00

Phi Theta Kappa

$544.40

AAUW Scholarship

$26.00

Valenty Scholarship

$375.00

NAIFA Scholarship

$26.00

Huntingdon

$9,500.00

Total

$51,971.56

Grants We are pleased to have been awarded a number of local grants during this year. These grants provide the College with the best opportunity to enhance programs and enrollment and lead to improved relationships with funding organizations throughout the region. Grant

Amount

Fend Foundation/ACE

$12,960

Fend Foundation

$7,000

PHEAA CAPS

$9,000

Lee Initiatives

$24,757

Community Foundation

$621

Total Grants Received

$54,338

Purpose Scholarships for ACE students in the 5 Greater Johnstown area School Districts Scholarships for incoming freshmen from the 5 Greater Johnstown Area School Districts To work directly with Greater Johnstown School District to improve College access for their students To purchase equipment for the Medical Assisting Technology Program Funding of the One Book Program

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Scholarships This year we have put in place a scholarship application protocol that requires our potential recipients to take a more active role in our selection process. All applicants are required to complete an application and an essay in order to be considered. Students are also required to meet deadlines and provide required financial information prior to being selected as a recipient. As we continue to develop our scholarship programs and opportunities, these procedures will be critical. We are hoping to further enhance our scholarship offerings by encouraging local businesses to commit dollars to help fund local students who may wish to attend Pennsylvania Highlands.

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Student Enrollment and Demographic Information Annual Enrollment Unduplicated Headcount Credit 3,999 Non-Credit 1,526 Credit Enrollment by Semester Fall, 2011 Headcount 3,022 Credits 23,411 FTE’s 1950.92 Enrollment Type Type of Student Core New Returning Total Core Non-Core Dual Enrollment Associates in High School Conemaugh Nursing Conemaugh Radiology Conemaugh Histotechnology First Energy JWF

Spring, 2012 1,857 15,833 1319.42

Fall, 2011 428 886 1,314 Fall, 2011 1,614 16

Spring, 2012 161 1,068 1,229 Spring, 2012 413 56

43

115

18

18

0

18

10 0

9 0

Summer, 2012 703 3,556 296.33

Degree-Seeking Status of CORE students Fall, 2011 Spring, 2012 Degree Seeking 1227 1160 Non-Degree Seeking 87 69 Full-Time / Part-Time Status - % of CORE students Fall, 2011 Spring, 2012 Full-Time 67.50% 65.66%

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Part-Time

32.49%

Gender - % of CORE students Fall, 2011 Male Female

42.54% 58.22%

Ethnicity - % of CORE students Fall, 2011 Caucasian 91.82% African American 4.43% Hispanic 0.62% Asian or Pacific 0.70% Islander American Indian or 0.23% Alaska Native Unknown 2.18%

34.33%

Spring, 2012 43.04% 56.96%

Spring, 2012 91.31% 5.05% 0.58% 0.50% 0.17% 2.39%

Age - % of CORE students Under 18 18-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-49 50-64 65+ Unknown Non-Traditional (25+)

Fall, 2011 0.30% 65.45% 10.20% 7.08% 5.48% 7.31% 3.20% 0.08% 0.91% 34.26%

Spring, 2012 0.33% 65.09% 11.96% 6.83% 4.72% 6.75% 3.50% 0.08% 0.73% 34.57%

County of Residence - % of CORE students Fall, 2011 Spring, 2012 Bedford 0.61% 0.81% Blair 2.89% 3.01%

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Cambria Fulton Huntingdon Somerset All Other Counties

76.71% 0.00% 1.83% 15.07% 2.89%

76.15% 0.00% 2.60% 15.38% 2.03%

Program Headcount and FTE Information Program AC Accounting, AAS ACAS Accounting- Associate of Science ACDT Architectural/Civil: CAD & Design, AAS AO Administrative Office Assistant BAAS Business Administration BIOT Biotechnology BM Business Management, AAS BMO Business Management Online, AAS CJ Criminal Justice, AAS CJAS Criminal Justice – AS Degree CM Communication, AA CMST Communication Studies CTNA CICT – Network Administration, AAS CTTC CICT – Telecommunications, AAS CUL Culinary Arts, AAS ECML Early Childhood Mgmt. Leadership, CERT EE Early Childhood Education, AAS EUT Electric Utilities Technology, AAS GN General Studies, AGS GNO General Studies Online, AGS HC Health Care Management, AAS HIST Health Professions: Histotechnology HSEC Human Services – Early Child Care, AAS HSGN Human Services – Generalist, AAS HSGR Human Services – Gerontology, AAS ISA Information Security and Analysis LA Liberal Arts, AA MC Medical Coding Specialist, DIP MDAT Medical Assisting Technology, AAS MO Medical Office Specialist, DIP

Fall, 2011 Headcount FTE 14 13.00 2 1.25 42 40.25 2 1.67 27 25.42 12 10.75 115 88.92 9 5.75 73 67.92 26 25.00 2 1.58 64 57.67 6 3.92 22 20.50 0 0 66 59.50 10 8.25 467 430.42 3 1.83 1 0.75 2 1.0 60 708.0 1 0.50 1 0.33 15 11.25 18 12.58 86 76.67 2 0.75

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Spring, 2012 Headcount FTE 15 12.58 6 5.0 40 38.08 6 5.33 28 25.83 9 7.33 105 80.42 9 6.75 62 56.25 35 31.83 1 0.75 3 2.75 54 50.33 2 1.42 19 16.33 14 6.50 51 42.83 9 7.75 459 408.50 5 3.75 2 1.25 1 1.0 1 0.58 55 50.58 1 0.83 13 9.25 16 12.00 82 75.08 1 0.25

MT NM OA PH PM PRPI RT ST TP TECH WAN WELD

Manufacturing Technology, AAS Non-Matriculating Administrative Office Assistant Pharmacy Technician, CERT Pre-Communications/Media, AA Professional Pilot Radiologic Technology, AAS Secretarial Technology, AAS Teacher Education, AA Technology Studies, AAS WAN/CISCO Networking Welding Technology, AAS

1 193 2 16 3 5 19 1 10 11 3 16

0.50 65.50 2.00 15.67 2.50 4.75 9.25 1.00 9.83 11.00 3.00 12.08

630 1 19 2 5 19 1 9 7 5 19

183.08 1.00 16.92 1.50 4.58 8.17 1.00 7.83 6.83 4.83 12.58

Note: Several programs have been discontinued, combined with other programs, or renamed in the 2010-2011 academic year.

Program Type and FTE Information Program AAS AS AA CERT DIP

Associate of Applied Science Associate of Science Associate of Arts Certificate Diploma

Degrees/Awards conferred by Program Program AC Accounting, AAS ACDT Architectural/Civil: CAD & Design, AAS AO Administrative Office Assistant BIOT Biotechnology, AAS BM Business Management, AAS CM Communication, AA CJ Criminal Justice, AAS CTNA CICT – Network Administration, AAS CTTC CICT – Telecommunications, AAS CUL Culinary Arts, AAS ECML Early Childhood Mgmt. Leadership, CERT EE Early Childhood Education, AAS ET Electronics Technology, AAS EUT Electric Utilities Technology, AAS EV Environmental Science and Technology,

Fall, 2011 Headcount FTE 542 1117.18 60 56.42 500 463.83 17 16.00 20 14.58

Awards 10 11 1 2 44 1 13 16 5 4 4 16 1 11 1

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Spring, 2012 Headcount FTE 490 411.05 74 67.29 496 438.33 33 23.42 17 13.00

GN GNO HC HSEC HSGN LA MC MDAT MO MT PH RT ST TECH TP WELD

AAS General Studies, AA General Studies Online Health Care Management, AAS Human Services – Early Child Care, AAS Human Services – Generalist, AAS Liberal Arts, AA Medical Coding Specialist, DIP Medical Assisting Technology, AAS Medical Office Specialist, DIP Manufacturing Technology, AAS Pharmacy Technician, CERT Radiologic Technology, AAS Secretarial Technology, AAS Technology Management, AAS Teacher Education, AA Welding Technology, AAS

Program Type and Degrees/Awards Conferred Program Type AAS Associate of Applied Science AA Associate of Arts AGS Associate of General Studies CERT Certificate DIP Diploma Total

50 1 1 2 10 10 8 26 1 1 8 5 3 1 6 1

Awards 187 25 44 13 10 279

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Institutional Resources Employee Data, Fall of 2011 Category and Employment Status Instructors Executive/Administrative Other Professionals, Support Services Technical & Paraprofessionals Clerical & Secretarial Service & Maintenance Total

Full-Time 25 35 11

Part-Time 92 0 0

Total 117 35 11

0

0

0

15 9 95

11 6 109

26 15 204

Employment Status, Gender and Ethnicity Full-Time Male Female Caucasian 39 55 African American 0 1 Hispanic 0 0 Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0 American Indian or 0 0 Alaska Native Unknown 0 0 Total 39 55

Part-Time Male Female 55 52 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 55

0 52

Facilities Data Square Feet Richland Ebensburg Somerset-West Main St Huntingdon Somerset-Georgian Place Total

128,967 24,651 3,759 3,258 3868 164,503

Assignable Square Feet 99,205 19,248 2,959 1,638 1,994 125,044

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Male 94 0 0 0 0 0 94

Total Female 107 3 0 0 0 0 110

Finance Data Revenue and Expenses, 2010-2011 College

Foundation

REVENUES Operating Revenues Student Tuition & Fees Government Grants Government Grants - Capital Auxiliary Enterprise In-kind Revenues Contributions Fundraising State Appropriations: Operating Mandated Other Appropriations

5,616,415 6,482,650 95,000 108,017 43,744 102,555 14,972 2,485,046 868,930 195,183

County Appropriations Private Gifts Interest and Dividends Unrealized Gains and Losses Other Non-Operating Revenue / (Expenses) Total Operating Revenues EXPENSES Education & General: Instruction Academic Support Student Services Institutional Support Operations & Facility Maintenance Government Grants Provision for Uncollectible Accounts Depreciation Grants to PHCC Fundraising In-kind Expenses Interest

1,205,000 61,228

76,445 17,193,914

3,732,065 1,572,621 1,144922 1,717,329 1,629,958 5,815,635 24,581 875,799

25,633 30,221 (28,914) 188,211

61,228

14,839 4,169 43,744 141,999

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Total Operating Expenses Net Income /(Loss)

16,645,909 539,005

123,980 30,462

Change in Net Assets Net Assets – Beginning of the Year Current Year Net Income (Loss)

9,390,484 539,005

341,388 64,231

Net Assets – End of the Year

9,929,489

436,081

Operating Fund Sources (as of June, 2011) Source Amount Tuition 5,616,415 State 3,549,159 Local (Cambria County) 1,205,000 Other 245,690 Total 10,616,264

% of Operating Funds 53% 33% 11% 3% 100%

Tuition, 2011-2012 Per-Credit Tuition In-County

Regional

Out of County

Out of State

Full-Time Tuition

$1,450.00

$2,550.00

$2,900.00

$4,350.00

Per-Credit Tuition

$96.00

$168.00

$192.00

$288.00

Note: Does not include course fees.

[38]


Annual Report | 2011-2012