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Palo Alto

Vol. XXXIV, Number 43 N July 26, 2013

City weighs info about mobile home park Page 3

w w w.PaloA ltoOnline.com

Up for the challenge Ten-year-old local chess club puts Bay Area on the national map page 14

SUPPORTLOCALJOURNALISM.ORG

Transitions 13

Shop Talk 20

Movies 21

Puzzles 41

NArts Afro-Cuban and all that jazz at festival

Page 17

NSports Stanford tennis duo learning the pro game

Page 23

NHome A trio of centrally located neighborhoods

Page 29

CIT Y O F PALO ALTO PR ESE NTS TH E 29TH ANN UAL

TIME & PLACE 5K walk 7:00pm, 10K run 8:15pm, 5K run 8:45pm. Race-night registration 6 to 8pm at City of Palo Alto Baylands Athletic Center, Embarcadero & Geng Roads (just east of the Embarcadero Exit off Highway 101). Parking — go to PaloAltoOnline.com to check for specific parking locations.

5K WALK, 5K & 10K RUN Great for kids and families

COURSE 5k and 10k courses around the Palo Alto Baylands under the light of the Full Harvest Moon. Course is USAT&F certified (10k only) and flat along paved roads. Water at all stops. Course maps coming soon.

REGISTRATIONS & ENTRY FEE Adult Registration (13 +) registration fee is $30 per entrant by 9/13/13. Includes a long-sleeved t-shirt. Youth Registration (6 - 12) registration is $20 per entrant by 9/13/13. Includes a long-sleeved t-shirt. Youth (5 and under) run free with an adult, but must be registered through Evenbrite with signed parental guardian waiver, or may bring/fill out a signed waiver to race-night registration. Late Registration fee is $35 for adults, $25 for youth from 9/14 - 9/18. Race night registration fee is $40 for adult; $30 for youth from 6 to 8pm. T-shirts available only while supplies last. Refunds will not be issued for no-show registrations and t-shirts will not be held. MINORS: If not pre-registered, minors under 18 must bring signed parental/waiver form on race night.

SPORTS TEAM/CLUBS: Online pre-registration opportunity for organizations of 10 or more runners; e-mail MoonlightRun@paweekly.com.

DIVISIONS Age divisions: 9 & under; 10 - 12; 13 - 15; 16 - 19; 20 - 24; 25 - 29; 30 - 34; 35 - 39; 40 - 44; 45 - 49; 50 - 54; 55 - 59; 60 - 64; 65 - 69; 70 & over with separate divisions for male and female runners in each age group. Race timing provided for 5K and 10K runs only.

COMPUTERIZED RESULTS BY A CHANGE OF PACE Chip timing results will be posted on PaloAltoOnline.com by 11pm race night. Race organizers are not responsible for incorrect results caused by incomplete/incorrect registration forms.

AWARDS/PRIZES/ENTERTAINMENT Top three finishers in each division. Prize giveaways and refreshments. Pre-race warmups by Noxcuses Fitness, Palo Alto

BENEFICIARY Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund. A holiday-giving fund to benefit Palo Alto area nonprofits and charitable organizations. In April 2013, 55 organizations received a total of $380,000 (from the 2012-2013 Holiday Fund.)

FRIDAY SEPT 20 7PM A benefit event for local non-profits supporting kids and families

MORE INFORMATION Call (650) 463-4920, (650) 326-8210, email MoonlightRun@paweekly.com or go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com. For safety reasons, no dogs allowed on course for the 5K and 10K runs. They are welcome on the 5K walk only. No retractable leashes. Bring your own clean-up bag. Jogging strollers welcome in the 5K walk or at the back of either run.

Presented by

REGISTER ONLINE: PaloAltoOnline.com/moonlight_run Corporate Sponsors

Event Sponsors

Community Sponsors

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Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

Effort to close Buena Vista hampered by lack of information Palo Alto considers revised analysis from owner of city’s only mobile-home park by Gennady Sheyner OR MORE THAN A HALF CENTURY UNTIL LAST .OVEMBER WHEN THE *IS THE"UENA6ISTA-OBILE(OME SER FAMILY ANNOUNCED ITS INTENTION 0ARK HAS STOOD OUT AS A QUIET TOSHUTTER"UENA6ISTAANDCONVERTIT COUNTERPOINTTO0ALO!LTOSAFFLUENT INTOA UNITAPARTMENTCOMPLEX TOUCHSCREEN TAPPING0RIUSCULTURE %VENNOW WITHTHESPOTLIGHTSHINING !S ONE OF THE CITYS FEW REFUGES ON"UENA6ISTAANDADVOCATESSTEP FORLOW INCOMERESIDENTS THETRAILER PINGFORWARDTOPROTECTITSROUGHLY PARK AT  %L #AMINO 2EAL LIN  RESIDENTS FROM DISPLACEMENT GERED MOSTLY IN POLITICAL OBSCURITY MUCH REMAINS UNKNOWN ABOUT THE

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COMMUNITY INCLUDING THE EXACT NUMBEROFPEOPLELIVINGATTHEPARK THE PERCENTAGE WHO HAVE SPECIAL NEEDS OR DISABILITIES AND THE VALUE OFEACHMOBILEHOME 4HATINFORMATIONˆORLACKTHERE OFˆHASBECOMEKEYASTHE*ISSER FAMILYTRIESTOCOMPLETEAMANDATED 2ELOCATION)MPACT2EPORT ANANALY SISOFTHEPARKTHATDETERMINESHOW MUCH EACH HOUSEHOLD WOULD GET PAIDINEXCHANGEFORLEAVING"UENA 6ISTA

4HE FAMILY SUBMITTED THE FIRST VERSIONOFTHEREPORTIN-AYBUTTHE DOCUMENT WAS DEEMED INCOMPLETE BY THE CITY /N *ULY  THE FAM ILY SUBMITTED AN AMENDED VERSION WHICHTHECITYISNOWREVIEWINGFOR COMPLIANCE )F DEEMED COMPLETE THE REPORT WOULD BE SUBMITTED TO THEHEARINGOFFICER #RAIG,ABADIE ANATTORNEYRETAINEDBYTHECITY WHO WOULDDETERMINEWHETHERTHECOM PENSATIONOFFEREDTOTHERESIDENTSBY THE*ISSERSISFAIR

-UCHLIKETHEORIGINALREPORT THE  PAGEAMENDEDVERSIONILLUSTRATES THESTEEPCHALLENGESTHE*ISSERFAMI LYISFACINGASITTRIESTOCOMPLYWITH THELOCALLAWFORPARKCLOSURE-ANY OFTHERESIDENTSHAVEEITHERDECLINED TORESPONDTOTHEQUESTIONNAIRESTHE *ISSERSRELOCATIONSPECIALISTHASSENT OUTORHAVESUBMITTEDINCOMPLETERE PLIES WHICHSUGGESTSTHATTHEIRPOP ULATIONCOULDBESIGNIFICANTLYUNDER (continued on page 6)

LAW ENFORCEMENT

Palo Alto police are capturing license-plate info Police say the new device will catch criminals; critics express concerns by Sue Dremann AMERASMOUNTEDATOPA0ALO !LTOPOLICECARARERECORDING THE LICENSE PLATES OF NEARBY VEHICLES NOW THAT AN AUTOMATED LICENSE PLATE READER HAS BEEN IN STALLED 4HE DEVICE DEBUTED ON 4UESDAY *ULY ANDISDESIGNEDTOHELPPO LICE FIND CRIMINALS AND STOLEN VE HICLES QUICKLY AND EFFICIENTLY ,T :ACH0ERRONSAID"UTCIVIL LIBERTIES WATCHDOGS FEAR THAT THE PRICE FOR CATCHINGLAWBREAKERSISTOOHIGH 4HE READER TAKES IN LICENSE IN FORMATIONFROMALLNEARBYVEHICLES NOT JUST A SUSPECTS !ND THAT IN FORMATIONCANBEFEDTOOTHERLAW ENFORCEMENTAGENCIES ACCORDINGTO THE!MERICAN#IVIL,IBERTIES5NION !#,5 WHICH PUBLISHED A REPORT ONTHEISSUEIN*ULY !BOUT  "AY !REA GOVERNMENT AGENCIES USE LICENSE PLATE READERS ACCORDINGTOAREPORTBYTHE#ENTER FOR)NVESTIGATIVE2EPORTING INCLUD INGTHE#ITYOF%AST0ALO!LTO-EN LO 0ARK PLANS TO ADD READERS TO ITS CRIMINAL CATCHINGARSENAL 4HE3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY3HERIFFS /FFICE GAVE A READER TO EACH LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY IN THE COUNTY ANDWILLGATHERTHEDATACOUNTYWIDE FROM MULTIPLE POLICE DEPARTMENTS 0ALO!LTORECEIVEDITSDEVICEATNO COST 0ERRONSAID "UT THE 3HERIFFS /FFICE HAS NOT YETDECIDEDWHETHERITWILLUSETHE INFORMATIONONLYTOSOLVECRIMESOR WILLSUBMITTHEINFORMATIONTOAFED ERALAGENCYFORBROADERINTELLIGENCE PURPOSES 3HERIFFS/FFICE3GT+URT 3TENDERUPSAID ,ICENSE PLATEDATAISCOLLECTEDIN THE"AY!REATHROUGHTHE.ORTHERN #ALIFORNIA 2EGIONAL )NTELLIGENCE #ENTER ONEOFhFUSIONvSITESNA TIONWIDEESTABLISHEDAFTERTHE3EPT   TERRORISTATTACKS h4HE GOAL IS TO CREATE A SYSTEM

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Christophe Haubursin

Handle with care Jen Kotkin, left, and Shannon Forbes, educators and handlers for Wildlife Associates, present an African crested porcupine, Koe, at the Cubberley Community Center on July 24. The show-and-tell demonstration also involved Bug, a six-banded armadillo; Savannah, an African serval cat; and Wiyaca, an American kestrel.

ENVIRONMENT

El Palo Alto gets the high-tech treatment Radar being used to gauge Palo Alto namesake’s health, with aim of helping venerable redwood endure by Sue Dremann L 0ALO !LTO THE CITYS ICONIC REDWOOD THAT HAS STOOD NEAR THEBANKSOF3AN&RANCISQUITO #REEKFORMORETHAN YEARS IS UNDERGOINGTHEMOSTIN DEPTHTECH NICALSTUDYOFITSHEALTHEVERDONE CITY 5RBAN &ORESTER 7ALTER 0ASS MORESAID 4HE STUDY IS USING CUTTING EDGE RADAR TECHNOLOGY TO SEE DEEP INTO THE TREES CORE AND TO ASSESS ITS ROOTS4HEWORKISBEINGDONATEDTO THECITYBY!RBORIST/N3ITE A3OUTH "AY HORTICULTURAL CONSULTING COM PANY 0ASSMORESAID !SCANOFTHETRUNKSOUTERLAYERS STARTED 4HURSDAY *ULY  AND WAS EXPECTED TO BE FINISHED BY THE END OFTHEAFTERNOON$AVE$OCKTER THE CITYS MANAGING ARBORIST DONNED A HARDHATANDHARNESSANDPREPAREDTO

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RAPPELDOWNTHE FOOT DEEPBANK OF3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEK4HURSDAY MORNING %VERY THREE FEET OR SO HE WOULD AIM THE RADAR GUN AT A CON CRETE RETAINING WALL *ANE ,ATHROP 3TANFORD HAD INSTALLED IN  TO KEEPTHEBANKFROMERODINGFURTHER 4HERADARTECHNIQUEISLIKEMAG NETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OR -2) ANDWILLCHECKTHESOUNDNESSOFTHE WOODANDTHEVOLUMEOFTHEROOTSIN THESOIL4HEEQUIPMENTFITSINTOTWO SMALLHARD SHELLSUITCASES/NLYTWO UNITSEXISTIN#ALIFORNIA ANDTHERE AREONLYINTHE53 "OB"OOTY OF!RBORIST/N3ITESAID ! -ARCH ASSESSMENT OF THE TREE FOUND SOME DECAY BUT ALSO HELD PROMISINGNEWS h4HEVERYTOPOFTHETREEISDEAD v "OOTYSAID"UTTHEBUTTRESSROOTSAT

THE BOTTOM OF THE TREE ARE IN VERY GOODHEALTH HEADDED !RBORIST/N3ITEANDCITYARBORISTS ALSOPLANTOSCANTHETRUNKATABOUT FEETHIGH "OOTYSAID %L 0ALO !LTO HAD TWIN TRUNKS IN  WHENITMARKEDTHECORNEROF ,ELAND 3TANFORDS FARM BUT IN THE SONETRUNKDISAPPEARED3OME PEOPLETHEORIZEITWASSWEPTAWAYIN AFLOODOTHERSTHINKITWASREMOVED BECAUSEITWASTOONEARTHE3OUTHERN 0ACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE 0ASSMORE SAID 7HATEVER THE REASON ,ELAND 3TANFORD ADDED A WOOD BULKHEAD ALONGTHECREEKTOSTABILIZEIT 4HEBARRIERSOFWOODANDCONCRETE WILLBENOOBSTACLESTOTHEGROUND PENETRATING RADAR WHICH WILL MAP (continued on page 8)

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Upfront Before you select a real estate agent, meet with Michael Repka to discuss how his real estate law and tax back-ground beneďŹ ts Ken DeLeon’s clients.

Managing Broker DeLeon Realty JD - Rutgers School of Law L.L.M (Taxation) NYU School of Law

(650) 488.7325 DRE# 01854880 | CA BAR# 255996

michaelr@deleonrealty.com

www.deleonrealty.com

FARM FRESH, MODERN ITALIAN CUISINE

PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Terri Lobdell, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns John Brunett, Rye Druzin, Karishma Mehrotra ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Assistant Design Director Lili Cao (223-6562) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Paul Llewellyn, Scott Peterson Designers Rosanna Leung, Kameron Sawyer EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Assistant to the Publisher Miranda Chatfield (223-6559) Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo

Campo Pizzeria PALO ALTO

July, 2013

“The latest well-packaged project from the team behind Osteria Coppa has chef Robert Holt going well beyond margaritas. There are satisfying starters like veal-and-pork meatballs, along with pastas ranging from chicken lasagna to lamb pappardelle. BeďŹ tting it’s surroundings, Campo works as a casual adult evening or a college kid’s semi-special night out.â€? (J.S.) 185 UNIVERSITY AVE. (AT EMERSON ST.) 650-614-1177 $$$ RW (4/13)

LUNCH & DINNER: Wed - Sun BRUNCH: Sat-Sun Reservations:

185

(650) 614-1177 Campo185.com

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Š2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

‘‘

‘‘

Michael Repka

It feels nice to know the world is small in a way. — Kris Loew, who launched a Kickstarter campaign to sell her daughter’s animal plush pillows, on the supportive culture she found on the fundraising website. See story on page 5.

Around Town DOG, CAT AND MOUSE ... Palo Alto’s dog owners often lament the dearth of dog parks, off-leash areas and other local amenities for their loyal, slobbering companions. Now, however, they have one new weapon at their disposal — a watchdog at City Hall. Howard Hoffman, a former soccer coach and founder of the newly formed group Palo Alto Dog Owners, introduced himself and his group this week to the Parks and Recreation Commission. Hoffman said the group already includes a few hundred people, mostly dog owners but also some who used to own dogs and who still sympathize. Their goal? To change the status quo. “We’ve got three rather pathetic dog runs,� Hoffman told the commission. “Some people refer to them as dog parks. I wouldn’t call them that. They’re really not good for exercising your dogs.� Some, he said, have little grass or are covered in dirt, which makes the prospect of throwing Frisbees or balls unappealing. Fences are also substandard, he said, noting that his dog can jump over the Hoover Park fence any time she wants. Because of these poor conditions, dog owners often end up taking their dogs off leash, in violation of local law. “Not that we want to flout the law,� Hoffman said. “We have a game of cat and mouse with Animal Control, which is periodically giving out citations.� What do the dog people need to escape from the cat-and-mouse predicament? Hoffman said they would be satisfied with a dual-use facility like Nealon Park in Menlo Park. There, a baseball field accommodates dogs and their owners for two hours every weekday morning. Even that, however, would only be a partial solution. “Ultimately, the best thing would be decent-sized, dedicated dog parks,� Hoffman said. WIDER WALKWAYS ... Skinny sidewalks seem to become the topic of water-cooler conversation just about every time a new building is proposed for Palo Alto’s prominent thoroughfares, particularly along El Camino Real or Alma Street. When sidewalks aren’t particularly wide, tall developments appear as though they’re looming perilously close to the street, residents have complained. Now, however, the city is looking to change all that, giving pedestrians a little breathing room.

Triggered by an April memo from four City Council members, the city will take a new look at design criteria for new developments and the possibility of increasing sidewalk requirements on El Camino from 12 to 18 feet. Along with beefier sidewalks, the city could require new buildings to be set back farther from main thoroughfares. During the April discussion, Councilwoman Karen Holman cited German author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s famous description of architecture as “frozen music� and argued that with recent developments, Palo Alto is “out of tune.� This week, the task of tuning up the city’s design goals will officially begin. The Architectural Review Board and the Planning and Transportation Commission are set to tackle the subject July 31. The hour-long discussion is scheduled for 5 p.m. and will address “sidewalk widths and how buildings address El Camino Real (and other major commercial streets),� according to a public notice from the city. FOOTHILLS FROLICKING ... After a period of disappointment and underachievement, Palo Alto’s city-run summer camps are finally flying high. The camps, which are administered by the Community Services Department and include swimming, hiking and all the usual summer fare, ended 2012 on an underwhelming note. They were only 49 percent filled and produced just $159,462 in revenues, well below the department’s target of $200,000, Recreation Manager Lacee Korsten told the Parks and Recreation Commission Tuesday. The lukewarm response prompted officials to take a fresh look at the programs and ongoing marketing efforts. Some programs were eliminated, others consolidated. Outreach was greatly expanded through social media and flyers. Korsten, who was hired by the city last year and who led the revival of the summer camps, reported that this year camp enrollment was at 93 percent and that all programs other than the ones around the Fourth of July holiday had wait lists. Revenues soared to $267,781. The results greatly pleased the commissioners, who lauded the efforts by Korsten and other department staff to improve the camp system. “Wish we can take some credit for it, but we cannot,� Chair Ed Lauing said Tuesday. N

Upfront BUSINESS

Local entrepreneurs use Kickstarter to get a foot in the door YDNEY,OEW ANEIGHTH GRADER AT 4HE 'IRLS -IDDLE 3CHOOL CAME UP WITH THE DESIGN FOR HER CUTE ANIMAL PILLOWS DURING A SCHOOLENTREPRENEURSHIPPROJECTLAST YEAR BUT WHEN TRYING TO TURN THE PLUSH CREATURES INTO SALABLE PROD UCTS 3YDNEYANDHERMOTHER +RIS FACEDAPROBLEMTHATEVENTHESAV VIESTTECHSTARTUPSMIGHTBEFAMIL IARWITHˆHOWTOSIMULTANEOUSLY PROVE THE PRODUCT WAS MARKETABLE WHILE OFFSETTING THE SIGNIFICANT COSTSITWOULDTAKETOPRODUCEIT -AJOR BANKS EITHER WOULDNT LENDTOTHEMOROFFEREDTHEMLOANS THAT DIDNT COME CLOSE TO COVERING THE THEYDNEEDTOCREATE   OF THE STUFFED ANIMALS OR TO CONDUCT ANY MARKETING 3O THE ,OEWS DECIDED TO START A FUNDING CAMPAIGN ON +ICKSTARTER A WEB PLATFORM THAT ELICITS SUPPORT FROM FANSWHODONATEPLEDGESTOSEETHE PRODUCTSUCCEED 7ITHINONEWEEKOFTHECAMPAIGNS LAUNCH *ULY   BACKERS HAD PLEDGEDMORETHAN ˆAQUAR TEROFTHEIRGOALFORTHECAMPAIGN 4HE,OEWSAREONEOFAHANDFULOF 0ALO!LTO+ICKSTARTERCAMPAIGNERS WHOLIVEONLYAFEWMILESFROMTHE

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by Eric Van Susteren TOP NOTCH3AND(ILL2OADVENTURE CAPITALCOMPANIES"UTTHEYAREUS ING +ICKSTARTERCOM TO CIRCUMVENT STANDARDINVESTMENTMODELS DISCOV ERINGTHEPERKSANDDISADVANTAGESOF THE GRASSROOTS CROWDSOURCED FUND INGPROGRAMALONGTHEWAY 3INCE+ICKSTARTERWASFOUNDEDIN  MORETHANMILLIONPEOPLE HAVE PLEDGED ABOUT  MILLION TO FUND   PROJECTS ACCORDING TO ITS WEBSITE $ONORS GIVE MONEY TO THE PROJECT OF THEIR CHOICE USU ALLY IN EXCHANGE FOR SOME TYPE OF REWARD RELATED TO THE PROJECT AND +ICKSTARTERTAKESAPERCENTCHUNK FORHOSTINGTHECAMPAIGN 4HERES A CATCH )F THE CREATORS DONTREACHTHEIRFUNDINGGOALS THEY GETNOTHING 4O THE ,OEWS WHOSE MAIN GOAL WASTOCUTDOWNONTHEHEFTYPRICE TAG OF GETTING THEIR BUSINESS RUN NING THISFACTWASABITDAUNTINGAND PART OF THE REASON THEY DECIDED ON A FUNDING GOAL SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THANTHEOVERHEADTHEYNEEDEDTOGET THEIRBUSINESSOFFTHEGROUND h ISTHEGOALONLYBECAUSE WE REALLY WANT TO ACHIEVE IT v SHE SAID h4HE WORST THING TO HAPPEN WOULD BE A FAILED +ICKSTARTER WE

WANTAVERYSUCCESSFUL+ICKSTARTERv 4HEY WANTED A BENCHMARK THEY COULD POINT TO WHEN TRYING TO SELL THEIR PRODUCT A SUCCESS STORY THAT WOULDSHOWINVESTORSORBUYERSTHAT PEOPLEAREINTERESTEDINTHEIRPROD UCT ,OEWSAID h)TSHOWSAKINDOFVULNERABILITY v SHESAIDOFTHEMODESTGOALh)TSAYS @7ERELITTLE7ERELEAN0LEASEHELP ˆITSATOTALLYDIFFERENTMENTALITYv &OR3TANFORD5NIVERSITYGRADUATE *ACK"RODY WHOCOFOUNDEDACOM PANYTHATMAKESASIMPLESOUNDSYS TEM TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A ROOMS NATURAL ACOUSTICS HIS +ICKSTARTER CAMPAIGNRESULTSCOULDHARDLYHAVE BEENMOREDIFFERENT"RODYISTOTALLY UNFAZEDAFTERHISCAMPAIGN WHICH LAUNCHED IN -AY FAILED TO REACH EVENHALFITSFUNDINGGOAL h&ORUSITWASACTUALLYTHEPERFECT OUTCOME vHESAIDh)TALLOWEDUSTO LEARNMOREABOUTTHEPRODUCTBEFORE COMMITTINGTODIFFERENTASPECTSAND BEFOREPUTTINGITOUTONTHEMARKETv &AILURE MIGHT BE A STRONG WAY TO CHARACTERIZE THE RESULTS FOR HIS SPEAKERPROJECT 4IPTOP4HEPROJECT RAISEDABITMORETHAN OFITS  GOAL ASIGNIFICANTAMOUNT FOR HARDWARE DEVELOPERS WITH LITTLE

Veronica Weber

From marketing to troubleshooting, Palo Altans use platform for different ends

Kris Loew, right, and daughters Toni, left, and Sydney look through sketches and mockups of the Poketti plush characters they’ve created. Sydney, 13, first thought up the idea for an entrepreneur project at The Girls Middle School. CLOUT!NDITPROVEDAGOODMETRIC FORTHEPRODUCTSPLACEINTHEMARKET ANDITSSHORTCOMINGSINTHEEYESOF CONSUMERSANDINVESTORS "ASEDONTHEPRODUCTSPOPULARITY AND DONOR FEEDBACK THE FOUNDERS DETERMINEDTHEYNEEDEDTOADDNEW FEATURESANDLOWERTHEIRPRICEPOINT ˆ REVELATIONS THAT COST THEM ONLY THESWEATITTOOKTOPREPAREANDEX ECUTETHECAMPAIGN!hSUCCESSFULv CAMPAIGNUSINGALOWERGOALWOULD HAVE MEANT THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN OBLIGATEDTODELIVERAPRODUCTWITH FEATURESANDAPRICEPOINTNOTOPTI MAL FOR THEIR MARKET 4HEN THEYD HAVETHEISSUEOFRAISINGTHERESTOF THEMONEY HESAID !RMEDWITHTHISNEWKNOWLEDGE THE THREE 4IPTOP FOUNDERS ARE GO

INGTOREFOCUSTHEIRPRODUCTANDTRY FUNDRAISINGAGAINˆEITHERTHROUGH TRADITIONAL MEANS CROWDSOURCING ORBOTH4HEYMAYEVENTRYANOTHER +ICKSTARTERCAMPAIGN "RODYSAID 2AISING MONEY WASNT THE FIRST THING ON +EITH 2AFFELS MIND WHEN HE USED +ICKSTARTER TO HELP PUBLISH HISFIFTHBOOK ATHRILLERCALLEDh4HE 4EMPLE-OUNTv4HEAUTHORANDFOR MERTECHEXECUTIVEPUBLISHEDHISFIRST TWO THRILLERS USING TRADITIONAL PRINT PUBLISHERSANDHISSECONDTWOBOOKS ASEBOOKS&ORHISFIFTHBOOK HEDE CIDEDTOTRYSOMETHINGDIFFERENT h)M A 3ILICON 6ALLEY GUY ) THOUGHT @7HY NOT TRY +ICKSTART ERvHESAID (continued on page 7)

EDUCATION

Knocking off ‘living skills’ Teens in required class comprise half of high school summer enrollment SCRAMBLETOFULFILLTHEhLIVING SKILLSv REQUIREMENT FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION PROMPTED NEARLYSTUDENTSTOENROLLINTHIS YEARS0ALO!LTOSCHOOLDISTRICTSUM MERSCHOOL WHICHENDSTHISWEEK ,IVING SKILLS ˆ WHICH COVERS HEALTH DRUG AND SEX EDUCATION AS WELL AS A  HOUR COMMUNITY SER VICEREQUIREMENTˆWAShWITHOUTA DOUBTTHEMOSTPOPULARCLASSINSUM MERSCHOOL vWHICHHADATOTALHIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT OF ABOUT   SAID*AMES,UBBE WHOWASPRINCI PALOFTHEDISTRICT WIDESUMMERPRO GRAMFORHIGHSCHOOLSTUDENTS HELD THISYEARAT0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOL )N SUMMER SCHOOL THE ONE SE MESTER LIVING SKILLS COURSE CAN BE COMPLETEDINCLASSESTHATMEETOVER THREEWEEKSFORFIVEANDAHALFHOURS ADAY /N7EDNESDAY STUDENTSIN*OAN NA(UBENTHALSCLASSWEREPONDERING THE SHORT AND LONG TERM EFFECTS OF SMOKINGCIGARETTES )NTHENEARBYCLASSROOMOFTEACHER +IM3ABBAG AGUESTSPEAKER LAW YER !MY 0ARK WAS FAMILIARIZING STUDENTS WITH THE STATE AND FEDERAL LAWS GOVERNING SEXUAL MISCONDUCT ANDCYBERCRIMES 4HIS SUMMER THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFEREDLIVING SKILLSCLASSESWITH ENROLLMENTOFSTUDENTSPERCLASS

A

ˆANINCREASEOVERTHESECTIONS OFFEREDLASTSUMMER 4OMEETTHEDEMAND OFFICIALSRE CRUITEDTEACHERSFROMOTHERDEPART MENTS AND GRADE LEVELS ˆ INCLUD ING MIDDLE SCHOOL %NGLISH SOCIAL STUDIES LANGUAGE ˆ TO TEACH THE COURSE h4HEY GOT TOGETHER A FULL WEEK BEFORE SCHOOL STARTED TO BE TRAINED IN THE CURRICULUM v SAID SUMMER SCHOOL !SSISTANT 0RINCIPAL (EATHER *OHANSON h4HEY BROUGHT IN TONS OF OUT SIDE SPEAKERS v INCLUDING MEDICAL FACULTY FROM 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY WHOTRAINEDSTUDENTSINTHEh102v 1UESTION 0ERSUADE AND 2EFER METHODOFRECOGNIZINGSIGNSOFRISK FORSUICIDE SHESAID 3TUDENTS SAID THEY WERE HAPPY TOGETTHELIVING SKILLSREQUIREMENT CHECKEDOFF h)DRATHERDOITNOWWHEN)CAN FOCUSONITMOREINSTEADOFDEALWITH ITDURINGMYJUNIORYEARWHEN)HAVE A LOT OF OTHER THINGS ON MY PLATE v 0ALYJUNIOR*EREMY2EVLOCKSAID h!ND THREE WEEKS OF IT SOUNDS A LOT BETTER THAN A FULL SEMESTER v HE SAIDh)MNOTSAYING)DONTLIKEIT BUT)PREFERTOFOCUSMYTIMEONOTH ERTHINGSDURINGTHESCHOOLYEARv 'UNN (IGH 3CHOOL SOPHOMORE +ATHLEEN8UESAIDSHETOOKTHECLASS

TOFULFILLTHEGRADUATIONREQUIREMENT BUTFOUNDIThAREALLYGOODLEARNING EXPERIENCE h7ERE LEARNING ABOUT A LOT OF THINGS FOREXAMPLE HOWTOLIVEIN DEPENDENTLY WATCHINGOVEROUROWN MONEY BEINGABLETORAISEAKIDAS WELL AS HAVING A GOOD RELATIONSHIP AND MAKING SURE YOU ARENT TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF BY YOUR PARTNER SO ) THINKITSREALLYHELPFUL v8UESAID !LLTOLD 0ALYENROLLEDABOUT STUDENTS IN SUMMER SCHOOLS hFIRST SEMESTERv *UNE   AND MORE THAN  hSECOND SEMESTERv *ULY  *ULY ACCORDINGTO,UBBE &OR STUDENTS NOT IN LIVING SKILLS SUMMER SCHOOL WAS A CHANCE TO TAKE A NEEDED ACADEMIC COURSE ˆ IN%NGLISH MATH SCIENCEORSOCIAL STUDIESˆOR FORSPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS MAINTAINCAPABILITIES 3OMESTUDENTSTOOKASUMMERAC ADEMIC CLASS FOR hCREDIT RECOVERYv ˆMAKINGUPAFAILEDSEMESTER /THERS TOOK CLASSES FOR DIFFERENT REASONS ,UBBESAID h-AYBETHEYWERESICKANDHADTO DROPOUTOFACLASSORMAYBETHEYRE COMING FROM A DIFFERENT SCHOOL DISTRICT WHERE THEY DIDNT OFFER THE CLASS ORMAYBETHEYJUSTCAMEFROM ADIFFERENTCOUNTRY vHESAID !LSO OFFERED THIS SUMMER WERE SEVERALhBRIDGEvCLASSESˆONEFOR

Christophe Haubursin

by Chris Kenrick

Skadden law firm partner Amy Park leads a talk on the laws behind sexual conduct, in a Living Skills class during Palo Alto High School’s summer session. A popular choice for summer school, the Living Skills class covered subjects such as drug abuse, sexuality and health. ENTERINGFRESHMENWHOSECOUNSELORS VOCATIONALLY ORIENTED CLASS TO HELP THOUGHT THEYD BENEFIT FROM A PRE STUDENTS WORK ON FUNCTIONAL SKILLS VIEW OF HIGH SCHOOL SAMPLINGS IN SUCH AS COOKING AND SOCIAL SKILLS %NGLISH MATH AND COUNSELING AND WITHTHEGOALOFINDEPENDENTLIVING ANOTHERFORSTUDENTSHOPINGTOBOOST SHESAID THEIR SKILLS IN ORDER TO QUALIFY FOR .EW THIS YEAR WAS AN ACADEMIC GEOMETRYTHISFALL SUPPORT CENTER WHERE ANY STUDENT )NSPECIALEDUCATION 0ALYOFFERED COULD GET TUTORING AND SPECIAL ED hTHERAPEUTIC SUPPORT SERVICES v A UCATION STUDENTS COULD WORK WITH CLASSOFORSTUDENTSLEDBYA ACCOMMODATIONS TO THEIR SPECIAL TEACHER ABEHAVIORISTANDATHERAPIST NEEDS SUCHASEXTRATIMEONTESTS TO HELP STUDENTS hBUILD THEIR EMO 3UMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS SHARED TIONAL )1 v SAID *OHANSON WHO FOR THE 0ALY CAMPUS WITH A HOST OF THEPASTTHREEYEARSHASBEEN0ALYS UNRELATED PROGRAMS LEASING SPACE INSTRUCTIONAL SUPERVISOR IN SPECIAL INCLUDING 'ALILEO 3UMMER 1UEST EDUCATION A CAMP FOR FIFTH TO EIGHTH GRAD h4HEFOCUSISGIVINGSTUDENTSTHE ERS 3!4 PREP COURSES WATER POLO EMOTIONAL EDUCATION TO GET THEM MATCHESANDSPORTSCAMPSINBAS BACK INTO THE MAINSTREAM AS MUCH KETBALL TENNISANDFOOTBALLN Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can ASPOSSIBLE v*OHANSONSAID !LSO OFFERED IN SPECIAL EDUCA be emailed at ckenrick@paweekly. TION WAS THE hFUTURES PROGRAM v A com. ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊՏÞÊÓÈ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 5

Upfront EDUCATION

Buena Vista conversion prompts debate about local schools Residents concerned about being displaced from Palo Alto school system by Gennady Sheyner

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(continued from page 3)

REPORTEDINTHEREPORTSANALYSIS)N MANYCASES THEYHAVEALSOALLEGEDLY MADE MAJOR MODIFICATIONS TO THEIR MOBILEHOMESWITHOUTACQUIRINGTHE NEEDEDPERMITS WHICHCOMPLICATES THEEFFORTTOAPPRAISEHOMEVALUES )N ADDITION THE *ISSERS AND THEIR RELOCATION AGENCY !UTOTEMP ARE JOUSTING WITH THE CITY OVER COMPLEX QUESTIONSPERTAININGTOWHAThCOMPA RABLEvˆTHEBASISFORCOMPENSATION ˆMEANS INCLUDINGWHATTHEVALUEOF A0ALO!LTOEDUCATIONIS WHATWOULD CONSTITUTEAhCOMPARABLEvCOMMUNI TY AND PERHAPSMOREFUNDAMENTALLY WHATMAKESAHOME )NBOTHTHE-AYAND*ULYREPORTS THE *ISSERS OFFERED EACH HOUSEHOLD BETWEEN   AND   FOR RELOCATION (OUSEHOLDS THAT CANNOT MOVETHEIRMOBILEHOMESWOULDGET A LUMP SUM OF   4HE CITYS RESPONSE TO THE INITIAL REPORT TAKES ISSUE WITH THESE FIGURES AND CALLS THE   SUM hINADEQUATEv BE CAUSEITFALLSSHORTOFWHATWOULDBE NEEDED FOR A "UENA 6ISTA RESIDENT TOREMAININ0ALO!LTO EVENIFMOV INGINTOTHELOWEST COSTAPARTMENTS 4HEDIFFERENCEBETWEENARENT AHOUSEHOLDMAYBEPAYINGAT"UENA 6ISTAANDTHE PERMONTHFOR A ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT IN 0ALO !LTO WOULD BE MORE THAN   PERRESIDENT THECITYNOTED %RIKA%SCALANTE WHOSEFAMILYHAS LIVEDAT"UENA6ISTAFORYEARSAND WHOHEADSTHENEWLYFORMED"UENA 6ISTA .EIGHBORHOOD !SSOCIATION AGREED WITH THE CITYS ASSESSMENT THAT WONTDOVERYMUCHFOR RESIDENTS LOOKING TO REMAIN IN THE COMMUNITY h)FTHEYWANTTOSTAYIN0ALO!LTO

TYSIMILARTOTHATINWHICHTHEPARK THATISBEINGCLOSEDISLOCATEDAND HAS SIMILAR ACCESS TO COMMUNITY AMENITIESSUCHASSHOPPING MEDI CALSERVICES RECREATIONALFACILITIES ANDTRANSPORTATIONv &OR THE *ISSER FAMILY WHO OWN THE PROPERTY THE EXCLUSION OF SCHOOLS FROM THE LEGAL DEFINITION OF AMENITIES IS SIGNIFICANT "UT EVEN IF IT WERE LISTED THEY ARGUE OTHERSCHOOLSINTHEREGIONCANBE CONSIDEREDCOMPARABLE h4HE APPLICANT SUBMITS THAT WHILE THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION AT THE0ALO!LTOSCHOOLSISHIGH THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION AT THE SUR ROUNDING COMMUNITIES SUCH AS #UPERTINO 3UNNYVALE -OUNTAIN 6IEW AND 2EDWOOD #ITY IS ALSO HIGH AND THUS HOUSING IN THESE COMMUNITIES WHICH IS OTHERWISE @COMPARABLEUNDERTHEORDINANCES DEFINITIONMEETSTHECRITERIAOFTHE ORDINANCE vANEWREPORTFROMTHE *ISSERSSTATESh4HUSTHESUGGESTION THAT THE ONLY COMPARABLE HOUSING

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HEN RESIDENTS OF "UENA 6ISTA-OBILE0ARKPAIDA SURPRISEVISITTO0ALO!LTO #ITY(ALLLASTFALLTOURGECITYOF FICIALS TO PRESERVE THEIR HOMES EDUCATION WAS AMONG THEIR LEAD INGCONCERNS3EVERALSTUDENTSAND PARENTSFROM"UENA6ISTATOLDTHE #ITY #OUNCIL THEY WORRIED ABOUT BEING DISPLACED FROM 0ALO !LTOS SCHOOLSYSTEM h0ALO !LTO HAS GREAT SCHOOLS 4HEY CANT REALLY BE COMPARED TO OTHERSCHOOLSAROUNDTHEAREA v-I SAEL-ORALES3ANCHEZ AN YEAR OLDSTUDENTAT7EST6ALLEY#OLLEGE TOLDTHE#ITY#OUNCILATAN/CT MEETING "UTITSFARFROMCLEARHOWPROM INENTLY THE TOPIC OF SCHOOL DIS PLACEMENTWILLFIGUREINTHEDEBATE OVERTHEPARKSCONVERSIONINTOAN UPSCALE APARTMENT COMPLEX 4HE CITYS ORDINANCE STATES THAT DIS PLACEDRESIDENTSMUSTBECOMPEN SATEDFORMOVINGTOAhCOMPARABLEv MOBILEHOMEPARKINhACOMMUNI

Cottages Office/home

Buena Vista Mobile Home Park

The Buena Vista Mobile Home Park is located at 3980 El Camino Real in Palo Alto. THATSNOTGOINGTOLASTVERYLONG v%S CALANTETOLDTHE7EEKLYh4HERENTS ARE SKY HIGH HERE AND THEY ARENT TAKINGTHATINTOCONSIDERATIONv 4HENEWREPORTINCLUDESMOREDE TAILSABOUTTHESITESVALUEANDFULLER EXPLANATIONS OF THE RESIDENT SURVEY THAT THE PARK OWNER HAD CONDUCTED ANDPOTENTIALRELOCATIONOPTIONS"UT HOUSINGADVOCATES ATTORNEYSAND"AR RON0ARKRESIDENTSWHOHAVESTEPPED UP TO ASSIST THE RESIDENTS MANY OF WHOMARENON NATIVE%NGLISHSPEAK ERS HAVE EXPRESSED INITIAL CONCERNS ABOUTTHE*ISSERSLATESTRESPONSE 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY PROFESSORS $ON"ARRAND!MADO0ADILLA WHO HAVEDONEEXTENSIVERESEARCHAT"UE NA 6ISTA TOLD THE 7EEKLY THAT THE NUMBER OF RESIDENTS TALLIED BY THE RELOCATIONSPECIALISTSISFARSHORTOF WHATTHEYKNOWTOBETHEREALNUM BER4HEYHAVEALSOTAKENISSUEWITH THE*ISSERSDEFINITIONOFAhCOMPA RABLE COMMUNITY v PARTICULARLY AS THEPHRASERELATESTOSCHOOLS 7INTER$ELLENBACH AHOUSINGAT TORNEY WHO HELPED FORM THE GROUP &RIENDS OF "UENA 6ISTA ALSO SAID SHEWASCONCERNEDABOUTBOTHPARK

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FORRESIDENTSWITHCHILDRENATTEND INGPUBLICSCHOOLISIN0ALO!LTO IS NEITHER SUPPORTED BY THE REQUIRE MENTSOFTHEORDINANCE NORBYEM PIRICALDATANOR!0)SCORESv !MADO 0ADILLA A PROFESSOR OF EDUCATION AT 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY REJECTS THIS ASSESSMENT 0ADILLA A FORMER MEMBER OF THE 0ALO !LTO 5NIFED 3CHOOL $ISTRICT BOARD WHO CURRENTLY WORKS WITH FELLOW 3TANFORD 0ROFESSOR $ON "ARR AND AGROUPOFSTUDENTSONRESEARCHIN "UENA6ISTA TOLDTHE7EEKLYTHAT THE OTHER COMMUNITIES CITED IN THEREPORTARESIGNIFICANTLYDIFFER ENTFROM0ALO!LTO4HOUGHMANY BOAST FINE SCHOOL SYSTEMS THEY HAVETWOSIGNIFICANTDISADVANTAGES WHENCOMPAREDTO0ALO!LTOFEWER RESOURCESANDLESSSTABILITY 4HE 0ALO !LTO DISTRICT BENEFITS FROM BOTH THE CITYS HIGH PROPERTY VALUESANDFROMGENEROUSDONATIONS 4HE FUNDRAISING GROUP 0ARTNERS IN %DUCATIONPRESENTEDTHEDISTRICTWITH AMILLIONCHECKIN-ARCH

h4HERES JUST A LOT OF RESOURCES GOINGINTOTHESCHOOLSIN0ALO!LTO THATMOSTOFTHESURROUNDINGSCHOOL DISTRICTS CANNOT MATCH v 0ADILLA TOLDTHE7EEKLY 4HESTABILITYFACTORISALSOCRITICAL 0ADILLASAID)N0ALO!LTO ASTUDENT STAYSWITHINTHESAMEDISTRICTFROM KINDERGARTENTHROUGHTHGRADE)N EACHOFTHEOTHERCITIESTHE2ELOCA TION )MPACT 2EPORT CITES STUDENTS GOTHROUGHDIFFERENTSCHOOLDISTRICTS BEFOREGRADUATION-OUNTAIN6IEW HAS THREE DISTRICTS 3UNNYVALE AND #UPERTINO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STU DENTS ATTEND THEIR OWN DISTRICTS UP UNTIL HIGH SCHOOL WHEN THEY ARE FUNNELEDTOTHEJOINT&REMONT5NION (IGH3CHOOL$ISTRICT 4HE TRANSITIONS 0ADILLA SAID MAKE IT HARDER FOR OTHER SCHOOL SYSTEMSTOTRACKSTUDENTSANDTHEIR PARTICULAR NEEDS AS THEY PROGRESS FROMONEGRADETOANOTHER)TALSO MAKESITHARDERFORSTUDENTSTOFEEL LIKE THEYRE PART OF A STABLE COM MUNITYASTHEYGETOLDER

RESIDENTS BEING UNDER COUNTED AND THE SUM OFFERED TO EACH HOUSEHOLD FOR RELOCATION )N AN INTERVIEW THIS WEEK SHECALLEDTHEDEVELOPERSDE CISIONNOTTOREVISETHEOFFERS WHICH THECITYIN*UNEDEEMEDINSUFFICIENT hAPUZZLEMENTv h4HATS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW THIS REPORTSEEMSTOBESTONEWALLINGOR IS ATTHEVERYLEAST UNRESPONSIVETO THEEXISTINGCRITIQUEBYTHECITYTHAT GOESTOTHEREPORTBEINGCOMPLETEOR NOT v$ELLENBACHSAID

MAILINGSANDPHONECALLSANDASSIS TANCEFROM!UTOTEMPSTWOBILINGUAL ASSISTANTS 4HE COMPANY HAD ALSO TAPED hCONTACT CARDSv TO HOMEOWN ERSDOORSWITHASPECIFICREQUESTTHAT THEHOUSEHOLDCONTACT!UTOTEMP 4HE NEW REPORT CONCLUDES THAT hTHE LIKELIHOOD OF OBTAINING  PERCENTCOMPLIANCEISNOTREALISTICv )NSOMECASES THEREPORTSTATES THE RESIDENTS DIDNT HAVE INFORMATION ABOUT THE MOBILE HOMES MANUFAC TURE DATE AND OTHER CHARACTERISTICS )NOTHERCASES THEYDIDNTCOOPERATE ACCORDINGTOTHEAMENDEDREPORT h4HEY REFUSED TO COMPLETE THE RESIDENT QUESTIONNAIRES EITHER BE CAUSE THEY BELIEVED IT WOULD DELAY THEPROCESSORBECAUSETHEYWOULD NOT REVEAL TO THE CONSULTANTS INFOR MATION THEY CONSIDERED CONFIDEN TIAL vTHEREPORTSTATES %SCALANTE DISPUTED THE ASSERTION THATRESIDENTSHAVENOTBEENCOOPER ATIVE-ANYHAVEFILLEDOUTTHEQUES TIONNAIRES WITH ASSISTANCE FROM AN !UTOTEMPSPECIALIST ONLYTORECEIVE ANOTHER QUESTIONNAIRE LATER CLAIM INGTHERESPONSESWEREINCOMPLETE SHETOLDTHE7EEKLY)NTHEAGENCYS LATESTATTEMPTTOCOLLECTANSWERS THE QUESTIONNAIRESWERESENTTOTHERESI DENTSON*ULY LEAVINGTHEMLITTLE TIME TO COMPLETE THEM BEFORE THE RELEASE OF THE AMENDED 2ELOCATION )MPACT2EPORTON*ULY h4HEYDIDNTEVENGIVEUSENOUGH TIME TO MAIL QUESTIONNAIRES BACK v %SCALANTESAID 4HEFACTTHATRESIDENTSHAVEBEEN GETTING VISITS FROM BOTH APPRAISERS AND RELOCATION SPECIALISTS HAS ALSO FOSTEREDCONFUSION PROMPTINGSOME TOWONDERWHYTHEYREBEINGASKED TOFILLOUTDIFFERENTSURVEYSFROMDIF FERENTGROUPS SHESAID 4HE REPORT ARGUES THAT ITS NOT REALISTICTOEXPECTAPERCENTRE SPONSE RATE STATING THAT hTHE CITY

MONG THE BIGGEST OBSTACLES THE*ISSERSAND!UTOTEMPHAVE FACED IS THE REQUIREMENT TO SURVEY "UENA 6ISTA RESIDENTS 4HE CITYSMOBILE HOMEORDINANCESPEC IFIES THAT hNO APPLICATION SHALL BE DEEMEDCOMPLETEUNTILTHEQUESTION NAIREFOREACHAFFECTEDRESIDENTAND TENANTANDACOMPLETED2ELOCATION )MPACT2EPORT HAVEBEENFILEDv4HE QUESTIONNAIRE HAS TO INCLUDE SUCH INFORMATIONASTHENAMES AGESAND hANY MENTAL OR PHYSICAL HANDICAP ORSPECIALNEEDSvOFTHERESIDENTS)T MUSTALSOINCLUDEINFORMATIONABOUT EACH MOBILE HOME INCLUDING DATE OFMANUFACTURE PURCHASEPRICEAND THETYPEOFADDITIONSTHATHAVEBEEN MADETOEACHHOME )FTHECITYFOLLOWSTHELETTEROFTHE LAW THEAMENDEDAPPLICATIONSHOULD BE DEEMED AS INCOMPLETE AS THE ORIGINALONE WHICHINCLUDEDQUES TIONNAIRESFROMOFTHEHOUSE HOLDSTHEREMAININGSIXHOUSEHOLDS ARENT INCLUDED BECAUSE THEYRE EI THER VACANT OR THE TENANTS MOVED INAFTERTHECONVERSIONPROCESSWAS LAUNCHED  4HE FAILURE TO GET THE NEEDED RE SPONSESWASNOTFORLACKOFEFFORTBY !UTOTEMP 4HE NEW REPORT INCLUDES A SPREADSHEET SHOWING THE EFFORTS THEAGENCYMADEINCONTACTINGEACH HOUSEHOLD WHICHINCLUDEDNUMEROUS

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h4HATSTABILITYISVERY VERYIM PORTANT IN A STUDENTS LIFE AND IS PROBABLYMOREIMPORTANTFORKIDS WHO COME FROM THE KINDS OF DIS ADVANTAGEDCIRCUMSTANCESWESEE AT"UENA6ISTA v0ADILLASAIDh&OR MANYOFTHEKIDSWHOLIVEIN"UENA 6ISTA THISISTHEONLYCOMMUNITY THEYVE EVER KNOWN ! NUMBER WERE BORN IN 3TANFORD (OSPITAL 4HEY IDENTIFY WITH "ARRON 0ARK %LEMENTARY 3CHOOL OR 4ERMAN -IDDLE3CHOOLOR'UNN(IGH4HIS ISTHEIRCOMMUNITYv %RICA%SCALANTE A'UNNGRADU ATEWHOHASBEENLIVINGATTHEPARK FOR  YEARS SAID RESIDENTS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE ADJUSTMENTS THEYDHAVETOMAKEIFTHEYMOVE FROM0ALO!LTO h7EKNOWOURSCHOOLSARESAFE 7E KNOW WE HAVE GOOD RELATION SHIPSWITHSTAFF3HIFTINGALLTHATˆ ITSGOINGTOHAVEANIMPACTvN Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

MUSTACKNOWLEDGETHERENEWEDAND CONTINUINGGOODFAITHEFFORTSONTHE PARTOFTHEPARKOWNERANDTHEHOUS ING RELOCATION SPECIALIST REGARDING THE RESIDENT QUESTIONNAIREv "UT IF THE CITY AGREES WITH THIS ARGUMENT ITRUNSTHERISKOFUNDER COUNTINGTHE RESIDENTS WHO WOULD BE DISPLACED AND WHO WOULD REQUIRE ASSISTANCE SAID "ARR A HOUSING ADVOCATE AND 3TANFORD PROFESSOR WHOSE STUDENTS HAVEBEENWORKINGWITH"UENA6ISTA RESIDENTSOVERTHEPASTYEARONARE SEARCH ASSIGNMENT UNRELATED TO THE PARKS CLOSURE (E NOTED THAT THE REPORT PEGS THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN AT "UENA 6ISTA AT  !CCORDING TO THESCHOOL DISTRICTDATA THENUMBER IS HESAID%SCALANTESAID"UENA 6ISTASOWNCENSUSSHOWSABOUT CHILDREN TOTAL  OF WHOM ATTEND PUBLICSCHOOLSIN0ALO!LTO )FASIM ILARDISPARITYEXISTSINMEASURINGTHE ADULTPOPULATION DOZENSOFRESIDENTS AREBEINGDISCOUNTED "ARRSAID &OR "ARR A SOCIOLOGIST !UTO TEMPSAPPROACHTOGETTINGANSWERS ISNT GOOD ENOUGH 3OME HOUSE HOLDS HESAID HAVERESIDENTSWITH DISABILITIESWHOMAYREQUIREASPE CIAL CONTACT WITH TRAINED MENTAL HEALTHSPECIALISTS h-Y UNDERSTANDING IS THAT SOME OFTHEFOLKSTHEREDONOTLIKESTRANG ERSCOMINGTOTHEIRDOORSASPARTOF THEIR MENTAL DISABILITY v "ARR TOLD THE 7EEKLY h(OW ARE YOU GOING TOBESTHELPTHATPERSONTHROUGHTHE RELOCATIONPROCESS)ASSUMEYOUD NEED SOMEONE WITH MENTAL HEALTH TRAININGTOAPPROACHTHATPERSONAND TOGETTHEIRINPUT h)HAVENTSEENANYTHINGINTHERE PORTADDRESSINGTHIS)FTHATREPORT MEETSTHESTANDARDOFLAWFORDEFI NITIONOF@COMPLETE  )GUESSTHATS THELAW)CANTACCEPTTHATITSREALLY COMPLETEUNTILTHEYREABLETOSPEAK TOEVERYONE v"ARRSAID

REAL ESTATE TRENDS

Upfront

! MAJOR WAY 2AFFEL ATTRACTED DO NORSWASBYOFFERINGTHEMTHECHANCE TOINVOLVETHEMSELVESINHISWRITING PROCESS IN EXCHANGE FOR THEIR DONA TIONS 0LEDGES OF  OR MORE GIVE BACKERSACHANCETOREVIEWANDGIVE EDITSONTHEBOOKSMANUSCRIPT!DO NATIONOFORMOREALLOWSDONORS TONAMEACHARACTERINTHEBOOK 3HORTLYAFTERLAUNCHINGHISCAM PAIGN HE RECEIVED AN EMAIL FROM !NDY &ORSSELL A FORMER COLLEAGUE FROMHISTECHDAYS INWHICH&ORS SELLEXPRESSEDEXCITEMENTATTHEIDEA OFBEINGABLETOhEDITTHEHECKOUTOF YOURMANUSCRIPTv h7HEN DO YOU EVER GET TO READ A BOOK AND GIVE THE AUTHOR COPIOUS FEEDBACKONWHATTHEYCOULDVEDONE BETTERvWROTE&ORSSELL NOWTHEACT ING #%/ AT (ULU h0RICELESS !S IS YOURRIGHTTOIGNOREEVERYWORDOFITv 2AFFELSAIDHEWASEXCITEDABOUT THE IDEA OF CROWDSOURCING EDITS SOMEOFTHEMFROMBIGNAMEPEOPLE LIKE &ORSSELL ACKNOWLEDGING THAT THECHALLENGEWOULDBEINCORPORAT INGTHOSEEDITSJUDICIOUSLY 2AFFEL REACHED HIS   GOAL WHICH WILL HELP WITH HIS PUBLISH ING COSTS BUT HIS REAL GOAL WAS TO INCREASE THE VISIBILITY OF HIS BOOK ANDBOOSTITSREADERSHIP ANDFOSTER ENGAGEMENTWITHHISFANS&ORTHOSE REASONS CALLINGTHE+ICKSTARTEREFFORT AhCAMPAIGNvISFITTINGFOR2AFFEL

h)TS KIND OF LIKE A POLITICAL CAMPAIGN  7HEN PEOPLE DONATE MONEY OR EFFORT FROM VOLUNTEERS IT ATTACHES SOMETHING MORE v HE SAIDh7HENPEOPLEDONATETO SAY "ARACK/BAMA THEYFEELVESTEDIN WHATHESDOING AND)DLIKEPEOPLE TO FEEL VESTED IN MAKING @4EMPLE -OUNTASUCCESSv h4HERESTHESENSEOFBEINGINAN ADVENTURETOGETHER vHESAID .OT EVERY +ICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN GOAL IS PROFIT !FTER  YEARS IN THE 3ILICON 6ALLEY STARTUP LIFE $ORRIAN 0ORTERTOOKABREAKTOBRINGATTENTION TOSOMEONEHETHINKSPEOPLEINTHERAT RACESHOULDREMEMBER.IKOLA4ESLA 4OPAYHOMAGETO4ESLASCONTRIBU TIONSTOWIRELESSENERGYTRANSFERAND 4ESLASBELIEFINBETTERINGTHEWORLD OVER THE PURSUIT OF PROFIT 0ORTER LAUNCHEDA+ICKSTARTERCAMPAIGNTO BUILDABRONZESTATUEOFTHEINVENTOR

)T WILL BE SITUATED IN 0ALO !LTO ˆ ANDFUNCTIONASAFREE7I&IHOTSPOT /NEOF+ICKSTARTERSBESTBENEFITS ISTHATITCANSERVEASALITMUSTESTFOR APROJECTSPOPULARITY HESAID h9OUCANPUTOUTCONCEPTSANDSEE HOWWELLTHEYDO5SING+ICKSTARTER ASAWAYTODETERMINEHOWTHISCON CEPT WOULD BE ACCEPTED IN 3ILICON 6ALLEYANDGETTINGTHATANSWERAND BEINGTOLDBYTHECOMMUNITYWASA REALLYMOTIVATINGPIECEOFTHEOVER ALLCAMPAIGNFORMEv 0ORTERSAIDHEBECAMEINTERESTED IN +ICKSTARTER TWO YEARS AGO BE CAUSE OF ITS CULTURE OF SUPPORT FOR FILM ART AND MUSIC (E HAS SINCE BACKEDAROUNDPROJECTS 4HE OTHER LOCAL +ICKSTARTER CAM PAIGNERSALSOPRAISEDTHESUPPORTIVE CULTURE THE PLATFORM OFFERS 7HILE +RIS ,OEW SAID THAT MANY WHO ARE SUPPORTINGHERPROJECTAREPEOPLESHE KNOWSPERSONALLY SHECANTHELPBUT FEELCONNECTEDTOEVENTHESTRANGERS h) FEEL COMPELLED TO MAKE IT SUC CESSFULFORTHEM vSHESAIDh)FEELTHE URGETOSENDTHEMSTUFFBECAUSE)MSO HAPPYTHEYAREHELPING)TFEELSNICETO KNOWTHEWORLDISSMALLINAWAYv 7HEN SHE HEARD ABOUT 2AFFELS PROJECTANDFOUNDOUTHEWASWITHIN  OF HIS FUNDING GOAL BUT HAD LESS THAN TWO DAYS TO COMPLETE IT SHESPRUNGTOACTION h#OOLvSHESAIDh)LLGOHELPHIM OUTvN Online Editor Eric Van Susteren can be emailed at evansusteren@ paweekly.com.

!TTORNEYSWORKINGONTHEREPORT -ARGARET.ANDAAND"RIAN'RASSER ALSO HAD A HARD TIME TALLYING AND ESTIMATING THE VALUE OF ALL THE IM PROVEMENTS AND ADDITIONS TO EACH MOBILEHOME7HILETHECHANGESARE MYRIADANAVERAGEMOBILEHOMEAT "UENA 6ISTA IS JUST UNDER  YEARS OLD AND HAS UNDERGONE NUMEROUS MODIFICATIONS OFFICIALDOCUMENTA TIONISSCARCE/FTHEHOMESTHAT WERESHOWNTOHAVEIMPROVEMENTS DIDNTHAVEASSOCIATEDPERMITS)N MANYCASES THEREPORTSTATES THEHO MEOWNERhDOUBLEDTHESQUAREFOOT AGEOFTHEMOBILEHOMEBYENCLOSING THEMOBILEHOMEINSIDINGANDTHEN CONTINUINGSAIDSIDINGASWALLS CRE ATINGANOTHERENCLOSUREEQUALTO OR EXCEEDING THEINITIALDIMENSIONSOF THEMOBILEHOMEv h)NONECASE AHOMEOWNERHASEN CLOSEDTHESPACESURROUNDINGHISMO BILEHOME WHICHRESULTEDINANEN TIRETREEBECOMINGPARTOFHISHOME WHICHNOWEXTENDSTHROUGHTHEROOF OFHISHOME vTHEREPORTSTATES 'IVEN THE LACK OF PERMITS THE REPORT ARGUES THE HOMES hCAN NOTBERESOLDWITHTHEUNPERMITTED IMPROVEMENTSv )F THE HOMES WERE VALUEDWITHOUTTHEUNPERMITTEDIM PROVEMENTS THEY WOULD HAVE hNO LEGALLYTRANSFERABLEVALUEv h4HE HOMES HAVE VALUE ONLY BE CAUSE THEY ARE SITUATED ON LAND IN 0ALO !LTO LAND OWNED BY THE PARK OWNER vTHEREPORTSTATES)NBUYING THEMOBILEHOMESFROMTHEPRESENT OWNERS THEREPORTARGUES THE*ISSERS WILLESSENTIALLYBEPAYINGAPREMIUM ONLANDTHEYTHEMSELVESOWN h)FTHEHOMESWERENOTSITUATEDON THEPARKOWNERSPROPERTY THEYWOULD HAVELITTLEORNOVALUEGIVENTHEIRAGE ANDCONDITION vTHEREPORTASSERTS

YLOCALLAW THE*ISSERFAMILY IS REQUIRED TO hPROVIDE THE PURCHASEPRICEOFCOMPARABLE MOBILE HOMES IN COMPARABLE MO BILEHOMEPARKSv &URTHER THE CITYS ORDINANCE DE FINEShCOMPARABLEMOBILEPARKvAS ONETHATIShSIMILARINCONDITION AGE SIZEANDAMENITIESTOTHEPARKTHATIS BEINGCLOSEDANDISLOCATEDWITHINA COMMUNITYSIMILARTOTHATINWHICH THE PARK THAT IS BEING CLOSED IS LO CATEDANDHASSIMILARACCESSTOCOM MUNITYAMENITIESSUCHASSHOPPING MEDICALSERVICES RECREATIONALFACILI TIESANDTRANSPORTATIONv )N THIS CONTEXT THE WORD hCOM PARABLEv IS A TRICKY ONE SUBJECT TO VARIOUS INTERPRETATIONS 4HE ORIGI NAL2ELOCATION)MPACT2EPORTCON CLUDEDTHATTHEREARENOCOMPARABLE APARTMENTSORCONDOMINIUMSINTHE AREA WHOSE RENTAL COST WOULD BE COMPARABLETOTHATOF"UENA6ISTA 4HE CITY DECIDED THAT THIS FINDING ISNT GOOD ENOUGH AND CALLED THE APPLICANTS FAILURE TO CALCULATE THE COSTOFCOMPARABLERENTALHOUSINGA hSIGNIFICANTvOMISSION /NE AMENITY THATS OFTEN TOUTED IN DISCUSSING THE VALUE OF LIVING IN0ALO!LTOISTHEQUALITYOFLOCAL SCHOOLS 4HE PROSPECT OF STUDENTS BEING FORCED TO LEAVE THEIR SCHOOLS HASBEENALEADINGCONCERNFOR"UE NA 6ISTA RESIDENTS SOME OF WHOM HADATTENDED#ITY#OUNCILMEETINGS INRECENTMONTHSTOPLEADTHEIRCASES FORKEEPINGTHEPARKOPEN &OR"ARR THEWORDShSUCHASvIN THE ORDINANCE IMPLY THAT THE AME NITIES LISTED IN THE DEFINITION ARE MEANTTOBEILLUSTRATIVERATHERTHAN ALL ENCOMPASSING 4HE QUALITY OF SCHOOLSSHOULDBEFACTOREDINTOTHE EQUATION HESAID WHENCONSIDERING

POSSIBLE OPTIONS FOR RELOCATION OF "UENA6ISTACHILDREN h-OST OF THE CHILDREN HERE HAVE BEEN IN 0ALO !LTO SCHOOLS SINCE $AY/NE vSAID%SCALANTE AGRADU ATEOF*,3-IDDLEAND'UNN(IGH SCHOOLS (ERYOUNGERBROTHER SHENOTED IS NOWINMIDDLESCHOOLANDhDOESNT KNOWANYWHEREELSEv &ORTHE*ISSERFAMILY THEEXCLUSION OFSCHOOLSFROMTHELEGALDEFINITION IS SIGNIFICANT 4HE REVISED 2ELOCA TION)MPACT2EPORTSPECIFIESTHATTHE WORDShCOMPARABLESCHOOLSvDONOT APPEARINTHEORDINANCESDEFINITION FORhCOMPARABLEHOUSINGv"UTEVEN IFTHEYHAD THEREPORTARGUES OTHER SCHOOLSINTHEREGIONCANBECONSID EREDCOMPARABLE(See sidebar.) $EBATES ABOUT THE MEANING OF hCOMPARABLEv ASIDE THE AMENDED REPORT ALSO PROVIDES INFORMATION ABOUT OTHER MOBILE HOME PARKS IN THE  MILE RADIUS AND MOVING COMPANIES THAT COULD HANDLE THE RELOCATION4HENEWREPORTINCLUDES THESEWAIVERSFROMTHOSERESIDENTS WHO HAD MOVED INTO "UENA 6ISTA AFTER THE CONVERSION PROCESS WAS INITIATED AS WELL AS MORE INFOR MATION ABOUT DIFFERENT PARKS AND FULLER EXPLANATION OF WHY SOME PARKSONTHELISTARERANKEDABOVE OTHERS !CTING 0LANNING $IRECTOR !ARON !KNINSAIDTHECITYHASDAYSFROM THE*ULYSUBMISSIONTOREVIEWTHE NEWREPORT)FTHEREPORTISDEEMED COMPLETE THEHEARINGINFRONTOF,A BADIEWILLTAKEPLACEWITHINDAYS OFTHEFINDING(ISDECISIONCANTHEN BEAPPEALEDTOTHE#ITY#OUNCILN Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

Kickstarter (continued from page 5)

Veronica Weber

A Kickstarter campaign was used to jump-start funding for a company to make Poketti plush animals, each of which has a pocket in the back.

B

by Samia Cullen

Finding Your Dream Home Every house hunter has a vision of their dream house. However, budgetary constraints often make concessions necessary. It is important for buyers to be prepared to make concessions that they will not regret later. Balancing wants and needs is crucial. Acknowledging that there is no perfect house, how should buyers approach their search for a home? Size: The optimal house varies with family size and needs. An undersized home is uncomfortable and among other things can contribute to clutter and tension among family members. But an oversized home can be a major drain of time, energy and cash when you consider what is required to purchase, furnish, heat, cool, clean and maintain the home. Buyers should be looking at a home that is not too big or too small for their anticipated needs for the next 5 to 7 years. Lifestyle Needs: This will vary depending on who lives in the house - for example, good schools for a family with kids, one-story home

for a retired couple, a separate in-law unit for buyers with older parents etc. Buyers should avoid buying a home that requires major work to satisfy their basic needs. House with a Vision: An alternative to ďŹ nding that dream house is to ďŹ nd a house with the potential to become that house within a reasonable budget. Having a vision before start your home search will prove helpful in ďŹ nding the right house. Staying Power: Given today’s real estate market and the high prices buyers are paying, it’s important that your home be one you can see yourself living in and being comfortable with for at least 5 to 7 years. If another recession hits and prices fall, you may need to stay in that house longer than anticipated. Keep Resale in Mind: Houses that are overly customized are more difďŹ cult to sell. When you are remodeling your home keep resale in mind and spend your money where you can get it back. Your agent can advise you on the most cost-effective remodeling projects.

If you have a real estate question or would like a free market analysis for your home, please call me at 650-384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors, or email me at scullen@apr.com. For the latest real estate news, follow my blog at www.samiacullen.com

Be Yourself Be Inventive! Colin Hacking Engineering Consultant, Inventor Channing House Resident since 2007

Call Today for a Personal Tour

650.327.0950 www.channinghouse.org 850 Webster Street Palo Alto DSS license #430700136

Scan this barcode with your smartphone to see our website

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Upfront

Tree (continued from page 3)

DEEPINTOTHESOIL)TWILLRECORDTHE DIFFERENT DENSITIES OF MATERIALS TO DETERMINE WHERE THE ROOT SYSTEM OCCURSANDITSCONDITION0ASSMORE SAIDTHEROOTSCOULDRUNALLTHEWAY DOWN TO THE CREEK FLOOR OR DEEPER ˆATLEASTFEET !T   YEARS %L 0ALO !LTO IS MIDDLE AGED)N THETREETRUNK WASINCHESINDIAMETERAND FEET HIGH ACCORDING TO A REPORT BY $OCKTER!TTHATTIMEITHADACROWN SPREADOFFEET "UTTHETREEHASSHRUNKENSINCEITS RECORDEDHEIGHTOFFEETIN 4HETREEISACTUALLYHEALTHIERTHAN IN PREVIOUS TIMES $OCKTER SAID 7ELLSTHATONCESUCKEDUPGROUND WATER WERE CAPPED IN THE S ALLOWING MORE WATER TO REACH THE ROOTS 4HE CITY IN THE S ALSO ADDEDAMISTERTOTHETOPOFTHETREE TO SIMULATE THE REDWOODS NATURAL FOGENVIRONMENT HESAID %L0ALO!LTOHASSURVIVEDCENTU RIESOFFLOODANDDROUGHT CHANGES TO THE CREEK THAT FEEDS IT AND POL LUTION AND PARTICULATE MATTER FROM VEHICLES 3TANDING JUST A FEW FEET FROMBOTHTHECREEKANDTHERAILROAD BRIDGE ITSFOLIAGEWASONCEAFFECTED BY BELCHING LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES 0ASSMORESAID 4HE PROPOSED HIGH SPEED RAIL SYSTEMCOULDALSOFURTHERAFFECTTHE TREE h4RAINS MAKE WIND WHEN PASS INGBYTHATWILLBLOWBRANCHESAND LEAVES4HEHIGH SPEEDTRAINSMIGHT NOTBEABLETOUSETHEEXACTFOOTPRINT OFTHEEXISTINGRAIL ANDTHATMIGHT INFRINGE ON THE TREES ROOT ZONE 4HERE ARE A LOT OF POSSIBILITIES WE NEEDTOBECOGNIZANTOF vHESAID %L 0ALO !LTO IS SOMETHING OF AN ANOMALY#OASTREDWOODSARETYPI CALLYFOUNDINMOISTER FOGGIERENVI RONMENTSTHAN0ALO!LTO h)TSNOTCOMMONTOHAVEREDWOOD TREESINTHEDRYENVIRONMENTWEHAVE IN0ALO!LTO v0ASSMORESAID 3TANDING ON THE FOOTBRIDGE OVER 3AN &RANCISQUITO #REEK HE MAR VELED AT HOW THE TREE CAME TO BE THEREANDSURVIVEDTHECENTURIES h)T WAS PROBABLY A FLOOD THAT BROUGHT ITS SEED DOWN FROM THE MOUNTAINS WHERE IT WAS DEPOSITED ONTHECREEKBANK vHESAID %L 0ALO !LTO HAS BEEN A PART OF MANY MAJOR EVENTS IN LOCAL HISTORY .AMED BY THE 3PANIARDS IT MEANS hTHE TALL TREEv LITERALLY hSTICKv  3PANISH EXPLORER 'ASPAR 0ORTOLA CAMPED UNDER THE GIANT TREE DURING HISEXPEDITION)TISDESIGNATED AS#ALIFORNIA3TATE,ANDMARK.O h4HISTREESYMBOLIZESTHEPIONEER SPIRITOF0ALO!LTO v0ASSMORESAID NOTING THE PEOPLE AND HISTORICAL MILESTONES THAT HAVE COME BEFORE ANDARELIKELYTOCONTINUEGRAVITAT ING TO 0ALO !LTO IN THE DECADES TO COME (E THOUGHT OF 3TANFORD AND THE LATE 3ILICON 6ALLEY ICON 3TEVE *OBSANDOTHERSWHOHAVEPUTDOWN ROOTSINTHEVALLEY %L0ALO!LTOESTABLISHEDITSELFON THEBANKSOFTHECREEKBEFOREANYOF THEM ANDITENDUREDINANOFTENHOS TILEANDCHALLENGINGENVIRONMENT h)TS THAT TYPE OF FIGHTING SPIRIT THAT EXEMPLIFIES THE SPIRIT OF 0ALO !LTO vHESAID !VIDEOOFTHEWORKWILLAPPEAR ONTHECITYSWEBSITEINTHEFUTUREN Page 8ÊUÊՏÞÊÓÈ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

News Digest Palo Alto man dies in Tahoe plane crash !0ALO!LTOPILOTWASKILLEDANDHISWIFEWASINJUREDAFTERTHEIRPRIVATE PLANECRASHEDINAWOODEDAREAIN3OUTH,AKE4AHOE-ONDAY *ULY THE%L$ORADO#OUNTY3HERIFFS/FFICECONFIRMED 3TEVE,EFTON  DIEDONIMPACTWHENHISSINGLE ENGINE-OONEY AIRPLANECRASHEDSHORTLYAFTERTAKEOFFFROM,AKE4AHOE!IRPORTATAP PROXIMATELYAM ,T0ETE6AN!RNUMSAID 4HE ,EFTONS WERE RETURNING TO THE 0ALO !LTO !IRPORT AFTER A FAMILY GATHERINGATACABININ3OUTH,AKE4AHOE3OMEOFTHERELATIVESWERESTILL ATTHECABIN INCLUDINGTHE,EFTONSDAUGHTER .UMEROUSWITNESSESSAWTHEPLANEBEGINTOLOSEALTITUDEAFTERTAKE OFFANDBANKSHARPLYINTOAWOODEDAREAEASTOFTHEAIRPORT4HEPLANE CRASHEDINTOLARGEPINETREESANDFLIPPEDOVER 4HEAREAISFORESTEDANDISNEARAMEADOWWITHHIKINGTRAILSANDIS NEAR TWO HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS 6AN !RNUM SAID 4HE PLANE CRASHED NEXTTOADIRTROAD /FF DUTY#AL3TARFLIGHTNURSE"ETH&RISBYWASWALKINGHERDOGINTHE AREAANDCAMEUPONTHEWRECKAGE ACCORDINGTOTHE3HERIFFS/FFICE3HE PROVIDEDMEDICALAIDANDCOMFORTTO+AREN,EFTONFORSEVERALMINUTES UNTIL DEPUTIES MEDICS AND FIREFIGHTERS FROM ,AKE 6ALLEY &IRE $EPART MENTARRIVED &UELWASLEAKINGFROMTHERUPTUREDFUELTANKSINTHEWINGS ANDFIRE DEPARTMENTPERSONNELSPRAYEDFIRERETARDANTFOAMONTOTHEPLANEWHILE MEDICSANDFIREFIGHTERSREMOVED+AREN,EFTONFROMTHEWRECKAGE WHERE SHEHADBEENPINNEDUPSIDE DOWN3HESUSTAINEDMODERATEINJURIES WAS FLOWNBY#AL3TARTO2ENOWN(OSPITALIN2ENO .EV ANDISEXPECTEDTO SURVIVE 6AN!RNUMSAID 3TEVE,EFTONRECENTLYRETIREDFROMHISJOBASAFAILURE ANALYSISENGINEER WHOSPECIALIZEDINELECTRICUTILITIES h4HEY WERE WONDERFUL LOVING PEOPLE 4HEY WERE AN AMAZING FUN LOVINGFAMILY SWEETANDKIND vLONGTIMEFRIEND"ARBARA3PRENGSAIDN — Sue Dremann

Arastradero Preserve eyed for tree influx 7HENITCOMESTOTREES THE0ALO!LTOMUNICIPALGOLFCOURSESLOSSMAY BE!RASTRADERO0RESERVESGAIN !S0ALO!LTOOFFICIALSWORKONACOMPLETEOVERHAULOFTHEGOLFCOURSE INTHE"AYLANDS THEYARECONSIDERINGWAYSTOMAKEUPFORTHELOSSOF TREES WHICHWOULDHAVETOBEAXEDASPARTOFTHERENOVATION/NE STRATEGY WHICHTHECITYISNOWREFINING ISTOPLANTNEWTREESINOTHERPARTS OFTHECITY!SSISTANT#OMMUNITY3ERVICES$IRECTOR2OBDE'EUSTOLDTHE 0ARKSAND2ECREATION#OMMISSION4UESDAYNIGHTTHAT!RASTRADEROISA LEADINGCANDIDATEFORTHECANOPYINFLUX $E'EUSSAIDCITYOFFICIALSHADCONSULTEDWITHITSPARTNERSINTHENON PROFITCOMMUNITY INCLUDING!CTERRAAND#ANOPY TODEVISESTRATEGIESTO EASE THE TREE LOSS !RASTRADERO BECAME A LEADING CANDIDATE BECAUSE IT ONCEBOASTEDANOAKWOODLAND-ANYOFTHETREESWERECHOPPEDDOWN WHENTHEPRESERVEBECAMEAHORSERANCH.OW THEPLANISTOPUTLIVEOAKS BACKINTO!RASTRADERO DE'EUSSAID 0ALO!LTOOFFICIALSDECIDEDTOOVERHAULTHEMUNICIPALGOLFCOURSEIN CONJUNCTIONWITHNEEDEDCHANGESTOTHEADJACENTCREEKTOPREVENTFLOOD ING4HOUGHTHECREEK CALMINGPLANWOULDHAVEREQUIREDTHERECONFIGU RATION OF ONLY SIX OR SEVEN HOLES THE OVERHAUL WOULD AFFECT THEENTIRE  HOLECOURSEANDEMPHASIZEITS"AYLANDSLOCATION4HERECONFIGURATION WOULDALSOMAKEROOMFORTHREEATHLETICFIELDSANDAGYM 7HILEMANYOFTHENEWTREESCOULDTAKEROOTINTHEFOOTHILLS AFINAL DETERMINATIONHASYETTOBEMADE!RASTRADERO DE'EUSSAID IShNOTA DONEDEALv 4HEGOLFCOURSERENOVATIONPLANISSCHEDULEDTOUNDERGOANOTHERREVIEW INFRONTOFTHE0LANNINGAND4RANSPORTATION#OMMISSIONON*ULYN — Gennady Sheyner

Uber launches low-cost car service in Palo Alto 5BER THE3AN&RANCISCO BASEDCOMPANYTHATCOORDINATESCARSERVICE THROUGHAMOBILEAPP STARTEDOFFERINGITSLOWEST COSTTRANSPORTATIONOP TIONIN0ALO!LTO*ULY 5BER8 WHICHTHECOMPANYLAUNCHEDLAST*ULY OFFERSRIDESFORPRICES TOPERCENTLOWERTHANTAXIPRICESANDLOWERTHANNORMAL5BERPRICES SAID)LYA!BYZOV 5BERS3AN&RANCISCOGENERALMANAGER 4HISMEANSTHATFORAFLATRATE COMMUTERSCANNOWGETFROM0ALO!LTO TO-OUNTAIN6IEWFOR FROM0ALO!LTOTO3AN*OSEFORANDFROM 3AN&RANCISCOTO0ALO!LTOFOR!LSOAVAILABLEAREDRIVERSWITHLARGER CARSˆSOMEOFTHEMECO FRIENDLYHYBRIDSˆ5BERSNORMALTOWNCARS ANDLUXURYOPTIONS WHICHAREMOREEXPENSIVEANDHAVEBEENAVAILABLE INTHE3OUTH"AYSINCE 5BERLAUNCHEDININ3AN&RANCISCOWITHASMARTPHONEAPPLICA TIONTHATALLOWSUSERSTOTRACKSTHEIRDRIVERS SENDSATEXTMESSAGEWHENA DRIVERARRIVESANDCHARGESRIDERSCOMPLETELYDIGITALLY4HESOFTWAREWORKS WITHI0HONES !NDROIDSAND"LACKBERRIES BUTNON SMARTPHONEUSERSCAN ALSOUSE5BERONLINEVIATHECOMPANYSWEBSITE (OWEVER 5BERDOESNTOWNCARSOREMPLOYITSOWNDRIVERS)NSTEAD THECOMPANYPARTNERSWITHPROFESSIONALDRIVERSLOOKINGTOMAKEANEXTRA BUCKINTHEIRDOWNTIMEN — Elena Kadvany

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Upfront

August Events for Active Adults Successful Aging Celebration Sat. Aug. 10, 9:30 am - 1:30 pm Palo Alto Medical Foundation 701 East El Camino Real, Mountain View A free day of seminars, art, music, food, prizes, a movie and more! Call 650-934-7380 for more information or to register.

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council

Avenidas Fitness Camp

The council did not meet this week.

Tues. Aug. 20 to Thurs Aug. 22, 9 am - 3 pm Channing House 850 Webster St., Palo Alto Call 650-289-5436 for more information or to register.

Parks and Recreation Commission (July 23) Master plans: The commission heard updates about the pending Parks and Recreation Master Plan and the Rinconada Park Master Plan. The commission also discussed the reconfiguration of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course. Action: None

Family Caregiving 101 A year-long series of free workshops Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center, 270 Escuela Avenue, Mountain View Call 650-289-5499 for more information or to register. s Self-Care s Stress Management Thursday, Aug. 22, 7 pm Thursday, Oct. 24, 7 pm s Falls Prevention s Family Dynamics Thursday, Sept. 26, 7 pm Thursday, Nov. 14, 7 pm

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council has no meetings scheduled this week.

Resources and programs for positive aging

(650) 289-5400 | www.avenidas.org

An Independent K-8 Non proďŹ t School

UTILITIES ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to elect its officers; hear presentations on the Development Center and safety-related outreach; discuss the PaloAltoGreen program redesign; and consider the city’s Energy Risk Management Report for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 31, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Individualized, Self-Directed Learning “Follow the child�

Essential Qualities: Respect, Responsibility, Independence

Multi-Age Classrooms “Continuity is key to learning�

PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to hold a joint meeting with the Architectural Review Board to discuss sidewalk widths and how buildings address El Camino Real. The commission also plans to hold a public hearing on the proposed reconfiguration of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course and to have a scoping session on the draft Environmental Impact Report for 395 Page Mill Road, a proposal by Jay Paul for a commercial development and a new police headquarters for the city. The meeting will begin at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 31, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

“Children thrive on trust�

Inspirations

a guide to the spiritual community

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC £™nxĂŠÂœĂ•ÂˆĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`]ĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠUĂŠÂ­ĂˆxäŽÊnxĂˆÂ‡ĂˆĂˆĂˆĂ“ĂŠUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°vVVÂŤ>Â°ÂœĂ€}ĂŠ Sunday Worship and Church School at 10 a.m.

This Sunday: Still Listening God Rev. Daniel-Jones, preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ We celebrate Marriage Equality!

ST. ANN ANGLICAN CHAPEL A TRADITIONAL E PISCOPAL

CHURCH

x{ÂŁĂŠiÂ?Ă›ÂˆÂ?Â?iĂŠĂ›i°]ĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœ]ĂŠ ʙ{Îä£ÊUĂŠĂˆxä‡nĂŽn‡äxän The Most Reverend Robert S. Morse, Vicar Reverend Matthew Weber, Assistant -Ă•Â˜`>Ăž\ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ää>“‡ Â…ÂœĂ€>Â?ĂŠ Ă•VÂ…>Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂŠEĂŠ-iĂ€Â“ÂœÂ˜ĂŠ 7i`˜iĂƒ`>Ăž\ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\{x>“‡ÂœĂ€Â˜ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠ*Ă€>ĂžiÀÊUĂŠÂŁĂ“\ää\ĂŠ Ă•VÂ…>Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂŠ Ç\ä䍓\ĂŠ ˆLÂ?iĂŠ-ĂŒĂ•`ÞÊUĂŠ …ˆÂ?`ĂŠ >Ă€iĂŠ*Ă€ÂœĂ›Âˆ`i`

(650) 813-9131 State–of–the–art facility located at 4000 Terman Rd (cross street Arastradero) in Palo Alto

The Bowman faculty includes trained Montessori teachers, interns and teaching specialists who teach cultural, music and after–school enrichment programs. During the core school day our low student– to–faculty ratio enables us to place a strong focus on the child and deliver individualized teaching to each students.

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Reader (continued from page 3)

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Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News” in the left, green column.

Man convicted of murder !MANWHOSTRUCKANDKILLEDAMOTORCYCLISTAF TERFLEEING%AST0ALO!LTOPOLICEWASCONVICTEDOF SECOND DEGREEMURDERANDVEHICULARMANSLAUGHTER ON7EDNESDAY *ULY ACCORDINGTOTHE3AN-A TEO #OUNTY $ISTRICT !TTORNEYS /FFICE (Posted July 25, 9:53 a.m.)

TICETHATITSINTERACTIONSWITH2AVENSWOODAREUNDER SCRUTINY(Posted July 24, 9:50 a.m.)

College leaders meet edtech startups #OLLEGEANDUNIVERSITYPRESIDENTSWHOMETIN0ALO !LTOTHISWEEKBRAINSTORMEDTHEFUTUREOFHIGHEREDU CATIONBYDISCUSSINGHYPOTHETICALSTUDENTSANDHEAR INGFROMEDTECHSTARTUPS(Posted July 24, 9:50 a.m.)

Menlo Park police arrest fugitive -ENLO 0ARK POLICE AND &") AGENTS ARRESTED ON -ONDAYA YEAR OLD.EWARKMANWHOHASBEENON THERUNFROMPOLICEINCONNECTIONWITHADRUGTRAF FICKING AND WEAPONS VIOLATION INVESTIGATION (Posted July 24, 9:41 a.m.)

Menlo Park fire chief returns home !FTERTHREEDECADESINACAREERTHATSAWHIMDE PLOYEDFOR THE/KLAHOMA#ITYBOMBING +A TRINAANDLOCALEMERGENCIESTOONUMEROUSTOCOUNT THE FIRE CHIEF OF THE -ENLO 0ARK &IRE 0ROTECTION $ISTRICT IS USED TO SAVING LIVES RATHER THAN BEING SAVED(Thursday, 9:14 a.m.)

Man arrested in nonfatal shooting !MANWASARRESTEDONSUSPICIONOFSHOOTINGAN OTHERMANINTHELEGIN%AST0ALO!LTOTHIS7EDNES DAY AFTERNOON ACCORDING TO POLICE (Posted July 25, 9:12 a.m.)

Stanford reports security breach 3TANFORD5NIVERSITYISINVESTIGATINGWHATAPPEARSTO BEABREACHINITSINFORMATIONTECHNOLOGYINFRASTRUC TUREBUTTHEUNIVERSITYSTATEDTHATITDOESNTYETKNOW THESCOPEOFTHEINTRUSION(Posted July 25, 8:56 a.m.)

Eshoo votes to defund NSA program 532EP!NNA%SHOO#!  VOTEDINFAVORTO DAYOFANAMENDMENTTOTHISYEARSDEFENSESPENDING BILLTHATWOULDREQUIRETHE.ATIONAL3ECURITY!GENCY .3! TOLIMITITSINFORMATION GATHERINGTOSUBJECTS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INVESTIGATIONS RATHER THAN ALL !MERICANS(Posted July 24, 4:42 p.m.)

Civil rights lawyers scrutinize district )NABIDTOSTARTACONVERSATIONONADDRESSINGPOOR ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AMONG STUDENTS FROM THE 2AVENSWOOD #ITY 3CHOOL $ISTRICT WHO ATTEND HIGH SCHOOLSINTHE3EQUOIA5NION(IGH3CHOOL$ISTRICT AGROUPOF"AY!REACIVILRIGHTSLAWYERSHASISSUEDA REPORTTHATATTEMPTSTOPUTTHE3EQUOIADISTRICTONNO

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New homes: snapshot of sellers’ market 4HEAVERAGENUMBEROFDAYSTHATA0ALO!LTOHOUSE STAYED ON THE MARKET DURING THE FIRST HALF OF  WAS  DAYS ! CONDO TOOK  DAYS TO SELL "UT IT WASLESSTHANAWEEKFORHOMESINANEW0ALO!LTO DEVELOPMENTTHATWENTONSALETHISMONTH(Posted July 23, 12:02 p.m.)

Traffic-signal upgrades to begin ,ONG AWAITED TRAFFIC SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS ALONG /REGON%XPRESSWAYCOULDSOONBEGIN REPLACINGHALF CENTURY OLD SIGNALS ALONG THE BUSY EXPRESSWAY THE 3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY2OADSAND!IRPORTS$EPARTMENT HASANNOUNCED(Posted July 23, 9:51 a.m.)

t.BLFQVSDIBTFT t8SJUFBOESFBESFWJFXT t'JOEEFBMTBOEDPVQPOT t#VZHJGUDFSUJöDBUFT t%JTDPWFSMPDBMCVTJOFTTFT

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New police dog, ‘Eddie,’ presented 7ITHTHEPRESSOFABUTTON THEDOORTOTHEPOLICE CARPOPPEDOPEN REVEALINGTHENEWESTMEMBEROFTHE 0ALO!LTO0OLICE$EPARTMENT4OAROUNDOFAPPLAUSE %DDIETHEPOLICEDOGBOUNDEDOUTOFHISCARINFRONT OFTHEWAITINGCROWD(Posted July 23, 9:27 a.m.)

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Mi Pueblo seeks bankruptcy -I0UEBLO&OODSISSEEKING#HAPTERBANKRUPTCY COURTPROTECTION CITINGAPROBLEMWITHITSMAINSE CUREDCREDITOR ACCORDINGTOANARTICLEINTHE3ILICON 6ALLEY"USINESS*OURNAL(Posted July 22, 5:21 p.m.)

Castilleja seeks to boost enrollment #ASTILLEJA ANINDEPENDENTMIDDLEANDHIGHSCHOOL FORGIRLSON"RYANT3TREET SAYSITWILLSEEKPERMIS SIONFROMTHE#ITYOF0ALO!LTOTOINCREASEITSENROLL MENTGRADUALLYFROMSTUDENTSTO(Posted July 19, 9:40 a.m.)

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Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto July 18 - July 24 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Child abuse/physical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Child abuse/neglect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Elder abuse/physical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Attempted theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Bicycle recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .9 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Oliver Peoples & Paul Smith

Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . 10 Vehicle accident/prop. damage . . . . . . .3 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Alcohol or drug related Drinking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Drunk driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Open container. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Brandishing a weapon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbing/annoying phone calls. . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .3 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Possession of stolen property . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Menlo Park July 18 - July 24 Theft related Burglary attempt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Credit card forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .8 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/mjr. injury . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/prop. damage . . . . . . .5 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous Criminal threats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Atherton July 18 - July 24 Theft related Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Alcohol or drug related Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .1

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VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Channing Ave., 6/6. Child abuse/physical. Arastradero Rd., 6/23, 1:00 a.m.; Elder abuse/physical Encina Ave., 7/17, 3:50 a.m.; Domestic violence/battery. Crescent Dr., 7/17, 9:03 p.m.; Domestic violence/battery. Laguna Way, 7/18, 7:20 p.m.; Domestic violence/battery El Camino Real, 7/18, 7:33 p.m.; Child abuse/neglect 33 Encina Ave., 7/19, 9:48 a.m.; Michael Guilford booked at main jail in San Jose for battery/simple

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

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Hours: Mon. - Fri. 10am - 7pm, Sat. 10am - 6pm, Sun. 11am - 5pm

Transitions

Two of the Bay Area’s Best Independent Choruses

Schola Cantorum and Masterworks Chorale Present Choral Sing-Along Extravaganza: Orff’s Carmina Burana

Births, marriages and deaths

JoAnn Murray JoAnn Murray died on July 13. Born on Aug. 18, 1939, she was raised in Wisconsin. After attending the University of Wisconsin, she moved to California where she met and married her husband and best friend, Roger Murray. She worked for many years for the Palo Alto Times. She and her husband moved to downtown Palo Alto in 1980, where she owned and operated McMillan Coffee Company for 15 years. She is survived by her husband of 50 years and his three children. Per her request, no services will be held. In lieu of flowers, she and her family prefer that donations are given to the charity of your choosing.

Mona Ruth Miller Mona Ruth Miller (Jablow) was a resident of Palo Alto since 1953.

She was born in Chelsea, Mass., in 1925. Raised in Cambridge, Mass., she graduated from Cambridge High and Latin School in 1943. She attended multiple colleges, from Simmons College and Northeastern University, to Foothill and De Anza Community Colleges. She met her husband, Jack, at M.I.T. where she was working in a lab. They were married for almost 55 years before Jack’s death in 1999. She was a community worker, at first involved in her children’s activities — PTA boards at Ross Road and Van Auken — as well as Boy Scout and Girl Scout activities. She was a member of Avenidas Senior Center for many years. She also helped establish Avenidas Village, an organization that assists seniors who wish to “age in place� in their homes — which she was able

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August 2, 3, 4

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to do — and she used that service until she was 86. She was a member of Friends of the Palo Alto Library, working at book sales in earlier years. She was also a member of the Palo Alto Historical Association and an active member at Palo Alto Unitarian Church (member of board as well as teaching). She is survived by her son, Alan Miller of Davis; her daughter Sharane Miller of Baltimore, Md.; granddaughter Jenelle Gaultney and great-grand-children Taegan, Evan and Kyle of Grants, N.M.; also many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.

Under the baton of special guest, Vance George, Conductor Emeritus, San Francisco Symphony Chorus 7:30 PM

Monday, August 5, 2013 Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts Come to sing or come to listen! Bring your own score or borrow ours.

Births Olcan and Bilgen Serc Palo Alto, July 16, a boy.

For more information, visit www.scholacantorum.org or www.masterworks.org

Thomas John Schafer, DDS, MSD May 14, 1934 – July 12, 2013 Surrounded by his loving family at the Veterans Hospice Hospital in Palo Alto, California, Tom lost his battle with gastro-esophageal cancer on July 12, 2013. He was born in West Allis, Wisconsin, to Ann Nystrom Schafer and John Kenneth Schafer. Tom had a younger sister, Sally Patricia. During the second grade, the family moved to Ottawa, Illinois, where his dad was the store manager of Sears and the police commissioner. They later moved to La Grange, Illinois, when his dad became head of Sears trucking in the Chicago area. A varsity football player, defensive end and offensive tackle, Tom graduated from Lyons Township High School in 1952. He attended the University of Illinois in Champagne, Illinois, was a member of the ATO fraternity, and went on to the University of Illinois Dental School in Chicago, graduating in 1958. In the fall of 1958, Tom joined the Army as a captain, completing his dental internship at William Beaumont Army Hospital in El Paso, Texas. In 1959, he was transferred to Korea for thirteen months, doing general dentistry at Camp Kaiser on the 38th parallel and then oral surgery at the main hospital in Seoul. He spent the last two years of his army career at Fort Ord in California, continuing with general dentistry and periodontics. It was during that time that he met his wife, Sharon Weigel, in Carmel in 1961. “He had a particular love of American Airlines and their stewardesses,â€? says Sharon, “and I just happened to be one of them.â€? In 1962, Tom entered Baylor Dental University in Dallas and received a Master of Science in periodontology. Tom and Sharon were married in 1963 in the chapel at SMU. They returned to the Bay Area in 1964 and Tom started private periodontal practice in Menlo Park, moved his ofďŹ ce ďŹ ve years later to Welch Road in Palo Alto, and became Board CertiďŹ ed. He served as President of the Mid-Peninsula Dental Society and belonged to the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Periodontology. After

practicing for 34 years, he retired in 1992. Tom and Sharon lived in Portola Valley for six years and in Atherton for 41 years, joining the Menlo Circus Club and the Sharon Heights Country Club. Over the years, they hosted spectacular theme parties for their many friends (40th birthday, Egyptian, disco, tennis, opera, Christmas, and “glad to be alive after a heart attackâ€?). In retirement, Tom enjoyed social tennis, golf, couples’ bridge, and many school reunions. He and Sharon cruised and traveled the world. At home, Tom found pleasure in gardening and was an all-round Mr. Fix-it—a one-man yellow pages. An exceptional innovator, he created remarkable indoor-outdoor features long before smart houses; a car entering the driveway, for example, triggered their music system. Friends remember Tom’s easygoing manner, his warm, accepting ways, straight-forward honesty, and ever-present sense of humor. A handsome man, always a gentleman, a loyal and thoughtful friend, Tom was a wonderful husband, father, and grandfather—a solid citizen and great human being. He felt blessed by his beautiful wife and constant companion, Sharon, their family, friends, and an extraordinary life. Tom is survived by his wife of ďŹ fty years, Sharon, son, John (Jack) Schafer, daughter, Shannon Schafer Lewis, son-in-law, Craig Lewis, and only grandson, Tyler Lewis. Other family members include brother-in-law, Roger Hurt, niece, Linda Hurt Ruiz, nephew, David Hurt, and many grandnieces and grand nephews. He is predeceased by his parents, Ann and John Kenneth (Ken) Schafer, sister, Sally Patricia Schafer Hurt, and his favorite uncle from Arkansas, Elmer Nystrom, whose salt-of-the-earth spirit and stories Tom admired and inherited. A celebration of life was held at the Menlo Park Presbyterian Church, Menlo Park, CA, and Menlo Circus Club, July 16, 2013. In lieu of owers, please send donations to Pathways Home Health at 585 N. Mary Ave, Sunnyvale, CA 94085, or the VA Palo Alto Hospice Unit at 3801 Miranda Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304, or a charity of choice. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Cover Story

Up

for the

challenge Ten-year-old local chess club puts Bay Area on the national map photos by Veronica Weber | story by Rye Druzin

Clockwise, from top: Charlie Vamacht, 7, moves his chess piece during a game at Bay Area Chess summer camp at Fairmeadow Elementary School in July; Kelvin Jiang, 9, of Palo Alto, studies the board while pondering his next move during the People’s Tournament in Santa Clara on July 20; young Palo Alto chess players Mihir Mirchandani, left, and Rishit Bhat, far right, play a game of chess at the Bay Area Chess summer camp at Fairmeadow, while Matthew Bhattacharya, second from left, and Cody West watch. Page 14ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â?ĂžĂŠĂ“Ăˆ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

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he tension in the room is high, and not a move is being made. Players sit across from each other, their brows furrowed as they ponder their next step. Digital clocks count

down the remaining time in the game. A few curious onlookers and players roam from game to game, analyzing strategies. Welcome to the world of competitive chess.

Cover Story

Andrew Peng, 7, waits as opponent Garrett Kingman studies the board before making his move during the People’s Tournament at the Santa Clara Hilton.

Beginning chess player Sophia Lee ponders her move at the Bay Area Chess summer camp at Fairmeadow on July 17. Young chess players at the Bay Area Chess summer camp at Fairmeadow Elementary School, Sophia Lee and Theo Dischler, bottom row, and Matthew Bhattacharya and Edan Cho, top row, play against one another on July 17.

Players in kindergarten through first grade compete in the Young People’s Tournament at the Santa Clara Hilton on July 21.

Last weekend saw Bay Area Chess, an organization that provides weekly chess tournaments and camps, host the People’s Tournament. The three-day event in Santa Clara drew 150 adult competitors and nearly 100 youths — among them Palo Altans Saleem Karamali, 18; Andrew Peng, 7; Kelvin Jiang, 9; and Mihir Mirchandani, 10. The tournament afforded the younger players both practice and a view of the adult and advanced competitors. The chess scene in the Bay Area has grown tremendously in the past decade from a small group of organizations to a nationally recognized region. Bay Area Chess, based in San Jose, has been a major part of this expansion. The group was begun nine years ago by Salman Azhar to offer parents a high-quality alternative to other chess programs as well as regular tournaments for chess players throughout the Bay Area. Today’s local chess community is “extremely active, thriving and growing,� Azhar said, and now the San Francisco Bay Area has become, through numbers, tournaments and growth, one of the three top chess scenes in the country. Azhar started the organization on his own when his son moved to a new school that was not providing the qual-

ity of coaching that he expected. Afterschool programs with Bay Area Chess cost between $107 and $267 for the fourmonth programs, while week-long summer courses at Fairmeadow Elementary School in Palo Alto average $177 for a three-hour session, or $417 for the whole day. Most of the people who work for Bay Area Chess are volunteers passionate to help kids learn chess, he said. Bay Area Chess runs summer camps in three Palo Alto elementary schools — at Fairmeadow, Duveneck and Palo Verde — in addition to regular after-school programs at seven schools. Fairmeadow hosts the largest camp, with more than 300 children attending during the summer, said Judit Sztaray, a parent volunteer. Palo Alto’s chess scene is small compared with other areas such as Cupertino and Fremont, according to Azhar. Despite its size and youthful makeup, Palo Alto’s chess players and their parents are enthusiastic and active. Kelvin, who has been playing for four years, has favored chess over sports. He also participates in one to two tournaments per month. “When I am playing chess I think it’s pretty fun,� Kelvin said. “It’s calculating (continued on next page)

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Cover Story

International Master Emory Tate, second from right, offers a few words of advice to young chess players competing in the Young People’s Tournament, as Salman Azhar, second from left, founder of Bay Area Chess, and fellow coaches listen on July 21. (continued from previous page)

and thinking and involves a lot of strategy.� Compared to physical sports, where youths are grouped by age, chess is organized by ability. Because of this, Kelvin sometimes plays against those older than he is. But he does not let the age difference faze him. “I don’t really concentrate about how old they are; I just play chess,� Kelvin said.

Bay Area Chess has attracted volunteers by word of mouth, Azhar said, and that base of volunteers helps keep tournament costs low for participants. Azhar said the focus of the camps and coaching is less on winning the game than on instilling principles that are inherent in chess. “We generally do not emphasize the result of the game,� Azhar said. “We emphasize analyzing the game and learning from the good moves you made and the bad moves you

Edward Aquas, a coach with Bay Area Chess, teaches students Sophia Lee and Ribhav Kaul key opening moves during chess summer camp. Page 16ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â?ĂžĂŠĂ“Ăˆ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

made. And we don’t call it bad moves but, ‘Could you do something different?’.� It is this attitude that has gained Azhar attention, as he now has programs for youths in more than 50 schools. The growth of the chess community, enhanced by Bay Area Chess and other chess programs, has meant that the Bay Area’s chess scene now ranks at the top with New York City and Dallas, Texas, said American International Master Emory Tate. These two cities have traditionally been the hub of American chess. While Azhar’s focus has been on bringing programs to schools, another chess organization has tried to bring chess to youth who are locked up in San Jose’s juvenile hall. Daniel Dupre launched ChessKing in 2006 to provide after-school chess education to kids, and now runs programs at Ohlone, El Carmelo, Hoover and Barron Park elementary schools in Palo Alto. But Dupre also provides the game at least twice a month at juvenile hall to youth who are facing 25 years to life in prison. Begun in late 2008, the program aims to help kids overcome ignorance while teaching them useful skills from chess, Dupre said. “I believe chess has a lot to teach everyone,� he said. “It’s more than just a mental exercise; there’s a lot of universal principles, laws of physics and laws of the universe that are modeled on the chess board.� Dupre also hopes that the kids who play chess in juvenile hall will become better at questioning the situations and influences that surround them. “With the juvenile-hall group I really stress critical thinking,� he said. “You want to think what you think ... but you also want to know why you think what you think. ... Is there a sound reasoning behind it? And peer pressure too — I think critical thinking helps us overcome peer pressure.� While his program in juvenile hall is popular with the administrators and some inmates, Dupre’s after-school programs have rapidly expanded in size and scope. Starting with programs at three schools

Mihir Mirchandani, 10, smiles as he accepts a trophy from Bay Area Chess founder Salman Azhar after winning fourth place in the grades 4-5 division of the Young People’s Tournament in Santa Clara on July 21.

with 40 students, ChessKing has grown to a dozen schools with more than 300 students during the school year. Dupre hopes to continue to bring chess to more kids as the local chess community gets larger. “What’s exciting about it for me is the opportunity to get kids excited about chess,� Dupre said. “The program is designed to be really inclusive. You don’t need to be a chess genius, or you don’t even have to have a lot of chess aptitude.� As chess appears poised to continue its expansion in the Bay Area, Tate hopes that its growth will come with positive consequences. “I personally believe that chess is the only thing that competes with

video games,� Tate said. “Once kids really get into chess you can kinda drop the video games because it’s not the same level. Pushing a button and clicking on a few monsters, it doesn’t engage the brain like chess does.� N Staff Photographer Veronica Weber and Editorial Intern Rye Druzin can be emailed at vweber@paweekly.com and rdruzin@ paweekly.com. About the cover: Andrew Peng, 7, takes a close-up view of the pieces on the chess board during his second round at the People’s Tournament in Santa Clara on July 20. Photograph by Veronica Weber.

People’s Tournament results The People’s Tournament event took place in Santa Clara from July 19 to 21. Saleem Karamali, who has a United States Chess Federation (USCF) rating of 1,697, finished third in the Class B group, while Andrew Peng, rated 1,468, finished 14th. Kelvin Jiang, rated at 1,518, finished ninth in the Class C group, which he played as an advanced youth. Mihir Mirchandani, rated 1,204 (Class D), placed fourth in the Young People’s Swiss for grades 4-5. For perspective, an expert is rated above 2,000, while a senior master (the highest rating) is rated 2,400 and above. Players compete

with their classes: Class A, 1,800 to 1,999 points; Class B, 1,600 to 1,799 points; Class C, 1,400 to 1,599 points; and Class D, 1,200 to 1,399 points. Ratings estimate the relative strength of chess players based on their history of play. Players begin with a baseline 1,200 score, judged to be average, and the rating increases or decreases depending on the player’s performance. Both the USCF and the World Chess Federation (FIDE) use the Elo rating system, which uses a complex algorithm to calculate players’ scores. N — Rye Druzin

Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

Frank Steward

With his new album, “Border-Free,â€? pianist Chucho ValdĂŠs will take audiences on a musical journey from Cuba to Morocco.

Chucho ValdĂŠs and his quintet to perform the Stanford Jazz Festival season finale by Elena Kadvany

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hucho ValdĂŠs grew up in a house constantly full of music and musicians. Born in Quivican, Cuba, he had his immediate family: father Bebo ValdĂŠs, the pianist, bandleader, composer, arranger and central figure in the 20th-century Cuban music scene; and his mother, Pilar RodrĂ­guez, a singer who loves Bach preludes. And then there were the Cuban artists, overflow from Bebo’s work as assistant director and arranger for Havana’s famed Tropicana Club. American musicians such as Roy Haynes, Bill Jackson and Buddy Rich often dropped by. “And I was always present when they came to visit,â€? said ValdĂŠs, now 71, speaking through an interpreter from his home in Spain. “So that’s how my childhood developed.â€? ValdĂŠs’ own music — in particular his newest album, “Border-Free,â€? — is a distinct product of that environment. “Border-Freeâ€? pays tribute to the people, places and moments that have shaped him musically. Local audiences will get to hear songs from the album on Aug. 10, when ValdĂŠs performs with his quintet at Bing Concert Hall to

close this season’s Stanford Jazz Festival. ValdĂŠs started to play piano with his father at the age of 3. When he was 5 years old — too young to attend music school — his parents hired a classical piano teacher to further his musical education. Bebo also taught his son Cuban folk and jazz music, immersing him in many worlds at once. “I had my feet in the classical world; I was studying classical piano,â€? ValdĂŠs said. “I was immersed in the jazz world at the Tropicana, and at age 14, I started my first trio.â€? After studying at the Municipal Music Conservatory of Havana, ValdĂŠs started recording with his father’s group, Orquesta Sabor de Cuba (“saborâ€? meaning flavor or taste of Cuba). He was 15 years old. He went on to form Irakere, one of Cuba’s most famous Latin jazz bands, in 1973 and later won five Grammy Awards and three Latin Grammy Awards for his solo work. “Border-Free,â€? released on July 9, is true to its name. With a quintet of musicians dubbed The Afro-Cuban Messengers and guest saxophonist Branford Marsalis, ValdĂŠs takes listeners on a musical journey from Cuba to Morocco, from the 19th to the

21st centuries, referencing flamenco, Bach, Miles Davis. The album opens with “Congadanza,â€? a high-energy, upbeat piece that pays tribute to Maria Cervantes, daughter of the Cuban composer and pianist Ignacio Cervantes. The song also exhibits the beauty of so many musicians playing at once, but together. “Border-Freeâ€? is ValdĂŠs’ second release with The Afro-Cuban Messengers, who are Reynaldo Melian Alvarez, trumpet; Dreiser Durruthy BombalĂŠ, batĂĄ drums and lead vocals; Rodney Yllarza Barreto, drums and vocals; Angel GastĂłn Joya Perellada, double bass and vocals; and Yaroldy Abreu Robles, percussion and vocals. The song “Beboâ€? is a musical homage to ValdĂŠs’ father, who died in March. (ValdĂŠs began recording in December, so his father was able to hear the album.) It is in no way melancholy, but rather smooth and melodic. It features Alvarez on the trumpet and Marsalis on the tenor sax. But as it’s a deeply personal piece, the standout feature is ValdĂŠs himself, who said he physically channeled his father. “This was an idea that came to me spur of the moment,â€? he said. “I was playing a solo

and then all of a sudden I started playing in my father’s style with my left hand. So right then and there I divided my brain. With my left hand, I was playing in his style and with my right hand, I was playing in my style. “And when my father heard it, he just loved it. He loved the idea of me splitting myself up into two and playing him and myself as one.â€? “Pilarâ€? is also a reflection of his mother’s style, with sequences from genres she loved; Miles Davis’ “Blue and Greenâ€? and Bach’s “Prelude in D Minorâ€? are represented. “It’s melancholy, it’s spiritual, like my mother — my mother was a very spiritual person,â€? ValdĂŠs said. The 12-minute track between familial tributes, “Afro-Comanche,â€? takes a historical turn but continues in the theme of blurred borders. In the 19th century, a group of about 700 Comanche were taken prisoner by the Spanish Army in what is now Texas. They were eventually relocated to the eastern part of Cuba, where many intermarried with Cubans and gave birth to “Afro-Comanches.â€? Their hyphenated (continued on page 20)

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Arts & Entertainment as men in their late 20s, it hardly matters when they’re able to wring laughs from exchanges like this: Jack: You don’t think there is any chance of Gwendolen becoming like her mother in about 150 years, do you, Algy? Algernon: All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That’s his. It’s a perfect set-up and delivery, but then Wilde takes it one level further, as Jack becomes an even more perfect straight man, positioning Algernon for the proverbial slam dunk.

SEPTEMBER 20 REGISTER ONLINE: PaloAltoOnline.com/moonlight_run

Jack: Is that clever? Algernon: It is perfectly phrased! And quite as true as any observation in civilized life should be.

Stefanie Okuda

Ruth Marks (in hat) plays Gwendolen Fairfax and Jessica Waldman is Cecily Cardew in “The Importance of Being Earnest.�

A confident comedy machine Stanford Summer Theater’s take on Oscar Wilde classic is spot-on by Chad Jones

E

arlier this year, THEATER TheatreWorks attempted to go Oscar Wilde one better by turning his “The Importance of Being Earnest� into a musical set in the swinging London of the mid-1960s. The results weren’t awful, and much of the play’s genius still shone through the middling music. But the lesson was clear: You don’t mess with perfection. If Wilde’s intent was to spoof the kinds of Victorian melodramas and comedies of manners that were the order of the day as the 19th century barreled into the 20th, he miscalculated by creating the funniest comedy of manners imaginable, spoof or not. Granted, in the world of 1895, when the play premiered in London, there was a lot to make fun of regarding the intricate transactions surrounding the marriage pact when the person mattered less than the social standing or the land holdings or dollars invested in the fund. But Wilde also threw perfectly constructed farce (minus the door slamming) into the mix and a healthy dose of self-parody to make it really interesting. A sturdy production of “The Importance of Being Earnest� makes it all look effortless, as the

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laughs never stop rolling and the play hums along like the expertly calibrated comedy machine that it is. Stanford Summer Theater kicks off its 15th season — a festival called “He’s Funny That Way� featuring Wilde and Samuel Beckett plays, symposia, a film series, etc. — with a well-tuned “Earnest� directed by Lynne Soffer, who is also the Bay Area’s go-to dialect coach. So as you can imagine, every syllable is as crisp as can be, and there’s no trouble hearing every one of Wilde’s pithy bon mots spoken in surprisingly good British accents. Perhaps Sofer’s great accomplishment here is casting actors with mostly crackling good chemistry. Of course there are the two central romantic couples, but where the chemistry really energizes the play is between friends Algernon and Jack and rivals/besties Gwendolen and Cecily. Stanford undergrads Austin Caldwell as Algernon and David Raymond as Jack bring a robust energy to their scenes, and each fairly drips with British upper-class privilege. If they’re a few years too young to be completely believable

REVIEW

Jessica Waldman brings sweetness edged with lacerating singlemindedness to Cecily, an 18-yearold with a plan (why else would she be keeping a diary filled with fiction but for eventual publication?), and Ruth Marks nearly steals the show with her charm and domineering personality as Gwendolen. It’s very clear in Marks’ astute performance that she will grow up to be exactly like her imperious mother, Lady Bracknell, who might even make the Dowager Countess at Downton Abbey quake in her tightly laced boots. Played by Courtney Walsh, this Lady Bracknell is a tower — literally, as this is a tall actor made taller by costumer Connie Strayer’s divine hats — of societal propriety. With her booming voice and everarching eyebrows, she is not only a scene stealer but also a play stealer, and all without chewing the scenery as some Lady Bracknells are prone to do. You could forgive her for taking bites of the scenery because the designs by Erik Flatmo are, in a word, delicious. “Earnest� is very much a period piece (which is why TheatreWorks’ updating of it to the ‘60s fizzled), and Flatmo goes all out to create sumptuous settings for Algernon’s London townhouse, drowning in rich fabrics and bachelor excess, and the light, airy gardens and manor house of Jack’s Hertfordshire estate (the lovely lighting is by Michael Ramsaur). In supporting roles, Don DeMico nabs laughs as two butlers, one so inured to his employer he’s barely conscious and one so stooped from work he can barely walk. Marty Pistone is an affably dopey Rev. Chasuble, a country rector more prone to ego than spirituality, and Kay Kostopoulos is a bright but nervous Miss Prism, a tutor with a past. One delightful feature of Kostopoulos’ performance is the bouncing of the tight ringlets spilling from her head when she speaks excitedly (which is most of the time). There are a few bumps here and there, and the comedy machine misses a beat or two, but the real pleasure from this “Earnest� is its confidence. Director Sofer and the actors trust the play enough not to try and make it funny by pushing too hard. That means the audience (continued on page 20)

Arts & Entertainment

A tap legacy Virtuoso Savion Glover will perform with his trio on Aug. 3 by Elena Kadvany

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it’s always evolving and people are better off asking him tomorrow, because his style changes from day to day. He said his approach as a dancer is similar to how a musician would approach his or her instrument. Glover has also appeared on Broadway multiple times, beginning when he was 10 years old. He won a Tony award in 1996 for his performance in the Broadway musical “Bring in ‘da Noise/Bring in ‘da Funk� and has starred in television shows and films including Spike Lee’s “Bamboozled� in 2000. At Stanford, Glover plans to perform three pieces with each member of his trio — a vocalist, horn player and pianist — and a concluding piece all together. He said he aims to show “how the dance can be the bottom or lead instrument to each individual component, whether it’s vocal, horn or piano.� N Editorial Assistant Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@paweekly.com.

Photo courtesy of the HooFeRzCLub

avion Glover, a 39-year-old tap dancer, choreographer and actor who learned the art of tap from many of the “great masters of dance,� will bring his art to the Stanford Jazz Festival on Aug. 3, performing with his trio in Dinkelspiel Auditorium. Glover, who hails from New Jersey, started tap dancing when he was 7, going on to learn from many influential tappers including Buster Brown, Gregory Hines, Honie Coles and Sammy Davis Jr. He said that this early education not only changed his approach to dance, it also changed his life. “It just made me more aware of what I was involved in — the tradition of dance and entertainment. I was honored to be a part of that tradition and legacy,� he said in an interview. Glover now works to pass on this history and musicality to young tap dancers at the HooFeRzCLub, his tap school in Newark. The name is a nod to hoofers: tap dancers who dance close to the floor, focusing primarily on footwork without much arm or body movement. The style is also called “rhythm tap.� When asked about his personal tap style, Glover described it only as “tomorrow� —

Info: Savion Glover and his trio will perform Saturday, Aug. 3, at 8 p.m. in Stanford’s Dinkelspiel Auditorium. Tickets are $38 general, $45 premium and $15 for students. Go to stanfordjazz.org.

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S

Cucina Venti e!

abl l i a v a ng cateri

Join us for Dinner Before the Show! Shoreline Amphitheatre

John Mayer & Phillip Phillips Friday, July 26 Century 16

The Wolverine sPG-13 s126 Mins 9:30AM | | 11:30AM | 12:30PM | 3:45PM 5:45PM | 7:00PM | 10:15PM

Saturday, July 27 1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

Movie Theater is right across the street from Cucina Venti Come see live music on the Cucina Venti patio every Wednesday & Thursday, 5-8pm!

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Arts & Entertainment

Chucho ValdĂŠs (continued from page 17)

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Notice is hereby given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District for Gunn High School Walkway Project, Contract no: GSW-13. Description of the work is as follows:

The practiced hands of jazz pianist Chucho ValdĂŠs.

“When I create music like this, it’s not this or that or the other,� he said of his latest album. “The way I trained, I studied Cuban music, I studied Afro-Cuban music, I studied classics, I studied other genres — and since my childhood. So when I say ‘It’s not this that or the other,’ it’s that all of this comes together as a single coherent whole.� N Editorial Assistant Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

What: Chucho ValdĂŠs will perform with his quintet at the Stanford Jazz Festival. Where: Bing Concert Hall, 327 Lasuen St., Stanford University When: 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10. Cost: Tickets are $45-$70 general and $15 for students, with premium tickets priced at $100. Info: Go to stanfordjazz.org or call 650-725-ARTS.

Supply and installation of new accessible stairs and ramps, guard rails, hand rails, replacement/adjustment of existing utility vaults, and drain inlets. Grading & compaction, protection of existing ďŹ nished surfaces for a complete project. Bid documents contain full scope of work. Mandatory Job Walk: 10:00 a.m. on July 31, 2013 starting at the front of Gunn High School Administration OfďŹ ce, Palo Alto, CA 94306. Failure to addend or tardiness will render bid ineligible. Bid Submission: Proposals must be received at the District Facilities OfďŹ ce, Building “Dâ€?. Proposals are due on August 15, 2013 10:00 a.m. Contractor to ensure bid is received at the District Facilities OfďŹ ce. Bidding Documents: Plans and speciďŹ cations are available at ARC Reprographics located at 1100 Industrial Rd. Unit 13, San Carlos, CA 94070 for $100 | Phone: (650) 517-1895 This fee is refundable if the Contract Documents are returned in clean condition back to the District Facilities OfďŹ ce no later than ten (10) calendar days after the date of the bid opening. Bidders may also examine Bidding Documents at Facilities OfďŹ ce, Building “Dâ€?. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 – 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certiďŹ ed copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred.

Bidders may examine Bidding Documents at Facilities OfďŹ ce, Building “Dâ€?. For more details on obtaining plans and speciďŹ cations, the mandatory job walk, bid submission, or prevailing wage laws please contact: Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building “Dâ€? Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: Ron Smith Phone: (650) 329-3927 Fax: (650) 327-3588

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ShopTalk by Daryl Savage

ComancheMusic

name indicates the meeting of two worlds, a fusion that characterized their culture. “(They) created a sort of Mardi Gras-like celebration in eastern Cuba similar to New Orleans where the Africans dress up as Native Americans and create music together with them, which must have been a tremendous musical expression,â€? ValdĂŠs said. “And that’s why I appear wearing a Native headdress on the cover.â€? The album’s cover art — an image of ValdĂŠs in an enormous Native

American headdress — shows him again testing the limits of borders, traditions and styles. Other tribute tracks include “Caridad Amaro,â€? a piece for ValdĂŠs’ grandmother; “Tabu,â€? a nod to Cuban musician and composer Margarita Lecuona; “Santa Cruz,â€? a track that draws on flamenco music in dedication to Santi, a guitarist from the Canary Islands; and “Abdel,â€? the eighth and final track, named for a Moroccan percussionist who taught ValdĂŠs. ValdĂŠs said he will “for sureâ€? play from “Border-Freeâ€? at the jazz festival, and also plans to preview a few songs he’s currently working on for next year.

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The Best of the Stanford Youth Orchestra             Tickets: $10. Available at the Stanford Ticket Office. More information: youthorchestra.stanford.edu 1.888.423.6040

WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE? ... One of Palo Alto’s oldest florists is shutting its doors. After 19 years in business, Stanford Floral Design at 433 Hamilton Ave. will close on Sept. 30. “I have no choice but to leave. The rent is almost doubling here,� owner Werner Rogmans said. Also leaving is Rogmans’ companion, a 10year-old white dog named Stanford, who was a constant fixture in the small shop. “Stanford comes out to greet all my customers. He loves them. All of them. And they love him. He will especially miss being here,� Rogmans said. Born and educated in Germany, Rogmans takes great pride in the business of flower arranging. “I’m a sixth-generation master florist,� said Rogmans, who studied for eight years in his native country to get his horticulture degree. “In Germany, it’s a profession. Here people think it’s just a job. I am better educated than U.S.-trained horticulturists. There’s a real art to flower arranging. For example, you don’t put a cactus with an orchid. You just don’t,� he said. Rogmans has seen the florist industry dramatically change in the past few years. “What makes me upset is that people go through the Internet now to get their flowers. It didn’t use to be like that. We only have three florists left in downtown Palo Alto,� he said. Rogmans plans to continue his flower business out of his East Palo Alto home. “I have so many longtime customers. They will continue to be my customers even though I no longer have a shop in Palo Alto. I’m not going to disappear,� he said.

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business moving out, or in, down the block or across town? Daryl Savage will check it out. Email shoptalk@ paweekly.com.

Earnest (continued from page 18)

gets to sit back and enjoy actors being earnest about everything but actually being earnest. It’s Wilde’s great irony and part of what makes the play so smart and so foolish at the same time. Next up for Stanford Summer Theater: another Irish playwright, Samuel Beckett and his “Happy Days,� although in the afterglow of “Earnest,� it’s hard to imagine happier theatrical days than this. N What: “The Importance of Being Earnest� by Oscar Wilde, presented by Stanford Summer Theater Where: Pigott Theater, Memorial Auditorium, 551 Serra Mall, Stanford When: Through Aug. 11 with 8 p.m. shows Thursday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday Cost: Tickets are $15-$25. Info: Go to sst.stanford.edu or call 650-725-5838.

Movies OPENINGS

Fruitvale Station --(Aquarius, Century 20) Bay Area audiences may feel they need no introduction to Oscar Grant III when it comes to “Fruitvale Station,� a based-on-a-true-story film about the young local’s last hours on Earth. But Bay Area-bred writer-director Ryan Coogler feels it’s precisely the point that we all do need to get to know the man — as more than a victim frozen in time. The film begins with the infamous cellphone video of Grant’s ignominious end in the titular BART station, pointing up that this is what we have seen and mostly know of Grant. What follows, in docudramatic form, strives to round out our knowledge of this ordinary 22-year-old American male, to return this symbol to his humanity as a son, a grandson, a boyfriend, a father. “Fruitvale Station� tallies the toll of what was lost on New Year’s Day 2009. Star-in-the-making Michael B. Jordan (“The Wire,� “Friday Night Lights�) ably walks a mile

in Grant’s shoes, conspiring with Coogler to show many facets of their subject. With 4-year-old daughter Tatiana (Ariana Neal), girlfriend Sophina (Melonie Diaz), and assorted family elders, Oscar radiates love and charm, but in unguarded moments, he reveals his anxiety about making ends meet without getting caught in a parole violation and reliving his nightmare of prison-bound separation from loved ones. In a flashback to San Quentin (on New Year’s Eve day of 2007), Coogler, Jordan and Octavia Spencer (splendid as Grant’s mom, Wanda) establish emotional stakes. In what seems at the time to be the worst-case scenario, Oscar flashes a volatile temper as well as little-boy-lost remorse toward a mother achingly forcing herself to “tough love� her son. Here and in the stomach-churning climax, “Fruitvale Station� functions on a gut level. More often, though, it is deliberately mundane. Oscar helps a market customer to prepare for a Southern fish fry. Oscar buys a birth-

     

     

JAMES CROMWELL GENEVIĂˆVE BUJOLD CAMPBELL SCOTT

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square

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UNFORGETTABLE . Superbly acted...Cromwell and Bujold are nothing short of magniďŹ cent.â€? Rex Reed, NEW YORK OBSERVER

Fri & Sat 7/26 – 7/27 BlackďŹ sh – 2:00, 5:00, 7:25, 9:55 Girl Most Likely – 1:45, 7:15 The East –4:30, 9:45

“A

GROWNUP LOVE STORY FOR THE AGES.

‘Still Mine’ has romance, passion, suspense, and a David-and-Goliath narrative that may make you want to stand up and cheer.�

Sun - Thr 7/28 – 8/1 BlackďŹ sh – 2:00, 5:00, 7:25 Girl Most Likely – 1:45, 7:15 The East –4:30

Bill Newcott, AARP.ORG

“CROMWELL

GIVES A STAR TURN.� Leba Hertz, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

Still Mine LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 26

CENTURY CINEMAS 16 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd, Mountain View (800) FANDANGO

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PENINSULA

(continued on page 22)

Discover the best places to eat this week!

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THIS SUMMER’S ‘LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE’.� -Claudia Puig,

“

WAY, WAY WONDERFUL.

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AMERICAN

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Armadillo Willy’s

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INDIAN

The Old Pro

Janta Indian Restaurant

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

ITALIAN

Thaiphoon

Cucina Venti

323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

254-1120 1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View www.cucinaventi.com CHINESE

Read and post reviews,

Chef Chu’s

explore restaurant menus,

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

and more at ShopPaloAlto,

Ming’s

ShopMenloPark

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

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NOW PLAYING AT SELECT THEATRES CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES AND SHOWTIMES

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(continued from page 21)

chabadhebrewschool

MOVIE TIMES

for his mother, and looks forward to a dinner of Grandma Bonnie’s gumbo. Oscar parries and thrusts in the bedroom, as he and Sophina fret together and make love together. Coogler isn’t after much more than what naturally comes with his approach: a memorial in dramatic prose, an occasion for cathartic outrage and empathetic grief. And the film only notably stumbles when Coogler strains for clumsy symbolism (Oscar befriends a doomed stray dog — hoo boy) and intimations of fate (look how close Oscar came to making it after all!). Social-justice issues are inherent in Grant’s story, but “Fruitvale Station,� for better and worse, prefers pure emotional appeal.

All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. 20 Feet From Stardom (PG-13) ((( p.m. Fri-Sun also at noon. American Graffiti (1973) (PG)

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Century 16: Sun 2 p.m. Mon 2 p.m.

Palo Alto Square: 2, 5, 7:25 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 9:55 p.m.

Blackfish (PG-13)

Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m.

The Brothers (1947)

The Conjuring (R) Century 16: 10:50 a.m. & 1:45, 4:50, 7:50, 10:35 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m. & 12:05, 1:30, 2:45, 4:10, 5:25, 6:55, 8:10, 9:40, 10:50 p.m. Despicable Me 2 (PG) (( Century 16: 9:15 a.m. & 2:35, 7:55 p.m. In 3D 11:$5 a.m. & 5:@0, 10:35 p.m. Century 20: 10:20 a.m. & 3:15, 8:10 p.m. In 3D 12:50, 5:40, 10:35 p.m. The East (PG-13) (((

Palo Alto Square: 4:30 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 9:45 p.m.

Fruitvale Station (R) Aquarius Theatre: 2:45, 5, 7:30, 9:55 p.m. FriSun also at 12:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:55 a.m. & 1:10, 3:20, 5:35, 7:55, 10:20 p.m. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun 5:35 & 9:10 p.m. Girl Most Likely (PG-13) ((

Palo Alto Square: 1:45, 7:15 p.m.

Grown Ups 2 (PG-13) Century 16: 9 & 11:35 a.m. & 2:05, 4:35, 7:25, 10:20 p.m. Century 20: noon & 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10:15 p.m. The Heat (R) (( Century 16: 11:10 a.m. & 4:40, 7:45, 10:40 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 1:55 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 1:45, 4:25, 7:10, 10 p.m.

Rated R for violence, language and drugs. One hour, 30 minutes. — Peter Canavese

%BZ4QB

Aquarius Theatre: 2:15, 4:30, 7, 9:30

Laura (1944)

Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun 3:55 & 7:30 p.m.

Madonna of the Seven Moons (1945)

Stanford Theatre: Fri 5:30 & 9:10 p.m.

Monsters University (G) (((1/2 Century 16: 9:25 a.m. & 2:25, 7:30 p.m. In 3D 11:55 a.m. & 5, 10 p.m. Century 20: 10:30 a.m. & 1:10, 6:25 p.m. In 3D 2:25, 8 p.m.

Still Mine ---

Pacific Rim (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 12:25, 7:05 p.m. In 3D 9:20 a.m. & 3:35, 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 1:35, 7:45 p.m. In 3D 10:35 a.m. & 4:45, 10:45 p.m.

(Century 16) Conventional wisdom has it that advanced age means diminished agency, but it ain’t necessarily so. In the fact-based Canadian drama “Still Mine,� Alzheimer’s disease cruelly erodes one half of a couple while the other proves that giving up is not an option. Hewing closely to the true story of Craig Morrison, writer-director Michael McGowan tells a tale of aging with dignity and, albeit with a certain Canadian gentility, raging against the dying of the light. Experienced house builder Morrison (James Cromwell) determines that the best way to manage the illness of his wife Irene (Genevieve Bujold) is to build a safer and more practical one-story home on their rural New Brunswick spread. But neither common sense nor cooler heads prevail when the 87-year-old Morrison grudgingly approaches the local planning commission. To Morrison, every requirement — from submitting plans to submitting to an inflexible National Building Code — is a pointless delay to an urgent project. To inspector Rick Daigle (Jonathan Potts), Morrison’s refusal to stop work is criminal. That the commission refuses to make a place for Morrison, whose materials and methods prove purer and stronger than the standard, becomes a metaphor for wasteful disregard of the experience and personality of our elders. “Still Mine� could be mistaken and misused as an anti-regulatory screed. Certainly, it is a critique

R.I.P.D. (PG-13) Century 16: 11:50 a.m. & 5:05, 10:10 p.m. In 3D 9:10 a.m. & 2:20, 7:40 p.m. Century 20: 10:40 a.m. & 1:05, 3:35, 6:10, 8:45 p.m. In 3D 11:55 a.m. & 2:20, 7:25 p.m. Red 2 (PG-13) Century 16: 9:40 & 11:05 a.m. & 12:40, 2:10, 4:05, 5:40, 7:20, 8:55, 10:20, 11:45 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 12:25, 1:45, 3:10, 4:30, 6, 7:20, 8:50, 10:10 p.m. Still Mine (PG-13)

Century 16: 11 a.m. & 1:40, 4:30, 7:15, 9:50 p.m.

This Is The End (R) ((1/2

Century 20: 4:50, 10:05 p.m.

The To Do List (R) Century 16: 9:05 & 11:40 a.m. & 2:!5, 4:55, 7:35, 10:20, 11:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m. & 2:15, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15 p.m. Turbo (PG) (( Century 16: 9:35 a.m. & noon & 2:40, 5:10, 8, 10:25 p.m. In 3D 10:45 a.m. & 1:!5, 3:55, 6:45, 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m. & 12:55, 3:25, 5:55, 8:20, 10:45 p.m. In 3D 11:25 a.m. & 2, 4:20, 7, 9:25 p.m. The Way Way Back (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55 p.m. Guild Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:55 p.m. The Wolverine (PG-13) Century 16: 10:30 a.m. & 1:30, 2:30, 4:45, 8, 9 p.m. & 12:01 a.m. Fri-Sat also at 11 p.m. In 3D 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 12:30, 3:45, 5:45, 7, 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m. & 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 8:35, 9:35 p.m. In 3D 12:30, 6:35 p.m. In XD 10:30 a.m. & 1:30, 4:30, 7:35, 10:40 p.m. World War Z (PG-13) Century 20: 3:45, 9:05 p.m. In 3D 11:40 a.m. & 5:10, 10:40 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding

of bureaucracy overcoming rationality. But more importantly, it’s a character study of a man holding the line for what’s still his: his life with Irene and his sense of self, based on his love for her and his identity as a man who makes things happen. That theme, handled with care by McGowan, deftly sidesteps sentimentality and cliche. Above all, “Still Mine� is a unique showcase for one-time Oscar nominee Cromwell. (According to the film’s publicity, it’s the lanky character actor’s first starring role in a feature film — go figure.) Often without dialogue, Cromwell keenly conveys Craig’s every irritation, doubt, and heartache. His only failing is an appearance and demeanor that lacks the edge of a late-octogenarian (Cromwell’s

well-preserved in his early 70s). He’s ably supported by a cast also including Campbell Scott (as Craig’s lawyer), Barbara Gordon as an attentive friend, and Rick Roberts and Julie Stewart as some of Craig’s many lovingly concerned children. It’s to their credit and McGowan’s that the characters never lapse into simplistic TV-movie archetypes: Like its hero, “Still Mine� has its integrity. Rated PG-13 for some thematic elements and brief sensuality/partial nudity. One hour, 42 minutes. — Peter Canavese

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com To read the Weekly’s review of “The Wolverine� (2.5 stars), go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

  )$***

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

+ ,  $     #$

TIA FULLER QUARTET

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Saturday, July 27 “Recalls the years when jazz had soul as well as melody.� —All About Jazz

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tickets on sale for these great shows SAVION GLOVER & HIS TRIO

JULIAN LAGE AND LARRY KOONSE

Saturday, August 3

Monday, August 5

ERIC ALEXANDER

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Sunday, August 4

Wednesday, August 7

ďŹ nd out more & purchase tickets STANFORDJAZZ.ORG or 650-725-ARTS (2787)

DAYNA STEPHENS DANN ZINN 4 & TAYLOR EIGSTI Monday, July 29

CALVIN KEYS QUARTET

Sunday, July 28

Tuesday, July 30

Sports Shorts A SELLOUT . . . This is what a Rose Bowl victory can do: Stanford football has sold out of season tickets for the first time in school history. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 33,000 packages sold, with 5,000 more reserved for the student section. Stanford Stadium, which also hosted the Pac-12 championship game, holds about 50,000. The stadium also will feature a new, stateof-the-art scoreboard. The school announced that a limited number of individual game tickets will go on sale Aug. 1. Single game tickets for marquee games including California, Notre Dame and Oregon will be sold using a Predictable Dynamic Pricing structure. The Cardinal beat Wisconsin, 20-14, on Jan. 1 for the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first Rose Bowl victory since 1972. Stanford is 24-2 at home over the last four seasons. The Cardinal open this season at home against San Jose State on Sept. 7.

Stanford All-American Nicole Gibbs, who turned pro after winning the NCAA singles title and helping the Cardinal capture the NCAA team title this past season, is gaining valuable experience this week at the annual Bank of the West Classic on her home courts.

BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC

Burdette and Gibbs learning pro game Former Stanford All-Americans adjusting to the new challenges and opportunities by Rick Eymer

M

allory Burdette and Nicole Gibbs are the latest in a long line of Stanford women tennis players who helped the Cardinal win a national title and then turned their attentions to the professional game. They were back at Stanford this week, each participating in their second Bank of the West Classic on the familiar courts of Taube Family Tennis Center. Burdette, who provided the clinching point in Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 NCAA title, won a pair of NCAA doubles titles, one with Gibbs and another with Hilary Barte. Gibbs also won a pair of NCAA singles titles. She beat Burdette in three sets for the 2012 title. They turned pro within seven months of each other, each passing up their senior season. Cardinal coach Lele Forood said she thought Burdetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game was suited for the pro circuit. Burdette certainly showed that playing on the pro circuit as an amateur last (continued on page 27)

Harjanto Sumali

ON THE LINKS . . . Incoming Stanford freshman golfer Jim Liu, 17, of Smithtown, N.Y., was upset by John Augenstein of Owensboro, Ky., on the 20th hole Thursday at the 2013 U.S. Junior Amateur Championships at the par-72, 7,740-yard Martis Camp Club in Truckee. Liu, the stroke-play medalist this week who won this title at age 14 in 2010, made his earliest exit in this tournament.

Harjanto Sumali

GOLD MEDALS . . . The New York Athletic Club, with local players on each team, closed out a banner weekend of competition at Sacred Heart Prep in Atherton as both their men and women won gold at the US Open of Water Polo. In the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final, NYAC topped Bruin by 10-8 as former Stanford Water Polo Club team member Cassie Wyckoff of Los Altos was voted MVP. Also playing for NYAC was Menlo-Atherton High and Stanford grad Kelly Eaton while M-A grad Rebecca Dorst played for Bruin. Wyckoff, Eaton and Dorst all were named to the all-tournament team. In the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final, NYACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;? team held off Stanford, 11-10, in the title match. Stanford grad Wolf Wigo helped NYAC win the title against his former team and was named to the all-tournament team along with Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B.J. Churnside and Forest Watkins. In the third-place fame, Olympic Club defeated defending champion Newport Water Polo Foundation by 9-5. Stanford grad and U.S. Olympian Peter Varellas played for Olympic Club and also was named to the all-tournament team.

Former Stanford All-American Mallory Burdette saw her run at the Bank of the West Classic end by mid-week in singles and doubles.

ON THE AIR

Palo Alto Oaks plan baseball boycott of World Series

Friday

Semipro team will stay home it if qualifies this weekend at West Regional tournament in Sacramento

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis: Bank of the West Classic, 8 p.m.; ESPN2

Saturday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis: Bank of the West Classic, 7 p.m.; ESPN2

Sunday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis: Bank of the West Classic, 2 p.m.; ESPN2

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

by Keith Peters

T

he Palo Alto Oaks have been playing semipro baseball on the Peninsula for 65 years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very doubtful, however, that the team has ever made it through any season undefeated. The Oaks came close in 2004 when they finished the regular season with a 23-1 record under firstyear manager Steve Espinoza. This season, however, may be the best ever for Palo Alto. The Oaks

are 16-0 heading into this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Regional in Sacramento, where they could finish 21-0 by winning the title. However, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the historic season will end. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The West Regional is the last tournament for us,â&#x20AC;? said Espinoza, now the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are boycotting the Stan Musial World Series this year as the cost to take the team to New York, after taking the team to Florida last year and Houston the previous two years,

would bankrupt us.â&#x20AC;? The Oaks spent some $20,000 last summer to travel and play in the World Series in Port Lucie, Fla. Palo Alto finished in seventh place and ended its season with a 19-8 record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re boycotting this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Series based on principle and cost,â&#x20AC;? Espinoza said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The AABC, the governing body of the sport, continues to have these World Series on the East Coast. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to

be partial to teams only on the East Coast, then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to go.â&#x20AC;? In 2011, when the Oaks played in their first World Series in Houston, the hotel was paid for. Last year in Florida, the teams were given $1,000 credit toward their hotel bill that cost upwards of $4,000 according to Espinoza. And, to make matters worse, Espinoza heard after last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World (continued on page 25)

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Sports USA SWIMMING

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Chasing the dream once again

USA women start off perfect in water polo Local players contribute in big way to a 3-0 start; American men split their opening matches in Barcelona

World Championships has Stanford grad Godsoe thinking Olympics again

T

by Mike Watkins

O

Mike Comer/Pro Swim

nce his swimming career is over, Eugene Godsoe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an accomplished pianist and musician â&#x20AC;&#x201D; hopes his fans will be able to enjoy his music online as much as they enjoyed cheering him on in the pool. Until that happens and while he is swimming some of the fastest times of his career, Godsoe remains focused on his current career as a professional athlete â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and for the next few weeks, his events at the 2013 FINA World Championships in Barcelona, Spain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know swimming is an incredibly tough sport to make it as a professional, and I beat the odds on that,â&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure if that means Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m more or less likely to make it as a musician later on, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just have to see! â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to play a good amount of piano and other instruments every day. I just finished up a class learning some music recording software, so I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to put some more songs online soon.â&#x20AC;? Godsoeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current path in swimming hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been without its share of hiccups and obstacles. A member of the 2009 World University Games and 2011 Pan American Games teams (where he won silver in the 100 backstroke), Godsoe nearly ended his career after a very disappointing Olympic Trials last summer in Omaha. Now, a year later and following a great meet last month at the Phillips 66 USA Swimming National Championships in Indianapolis where he won both the 50 and 100 butterfly events, he has a renewed interest in and excitement toward his future in the sport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had very high expectations going in and big disappointment coming out (of Trials),â&#x20AC;? said Godsoe, a 2010 graduate of Stanford University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cameras at Trials always show the first- and second-place finishersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; celebrations, but rarely capture what the third- through eighth-place swimmers are doing after the race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough to look up at the board and see you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it. I was able to sit down with my club coach from high school (Kevin Thornton) and decide I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ready to retire. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.â&#x20AC;? Instead, Godsoe said he rededicated himself to his future in the sport, making some stroke and lifestyle changes to be in the best possible position to make future international teams. He went to Indianapolis feeling very optimistic and happy with where he was in his training and outlook, especially after returning to his home and college team at Stanford

by Keith Peters he face of the USA Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Team has changed since it captured the gold medal in water polo at the 2012 Summer Games in London, with veteran players like Brenda Villa retiring. While the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s makeup has changed, the results have not. The Americans, in fact, have completed group play at the FINA World Championships with a perfect 3-0 record following a 16-4 victory over Great Britain on Thursday in Barcelona, Spain. Sacred Heart Prep grad KK Clark of Menlo Park scored three goals for the U.S. and Tumua Anae posted 14 saves in the cage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a good match for us because Great Britain is a really good opponent and they do a lot of things that other teams donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do,â&#x20AC;? said Clark, a UCLA grad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, it was important for us to stay focused throughout the entire game, which I think we did a really good job of.â&#x20AC;? The U.S. women now move on the quarterfinals, where they likely will meet Brazil on Saturday. That match will stream live on UniversalSports. com and air on delay on Universal Sports at 3:30 p.m. (PT). Team USA started off the match strong and built a 4-0 lead after the first period. Clark scored first from the outside followed by another perimeter shot from Stanford grad Lolo Silver. Kami Craig got free on the counter attack for a tally and Jillian Kraus buried a shot from deep to go up 4-0. The second period started with more of the same after the Americans drew a penalty, their first of three on the day, and Kelly Rulon converted for a 5-0 lead. Great Britain came to life with two straight scores to draw within 5-2 with 1:16 left in the half. Stanford grad Melissa Seidemann responded on the next possession with an outside shot for a 6-2 lead at intermission. Another drawn penalty started the third period for Team USA and Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Maggie Steffens converted for a 7-2 lead. She followed that with a natural goal less than a minute later for an 8-2 lead. Holding a 9-3 lead entering the final period, the USA outscored Great Britain, 7-1. Clark connected on a perimeter shot for a 13-3 lead with 3:19 remaining in the match. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough game for both teams to be inspired, because both teams know their standings in the group already, but we tried to focus on playing the game the way we want to play the game,â&#x20AC;? said U.S. head coach Adam Krikorian. In Round 2 on Tuesday, the U.S. women picked up their second straight victory and secured first place in their group with a 10-8 win over Canada. Silver and Seidemann each scored twice for the Americans while Betsey Armstrong had seven

Stanford swim grad Eugene Godsoe will compete in three events at the FINA World Championships starting Sunday. last summer to live and train. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d made a lot of positive changes with my strokes and lifestyle, and whether or not it was enough to put me on a World Champs team or not, I knew I was going to swim fast,â&#x20AC;? said Godsoe, who gives a shout-out to Tony Batis (at Palo Alto Stanford Aquatics) for making him do breaststroke relays, Scott Armstrong for helping him think outside the box and Ted Knapp for believing in him since he came to Stanford many years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just continually trying to learn more about the sport and myself in this process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned some great things the past couple years at SwimMAC, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m adding on to that here back at Stanford. In my eyes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect place for a guy like me who loves swimming and wants to reach the highest level but also embraces everything else thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in Silicon Valley.â&#x20AC;? One positive Godsoe (and the rest of the world of swimming) knew going into Nationals was that, unlike past meets, both spots in the butterfly events were wide open for the taking. While he admits the absence of Michael Phelps â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he retired following last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Olympics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for the first time in over a decade opened up the competition, Godsoe said the real coup was securing the first spot in the dominant U.S. 400 medley relay team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In all honesty, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think there was any direct impact (of Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absence),â&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the back of your mind, as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure with all the guys in the 100 fly final, I knew that the coveted medley relay spot was now open. Getting a chance to swim in probably the most esteemed swimming event and team is a huge honor. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really excited about that.â&#x20AC;?

Page 24Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

And while this World Championship team isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t his first international competition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he was on the 2005 National Junior team as well as World University and Pan Am teams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Godsoe knows this time, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different. He sees this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;next stepâ&#x20AC;? in his swimming evolution as he progresses and works toward making his first Olympic team in 2016. Godsoe also has a renewed love and passion that he knows will carry him through the next three years toward Rio de Janeiro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the next step Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been waiting (forever) for,â&#x20AC;? said Godsoe, who returned to Stanford to finetune little details, keep my strength up and get some good sunâ&#x20AC;? before leaving for Spain on Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Realistically, my goals (at Worlds) are to fine tune and find ways to be faster than I was at Nationals. With the stage being bigger, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important for me to be cool and collected going in. This will give me the best shot to add a medal or two to the USA tally. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m more in love with the sport now than ever before. As long as I truly believe I can be a contender for 2016, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be there. If I feel like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given it my all before then and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all I have in the tank, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll retire. In the meantime, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to being a part of Team USA at one of the highest levels, learning from the veterans, and doing my best to contribute to the overall team goals.â&#x20AC;? Godsoe will get his first World Championships under way Sunday with the 50-meter butterfly. The 100 fly will be Saturday, Aug. 3 with the 400 medley relay capping the meet on Sunday, Aug. 4.N Mike Watkins is a correspondent for U.S. Swimming.

saves in goal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was kind of a struggle towards the end but we had a good first half so that was good,â&#x20AC;? said Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kiley Neushul, who scored once. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was hard, every game is hard at this level. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big rival, Canada vs the USA, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always fun to play against them.â&#x20AC;? Team USA built a 9-3 lead midway through the third period, only to see Canada close to within two with 5:43 to play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a good win against a quality opponent and obviously a great start for us that certainly helped,â&#x20AC;? said Krikorian. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do think we could play much better at the end of the game than we did. We got a little too conservative. We expect every time we play Canada to be a one- or twogoal game and, sure enough, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what it was today.â&#x20AC;? In the opening round, Steffens scored three goals, all in the fourth quarter, as the USA posted a 12-8 victory over defending champion Greece on Sunday. Neushul scored on both of her shot attempts while Clark added a goal and two assists. Men Current and former Stanford water polo players accounted for seven goals as the USA Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Team picked up its first victory at the FINA World Championships with a convincing 16-3 victory over South Africa on Wednesday in Barcelona. Current Cardinal Alex Bowen tallied three times while Stanford grads Tony Azevedo and Janson Wigo each added two goals for the Americans. John Mann paced the U.S. offensive attack with five goals while Andy Stevens went the distance in net, turning aside eight shots. Team USA now moves to 1-1 in group play with Canada remaining on Friday evening to close out preliminary play. USA matches stream live on UniversalSports.com. Team USA got off to a blazing start on the offensive end building a 4-0 lead in the first period. Bowen connected from the outside less than thirty seconds into the match for a 1-0 lead. Mann followed moments later with two straight goals, the latter coming on a power play, for a 3-0 lead. Wigo closed out the scoring in the first period with a power-play strike from the perimeter for a 4-0 lead. In an opening-round match, Croatia handed Team USA a 9-7 loss on Monday. Bowen scored one goal for the USA, which caused a ripple in the pool with a 3-2 advantage late in the second quarter. Croatia regained momentum with a four-goal burst in the middle stages that left USA grappling for goals.Wigo and Azevedo also saw action but did not score. N (USA Water Polo contributed)

Sports

PA Oaks

BASEBALL

The pro game can be tough M-A grad discovers the high and lows of the minor leagues by Andrew Preimesberger

A

Chris Preimesberger

t 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, June 9, I received my first call from a professional baseball team; it might have been the best phone call Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever answered in my life. My agent, Jim Hayes, woke me up to tell me that the Pacific Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hawaii Stars wanted to sign me for the remainder of the season. I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even been to Hawaii before, and coach Garry Templeton II wanted me there as soon as possible. We hurriedly bought an airline ticket, and I left the next morning. When I arrived on the island of Maui, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have a plan for what I was doing or who I was about to meet; I had to play it all by ear. Luckily, the Stars were playing the leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Maui-based club that day. My timing was good; the Stars landed at the airport about an hour after I arrived. We all took a shuttle from the airport to our hotel in Kahului. It happened to be the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s off day, so Templeton and the coaches took us to Lahaina to watch a play about the history of Hawaii. It was a good welcoming to Hawaii for me. The next day we opened our first game of a six-game series against the Na Koa Ikaika Maui Warriors that started at 5:30 p.m. I was excited and nervous at the same time; I had no idea what was going to happen, but I knew I was going to love it. We got out to the field at about 2 p.m., and pitchers started their warm-ups. When game time started, I was suited up in a gray-and-blue uniform and a new hat, feeling like a real pro baseball player. Maui had a good crowd that night of about 300 people, and it got pretty loud at certain points. They had an announcer who would talk after almost every pitch, rooting the Warriors on. In between innings, they had games for fans and gave out tickets for vacations; it felt a little like a major league game. Our teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record was 4-10 before I arrived, and we won big that night. I was wondering how we had compiled such a poor record. Our third game was a special one to me; it was the first game in which I pitched. I was in the dugout in the fifth inning, walked by Templeton and asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Should I be in the bullpen right now?â&#x20AC;? He replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming in next.â&#x20AC;? My eyes lit up, and I was dialed in as soon as he said that. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think I threw one pitch out of the strike zone in the bullpen; I was just focused and excited. In the game, I threw 40 out of 47 pitches for strikes. I came in the game in the sixth

M-A grad Andrew Preimesberger spent part of his summer learning what pro baseball is like with the Hawaii Stars of the Pacific Association. and had a clean first inning, giving up only one hit. My highlight moment was in the ninth, when Mauiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best hitter, Jeremy Williams, came up. I worked the count to 1-2 and was feeling a strikeout to win it, so I pumped up and threw him a fastball shoulder-high. He whiffed it, and I got my first save as a Star. The rest of the week was fun. During the day, we were free to do whatever we wanted. I liked to go to our hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beach and just relax. Other days I would go with my roommate, shortstop Felix Brown, and a few other guys to the shopping center across the street for food or Starbucks coffee. After our 4-2 series win over Maui, we headed to Hilo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our home base. The flight to Hilo takes about a half an hour from Maui. Our shuttle arrived at the airport and took us to our house on Kinoole Street. Hilo was a little different. We had eight guys living in a fivebedroom house, so you can imagine what that might look like. Three teammates and I slept in a bunker on air mattresses under the house in about 80-degree weather. Hilo has a little more of an old town feeling to it than Maui. I walked down the street to the gym every morning and would observe cracked pavement and houses that looked like they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been remodeled in decades, if ever. Our house was about a 25-minute walk from downtown and to the beach; pretty much everything there is within walking distance. On June 22, I started my first game with the Stars against the East Bay Lumberjacks. The mental preparation for starting games is un-

real. Our minivan full of guys got to the field at 1 p.m. for a 5:30 p.m. game. That was the most preparation time for a game Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had. I spent about four hours visualizing and thinking of how I was going to approach the game by just sitting on a bench with my headphones on. I had a good first start, getting the win by throwing five innings with three strikeouts, four earned runs, and no walks. It was more exciting than a nervous feeling for me; I felt good about it. Last summer 2012, I played for the San Francisco Isotopes, a semi-pro team in the National Adult Baseball Association. The competition in the independent Pacific Association league is definitely a step up from semi-pro ball. This league includes some players who were once major leaguers (such my teammate, Onan Masaoka, who had pitched for the Dodgers) as to others who had played in Single- and Double-A ball. There were other ties to the majors on the Stars; manager Garry Templeton IIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father had played shortstop for St. Louis and San Diego during his long career, and second baseman Dustin Smith (St. Louis Hall of Famer shortstop Ozzie Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son) and reliever Mike Jackson Jr. (his dad pitched for several teams, including the Giants, in his long career) were teammates. In the minors, if you make one mistake on a pitch, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re generally going to pay for it. The players are a big step up from the semi-pro league. I love the fact that in pro ball (continued on next page)

rental of the Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home field at Baylands Athletic Center (from the (continued from page 23) City of Palo Alto) now runs in the vicinity of $1,500 a year. Series that any team wanting to play â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I first took over the team, in the 2012 tournament could have it was like $35 for the season (to rent done just that â&#x20AC;&#x201D; without qualifying. Baylands),â&#x20AC;? Espinoza said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The 2012 World Series was played like $35 per hour.â&#x20AC;? at the New York Metsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; spring trainExpenditures could be higher, but ing facility. the Oaks have played â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone could all 16 of their games have bought their way â&#x20AC;&#x201D; eight doubleheadin last year,â&#x20AC;? he said. ers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at home this â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it just comes season. This weekdown to money.â&#x20AC;? endâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trip to SacraOr, in the Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mento will be the case, the lack thereof. teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first road Thus, the days of repgames. resenting Palo Alto The Oaks will open on the biggest stage the five-team regionfor this level of baseal Friday against the ball appears gone. At Healdsburg Prune least for now. Packers at Sacramenâ&#x20AC;&#x153;We would go to to State at 11 a.m. CJ New York (FarmHillyer will get the ingdale) if we could starting assignment just afford it,â&#x20AC;? Espion the mound for Palo noza said of his non- Brandt Norlander Alto. profit organization. Should Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;Either we find a corporate sponsor win, it will get a bye into Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or we just stop going.â&#x20AC;? round of games at Sacramento City Palo Alto likely will finish with College. The tournament wraps up one of the best records in the coun- Sunday. try (if not the best). The World SeWhile the season comes to a close ries, then, is that in this weekend for Palo name only as it beAlto, Espinoza says it comes sort of a prinonetheless will end vate country club for on a positive. the sport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we do end Espinoza says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on a high note,â&#x20AC;? he shame his current said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just had team faces this situato draw a line in the tion, given the makesand with the AABC. up of the squad. If they want the best â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a mix of teams in the West this youth and experiyear, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to ence,â&#x20AC;? Espinoza said. have to foot some â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would have been a of the cost to get us good year to go.â&#x20AC;? there.â&#x20AC;? The Oaks have The Oaks comnine players age 25 pleted their regular or older. Most of the summer season last players have day jobs. CJ Hillyer Sunday with a doublePlaying for the Oaks header sweep of visitis a way to delay the inevitable â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an ing Fontanettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Baylands Athletic end to oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playing days. Center, 6-0 and 12-0. Palo Alto continues to survive unDominic Hernandez earned the der the guidance of Espinoza, who win in Game 1 as he tossed seven began his playing career with the shutout innings, allowing only three Oaks at age 15. He later managed hits while walking one. Gilbert the team for eight Guerra pitched the fiyears following the nal two innings, comdeath of the legendpleting the shutout. ary Tony Makjavich Trevor Demerritt and in 2000 before turnTravis Conroy coming that job over to bined to provide much Greg Matson. The of the offense for Palo former Gunn High Alto with five of the standout, who doubles Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; total hits. as the pitching coach In Game 2, Temple at Menlo College, has University graduate scaled back his playBrandt Norlander ing in order to concontinued his pitchcentrate on managing ing dominance this the Oaks. summer as he threw The team pretty five shutout innings much survives on in a game shortened donations and its anby the 10-run mercy nual Tony Makjav- Steve Espinoza rule. Norlander struck ich Memorial Golf out six, allowing just Tournament, the 10th annual which two hits while walking none. is tentatively scheduled for Oct. 12 Demerritt again led the Oaks with at Shoreline Golf Links in Moun- three hits in addition to scoring three tain View. Proceeds from the event, runs and driving in two. Teammate which range from $5,000-$6,000, Maxx Sheehan added two hits. go directly to funding the team durWith a day off from his normal ing the summer season. pitching duties, Gunn High grad â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough to get us through the Ricky Navarro contributed two hits, season,â&#x20AC;? Espinoza said. three RBI and scored three runs Espinoza pointed out just the while playing a solid right field. N Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 25

Sports

Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brown suffers another ACL tear Cardinal basketball senior forward sustains his fourth knee injury and will miss his third season since arriving on The Farm

S

Don Feria/isiphotos.com

Andy Brown

enior forward Andy Brown will miss yet another basketball season due to an ACL tear; this time in his right knee. Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins made the announcement on Wednesday. Brown sustained the injury during a team workout on Tuesday. Brown suffered his fourth ACL tear, and the third since arriving at Stanford in the fall of 2009. The first three injuries were to his left knee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone associated with our program is saddened by Andyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest injury,â&#x20AC;? Dawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobody has worked harder to get back into playing shape, having already experienced three tears and waiting two full years before putting on a uniform. What makes this even more disappointing is Andy had already passed the initial test of getting back on the court.â&#x20AC;? The latest injury represents yet another setback for Brown, who has

grown accustomed to working hard throughout the rehab process and successfully bouncing back. Brown was coming off the first full season of his college career, averaging 6.2 points and 2.8 rebounds while shooting a team-best 48.5 percent from the field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was a highly productive player for our team last year and we were fully counting on him to be a key contributor again this season,â&#x20AC;? Dawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More importantly, his presence and leadership will be extremely difficult to replace. Andy is a fighter, he will bounce back and has the full support of the Stanford basketball family.â&#x20AC;? He scored in double figures five times, totaling a career-high 17 points on three occasions while playing at least 25 minutes in 16 games. In addition to proving his durability by competing in 33 games and making 20 starts, Brown was even more valuable as an inspirational team

leader for a young squad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just want to thank all of my teammates and coaches during the past four years who have always been there to support and encourage me,â&#x20AC;? said Brown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never would have been able to battle back through these injuries without their help. Even though this is a difficult way to end my career, I feel grateful to have been able to wear a Stanford uniform and contribute to such a great program and university. I will do everything I can to help the team from the sideline this year and am looking forward to all that we will accomplish.â&#x20AC;? Brown sat out his freshman year as a medical redshirt after tearing the ACL in his left knee on the Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first day of practice. That setback was the second in a 10-month span for Brown, who was already recovering from an ACL tear in the same knee back in January of 2009, cutting short his senior season at

Mater Dei High. The next year, Brown again tore his left ACL in an August team workout, forcing him to miss 2010-11. Golf Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cameron Wilson and Andrew Yun were recognized for their work in the classroom this week, being named Cleveland Golf/ Srixon All-America Scholars. Swimming Former Stanford All-American swimmer Geoff Cheah broke five Hong Kong records during last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World University Games in Kazan, Russia. Cheah, who completed his Stanford career in 2012, made it to the semifinals in each of his three individual events. He missed the finals of the 100-meter free by 0.10 seconds, finishing 11th with a lifetimebest and Hong Kong record 49.69. In the 100 fly, Cheah posted a record 53.70 and broke the 50 fly Hong Kong record at the halfway mark in 24.60. Cheah went 53.95 in the finals for 15th. Cheah went 22.76 in the 50 free for another lifetime best, missing the finals by 0.18 to take 13th. Cheahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 57.28 in his backstroke leg of the 400 medley relay broke another Hong Kong record. N -- Stanford Athletics

Pitcher (continued from previous page)

you actually get paid for playing. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much, but I was getting paid for something I love doing. All major expenses were paid for by the team; travel, food, and housing. About halfway through my month with the Stars, I was beginning to feel a lot of pain in my elbow, and I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t throwing my usual 88 mph anymore. I learned that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough to go from not throwing every day to throwing every day, and my arm wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite ready for that. Icing my arm and running every day didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to get me back to 100 percent. We also didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a trainer in Hawaii so I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any treatment for it. It caused me to labor every time I took the mound, and I was giving up too many hits. The Stars was released me when we came back to California to play the San Rafael Pacifics and the Vallejo Admirals. It was tough for a few days, but I now know what I need to do next time I get the call. All in all, it was a great experience. It taught me a lot about what it takes to be a professional. Your mind needs to be ready every day, you have to eat right, you have to have enough sleep, you have to work out, and you have to know how to take care of your arm. This is only a step in what I hope to accomplish. I was happy to be a part of the ride.N (Andrew Preimesberger is a graduate of Menlo-Atherton High and currently works as a freelance writer for the Weekly.) Page 26Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Sports

(continued from page 23)

Harjanto Sumali

sleep while in Brussels. She had the Stanford womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis team on her mind. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think my neighbors in the hotel thought I was crazy,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was waking up in the middle of the night and screaming at my computer. It was definitely a lot of fun to see them make that great run and take the title. I was so proud of them.â&#x20AC;? Burdette, ranked 76th, was playing for the first time this week since losing in the first round of Wimbledon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was a tough one,â&#x20AC;? Burdette said after losing to Schiavone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I played a great champion but overall I did some things well. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken some steps forward the last few weeks after taking time off.â&#x20AC;? Burdette is one of 11 Americans ranked among the top 100, peaking at 68 the week of June 24. She

Harjanto Sumali

Veteran Daniela Hantuchova won her opener Tuesday and was hoping to reach Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals.

does have three wins over the top 50 this season, including then No. 27 Tamira Paszek of Austria at Indian Wells. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Americans try to stay close,â&#x20AC;? Burdette said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can say Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve met some great friends. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned a lot this year. Coming to tournaments for the first time, I think I won the award for asking the most questions.â&#x20AC;? Burdette was coached by older sister, Lindsay, during the tournament. Mallory does not have an official traveling coach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She told me I looked like I belonged out there,â&#x20AC;? Burdette said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy with the way I handled myself at times, even I was frustrated.â&#x20AC;? The eldest sister, Erin, was also in attendance. All three were AllAmericans at Stanford. Gibbs, who turned pro moments after winning both the NCAA team and singles titles in May, won her second straight first-round match at the Bank of the West, beating Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands, 6-4, 6-1. Gibbs, who entered the tournament ranked 191st in the world, knocked off her highest-rated opponent in the 67th-ranked Bertens. Gibbs, who faced No. 4 seed Jamie Hampton on Thursday, recorded a mark of 56-5 in college matches played at Stanford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each week has its own challenges and opportunities,â&#x20AC;? Gibbs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to put myself in position to win each week.â&#x20AC;? Gibbs made her professional debut at Wimbledon, the most storied of any tournament. She lost in qualifying but gained in experience. The next time she entered a tournament, Gibbs took no prisoners, winning the title at Yakima and earning $7,600. More important, her ranking points started adding up. She went from 205 to 191 in two weeks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was huge for my confidence,â&#x20AC;? Gibbs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different animal on the tour and I had some doubts in my mind. A poor performance would have been tough.â&#x20AC;? She reached the quarterfinals in another $50,000 ITF Circuit stop at Portland last week and her first-

Harjanto Sumali

Top-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska opened with a 6-4, 6-3 victory over Francesca Schiavone on Wednesday night.

Olga Govortsova of Belarus reached the quarterfinals with a 6-2, 6-4 upset of No. 2 seed Samantha Stosur.

Harjanto Sumali

fall and succeeding at every stop. Burdette went from college AllAmerican to professional tennis player, literally, overnight. After reaching the third round of the U.S. Open, she clearly showed a potentially successful career. She reached a career-high ranking of 68 in June, nine months into her professional career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was the first time I was defending points,â&#x20AC;? Burdette said after losing to Italian Francesca Schiavone, 7-5, 6-3, in the first round on Monday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That made it easy for my ranking to go up so fast.â&#x20AC;? Burdette also had to play a lot of tough tournaments along the way and showed she belongs on tour. The Bank of the West was her 14th tournament of the year, 13 have been on the WTA Tour. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s played 18 of her 24 career tournaments at the higher level. Burdette won two of the first three ITF tournaments she played and has also appeared at the French Open (she won her first-round match) and Wimbledon. She went from winning $700 at an event in Memphis in February to earning $26,000 at Indian Wells in March, where she qualified and then reached the third round. Burdette continued to play well at Miami, Charleston, Rome and Brussels heading into the French Open. Rating points and prize money continued to pile up. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s earned over $150,000 this season. She might not have gotten a lot of

Second-seeded Samantha Stosur agonized after a missed opportunity in her second-round loss on Tuesday night. round victory at Stanford was just as important. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to place expectations on myself without placing pressure on myself,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I had done everything there was to do in college tennis. This is a natural transition for me.â&#x20AC;? Last year, Gibbs played Serena Williams in the second round. This

year? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to not playing Williams in the next round,â&#x20AC;? Gibbs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But Hampton is having an unbelievable year.â&#x20AC;? The Bank of the West Classic wraps up this weekend with quarterfinals on Friday, semifinals o Saturday and the singles finale Sunday at 2 p.m. N

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 27

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