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Vol. XXXIV, Number 26 N March 29, 2013

City asks: Just what is a ‘public benefit’? Page 3

Mod ’60s costumes add zip to a new musical take on Oscar Wilde Page 16

Transitions 13

Spectrum 14

Movies 22

Puzzles 46

NArts Exploring auditory hallucinations through opera

Page 20

NSports Stanford women’s basketball heads to Sweet 16

Page 24

NHome Barron Park: Semi-rural charm in the midst of the city

Page 29

                   

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Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

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h/UR HOPE IS THAT BY BRINGING GREATERCLARITYANDPREDICTABILITYTO THIS PROCESS WE WILL ENHANCE THE COMMUNITYS BENEFITS AND OUR SAT ISFACTION WITH THESE BENEFITS v !L CHECKSAID 4HEMUNICIPALCODEISPURPOSEFULLY VAGUEWHENITCOMESTOhPUBLICBENE FITS vLEAVINGITUPTOTHE#ITY#OUNCIL TODEFINETHETERMONANADHOCBASIS ASDEVELOPMENTPROPOSALSSURFACE (continued on page 6)

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Local scouts want change in policy -EETINGSPREFACE-AYVOTE ONTHESEXUAL ORIENTATION ISSUEBYTHENATIONALBOARD by Sue Dremann HE NATIONAL "OY 3COUTS OF !MERICA POLICY PROHIBITING HOMOSEXUAL PEOPLE FROM BE COMING MEMBERS OR LEADERS IS OUT OF TOUCH PARENTS AND SOME SCOUT LEADERS SAID AFTER A MEETING -ON DAYNIGHT -ARCH ONTHETOPICOF CHANGINGTHEORGANIZATIONSSTANCE -EMBERSOFTHE0ACIFIC3KYLINE #OUNCIL MET AT THE "OY 3COUT OF FICES AT ,UCIE 3TERN #OMMUNITY #ENTER IN 0ALO !LTO TO DISCUSS WHETHERTOSUPPORTACHANGETOAL LOWOPENLYGAYMEMBERSORTOCON TINUETHESTATUSQUO 4HE APPROXIMATELY   VOT ING MEMBERS OF THE "OY 3COUTS OF !MERICANATIONALCOUNCILWILLVOTEON ARESOLUTIONIN-AY!PLANNED&EB RUARY VOTE WAS POSTPONED TO GAUGE SENTIMENT FROM COUNCILS AROUND THE COUNTRY LEADERSSAIDINASTATEMENT 0ACIFIC 3KYLINES 3TANFORD DIS TRICTREPRESENTS 3COUTSIN0ALO !LTO ,OS!LTOS ,OS!LTOS(ILLSAND -OUNTAIN 6IEW #ITING A SECRECY PROMISE FEW MEMBERS SPOKE PUB LICLY-ONDAYEVENING"UTSOMESAID THEMEETINGWASBROADLYSUPPORTIVE OFINCLUDINGGAYSANDLESBIANS -ANY LOCAL LEADERS AND PARENTS SAID IT IS INCREASINGLY DIFFICULT TO RECONCILETHENATIONALORGANIZATIONS STANCE WITH THEIR OWN VIEWS !ND ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS THE 2OTARY #LUBSAIDTHEYARECONSIDERINGPULL INGTHEIRSPONSORSHIPOFLOCALTROOPS IFTHEPOLICYREMAINS $EIRDRE-OORE THEMOTHEROFAN  YEAR OLD3COUT ATTENDEDTHE-ON DAY MEETING AND SAID SHE STRONGLY SUPPORTSTHECHANGE h4HE MEETING WENT VERY WELL

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DICTIONARY THEY FORM THE LETTERS OUT OFCLAYTOHELPSTUDENTSGRASPTHATTHE OBJECTSACTUALLYARESYMBOLS 7ORDS THAT DONT SPARK AN AUTO MATICMENTALPICTUREAREESPECIALLY DIFFICULT 2AYACICHSAYS &ORTHEWORDhTHE vFOREXAMPLE SHEUSESAPICTUREOFALITTLEPERSON POINTINGTOTHENEXTWORD h-YSONSAIDHEUSEDTOGETSLOWED DOWNBYTHEWORD@THEBUTNOWHE SPEEDSUPBECAUSEHEWANTSTOSEE WHATTHENEXTWORDIS vSHESAID 3IMILARTECHNIQUESWITHCLAYAND OTHER MANIPULATIVES ARE USED FOR MATHSYMBOLSANDOTHERSYMBOLS 4HESCHOOLALSOFOCUSESONTEACH ING STUDENTS SELF CALMING TECH NIQUES AS WELL AS CERTAIN LIFE CON (continued on page 12)

(continued on page 9)

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Upfront 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505)

Notice is hereby given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District for multiple work bid packages. Description of the projects/work is as follows: s2EMOVALAND)NSTALLATIONOF0OURED )N 0LACE2UBBER\ #ONTRACT.O02  s2EMOVALAND)NSTALLATIONOF0OURED )N 0LACE2UBBER\ #ONTRACT.O02  -ANDATORY*OB7ALK 02 

There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 9:00 a.m. on April 8th, 2013 at the !DDISON %LEMENTARY3CHOOL!DDISON!VE 0ALO!LTO #ALIFORNIAFOR02 

02  There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 9:00 a.m. on April 11th, 2013 at the &AIRMEADOW %LEMENTARY3CHOOL%-EADOW2D 0ALO!LTO #ALIFORNIAFOR02  "ID3UBMISSION 02  Proposals for 02  must be received at the District Facilities OfďŹ ce building D, by AM on April TH  02  Proposals for 02  must be received at the District Facilities OfďŹ ce building D, by AM on !PRILTH  Bonding required for this project is as follows: Bid Bond 10% of the total bid, Performance Bond to be 100%, Payment Bond is to be 100%. 02%6!),).'7!'%,!73 The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 – 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certiďŹ ed copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred.

Bidders may examine or procure a copy of the Bidding Documents at Facilities OfďŹ ce, "UILDINGh$v. For more details on obtaining plans and speciďŹ cations, the mandatory job walk, bid submission, or prevailing wage laws please contact: Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: David Tran Phone: (650) 329-3927 Fax: (650) 327-3588

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EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Š2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

‘‘

0ALO!LTO5NIlED3CHOOL$ISTRICT

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

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It’s pretty devastating. —Michael “Miki� Werness, owner of Miki’s Farm Fresh Market at Alma Plaza, which will close April 1 after less than six months in business. See story on page xx.

Around Town

RAINBOW SEASON ... The rainbow flag may soon fly high over Palo Alto’s King Plaza as a colorful reminder to the world where the city stands on the topic of samesex marriage. The city is considering joining other cities and counties in the area in showing its support for gay marriage and its opposition to California’s Proposition 8, which bans gay marriage and which passed in 2008 (76 percent of Palo Alto voters rejected it). The only problem is that the city currently has no policies that allow the city to fly a flag unless someone dies. On Monday night, the City Council will address the issue when it considers a request from City Manager James Keene for authority to fly the flag. The request comes at a time when gay marriage is dominating headlines across the nation, with both Proposition 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act undergoing hearings in front of the U.S. Supreme Court this week. In his request and a proposed resolution, Keene notes that other cities in the area, including Oakland and San Leandro, are flying the rainbow flag. An even greater coalition of cities, led by San Francisco and including Los Angeles, San Diego and Santa Cruz, have joined a legal effort challenging Proposition 8. Palo Alto hasn’t joined any lawsuits when it comes to gay marriage, but if Keene’s request is accepted, it will become the latest member — however symbolic — of a growing coalition of cities and counties calling for legalization of same-sex marriage. BOOK OF TREES ... How do Palo Altans love their trees? Let Walter Passmore count the ways. The city’s recently hired urban forester is in the midst of putting together the city’s first Urban Forest Master Plan, an ambitious compendium of facts, values and recommendations for preserving the city’s lush urban forest. Passmore discussed this project Wednesday night with the Planning and Transportation Commission, which heard a brief presentation and saw a giant table of contents for the master plan (chapter titles include “Disparity between north and south Palo Alto,� “Conflict between overhead power lines and tree canopy� and “Availability of less thirsty trees�). Passmore told the commission

that one of the major goals of the document is arriving at a community vision for the urban forest. The tentative vision statement, which is subject to revision, states that the city’s urban forest “will be a model of form and function — a complement of diverse yet symbiotic ecotypes that mirrors the city’s vibrant and thriving population.� Commissioners had a few questions, with Vice Chair Mark Michael wondering whether the city’s redwood trees are native species. Passmore said there is a “substantial debate� in the tree community about this topic, though he made no secret as to where he stands in this debate. “There are people who say redwoods are not native to Palo Alto. However, El Palo Alto — the tree that the city is named after — is over 1,000 years old. I’d say that qualifies redwoods as being native to Palo Alto.� VIKING TURF ... The Embarcadero Road tunnel underpass next to Palo Alto High School may soon look a lot more like Viking territory. The city’s Public Art Commission on March 21 approved a proposal by Paly’s associated student body to adorn the walls of the 111-foot tunnel with Viking-themed murals. Under the plan, each class through 2023 will have a 10-foot space to paint a mural that fits a theme related to the school’s mascot, the Vikings. The class of 2013 will use the first 11 feet and the last 10 feet of the tunnel for their own murals. The commission approved the plan but said that each year’s design would be approved by the commission before being put up in the tunnel. Class President Michael Wang, who delivered the proposal to the commission, said the murals would be a “gift� from this year’s senior class and that adding space for “a decade of Vikings� was aimed to help connect the school to the city of Palo Alto. Since funds for creating the mural would come out of the student body’s discretionary fund, no public money would be used to paint the walls. The artistic directors of the project, Paly seniors Claire Marchon and Lisie Sabbag, said they hadn’t yet chosen designs for 2013’s spaces but that they would probably feature geometric background patterns of the Palo Alto tree. N

Upfront %$5#!4)/.

Gunn, Paly students explore ‘teen themes’ in Young Playwrights Project 0LAYSBYADVANCEDTHEATERSTUDENTSTOBESTAGEDBYPROFESSIONALSIN!PRIL

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ABOUTTHESTEREOTYPESOFTEENSv 3ENIOR #ORY 'AYTAN SAID PEOPLE WILL BE SURPRISED AT THE INDIVIDUAL VOICESANDTHEDIVERSITYOFTHEMES h4HEYRE NOT ANGSTY LIKE @) HATE EVERYTHING v'AYTANSAID h4HEYRE JUST HONEST !ND ) LIKE THAT ITS NOT COMPLETELY FOCUSED ON SUICIDEBECAUSETHATISUNFORTUNATE LYAVERYHOTTOPICINOURTOWNAND ITSWHATPEOPLETHINKOFWHENTHEY THINKOFTEENSDEALINGWITHISSUESv %VENINTHESINGLE'UNNPLAYTHAT DEALS WITH SUICIDE SHE NOTED THE STUDENT IN QUESTION ENDS UP DECID INGHEWANTSTOLIVE h!DULTSKEEPTRYINGTOHELPUS BUT NOW THEYRE GETTING TEENS TO SPEAK OUTABOUTWHATSGOINGONˆNOTJUST SUICIDES BUTLIFEINGENERAL vSAIDJU NIOR*ULIA.ELSON WHOWROTEABOUTA CONVERSATIONBETWEENAMOTHERAND DAUGHTERTHATTAKESPLACEATTHEWAKE OFTHEIRHUSBANDANDFATHER h)THINKTHATSGOINGTOBEREALLY EFFECTIVE INSTEADOFTHEMTRYINGTO TALKTOUSv !T 0ALY SOPHOMORE PLAYWRIGHT $ARYL$ILLAHUNTYSAIDSTUDENTSWERE ASKEDTOWRITEABOUTTEENAGECHARAC TERSNOTUSUALLYSEENONTELEVISION WHICHCAMENATURALLYTOHIM

Caltrain

Planned dog park in north Palo Alto hits a snag

(continued on page 8)

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Map by Shannon Corey

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Softball and multi-purpose playing fields

Soccer field Dog park

.EWOPTIONSNEEDEDAT%L#AMINO0ARKAFTERDESIGN VIOLATESENVIRONMENTALLAW ALO !LTOS PLAN TO GIVE RESI DENTSINTHENORTHPARTOFTHE CITY THEIR FIRST DOG PARK IS NOWINLIMBOAFTEROFFICIALSLEARNED THAT VISITING POOCHES WOULD BE EXERCISING TOO CLOSE TO ANOTHER LO CAL SPECIES ˆ THE STEELHEAD TROUT SWIMMINGINTHENEARBY3AN&RAN CISQUITO#REEK .OW CITYSTAFFANDCONSULTANTSARE STRUGGLINGTOFINDANEWLOCATIONIN %L#AMINO0ARKFORTHEPROPOSEDDOG RUNASWELLASANOTHERSPACEWHERE THEHISTORIC *ULIA-ORGAN DESIGNED (OSTESS(OUSECOULDBEPLACED4HE HOUSE IS CURRENTLY AT  5NIVERSITY !VE OCCUPIEDBY-AC!RTHUR0ARK RESTAURANT "UT A MASSIVE PROJECT PROPOSED BY DEVELOPER *OHN !RRIL LAGA FOR THAT SITE WOULD REQUIRE THE -ORGANBUILDINGTOBEMOVED 4HE 0ALO !LTO 0ARKS AND 2ECRE ATION #OMMISSION DISCUSSED THE DOG PARKAND(OSTESS(OUSEPROB LEMS4UESDAYNIGHT -ARCH4HE PROJECTS SHIFTING NATURE AND LARGE NUMBEROFPOTENTIALAMENITIESHAVE BECOMEADESIGNNIGHTMAREFORTHE CITYS CONSULTING FIRM 3IEGFRIED %NGINEERING 0AUL 3CHNEIDER THE FIRMSVICEPRESIDENT DESCRIBEDTHE

h)TWASNOTEASYBUTITWASNATU RALBECAUSEFORTHEMOSTPARTPEOPLE WESEEEVERYDAYDONTACTLIKETHE TYPICALTEENYOUSEEONTELEVISION v SAID $ILLAHUNTY WHO WROTE ABOUT AAMCONVERSATIONBETWEENTWO TEENAGEBOYSWHORECENTLYHADBRO KENOFFALONG TERMRELATIONSHIP !SERIESOFWORKSHOPSWITH4HE ATRE7ORKS PROFESSIONALS INCLUDING PLAYWRIGHT 0RINCE 'OMOLVILAS OF ,OS !NGELES HELPED THE TEENS DE VELOPTHEIRSCRIPTS 0ALYSOPHOMORE -OLLY-ACKRISSAID h(ETAUGHTUSALOTABOUTCHARAC TER DEVELOPMENT HOW TO START WITH A SIMPLE IDEA LIKE TWO PEOPLE AT A GROCERY STORE AND TURNING IT INTO A

Latest plans for El Camino Park

/0%.30!#%

by Gennady Sheyner

3TUDENTPLAYWRIGHTSFROM0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOLBACKROW FROMLEFT -ATTHEW#RAIG %LANA,OEB $ARYL$ILLAHUNTYAND0AIGE%STERLY AND FRONTROW FROMLEFT -OLLY-ACKRIS 3ARAH/HLSONAND!ARON3LIPPER ALONGWITHSEVENSTUDENTSFROM'UNN(IGH3CHOOL WILLHAVETHEIRPLAYS FEATUREDATUPCOMINGPERFORMANCESBY4HEATRE7ORKS

aS t

OTHER DAUGHTER RELATION SHIPS DIVORCE AUTISM GAY TEEN RELATIONSHIPS ˆ EVEN DEMENTIAˆAREAMONGTHETHEMES ADDRESSEDINPLAYSWRITTENBYLOCAL HIGHSCHOOLSTUDENTSANDSETFORPRO FESSIONALPERFORMANCETOTHEPUBLIC NEXTMONTH &OURTEEN ADVANCED THEATER STU DENTSFROM'UNNAND0ALO!LTOHIGH SCHOOLS ARE POLISHING THEIR SCRIPTS WHICH HAVE BEEN IN DEVELOPMENT SINCE /CTOBER UNDER THE DIRECTION OFTHENONPROFIT4HEATRE7ORKS 4HE PLAYS WILL BE SHOWN AT THE -OUNTAIN6IEW#ENTERFORTHE0ER FORMING!RTSINLATE!PRIL &OR THE FIRST TIME THIS YEAR 0ALO !LTOSTUDENTSINTHE4HEATRE7ORKSS ANNUAL 9OUNG 0LAYWRIGHTS 0ROJECT WEREASKEDTOSTICKTOTHETHEMEOF TEENISSUESBECAUSEOFPARTICIPATION BY 0ALO !LTO 0ROJECT 3AFETY .ET A COMMUNITY COALITION FOCUSED ON YOUTHWELLNESSTHATWASFORMEDFOL LOWINGASERIESOFSTUDENTSUICIDESIN AND 4HOUGHNOTHAPPYTOBELIMITEDIN THEIR SUBJECT MATTER THE 'UNN STU DENTSSAIDTHEYMANAGEDTOCOMPLY WHILESTILLCOMINGUPWITHCOMPEL LINGWORKS

Veronica Weber

by Chris Kenrick

El Camino Real

Space for Hostess House

Parking

Stanford Shopping Center parking lot

0ARKSAND2ECREATION#OMMISSIONMEMBERSON-ARCHSAIDTHENEWPLANFOR%L#AMINO0ARKTRIESTODOTOO MUCHANDLEAVESTHEPARKWITHVIRTUALLYNOOPENSPACE ˆ TO SOUTH OF !LMA NEXT TO THE PARKSTWOPLAYINGFIELDS4HECOM MISSIONSCONCERNSDIDNTCENTERSO MUCHONTHENEWLOCATIONOFTHEDOG PARK THOUGH BUT ON THE CHANGING NATUREOFTHEPARKPROJECT h4HEISSUEISJUSTTHATTHERESJUST TOO MANY THINGS THERE v #HAIR %D ,AUINGSAID 6ICE #HAIR *ENNIFER (ETTERLY AGREEDANDTOOK3CHNEIDERSMETA PHORASTEPFURTHER h7EENDUPWITHMASHEDPOTATOES NOTJUSTABAGOFCROWDEDPOTATOES v (ETTERLEYSAID LATERADDINGTHATSHE THINKS ITS hCRAZY TO TRY TO INCLUDE THEDOGPARKANDTHEFIELDANDALLTHE EXTRAPARKINGv 4HEDISCUSSION4UESDAYFOLLOWED MORETHANADOZENHEARINGSONTHE PROJECTSPANNINGTWOYEARS)N!PRIL  THECOUNCILAPPROVEDTHE MILLION PROJECT THAT INCLUDES A DOG

PARK WITHSEVERALMEMBERSARGUING THATTHISAMENITYISSORELYMISSINGIN THENORTHPARTOFTHECITY4HECITYS ONLYEXISTINGDOGPARKSAREAT'REER (OOVERAND-ITCHELLPARKS "UT RECENTLY THE CITYS ENVIRON MENTAL CONSULTANT REPORTED THAT THE DOG RUN WOULD INFRINGE ON THE  FOOT SETBACK ZONE NEXT TO THE 3AN &RANCISQUITO #REEK WHICH IS HOMETOSTEELHEADTROUT%VENWITH A CHAIN LINK FENCE SEPARATING THE DOGSFROMTHECREEK THESITEWOULD BEUNUSABLEBECAUSEOFENVIRONMEN TALRESTRICTIONS 3IEGFRIEDACCOMMODATEDTHENEW DIRECTION FROM COUNCIL BY MOVING THE PLAYING FIELDS STRIPPING WHAT LITTLEOPENSPACEWASSTILLAVAILABLE IN THE PARK DESIGN #OMMISSIONER $IERDRE #ROMMIE AGREED WITH THE MAJORITYTHATTHENEWDESIGNISTOO AMBITIOUSFORTHESMALLSITE

h) FEEL LIKE WERE NOT BETTER OFF THAN WHEN WE STARTED v #ROMMIE SAIDh)FEELWERESQUEEZINGINTHE DOGPARKv 7HILETHERELOCATIONOFTHE(OST ESS(OUSEISTENTATIVEˆTHE5NI VERSITY REDEVELOPMENT HASNT BEEN FORMALLY PROPOSED ˆ THE CITY IS CONSIDERING%L#AMINO0ARKANDTHE 0ALO!LTO-UNICIPAL'OLF#OURSEAS POTENTIALNEWHOMESFORTHEHISTORIC BUILDING 4HECOMMISSIONDIDNTVOTE4UES DAYONTHENEWDESIGN WHICHWOULD STILLNEEDTOGOTHROUGHREVIEWSBY THECITYSVARIOUSCOMMISSIONSBE FORE IT RETURNS TO THE #ITY #OUNCIL FORFRESHAPPROVAL4HEPROJECTISEX PECTEDTOBECOMPLETEDINLATE OREARLYN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

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Upfront

Zones

(continued from page 3)

4HEPROCESSHASNTALWAYSWORKED AS EXPECTED !LMA 0LAZAS MAIN hPUBLIC BENEFITv WILL DISAPPEAR AT

LEASTTEMPORARILYON!PRIL WHEN -IKIS &ARM &RESH -ARKET CLOSES ITSDOORSAFTERLESSTHANSIXMONTHS INOPERATION#OLLEGE4ERRACE#EN TRE STILL INCLUDES THE **& -ARKET THERETENTIONOFWHICHWASACHIEF hPUBLIC BENEFITv THOUGH THE STORE

www.paphil.org

Beethoven Symphony No. 5 Actor Concerto for Guitar

and Orchestra

Guitarist

Marc Teicholz Bernstein On the Town: Three Dance Episodes

8pm Saturday April 6, 2013 Pre-concert talk at 7:30pm

Cubberley Theatre 4000 Middlefield Rd Palo Alto, CA Tickets: $10/$17/$20

(student / senior / general)

at the door or online

HASBEENSOLDTONEWOPERATORSAND THE OVERALL PROJECT IS CURRENTLY ON HOLD BECAUSE OF FINANCING !ND AT %DGEWOOD0LAZA ONEOFTHEPUBLIC BENEFITSˆRETENTIONOFAhHISTORICv STRUCTUREˆVANISHEDINACLOUDOF DUSTLAST3EPTEMBERWHENACONTRAC TORILLEGALLYDEMOLISHEDTHE*OSEPH %ICHLER BUILDING THAT WAS SLATED TO BEDISASSEMBLEDANDRESTORED /N7EDNESDAY COMMISSIONERSOF FEREDAFEWIDEAS SOMEOFWHICHHAVE ALSOBEENVOICEDBYCOUNCILMEMBERS DURINGRECENTDISCUSSIONSOFPARTICU LARPLANNED COMMUNITYPROJECTS/NE ISTOQUANTIFYTHEPROJECTSBENEFITTO THEDEVELOPERANDTHENEXTRACTACOM MENSURATEQUANTITYINPUBLICBENEFITS -ICHAEL AND COMMISSIONERS !RTHUR +ELLER AND #ARL +ING ALL MADE THE POINT THAT hYOU CANT MANAGE WHAT YOUCANTMEASUREv -ARTINEZWASNTSOSURE(ECIT EDTHE#ENTURY0LAZA(OTELIN,OS !NGELES WHICH FELL INTO DISREPAIR DECADES AGO AND WAS RECENTLY RE STORED TO ITS hFORMER GLORYv AS A SYMBOLOFTHECITY h9OU CANT MEASURE THE PUBLIC BENEFITOFTHAT vSAID-ARTINEZ AFOR MER,OS!NGELESRESIDENT4HEDE VELOPER HESURMISED MADEFARMORE MONEYTHANHEGAVEUPINBENEFITS WHENTHEPROJECTWASAPPROVED h.EVERTHELESS THEHISTORICBUILD INGISSTILLTHERE ITSPARTOFTHE,OS !NGELES LANDSCAPE IT LIVES ON FOR ANOTHER GENERATION OR TWO AND ITS ANEXAMPLEOFAPUBLICBENEFITINTHE DEVELOPMENTOFTHISSITETHATISIM MEASURABLE v-ARTINEZSAID 2ESIDENT "OB -OSS A FREQUENT CRITIC OF THE PLANNED COMMUNITY PROCESS CALLEDMANYOFTHERECENTLY

APPROVEDPROJECTSUNDERTHISDESIGNA TIONhSCAMSv(EADDEDHISSUPPORTTO QUANTIFYINGTHEBENEFITSTOTHEDEVEL OPER AND USING THIS NUMBER TO HELP DETERMINETHEPROJECTSPUBLICBENE FITS(EALSOSAIDTHECITYNEEDSTODO ABETTERJOBENFORCINGPUBLICBENEFITS SUCH AS WHEN PROMISED ONES FAIL TO MATERIALIZEORARECHANGEDSOTHEYNO LONGERBENEFITTHEPUBLIC 7INTER$ELLENBACH A"ARRON0ARK RESIDENTWHOHASLONGBEENCHRONI CLING DISAPPEARING PUBLIC BENEFITS AGREEDANDCALLEDENFORCEMENThAB SOLUTELY CRITICALv 3HE ALSO ENCOUR AGEDTHECITYTOhDOTHEMATHvAND USETHEPROJECTEDPROFITSTOMEASURE THEREQUIREDPUBLICBENEFITS -ICHAEL SAID HE WOULD SUPPORT ESTABLISHINGAMENUOFELIGIBLEPUB LIC BENEFITS THAT DEVELOPERS CAN USE WHENTHEYREQUESTCONCESSIONS3ANTA -ONICA FORINSTANCE OFFERSALISTOF BENEFIT CATEGORIES TRAFFIC MANAGE MENT AFFORDABLE HOUSING PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FACILITIES AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION THATDEVELOPERSCANUSETOEARNPOINTS 4HEPOINTSWOULDALLOWDEVELOPERSTO EXCEEDHEIGHTRESTRICTIONS -ICHAEL ALSO SAID THE SUBJECT OF PUBLICBENEFITSSHOULDBETREATEDIN AMOREROBUSTFASHIONINTHE#OM PREHENSIVE0LAN THECITYSLAND USE BIBLE THAT IS NOW BEING UPDATED 4HEGOAL HESAID ISTOMOVEAWAY FROMTHEEXISTINGhADHOCTREATMENT FORAPPROVALv 4HE COMMISSIONERS MEMO CALLS PLANNED COMMUNITY ZONING hTHE GREATESTCHALLENGETOLAND USEIN0ALO !LTO TODAYv )T ALSO ARGUES THAT THE TOPICOFPUBLICBENEFITSISABOUTTOBE COMEEVENMOREPERTINENTASDEVELOP

MENTAPPLICATIONSCONTINUETOPILEUP 4HE USE OF THIS ZONING DESIGNATION THEMEMOSTATES hWILLONLYGROWv !MONG THE MAJOR PLANNED COM MUNITY 0# PROJECTS THE CITY IS WEIGHINGAREANEWBUILDINGFORTHE BUSYCORNEROF%L#AMINOAND0AGE -ILL2OADANDTWODENSEOFFICETOW ERSAT0AGE-ILL2OAD NEXTTO !/,S3ILICON6ALLEYHEADQUARTERS h4HE FORCES FOR DEVELOPMENT IN 0ALO!LTO THESCARCITYOFAVAILABLE LAND THE IMPACT OF HIGHER DENSITY LANDUSES ANDTHEINFRASTRUCTURERE QUIREDTOSUPPORTEXISTINGANDNEW DEVELOPMENTDEMANDTHATWEREVISIT THIS ASPECT OF THE @0ALO !LTO 0RO CESS0#SANDTHEIRACCOMPANYING PUBLIC BENEFITS DO NEED MORE CLAR ITY4HEDISCUSSIONOFTHEUSEOFPRO FORMASNEEDSTOTAKEPLACE!NDTHE STANDARDS FOR RECOMMENDING A 0# MUSTBEGINNOW vTHEMEMOSTATES 4HE DISCUSSION WILL CONTINUE TO UNFOLD IN THE COMING MONTHS AS THE PLANNED COMMUNITY PROPOSALS PROCEEDTHROUGHTHECITYSPLANNING PIPELINE 4HE COMMISSION VOTED   ON 7EDNESDAYTOMAKETHISTOPICAPRI ORITYINITSNEXTJOINTMEETINGWITH THE#ITY#OUNCILN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com Should the city change the way it works with developers who propose public benefits for planned-community projects, and if so, how? Share your opinion on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

,!.$53%

JJ&F Market renovation on hold &UNDINGFOR#OLLEGE4ERRACE#ENTREREDEVELOPMENTINJEOPARDY by Sue Dremann HILE RESIDENTS ARE STILL ABSORBINGTHESHOCKTHAT -IKIS&ARM&RESH-AR KETWILLCLOSEJUSTSIXMONTHSAFTER ITOPENEDATTHERENOVATED!LMA 0LAZA PLANSTOREVITALIZEANOTHER NEIGHBORHOOD GROCERY STORE AND SHOPPING AREA ARE ALSO ON HOLD CITY OFFICIALS AND THE PROJECT AR CHITECTHAVEREVEALED &UNDINGFORTHEBLOCK WIDE#OL LEGE4ERRACE#ENTREPROJECT WHICH INCLUDESANUPDATEDSPACEFORTHE MORETHAN YEAR OLD**&-AR KET HASNOTMATERIALIZED ANDTHE DEVELOPER !DVENTERA)NC HASRE CEIVEDAONE YEAREXTENSIONFORITS PLANNING ENTITLEMENTPERMIT CITY 0LANNING $IRECTOR #URTIS 7IL LIAMSSAIDON-ONDAY -ARCH #OLLEGE4ERRACE#ENTRE LOCATED AT THE CORNER OF #OLLEGE !VENUE AND %L #AMINO 2EAL WOULD IN CLUDE SQUAREFEETOFOFFICE SPACE  SQUAREFEETOFOTHER RETAILANDEIGHTUNITSOFAFFORDABLE HOUSING4HEPLANWON#ITY#OUN CIL APPROVAL IN $ECEMBER  AFTER MONTHS OF PUBLIC SCRUTINY WITH RESIDENTS RALLYING TO KEEP THEBELOVEDMARKETWHILEOPPOS INGDENSEDEVELOPMENT

W

Page 6ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Êә]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

!DVENTERAREQUESTEDTHEEXTEN SIONLATELASTYEAR 7ILLIAMSSAID )FPLANSFORABUILDINGPERMITARE NOT SUBMITTED BY $ECEMBER AN OTHER YEAR LONG EXTENSION WOULD BEATTHEDISCRETIONOFTHE0LANNING AND 4RANSPORTATION #OMMISSION AND#ITY#OUNCIL 7ILLIAMSSAID 4HE DEVELOPER HAS COMMU NICATED hIN FITS AND STARTSv OVER FINANCING REGARDING THE PROJECT AT TIMES SAYING THE FUNDING WAS CLOSE TO BEING SETTLED 7ILLIAMS SAID BUTABUILDINGPERMITHASNT BEENREQUESTED !DVENTERA 0RESIDENT 0ATRICK 3MAILEY DID NOT RESPOND TO RE QUESTSFORCOMMENT "UTPROJECTARCHITECT4ONY#AR RASCOOF#ARRASCOAND!SSOCIATES !RCHITECTS SAID ON -ONDAY THAT DEVELOPERSAREhSTILLTRYINGTOGET ITFINANCEDv 4HEECONOMICDOWNTURNCAUSED THE COUNCIL IN .OVEMBER  TO PASS AN ORDINANCE THAT ALLOWS PROJECTS TO EXTEND AN ADDITIONAL TWOYEARSWITHAPPROVALFROMTHE PLANNING DIRECTOR 0ROJECTS WITH A PLANNEDCOMMUNITYOR0#DESIGNA TIONCANRECEIVEAONE YEAREXTEN SIONFROMTHEPLANNINGDIRECTOR BUT

THEFOLLOWINGYEARWOULDBEATTHE DISCRETIONOFTHEPLANNINGCOMMIS SIONANDCOUNCIL 7ILLIAMSSAID $EVELOPERS OF PLANNED COM MUNITY PROJECTS MUST OFFER PUB LICBENEFITSINEXCHANGEFORTALLER OR DENSER DEVELOPMENT AND THE COUNCILMIGHTWANTTOCHANGETHE PUBLICBENEFITSSHOULDTHEPROJECT TAKEYEARSTOBEBUILT HESAID 4HEONLYOTHERPROJECTTHATHAS ASKED FOR AN EXTENSION IS -INGS (OTEL EASTOF53(IGHWAY 7ILLIAMS SAID 4HAT PROJECT JUST RECEIVEDARECOMMENDATIONFORA ONE YEAREXTENSIONFROMPLANNING COMMISSIONERSANDWILLBEONTHE COUNCILSCONSENTCALENDARFORAP PROVALON!PRIL **&OWNER*OE+HOURYSAIDTHE STOREISNOTMAKINGANYMONEYAND THATTHEDELAYISAFFECTINGBUSINESS h7E DONT KNOW WHAT IS GOING ON 7E CANT DO MUCH 7E WERE PROMISED THE NEW PLACE ) HAVE CALLED BUT  ) DONT GET ANY AN SWERS vHESAID +HOURY SAID THERE IS GARBAGE AROUND THE ABANDONED ADJACENT PROPERTYANDTHEROOFLEAKS4HE (continued on page 8)

Upfront "53).%33

Miki’s Market in Palo Alto to close April 1 'ROCERYSTOREWASREQUIREDINREDEVELOPMENTOF!LMA0LAZA by Gennady Sheyner and Elena Kadvany

L

DEVELOPMENT7ITHTHEECONOMYIN FLUX IT TOOK ANOTHER TWO YEARS FOR -C.ELLISTOFINDAGROCERTOFILLTHAT VACANCY (E ANNOUNCED 7ERNESS DECISIONTOSETUPSHOPINTHEPLAZA IN*ULY MORETHANAYEARBEFORE THESTOREOPENEDITSDOORS -C.ELLIS SAID THE STORES CLOSURE IS DUE TO POOR SALES AND SHOPPERS FAILURE TO EMBRACE -IKIS (E SAID THE MARKET HADNT PAID ANY RENT SINCE IT OPENED AND HE ATTRIBUTED ITSFINANCIALWOESTOVENDORSSTART INGTOCUTOFFTHEGROCER4HESALES AT-IKIS HESAID FELLBELOWTHOSE OF,UCKYSAND!LBERTSONS ITSPLAZA PREDECESSORS h4HISISNOTACASEOFALANDLORD KICKING HIM OUT v -C.ELLIS SAID h4HISISACASEOFSALESBEINGSOLOW THATEVENWITHOUTRENT HECOULDNOT PAY VENDORS )TS A VERY VERY SAD SITUATIONv 7ERNESSTOLDTHE7EEKLYTHATHIS FIRSTCONCERNINREGARDSTOTHECLO SURE IS HIS EMPLOYEES FOLLOWED BY HISVENDORS(ECALLED-IKISBRIEF HISTORYIN0ALO!LTOhALOTOFCOULDA SHOULDA WOULDAv h"UT)CANTSITHEREANDSECOND GUESSMYSELF v7ERNESSSAID &OR -C.ELLIS THE DEPARTURE OF -IKIS MEANS THE SEARCH IS ON YET AGAIN FOR A GROCER TO OCCUPY THE PLAZA IN THE  BLOCK OF !LMA 3TREET4HECITYHADVIEWEDTHEGRO CERY STORE AS THE PLAZAS ANCHOR A FACT THAT IS REFLECTED IN THE CONDI TIONSOFTHECOUNCILSAPPROVAL4HE COUNCILHADSPECIFIEDTHAT-C.ELLIS WOULD BE ALLOWED TO BUILD HALF OF THE PLAZAS HOMES ONCE HE SIGNED THELEASEWITHAGROCERANDTHEOTHER HALFAFTERTHEGROCERMOVEDIN )N &EBRUARY  -C.ELLIS

Survey is available at http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ts2013.

Public Announcement The Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) intends to lease a building to the Whistle Stop Child Care Center for the purpose of operating a child care facility on Federal Property. This is not a solicitation or a sources-sought notice. Comments may be addressed to Alexander Ortiz, Contracts Specialists, at 559-247-6432. Please note that this notice is intended for notiďŹ cation purposes only, no request for offers (RFI) will be issued.

Palo Alto Historical Association presents a public program

Let’s Talk Tree Presenter: John Henry McClenahan

For further information regarding the survey please contact: Ruchika Aggarwal – ruchika.aggarwal@cityofpaloalto.org or (650)617.3136.

DR. CINDY HUE, D.D.S.sDR. JESSE KIM, D.D.S. FAMILY COSMETIC DENTISTRY

ONLY $ 49* Includes Whitening Treatment Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Sunday, April 7, 2013 2:00 p.m Lucie Stern Community Center 1305 MiddleďŹ eld Road, Palo Alto Refreshments No admission charge

SIGNED AN AGREEMENT WITH $2 (ORTONTOBUILDTHEFIRSTHOMES ,AST FALL WITH THE OPENING OF -IKIS -C.ELLIS WAS ALLOWED TO PROCEED WITH CONSTRUCTION OF THE REMAININGHALF 4HEPLAZASRESIDENTIALCOMPONENT IS BOTH THE MOST CONTROVERSIAL AND THEMOSTFINANCIALLYLUCRATIVEPARTOF THEDEVELOPMENTFOR-C.ELLIS 4HECITYSPLANNED COMMUNITYOR DINANCEFOR!LMA0LAZAALSOREFLECTS THE CITYS COMMITMENT TO HAVING A -IKIS&ARM&RESH-ARKETON!LMA3TREET NEAR%AST-EADOW$RIVE GROCERY STORE ANCHOR THE  ACRE HASANNOUNCEDITWILLCLOSEON!PRIL PLAZA WHICH ALSO INCLUDES A 3TAR BUCKSANDACOMMUNITYROOM4HE PLEKNOWABOUTTHESITESAVAILABIL GOTO0ALO!LTO/NLINE 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER ORDINANCESPECIFIESTHATTHEMIXED ITY v&EHRENBACHSAIDN 4HISARTICLEWASORIGINALLYPOSTED AND%DITORIAL!SSISTANT%LENA+AD USE BUILDING AT !LMA 0LAZA WOULD BERESERVEDhFORGROCERYSTOREUSES ON -ONDAY -ARCH  ON WWW VANYCANBEEMAILEDATGSHEYNER IN PERPETUITYv 4HE ORDINANCE ALSO 0ALO!LTO/NLINECOM 4O STAY CUR PAWEEKLYCOM AND EKADVANY SPECIFIES THAT THE GROCERY STORE RENTONALLOFTHELATESTLOCALNEWS PAWEEKLYCOM WOULD HAVE hA MINIMUM GROUND FLOORSIZEOF SQUAREFEETAND TOTALMINIMUMSIZEOF SQUARE FEETINCLUDINGAPPROXIMATELY  SQUARE FEET OF BASEMENT FOR OFFICE NOTICE OF STORAGEANDSERVICEAREASUPPORTING TRANSPORTATION SURVEY THEGROCERYSTORE v -C.ELLIS SAID THAT -IKIS DEPAR Of the City of Palo Alto TURE WILL MEAN ANOTHER PERIOD OF VACANCY FOR THE PLAZA AND ANOTHER SEARCHFORAGROCERTOFILLTHEVOID The City of Palo Alto is releasing its ďŹ rst ever Transportation (ESAIDHEDOESNTKNOWHOWLONG Survey to help better understand the travel mode and patterns THISSEARCHWILLTAKE of the community. Residents and persons travelling into Palo h7ERE CALLING EVERY MARKET WE Alto to work are encouraged to complete the survey. CAN v-C.ELLISSAID 4HOMAS&EHRENBACH 0ALO!LTOS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MANAGER The survey is comprised of 12-15 questions and takes only a SAID THE CITY HAS REACHED OUT TO few minutes to complete. Please provide your input before May -C.ELLIS TO OFFER HELP IN FINDING 5th, 2013 by taking the survey online. Data from the survey will THE NEXT TENANT (E ALSO SAID THE be used to develop future transportation programs, projects CITYISREADYTOASSISTTHEDEVELOPER WITHROUTINEISSUESSUCHASREPLAC and policies. INGSIGNAGE h7ELLDOWHATWECANTOLETPEO Elena Kadvany

ESS THAN SIX MONTHS AFTER -IKIS &ARM &RESH -ARKET OPENED ITS DOORS AT !LMA 0LAZA FILLING A VACANCY THAT HAS BLIGHTEDTHEPLAZAFORSEVENYEARS THESTOREHASANNOUNCEDITSPLANSTO SHUTDOWN h2EGRETTABLY -IKIS &ARM &RESH -ARKETISCLOSINGITSDOORS!PRIL -ERCHANDISE IS  PERCENT OFF IN THEENTIRESTORE vREADSTHESIGNTHAT GREETS CUSTOMERS WALKING INTO THE SOUTH0ALO!LTOSTORE WHICHOPENED TOGREATFANFARELAST/CTOBER 4HEANNOUNCEDCLOSUREISTHELAT ESTBLOWTOAPLAZATHATHADBEENIN DEVELOPMENTALLIMBOFORYEARSAND THATISSTILLSEENBYMANYASAPRIME EXAMPLEOFTHELOCALZONINGPROCESS GOINGAWRY $EVELOPER*OHN-C.ELLISRECEIVED APPROVALFORTHEhPLANNEDCOMMU NITYv ZONED PROJECT IN EARLY  AFTERALENGTHYDISPUTEWITHTHECITY ANDAREARESIDENTSOVERTHETYPESOF hPUBLIC BENEFITSv THE DEVELOPMENT WOULDHAVETOOFFERINEXCHANGEFOR 0# ZONING EXEMPTIONS 4HE CITYS APPROVALALLOWED-C.ELLISTOBUILD  SINGLE FAMILY HOMES AND  BELOW MARKET RATE UNITS WITH THE GROCERY STORE SERVING AS THE CHIEF PUBLICBENEFIT .OW IT LOOKS LIKE THIS PUBLIC BENEFITISABOUTTOCOMETOANEND -ICHAEL h-IKIv 7ERNESS THE FOR MER "ERKELEY "OWL MANAGER WHO FOUNDED -IKIS SAID THE STORE HAS BEENHAVINGTROUBLEKEEPINGUPWITH BACKRENTANDHASTOCLOSEDOWN h&ORMEANDMYWIFE ITSOVER)TS PRETTYDEVASTATING v7ERNESSTOLDTHE 7EEKLY-ONDAYMORNING 7HENTHESTOREOPENED THEHOPE WAS TO BRING TO SOUTH 0ALO !LTO A STORE THAT WOULD OFFER ORGANIC AND SPECIALTY FOODS AT AN AFFORD ABLE PRICE ˆ A "ERKELEY "OWL ON A SMALLER SCALE 4HE SITE HAD BEEN VACANTSINCE!LBERTSONSLEFTIN LEAVINGTHECOMMERCIALPLAZANEARLY DESERTEDANDAREARESIDENTSFRUSTRAT EDABOUTTHELACKOFPROGRESS 4HE COUNCIL VOTED IN *ANUARY TOAPPROVE-C.ELLISPROPOSAL ANAPPROVALTHATFOLLOWEDABOUT PUBLICHEARINGSONTHECONTROVERSIAL

6ALUE 5NINSURED .EW0ATIENTS/NLY #ALLFORDETAILS7ITHCOUPONONLY ,IMITEDTIMEOFFER

Seymour P. McClenahan, Circa 1911

650.366.0552

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Teeth Whitening Kit with Complete X-rays, Exam and Cleaning

Uninsured, New Patients Only Call for details.

.EW00/0ATIENTS/NLY #ANNOTBECOMBINEDWITH OTHERCOUPONS #ALLFORDETAILS ,IMITEDTIMEOFFER

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BIRCH DENTAL GROUP

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ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂŠ>Ă€V…Êә]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 7

Upfront

UNIVERSITY AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION 11am Resurrection Sunday Service, March 31

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-ASHEVSKY AREJUNIORS3IVAN3PEC TORANDSENIOR*EREMY+ELEM 0ROFESSIONALREADINGSOFTHEPLAYS FREEANDOPENTOTHEPUBLIC WILLBE ON THE 3ECOND 3TAGE AT -OUNTAIN 6IEWS #ENTER FOR THE 0ERFORMING !RTSON-ONDAY !PRIL FOR0ALY ANDON4UESDAY !PRIL FOR'UNN %ACHSHOWWILLBEFOLLOWEDBYOP PORTUNITYFORAUDIENCEDISCUSSION 0ALY THEATER TEACHER +ATHLEEN 7OODS SAID SHE TRIES TO SCRAPE TO GETHERFUNDINGFORTHE9OUNG0LAY WRIGHTS0ROJECTEVERYYEARBECAUSE ITSAGREATOPPORTUNITYFORSTUDENTS 3TUDENTSALSOHAVEPLAY WRITINGOP PORTUNITIESTHROUGH0ALYS0LAYINA $AYPROJECTEACH$ECEMBERANDTHE /NE !CT3HOWCASEIN-AY 4HE 9OUNG 0LAYWRIGHTS 0ROJECT hIS ABOUT GIVING STUDENTS THE IDEA THATTHEYHAVEAVOICEINTHECOMMU NITY vSAID4HEATRE7ORKS%DUCATION !DMINISTRATOR*AKE!RKEY h4HIS TYPE OF CREATIVE WRITING GIVESSTUDENTSSOMETHINGTHEYDONT OFTENGET ASAFEPLACETOFREELYEX PRESSTHEMSELVESvN

Three arrested for burglaries in Palo Alto garage

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Reverend Edward Prothro-Harris, Pastor, preaching on

“A Brighter Day.” 3549 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto, CA 94306   suniversityamezion@ymail.com Where wounded souls are healed, broken spirits are mended and Christ is fully offered. All are welcome at “The U!”

Learn the Guitar this Spring Carol McComb’s “Starting to Play” workshop includes the FREE use of a Loaner Guitar for the duration of the classes.* Regular cost is just $160 for nine weeks of group lessons, and all music is included. *“Starting to Play” meets for one hour each Monday night for nine weeks beginning March 25. Students are encouraged to bring their own guitar, but both nylon-string and steel-string loaner guitars are available. Other classes at more advanced levels are also offered. A full brochure is available at Gryphon.

JJ&F Market

Stringed Instruments

(continued from page 6)

Since 1969

650 U493 U2131 ,AMBERT!VENUEs0ALO!LTO www.gryphonstrings.com 4IC

IL TROVATORE BY GIUSEPPE VERDI Betrayal

Revenge

Lust

Keith Kreiman, San Mateo City Times 02’ “Liliane Cromer, as Carmen with her beautiful lyric voice, dominates the stage in the most definitive interpretation since Rïse Stevens the great Met Diva...” Liliane Cromer returns to the Fox as a riveting Azucena

Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 2pm Tickets $22 - $24, 650 -Fox-7770 or <foxwc.com> Fox Theater, 2223 Broadway, Redwood City, 94063 Chamber Orchestra and English Supertitles verismoopera.org and bslopera.com Page 8ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Êә]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

BUSINESSISNOTGETTINGCUSTOMERSTO MAKEMONEY HESAID h)FITSTAYSLIKETHAT WELLHAVETO LEAVE7EREWASTINGOURTIMEHERE v HE SAID ON 4HURSDAY ADDING THAT WHENITCOMESTOTHEREDEVELOPMENT h)DONTTHINKITSHAPPENINGv #OLLEGE 4ERRACE NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENT $ORIA 3UMMA WHO IS A LIAISON FOR THE NEIGHBORHOOD AS SOCIATION WITH THE CITY SAID THERE ARE REAL CONCERNS REGARDING THE VIABILITY OF **& CONSIDERING THE SHUTTERINGOF-IKIS h)F THAT GROCERY STORE FAILED ) DONT KNOW WHAT GROCERY STORE WOULDNT vSHESAID %VEN YEARS AGO UNDER THE OWN ERSHIP OF THE 'ARCIA FAMILY **& APPEAREDASTHOUGHITWOULDGOOUT OFBUSINESSWITHOUTTHE#OLLEGE4ER RACE#ENTREREDEVELOPMENT SHESAID 4HECOMMUNITYSDESIRETOMAINTAIN THEGROCERYSTORETHEREWASTHEBASIS FORALLOWINGTHEOVERSIZEDREDEVEL OPMENT SHESAID h)FYOUHAVEAPROJECTBASEDONA PRIVATE BUSINESS IT WOULD BEHOOVE THECITYTOLOOKINTOTHEVIABILITYOF THE BUSINESSv BEFORE APPROVING A PLAN SHESAID h7ITH THE RECENT INFORMATION ABOUT-IKISANDTHEPLANNINGCOM MISSIONANDCOUNCILSAYINGTHEYARE REALLYCONCERNEDABOUTPUBLICBEN EFITS )THINKTHISSHOULDBEAWARN INGSIGN vSHESAID 3UMMA SAID AT THE TIME WHEN THEPROJECTSWEREBEINGCONSIDERED SOMERESIDENTSHADASKEDTHECOUN CILTOSPECIFYASECONDUSEIFAGRO CERYSTOREPROVEDNOTVIABLE BUTTHE COUNCILLOCKEDINTHEGROCERY STORE USEAT!LMAAND#OLLEGE4ERRACE h)NTHECASEOF-IKISAND**& THAT COULD HAVE BEEN AN IMPORTANT THINGTODO vSHESAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

4HREE3AN&RANCISCORESIDENTSWEREARRESTEDINDOWNTOWN0ALO!LTOON 4UESDAYNIGHT -ARCH ANDCHARGEDWITHSMASHINGANDBURGLARIZING CARS4HEYWEREALLEGEDLYCAUGHTACTINGSUSPICIOUSLYBYPLAINCLOTHESOF FICERSWHOWEREPATROLLINGAGARAGEON(IGH3TREETINTHEAFTERMATHOFA BURGLARYSPREE 0ALO!LTOPOLICEARRESTED3HANE3PRINGER  /LEG.EVIDOMYY  AND *ULIA.ENAYDOKH  ONMULTIPLECHARGESRELATINGTOBURGLARYANDDRUG POSSESSION AFTER STOPPING THE VEHICLE THEY WERE IN AND FINDING STOLEN ITEMS HEROINANDSYRINGES0OLICEMADETHEARRESTMINUTESAFTERTHECAR A ,INCOLN.AVIGATOR WASSPOTTEDBYPLAINCLOTHESOFFICERSINAPARKING STALLONTHESECONDFLOOROFTHEGARAGE KNOWNAS,OTh2v4HEOFFICERS WEREDRIVINGANUNMARKEDCARANDWERESPECIFICALLYONTHELOOKOUTFOR BURGLARIES ABOUTOFWHICHHAVEOCCURREDINTHISGARAGEOVERTHEPAST SIXMONTHS 4HEOFFICERSBECAMESUSPICIOUSWHENAMANNEXTTOTHE.AVIGATOR APPEARED STARTLED AND TRIED TO LOOK BUSY UPON SEEING THE OFFICERS CRUISEBY4HOUGHTHEREWASNOSHATTEREDGLASSORANYOTHERDISTUR BANCES IN THE AREA THE OFFICERS TOOK DOWN THE .AVIGATORS LICENSE PLATEANDPROCEEDEDTOPATROLUPPERLEVELSOFTHEGARAGE7HENTHE OFFICERSRETURNEDLESSTHANMINUTESLATER THEYSAWTHATTHE.AVI GATORWASGONE THATACARPARKEDTWOSTALLSAWAYHADABROKENREAR WINDOW ON THE PASSENGER SIDE AND THAT THERE WAS SHATTERED GLASS ONTHEGROUND ACCORDINGTOAPOLICESTATEMENT4HEYBROADCASTTHE INFORMATIONABOUTTHE.AVIGATOROVERTHEPOLICERADIO TRIGGERINGA SEARCHFORTHECAR !NYONEWITHINFORMATIONABOUTTHISINCIDENTCANCONTACTTHE HOUR POLICEDISPATCHCENTERAT  !NONYMOUSTIPSCANBEE MAILED TO PALOALTO TIPNOWORG OR SENT BY TEXT MESSAGE OR VOICE MAIL TO   N ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

Greenmeadow to lead organic-waste experiment &ORRESIDENTSOF0ALO!LTOS'REENMEADOWNEIGHBORHOOD THEROUTINE CHOREOFPUTTINGOUTBLACKTRASHBINSFOR7EDNESDAYSGARBAGEPICKUP TOOKONADDEDSIGNIFICANCETHISWEEK 4HATSBECAUSE7EDNESDAY -ARCH WASTHELASTTIMETHATTHETRADI TIONALTRASHBINSWOULDBEUSEDINTHESOUTH0ALO!LTONEIGHBORHOODIN THECOMINGYEAR3TARTINGNEXTWEEK THEBLACKBINSWILLBEREPLACEDIN 'REENMEADOWWITHONESTHATARE APPROPRIATELY GREEN 4HE NEIGHBORHOOD AND NEARBY APARTMENT BUILDINGS WERE RECENTLY CHOSEN BY THE CITY FOR A YEARLONG PILOT PROJECT IN WHICH RESIDENTS WILL CONSIDERWHETHERAPIECEOFWASTEISORGANICˆRATHERTHANWHETHERITS RECYCLABLEORNOT)FSO ITWILLGOINAGREENBINANDBEPICKEDUPFORSORT INGANDCOMPOSTINGATTHE: "ESTFACILITYIN'ILROY/THERWISE ITWILLGO INTHEBLUEBINANDGETSHIPPEDTOTHE3UNNYVALE-ATERIAL2ECOVERYAND 4RANSFER3-A24 3TATION WHERERECYCLABLEGOODSARESEPARATEDFROM EVERYTHINGELSE 4HE#ITY#OUNCILAPPROVEDTHEPROJECTIN*ANUARY BUTITWASONLYIN RECENTWEEKSTHATTHE0UBLIC7ORKS$EPARTMENTIDENTIFIED'REENMEADOW ASTHEPILOTNEIGHBORHOOD4HEAREASLOCATIONHADALOTTODOWITHIT4HE CITYWASLOOKINGFORANEIGHBORHOODSUFFICIENTLYISOLATEDFROMOTHERS TO AVOIDCONFUSIONAMONGRESIDENTSUSINGTHETRADITIONALMODELANDTHOSE PARTICIPATINGINTHEPILOTPROJECTN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

Palo Alto water rates set to rise again 0ALO!LTORESIDENTSWILLSEETHEIRWATERBILLSRISEYETAGAININ*ULY DE SPITESUCCESSFULEFFORTSINRECENTYEARSTOCONSERVEWATER 4HE #ITY #OUNCIL &INANCE #OMMITTEE VOTED LAST WEEK TO APPROVE A RECOMMENDATION FROM 5TILITIES $EPARTMENT STAFF TO RAISE WATER RATES BYPERCENTIN*ULY ACHANGETHATWOULDADDABOUTTOTHEAVERAGE RESIDENTIALMONTHLYBILL,IKEINYEARSPAST THERECOMMENDATIONISDRIVEN BYTWOFACTORSTHEINCREASINGCOSTOFBUYINGWATERFROMTHECITYSSUP PLIER THE3AN&RANCISCO0UBLIC5TILITIES#OMMISSIONANDVARIOUSCAPITAL PROJECTSRELATEDTOTHEWATERSYSTEM 4HERATEINCREASEISLESSDRAMATICTHANWHATSTAFFHADPREVIOUSLYPRO JECTED,ASTYEAR THE5TILITIES$EPARTMENTESTIMATEDTHATITWOULDHAVE TORAISERATESBYPERCENTINTHEFISCALYEAR WHICHBEGINSON*ULY  TOACCOMMODATERISINGWHOLESALEANDCAPITALCOSTS%ACHOFTHESECOSTS INCREASEDBYLESSTHANEXPECTED "UTTHELATESTRATEADJUSTMENTISFARFROMTHEENDOFTHESTORYFORLOCAL RATEPAYERS WHOSAWTHEIRRATESGOUPBYPERCENTLASTYEARANDBY PERCENTTHEYEARBEFORE-OREPERCENTINCREASESAREONTHEHORIZONFOR EACHOFTHENEXTTHREEYEARS ACCORDINGTOASTAFFREPORT4HISYEAR THE PERCENTINCREASEWILLADDABOUTMILLIONINREVENUES 4HERATEADJUSTMENTWOULDADDTOWHATAREALREADYSOMEOFTHEHIGHEST WATERBILLSINTHEREGION!SOF&EBRUARY THEMEDIANRESIDENTIALMONTHLY BILLIN0ALO!LTOWAS COMPAREDTOIN-ENLO0ARK  IN2EDWOOD#ITYANDIN-OUNTAIN6IEWN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

Upfront

Scouts

(continued from page 3)

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FAIRSANDBOOTHS ANDHELPINGWITH -AY &ETE AND OTHER EVENTS )N THE PAST THE ASSOCIATION CONTRIBUTED FUNDSFORMATERIALSFOR3COUTPROJ ECTS THAT BENEFITED THE NEIGHBOR HOOD HESAID "UTTHE"OY3COUTSPOLICYCREAT EDASTORMOFDISCUSSIONONTHE"AR RON 0ARK !SSOCIATIONS EMAIL LISTS STARTING LAST !UGUST AFTER A TROOP LEADERINVITEDTHECOMMUNITYTOBE COMEINVOLVEDIN4ROOPEVENTS -ANYRESIDENTSQUESTIONEDWHETHER THE ASSOCIATION SHOULD SPONSOR A "OY3COUTTROOPGIVENTHENATIONAL POLICY!NDSOMEPEOPLESAIDTHEY WOULD NOT RENEW THEIR ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPASLONGAS"ARRON0ARK !SSOCIATIONREMAINEDACHARTERING ORGANIZATION )NRESPONSETONEIGHBORHOODCON CERNS THEASSOCIATIONSBOARDOFDI RECTORSSENTANEMAILTOTHENATIONAL "OY3COUTLEADERSHIPINEARLY&EB RUARYh7EBELIEVETHATDISCRIMINA TIONIN"OY3COUTSOF!MERICAHURTS COMMUNITIES BOTH IN EXCLUDING BOYS AND IN PROCLAIMING THAT SUCH EXCLUSION IS JUSTIFIED 7E REJECT BOTH ASDOAGREATMANYPARENTSIN

OURCOMMUNITY vTHEYWROTE ,EADERS OF OTHER ORGANIZATIONS SAID THEIR GROUPS MIGHT DROP LONG STANDINGCHARTERS4HE2OTARY#LUB OF,OS!LTOSISALSOWAITINGFORTHE -AYVOTEBEFOREITMAKESADETERMI NATION *OHN3YLVESTER ITSPRESIDENT SAID (E WROTE A LETTER TO THE "OY 3COUTSNATIONALEXECUTIVEBOARDLAST 3EPTEMBER SAYINGTHE3COUTSPOL ICY VIOLATES THE 2OTARYS FOUR WAY TEST WHICH INCLUDES FAIRNESS GOOD WILL AND BUILDING FRIENDSHIPS AND BEINGBENEFICIALTOALLCONCERNED *ENNIFER(ESS THE3COUTSLEADER WHOSE INVITATION SET OFF THE "AR RON 0ARK CONTROVERSY SAID LOSING THE CHARTER MEANS THE TROOP CANT BELONG TO THE "OY 3COUTS UNTIL THEY FIND ANOTHER SPONSOR WHICH ISCOMPLEX SHESAID #HARTERORGANIZATIONSSIGNACON TRACTWITHTHETROOPTOPROVIDEAMEET INGPLACE SOMETIMESOFFERFINANCIAL AIDANDTRAINAREPRESENTATIVE%ACH CHARTERISRESPONSIBLEFORAPPROVING AND SIGNING OFF EVERY APPLICATION FOR ADULT LEADERSHIP AND EVERY DEN LEADER WHICHPROVIDESANOTHERLAYER OF PROTECTION AGAINST CRIMINAL OR

AMORALCONDUCT SHESAID (ESSLEADSA0ACKOFOFBOYS ANDHASSONSIN#UB3COUT$EN AND "OY 3COUT 4ROOP  3HE IS ALSOAMEMBEROFTHE"ARRON0ARK !SSOCIATION 3HE PLANS TO LOOK FOR ANOTHER CHARTERING GROUP BECAUSE

SHE DOESNT WANT TO PUT THE NEIGH BORHOODASSOCIATIONINANAWKWARD POSITION SHESAID h) PERSONALLY STRUGGLE WITH THE POLICY  7E ARE TRAINING LEADERS TOLEADINAWAYTHATISINCLUSIVEOF EVERYONE vSHESAIDN

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL

E ASTER

BRUNCH BUFFET SUNDAY MARCH 31st, 2013 10:00AM - 2:00PM

$20/Adult $12/Child (5-11 years) Join us Poolside for a delicious brunch buffet perfect for the whole family! Reservations are recommended but not required

Dinahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poolside Restaurant 4261 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Reservations & Inquires - (650) 798-1314

CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; REGULAR MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; COUNCIL CHAMBERS April 1, 2013 - 7:00 PM SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 1. Proclamation for Neighbors Abroad Delegation from Sister City Oaxaca, Mexico 2. Recognition by the Mid-Peninsula Lions Region for Acts of Heroism and Acts of Community Service 3. Selection of Candidates to be Interviewed for the Citizen Oversight Committee for Expenditures of Library Bond Funds for ďŹ ve terms ending on 5/31/17 4. Selection of Candidates to be Interviewed for the Historic Resources Board for one unexpired term ending on 5/31/14 and for three terms ending on 5/31/16 5. Selection of Candidates to be Interviewed for the Human Relations Commission for two terms ending on 3/31/16 CONSENT CALENDAR 6. Approval of Amendment Number One to the Water Supply Agreement with the City and County of San Francisco 7. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation to Accept the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OfďŹ ce Quarterly Report as of December 31, 2012 and Revised Workplan 8. Approval of Contract with D&M TrafďŹ c Services, Inc for a Total of $150,000 to Provide On Call TrafďŹ c Management Services 9. Approval of Enterprise Wastewater Treatment Fund Contract with Kennedy/ Jenks Consultants in the Total Amount of $205,430 for the Design of Dual Media Filters Optimization Project at Regional Water Quality Control Plant - Capital Improvement Program Project 10. Approval of Amendment Number 2 to the Contract #C10131396 in the Amount of $1,260,000 with CDM Smith Inc. to Provide Additional Services Associated with the Reservoir, Pump Station, and Well at El Camino Park and MayďŹ eld Pump Station Augmentation Project WS-08002, for a Total Not to Exceed Amount of $6,387,802 11. Approval of a Contract with Geosyntec Consultants in the Total Amount of $226,000 for Site Remediation Design and Permitting Services for the Former Los Altos Treatment Plant Located at 1237 North San Antonio Road (CIP PO-12002) 12. Approval of a Resolution Authorizing the City Manager to Submit a Grant Application to the California Department of Water Resources for an Enhanced Regional Flood Warning System for the San Francisquito Creek Watershed 13. Appointment of Lanie Wheeler to the Emergency Standby Council ACTION ITEMS 14. Approval of a Water Enterprise Fund Contract with RMC Water and Environment, Inc. for a Total Not to Exceed Amount of $193,914 to Complete the Environmental Analysis of Expanding the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Recycled Water Delivery System 15. Designation of Vote for Ballot From the League of California Cities on Amendments to the Leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bylaws to the Membership 16. Policy & Services Committee Recommendation: 2013 Federal and State Legislative Program 17. Authorization to the City Manager to Fly the Rainbow Flag in King Plaza

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Upfront

# ! . 4 / 2 ! 2 4 3 # % . 4 % 2 !4 3 4! . & / 2 $ 5 . ) 6 % 2 3 ) 4 9

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Newsâ&#x20AC;? in the left, green column.

Song, dance complement international food fair 3TUDENTSAT'UNN(IGH3CHOOLFEASTEDANDDANCEDTOTHESOUNDSOF AN!FRICANPERCUSSIONENSEMBLE4UESDAY -ARCH ATTHESCHOOLS )NTERNATIONAL&OOD&AIRE(Posted March 28 at 10:43 a.m.)

Air pollutants linked to higher risk of birth defects "REATHINGTRAFFICPOLLUTIONINEARLYPREGNANCYISLINKEDTOAHIGHER RISKFORCERTAINSERIOUSBIRTHDEFECTS ACCORDINGTONEWRESEARCHFROMTHE 3TANFORD5NIVERSITY3CHOOLOF-EDICINE(Posted March 28 at 9:53 a.m.)

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FROMCLASSICALTOCONTEMPORARY4HEREISSOMETHINGFOREVERYONEATTHE#ANTOR ANDADMISSIONISFREE    s MUSEUMSTANFORDEDU 2ICHARD-ISRACH 3WAMPAND0IPELINE 'EISMAR ,OUISIANA NEGATIVE PRINT)NKJETPRINT(IGH-USEUMOF!RT !TLANTAÂĽ2ICHARD-ISRACH 2EVISITINGTHE3OUTH2ICHARD-ISRACHS#ANCER!LLEYISORGANIZEDBYTHE(IGH-USEUMOF!R T !TLANTA 7EGRATEFULLYACKNOWLEDGESUPPOR TFORTHEEXHIBITIONSPRESENTATIONAT3TANFORDFROMTHE#LUMECK&UND

THE#ONTEMPORARY#OLLECTORS#IRCLE AND#ANTOR!R TS#ENTER-EMBERS

Educators parse new state math standards #ONCERNSABOUTNEWSTATESTANDARDSINMATHEMATICSONTHEHORIZON FORATTRACTEDLOCALEDUCATORSTOAGATHERING4UESDAYTOEXPLORE THEPOTENTIALIMPACT(Posted March 27 at 9:49 a.m.)

Palo Alto sees three big startup buys 0ALO!LTOHASSEENTHREESTARTUPACQUISITIONSOVERTHEPASTTWOWEEKS ANDTHECOLLECTIVECOSTOFTHEBUYSMAYBEOVERMILLION ( Posted March 27 at 9:38 a.m.)

Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget issues slow NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toxic cleanup 5NTILBUDGETPROBLEMSARESORTEDOUT .!3!OFFICIALSSAYTHEYPLAN TOSIMPLYPUTAFENCEAROUNDPILESOFCONTAMINATEDSOILTHATCOULDHARM WILDLIFEIN-OFFETT&IELDSWETLANDS(Posted March 27 at 8:55 a.m.)

Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golf course redesign up for review 0ALO!LTOSEVOLVINGEFFORTTOBRINGAh7OWvFACTORTOITS"AYLANDS GOLFCOURSEANDTOBUILDTHREEATHLETICFIELDSNEXTTOTHECOURSEWILLBE REVIEWEDBY0ARKSAND2ECREATION#OMMISSIONTONIGHT (Posted March 26 at 9:54 a.m.)

Unemployment rate edges up in Palo Alto, county 7HILETHE#ALIFORNIAUNEMPLOYMENTRATESTAYEDFLATIN*ANUARYAT PERCENT THERATECREPTUPINPARTSOFTHE"AY!REA INCLUDING0ALO !LTOAND3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYASAWHOLE ACCORDINGTODATARELEASED BYTHESTATES%MPLOYMENT$EVELOPMENT$EPARTMENT (Posted March 26 at 9:54 a.m.)

Palo Alto man struck by Caltrain identified !MANWHOWASSTRUCKANDKILLEDBYTHE.OTRAINAT#HARLESTON 2OADIN0ALO!LTO-ONDAYMORNINGHASBEENIDENTIFIEDBYTHE3ANTA #LARA#OUNTY#ORONER(Posted March 25 at 8:33 a.m.)

Daily News to cut two print days per week 0ALO!LTONEWSPAPER4HE$AILY.EWSANNOUNCEDTODAYITWOULDDE CREASETHEFREQUENCYATWHICHITPUBLISHESITSPRINTEDITIONEACHWEEK (Posted March 23 at 1:46 p.m.)

Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to select candidates to be interviewed for the Library Bond Oversight Committee, the Historic Resources Board and the Human Relations Commission; approve a $193,914 contract for an environmental analysis of expanding the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recycled water delivery system; approve the 2013 federal and state legislative program and consider authorizing the city manager to fly the Rainbow Flag in King Plaza. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 1, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). UTILITIES ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to consider three power-purchase agreements for photovoltaic energy; discuss changes to the PaloAltoGreen program; discuss the financial forecast for the fiber fund; and hear a presentation on the update to the Utilities Strategic Plan. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to discuss 50 El Camino Real, a proposal to expand the Ronald McDonald House; and 567-595 Maybell Ave., a proposed development that includes 15 homes and a 60-unit affordable-housing complex for seniors. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 4, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Page 10Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

G U I D E TO 2013 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

For more information about these camps, see our online directory of camps at http://paloaltoonline.com/biz/summercamps/ To advertise in a weekly directory, contact 650-326-8210

Academics Early Learning Camp Connection listing

Palo Alto

Write Now! Summer Writing Camps Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new!) Test-Taking Skills. Call or visit our website for details. www.headsup.org

Emerson (650) 424-1267 Hacienda (925) 485-5750

Foothill College

Los Altos Hills

Two Six-Week Summer Sessions Beginning June 10. These sessions are perfect for university students returning from summer break who need to pick up a class; and high school juniors, seniors and recent graduates who want to get an early start. 12345 El Monte Rd. www.foothill.edu

650.949.7362

Harker Summer Programs

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics - focusing on math, language arts and science - and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for-credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Sports programs also offered. www.summer.harker.org

Busy Bees & Astro Kids Summer Adventure Camps

Mountain View

Join us for these half-day camps designed for 3-8 year olds as we have fun, participate in games and crafts, and go on fun field trips! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue

Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, School of Rock, Digital Arts, more! One- and two-week sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org

Take interests further! Ages 7-17 create iPhone apps, video games, C++/ Java programs, movies, and more at weeklong, day and overnight programs held at Stanford and 60+ universities in 26 states. Also 2-week, teen-only programs: iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy (filmmaking & photography). www.internalDrive.com

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

iD Teen Academies Gaming, Programming & Visual Arts

Stanford

Gain a competitive edge! Learn different aspects of video game creation, app development, filmmaking, photography, and more. 2-week programs where ages 13-18 interact with industry professionals to gain competitive edge. iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy are held at Stanford, and other universities. 1-888-709-TECH (8324)

ISTP’s Language Immersion Summer Camp

Palo Alto

ISTP Summer Camp is designed to give participants a unique opportunity to spend their summer break having fun learning or improving in a second language. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language of proficiency. Our camp offers many immersion opportunities and consists of a combination of language classes and activities taught in the target language. Sessions are available in French, Mandarin, Chinese and English ESL and run Monday through Friday, 8am-3:30pm, with additional extending care from 3:30-5:30pm. www.istp.org

650-251-8519

Stratford School - Camp Socrates 17 Bay Area Campuses Academic enrichment infused with traditional summer camp fun--that’s what your child will experience at Camp Socrates. Sessions begin June 24 and end August 9, with the option for campers to attend all seven weeks, or the first four (June 24-July 19). Full or half-day morning or afternoon programs are available. www.StratfordSchools.com/Summer

Summer at Saint Francis

(650) 493-1151

Mountain View

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable! www.sfhs.com/summer

TechKnowHow Computer & Lego Camps

650.968.1213 x446

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-14 Courses include LEGO and K’NEX Projects with Motors, Electronics, NXT Robotics, 3D Modeling, and Game Design. Many locations, including Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Sunnyvale. Half and all day options. Early-bird and multi-session discounts available. Www.techknowhowkids.com

650-638-0500

YMCA of Silicon Valley

Peninsula

What makes Y camps different? We believe every child deserves the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve. Y campers experience the outdoors, make new friends and have healthy fun in a safe, nurturing environment. They become more confident and grow as individuals, and they learn value in helping others. We offer day, overnight, teen leadership and family camps. Financial assistance is available. Get your summer camp guide at ymcasv.org/summer camp. Youth camps (ages 5 - 17) run June 17 - Aug. 16 . Half-day and full-day options. Fees vary. 1922 The Alameda 3rd Floor, San Jose www.ymcasv.org

(408) 351-6400

Discover fun with us this summer through the many programs available with the City of Mountain View Recreation Division. From sports to traditional day camps, to cooking camps, dance camps and art camps... we have it all! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue http://mountainview.gov

City of Mountain View Swim Lessons Rengstorff and Eagle Parks

Mountain View

We offer swim lessons for ages 6 months to 14 years. Following the American Red Cross swim lesson program, students are divided into one of the 11 different levels taught by a certified instructor. Rengstorff Park Pool, 201 S Rengstorff Ave and Eagle Park Pool,650 Franklin St. http://mountainview.gov/

650-917-6800 ext. 0

Club Rec Juniors & Seniors DHF Wilderness Camps

Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve

Children ages 6-14 can meet the livestock, help with farm chores, explore a wilderness preserve and have fun with crafts, songs and games. Older campers conclude the week with a sleepover at the Farm. Near the intersection of Hwy 85 and Hwy 280 mountainview.gov

Pacific Art League of Palo Alto Held at Stanford

Mountain View

http://mountainview.gov

408-553-0537

iD Tech Camps - Summer Tech Fun

www.iDTeenAcademies.com

City of Mountain View Recreation Division

Arts, Culture, Other Camps

Palo Alto

PAL offers morning and afternoon art camps in cartooning and comics, printmaking, glass fusing, mixed media and acrylic and watercolor painting for children 5-18 years. It is a great place to explore imagination and creativity in a supportive, encouraging and fun environment with a lot of personal attention. Scholarships are available. 227 Forest Avenue www.pacificartleague.org

(650) 321-3891

Palo Alto Community Child Care (PACCC)

Palo Alto

PACCC summer camps offer campers, grades kindergarten to 6th, a wide variety of fun opportunities! K-1 Fun for the youngest campers, Neighborhood Adventure Fun and Ultimate Adventure Fun for the more active and on-the-go campers! New this year: Sports Adventure Camp for those young athletes and Operation Chef for out of this world cooking fun! Swimming twice per week, periodic field trips, special visitors and many engaging camp activities, songs and skits round out the fun offerings of PACCC Summer Camps! Registration is online. Open to campers from all communities! Come join the fun in Palo Alto! www.paccc.org

650-493-2361

Theatreworks Summer Camps

Palo Alto

In these skill-building workshops for grades K-5, students engage in language-based activities, movement, music, and improvisation theatre games. Students present their own original pieces at the end of each two-week camp. www.theatreworks.org/educationcommunity

Western Ballet Children’s Summer Camp

650-493-7146

Mountain View

Students attend ballet class and rehearsal in preparation for the recital of either Peter Pan or The Little Mermaid at the end of the two week session. Separate Saturday classes are also offered. Ages 4-9. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summerchildrens.html

Western Ballet Intermediate Summer Intensive

Mountain View

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 9-12. Audition required 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summerpre-intermediate.html

Western Ballet Advanced Summer Intensive

Mountain View

http://westernballet.org/documents/summer_int_adv.html

Summer at Peninsula School

http://mountainview.gov

Foothills Day Camp

Palo Alto

What will you discover? Foothills Day and Fun Camps, for youth ages 8-10 and 5-7 respectively, includes canoeing, hiking, animal identification games, crafts, and more- all for less than $5 an hour. Registration begins February 15th for residents. (February 22nd for non-residents.) Hurry, spaces are limited! cityofpaloalto.org/enjoy

650-463-4900

J-Camp

Palo Alto

Exciting programs for kindergartners through teens include swimming, field trips, sports and more. Enroll your child in traditional or special focus camps like Surfing, Archery, Animal Adventure, Circus Camp and over 50 others! Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way www.paloaltojcc.org/jcamp

Kim Grant Tennis Academy & Summer Camps

650-223-8622

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Redwood City

Fun and Specialized junior camps for Mini (3-5), Beginner, Intermediate 1&2, Advanced and Elite Players. Weekly programs designed by Kim Grant to improve players technique, fitness, agility, mental toughness and all around tennis game. Camps in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Redwood City. Come make new friends and have tons of FUN!! www.KimGrantTennis.com

Nike Tennis Camps

650-752-8061

Stanford University

Dick Gould’s 43rd Annual Stanford Tennis School offers day camps for both juniors & adults. Weekly junior overnight & extended day camps run by John Whitlinger & Lele Forood. Junior Day Camp run by Brandon Coupe & Frankie Brennan. www.USSportsCamps.com/tennis

1-800-NIKE-CAMP (645-3226)

Spartans Sports Camp Spartans Sports Camp offers multi-sport, week-long sessions for boys and girls in grades 3-6 as well as sport-specific sessions for grades 6-9. There are also strength and conditioning camps for grades 6-12. Camps begin June 10th and run weekly through August 2nd at Mountain View High School. The camp is run by MVHS coaches and student-athletes and all proceeds benefit the MVHS Athletic Department. Lunch and extended care are available for your convenience. Register today! www. SpartansSportsCamp.com

Spring Down Camp Equestrian Center

650-479-5906

Portola Valley

Spring Down Camp teaches basic to advanced horsemanship skills. Ages 6-99 welcome! Daily informative lecture, riding lesson, supervised hands-on ski-ll practice, safety around horses, tacking/untacking of own camp horse, and arts/crafts. www.springdown.com

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 13-23. Audition required. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View

Mountain View

Club Rec Juniors and Seniors is open for youth 6-11 years old. These traditional day camps are filled with fun theme weeks, weekly trips, swimming, games, crafts and more! Monta Loma Elementary School, 490 Thompson Ave.

Stanford Water Polo Camps

650.851.1114

Stanford

Ages 7 and up. New to sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or Full day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, position work, scrimmages and games. StanfordWaterPoloCamps.com

650-725-9016

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Menlo Park

This is a child’s delight with trees to climb, rope swings, and unpaved open spaces. Our engaging and creative program includes time to play and make friends. Peninsula School, 920 Peninsula Way. Visit website for class listings. www.peninsulaschool.org/pensummerschool.htm (650) 325-1584, ext. 39

Athletics

Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all-sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. After camp care and swim lessons available. www.sfhs.com/summer

650.968.1213 x650

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps provide an enjoyable way for your child to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. Our approach is to create lots of fun with positive feedback and reinforcement in a nurturing tennis environment. Building self-esteem and confidence through enjoyment on the tennis court is a wonderful gift a child can keep forever! Super Juniors Camps, ages 3-6; Juniors Camps, ages 6-14.

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

www.alanmargot-tennis.net

www.sfhs.com/summer

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps

Atherton

650-400-0464

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camps designed to provide players with the opportunity to improve both their skills and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff. 650.968.1213 x650

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Upfront

Palo Alto government action this week

Public Art Commission (March 22)

Palo Alto High School mural: The commission approved a proposal by the Palo Alto High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s associated student body to paint Viking-themed murals on the inside of the Embarcadero Road underpass tunnel. Yes: Unanimous.

City Council The council did not meet this week.

Parks and Recreation Commission (March 26)

Golf course: The commission discussed and recommended approving the proposed redesign of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course. Yes: Ashlund, Hetterly, Knopper, Lauing, Markevitch, Reckdahl No: Crommie El Camino Park: The commission discussed the latest design for El Camino Park, which includes a new location for dog runs and space for a potential relocation of Hostess House. Commissioners said they were concerned that the new design tries to cram too many amenities into the park. Action: None

Planning and Transportation Commission (March 27)

Planned community: The commission proposed a process for defining â&#x20AC;&#x153;public benefitsâ&#x20AC;? as pertaining to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;planned communityâ&#x20AC;? zone process. Commissioners voted to make this topic a priority at the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next meeting with the City Council. Yes: Alcheck, Keller, King, Martinez, Michael, Tanaka Absent: Panelli

Council Rail Committee (March 28)

High-speed rail: The committee heard a report from its consultant on high-speed rail and approved a package of revisions to its guiding principles. These include a stated commitment to preserving state and federal environmental laws governing the review of high-speed rail and Caltrainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electrification. Yes: Unanimous

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Veronica Weber

A round-up of

(continued from page 3)

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Veronica Weber

CityView

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Transitions

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

Robert Smithwick, Foothill’s ‘founding father,’ dies Robert Smithwick, a founder of Foothill College who served as a trustee for nearly 35 years, died Friday at his home in Los Altos Hills. He was 92. Smithwick was a young dentist in Los Altos in 1956 when he attended early planning meetings for a “junior college,” convened by then-Palo Alto School Superintendent Henry M. Gunn. He chaired the original elected board of trustees of Foothill, which was built with funds from a $10.4 million bond issue passed in May 1958. Smithwick, who maintained a dentistry practice in Sunnyvale until 1983, was until recently a regular presence at college events. Dick Henning, who founded the Celebrity Forum Speakers Series in the 1960s (now at Flint Center at De Anza College), said Smithwick rarely missed a speaker and typically sent a hand-written note

afterwards with comments on the talk. “He had this brown paper and small brown envelopes, just for thank-you notes,” Henning recalled Monday. “It’s so rare to get hand-written notes these days. He always had a comment and he was always so positive.” Smithwick said in a 2008 interview that early planners expected Foothill’s enrollment would top out at 6,000. Today’s enrollment at Foothill and its sister institution, De Anza College, is more than 40,000. “We were certainly surprised at the demand and glad we were able to meet it in most ways,” he said in the 2008 interview with the Weekly. “People didn’t understand much in those days about junior colleges. We wanted to prove to them that we could be as good or better than any of the good four-year schools in terms of quality of education. “Today people take it for granted, but in those days a lot of high school seniors didn’t even think about going to college. They just went to work.

Leon Samoilovich Leon Samoilovich died on Saturday, March 23 at 3:35 p.m. He was born on October 24, 1926 in Kiev, Ukraine, at the time, the USSR. He was an artist and musician. He lived through World War II, communism and immigration to the United States. He was a Palo Alto resident for over 30 years.

Births

Rishi and Soniya Jobanputra, Menlo Park, March 13, a girl. James and Miriam Nielsen, Mountain View, March 22, a girl. Henry and Sara Styles, Menlo Park, March 24, a boy. Christopher Lomboy and Verona Salvaleon, East Palo Alto, March 25, a boy.

Sherley “Bud “Stein At 93, Bud S. Stein died peacefully at 2:25pm, March 23 in Palo Alto after 2½ years of chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Bud loved life and had many interests that he shared with friends. Born October 31, 1919 in Detroit, MI, Bud grew up in Kentucky and served in the Navy during WWII, mostly in North Africa. After graduating from the Univ. of Miami, he worked for a private chemical company and after that briefly taught at schools. He then moved to the Bay Area for 25 years where he worked with various airlines as a service rep and services coordinator. He retired in Palm Desert, CA where he lived for the next 22 years. Bud eventually returned to the Bay Area to continue chemotherapy for his cancer. He is survived by his long-time close friend of 42 years, Russ, and a daughter who lives in Southern CA by a former marriage. Services will most likely be held in the next week. Arrangements by Alta Mesa Funeral Home in Palo Alto. PA I D

OBITUARY

“We wanted to encourage them to go to college.” Henning said Smithwick was fond of a quote from the Roman orator Cicero: “What greater or better gift can we offer the republic than to teach and instruct our youth.” Smithwick, whose father was a minister and missionary, spent his young boyhood in India. After the family returned to the United States, Smithwick moved through eighth grade in six years, high school in three years and university in three years, according to his family. He graduated from what is now Andrews University in Michigan and the University of Illinois Dental School. He was married for 60 years to Aileen Lois Russell, who died in 2002. Among his survivors are a daughter Cathye and a son Michael, both of San Jose. He also is survived by his sister-in-law Elizabeth Oswald of Dinuba and his grand-nephew Scott Smithwick of San Jose. The family plans a memorial service, but time and location have not been fixed.

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto March 21-27 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft related Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Shoplifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .9 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/no injury. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . 10 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of paraphernalia. . . . . . . . . .1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Unattended death. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Menlo Park March 21-27 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Violation of court order . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Resisting arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mental Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Gang info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Parole arrest or assist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Atherton March 21-27 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle/traffic hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunk driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Hang-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Watermain break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Civil matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Joseph “Joe” Baxter July 14, 1931 – March 17, 2013

Joseph “Joe” Baxter, late of Palo Alto, passed away in the family home on March 17, 2013. A native of San Francisco, Joe was born on July 14, 1931 to Cecil Leroy Baxter and Hazel Cecelia Swift. A 1949 graduate of Palo Alto High School, Joe went on to serve as an Airman 1st Class in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean Conflict from1951 – 1955. Joe was the owner of West Coast Glass Company of Palo Alto, a family owned company since 1928. He was also an avid pheasant and duck hunter, and a San Francisco Giants, 49er fan. Joe loved the family gatherings and BBQs he hosted at the family home. He is survived by his wife Cindy Baxter whom he married on September 21, 1951 and children Kathy Baxter Tullus, Steve Baxter, Terri Bax-

ter-Smith; grandchildren: Erin, Daniel, Joey, Kyle, Trent, Tristen and Mitchell and two great grandsons, Kyler and Joseph. Joe was preceded in death by a daughter, JoJo Baxter. Funeral services were held on March 26, 2013 at Roller & Hapgood & Tinney Funeral Home in Palo Alto followed by a burial service at Skylawn Memorial Park in San Mateo where military honors were accorded. Remembrances in Joe’s name may be directed to Ducks Unlimited at 800-45-DUCKS. PA I D

OBITUARY

Charles Peter Bassin July 12, 1980-March 17, 2013

On Sunday, March seventeenth, we lost our beautiful son, Charles Peter Bassin, in a tragic accident at our family home in Whitehawk Ranch, Northern California. He had just returned from the BNP Paribas Tennis Open in Indian Wells - a favorite outing of his. Charles was born on the twelfth of July, 1980 and lived his entire childhood in Palo Alto. He attended St. Joseph’s School in Atherton, Walter Hays and Jordan Middle School in Palo Alto, St. Francis High School in Mountain View, Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington and the University of Colorado in Boulder. Charles’ athletic accomplishments were numerous in the sports of swimming, soccer, baseball, basketball, golf and tennis. His golf handicap was hovering at scratch. In recent years he enjoyed hiking and fish-

ing in the Sierras and spending time with his Clumber Spaniels. Charles’ life was a contrast of incredible joys and pains but, when those of us who loved him were privileged to join him on his journey, he was a consummate source of compassion, love and laughter. He leaves behind heartbroken parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, siblings, friends and his spaniels. Charles has been laid to rest at Skylawn Park in the hills of San Mateo overlooking the Bay Area he loved. We carry his heart, we carry it in our hearts. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Editorial For now, a required ‘public benefit’ slips away Closure of Miki’s market leaves Alma Plaza developer with 37 homes, city with no grocery store

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here is plenty of blame to go around in any assessment of why Miki’s Farm Fresh Market will have to close its doors next week, after less than six months as the anchor tenant of the made-over Alma Plaza site near the intersection of East Meadow Drive and Alma Street. Certainly the building’s awful placement, within a few feet of busy Alma with tight access and minimal parking, and the operator’s lack of working capital contributed to its short run. But leading to these problems was the city’s poor handling of the redevelopment of this land in the first place. While many saw this train wreck coming before ground was even broken for what became primarily a housing development, many Palo Altans didn’t tune into the issue until construction of the grocery store, right along Alma Street, began. It is but another example of what’s wrong with the city’s “planned community” deals with developers that attempt to extract valuable public benefits from a developer who wants to exceed normal zoning limits. In the case of Alma Plaza, owner-developer John McNellis chose a strategy of simply outlasting those who stood in the way of his desired housing development. For years, he allowed the former neighborhood shopping center to become an eyesore and a symbol of government obstructionism. McNellis acquired the run-down 4.2-acre site of a shuttered Albertsons market in 2005, and then withstood numerous efforts by neighbors and city officials to create an upgraded neighborhood-serving retail center with a decent-sized grocery store. Instead, he wanted to convert the land to housing, a much more lucrative development, and offered a community meeting room and a small grocery store as the public benefits he would provide in return for approval to build 37 very cramped single-family homes. After two years and 15 hearings, in January 2009 the City Council finally gave in, over the objections of the Planning and Transportation Commission and many residents, allowing McNellis to build the homes, a 5,000-square-foot retail building now occupied by Starbucks and a physical therapy office, a grocery store, a community room and 14 below-market-rate apartments above the store. Finding a grocer interested in the space proved difficult. After announcing that Michael “Miki” Werness would operate the store, there were many challenges for the former manager of Berkeley Bowl. He patterned Miki’s after Berkeley Bowl, with a wide variety of organic produce and specialty foods and wines, and it found a following, but not large or quickly enough given his lack of working capital. A respected and well-liked grocer, he was able to persuade vendors to help him and attracted talented managers and employees, but in the end there were too many strikes against his operation. As just one example, due to the home construction behind the store, there was no way for the immediate neighborhood to even access the store without driving around the block. For McNellis, who received the right to build the second phase of his housing project as soon as Miki’s opened, his task now is to find another grocer who is willing to take a crack at the Miki’s location. Under the terms of his development approval, he must maintain a grocery store in perpetuity, so the buildings cannot be used for another type of use. But that stipulation does little to outweigh the mistake in judgment that permitted the conversion of this neighborhood retail space to housing in the first place. Construction and sale of 37 single-family homes on this site brings our community no public benefit, only private financial gain for the developer. The recent history of Alma Plaza goes back to late 1997, when owner Albertsons sought approval to triple the size of the store to 50,000 square feet. Neighbors were strongly opposed, and the plans lapsed until 2003, when Albertsons offered another plan that included an enlarged store, rebuilding the center’s retail area, construction of five single-family homes and stacking low-income apartments above the stores. The plan cleared all city commissions except the City Council. A year later the plan was withdrawn, and in 2005 McNellis purchased the property and the grocery store closed later in the year. Back then neighbors circulated a petition calling on the city to keep Alma Plaza as primarily retail. The neighbors said they wanted to see a “quality, affordable” grocery store, a post office, an ATM, a coffee shop, a dry cleaner, a bakery and a sewing service. But McNellis had other plans and outlasted the petitioners and city planners. The site became a symbol of the long, tortured Palo Alto “process” and the City Council became focused only on getting the abandoned, ugly site redeveloped. We are now left with the permanent impacts of that ill-conceived decision. We hope one unanticipated public benefit of this project will be a complete overhaul of the planned-community zoning system, something we have urged for decades and which the planning commission established as a priority at its meeting Wednesday night.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

A tempting new garage Editor, Chop Keenan is dangling a mouthwatering new garage to the City Council. Most citizens won’t have time to delve into the details. We all rely on the city staff and Council to hash out the pros and cons as the Keenan offer works its way through review. Three issues are obvious. First, the Council, staff and downtown business stakeholder realize that a severe parking deficit exists. Second, there will be a mad rush to add this parking capacity. Third, the garage will not stop the continued intrusion of city workers parking on residential streets. But there is a more important issue, as illustrated by the news today that the Palo Alto School District achieved windfall 52 percent profit on 2.7 acres of land bought slightly over a year ago. Mr. Keenan, apparently an adviser to the deal, extends well-deserved praise to the school district. The City Council is now in discussions with Mr. Keenan over terms for city land, complex development rights and the new garage. The only prudent action is for Council and staff to seek independent realestate consultants from day one to evaluate the entire transaction in light of the exploding real-estate values. The last remaining undeveloped plots of downtown land have premium added value in today’s market. Neilson Buchanan Bryant Street Palo Alto

Project needs downsizing Editor, Chop Keenan’s proposal to develop Lot P as a parking garage with two floors for the exclusive perpetual use of his employees is a land grab. Imagine if he wants a section of Johnson Park for the exclusive use of his employees next time? But call a land-grab a “public-private partnership” and suddenly the City Council is eating out of your hand. Chop Keenan should be building a project at 135 Hamilton that can be parked on site. That will mean downsizing the project. No one downsizes in Palo Alto any longer. If he won’t downsize, make him pay the (ludicrously cheap) in-lieu parking fees for his project that are supposed to be used for constructing public parking. If it must be a “public-private partnership,” then make it an open process so other developers have the chance to participate. Letting those two floors go to the highest bidder would be a much better system than handing over public land to Chop Keenan, just because he asked for it.

Sally-Ann Rudd Cowper Street Palo Alto

A blight-in-the-making Editor, In a stranger-than-fiction blast from the past, the city of Mountain View is looking for a home for two sizable chunks of the Berlin Wall. This could hardly be more apt. If you’ve ever seen East Berlin’s highdensity housing-project tenements constructed under Soviet rule, you’ll recognize the style and concept in the massive, utilitarian, eyesore development on the site of the former San Antonio Shopping Center. All this blight-in-the-making needs to cement the analogy is a chunk or two of the Berlin Wall, which would be as at home on San Antonio and El Camino as if it never left Germany. Regionalism, the nonrepresentational bureaucratic mechanism now in vogue in California, is simply government by mandate, Soviet style. Regional bodies such as ABAG (Association of Bay Area Governments), joining with politicized erstwhile environmental organizations, are mandating this high-density

urban ruination of our suburban havens. It’s up to us to tear down the invisible wall of encroaching illegitimate government and its subversive public-private partnerships, before it’s too late. For us, the pieces of this Wall symbolize not the fall of Communism abroad, but the danger of the rise of it at home — reminding us it can, indeed, happen here. Cherie Zaslawsky Oak Lane Menlo Park

Who knew what? Editor, The issue unmentioned in your soundly reasoned statement about the blown bullying incidents is “who knew what, and when.” That the school board let none of the important facts into light during an election year in which two incumbents were running for reelection casts a particularly suspicious aroma on an unusual, prolonged silence. Credible deniability concepts notwithstanding, this is definitely a case where the dog did not bark. John Fredrich La Para Avenue Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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What do you think about the closing of Miki’s Farm Fresh Market?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

Guest Opinion

Teens should be involved in disaster preparedness by Divya Saina urricane Sandy was a stark reminder to us that Mother Nature has the power to strike anywhere at anytime. We’ve seen that even in the strongholds of our urban landscape, we are vulnerable to major breakdowns of basic civic amenities such as water, electricity and phone service. This means we would be well served to not take our normal, everyday living for granted, but rather to invest time and energy in getting the basic essentials of preparedness sorted out proactively. To summarize my previous column, the framework of preparedness consists of four basic parts — becoming informed, building a kit, making a family plan, getting involved in joint community action. Most preparedness efforts are directed towards the adult population in our society, and this can easily be rationalized as the logical thing to do. After all, adults know the ways of the world and are primarily responsible for taking care of their families. A compelling argument, can be made, however, that young adults can be equally as effective in playing significant and meaningful roles in all aspects of disaster management: preparedness, response and recovery. Children comprise approximately 25 percent of our nation’s population and their social, emotional and physical well-being and contributions will play vital roles for everybody after a disaster. As sig-

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nificant parts of our society, teens must be included in the debate and the efforts. Here’s why:

The social component Teens have the same reputation all around the world: They are technology addicts. This winter when I travelled to India, my cell phone didn’t have service in the foreign country. I found myself at unease by the second day without my direct access to technology. A couple days later, however, I got to meet some of my cousins. They too had their gazes fixed on tiny screens and ears plugged by earbuds. My eyes lit up as I saw phones, iPads, iPods and laptops everywhere. I realized that teens everywhere are technologically the same. Think about your own teens, or your neighbor’s teens. Don’t they always have phones in hand? Doesn’t this phone vibrate non-stop? Can teens even consider living a day without typing, chatting, tweeting, commenting, posting, messaging, texting and clicking? The answer is no! And as much trouble teens get in today for having their eyes glued to digital screens for 12 hours straight, for going on Facebook as soon as they wake up, and for texting over their monthly limits regularly, if you truly think about it, this intimate familiarity with the digital world could be a great asset during a disaster. In the aftermaths of a disaster, teens will do what they do best, and will help communicate and comprehend information. The community will use this, dare I say, skill to get messages out, to gather updated information, to connect families together, and to inform authorities about vital situa-

tions. Teens will be in their natural habitats as they tweet, text and post furiously. All that is needed now is for teens to be provided with the proper training and to be brought a sense of awareness about when to harness their innate technological talents in manners that can make a real difference to themselves and the community.

The emotional component What we need, more than anything, is to have everybody in the community stay calm in the aftermaths of a disaster. Safety will be of utmost importance during this time, and safety will be enhanced if and only if we are all mentally and emotionally resilient. In the midst of a devastating disaster, a teen could find it difficult to muster this resiliency. For this reason, teens and children need to be helped in the process of building up their mental-readiness and emotional preparedness proactively. Teens who are able to stay calm and collected after a disaster will prove to be huge assets for the community, which will be able to use their help. On the contrary, if teens are panicking, unsafe situations will arise, and the community will suffer from a loss, as a huge percentage of community help will be disabled. It is important, therefore, to orient teens to the basics of preparedness such that during times of crisis, they are not only able to cope emotionally but are also able to offer assistance.

The physical component Finally, it should be well understood that teens are as, if not more, physically capable as adults in communities. After a disaster

their physical strength will be a direct asset when certain things will need to be moved, transported or distributed. Of course teens will need to be informed and proactively involved in preparedness efforts to understand this. Prepared teens are more confident than their peers. That confidence can translate into real impact — for their own lives, as well as the lives of their families, friends and neighbors. These three components truly exemplify that teens are an important part of the overall emergency preparedness and response picture, thus highlighting necessity to involve them in ongoing debates and trainings. Not only will training teens be beneficial to communities during this generation, but it must also be remembered that investing in preparedness is similar to investing in a life skill. The skills taught will be useful for the rest of the teen’s life. Thus, in essence, getting involved now will continue to be valuable knowledge and an asset to young adults in their futures. Finally, prepared teens today ensure a future generation of prepared adults, ensuring that our future society and our posterity will be stronger and more resilient than ever before. Now is the time to get teens involved. N Contact epvolunteers@paneighborhoods. org to learn about how teens can become Palo Alto Block Preparedness Coordinators. Also check out Facebook.com/PaloAltoEarthquakePreparedness to stay up-todate about upcoming volunteer opportunities and classes. Divya Saini is a junior at Gunn High School and a member of FEMA’s first federal National Youth Preparedness Council.

Streetwise

What do you think about Miki’s Market closing? Asked on California Avenue, Palo Alto. Interviews and photographs by Elena Kadvany.

Collin Hoctor

Village Stationers employee California Avenue I thought it was a really great store, but it was the worst location. Driving there was impossible.

Ruben Contreras

Retired Waverley Street I had misgivings right off the bat. There was no street access.

Joann Meredith

Retired Sand Hill Road I’m sorry to hear it’s closed. I never got over there; it’s far from where I live.

Elena Tverskoy

Translator Alma Street (Miki’s) was the best thing to happen in eight years. My sister and I shopped there every day. It’s horrible.

Denise Tavil

Retired Alma Street I’m very sorry for the employees that are going to be out of work.

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Cover Story

The

importance of being

well-dressed

Mod ‘60s costumes add zip to a new musical take on Oscar Wilde by Rebecca Wallace photos by Veronica Weber

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heatreWorks artistic director Robert Kelley huddles with designers in the costume shop, peering at purple swatches of wool and wool blend. The air is heavy with indecision. Costume Director Jill Bowers makes a grim pronouncement: “We have been completely unable to find a lilac plaid.” Alas, it seems that young Algernon will not wear the daring patterned jacket that the designers envisioned for Act One. They have scoured the Internet, even sent for fabric from New York, but the perfect lilac plaid remains elusive. Yet the show must go on, so the designers will sew the jacket with a solid fabric. Kelley selects a linen. These are the sartorial challenges you face when moving a 19th-century theater classic into the swinging ‘60s. Because in London’s mod culture, it was all about the clothes. The show at hand is a world premiere: a new musical version of the beloved Oscar Wilde man-

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Top: Costume designer Fumiko Bielefeldt consults with Robert Kelley, founding artistic director of TheatreWorks, about the perfect plaid for a character’s costume. Center: Bielefeldt’s costume drawings show the mid-’60s generation gap between younger characters, left, and older ones. Above: Anna Boyarshinova works with a wild piece of fabric to create that mod look.

Cover Story “Essentially what we do is couture fashion on a deadline and on a budget,” Bowers says with a grin.

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Top: Nhan Luu, a stitcher in TheatreWorks’ costume department, prepares to iron an item of clothing. Above: Robert Kelley, who is directing the production of “Being Earnest,” works with actor Hayden Tee, who plays Jack. ners comedy “The Importance of Being Earnest,” which is now being set in 1965. Adapted from the play and using much of its original language — because this is Wilde, after all — the musical is called simply “Being Earnest.” It comes from the pens of composers Jay Gruska and Paul Gordon, who are in town for rehearsals and continuing to revise lyrics and notes as the April 6 opening nears. “Being Earnest” bowed on the TheatreWorks stage last summer as a staged reading in the annual New Works Festival. Several of the cast members are returning, and Gordon is a familiar, and popular, face around here as well. He wrote the music, lyrics and book for the musical “Emma,” one of TheatreWorks’ biggest hits in recent years. He also co-wrote “Daddy Long Legs,” which played at the company in 2010, and the Broadway musical “Jane Eyre.” Gruska is an Emmy-nominated composer who has penned songs for Bette Midler, Michael Jackson and Chicago. With a show set in the fashionobsessed mod world, it’s crucial to have veterans in the costume shop as well. Fumiko Bielefeldt is the costume designer for “Being Earnest.” She has done shows for TheatreWorks since the mid-’80s. A graduate of Waseda University in Tokyo, she has studied costume design at Stanford and designed more than 50 TheatreWorks shows,

including “Emma,” “A Civil War Christmas” and “Caroline, Or Change.” Overall, there are about six people working to make Bielefeldt’s designs a reality. On this afternoon, several are busy in the huge Redwood Shores costume shop, running sewing machines and peering at fabric. On the walls hang giant paintings of corsets from TheatreWorks’ 2005 production of the Lynn Nottage play “Intimate Apparel.” The theater company moved its shop, offices and rehearsal space here from Menlo Park last fall, and everyone seems grateful for the larger floor area. When Bielefeldt comes in to design a show for TheatreWorks, she starts with the basics: reading the script and meeting with the director to hear his or her vision. Then she hits the books and researches the period before making detailed, colorful costume drawings. Bowers, as the troupe’s staff costume director, jumps in on logistics. “Fumiko does the drawings a couple months out. I start estimating the labor and the price and start sourcing the really weird things,” Bowers says. Weird things like lilac plaids. Sometimes TheatreWorks will borrow costumes from other companies, like San Jose Repertory Theatre, and vice versa. Actors at TheatreWorks often come in from out of town to do shows, so that makes fittings more difficult to schedule.

o make an unavoidable pun, costume design is woven deeply into the fabric of any show. The designs and colors set moods, conjure up time periods, give insight into characters. Actors can immerse themselves more in a role by wearing a particular pair of tottering heels or a crisply starched shirt that reminds them at every step or breath who they are. (And corsets are great for breath control in singing.) In “Earnest,” one particular dress has been a factor in changing the whole script. While talking about her costume research, Bielefeldt spreads out several of her sources on a table: glossy fashion books full of the creations of Yves Saint Laurent, Andre Courreges, Pierre Cardin. She opens to a page where three models slouch elegantly, all wearing one of the most iconic looks of the time: Saint Laurent’s 1965 “Mondrian dress.” Made to look like a painting by the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian, the dress features primary-color blocks with black bordering, set on a white background. It’s a short, straight number with no sleeves and lots of boldness. It’s also one of the reasons for a script change. The musical was originally set in 1964, but this dress is from the fall 1965 collection. Kelley wanted it in the show for its unmistakable mid-’60s-ness, and as Bielefeldt did her research she learned that the mod fashions weren’t really in full swing until ‘65. So the script got moved a year later, and Bielefeldt got to keep her Mondrian dress. (She just updated it a tiny bit with a slightly more defined waist. Actresses of any period don’t look their best in super-boxy dresses.) Bielefeldt is fascinated by the dynamic mid-’60s, when women’s clothes in particular were transforming from the staid ‘50s styles at a pace that dizzied many older women. She flips through a book of Courreges’ modern miniskirts with dramatic stripes. “He’s a signature of that period, breaking away from the ‘50s,” she says. “They went from cinchedwaist dresses to almost no waistline, to almost a sheath or a shift. That’s happening in the late ‘50s and bursting into mod fashion.” Pantyhose was invented in 1959, which meant that skirts could soar sky-high without girls worrying about revealing their garters, Bielefeldt points out. And every young woman soon wanted to be as slim and big-eyed as Jean Shrimpton or Twiggy. “Earnest” clearly illustrates the generation gap between the miniskirts and the cardigans. It’s the story of two wealthy young Englishmen who both pose as men named Ernest, for reasons having to do with seeking frivolity and love. Jack falls for the fashion model Gwendolen, and his chum Algernon woos the naive country girl Cecily. Rep(continued on next page)

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Cover Story (continued from previous page)

resenting the older generation are stuffy Lady Bracknell (Gwendolen’s mother and Algernon’s aunt), who disapproves of any match she deems unsuitable; and the governess Miss

Prism. Mistaken identity, more than one proposal and many cucumber sandwiches ensue. The generation gap is reflected in the mannequins standing behind Bielefeldt. Side-by-side are: a zippy red-and-white, very short striped

number for Gwendolen; a tamer but still short yellow sundress for little Cecily; and a longish cream coat for Lady Bracknell. Bielefeldt based the coat on a 1950 Dior design, and its nipped-in waist is definitely from an earlier era. Nearby, a costume de-

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sign for Miss Prism shows her with demure eyeglasses on a chain. Gwendolen’s striped dress gives a clue to the hours of work done by the costumers. Since the perfect fabric couldn’t be found, the stripes were fashioned from small pieces of fabric and sewn on by hand. Designers are also painting stripes on Gwendolen’s boots. “This is a period with specific textures and textiles,” Bielefeldt says. “Often they’re hard to find, so we have to re-create them.” Meanwhile, the men get to have a little fun, too. There’s Algernon’s famous purple creation, of course, and Bielefeldt holds up a bright blue fabric used in a jacket for Jack. “Jack is a country squire who takes ‘Ernest’ as an alias. We decided he could be a little bold,” she says. In this case, “bold” means “double-breasted.” The toughest gig goes to actor Brian Herndon, who plays lots of roles, including a man of the cloth and a manservant. That means lots of quick changes. Herndon will have two dressers to help him out (and in).

Bielefeldt lingers on one photo. It depicts Pierre Cardin’s Space Age styles, with the models boasting hats like riding helmets. The costumers plan to make a similar hat for Gwendolen, out of felt. “Audrey Hepburn had one of those,” Bielefeldt says, recalling the 1966 flick “How to Steal a Million,” in which La Hepburn makes her entrance in a white Space Age hat, lots of eyeliner and a convertible. “I wish Gwendolen could come on in a car,” she adds wistfully.

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ver in the rehearsal hall, costumes are playing an important role as well. For example, there’s the song “A Man Dressed in Tweed,” in which ingenue actress Riley Krull, playing Cecily, tells Euan Morton (Algernon) that she just doesn’t trust a man who wears tweed. The production’s veteran musical director, William Liberatore, mans the piano while composers Gruska and Gordon watch. Also seated behind the rehearsal table is TheatreWorks founder Kelley, who is

Cover Story directing the production. The atmosphere is friendly, with artistic give-and-take seemingly encouraged. Morton wonders aloud why the song doesn’t allow soprano Krull to sing more in her head voice. Gordon says he likes the lower register. “That’s more reminiscent of the sound of the era.” Morton’s parts have plenty of heights, with his sprightly tenor leaping through such Wilde-y lines as “I am a man with no enemies at all. That’s why I’m disliked by my friends,” and “A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her.” Then some lyrics are a little ahead of Wilde’s time, like “There’s another Georgy Girl on another Ruby Tuesday.” They go perfectly with a wall display that has company dramaturg Vickie Rozell’s fingerprints all over it: Beatles photos, a ‘60s TIME Magazine cover, period advertisements, a photo of Carnaby Street.

Above left: During a vocal rehearsal, Riley Krull (as the innocent Cecily) sings with Euan Morton (playing the dapper Algernon). Below left: Amanda Warner, a production assistant, talks with Emily Wolf, the assistant stage manager, in front of a wall of photos and other images from England in the mid-’60s.

Morton, who originally hails from Scotland, joins up with New Zealand actor Hayden Tee, who plays Jack, to rehearse several songs. They soon hit a snag that has nothing to do with the smooth blend of their voices. In one number of bouncy repartee between the two characters, Tee sings to Morton, “Your conduct is an outrage and your tie less than ideal.” But then about 15 pages later in the scene he has the line “You look good in a turtleneck sweater.” Insert sound of record-player needle scratch. Man cannot wear tie and turtleneck both. Kelley looks thoughtful. He likes the second line a lot. “Paul, it’s funny, but we can’t put either of them in a turtleneck sweater.” Rehearsal stops. Kelley and Gordon get up and examine the costume drawings on the wall. Should they change the tie line? Or the costume? They wonder if “your curls less than ideal” would work. “Would they say ‘pants’?” Gordon asks. “Your pants less than ideal?” Kelley goes over to the costume shop to consult with Bielefeldt. Soon, a conclusion is reached. Jack will sing “your hair less than ideal.” Algernon will wear the turtleneck sweater. Order restored. “We realized we had an irreconcilable situation,” Kelley jokes later about the wardrobe malfunction. But all’s well that ends well. “This era is fun.” Wig designer Sharon Ridge is

one of the people who’s gotten in on the fun. She actually owned a Mondrian dress in the 1960s and brought in a photo of herself wearing it, Kelley says. Still, he notes, it has been a challenging era to re-create in dress, with its elusive fabrics. When theater designers do find the perfect material, they have to snap it up. Kelley laughs as he imagines the clerks in a fabric store somewhere, thrilled that someone is finally buying some wild pattern that’s been hanging around the shop for decades. “We’ve had this for 40 years!” N What: “Being Earnest,” a new musical version of Oscar Wilde’s classic play “The Importance of Being Earnest,” by composer/lyricist Paul Gordon and songwriter Jay Gruska, opens at TheatreWorks. Where: Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St. When: The show previews April 3-5 and then runs April 6-28, with performances Tuesday through Sunday. Cost: Tickets are $23-$73. Info: 650-463-1960 or theatreworks.org

About the cover: Jill Bowers, costume director, and Fumiko Bielefeldt, costume designer, confer on “Being Earnest” designs. Photo by Veronica Weber.

2013/2014

Groundwater Production and Surface Water Charges NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That on the 22nd of February 2013, a report of the SANTA CLARA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT’S activities in the protection and augmentation of the water supplies of the District has been delivered to Michele L. King, CMC, Clerk of the Board, in writing, including: a financial analysis of the District’s water utility system; information as to the present and future water requirements of the District; the water supply available to the District, and future capital improvement and maintenance and operating requirements; a method of financing; a recommendation as to whether or not a groundwater charge should be levied in any zone or zones of the District and, if any groundwater charge is recommended, a proposal of a rate per acre-foot for agricultural water and a rate per acre-foot for all water other than agricultural water for such zone or zones; That on the 9th day of April 2013, at 9 a.m., in the chambers of the Board of Directors of Santa Clara Valley Water District at 5700 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, California, a public hearing regarding said report will be held; that all operators of water producing facilities within the District and any persons interested in the District’s activities in the protection and augmentation of the water supplies of the District are invited to call at the offices of the District at 5750 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, California, to examine said report; That at the time and place above stated any operator of a water producing facility within the District, or any person interested in the District’s activities in the protection and augmentation of the water supplies of the District, may, in person or by representative, appear and submit evidence concerning the subject of said written report; and That based upon findings and determinations from said hearing, including the results of any protest procedure, the Board of Directors of the District will determine whether or not a groundwater production charge and surface water charge should be levied in any zone or zones; and that, if the Board of Directors determines that a groundwater production charge and surface water charge should be levied, the same shall be levied, subject and pursuant to applicable law, against all persons operating groundwater facilities and diverting District surface water within such zone or zones beginning July 1, 2013. 2/2013_AY_mtv

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

Nicholas Jensen

Stanford composer explores auditory hallucinations in two new chamber operas by Rebecca Wallace

P

will premiere at Bing with another of Berger’s brand-new oneact operas, “The War Reporter.” Both have librettos written by Dan O’Brien. “Theotokia” is deeply spiritual: Leon is enticed and jeered by the mother of God, hearing her alternately as Shaker leader Mother Anne, the God mother Yeti and his real mother. At times, his speech morphs into glossolalia, or he compulsively beats a rhythm on his own body. Meanwhile, “The War Reporter” depicts the earthly struggles of Canadian photojournalist Paul Watson, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his 1993 photo of the body of a captured American soldier mutilated by a Mogadishu mob. Just before he took the photo, he heard the voice of the soldier in his mind: “If you do this, I will own you forever.” Watson remains haunted by guilt and self-loathing as he seeks forgiveness from the soldier’s family, even while throwing himself into more dangerous war zones. Musically, “Theotokia” begins simply, with Mother Anne (the soprano Heather Buck) singing with Shaker minimalism, then joined by the chorus (the New York Polyphony ensemble) in tight harmony. The music becomes more complex as Leon’s hallucinations deepen, and as his mother fantasies evolve. “Along the way, you realize that his

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real mother is as mentally unstable as he is,” Berger said. “The War Reporter” is more narrative, with the music growing increasingly tonal as Watson’s thoughts become more haunted by his post-traumatic stress disorder. Berger believes that all good music surprises, and in this opera the music and lyrics can play off each other in startling ways. In the scene where Watson receives his Pulitzer, the external world is celebratory. Buck becomes a lounge singer and performs what seems at first to be a slinky number. “But the text is hor-

rifying,” Berger said. “She’s singing what he’s imagining. He’s reliving this moment in Mogadishu.” The two chamber operas display “very different faces of inner voices,” but their shared subject matter makes them a natural pairing, Berger said. They will be performed together twice, on Friday and Saturday nights. In between, during the day on Saturday, Berger, Watson and others will delve even more deeply into the topic of hallucinations with “Hearing Voices,” the 2013 Music and Brain Symposium. Berger presents the free sympo-

sia annually, focusing on a topic that he’s been researching or composing around. Past themes have included music and aging and memory, and rhythm and brain-wave enhancement. Scholars, writers and researchers come together to discuss various facets of the topic. This year, programs will cover musical hallucinations, the neuroscience of and hallucinations from schizophrenia, and PTSD and its sufferers who are plagued by voices. Speakers will include Stanford anthropology professor Tanya Luhrmann, author of “When God

Marco Borggreve

eople have likened the new Bing Concert Hall at Stanford to an oval and a theater in the round. Sometimes a ship with swooping sails of acoustic paneling. Jonathan Berger might be the first to call it a brain. Both of the faculty composer and researcher’s two new operas are about hallucinations. Thanks to the oval design of the hall, Berger imagines that he’s placing the audience right inside the mind. Twenty-six speakers hung around the audience will provide a vivid soundscape for the first opera, “Theotokia,” in which protagonist Leon is a schizophrenic man immersed in religious hallucinations. As five singers and a chamber ensemble perform Berger’s music, electronic sounds will emerge, timed and placed to mimic the brain activity that occurs during verbal hallucinations. The system is based on ambisonic electroacoustics, “a computational method that allows you to localize sound,” Berger said. It was developed at the university’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, where the music professor is based. Berger, who has been at Stanford for 15 years, has premiered many an electroacoustic composition along with his chamber, orchestral and vocal works. On April 12 and 13, “Theotokia”

Top: Stanford composer Jonathan Berger, photographed by the Weekly at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. Above: The St. Lawrence String Quartet, which has long been in residence at Stanford, will perform in the two new operas.

Arts & Entertainment

Chris Owyoung

The quartet New York Polyphony will sing in the new operas “Theotokia” and “The War Reporter.” Talks Back”; Diana Deutsch, director of the Music Perception and Cognition Laboratory at the University of California at San Diego; and Stanford’s Shaili Jain, who works with veterans with PTSD and also heads the Primary Care-Behavioral Health Team at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Watson himself will also speak at the event, something Berger is particularly looking forward to. “I sort of timidly asked him to come, and he was amenable to speaking,” Berger said. “He’s in Syria right now. He goes where the danger is.” The new operas’ librettist, Los Angeles writer Dan O’Brien, has had a long history with Watson. He has written the play “The Body of an American” and a collection of poetry called “War Reporter,” both about Watson’s experiences. O’Brien was already working with Watson when he teamed up with Berger to create “Theotokia.” So “The War Reporter” became a natural subsequent project. Like the war reporter himself, Berger has a personal connection to the topic of hearing voices. His late mother had hearing loss and dementia, a combination that can lead to musical hallucinations. “She was hearing music she couldn’t identify,” Berger said. The composer also had an interest in schizophrenia. In 2010 he was commissioned by the Spoleto Festival USA to write what would become an earlier version of “Theotokia.” He created it for the famed soprano Dawn Upshaw, who sang its arias at the festival. “I jumped at the chance to write something that would lead into the opera. I loved the idea of having all the mothers sung by one voice,” he said. “It’s a prolonged, difficult part.” Heather Buck will clearly have a big job ahead of her at Bing next month, singing all the mothers and then portraying Watson’s inner voice in “The War Reporter.” Also featured will be the four singers of New York Polyphony, the St. Lawrence String Quartet and several other musicians, all conducted by Christopher Rountree. Costumes and scenic designs will be paired with video. Rinde Eckert — a director, composer, musician, librettist and Pu-

litzer Prize finalist — will direct the operas. His past stints at Stanford have included performing his play “Horizon” here in 2006, and directing part of Trimpin’s soundsculpture work “The Gurs Zyklus” in 2011. The Bing venue was designed as a concert hall, so there are limits for operatic and theatrical productions: not much of a backstage, for example. Berger said he’s rather enjoyed the challenge of working with the hall’s design. It gave him the whole “audience inside the brain” idea, and he’s using the choral-terrace seating for scenery instead of audience. Also, since there’s no orchestra pit like one would find in a theater, the musicians must be on stage with the singers. That has led to a cabaretlike setting that may be particularly effective in the Pulitzer-party scene, Berger said. Berger is looking forward to the premieres, but is never quite sure what to expect from audiences. After all, his operas are experimental, contemporary, often high-tech and at times dissonant. “I want people to come away moved,” he concluded. “My art is unabashedly expressive. ... In that context I’m a very conservative composer.” N What: “Theotokia” and “The War Reporter,” two new chamber operas by Jonathan Berger and Dan O’Brien Where: Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University When: at 8 p.m. on April 12 and 13 Cost: Tickets are $20-$56 general and $10 for Stanford students, with discounts available for youth, groups and other students. Info: Go to live.stanford.edu or call 650-725-ARTS. The free symposium “Hearing Voices” is planned from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on April 13 at Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, 660 Lomita Drive. To register, go to hearing-voices. stanford.edu.

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Old-fashioned hand-drawn animation is used to tell a nostalgic story in “From Up on Poppy Hill.”

OPENINGS From Up on Poppy Hill ---

(Palo Alto Square) There’s nothing supernatural to “From Up on Poppy Hill,” the latest film from Hayao Miyazaki’s legendary animation house Studio Ghibli. No one flies; animals don’t speak; and the only sparkles come off Tokyo Bay. Still, there’s magic in the craft of hand-drawn animation, a defiantly old-fashioned style here applied to a nostalgic story. Set in 1963 Yokohama as the cty prepares to host the Olympics, the film derives from the manga “Kokuriko-zaka kara” (“From Coquelicot Hill”) by Chizuru Takahashi and Tetsuro Sayama. The story concerns Umi Matsuzaki (dubbed by Sarah Bolger), a highschooler living and working in a boarding house overlooking the bay. In the absence of her mother, a medical professor studying abroad, Umi looks after her grandmother and younger siblings. Everyday adventure arrives in the form of schoolmate Shun Kazama (Anton Yelchin of “Star Trek”), who has taken notice of Umi’s daily habit of raising maritime signal flags. Shun’s daring spirit draws Umi more fully into the world, and as they bond over efforts to save a school clubhouse

from demolition, romance inevitably stirs. But some surprising shared family history may drive a wedge between the two. (The English-language version, voicedirected by Gary Rydstrom, also features Gillian Anderson, Beau Bridges, Christina Hendricks, Ron Howard, Jamie Lee Curtis and Aubrey Plaza, among others.) It’s a simple coming-of-age tale, told with Ghibli’s characteristic unhurried pace and unearthly gentleness (think of “Spirited Away” and “The Secret World of Arriety”). Studio founder Miyazaki co-authored the screenplay, but it’s his son Goro Miyazaki (“Tales from Earthsea”) who directs, overseeing the studio’s signature look of delicate detailing and shading amidst a generally sunny and verdant eye on the world. “From Up on Poppy Hill” spends some time in the quaintly ramshackle interior of the clubhouse, but the lasting impression is of sunny days, blue skies and rippling blue waters lined with greenery. In Japan, Ghibli has a Pixaresque reputation for excellence, and “From Up On Poppy Hill” was both the top grossing Japanese film of 2011 and winner of the Japan Academy Prize for animation. As for American audiences, part of the film’s appeal will be its exotic unbound demeanor: how gently the conflicts play out, how much

the film seems to breathe. Entirely unlike the audio-visual onslaught customary in American animated features, “From Up On Poppy Hill” feels like a nature walk with friends. That will be some folks’ knock against the movie, a J-teen romance that’s unabashedly sentimental and could just as easily have been filmed in live-action. It’s fair to say that the film will appeal less to the jaded (teens included) and more to tweeners who still dream in chastely romantic terms about one day having someone to hold hands with. Taken on its own terms, “From Up on Poppy Hill” is plain nice, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Rated PG for mild thematic elements and some incidental smoking images. One hour, 31 minutes. — Peter Canavese

The Host 1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) “Kiss me like you want to get slapped.” When a character comes out with this howler in “The Host,” it’s enough to make you wonder if writer-director Andrew Niccol — adapting Stephenie Meyer’s YA novel — is having a laugh at someone’s expense ... as in taking the money and running.

ACADEMY AWA RD® NOMINEE BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM “WEIRDLY FUNNY AND ROUSING, BOTH INTELLECTUALLY AND EMOTIONALLY.” -Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

WINNER

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL C.I.C.A.E. AWARD

WINNER BEST PICTURE

HHHHH HIGHEST RATING

-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK

SAN PAULO FILM FESTIVAL

Gael García Bernal A film by Pablo Larraín

NOW PLAYING

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.NOTHEMOVIE.COM

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Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square From Up on Poppy Hill – 1:50, 4:20, 7:15, 9:40 Spring Breakers – 2:00, 4:30, 7:25, 9:45 Sun – Tues & Thurs From Up on Poppy Hill – 1:50, 3/31 – 4/2, 4/4 4:20, 7:15 Spring Breakers – 2:00, 4:30, 7:25 Weds ONLY 4/3 From Up on Poppy Hill – 1:50 Spring Breakers – 2:00 Fri & Sat 3/29 – 3/30

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

gin bickering with each other like nobodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business. In the company of a hunky guy she happens upon (Max Ironsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jared), Melanie escapes to a desert hideaway, where Earthlings who have escaped possession try not to be found by the likes of Diane Krugerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Seeker.â&#x20AC;? There, the film settles into dull earnestness, represented by Oscar winner William Hurt, the king of dull earnestness. He plays Melanieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Uncle Jeb, the rebel leader who has been protecting her younger brother Jamie (Chandler Canterbury). There have been few movies in the history of cinema with as much talk about kissing as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hostâ&#x20AC;? has. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because Meyer, knowing which side her bread is buttered on, has included a love triangle. Jared loves Melanie, Melanie loves Jared, but â&#x20AC;&#x201D; uh oh â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wanda loves tall drink of water Ian (Jake Abel). Hence, the aforementioned â&#x20AC;&#x153;kiss me like you want to get slappedâ&#x20AC;? strategy, a plan to coax out a suddenly recessive personality. And so we get new candidates for the Bad Dialogue Hall of Fame, like â&#x20AC;&#x153;You hit me for kissing you ... I love you.â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let me guess: You have two minds about

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. Admission (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:30, 4, 7:10 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m. & 1:45, 5, 7:40 & 10:15 p.m. Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 2 & 7:10 p.m. The Call (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:50 a.m. & 2:10, 4:40, 7:40 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 12:40, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. Casablanca (1942) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Sun 2 & 7 p.m. Mon 2 & 7 p.m. Tue 2 & 7 p.m. Wed 2 & 7 p.m. Thu 2 & 7 p.m.

Century 20: Wed 2 & 7 p.m.

The Croods (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:35 a.m. & 2:20, 3, 5:05, 8, 9 & 10:30 p.m. In 3D 11 a.m. & 12:20, 1:30, 4:10, 6:05, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 12:35, 1:30, 4, 5:35, 6:30 & 9 p.m. From Up on Poppy Hill (PG) ((( Palo Alto Square: Fri and Sat 1:50, 4:20, 7:15 & 9:40 p.m. Sun 1:50, 4:20 & 7:15 p.m. G.I. Joe: Retaliation (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:30, 2:30, 3:20, 6:20, 8:30 & 9:30 p.m. In 3D 11 & 11:40 a.m. & 1:40 p.m., 4:30, 5:20, 7:30 & 10:40 p.m. (Last show 10:30 p.m. Sun.) Century 20: 11:05 a.m. & 1:45, 4:25, 7:05 & 9:50 p.m. In 3D 12:45, 3:25, 6:10 & 8:50 p.m. In XD 11:45 a.m. & 2:30, 5:15, 8 & 10:45 p.m. Ginger & Rosa (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 1:50 & 7:10 p.m. The Host (PG-13) 1/2 Century 16: 11:10 a.m. & 2, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:50 p.m. (Last show at 10:30 on Sun.) Century 20: 10:45 a.m. & 1:35, 4:25, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Identity Thief (R) ((1/2 Century 20: 11:25 a.m. & 4:35 & 9:55 p.m. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (PG-13) (( Century 16: 11:20 a.m. & 4:20 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 3, 5:35, 8:05 & 10:35 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 20: 1:25 & 7:15 p.m. In 3D 4:20 & 10:10 p.m. Met Opera: Francesca da Rimini (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Wed 6:30 p.m. No (R) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Fri-Sun also at 2:30 p.m. North by Northwest (1959) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m. Sat-Sun 3:05 & 7:30 p.m.

it.â&#x20AC;? Face palm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hostâ&#x20AC;? proves inept at character development and even worse at trying to develop any tension. The picture feints in the direction of philosophy: The alien â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soulsâ&#x20AC;? see their symbiosis as entirely natural, and instead of changing the culture of each world, they â&#x20AC;&#x153;experience it and perfect it.â&#x20AC;? On Earth, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve eliminated hunger, healed the environment and ended international conflict. Of course, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also mind-raped most of humanity into something very near brain-death, so they probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be winning any â&#x20AC;&#x153;Humanitarians of the Yearâ&#x20AC;? awards. Do not consume â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hostâ&#x20AC;? before operating heavy machinery. Fits of giggling may ensue. Rated PG-13 for some sensuality and violence. Two hours, five minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers, theater addresses and more information about films playing, go to Palo AltoOnline.com/movies

Notorious (1946) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: 5:35 & 10 p.m. Olympus Has Fallen (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:15 a.m. & 12:25, 2:15, 3:50, 5, 7:15, 8:20 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m. & 12:50, 2:15, 3:45, 5:05, 6:40, 7:55, 9:35 & 10:45 p.m. Oz the Great and Powerful (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:25 a.m. & 2:40, 6 & 9:30 p.m. In 3D 12:40, 3:40, 7:05 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 2:25, 5:25 & 8:25 p.m. In 3D 1:05, 4:05, 7:20 & 10:20 p.m. Quartet (PG-13) ((( Guild Theatre: 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. Fri-Sun also at 1 p.m. The Sapphires (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 4:15, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Fri-Sun also at 1:30 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 3:30, 6:40 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 1:55, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Spring Breakers (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: noon & 1, 2:20, 3:20, 4:45, 5:50, 7:05, 8:15, 9:30 & 10:40 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Fri and Sat 2, 4:30, 7:25 & 9:45 p.m. Sun 2, 4:30 & 7:25 p.m. Tyler Perryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: noon & 3:10, 7 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m. & 2:35, 5:10, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding

FROM THE LEGENDARY

STUDIO GHIBLI

CREATORS OF SPIRITED AWAY AND THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY

   



-Peter Debruge, VARIETY



 

       AO Scott,    

     Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

++++   -TIME OUT LOS ANGELES

WRITTEN BY HAYAO MIYAZAKI DIRECTED BY GORO MIYAZAKI www.FromUpOnPoppyHill.com

STARTS FRI. MARCH 29TH

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Perhaps the Oscar-nominated writer of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Truman Showâ&#x20AC;? accepted this body-snatcher disaster from the author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilightâ&#x20AC;? because, as the creator of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gattacaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Time,â&#x20AC;? he has simply pigeonholed himself in the futuristic dystopia genre. Where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilight,â&#x20AC;? thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s money. And â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hostâ&#x20AC;? isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the sort of work one has to take pride in; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more the sort of job where you work just hard enough not to get fired. Anyway, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hostâ&#x20AC;? proposes a future in which an alien invasion has left the vast majority of Earthlings possessed by delicatetendriled light slugs. No, really, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the plot of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Host.â&#x20AC;? How delicate-tendriled light slugs that can fit in the palm of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand achieved interstellar travel and conquered, yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;know, Earth, maybe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll explain that in the prequel. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say it gets better, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Saoirse Ronan (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lovely Bonesâ&#x20AC;?) plays Melanie Stryder, an extraordinary girl strong-willed enough to resist, at least partially, light-slug-possession (quoth the light-slugs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This one wants to liveâ&#x20AC;?). Which is a recipe for comedy, as it turns out, because Melanie is now the Girl with Two Brains. Thus, through the magic of voiceover, host Melanie and symbiont Wanda (short for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wandererâ&#x20AC;?) be-

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Sports Shorts

ON THE AIR Friday College baseball: Stanford at Washington St., 6 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday College baseball: Stanford at Washington St., 2 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM) Women’s basketball: Stanford vs. Georgia, 6:04 p.m.; ESPN; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Monday Women’s basketball: NCAA Spokane Regional final, 6:40 p.m.; ESPN

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Cardinal just two wins away from reaching the Final Four again by Rick Eymer oslyn Tinkle thinks the Stanford women’s basketball team showed why it will be a national title contender in its 73-40 victory over visiting Michigan on Tuesday in the second round of the NCAA tournament at Maples Pavilion.

J

With Sara James (21) leading the cheers, the Stanford women’s basketball team had plenty to celebrate during a 73-40 victory over Michigan that put the Cardinal into the Sweet 16 in Spokane, Wash., this weekend.

“That is what we need to keep advancing,” said Tinkle, who scored a game-high 21 points, including a career-high five 3-pointers. “We can’t rely on Chiney every game. We know she will bring it every game and we proved we have multiple threats.” Top-seeded Stanford (33-2) advances to a regional semifinal at the Spokane Arena and plays No. 4 seed Georgia (27-6) on Saturday at 6:04 p.m. (ESPN) Stanford leads the all-time series (continued on page 27)

STANFORD ROUNDUP

PREP TRACK & FIELD

Serious tests for Stanford men’s tennis

Palo Alto boys still chasing some records by Keith Peters

C

oming off a 7-0 nonconference victory over visiting St. Mary’s on Wednesday, the Stanford men’s tennis team shifts its focus to the Pac-12 season this weekend with two very big home matches. Winners of four in a row, Stanford (7-5, 0-0 Pac-12) is about to face a serious step up in competition, hosting the USC and UCLA this weekend to close out a six-match homestand at Taube Family Tennis Stadium. Nationally No. 2 USC (17-2, 0-0 Pac-12), which has won the past four NCAA team titles, visits The Farm on Friday for a 1:30 p.m. match. On Saturday, No. 4 UCLA (14-1, 0-0 Pac-12) will be No. 49 Stanford’s opponent during the firstever televised match on the Pac-12 Networks. The doubles competition begins at 2:30 p.m., with the telecast joining in progress live at 4 p.m. and showcasing the singles matches on (continued on page 27)

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ead coach Jason Fung and his Palo Alto boys’ track and field team enjoyed an historic season in 2012. The Vikings swept titles in the SCVAL De Anza Division dual-meet season and at the league finals in addition to winning the program’s first-ever Central Coast Section team crown. Junior E.J. Floreal, meanwhile, helped re-write the school record book by running to school records of 10.52 in the 100 meters and 21.16 in the 200 and anchoring the 400 relay to another school mark of 41.56. The 4x400 relay, meanwhile, also lowered a 1981 record to 3:20.69 in the state meet prelims. The possibility of any of those records falling this season appeared gone when Floreal left the state for Kentucky and both relays lost two seniors to graduation. While no one is talking about taking down Floreal’s individual marks, both relays are targeted for revision with nearly all new squad members. “We’re getting faster,” said Fung, “and we’re getting stronger. They just need to be pushed a little.” The 400 relay team has seen various members this season due to injuries. The main squad of Matt Tolbert, Jayshawn Gates, Jon Alee and Nick Sullivan has run a CCS-leading 42.53. Michael Johnson replaced Tolbert in Tuesday’s 65-62 dual-meet victory over Los Altos and Paly ripped off a conservative 42.57. The Vikings are ranked No. 15 in the state and No. 2

H

by Rick Eymer

Keith Peters

READ MORE ONLINE

Stanford’s position is sweet

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

TITLE SHOT MISSES . . . The Pinewood girls’ basketball team needed to shoot the lights out in order to win its sixth CIF Division V state championship last Friday in Sacramento. Instead, it looked like the Panthers were shooting with the lights off as they missed 38 shots, shot just .192 from three-point range and dropped a 47-33 decision to Sierra Canyon of Chatsworth in the state finals at Sleep Train Arena. Pinewood (23-9) had a solid game plan of playing a swarming defense, taking care of the ball and hitting its shots. After grabbing a 12-9 first-quarter lead, the plan appeared to be working. Sierra Canyon (27-9), however, proved to be more athletic, had way more size in 6-foot-1 Kennedy Burke and 5-11 Cheyanne Wallace and forced Pinewood into 19 turnovers while walking off the court with its first-ever state title. Burke finished with 14 points, 16 rebounds, five blocks and four assists while fellow sophomore Wallace had seven points, 11 rebounds and three blocks as the two helped pressure the Panthers into mistakes and out of a shooting rhythm. While Pinewood did a good job early on to double- and triple team both Burke and Wallace whenever possible and force others to step up, that plan disappeared when Sierra Canyon’s Gabi Nevill hit back-to-back three-pointers to spark a 9-0 run in the second quarter. Her first trey gave the Trailblazers the lead for good at 15-14. Trailing by just 1817 at the half, Pinewood let the game get away in the crucial third period by making just 1 of 14 field-goal attempts. Sierra Canyon outscored Pinewood, 18-5, in the period. Facing a 36-22 deficit to open the final quarter, Pinewood got to within seven points with 4:59 left to play when Bade made a steal and turned it into a layin and a 36-29 game. Sierra Canyon then scored six unanswered points to push its lead to 13 at 42-29. The Trailblazers put the finishing touches on the victory by making 5 of 7 free throws in the final 1:24. Pinewood finished just 11 of 49 from the field for .224 percent, including 5 of 26 from three-point range. Sophomore Gabi Bade led the Panthers with eight points and seven rebounds while junior Leeana Bade and sophomore Marissa Hing each added seven points and combined for 13 rebounds. Leeana Bade received the Pursuing Victory with Honor Sportsmanship Award for her team.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

After taking a handoff from Jon Alee, Nick Sullivan anchored the Paly boys’ 400 relay to victory against Los Altos this week.

(continued on page 26)

Menlo School, M-A baseball teams reach championship games by Keith Peters

M

enlo School and MenloAtherton will play for baseball tournament championships while Palo Alto continues to play like a champion following lopsided wins by all three teams on Wednesday. Menlo advanced to the championship game of the Cupertino Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club Host Tournament for the second straight year following a 10-0 victory over Kennedy (Sacramento) in a game shortened to five innings due to the 10-run rule. By reaching the finals, the Knights (9-3) denied Mitty a chance to play for a seventh straight Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club title as Menlo upset the Monarchs in the opening round and finished pool play with a 3-0 mark. Jack Redman pitched Menlo into the finals as he won his second game in three days. He needed only 59 pitches in five shutout innings, 47 of which were strikes while allowing just a first-inning single. He struck out four and walked none. Redman came on in relief in Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-2 win over Sierra and threw four shutout innings to gain the victory in extra innings. Menlo will face Monterey in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship game at PAL Stadium at 7 p.m. The Knights will be on spring break next week, but will be playing in the annual Bishop Gorman Classic starting Wednesday in Las Vegas. Menloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 9-8 win over Mitty in the opening round got the ball rolling in San Jose.

Despite a 6-1 deficit after two innings, Menlo rallied for two runs in the third four in the fourth and scored the game-winner in the sixth to pull off the upset. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great win,â&#x20AC;? said Menlo coach Craig Schoof. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the biggest in program history, right up there with CCS titles, win over Logan in 1991 and win over Hayward in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;91 when they were rank second in the state! With the Knights and Monarchs tied at 7 after four, Menlo took the lead in the fifth when Austin Marcus led of with a walk and Brock Cozad sacrificed him to second. After a strikeout, Jared Lucian singled in Marcus for an 8-7 lead. In the sixth, Mikey Diekroeger led off with a walk, advanced to second on a groundout and scored on a single by Adam Greenstein, his third RBI of the game. He finished with two hits, as did Will King and Lucian. At the Cordova Easter Tournament in Rancho Cordova near Sacramento, Menlo-Atherton junior Jordan Long tossed a three-hit, complete-game shutout and contributed a 3-for-3, four-RBI performance at the plate as the Bears dominated Mesa Verde, 21-0, in five innings Wednesday. M-A improved to 10-4 and advanced to yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship game against tourney host Rancho Cordova. Long threw just 56 pitches in the five-inning contest, striking out eight with no walks. On offense, M-

Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prolific attack was fueled by 12 hits, 10 walks, and six batters hit by pitches. In addition to Longâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfect day at the plate (including a double), senior James Kollar-Gasiewski went 3-for-4 with four RBI while giving starting catcher Charles Grose a day off behind the plate. Junior Josh Gabriel went 2-for-3 with two RBI and three runs scored, Paul DeTrempe was 1-for-2 with three RBI, Randy Lopez was 1-for-3 with two RBI, and Colin Martell was 1-for-3 with four runs scored. In all, 10 different M-A batters had at least one RBI in the game. After taking a 1-0 lead in the first, the Bears blew the game open in the second inning, scoring seven times. M-A put the game completely out of reach in the bottom of the fourth with a 13-run explosion as the Bears sent 18 batters to the plate. Menlo-Atherton defeated Placer (Auburn), 4-2, in its opening game and crushed Valley (Sacramento), 13-3, in five innings in its second game. On Tuesday, Matt McGarry pitched a one-hitter as the Bears posted a 9-0 victory over Rio Linda. McGarry lost his no-hitter on a lead-off single in the seventh. In the SCVAL De Anza Division, Palo Alto won its eighth straight game and remained tied for first place with Wilcox following a 10-1 romp over host Los Altos on Wednesday. The Vikings (6-1, 11-4) held a 1-0 lead until the top of the fifth when Austin Kron tripled home a pair of

runs for a 4-0 lead. In the top of the seventh, Paly scored five times with Isaac Feldsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-run homer the big hit. Feldstein finished with four hits and four RBI as Rohit Ramkumar gained the complete-game victory and improved to 6-0. He scattered five hits, walked none and struck out eight. The Eagles and Vikings will play again Friday, at Palo Alto starting at 3:30 p.m. Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; golf Sacred Heart Prep kept pace with defending champ Menlo School in the West Bay Athletic League with a 193-210 victory over Harker at Palo Alto Hills Golf & Country Club on Tuesday. The Gators (4-0, 6-0) were led by junior Bradley Knox, who had three birdies during his 1-over round of 36. Stanford-bound Maverick McNealy shared medalist honors with Knox. Derek Ackerman (37) and Ryan Galvin (39) also had solid rounds for SHP, which is off for spring break before hosting Menlo on April 8 in the first of two showdowns for first place. At Palo Alto Municipal, three other top golf teams got together to test their talents and local rivals Gunn and Palo Alto each shot 373 to share honors in the nonleague tri-match. Menlo, which was missing two starters, finished with a 393 total. Medalist honors went to Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Avinash Sharma and Menloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s An-

drew Buchanan, each shooting 2-under 70 for their 18-hole rounds. Carding even-par rounds of 72 included Anson Cheng of Gunn and John Knowles of Palo Alto. Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lacrosse Senior Charlotte Biffar scored a season-high seven goals to pace Palo Alto to a 16-3 romp over visiting Pioneer in a Santa Clara Valley Athletic League match on Tuesday night. The Vikings (7-0, 9-0) remained in first place as Annemarie Drez and Kristen DeStefano added two goals apiece. Single tallies came from Gigi Lucas-Conwell, Anna Dairaghi, Claire Chevallier, Nina Kelty and Julia Farino while Kelty and Simone Buteau provided two assists apiece. In Atherton, Caroline Cummings tallied five goals to pace Sacred Heart Prep to a 15-1 romp over visiting Sacred Heart Cathedral in a WBAL match on Tuesday. Ally Mayle added four goals, Brigid White tallied three and Libby Muir contributed two for the Gators (2-0, 8-0). In another WBAL match, senior Brooke Bullington scored seven goals in her second straight match to pace Menlo School to a 22-9 romp over visiting Castilleja. Kaitlin Frangione added five goals and three assists as the Knights improved to 2-0 in league (2-4 overall) while dropping the Gators to 0-2 (1-2). Katherine Hobbs tallied five goals for Castilleja. N

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ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

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The senior helped lead the Vikings to a pair of lacrosse victories by scoring eight goals and adding four assists in wins over Gunn and St. Francis (13-12) to take sole possession of first place in the SCVAL.

The junior attacker led the way with 10 goals and 12 assists in lacrosse victories over Palo Alto, Mountain View and Menlo School as the Gators jumped into second place in the SCVAL De Anza Division standings.

Honorable mention Charlotte Biffar Palo Alto lacrosse

Caroline Cummings Sacred Heart Prep lacrosse

Ally Howe Sacred Heart Prep swimming

Claire Klausner* Gunn softball

Gillian Meeks Gunn track & field

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Andrew Liang Palo Alto swimming

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Austin Poore Palo Alto baseball * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

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in Northeren California and will be tested this weekend at the annual Stanford Invitational at Cobb Track and Angell Field. NorCal leader De La Salle will be in the field with its 42.28, which ranks No. 11 in the state. Tolbert will be back in the lineup but Alee will be out when the Vikings challenge all-comers, beginning with prelims Saturday at 9:25 a.m. The top teams in five races will advance to the finals at 12:30 p.m. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still early in the season, Fung would not be surprised if the 41.56 school mark is surpassed this season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an attainable goal,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just have to clean up some things. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been pretty consistent around 42.5 without E.J. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to see what they can do. I think everyone can bring down their time a tenth.â&#x20AC;? The 1,600 relay mark may be even easier to get, once freshman Eli Givens is added to the mix. Givens won the frosh-soph 400 against Los Altos in 51.88, which was faster than the winning varsity time, and has run 51.07. Sullivan, however, did not run that event Tuesday. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the CCS leader at 49.63 this season. Add in Johnson and Alee and a sub3:20 time could be attainable. In West Bay Athletic League meets Wednesday, the Menlo and Sacred Heart Prep boys each won team titles. At Menlo, the Knights scored 254 points to defeat Priory (110) and Eastside Prep (103) while at SHP, the Gators scored 251 points to down St. Lawrence Academy (101), Harker (55) and Pinewood (13). In the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; meets, Menlo (146) was second, Eastside Prep third (84) and Casteilleja fourth (83) to Mercy-Burlingameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning total of 201. At SHP, the Gators (79.5) trailed Notre Dame-SJ (164) and Mercy-SF (93) while Pinewood was fourth (54.5). Menlo senior Max Parker won the 100 (11.77) and 200 (23.35) and ran a leg on the winning 400 relay (45.33). Junior teammate Matt Myers swept the 1,600 (4:40.31) and 800 (2:05.69), sophomore Sean Felderman swept the 110 high hurdles 18.60) and 300 intermediates (48.15), and senior Conor Shanley swept the shot put (39-0) and discus (112-1). For the Menlo girls, junior Maddy Price took the 100 (12.77) and 200 (25.78), Laura Gradiska swept the hurdles (17.17 and 48.58), and Zoe Enright won the 1,600 (5:36.25) and 800 (2:31.12). Daisy Alvarado-Munoz was a double-winner for Priory, taking the shot put (27-0) and discus (87-6), while Mia Kirkendoll of Eastside Prep swept the long jump (14-2 3/4) and triple jump (32-0 1/2). At SHP, the Gators were led by Daniel Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweep in the 1,600 (4:48.57) and 800 (2:13.21), Ricky Grauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweep in the hurdles (15.79 and 42.91), and Nico Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victories in the 100 (11.48), 200 (23.30) and long jump (22-6 1/2), the latter moving him into the No. 2 spot on the Central Coast Section leadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; list. N

Sports

NCAA hoops

Stanford roundup

(continued from page 24)

(continued from page 24)

with Georgia, 7-3, and Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting will be the seventh between the schools in the NCAA tournament (Stanford holds a 4-2 edge in those games). The last meeting of the schools was in the 2010 NCAA regional semifinal in Sacramento as Stanford took care of business with a 73-36 victory. No. 2 seed California (30-3) plays No. 6 LSU (22-11) in the other semifinal at 8:32 p.m. (ESPN2). One of the four teams in Spokane will reach the Final Four. The regional final is scheduled for 6:40 p.m. on Monday night. Chiney, of course, is Chiney Ogwumike. She was limited to 12 points by Michigan but has 15 rebounds and was a defensive force. Ogwumike is a lock to be named a first team All-American and is one of two or three players in the conversation for the national player of the year. If nationally fourth-ranked Stanford (33-2) goes on to win its first national title since 1992, it will be because of Ogwumike, who averages roughly 22 points and 13 rebounds a game. Contributions, however, are always needed from her teammates, and they all responded against the Wolverines, who tried to zone Stanford in an effort to take away Ogwumikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence. Tinkle, Sara James and Bonnie Samuelson made them pay by nailing 3-pointers. Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer could remember only Arizona State playing a zone against the Cardinal (Cal did at times to switch things up) for any length of time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the kind of game that will help us,â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to be going to Spokane.â&#x20AC;? The teams who did manage to beat Stanford or slow down Ogwumike each had a top defender athletic enough to stay with her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success starts with her,â&#x20AC;? Michigan senior forward Rachel Sheffer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She brings so much to the court. She never stops working. She works 30 seconds every possession. We keyed on Ogwumike and tried to take away the post but they kept hitting shot after shot.â&#x20AC;? Tinkle, meanwhile, made sure her final game in Maples Pavilion was one to remember while James turned in one of the top defensive efforts by any player all year. The game plan was executed to near perfection, which means the Stanford womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team will play in the Sweet 16 for the sixth consecutive season in hopes of reaching its sixth consecutive Final Four. Tinkle did not miss from long range as Stanford won its 19th straight. James put the clamps on Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kate Thompson, one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best 3-point shooters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I could not have asked to play any better than we did,â&#x20AC;? said VanDerveer, who is six wins shy of 900 for her career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy for Jos. I told her Candice Wiggins scored 44 points in her final game in Maples and Roz (Gold-Onwude) went crazy in her final game here, so it was her

courts Nos. 1-3. Ted Robinson will handle play-by-play duties while Paul Goldstein, four-time AllAmerican during his stellar Cardinal career from 1995-98, serves as the color analyst. Stanford squared off against UCLA and USC in early February, falling 7-0 to the Bruins and 6-1 to the Trojans. However, this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contests have been designated as the Pac-12 counting matches.

Matched CareGivers

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics Stanford garnered three first-team and one second-team All-Pac-12 honors, as announced by the conference Wednesday. Ashley Morgan, Ivana Hong and Amanda Spinner received first-team recognition, while Nicole Dayton was named to the second team.

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

Stanford senior Joslyn Tinkle (44) not only scored 21 points, but played great defense in a 73-40 win over Michigan on Tuesday. turn to keep up the tradition.â&#x20AC;? Tinkle shot 70 percent for the game and Stanford shot nearly 54 percent. Even with Ogwumike limited offensively, Michigan could not answer Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sharp shooters. One of the reasons is the defense James played on Thompson, who missed her first 10 shots and made her only basket late in the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a player who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get major minutes but sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do whatever we ask of her,â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer said of James. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told her â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;no 3s. If Thompson hits a 3, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming out.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sara really focused.â&#x20AC;? And Michigan could not help but notice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She did a good job of being physical,â&#x20AC;? Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jenny Ryan said of James. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was right on her the whole time. She got into her and never let up. We set screen after screen after screen and she worked hard.â&#x20AC;? The Wolverines scored fewer points just once all season and were held below 46 for just the third time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Physically they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow us to do anything,â&#x20AC;? Michigan coach Kim Barnes Arico said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It started with James, but it was one through five really. As a coach, I hate saying this but we might have felt a little intimidated. Ogwumike might have made a difference in us not going inside. She has that reputation and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just an outstanding basketball player.â&#x20AC;? Stanford made a season-high 12 three-pointers, eight coming in the first half during perhaps the most dominating half of the season for the Cardinal. Michigan had 14 made baskets total and shot under 30 percent for the game.

Like much of the nation, Barnes Arico had heard Stanford was more of a one-player team and she devised a defense based on stopping Ogwumike. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I heard about it all week long but I doubt there are many teams who played them and think that way,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not 33-2 without being an outstanding team.â&#x20AC;? Amber Orrange added 11 points and six assists, with just two turnovers, and continues to develop her all-around game for Stanford. Samuelson, Mikaela Ruef and James were all within a point of double figures. Ryan scored 11 to lead the Wolverines. Tinkle, meanwhile, was outstanding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The past couple of days have been crazy, surreal thinking this was my last game at Maples,â&#x20AC;? Tinkle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a nice talk with Kate Paye and with my parents about how to handle the situation. I was sad, yet at the same time I wanted to go out with a bang, and I wanted my team to go out with a bang. I was happy out there. I had fun.â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer remembered the high school girl who came to Spokane to watch Stanford play Maryland years ago in a regional. At the time, Tinkle was one of the most sought-after players in the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She wanted to be part of this team,â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jos is really Stanford. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a high-energy person. I love her energy and her versatility. Tonight, she was in her element.â&#x20AC;? As for Tinkleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roommate? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d play hard,â&#x20AC;? Ruef said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;But to go 5 for 5? That was sweet.â&#x20AC;? As in the Sweet 16. N

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golf Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning streak ended after a sixth-place finish at 25-overpar 889, trailing the leader by 35 strokes in the final day of the Anuenue Spring Break Classic at the Kapalua Bay Course in Maui. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Stanford senior Melissa Seidemann and freshman Maggie Steffens swept the KAP 7 MPSF Player and Newcomer of the Week awards, respectively, for their performances in No. 2 Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-0 showing last weekend. N

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no place like home.â&#x20AC;?

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Palo Alto Weekly 03.29.2013 - Section 1