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Vol. XXXIV, Number 19 N February 8, 2013

Feds: District violated student’s civil rights Page 3

It’s not too late to protect yourself PAGE 20

Spectrum 12

Transitions 14

Eating Out 28

Shop Talk 29

Movies 30

Puzzles 54

NArts Stegner lectures focus on the land

Page 24

NSports Paly girls’ soccer goes worst to first Page 32 NHome Big Brother or self-protection?

Page 37

FI W NA EE L K

ANTIQUE CARPET SALE

Antique Sultanabad | Central Persia | 7’6” x 14’5” | $35,000 Sale: $16,000

Featuring the World Class Collection of a Famous Collector and Palo Alto Resident

Antique Khorasan Northeast Persia | 10’4” x 13’

Antique Sultanabad Central Persia | 8’3” x 10’9”

Antique Serapi Northwest Persia | 9’8” x 10”8”

Antique Farahan Central Persia | 8’11” x 11’3”

Antique Agra India | 7’10” x 9’8”

$40,000 Sale: $18,500

$24,500 Sale: $13,800

$30,000 Sale: $16,500

$22,500 Sale: $10,800

$17,500 Sale: $9,450

TAPESTRIES 532 Ramona Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301 | Phone: 650.326.7900 | Open 7 days a week, 10am–6pm | www.pejmancarpet.com Page 2ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Feds: School district violated student’s civil rights 2EPORTCITESLACKOFPROCEDURES TRAINING ANDIGNORANCEOFLAWINBULLYINGCASE by Chris Kenrick HE 0ALO !LTO 5NIFIED 3CHOOL DISTRICTS MISHANDLING OF A MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS LONG STRUGGLE AGAINST BULLYING VIOLATED FEDERALANTI DISCRIMINATIONLAWSAND REQUIRESREMEDIALACTIONS AGOVERN MENTINVESTIGATIONHASCONCLUDED &AILURE TO CONTROL THE BULLYING WHICH WAS RELATED TO THE STUDENTS DISABILITY CREATED A hHOSTILE EN VIRONMENT v RISING ABOVE A SOCIAL OR DISCIPLINE PROBLEM TO BECOME A

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CIVIL RIGHTSISSUE INVESTIGATORSFROM THE53$EPARTMENTOF%DUCATIONS /FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSCONCLUDED !VOIDING POSSIBLE LEGAL ENFORCE MENTACTIONBYTHEGOVERNMENT 3U PERINTENDENT +EVIN 3KELLY ENTERED INTOAhRESOLUTIONAGREEMENTvIN$E CEMBERTHATADMITTEDNOVIOLATIONS OF LAW BUT PLEDGED TO UNDERTAKE TRAININGS ADOPT NEW POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MODIFYHANDBOOKSAND COMMUNICATEWITHSTUDENTS PARENTS

ANDSTAFFBETWEENNOWAND*UNEAS SPECIFIEDINDETAILBYTHE/FFICEFOR #IVIL2IGHTS h7E WANT TO DO THE BEST JOB WE CAN WITH OUR STUDENTS AND THE /F FICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS HAS GIVEN US SOME SUGGESTIONS AROUND THAT AND THESE ARE THINGS WELL DO v 3KELLY SAIDTHISWEEK h4HERE ARE SOME CONVERSATIONS WITHSTUDENTSWENEEDTOHAVE SOME COMMUNICATIONSWITHPARENTSANDAD MINISTRATIVETRAININGTHATWELLDOv )N A WRITTEN STATEMENT THE STU DENTS FAMILY SAID h7E ARE VERY THANKFUL THAT THE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS AGREED TO INVESTIGATE THE

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com The Office for Civil Rights report on the bullying case, and the resolution agreement signed by Palo Alto school district Superintendent Kevin Skelly, have been posted on www.PaloAltoOnline.com/pivot/?CivilRightsReport and www.PaloAltoOnline.com/ pivot/?CivilRightsAgreement.

CASE v WHICH FOLLOWED A COMPLAINT MADEBYTHESTUDENTSFAMILY h7EHADSOMANYMIXEDFEELINGS WHENWEREADTHEREPORTHAPPINESS BECAUSETHETRUTHCAMEOUT SADNESS FRUSTRATIONANDPAINBECAUSEITWAS

LIKELIVINGTHEEXPERIENCEAGAIN h4HEREASONFORMAKINGTHISPUB LICISBECAUSETHEREMIGHTBEMANY MORE STUDENTS GOING THROUGH THE SAME THING BUT MIGHT NOT BE ABLE TO ASK FOR HELP OR IF THEY DO THEY MIGHT NOT BE LISTENED TO 4HESE CHILDREN WILL ALSO GET BENEFIT FROM THE RESULT OF THIS INVESTIGATION AND AGREEMENTv 4HE BULLIED STUDENT WAS IN SPE CIAL EDUCATION WITH A SPEECH AND LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT THAT AFFECTED THESTUDENTSSOCIALSKILLSANDABILITY TOINTERPRETSOCIALCUES ACCORDINGTO (continued on page 8)

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Public benefit: Police HQ enough? 0LANNINGCOMMISSIONERSASKDEVELOPER*AY0AULTOREVISE ITSPACKAGEOF@BENEFITSFOR0AGE-ILL2OADPROPOSAL by Gennady Sheyner NAMBITIOUSPROPOSALTOBUILD A DENSE OFFICE COMPLEX NEXT TOTHE!/,BUILDINGON0AGE -ILL 2OAD IN 0ALO !LTO RECEIVED A COOL RECEPTION 7EDNESDAY NIGHT FROM THE 0LANNING AND 4RANSPORTA TION#OMMISSION WHICHDIRECTEDTHE DEVELOPERTOCOMEBACKWITHASTRON GERPACKAGEOFPUBLICBENEFITS )FAPPROVEDBYTHE#ITY#OUNCIL THE NEW OFFICE BUILDINGS PROPOSED BY 3AN &RANCISCO BASED *AY 0AUL #OMPANYWOULDOCCUPYASITETHAT UNDEREXISTINGZONINGREGULATIONSIS ALREADYATITSLIMITFORDEVELOPMENT DENSITY 4O ENABLE THE PROJECT THE CITY WOULD HAVE TO REZONE THE SITE TOhPLANNEDCOMMUNITY vADESIGNA TIONTHATALLOWSDEVELOPERSTOEXCEED REGULATIONSINEXCHANGEFORhPUBLIC BENEFITS vWHICHARETYPICALLYNEGO TIATEDBETWEENTHECOUNCILANDTHE DEVELOPEROVERASERIESOFMEETINGS 4HE BIGGEST PUBLIC BENEFIT IN THIS PROPOSAL WOULD BE A NEW PUBLIC SAFETYBUILDING APRIZETHATHASLONG ELUDED0ALO!LTOOFFICIALS#ITYOFFI CIALSHAVEBEENSTRUGGLINGINRECENT YEARS TO FIND A SUITABLE SITE FOR THE PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING AND A WAY TO PAYFORTHESTRUCTURE WHICHISEXPECT ED TO COST AROUND  MILLION 4HE EXISTINGPOLICEHEADQUARTERS HOUSED IN THE #ITY (ALL BUILDING HAS BEEN FOUNDTOBETOOSMALLANDSEISMICALLY UNSAFEFORTHE0OLICE$EPARTMENTBY VARIOUSCITYOFFICIALS CONSULTANTSAND CITIZENCOMMISSIONS4HE)NFRASTRUC TURE"LUE2IBBON#OMMISSION WHICH INREVIEWEDTHECITYSINFRASTRUC TURENEEDS CALLEDTHEEXISTINGPOLICE BUILDINGhUNSAFEANDVULNERABLEvAND URGEDTHECOUNCILTOMAKEANEWPUB LIC SAFETYBUILDINGAHIGHPRIORITY 4HE *AY 0AUL PLAN WOULD BUILD

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Veronica Weber

Fine-tuning their form 9OUNGBALLETSTUDENTS.ATALIE-URAI LEFT 4EAGAN4OOMRE +ENDALL3UTHERLANDAND3IMRAN3OOD PRACTICETHEIRFORMWHILEPREPARINGFOR$ANCE#ONNECTION0ALO!LTOSUPCOMINGSPRINGPRODUCTIONOF h#OPPELIAvIN!PRIL

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City Council aims for less talk, more action ,ONGERMEETINGSPROMPTMOREDISCUSSIONABOUTTALKINGLESS by Gennady Sheyner HE TOPIC OF TOO MUCH TALKING AT #ITY #OUNCIL MEETINGS HAS BECOME AN IRKSOME PROBLEM FOR 0ALO !LTOS COUNCIL MEMBERS PROMPTING LOTS OF TALK ABOUT THE NEEDTOTALKLESS 4HEPROBLEMISFARFROMNEW4HE COMBINATION OF AN ENGAGED PUBLIC AN AMBITIOUS WORKLOAD AND COUN CILMEMBERSFORWHOMBREVITYISNT ALWAYSTHEHIGHESTPRIORITYHASROU TINELYPUSHEDMEETINGSLATEINTOTHE NIGHT EXASPERATING STAFF AND LEAD ING SLEEPY MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC TOPREMATURELYSLIPOUTTHEEXITSAS

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THEBUREAUCRATICBACKGROUNDMUSIC OF SUBSTITUTE MOTIONS AND FRIENDLY AMENDMENTSDRONESON .OW AN EFFORT IS AFOOT TO SPEED THINGS UP ˆ AND GET MORE DONE .EWLYELECTED-AYOR'REG3CHARFF SETTHETONE*AN DURINGHISFIRST FULL MEETING AS MAYOR ,ATE MEET INGS HESAID ARETOUGHONSTAFFAND STIFLE DEMOCRACY IN THAT THEY hEF FECTIVELY DEPRIVE THE PUBLIC OF THE PRACTICALABILITYTOPARTICIPATEv(E CALLEDONHISCOLLEAGUESTODOTHEIR PARTTOMAKEMEETINGSENDATAREA SONABLETIMEIN

h4HISYEAR ABSENTEXTRAORDINARY CIRCUMSTANCES MEETINGSAREGOING TOENDBEFOREPM v3CHARFFSAID h4HISISGOINGTOTAKEDISCIPLINEAND COMMITMENT FOR US TO MAKE THIS HAPPENv 3OME PRACTICAL CHANGES HAVE AL READYBEENMADE4HISYEAR EACHITEM ON THE COUNCILS AGENDA HAS A TIME ESTIMATENEXTTOITˆAMOVEGEARED TOWARD PREVENTING MEANDERING AND KEEPINGTHINGSMOVING3CHARFFAND 6ICE -AYOR .ANCY 3HEPHERD NOW (continued on page 11)

THENEWPOLICESTATIONAT0ARK "LVD)TWOULDBEATTACHEDTOALARGE PARKING GARAGE WHICH WOULD IN CLUDE SPACES FOR BOTH OFFICERS AND OFFICE WORKERS 0LANNING COMMIS SIONERSACKNOWLEDGED7EDNESDAYA POLICESTATIONWOULDBEAHUGEBEN EFIT THOUGHSOMEWONDEREDWHETHER ITS ENOUGH TO COMPENSATE THE CITY FORTHETYPESOFEXEMPTIONSITWOULD GRANTTHEDEVELOPERˆMOSTNOTABLY PERMISSION TO BUILD ABOUT   SQUAREFEETOFOFFICESPACE 4HE*AY0AULPROPOSALISTHELATEST TWISTINTHECITYSLONG TORTUOUSAND THUSFARFRUITLESSPATHTOWARDANEW POLICEBUILDING!FEWYEARSAGO THE CITYHADCONSIDEREDPURCHASINGTWO PARCELS ON THE  BLOCK OF 0ARK "OULEVARDANDBUILDINGTHEPUBLIC SAFETY HEADQUARTERS THERE "UT THE COUNCIL DECIDED TO DROP THE CITYS PURCHASE OPTION ON THE PROPERTIES INBECAUSEOFUNCERTAINTYOVER FUNDINGFORTHENEWPOLICEBUILDING .OW THESE0ARK"OULEVARDPROP ERTIESMAYBEBACKINPLAY*AY0AUL HASRECENTLYACQUIREDTHETWO0ARK "OULEVARDSITES AND#OMMISSIONER !RTHUR +ELLER SUGGESTED THAT THE DEVELOPERTHROWTHESESITESINTOTHE MIXWHENCOMINGBACKONTHENEXT GO ROUND "UILDING A STAND ALONE POLICE BUILDING WOULD BE A BETTER ALTERNATIVE TO ATTACHING ONE TO THE GIANT GARAGE HE SAID BECAUSE THIS ALTERNATIVE WOULD MAKE THE POLICE BUILDING LESS VULNERABLE TO DOMES TICTERRORISMˆACONCERNEXPRESSED BY#OMMISSIONER!LEX0ANELLIAND LAND USEWATCHDOG"OB-OSS h) THINK MORE CREATIVE WORK WILLHAPPENOUTOFTHATREDESIGN v (continued on page 7)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 3

Upfront QUOTE OF THE WEEK

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Tyler Hanley (223-6519) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Colin Becht, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath

Monday, March 4, 2013 11:00 am to 2:00 pm

Sharon Heights Golf & Country Club

Get your reservations now! 650-566-8339 or www.artinaction.org

ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Adam Carter (223-6574), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 2236569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578)

Craig Watson, Director of the California Arts Council.

ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596)

of bringing art to children

engage.educate.empower

DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Palmer (223-6588) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6546) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6544) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza

 Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts 8:00 p.m. 500 Castro Street Mountain View, CA SERIES SPONSOR

Jean Lane

in memory of Bill Lane

MEDIA SPONSOR

Embarcadero Media ANNIVERSARY SPONSOR

Edible Silicon Valley EVENING SPONSORS

Sand Hill Global Advisors Armand and Eliane Neukermans Noble and Lorraine Hancock

MONDAY //

February 11

Will Allen

//

CEO, GROWING POWER

The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People and Communities

EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo

The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

‘‘

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PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505)

Almost anything a council member can say can be said in five minutes. — Greg Scharff, Palo Alto Mayor, on his belief that council meetings can be shorter and more efficient. See story on page 3.

Around Town ON EDGE ... Grace Hopper once famously remarked: “It’s easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.” The Sand Hill Property Company certainly hopes that’s the case. The Redwood City-developer angered many Palo Altans last fall, when it demolished a historic building at the former Edgewood Plaza shopping center on Embarcadero Road, in violation of its agreement with the city and area residents. Sand Hill had been involved in years of negotiations with area residents about upgrading and redeveloping the dilapidated plaza — a rare example of a Joseph Eichlerdeveloped commercial center. Last fall, after the two sides finally reached an agreement, the City Council approved a zone change that would allow Sand Hill to relocate one of the existing three retail buildings, build 10 homes and a grocery store, and create a 0.2-acre park. The “planned community” zone also required the developer to preserve two “historically significant” retail structures, one of which would be rehabilitated in place while the other would be disassembled, relocated and rehabilitated. But instead of disassembling that building, the applicant surprised the city by demolishing it without bothering to get any permits or approvals. After fielding complaints from residents, the city in September issued a “stop order” on the project. Now, city planners are recommending that the city require the developer to do an additional environmental-impact report, reflecting the new scope of the project. Staff is also recommending that the city allow Sand Hill to proceed with the construction of the grocery store and the rehabilitation of the building it didn’t demolish (the recommendation would put Sand Hill’s plan to build housing on hold until compliance issues are resolved). Sand Hill, for its part, has agreed to completely rebuild the structure it destroyed, though this would now be done with new materials rather than ones retained from the prior building. The council will have a chance to reflect on the staff recommendations, consider requiring new “public benefits” to make up for the demolished original building and offer its own views on the matter at its meeting on Monday. PLANNING AHEAD ... As major planning projects continue to pile up in Palo Alto, the city’s top planning officials are planning to step down

in the coming weeks and months. Steve Emslie, a longtime deputy city manager and a leading negotiator on behalf of the city, is retiring at the end of this month. Emslie, a land-use specialist who has 33 years of public service under his belt, including a decade in Palo Alto, recently represented the city in negotiations with Stanford University Medical Center on Stanford’s colossal expansion of its hospital facilities. The former planning director has also been the city’s leading man in recent negotiations with John Arrillaga over the billionaire developer’s proposal to build an office complex and theater at 27 University Ave. Meanwhile, the city’s current planning director, Curtis Williams, is looking ahead to his own exit in June. Williams, a softspoken and popular leader whose department has been at the forefront of some of the most contentious and complex issues of recent years, said this week that he will retire in June after four years at the helm of the department. Williams told the Planning and Transportation Commission at the conclusion of Wednesday’s meeting. LIBRARY BLUES ... The ongoing reconstruction of Palo Alto’s Mitchell Park Library and Community Center is dragging on. The project, which is by far the biggest and most expensive component of the $76 million library bond voters approved in 2008, continues to lag behind schedule as city inspectors and the project’s construction manager find new mistakes seemingly every month. According to a new report, which the City Council is scheduled to approve next week, the project is about 81 percent done and the library is now scheduled to open in fall of 2013 (the previous estimate was spring 2013). Corrections are needed on mechanical, electrical and plumbing infrastructure, on sliding glass doors and on windows, many of which failed water testing “multiple times.” It doesn’t help that the project’s Oklahoma-based contractor, Flintco, is undergoing its own problems. Its CEO has recently been replaced and a portion of the company has been bought by Saint Louis-based Alberici. Palo Alto staff are striking an optimistic note regarding the company’s news, noting that it has created a distraction and also an opportunity for “new leadership approaches,” the new report states. N

Upfront Residents commute beyond their counties

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"AY!REASMUNICIPALGOVERNMENTSILL EQUIPPEDTOTACKLELOOMINGREGIONALCRISES by Chris Kenrick OOGLE BUSES ROLLING UP AND DOWN53(IGHWAYSYM BOLIZETHENEW3ILICON6ALLEY ˆ AND ARE POTENT REMINDERS THAT REGIONALSOLUTIONSARENEEDEDIFTHE "AY !REA IS TO STAY ECONOMICALLY VIBRANT ANEWREPORTSTATES !TECHWORKERLIVINGIN3AN&RAN CISCOREQUIRESFOURSEPARATETRANSIT SYSTEMSTOGETTOAJOBALONGSTATE 2OUTE  ˆ A DAMNING INDICT MENTOFTHE"AY!REAShANTIQUATEDv PATCHWORK OF  SEPARATE SYSTEMS THATISUNFITTODOTHEJOB SAID3ILI CON6ALLEY#OMMUNITY&OUNDATION #%/%MMETT#ARSON h)FYOULIVEONONEOFTHOSELINES THAT HAS A 'OOGLE BUS YOUR HOUSE IS WORTH MORE BECAUSE THE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATIONSYSTEMISANTIQUATED INITSLOGICFORSERVINGTHISREGIONAL REALITY v#ARSONSAID h3ILICON6ALLEYvSHOULDBEREDE FINEDTOINCLUDE3AN&RANCISCO HE SAID #ARSONSCOMMENTSCAME4UESDAY &EB  WITH THE RELEASE OF THE  3ILICON6ALLEY)NDEX AYEARLYCOLLEC TIONOFECONOMICANDSOCIALINDICATORS JOINTLYPRESENTEDBYTHE3ILICON6ALLEY #OMMUNITY&OUNDATIONIN-OUNTAIN 6IEWANDTHENONPROFIT*OINT6ENTURE 3ILICON6ALLEYIN3AN*OSE 7HILE HAILING UPBEAT ECONOMIC

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2013 Silicon Valley Index

Report: Google buses reflect region in need of traffic, housing solutions

!SIGNIFICANTNUMBEROFRESIDENTSWORKOUTSIDEOFTHECITIESANDCOUNTIES WHERETHEYLIVE WITH COMINGINTO3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY FOR EXAMPLE AND COMMUTINGFROM3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYTO3AN-ATEO #OUNTYAND3AN&RANCISCO FOR A MORTGAGE  AND MEGA COM MUTESFORTHOSESEEKINGAFFORDABLY PRICED HOMES !ND WE GET BOOM AND BUSTRESIDENTIALPRICESTHATDRAG DOWNWHOLECOMMUNITIESWHENTHE CYCLESHIFTSv 0ALO!LTOHASNEARLYJOBSPER EMPLOYEDRESIDENTCOMPAREDTO3AN *OSESJOBS THEREPORTSAID h9ET BOTH CITIES ARE PART OF THE SAME LABOR MARKET AND ESSENTIALLY ONEHOUSINGMARKETv 7ITH LOCAL GOVERNMENTS REAPING MOREBENEFITFROMJOBGROWTHTHAN HOUSINGPRODUCTION hTHEFISCALOUT COMEOFTHELOCATIONOFJOBSRELATIVE TOHOMESISQUITESTARKv !BARCHARTINTHEREPORT DRAWN FROMDATAFROMTHE#ALIFORNIA"OARD OF%QUALIZATIONANDTHE53#ENSUS "UREAU SHOWED0ALO!LTOTOWERING OVEROTHERCITIESIN3ANTA#LARAAND 3AN-ATEOCOUNTIESINTOTALREVENUE PERCAPITA h4HEWINNER TAKE ALLAPPROACHTO

LOCAL TAX REVENUES RESULTS IN FISCAL ANDSERVICEDISPARITYAMONGCITIES )TALSOUNDERMINESREGIONALORSUB REGIONAL COOPERATION AND CAN LEAD TO INEFFICIENT LAND USE OUTCOMES v THEREPORTSAID )TCALLEDFORSTRENGTHENINGEXISTING REGIONAL AGENCIES OR CREATING NEW ONESˆSUCHAS0ORTLANDS-ETROOR ATAX SHARINGSCHEMEUSEDIN-IN NEAPOLISAND3T0AUL -INNˆTO TACKLETHECHALLENGES h4OACHIEVEANYOFTHESEOPTIONS WILLREQUIRETURNINGMOREOFOURLO CALRESIDENTSINTO"AY!REACITIZENS WHORECOGNIZEOURSHAREDFATEAND INTEREST vTHEREPORTCONCLUDED h2EGIONALISMISNOT@ALLORNOTHING ANDCANINVOLVEINCREMENTALCHANGES "UTONLYKEEPINGWHATWEHAVEAND ASSUMINGITWILLSERVEUSFORTHEFU TUREISNOLONGERAVIABLEOPTION h/UR NEEDS ARE MORE INTERCON NECTEDNOW/URGOVERNANCESHOULD REFLECTTHATvN

How real per-capital income compares

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Valley job growth biggest since dot-com boom 4ECHNOLOGYRECOVERYPROPELS@PRODIGIOUSGROWTH  SAYSYEARLYECONOMIC SOCIALINDEX ASTYEARSREBOUNDINTECHNOL OGYADDEDTHEHIGHESTNUMBER OFJOBSTOTHE"AY!REASINCE THEDOT COMBOOMOFTHELATES ACCORDINGTOAREPORTRELEASED4UES DAY &EB 3ILICON6ALLEYEMPLOYMENTGREW BY  PERCENT IN  MORE THAN DOUBLETHERATEOFJOBGROWTHINTHE 5NITED3TATESANDOUTPACINGTHEREST OF THE "AY !REA ACCORDING TO THE  3ILICON 6ALLEY )NDEX A SUM MARYOFECONOMICANDSOCIALINDICA TORSPRODUCEDBYTHE3ILICON6ALLEY #OMMUNITY &OUNDATION IN -OUN TAIN 6IEW AND THE NONPROFIT *OINT 6ENTURE3ILICON6ALLEYIN3AN*OSE 4HE"AY!REAADDED JOBS IN  OFTHEMIN3ILICON 6ALLEY DEFINEDAS3ANTA#LARAAND 3AN-ATEOCOUNTIES PLUS&REMONT .EWARK 5NION #ITY AND 3COTTS 6ALLEY3AN&RANCISCOADDED  JOBSINTHESAMEPERIOD h3ILICON 6ALLEY IS THE FIRST TO EMERGEFROMTHERECESSIONNATIONALLY AND WERE LEADING SOME PRETTY PRO DIGIOUS GROWTH FOR THE NATION v SAID *OINT6ENTURE#%/2USSELL(ANCOCK INTHEGROUPSTHANNUALINDEX

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2013 Silicon Valley Index

by Chris Kenrick

3ILICON6ALLEYSINCOMEHASCONSISTENTLYOUTPACEDTHESTATEOF#ALIFORNIASANDTHE5NITED3TATESASAWHOLE OVERTHEPASTYEARSˆWITHSIGNIFICANTBUMPSDURINGDOT COMBOOMS (ARDWAREWASFLAT2ESEARCHAND DEVELOPMENT GREW BY  PERCENT AND THE OVERALL PROSPERITY BOOSTED JOBS IN LAW ACCOUNTING AND EVEN NONPROFITS WHICH WERE UP BY  PERCENT THEINDEXSTATED 0RODUCTIVITY IN THE 6ALLEY ˆ AT  PEREMPLOYEEˆALSOLED THENATIONANDHASGROWNEVERYYEAR SINCE 4OTAL3ILICON6ALLEYPATENTREGIS TRATIONSTICKEDUP THOUGHTHEYREP RESENTED A SMALLER PORTION OF TOTAL STATEWIDE PATENTS BECAUSE OF THE RISE OF PATENTS IN OTHER AREAS SUCH

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Upfront "53).%33

Walk-in retail law center opens in Palo Alto #%/SAYSGATHERINGSPOTWILLMAKETHELAW@MOREACCESSIBLE AJ !BHYANKER WANTS TO CHANGE THE PUBLICS PERCEP TION OF LAWYERS STREAMLINE PART OF THE LEGAL PROCESS AND RES URRECTTHEh-AINSTREETBOOKSTOREv BUSINESSMODELˆALLBYOPENINGA RETAILSTOREINDOWNTOWN0ALO!LTO THAT SELLS LEGAL ADVICE BOOKS AND TABLETS !BHYANKERISTHE#%/OF,EGAL &ORCE ACOMPANYTHATAIMSTOIM PROVE THE ACCESS BETWEEN LAWYERS ANDTHEPUBLICBYUSINGTECHNOLOGY (EHOPESHISSTORE THE,EGAL&ORCE "OOK&LIP WILL TRANSFORM THE WAY

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Veronica Weber

,EGAL&ORCESRETAILSTORECOMBINESON SITELEGALCONSULTATION SALEOF TABLETCOMPUTERSANDBOOKS ANDACONFERENCEAREAFORFREETALKSAND WORKSHOPS

PROVIDE WALK IN ACCESS TO LAWYERS WHOWILLGIVEINITIALADVICEONPER SONALANDBUSINESSTOPICS! MIN UTEAPPOINTMENTWITHALAWYERWILL COST3UBSEQUENTAPPOINTMENTS CANTHENBESETUPWITH,EGAL&ORCE AFFILIATEDSPECIALISTS h4HESWEATYPALMSCOMEFROMTHE FIRSTVISITTOALAWYER vHESAIDh)F YOURESICK YOUGOTOURGENTCARE)F YOUNEEDTAXHELP YOUGOSEEATAX PROFESSIONAL4HERESNOEASYWAYTO WALKINANDSEEALAWYERv $ESPITE DOWNTOWN 0ALO !LTOS HIGH LEASE RATES "OOK&LIPS SPACE COSTS AMONTH !BHYANKER SAID HE THINKS BEING WITHIN WALK ING DISTANCE OF DOZENS OF 0ALO !LTOS STARTUPS WILL BE WORTH THE INVESTMENT (E HOPES REPRESENTA TIVES FROM STARTUPS WILL COME INTO THESTORETOSECUREAPATENT PROTECT APATENTORGETLEGALHELPWITHSOME OTHERBUSINESS RELATEDISSUE 4HERE WILL BE DIFFERENT FEES FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT AN APPLICATION FILLEDOUTENTIRELYBYALAWYER WITH ALAWYERSHELPORMERELYREVIEWED BYALAWYER !BHYANKERSAIDLARGEBOOKSTORES ANDELECTRONICSSTORESAREFINDINGIT DIFFICULTTOSURVIVEINTHEELECTRON ICSAGE0EOPLEGOTOTHEM FINDOUT WHAT THEY WANT AND GO HOME AND BUY ONLINE 4HE RESULT HE SAID IS THE LOSS OF THE h-AINSTREET BOOK STORE v LIKE "ORDERS "OOKS AND -USICIN0ALO!LTO WHICHCLOSEDIN

Veronica Weber

by Eric Van Susteren

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#/--5.)49

Avenidas salutes community contributors 3IXHONOREDWITH,IFETIMESOF!CHIEVEMENTAWARDS by Rebecca Duran IX ACCOMPLISHED COMMUNITY MEMBERS SELECTEDFROMALIST OFMORETHAN CANADDBE INGWINNERSOFTHEANNUAL!VENIDAS ,IFETIMESOF!CHIEVEMENTAWARDTO THEIREXTENSIVELISTSOFHONORS%ACH HAS CONTRIBUTED TO THE COMMUNITY IN A DIFFERENT WAY RANGING FROM SERVICEINMEDICINE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITYANDNONPROFITWORKTO EDUCATIONANDLANDSCAPEDESIGN 4HE HONOREES ALL OLDER THAN  WEREREVEALEDATAPRIVATECEREMONY HOSTED BY THE 0ALO !LTO NONPROFIT !VENIDAS ON 4HURSDAY 4HEY ARE $R4OM&IENE "ENAND2UTH(AM METT !L2USSELL *UDITH3TEINERAND +ATSY3WAN &IENE WAS A PARTNER AT -ENLO -EDICAL #LINIC FOR  YEARS UNTIL ANDHASTAUGHTINTHE3TANFORD 3CHOOLOF-EDICINESINCE(E HASVOLUNTEEREDASATEACHERATTHE 3TANFORD0ACIFIC&REE#LINICIN3AN *OSESINCEANDHASSERVEDON THE 3TANFORD (OSPITAL "IOMEDICAL %THICS#OMMITTEESINCE &IENE HAS ALSO SERVED ON THE BOARDS OF #HANNING (OUSE THE 0ALO!LTO#HAMBER/RCHESTRAAND THE0ORTOLA6ALLEY2ANCH!SSOCIA

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Upfront

REAL ESTATE TRENDS by Samia Cullen

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Building eyed for busy Palo Alto intersection $EVELOPERPROPOSEDFOUR STORYCOMMERCIALPROJECTONSITEOFVACANT%L#AMINO2EALLOT by Gennady Sheyner 4HE DEVELOPER IS LOOKING TO BUILD A FOUR STORY BUILDING WITH A THREE LEVELUNDERGROUNDPARKINGGARAGE &ORTHISVISIONTOBECOMEREALITY THE CITY WOULD HAVE TO REZONE THE SITETOAhPLANNEDCOMMUNITYvZONE ˆADESIGNATIONTHATALLOWSDEVEL OPERSTOEXCEEDEXISTINGDENSITYAND HEIGHT REGULATIONS IN EXCHANGE FOR hPUBLIC BENEFITSv 5NDER 0OLLOCKS PROPOSAL THESE BENEFITS WOULD IN CLUDE THE WIDENING OF 0AGE -ILL 2OAD TO CREATE A DEDICATED RIGHT TURNLANEONTO%L#AMINO2EALTHE DEDICATION OF THE WIDENED PORTION OF0AGE-ILLTOTHECITYANUPGRADE TO THE PEDESTRIAN TUNNEL UNDER %L #AMINO 2EAL NEAR THE -AYFIELD 3OCCER#OMPLEXANDACONTRIBUTION OF   TOWARD UPGRADING THE LIGHTS ON THE SOON TO BE RENOVATED COMMERCIAL STRETCH OF #ALIFORNIA !VENUE 4HEAPPLICANTHASALSOOFFEREDTO WIDEN SIDEWALKS BEYOND THE MINI MUMDESIGNSTANDARDSFOR%L#AMI NOANDTOPURCHASE%COPASSESAND #ALTRAINPASSESFORALLEMPLOYEESAT THE SITE FOR  YEARS )N THE APPLI

VACANT 0ALO !LTO PARKING LOT ONTHEPROMINENTINTERSECTION OF%L#AMINO2EALAND0AGE -ILL 2OAD WOULD MAKE WAY FOR A FOUR STORYCOMMERCIALBUILDINGUN DERANEWPROPOSALFROMTHECOM PANY THAT HAS RECENTLY PURCHASED THESITEFROMTHE3ANTA#LARA6ALLEY 4RANSPORTATION!UTHORITY64!  4HEPROPOSALBY0OLLOCK&INANCIAL 'ROUPOF0ORTOLA6ALLEYISTHELATEST INARECENTWAVEOFLARGEOFFICEDE VELOPMENTSTARGETING0ALO!LTO4HE APPLICATIONHASCOMEINLESSTHANA YEARSINCETHE#ITY#OUNCILAPPROVED ASIMILARPROJECTATTHEINTERSECTION OF,YTTON!VENUEAND!LMA3TREET AND AT A TIME WHEN THE COUNCIL IS WRESTLINGWITHTWOMUCHLARGEROF FICEPROPOSALSFOR5NIVERSITY!VE AND0AGE-ILL2OAD 4HE 0OLLOCK PROJECT WHICH THE COUNCIL IS SCHEDULED TO DISCUSS -ONDAYEVENING TARGETSASITETHAT FORDECADESHASSERVEDASASURFACE PARKING LOT FOR 64!S BUS RIDERS 4HE AGENCY PLACED THE SITE ON THE MARKETABOUTTWOYEARSAGOANDRE CENTLY CHOSE 0OLLOCK AS THE BUYER

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Police HQ

Local home prices rebounded last year and are expected to continue the upward trajectory in 2013. Our local market saw median home prices increasing to above the record prices of the 2007 recession, shattering expert predictions at that time that the real estate market would never look the same. Home sellers again will be in the driver’s seat with bidding wars a common occurrence due to pent-up demand and low inventory. While homes will sell quickly this year, they still have to be priced right. Here’s a rundown of what to expect from the market: 1) Increasing home prices will bring reluctant homeowners off the sidelines. 2) Expect home prices to jump at least 6% this year. 3) The Federal Reserve has held interest rates steady at near-record lows over the last several years in an effort to entice buyers into the market, and experts are

not expecting signiďŹ cant jumps in rates this year. Rates could move modestly higher this year to around 4% but still be among the lowest in a generation. 4) The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued new qualiďŹ ed mortgage standards last January that detail criteria lenders must use to determine if a borrower qualiďŹ es for a loan. Experts expect more mortgage rules to be handed down this year to help prevent reckless lending that led to the meltdown. 5) Buyers should start the mortgage lending process at least one month before they plan to start seriously looking because experts expect the process to take longer under the new lending standards. 6) House hunters should be ready to move quickly if they ďŹ nd the right house as inventory is expected to remain at low levels throughout the year.

I offer complimentary staging when I list your home. Contact me at (650) 384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors. To learn more, log-on to samiacullen.com

Proposed police headquarters and office complex

(continued from page 3)

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What to Expect In 2013

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Relax Together Come find that special gift... We have a wide selection of cozy robes and scarves. Plus one of a kind jewelry. Give a gift of relaxation to someone you love, gift cards available towards massage, facial or spa treatments.

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Upfront

Civil rights

(continued from page 3)

ASCHOOLRESOURCESPECIALISTQUOTED INTHEREPORT 4HE STUDENT AND FAMILY PERSIS TENTLYCOMPLAINEDTHATTHESTUDENT WAS CALLED hSTUPID v hSLOW v hAN NOYINGv hGROSSv AND hRETARDED v TEASED AND FELT PHYSICALLY IN DAN GER 4HE STUDENT ALSO DEVELOPED MENTALHEALTHISSUES 4HESITUATIONBECAMESOSERIOUS THATTHEFAMILYEVENTUALLYDECIDED TO KEEP THE STUDENT HOME AFTER A DOCTOR ADVISED AGAINST GOING TO SCHOOLASLONGASTHEBULLYINGWAS CONTINUING 2ATHERTHANCONDUCTINGANORGA NIZED AND FAR REACHING INVESTIGA TIONINTOTHEONGOINGBULLYING THE SCHOOL HANDLED THE COMPLAINTS IN APIECEMEALBASIS WHICHWAShNOT EFFECTIVE IN STOPPING THE HARASS MENT v SAID FEDERAL INVESTIGATORS WHO INTERVIEWED STUDENTS TEACH ERS SCHOOLCOUNSELORSANDADMIN ISTRATORS 7HEN DIFFICULTIES OCCURRED THE STUDENT AND PEERS WOULD BE

BROUGHT TO THE COUNSELOR FOR CON FLICT RESOLUTION TYPICALLY ENDING INANAGREEMENTTHATTHEhSTUDENTS SHOULD AVOID EACH OTHER OR LEAVE EACHOTHERALONE vTHEREPORTSAID 4HE SCHOOL ALSO OFFERED SOCIAL SKILLS COUNSELING TO THE STUDENT WHOWASBEINGHARASSED 7HILETHESCHOOLCANNOTBEHELD RESPONSIBLEFORTHEBULLYINGITSELF THEREPORTSAIDTHE DISTRICTSINAD EQUATERESPONSETOITAFTERREPEATED COMPLAINTSAMOUNTEDTOAVIOLATION OFTHESTUDENTSCIVILRIGHTS !MONG THE CONCLUSIONS OF THE REPORT N $ESPITE REPEATED DETAILED AND

PERSISTENT APPEALS BY THE STU DENTANDTHEFAMILY THESCHOOL DISTRICThDIDNOTCONDUCTANYOR GANIZEDINQUIRYINTOTHEREPORTS OFHARASSMENTv N4HEDISTRICThDIDNOTCONDUCTA THOROUGH AND IMPARTIAL INVES TIGATIONOFTHEINCIDENTS)TDID NOTTAKEANYDISCIPLINARYACTION TOWARDSSTUDENTSWHOENGAGED INTHEHARASSMENTv N h.ONE OF THE TEACHING STAFF AT THE SCHOOL COULD DEFINITIVELY

Thursday February 28, 2013 7:00 - 8:30 pm

A free “How To” workshop for Family Caregivers

at Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center 270 Escuela Avenue Mountain View

Understanding Early Stage Dementia with Grace Lee, LCSW Memory Clinic, Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center and

Stefanie Bonigut, MSW Family Care Specialist Alzheimer’s Association

Please RSVP to 650-289-5499 Light refreshments will be served. Free professional care for your loved one is available so you can attend the workshop—just call us 48 hours in advance to make arrangements.

Quality Daytime Care for Older Adults

RECALL HAVING BEEN ASKED BY THEDISTRICTORSCHOOLADMINIS TRATORS IF THEY KNEW ANYTHING ABOUT THE STUDENT BEING BUL LIED OR TOLD ABOUT THE BULLYING REPORTSTHEYHADRECEIVEDFROM THEFAMILYORFROMTHE3UPERIN TENDENTS/FFICEv N4HEDISTRICThFAILEDTORESPOND PROMPTLY AND EFFECTIVELY TO NOTICETHATTHESTUDENTWASBE ING SUBJECTED TO PEER HARASS MENT BASED ON DISABILITY 4HE RESPONSE WAS NOT REASONABLY CALCULATED TO END THE HARASS MENT PREVENTITFROMRECURRING ORELIMINATETHEEFFECTSOFTHE HOSTILEENVIRONMENTONTHESTU DENTv N4HEDISTRICTSSPECIAL EDUCATION OFFICETOLDTHESCHOOLPRINCIPAL THATITWOULDNOTFURNISHANAIDE FOR THE STUDENT DURING LUNCH WHENBULLYINGOCCURRED STAT ING THAT THIS WAS THE SCHOOLS RESPONSIBILITY AND OUTSIDE THE SCOPEOFTHESTUDENTSINDIVID UAL EDUCATIONPLAN N3CHOOLOFFICIALSSHOWEDhALACK OF UNDERSTANDING THAT HARASS MENTOFASTUDENTBASEDONBE HAVIORSTHATARETHEPRODUCTOFA DISABILITYISAMATTEROFDISCRIMI NATION ANDALACKOFUNDERSTAND INGOFWHATCONSTITUTESAHOSTILE ENVIRONMENTv 4HEREPORTSAIDEACHSCHOOLSTAFF MEMBERhWASLEFTTOHEROWNDEVIC ESASTOHOWBESTTORESPONDTOTHE INFORMATIONEACHRECEIVED h4HEREWASNOSINGLESTAFFMEM BER OR ADMINISTRATOR DESIGNATED TO INVESTIGATEANDGATHERINFORMATION .O STRUCTURED APPROACH WAS TAKEN TO INTERVIEWING STUDENTS 2ECORDS WERENOTKEPTOFINTERVIEWSWITHTHE STUDENTORTHEOTHERSTUDENTSACCUSED OFHARASSMENTv )NVESTIGATORSFAULTEDSCHOOLOFFI CIALSFORFAILINGTOINTERVIEWhOTHER STUDENTSWHOWEREWITNESSESOFTHE HARASSMENT OR COMPILE THE INFOR MATIONABOUTTHEREPORTSOFHARASS MENT OVER THE PERIOD OF SEVERAL MONTHSv )N THEIR OWN INTERVIEWS INVES TIGATORSSAIDMANYOFTHESTUDENTS REPORTED HAVING ATTENDED hSOCIAL KINDNESSv OR CYBERBULLYING TRAIN INGS OFFERED BY THE SCHOOL .ONE OFTHESTUDENTSREPORTEDHAVINGHAD ANYTRAININGABOUTINTERACTINGWITH ORRELATINGTOSTUDENTSWITHDISABIL ITIES vTHEREPORTSAID 7HILESEVERALSTUDENTSSAIDSTU

DENTSWITHDISABILITIESWERETREATED LIKEhNORMALvSTUDENTS OTHERSSAID STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES WERE hWEIRD vTALKEDTOTHEMSELVESAND WERE PERCEIVED AS DISRUPTIVE IN CLASS h/THERSINTHEGROUPHIGHLIGHTED STUDENTSWITHDISABILITIESWHOREAD SLOWLY SAYING THAT THOSE STUDENTS WERE WASTING CLASS TIME v THE RE PORTSTATED )N THE SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT WITH THE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS 3KELLY PLEDGED TO REVIEW THE COMPLAINING STUDENTS INDIVIDU ALIZED EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AND TO ESTABLISH REPORTING PROTOCOLS

SERVEh.OTIN/UR3CHOOLS7EEK v COMING UP IN -ARCH INVOLVING LUNCHTIMEACTIVITIEShACCEPTANCEOF EVERYONE DESPITE OUR DIFFERENCES OR RATHER CELEBRATING OUR DIFFER ENCES vTHEPRINCIPALSAID 4HE WEEK INCLUDES A hMIX IT UP LUNCH vINWHICHKIDSSITWITHPEO PLEWITHWHOMTHEYDONTNORMALLY HANGOUT h,ESSONS ON ANTI BULLYING CY BERBULLYING HARASSMENT AND HOW TO BE AN @UPSTANDER INSTEAD OF A BYSTANDERAREGIVENDURINGADVISO RY PERIODS AND WE PLAN TO FOLLOW UP WITH SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS THISYEAR vTHEPRINCIPALSAID

4HEDISTRICT@FAILEDTORESPONDPROMPTLYAND EFFECTIVELYTONOTICETHATTHESTUDENTWAS BEINGSUBJECTEDTOPEERHARASSMENTBASEDON DISABILITY ˆ/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSREPORT FORPOSSIBLEFUTUREHARASSMENTAS WELL AS TO OVERHAUL THE DISTRICTS TRAININGPROGRAMSREGARDINGCOM PLAINTSOFDISCRIMINATIONBASEDON DISABILITY 4HISSPRING THE/FFICEFOR#IVIL 2IGHTS WILL PROVIDE THE FIRST SES SION OF hMANDATORY TRAINING ON DISABILITY BASED HARASSMENT TO ALL SCHOOLSITEADMINISTRATORSv 0RINCIPALSWILLTHENTRAINTEACH ERS AS WELL AS DISTRIBUTE MEMOS EXPLAINING ASPECTS OF DISABILITY BASEDHARASSMENT 4HE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS RE PORT ASSUMES PARTICULAR RELEVANCE AT A TIME WHEN 0ALO !LTO SCHOOLS HAVE EMBARKED ON AMBITIOUS hIN CLUSIONv PROGRAMS ON MANY CAM PUSES IN WHICH SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTSAREINCREASINGLYINTEGRAT ED INTO REGULAR CLASSROOMS 4HE !MERICANSWITH$ISABILITIES!CTOF ANDTHE2EHABILITATION!CTOF BOTHPROHIBITDISCRIMINATION ONTHEBASISOFDISABILITY 4HE PRINCIPAL OF THE MIDDLE SCHOOL WHERE THE BULLYING TOOK PLACE TOLD THE 7EEKLY THAT THE SCHOOL HAS AN ARRAY OF PROGRAMS THATFOCUSONhINCLUSIONANDMAIN TAINING A SOCIALLY KIND CLIMATEv !MONG THEM WAS A SCHOOL WIDE hDISABILITY AWARENESS ASSEMBLYv FEATURINGADULTSANDSTUDENTSWITH VARIOUSPHYSICALANDLEARNINGDIS ABILITIES 0ALO !LTO SCHOOLS ANNUALLY OB

"OARD OF %DUCATION 0RESIDENT $ANA 4OM SAID THE ISSUES RAISED BYTHE/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSWERE ATTRIBUTABLE TO FLAWED IMPLEMEN TATION OF ALREADY EXISTING SCHOOL BOARD POLICIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS h)M SORRY THE STUDENT EXPERI ENCEDHARASSMENTANDWISHWEHAD BEENABLETOMORESQUARELYADDRESS IT v4OMSAID h/URDISTRICTLEARNEDFROMWHAT HAPPENEDWITHTHISSTUDENTANDIS COMMITTEDTOIMPROVINGONBEHALF OFEVERYSTUDENT v4OMSAID h4IGHTENING UP OF OUR HANDLING OFSTUDENTSHARASSINGANOTHERSTU DENTWITHDISABILITIESANDEXPAND ING OUR INSTRUCTION TO STUDENTS ON SOCIALKINDNESSTOINCLUDESTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES WILL IMPROVE OUR DISTRICT)MCONFIDENTTHATOURSTAFF CANANDWILLDOTHATv 4HE 7EEKLY WAS PROVIDED A COPY OF THE REPORT AND THE SETTLE MENT AGREEMENT BY THE FAM ILY AND CONFIRMED ITS AUTHEN TICITY WITH THE DISTRICT ! COPY REDACTED TO REMOVE INFORMATION THAT COULD EXPOSE THE IDENTITY OF THE CHILD AND THE AGREEMENT ARE POSTED AT WWW0ALO!LTO/NLINE COM PIVOT  #IVIL2IGHTS2EPOR T AND WWW0ALO!LTO/NLINECOM PIVOT#IVIL2IGHTS!GREEMENTN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

Palo Alto Bicycles would like to invite you to join us for an evening event of wine, hor d’ oeuvres and Trek Travel. Whether it is white water rafting in Costa Rica, amazing sunset wine tasting in Tuscany or climbing the legendary mountain passes of the Alps,Trek Travel has your vacation of a lifetime. Please join us for a relaxing evening with fellow cyclists and vacation enthusiasts! Raffle prizes throughout the evening, Grand Prize:Trek Travel Luxury Long Wine Country Weekend for 2 in 2013. No purchase necessary. WHEN Thursday February 28th 2013 | 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm WHERE Palo Alto Bicycles, 171 University Avenue, Palo Alto RSVP Space is limited please respond to trektravel@paloaltobicycles.com

Palo Alto Bicycles

|

171 University Avenue

Page 8ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

|

Palo Alto

|

650.328.7411

|

www.paloaltobicycles.com

Upfront

News Digest Palo Alto treads toward health care reform !SMEDICALCOSTSCONTINUETOSOAR 0ALO!LTOOFFICIALSAREEXPLORING WAYS TO REVAMP THE HEALTH CARE PLANS THE CITY OFFERS TO ITS EMPLOYEES ANDRETIREESˆANEFFORTTHATISALREADYCREATINGANXIETYANDTHREATSOF LAWSUITSFROMLABORUNIONS 4HE0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCILDISCUSSEDTHEDEEPLYCONTENTIOUSTOPICOF RISINGHEALTHCARECOSTSATLENGTHON-ONDAY &EB!NDWHILEMEM BERSDIDNTADOPTANYCHANGES THEYDIRECTEDSTAFFTOEXPLORETHECITYS OPTIONSFORHEALTHPLANS INCLUDINGAhFLEXIBLEBENEFITPLANvALSOKNOWN ASAhCAFETERIAPLANv INWHICHANEMPLOYEECANCHOOSEFROMAMENUOF BENEFITOPTIONS 4HE-ONDAYCONVERSATIONWASTHELATESTINSTALLMENTINASERIESOFMEET INGSTHECOUNCILSETUPLASTYEARTOTACKLETHECOMPLEXANDCONTENTIOUS PROBLEMSOFRISINGPENSIONANDHEALTHCARECOSTS!CCORDINGTOANEWCITY REPORT THECITYSHEALTHCAREEXPENSESINFISCALYEARTOTALED MILLION UPFROMMILLIONIN4HEREPORTFROM#ITY-ANAGER *AMES +EENE STATES THAT HEALTH CARE COSTS hWILL CONTINUE TO RISE AT AN ESTIMATEDRATEOFTOPERCENTINFORACTIVEEMPLOYEES RETIREES ANDTHEIRDEPENDENTS CONSUMINGAGREATERPORTIONOFTHEGENERAL FUND BUDGETv 4HECITYSPROPOSALTOREVAMPHEALTHCAREFOREMPLOYEESANDRETIREESHIT ASPEEDBUMPLASTYEAR WHENTHE0ALO!LTO0OLICE/FFICERS!SSOCIATION SIGNEDANEWCONTRACTTHATOFFEREDVARIOUSCONCESSIONSONPENSIONSAND HEALTHCARE"UTTHEUNIONALSOVEHEMENTLYREJECTEDCHANGINGHEALTHCARE BENEFITSFORFUTURERETIREES %VELYN 'UTIERREZ AN ORGANIZER FOR 3ERVICE %MPLOYEES )NTERNATIONAL 5NION #HAPTER CHALLENGEDTHECITYSPROPOSAL CLAIMINGINALETTER THATAhCAFETERIAvPLANWOULDhSELECTIVELYCUTRETIREMENTMEDICALBENEFIT FORLONG TERMEMPLOYEESWHILELEAVINGITINTACTFORNEWEREMPLOYEESvN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

COMMUNIT Y TALK:

Palo Alto seeks funds to revamp transit center 7HILE0ALO!LTOWRESTLESWITHAMASSIVEPROPOSALBY*OHN!RRILLAGA TO BUILD AN OFFICE COMPLEXANDTHEATERAT5NIVERSITY!VEANDTO REDESIGNTHEBUSYANDOUTMODEDTRANSITCENTERDOWNTOWN CITYPLAN NERS ARE ALSO PURSUING AN ALTERNATIVE TO PAY FOR THE DRAMATIC TRANSIT IMPROVEMENTS 4HE#ITY#OUNCILPLANSTOCONSIDERON-ONDAYNIGHT &EB ALISTOF PROJECTSTHATCOULDQUALIFYFORTHE/NE"AY!REA'RANT APROGRAMTHAT DISTRIBUTESFUNDSFROMTHEREGIONAL-ETROPOLITAN4RANSPORTATION#OM MISSIONTOLOCALJURISDICTIONSFORPROJECTSPROMOTINGTRANSPORTATION BIKE ANDPEDESTRIANIMPROVEMENTS)N3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY THE-4#FUNDS WILL BE ADMINISTERED BY THE 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY 6ALLEY 4RANSPORTA TION!UTHORITY64! WHICHHASATOTALOFMILLIONAVAILABLEFOR DISTRIBUTION !CCORDINGTOANEWREPORT 0ALO!LTOPLANSTOSUBMITPROJECTSFOR POSSIBLE CONSIDERATION INCLUDING TWO HAVING TO DO WITH THE 5NIVER SITY!VENUE#ALTRAINSTATION4HEFIRSTINVOLVESEXTENDINGTHEEXISTING 5RBAN ,ANE 4RANSIT -ALL SOUTH AND BUILDING A PARKING STRUCTURE TO SUPPORT#ALTRAINˆAPROJECTESTIMATEDTOCOSTUPTOMILLION4HE CITYISREQUESTINGMILLIONFORTHEPROJECT WITHTHECITYFOOTINGTHE RESTOFTHEBILL 4HESECONDPROJECTWOULDRECONSTRUCTTHETRANSITSTATIONTOACHIEVEA SIMILARDESIGNOFFEREDBY!RRILLAGA WHICHWOULDRAISETHENUMBEROF TRANSITSTOPSANDLAYOVERSTATIONSFROMTO4HISAMBITIOUSPROPOSAL WOULDCOSTABOUTMILLION ABOUTMILLIONOFWHICHTHECITYHOPES TOGETINGRANTFUNDS)FTHECITYRECEIVESTHISGRANTˆABITOFALONGSHOT GIVENTHEAMOUNTOFTHEREQUESTANDTHETOTALPOOLOFFUNDSAVAILABLE ˆTHECITYWOULDTHENHAVETOFINDAWAYTORAISEITSMATCHINGSHAREOF MILLION 4HECITYISALSOSEEKINGGRANTMONEYFORASERIESOFOTHERPROJECTS RANG INGFROMABIKE AND PEDESTRIANBRIDGEOVER53(IGHWAYAT!DOBE #REEKTOTRAFFIC SIGNALUPGRADESN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

Arson suspect deemed unfit for trial $AMON,UCE THEMANACCUSEDOFSETTINGSEVERALFIRESATTHE!RASTRA DERO0RESERVEIN0ALO!LTO WASFOUNDMENTALLYUNFITTOSTANDTRIALAFTER ADOCTORSTESTIMONY&EB 0ROCEEDINGSAGAINSTHIMWILLBESUSPENDEDWHILE,UCEISSENTTOASTATE PSYCHIATRICFACILITYTORESTOREHISCOMPETENCYUNTILHEISFITTOSTANDTRIAL $UFFY-C'ILLIGAN A3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYDEPUTYDISTRICTATTORNEY SAID ,UCECOULDBEINTHEFACILITYFORASLONGASTHREEYEARS ,UCEALLEGEDLYSETFIVEFIRESINTHE!RASTRADERO0RESERVEON!UG (EWASCHARGEDWITHFIVECOUNTSOFFELONYARSON -C'ILLIGANSAIDTHETESTIFYINGDOCTOREVALUATED,UCEASHAVINGAPSY CHOTICDISORDERNOTSPECIFIED4HECOURTSFINDINGMEANTTHAT,UCEWAS OFAMENTALSTATEINWHICHHEWASEITHERUNABLETOUNDERSTANDTHENATURE OFTHEPROCEEDINGSAGAINSTHIMORUNABLETORATIONALLYASSISTINHISDE FENSEN ˆ%RIC6AN3USTEREN

Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm problem, affecting over 2 million Americans. Without detection and treatment, atrial fibrillation can affect quality of life and cause stroke and heart failure. Expert Stanford physician specialists will discuss the signs and symptoms of atrial fibrillation and the options for evaluation and treatment, which may improve quality of life and decrease complications. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 9:30AM – 11:00AM Sheraton Palo Alto (Reception Room) 625 El Camino Real r Palo Alto, CA RSVP at: stanfordhospital.org/heartmonth This event is free and open to the public. Please register, seating is limited. MODERATED BY: Paul J. Wang, MD, FACC, FHRS, FAHA Professor of Medicine Director, Stanford Cardiac Arrhythmia Service

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

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Upfront

ATTENTION PENINSULA PARENTS

n e n c o t i C o n p m a C

The Almanac’s, Mountain View Voice’s, Palo Alto Weekly’s popular, annual Camp Connection magazine will be inserted in the newspaper the week of February 18.

nec tion n o C p m a C GUI

13 O 20 DE T

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Find.... * Summer Activities

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Stanford reveals Mayfield housing project plans 2EPRESENTATIVES FROM 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY PRESENTED PRELIMINARY CONSTRUCTIONDETAILSOFTHE ACRE-AYFIELDHOUSINGPROJECTON#ALI FORNIA !VENUE AT THE #OLLEGE 4ERRACE 2ESIDENTS !SSOCIATION "OARD OF$IRECTORSMEETINGON7EDNESDAYEVENING &EB (Posted Feb. 7 at 12:58 a.m.)

$20K in checks taken in Menlo church burglary 3OMEONEWALKEDAWAYWITHABOUT INSTAMPED FOR DEPOS IT CHECKS SOME OF THEM FOR PRESCHOOL TUITION AT "ETHANY ,UTHERAN #HURCHIN7EST-ENLO0ARK ACCORDINGTOA3AN-ATEO#OUNTY3HER IFFS/FFICEREPORT(Posted Feb. 6 at 3:41 p.m.)

Presidential autograph exhibit

* Camps

*OSEPH "ALDWIN A 0ALO !LTO RESIDENT SINCE  WILL DISPLAY HIS COLLECTIONOFORIGINALLETTERS DOCUMENTSANDSIGNATURESOFALL53 PRESIDENTS&EBANDINTHEPARISHHALLAT!LL3AINTS%PISCOPAL #HURCHIN0ALO!LTO(Posted Feb. 6 at 11:06 a.m.)

* Schools * and more ....in one magazine that’s delivered to your home! Additional complimentary copies can be found at local libraries, schools and recreation departments.

Accused murderer of activist David Lewis set free 4HE MAN WHO CONFESSED TO GUNNING DOWN WELL KNOWN %AST 0ALO !LTO COMMUNITY LEADER $AVID ,EWIS WAS SET FREE BY THE 3AN -A TEO#OUNTYCOURT4UESDAY &EB'REGORY,EON%LARMS3R  WAS RELEASEDFROMJAILTHREEMONTHSAFTERA3AN-ATEO#OUNTY3UPERIOR #OURTJUDGETHREWOUTFIRST DEGREEMURDERCHARGESAGAINSTHIMAFTER FINDINGTHAT3AN-ATEOPOLICEVIOLATEDHIS-IRANDARIGHTS(Posted Feb. 6 at 9:17 a.m.)

Money’s corruption of politics to be theme of talk 4HECORRUPTINGTHREATOFMONEYTO!MERICASDEMOCRACYWILLBETHE THEMEOFATALKBYFORMER533EN2USS&EINGOLDTHIS3ATURDAY &EB (Posted Feb. 6 at 9 a.m.)

Mountain View police catch suspected burglars 4WO MEN HAVE BEEN ARRESTED FOR ALLEGEDLY BURGLARIZING A STORAGE SPACE AT A -OUNTAIN 6IEW APARTMENT COMPLEX ON -ONDAY EVENING &EB ACCORDINGTO-OUNTAIN6IEWPOLICE(Posted Feb. 6 at 8:38 a.m.)

Man attempts to grab girl on bicycle in Palo Alto

Join us in discovering the diverse cultures spanning this magniďŹ cent continent! African percussionist, AďŹ a Walking Tree, presents a journey through the remarkable regions of Africa! Drumming, storytelling, crafts, food, and more will enliven the past, connect the present, and celebrate the diversity of all!

0ALO!LTOPOLICEARELOOKINGFORAMANWHOATTEMPTEDTOGRABAN  YEAR OLDGIRLSARMASSHERODEHERBICYCLEPASTHIMAFTERCURSINGAT HERASSHEAPPROACHEDHIM(Posted Feb. 5 at 5:09 p.m.)

Man cited for attack at Cogswell Plaza ! YEAR OLDMANWASCITEDFORASSAULTANDBATTERYAFTERHEALLEG EDLYTOREAMANSSHIRTANDKICKEDTHEVICTIMINTHESHINSON3UNDAY &EB 0ALO!LTOPOLICE!GENT*EAN"READYSAID (Posted Feb. 5 at 10:56 a.m.)

Paly team headed to National Science Bowl &IVE0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOLSTUDENTSWILLSPENDFIVEDAYSIN7ASH INGTON $#IN!PRILˆCOURTESYOFTHE53GOVERNMENTˆTOCOMPETE INTHE.ATIONAL3CIENCE"OWL(Posted Feb. 5 at 9:10 a.m.)

Cyclist’s account of Woodside road-rage event !0ORTOLA6ALLEYRESIDENTSAIDHEWASAMONGORSOCYCLISTSATTHE SCENEOFAROAD RAGEINCIDENTINVOLVINGAPICKUPTRUCKON3ATURDAY *AN  IN7OODSIDE(Posted Feb. 4 at 3:09 p.m.)

Mistrial in case involving threat against principal

For Families & All Ages - $15 “I absolutely love to leave it all behind and take my two girls to Hidden Villa. As a parent trying to instill traditional values and a love of land and animals, this is the place to be.� -Sue S. of Saratoga

!3AN-ATEO#OUNTYJUDGEHASDECLAREDAMISTRIALINACASEAGAINST AN%AST0ALO!LTOMOTHERWHOALLEGEDLYTHREATENEDTOKILLASCHOOL PRINCIPAL(Posted Feb. 4 at 10:59 a.m.)

New interest in book inspired by Stanford murder !NOVELINSPIREDBYASENSATIONALMURDERON3TANFORDS&ACULTY 2OWISTHESUBJECTOF3TANFORDSh!NOTHER,OOKv"OOK#LUBˆACAM PUSINITIATIVEBYWRITER4OBIAS7OLFFTHATISOPENTOTHECOMMUNITY (Posted Feb. 3 at 8:20 a.m.)

Police arrest Oregon man for indecent exposure 0OLICE ARRESTED A  YEAR OLD /REGON MAN FOR INDECENT EXPOSURE ANDLEWDCONDUCTINPUBLICON*ANAFTERAVICTIMSAIDSHESAWHIM WALKINGWITHHISPANTSDOWNANDTOUCHINGHIMSELFINASEXUALMANNER NEAR*UANA"RIONES0ARK(Posted Feb. 2 at 3:40 p.m.)

Please Pre-Register Online @www.hiddenvilla.org Page 10ĂŠUĂŠĂŠiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.

Upfront

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Feb. 2)

Retreat: The council held its annual retreat and chose as its 2013 priorities infrastructure strategy and funding; future of downtown and California Avenue; and technology and the connected city. Yes: Unanimous

City Council (Feb. 4)

Service efforts and accomplishments: The council discussed the results of the new Service Efforts and Accomplishments report. Action: None Health care: The council discussed curbing the costs of employee health care and directed staff to review options for new health care plans that may be considered for negotiation, including flexible benefit plans. Yes: Unanimous

Council Finance Committee (Feb. 5)

Carbon neutrality: The committee voted to support a staff-recommended plan for achieving carbon neutrality for the electric portfolio in 2013. Yes: Unanimous

Planning and Transportation Commission (Feb. 6)

395 Page Mill Road: The commission voted to continue the hearing on initiation of a proposed “planned community� zone for 395 Page Mill Road, which would enable construction of an office complex near the AOL building and a new public-safety building with an attached parking garage. Yes: Keller, Martinez, Panelli, Tanaka Absent: Alcheck, Michael

Architectural Review Board (Feb. 8)

780 Welch Road: The board approved a request by Stanford University Lands and Buildings for replacement of a three-story medical building at 780 Welch Road. Yes: Lew, Lippert, Malone Prichard, Popp Recused: Alizadeh

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

Public Agenda

Council

(continued from page 3)

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A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to discuss a claim against the city from Chuck Fong and Grace Wood; appoint commissioners for the Planning and Transportation, Parks and Recreation, and Public Art commissions; discuss the redesign of the PaloAltoGreen program and the proposed development at Page Mill Road and El Camino Real; consider a formal appeal of Adopted Regional Housing Needs Allocation for the 201422 Housing Element Cycle; and discuss projects for submittals for the One Bay Area Grant Program. The closed session will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 11. The rest of the meeting is scheduled to begin at 5:45 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will discuss an audit report for the 2011-12 school year, a budget update and a staff report on “student connectedness.� The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 12, in the boardroom at school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss the 2013 federal and state legislative program; the quarterly report from the Office of the City Auditor; and the role of council liaisons. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 12, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to hold a public hearing on instituting a ground-floor requirement for retail on the 600 block of Emerson Street. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). UTILITIES ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the 2013 assessment of water-resource alternatives; see a presentation on financial projections for the city’s electric, gas, water and wastewater collection utilities; and appoint commissioners to an ad hoc budget committee for the fiscal year 2014 budget. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). CITY/SCHOOL LIAISON COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss city and school budget updates, review recent school board and City Council meetings and discuss Palo Alto’s relationships with foreign cities. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 14, in Conference Room A at school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.).

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Editorial School bullying case reveals systemic problems Federal investigation uncovers a disturbing failure to respond to repeated incidents of harassment

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alo Alto school district leaders and parents should be shocked and saddened by the portrait painted in a scathing investigative report from the U.S. Department of Education. The report from the Office for Civil Rights, completed in December and obtained by the Weekly, found that the district violated federal law in the way it handled the ongoing harassment of a middle school special education student. Without admitting that its actions violated the law, the district entered into a settlement agreement that imposes a detailed list of actions and reforms aimed at correcting the poor practices the investigators uncovered. In a rare glimpse into the workings of the school district by an outside agency, school officials are portrayed as not understanding federal discrimination laws, not having good procedures and systems for addressing complaints, not conducting proper investigations and not providing appropriate training to its employees. Most importantly, the district did not stop the bullying or impose any discipline. The 10-page report and seven-page settlement agreement reflect the results of an extensive Office for Civil Rights investigation, conducted after the family of the Palo Alto student filed a complaint and turned over emails and other materials documenting its repeated attempts over more than a year to get the school to take action. The report and settlement agreement, with redactions to protect identities, has been posted by the Weekly on PaloAltoOnline.com. The Weekly is also withholding which of Palo Alto’s three middle schools were involved to protect the victim, who continues to be enrolled. If it fully complies with the terms of the settlement agreement the district will not face legal action by the Department of Education. But the family is not a party to the agreement and has the right to bring a civil action against the district if it chooses. The federal investigation included on-site interviews with students, teachers, counselors and administrators by Office for Civil Rights investigators. For a district and community often viewed as enamored with process, the investigation uncovered a stunning lack of protocols and systems for addressing serious complaints. It found that school staff members who had knowledge of the harassment were left to their own devices about how to respond and that no single staff member or administrator was designated to investigate and gather information. No records were kept of interviews with the victim or those students involved in the bullying, witnesses were not interviewed and no one compiled all the information relating to the incidents. None of the teaching staff at the school could recall having been informed about the student’s repeated reports of bullying nor being asked about what they might know. Requests for an aide to monitor the victim during lunchtime were rejected by the district office and kicked back to the school site stating in an email that the district “is taking the position that bullying is each site’s responsibility” and that the site should “work this out.” As disturbing as the report’s revelations are, the response this week by Superintendent Kevin Skelly is equally or more disappointing. He made no apologies nor showed any sign of acknowledging the seriousness of the institutional problems identified by the investigation. Skelly, who signed the settlement agreement on behalf of the district on Dec. 14, said it “was a chance for us to look at an issue that’s important to us — how our students treat each other — and work on making sure that’s better. We want to do the best job we can with our students and the Office for Civil Rights has given us some suggestions around that and these are things we’ll do. There are some conversations with students we need to have, some communications with parents and administrative training that we’ll do.” Sadly, these comments do nothing to boost confidence that Superintendent Skelly or his senior staff acknowledge the severity or significance of the report’s findings, or the value of transparency. According to school board President Dana Tom, the board was only informed about the settlement agreement earlier this week, almost two months after it was signed and only after the Weekly began asking questions. In fact, the only reason the public or school board is finding out about these deficiencies is that the family was brave enough to provide the report to the Weekly. So much for using this case to send a strong message that the culture and practices portrayed in the report were unacceptable, not in keeping with the district’s values and aspirations, and that with help from the Department of Education we are committed to fully reforming our practices. The school district is doing plenty of good things in the area of bullying prevention and education, and coincidentally the school board will hear an update on the task of developing required bullying prevention policies at its meeting next Tuesday. But the district should be judged on how well complaints are handled and resolved. On that front there is much work to be done.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

The Post with the most Editor, Planning Commissioner Michael Alcheck correctly noted that lighting was left out of California Avenue Streetscape discussions since September 2009, when “The Project” was proactively and publicly vetted by the city and stakeholders. I, too, wondered when lighting would be brought back and am glad it might again be included. New lighting was the California Avenue Area Development Association Board’s No. 1 priority, when the Streetscape Concept Plan was completed. Anonymous poster “Full Circle” was correct in his/ her comment in the Town Square: Discussion Forum stating that fact. But it is a shame the comment disparaged Commissioner Alcheck for his pertinent observation, and reported other false information, and the Weekly featured the comment in Spectrum, on Feb. 1. Palo Alto Weekly would be wise to follow the Daily Post, a publication that for the past year has made a concerted effort to provide provable facts and even well-researched, detailed timelines on local stories of interest for readers. By doing so, the Post serves as a helpful catalyst for fact-based community dialog, creating an environment where trust might again be restored, choosing to be part of the solution, via journalism, rather than being part of the problem. Prior to putting print to paper, the Weekly editors should ask themselves: Is this true? Is this kind? Is this necessary? “Full Circle’s” comments were partly true, unkind and not necessary. Ronna Devincenzi California Avenue Area Development Association board of directors president Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto

Eliminate level crossings Editor, I liked (Chris Kenrick’s) article about railroad crossings in Palo Alto. For (her) next article on this topic, I have a suggestion: Watch the Churchill crossing around the time high school students head home in the afternoon. I have done this several times. On the Palo Alto High School side of Churchill Street, there is not enough room for bicycles and pedestrians between the tracks and Alma. Sometimes kids are squeezed when they become trapped by the closing of the gates as a high-speed Caltrain approaches. Of course, they know this and try to carefully gauge how much room there is before crossing the tracks. For cars, there is an “escape-cycle” programmed into the stoplight sequence that allows cars on the

tracks to move. For pedestrians and bicyclists, there is no such “escapecycle,” and I think this arrangement is quite dangerous. In the long run, there will be increased traffic of all sorts and level railroad crossings such as this one must be eliminated. Marc Ross El Verano Avenue Palo Alto

Residents pay for benefits Editor, Why isn’t downtown parking working? One reason is the council’s largesse in granting parking exceptions for “public benefits.” A 10,000-foot waiver eliminates 40 spaces, a gift of $2.4 million to the developer. For one pending project, the subsidy exceeds $4 million but provides no new parking spaces for the employees. A hidden gift? How would you respond if the council directly granted $2.4 to $4 million dollars from the general fund to build a project? Likely: “You are what? No! Isn’t that a gift of public funds?”

So, who pays for the parking? Obviously, if the entire community “benefits,” the general fund, grants from a magnanimous benefactor (not asking for anything in return), or another communitywide resource. Right? No, only a few citizens, in this case approximately 1,500 residential downtown property owners and their families, pay for the developer’s extra profit with the deterioration of their neighborhood integrity. Leases in downtown are among the highest in the nation. Yet, other towns with much lower rates demand that development provide or pay for needed parking. Yes, the developers are still granted these subsidies, these entitlements, these gifts, and guess what? They have grown to expect them, to demand them. Amazing. The point: Developers benefit financially and a few residents, but not all, pay for “public benefits” with their neighborhoods’ lost values. Ken Alsman Ramona Street Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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How do you think the City Council can shorten its meetings?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

On Deadline Redefining ‘Silicon Valley’ — it’s doing great in most areas despite some big gaps by Jay Thorwaldson ilicon Valley — however one defines it — is doing just great, thank you, except for some deeply worrisome gaps. The Valley and broader region is leading the state and nation in job growth, inventiveness, investment, creation of new businesses, and it continues to be a great place overall, according to a new report out this week. But there are exceptions. Lower-income families are growing in number faster than better-off families, the “middle class” continues to shrink, the transportation system is a tangled and confusing mess, and the Valley faces renewed challenges from other areas that want slices of Silicon Valley’s economic pie. That is the core message of a major annual conference being held today (Friday, Feb. 8) in San Jose, the self-proclaimed and historic “capital” of Silicon Valley (notwithstanding Palo Alto’s perception of being the Valley’s heart and genesis). The conference is the presentation of a comprehensive report, the “Index of Silicon Valley,” by two major entities: Joint Venture Silicon Valley and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. Leaders of the two sponsoring organizations, flanked by consultants who helped put together the Index, unveiled the 77-page report, which includes a “Special Analysis” of the valley trends. The document is condensed, heavy with data about what happened in 2012 not just in economics but in health, the environment, education and

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generally. Besides the Good News about job and economic growth, the leaders slipped in two important announcements: (1) that as of about 10 a.m. Tuesday the entire Index went live online (at www.siliconvalleyindex.org), and (2) that the U.S. Patent Office will soon be opening an office in the Valley, reflecting the richness of patent activity in the area and years of lobbying and encouragement by local leaders. But the big headline out of the briefing was that Silicon Valley — always a bit befuddling to define — is changing rapidly, becoming more regional to the point that the mayor of San Francisco even proclaimed recently that his city was fast becoming the “capital of Silicon Valley.” Say what? San Francisco isn’t even in a valley. “We now have two major metropolitan areas ... that are basically at war over the identity of Silicon Valley,” Emmett D. Carson, CEO and president of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, said of San Jose and San Francisco. So the Special Analysis “focuses on regionalism” and an emerging new definition of Silicon Valley. “One of the things I get asked the most about is, ‘What is Silicon Valley?,’ ‘Where is it?,’ ‘What are its geographic boundaries?’” Carson said, highlighting “the most telling picture” (on page 53 of the Index) of how people commute between the major areas. Historically, Silicon Valley was initially defined as essentially Santa Clara County. Then it spilled into San Mateo County, and encompassed Scotts Valley and Fremont. Most of the “Silicon Valley” data in the Index covers that region, with San Francisco data separate. “Five years ago that was not the case; 10 years ago that was not the case. But today we are see-

ing a regional economy that is being created that I think is symbolized by this chart of the transportation patterns,” Carson said. Every workday, the chart shows, 41,919 persons travel to San Mateo County and 13,503 to San Francisco. At the same time, 55,044 persons travel out of San Mateo County to Santa Clara County while 75,426 travel to and from San Francisco. In return, 41,430 San Franciscans travel to San Mateo County and 21,644 to Santa Clara County. Combined, that is a stunning economic tidal flow, more person miles traveled in one day than in most of the great migrations of history in a century. “It’s the regional dynamics that are being created of this place,” Carson continued, noting that inter-city battles over the location of sports teams make virtually no difference in the regional framework or economy. “Think about the oddness of a report that has just been released from the Brookings Institution that says Silicon Valley is number one in patents but San Francisco is number two. It is one regional community. “And we are seeing it happen right before us.” Then he got to the meat: “That’s why we’ve got to figure out regionalism. “That’s why we have to understand that we can’t continue to have 27 separate transportation systems that are so ineffective that our major corporations are creating Google buses that run from San Francisco down to Google. If you’re on one of those lines that has one of those Google buses your housing price is worth more because the public transportation system is antiquated in terms of its logic for serving this regional reality.”

Russ Hancock, president and CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, dug into some of the detail of the Index, laden with charts, facts, statistics, trends. A relative handful of journalists at the briefing asked questions about the decline of venture capital investments in some areas and even a new way of raising funds, called “crowd funding.” That is a method of raising funds via the Internet, using systems such as JumpStarter or GoFundMe online to get people to send money for ideas or special personal situations. “It’s impressive. It’s very impressive. Some might even call it cause for euphoria,” Hancock said of the economic and jobs data. Of the 92,000 new jobs in the Bay Area, 42,000 were generated by Silicon Valley, he said, using the old definition of the South Bay and Peninsula valley. “But that definition is up for grabs,” he noted. The region produced about 92,000 new jobs, the most since the 129,000 jobs created at the peak of the dot.com boom. San Francisco generated about 18,000 jobs and the East Bay, including Oakland, generated more than 20,000 jobs. Great news for those who got them. But, Hancock cautioned, the number of persons using food stamps increased and middle-income “middle class” families — once the bulwark of the economy — shrank, continuing a trend, lost between “stratospherically” rich individuals and a growing lower-income group. Fascinating reading, free at www.siliconvalleyindex.com. N Former Weekly Editor Jay Thorwaldson can be emailed at jthorwaldson@paweekly. com with a copy to jaythor@well.com. He also writes blogs posted on the Weekly’s community website, www.PaloAltoOnline.com (below Town Square).

Streetwise

Do you think there is a speeding problem in the city? Asked on Emerson Street and Alma Street. Photos and interviews by Rebecca Duran.

Suzanne West

Retired Alma Street “I think it’s not just speeding, it’s a disregard for the traffic laws. Generally, people don’t act until something happens.”

Shirley Stewart

Retired Emerson Street “No, I don’t feel it’s that much of a problem.”

Drew Wittman

Stay-at-home father Rinconada Avenue “I think it’s more of a failure to stop at a sign, or confusion. There’s been stopping when there’s not a sign and people going when there is one.”

Marian Seah

Psychologist University Avenue “It can be, especially during school hours. They don’t see children walking or riding their bikes.”

Sabrina Chen

Musician Higgins Place “I think the city has pretty good control over it. Most of the time it is quite civilized. It’s more individual than a general problem.”

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Virginia (Jinny) Rowell Coolidge On Friday afternoon, January 18, 2013, Virginia Rowell Coolidge (Jinny) died peacefully in her sleep. For the past several years, Virginia (Mrs. Joseph Barlow Coolidge) was a resident of The Terraces, also known as Pilgrim Haven, in Los Altos, California. She was born on July 3, 1915 and died at the age of 97. Memorial Service for Virginia R. Coolidge will be held at: 2:00 pm on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at Christ Episcopal Church, 1040 Border Road, Los Altos, CA Virginia was the fourth of five children born to her mother, Gertrude Mercer Rowell, and father, Major General Frank Wheaton Rowell. As part of a military family, she lived on many Army posts both in the United States and in Panama. At the age of 25, Virginia moved to Palo Alto, California with her then retired father and mother, and daughter Virginia Dumont Brown. She later remarried and gave birth to a son, John Frederick Ballard. She is survived by John’s father, Walter John Ballard. In 1964, she married retired Colonel Joseph Barlow Coolidge, became step mother to Judy Barlow Coolidge and lived in Santa Clara, California. They later traveled to Peterborough, New Hampshire where they lived for two years, before returning to settle in Saratoga, California where they lived until shortly after Colonel Coolidge’s death. Virginia is survived by her daughter Jinny and her two children, five grandchildren and one great grandson; her son John and his wife Ruth and their children and grandchildren; her step-daughter Judy and her children and grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister Gertrude Rowell Dressler’s children, grandchildren and great grandchildren and her sister Catherine Rowell Doxey’s grandchildren.

Family members who died prior to Virginia’s passing were her mother, Gertrude Mercer Rowell and her father, Major General Frank Wheaton Rowell, a baby brother deceased at 18 months, her two sisters, Gertrude and Catherine, Catherine’s two sons, Douglas and Patrick Hearn, and Virginia’s brother Frederick Mercer Rowell. Her first husband, Colonel Charles Edward Brown died in 1982 and third husband, Colonel Joseph Barlow Coolidge, died in 1988. Virginia was an interesting human being with many talents, for art, writing and flower arranging. She also designed and created crewel embroidery for priest’s robes at Holy Trinity Church in Menlo Park, California. She volunteered over an extended period of time at the Veterans Hospital in Palo Alto. Most of the years while being a single mother raising children, she worked to support them. She worked for several years at Stanford University as secretary to the Dean of Men, and later, for a number of years, as the school secretary at Green Gables Elementary School in Palo Alto. Virginia traveled by bus to her job at Stanford University which meant a good deal of walking. Saturdays were spent doing the wash and on Sundays. after attending church and cooking dinner, Virginia sometimes surprised and pleased her children by making fudge. Christmas was simple, filled with love and beautiful memories, not of material things but sweet memories to last a lifetime. All of her life, she shared her wisdom in a quiet and unforgettable ways and for all this, we her children and grandchildren, are grateful. We’ve received treasures to be sure, not the least of which was Virginia’s story-telling. We will miss her but her gifts live on in our hearts. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Sara Virginia (Sally) Stepp McLeod December 17, 1918 – January 6, 2013 Sally died on January 6, 2013 at the age of 94. She was born Dec. 17, 1918, in Glenshaw, PA, and soon after moved with her family to Southern California. She grew up in Whittier, CA, and was the first female to run as president of her high school. Throughout her life she remained close to her high school friends Ken Stoney and Bill Ford. She was active in Jobs Daughters and was a debutant. Above all, she enjoyed life-long learning – attending Mills College where she pursued her equestrian interests; USC where she affiliated with Kappa Delta Sorority. Through her brother, she met the love of her life, Dunc (Duncan), and transferred as a senior to graduate from Stanford University in Psychology. After graduation, she entered UC graduate school of nursing. WWII intervened and she married her college sweetheart, Dunc on January 7,1943. During WWII, they moved to the Eastern Sea Front while Dunc was in the Navy. Later the couple returned to Palo Alto as Dunc pursued his law degree, and joined legal practice with his father in San Francisco. As a couple, Dunc and Sally were active in a Las Casadas (a local dance group), First United First Methodist Church of Palo Alto, and enjoyed travel to their homes in Kauai and Fallen Leaf Lake. Sally enjoyed a lifetime commitment to her

family and community. This included PTA, Girl & Boy Scouts, Retarded Children’s Guild, Children’s Health Council, Palo Alto Garden Club, Gamble Garden, Iris Society, Avenidas (where she organized kitchen tours), and Committee for Art at Stanford. Sally was awarded a lifetime membership in AAUW and Palo Alto Historical Society. She was known for her garden expertise, love of animals, and her family. While living at Channing House, she was actively involved in decorating the house Christmas tree. Sally loved opportunities to celebrate! She remained an active life-long learner taking numerous extension classes in horticulture among other interests. Sally was preceded in death by Duncan. She is survived by her two children: Janyne Slabaugh (Darrell) of Clinton, WA; Bruce McLeod (Nancy) of W. Richland, WA; 5 grandchildren; and 6 great-grandchildren. Sally is best remembered by her cheerful caring manner and advice to her family and friends to live life without using the phrase ‘if only’. A celebration of her life will be held at Channing House, 850 Webster St., Palo Alto on Sunday, February 17, 1-3pm. The family appreciates the ongoing care from the Channing House Skilled Nursing Center, as well as Pathways Hospice, and the ministry of First United Methodist Church of Palo Alto. PA I D

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OBITUARY

Transitions Births, marriages and deaths

Lawrence Viariseo Lawrence Viariseo, who survived a fall off a 100-foot Sierra cliff, triumphed over bladder cancer and became an avid bicyclist despite being paralyzed, died Jan. 30 of cancer. Viariseo was featured in an Aug. 4, 2012, Palo Alto Weekly story about his journey, in which he talked about his accident and struggles and his triumphs, and his goal to ride 100 miles to raise money for cancer research last September in the Canary Foundation Challenge. He did not get to make the ride, having been diagnosed with a metastasizing cancer shortly before the event, according to a friend. But Viariseo fought the cancer with the same aplomb as he had for all of his other challenges. And he died shortly after telling his mother that he would be alright, a friend said. His niece, Megan Cox, told the Canary Foundation that he was always grateful to Stanford University Medical Center for the care they had provided. “As you may remember, my uncle was a paraplegic who had beat stage 4 bladder cancer once before. The doctors at Stanford he felt had saved his life. It meant the world to him to be entering into the challenge in 2012 to give back to those doctors,” she said in a statement the foundation released. Viariseo, 54, was a well-known fixture for many years at Peet’s Coffee and Tea on Homer Avenue. He would frequently ride his bicycle or wheel his wheelchair down to the coffee shop. An accomplished artist, he painted a pastel portrait of the late Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs as

part of the Palo Alto We e k l y ’s sponsorship of the artist’s corner at the Palo Alto Festival of the Arts in August 2012. Via riseo broke his back and was paralyzed from the waist down after falling off a 100-foot cliff near Lake Tahoe while skiing. He was just 21 years old. Despite his paralysis, he built up his body and found he could control the quadriceps in his upper thighs and one knee. To cycle, he shifted his upper-body muscles to move his hips and propel the pedals; plastic braces supported his paralyzed legs. “I didn’t accept my disability on my doctors’ terms. I accepted it on my own terms. Doctors can’t tell you who you are going to be. They can’t measure your heart,” he told the Weekly last August. Viariseo was a Palo Alto native and graduate of Cubberley High School. During his interview, he summed up his life’s philosophy: “I just know how lucky I am,” he said. He is survived by his mother, Alicia Boyd; sisters, Janice ViariseoBothwell and Deborah Costella, and step-brother, Kirk Boyd; niece, Megan Cox; and his longtime companion, Aviva Rochester. A memorial service will be held Saturday, Feb. 9, at 3 p.m. at the Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Road, Palo Alto.

Edward Tatsuo Masuda Edward Tatsuo Masuda, resident of Mountain View, CA, passed away peacefully on January 30, 2013. He was born April 19, 1942 in Newcastle, CA and graduated from Placer Union High School, Sierra College, and received a degree in industrial design from San Jose State University. He started his career at Spectra Physics where he helped design the first cash register scanner, which is currently displayed at the Smithsonian, and continued his career at various start-up companies. His favorite past-times were fishing and target shooting with his friends. He is survived by his loving wife, Terrie Masuda; daughters Mari and Misa Masuda; sisters Yuki (Aki, deceased) Tsujimoto and Emi (Wilfred, deceased) Fukushima; brother Gene (Patti, deceased) Masuda; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents Kiyoto and Haruko Masuda, and brother Ken (Teruko) Masuda. Ed was always there for his family and friends and they will greatly miss his generosity and selfless spirit. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 2pm at the Palo Alto Buddhist Temple, 2751 Louis Road, Palo Alto. PA I D O B I T UA RY

Leah McDonough Dr. Leah McDonough died Jan. 16 in Redwood City of complications from Alzheimer’s. Born and raised in New York City, she and her husband Joseph McDonough had lived in Palo Alto since 1962. She was preceded in death by her husband of 61 years in 2010. They had known each other since they were 3 years old. She attended the College of New Rochelle (CNR), received a master’s degree at Fordham University, and earned her doctorate in psychology at Michigan State University. CNR awarded her a scholarship during the Great Depression, allowing her to pursue a career in psychology. A clinical psychologist, she worked for San Mateo County for more than two decades. For 12 years, she directed the forensic unit of San Mateo County’s Mental Health Division. Her psychology research was published in numerous articles and book chapters. After retiring from the County, she took up writing essays and short stories, publishing locally and nationally. She enjoyed babysitting for her granddaughter Carrie. She and her husband traveled extensively, and loved to take Carrie along with them. She is survived by her daughter, Susan McDonough (Warren Mar); and her granddaughter, Caroline Mar (Sandy Metivier).

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Jan. 31 - Feb. 6 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Family violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Credit card forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to:

PaloAltoOnline.com/ obituaries

Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/non-injury . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .8 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle tampering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of paraphernalia. . . . . . . . . .1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Indecent exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Prowler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .3 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/non-injury . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Drug registrant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Evading peace officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Indecent exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Meet citizen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Resisting arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Menlo Park Jan. 31 - Feb. 6

Atherton

Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Strong-arm robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Jan. 31 - Feb. 6 Theft related Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the Palo Alto Planning & Transportation Commission Please be advised the Planning and Transportation Commission (P&TC) shall conduct a public meeting at 6:00 PM, Wednesday, February 13, 2013 in the Council Chambers, Ground Floor, Civic Center, Palo Alto, California. Any interested persons may appear and be heard on these items. Staff reports for agendized items are available via the City’s main website at www.cityofpaloalto.org and also at the Planning Division Front Desk, 5th Floor, City Hall, after 2:00 PM on the Friday preceding the meeting date. Copies will be made available at the Development Center should City Hall be closed on the 9/80 Friday. Unfinished Business. Public Hearing 1. Recommendation of a Draft Ordinance to Rezone all CD-C and CD-S zoned properties fronting Emerson Street on the 600 block to add the Ground Floor Combining District. This item will be heard on the February 27, 2013 meeting of the Planning & Transportation Commission. New Business. Public Hearing 2. 1875 Embarcadero Road (Palo Alto Golf Course): Community Scoping meeting regarding the scope and content of the Draft EIR’s environmental analysis for the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course Renovation and Baylands Athletic Center Expansion Project. Request for Study Session review of preliminary plans for the golf course renovation. Zone District: PF(D). 3. 567-595 Maybell Avenue [12PLN-00453]: Request by Candice Gonzalez on behalf of Palo Alto Housing Corporation for initiation of a new Planned Community zone district to allow the development of 15 single family residences and a 60 unit multifamily affordable rental project for seniors on parcels having a combined area of 107,392 square feet and currently zoned R-2 and RM-15. Questions. For any questions regarding the above items, please contact the Planning Department at (650) 329-2441. The files relating to these items are available for inspection weekdays between the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This public meeting is televised live on Government Access Channel 26. ADA. The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request accommodations to access City facilities, services or programs, to participate at public meetings, or to learn more about the City’s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), please contact the City’s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto.org.

*** Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment

Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/non-injury . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/unknown injury . . . . . .1 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle/traffic hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hang up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Public works call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .5 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto 300 block University Avenue, 1/31, 1:58 a.m.; battery/simple.

1200 block Forest Avenue, 1/31, 8:43 p.m.; suicide. Unlisted block Churchill Avenue, 2/1, 11:38 a.m.; family violence. 700 block Embarcadero Road, 2/1, 1:45 p.m.; battery/simple. 3500 block El Camino Real, 2/2, 2:02 p.m.; battery/simple. 100 block El Camino Real, 2/3, 9:24 p.m.; battery/simple. 800 block San Antonio Road, 2/3, 7 a.m.; battery/simple. 200 blk Forest Avenue, 2/5, 1:59 p.m.; battery/simple.

Menlo Park Unlisted block Willow Road/Bayfront Expressway, 2/2, 10:23 a.m.; battery on peace officer/resisting arrest. Unlisted block Ringwood pedestrian bridge, 2/4, 7:06 p.m.; strong-arm robbery 100 block Newbridge Street, 2/5, 2:52 p.m.; spousal abuse.

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ******************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA – SPECIAL MEETING – COUNCIL CHAMBERS FEBRUARY 11, 2013 - 5:30 PM CLOSED SESSION. 1. Settlement of Claim SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 2. Proclamation in Support of Protect Our Children Gun Buy-Back 3. Appointment of one Commissioner to the Planning and Transportation Commission for an unexpired term ending on July 31, 2014 4. Appointment of two Commissioners to the Parks and Recreation Commission for two terms ending on December 31, 2015 5. Appointment of one Commissioner to the Public Art Commission for an unexpired term ending on April 30, 2015 STUDY SESSION 6. Study Session: on the Palo Alto Green Program Redesign Options 7. Study Session: VTA Lot (Page Mill/El Camino) Development Prescreening (PLNG) CONSENT CALENDAR 8. Utilities Advisory Commission Recommendation to Extend the Demand Response Pilot Program for Large Commercial Electric Customers for Three Years 9. Approval of Funding for Oracle Contract 10. Adoption of a BAO in the Amount of $67,000 and Approval of a Contract with Naturescapes in the Amount of $389,525 For The Ventura Community Center and Park Renovation (3990 Ventura Court) Project PE-10002 11. Submittal of Mitchell Park Library and Community Center BiMonthly Construction Contract Report 12 Consideration of Review Process for Edgewood Plaza 13. Approval of Amendment No. 1 to Contract C09127499 with AssetWorks, lnc. in the Amount of $63,805 for Software Implementation and Support Services; Training; and Annual License and Software Maintenance for a Term of Five Years for the City’s FleetFocus and FuelFocus Fleet Transaction Management Systems 14. Adoption of a Budget Amendment Ordinance and Approval of a Contract with TBWB Strategies in a Total Amount Not to exceed $95,000 for Educational Outreach Services Related to a Potential 2014 Infrastructure Finance Measure. ACTION ITEMS 15. Public Hearing: Review of Potential Options for Downtown Visioning and 27 University Avenue Site Planning (Staff Requests by Council Motion That This Agenda Item be Continued to March 11, 2013) 16. Appeal of ABAG Housing Allocations 17. Approval of Project Proposals for the One Bay Area Grant (OBAG) Program 18. Management of City Council Meetings and Recommendations for Revisions to the City Council’s Protocols and Procedures STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Policy and Services Committee will meet on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 7:00 PM to discuss: 1) Definition of Council Liaison Role, 2) Auditors Office Quarterly Report as of 12/31/12 and Revised Workplan, and 3) Discussion and Review of the Legislative Action Program Manual and the 2013 Federal and State Legislative Priorities. The School/ City Committee will meet on Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 8:30 AM at the PAUSD Offices to discuss:1) Review of Recent Meetings, 2) Budget Updates, 3) Relationship with Foreign Cities, and 4) 2013 City School Agendas ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 15

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Cover Story

I T’S N O T T O O L AT E T O P R O T E C T YO U R S E L F by Rebecca Wallace | photos by André Zandona

I

It was a terrifying way to start the new year. Feeling wiped out and congested, Menlo Park resident Candace Peterson took to her bed, wondering if she had a cold or the flu. A few days later, when she woke up she couldn’t breathe. An ambulance took her to the hospital, where she was definitively diagnosed with the flu — and then with viral pneumonia. She also learned that her home thermometer was broken: It had read 99 degrees, but the doctors told her she was running a fever of 103.9 when she was

brought in. After five days in the hospital and two weeks out of work, Peterson is back in the office. But it hasn’t been easy. “It was horrible,” she said. “All your energy is drained.” Peterson’s story is an unusually dramatic one, and it also reflects something unusual about this season’s flu: It started early. Influenza tends to begin hitting hard in February, but this year it came to town around the start of January in many states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Stories hit the media; readers got worried; and the demand for flu shots went up. While the flu season seems to have peaked in other parts of the country, reported activity is still high in California. “It’s definitely here,” said pediatrician Ross DeHovitz of the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. The exact number of flu cases in Santa Clara County is impossible to come by. Many people with the flu stay home and recover without ever seeing a doctor, and not every sick person gets tested for the flu. But several indicators are up. All the hospitals in the county have been reporting about 20 to 30 percent more people than usual coming into their emergency rooms, many with flu or flu-like symptoms, county health officer Marty Fenstersheib said. Margot Hyun grins and bears it as she gets a flu shot from certified medical assistant Thao Nguyen during a drop-in flu clinic at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Page 20ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Cover Story

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC £™nxʜՈÃÊ,œ>`]Ê*>œÊÌœÊUÊ­Èxä®ÊnxȇÈÈÈÓÊUÊÜÜÜ°vVV«>°œÀ}Ê Sunday Worship and Church School at 10 a.m.

This Sunday: Dimanche Gras! Change in the Air Rev. David Howell preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

Signs advertising flu shots are still up at many local spots, including the Walgreens pharmacy in Palo Alto’s Midtown neighborhood.

The current season appears to be somewhere in between a pandemic and the past two flu seasons, which were notably mild.

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

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Officials emphasize that the vaccine cannot give people the flu.

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Flu vaccine at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation.

“That’s to be expected in the winter,” he said, but added: “We know that this is a bit more than last year. ... We’ve had some reports of severe cases.” At press time, four cases of severe influenza and two flu-related deaths had been reported in Santa Clara County so far this season in people under 65. The county typically receives reports of severe cases in only the under-65 set but did also report the flu-related death of a 98-year-old woman a few weeks ago. “It was our first death, so we chose to report it to bring more awareness,” Fenstersheib said. Statewide, nine influenza-related deaths in people under 65 had been reported this season as of Jan. 26, none in the Bay Area, according to the most recent report from the California Department of Public Health Influenza Surveillance Program. The collaborative effort includes the CDC, Kaiser Permanente and various participating laboratories. Those nine people were all adults; no pediatric flu-related deaths have yet been reported in California this season. Nationwide, the CDC has reported 45 pediatric deaths related to flu this season. In the U.S. population as a whole (at least as reflected in the CDC’s 122-city reporting system), 9.4 percent of deaths in the country for the week ending Jan. 26 were due to pneumonia and influenza. That’s above the CDC’s “epidemic” threshold but down from the previous week’s 9.8 percent. Officials say these numbers pale in comparison to the pandemic of 2009, when H1N1, a new strain of influenza, hit. The CDC estimated that H1N1 caused “between about 8,870 and 18,300” deaths from April 2009 through April 2010 across the country, with perhaps hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations. That season, 282 flu-related deaths were reported in children in the U.S., according to the CDC. Last year’s number was 34. The current season appears to be somewhere in between a pandemic and the past two flu seasons, which were notably mild. CDC doctor Lyn Finelli settled on the word “severe” in a recent press release. And it’s been an especially severe season for seniors, she wrote. More than half of the people reportedly hospitalized for the flu this season have been ages 65 or older. Regardless of how the numbers turn out, doctors still advise most people ages 6 months and up to get vaccinated against the flu if they haven’t already. “Because you can have a late flu season even

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Cover Story

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB)

Flu

(continued from previous page)

8:30 A.M., Thursday, February 21, 2013 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review filed documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 180 El Camino Real [12PLN-00397]: Request by Golden Gate Sign Co., on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, for Minor Architectural Review of new exterior storefronts and signage for Marimekko at the Stanford Shopping Center. Zone District: CC (Community Commercial). Highway 101/Adobe Pedestrian Bicycle Overpass Project: Request by Palo Alto Public Works Engineering for a Study Session on the proposed project and to provide input on the preliminary design and environmental impacts for a new pedestrian/bicycle crossing at Adobe Creek over Highway 101. California AvenueTransit Hub Corridor Streetscape Improvements Project: Request by Transportation Division, on behalf of the City of Palo Alto for a Study Session review by the Architectural Review Board for Streetscape improvements along California Avenue between El Camino Real and the California Avenue-Park Blvd Plaza including: Community identity markers; new sidewalks and bulbouts; sidewalk and pavement treatments; crosswalk improvements; trees and planting palettes; streetscape elements including furniture such as benches and seatwalls; newspaper racks; trash receptacles; bicycle racks; decorative bollards; drinking fountains; street lights and pedestrian scale lighting and enhanced bicycle parking; and improvements to the Park Blvd Plaza. Zone District: CC (2)(R)(P). Amy French Chief Planning Official

into April or May, we don’t think there’s ever a time not to get (a vaccine) in the winter. You never know if there will be a peak later in the season,” DeHovitz said. Officials say this year’s vaccine has turned out to be well-matched to the flu strains that are circulating. After her frightening experience, Peterson said she’s become a believer in regular flu shots. She hasn’t been getting them in recent years, in part because she hates needles. “I’m going to have to get over it and just do it,” she said. “Now I’ve changed my philosophy.”

I

n her Stanford Medical Center office, Yvonne Maldonado was matter-of-fact as she pulled up CDC charts and maps on her computer, clicking through statistics on hospitalizations, positive influenza tests and general ILI (InfluenzaLike Illness) activity across the country. She had been asked about the flu more than a few times already. Maldonado, chief of pediatric infectious diseases, is also deeply immersed in monitoring ILI activity on the Stanford campus. She sees flu-test results from the main hospital, the children’s hospital, the student health center on campus and satellite facilities. “Over 50 to 60 percent of tests are negative for the flu,” she said. Maldonado said it’s too early to give a definitive answer on how serious the current flu season will turn out but said it’s unlikely to be a match for 2009. She pointed to a CDC chart marked “LaboratoryConfirmed Influenza Hospitalizations. The H1N1 year stands out as a big spike. “That year we had the disease in late April. That (flu) season re-

Many people who don’t like needles opt to get the flu shot with a new, smaller needle. ally didn’t end,” she said. By the time H1N1 started to taper off, a new flu season began. “When you have a new strain, that disrupts everything,” she said. “It was an odd year.” Influenza comes in two major forms, A and B, with A being more serious and more common, Maldonado said. In turn, A is sorted into combinations of H and N types. Every year there are different strains and mutations, “which is why every year we need a new vaccine,” she

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said. The predominant strain this season is H3N2, a common one. When asked how it differs from other strains, Maldonado said that it may cause some more hospitalizations but adds that flu symptoms are pretty much the same across strains: “Flu is flu.” The important distinction to remember, she added, is the difference between the flu and a simple head cold. Influenza is not just a cough, and it’s not just the sniffles. With

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Cover Story

The Safeway in Palo Alto’s Midtown neighborhood adds a little enticement to its flu-shot sign. the flu, most people have a fever, and headaches, sore throats, coughs and stuffy noses are also common. Kids sometimes have upset stomachs. Pretty much everyone gets that hit-by-a-truck feeling. “I always tell people that flu is really overwhelming; it’s not a cold. You get body aches, fever. You can’t get out of bed,” Maldonado said. “When you have the flu, it’s a systemic illness.” It’s a systemic illness that people would do well to avoid in the first place, Maldonado said. Every year, flu vaccines are ready by September, and she advises making a yearly autumn routine of getting the shot or the nasal-mist version. At Packard Children’s Hospital, “we try to get all patients vaccinated before they go home,” she said. hese days there are several options for getting vaccinated. There’s the trusty flu shot in the arm, with lower doses for children and higher doses available for seniors. People who are leery of needles can choose a smaller microneedle. The high-dose vaccine, which contains four times the amount of antigen, was approved at the end of 2009 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people ages 65 and older. “That’s because adults over 65 tend to have a poorer response to the flu vaccine than younger adults,” DeHovitz said. “When you give the higher-potency vaccine, you get their antibody levels up to a more normal level. There are a number of studies that are going on to see if this is a better vaccine. ... Right now, the CDC says either one is an option for seniors.” DeHovitz said the only side effect he’s seen in the high-dose option is more arm soreness from the shot. A nasal-mist flu vaccine has also been around for a decade, available for healthy people ages 2 to 49 who are not pregnant. “We recommend both vaccines, but the downside of the flu mist is that because it’s a live (attenuated) virus, it can cause some nasal congestion,” DeHovitz said. Overall, physicians recommend that nearly everyone ages 6 months and older get vaccinated against the

flu, with a few caveats. People with fevers should wait until they get better, and those who have severe egg

allergies or a history of GuillainBarre Syndrome — or who have had a bad reaction to a flu vaccine in the past — should consult their doctors, according to the CDC. Of course, not everyone chooses to get vaccinated, but the CDC says it’s especially important for people who are at high risk for developing complications from the flu. That includes seniors, pregnant women, kids under 5 and people with medical conditions including asthma, heart disease and weakened immune systems. Since children under 6 months can’t get vaccinated, it’s also key for all the people around them to get a flu shot or the flu mist. Officials emphasize that the vaccine cannot give people the flu. The unfortunate sorts who come down with the flu right after getting a shot either have a non-flu virus or have one of the strains not protected against in the vaccine — which is less likely but possible, the CDC reported. In addition, the vaccine takes two weeks to take effect, and it’s possible to come down with the

flu before the body has built up sufficient protection. Because the flu has gotten press recently, DeHovitz said he’s seen “definite interest” in vaccines from patients who didn’t get vaccinated last fall. Some vaccine vendors in the U.S. have had shortages because of the late demand, but this doesn’t seem to be endemic. Santa Clara County seems to have experienced only occasional brief shortages, Fenstersheib said. For example, a drugstore might be out of vaccine one day and then get a new shipment the next. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation reported on Jan. 16 that it was not able to schedule new flu-vaccine appointments — but by the following week it had received more vaccine and was scheduling appointments again. For people who choose not to get vaccinated (and indeed for everyone), Fenstersheib dispenses his typical annual advice: If you’re sick, stay home from school or work and keep it to yourself. If you think you really have the flu, see your doctor. Anti-flu medications can reduce the

severity of the illness if given within the first 48 hours. And, of course, there’s Public Health 101: Wash your hands frequently. Flu viruses like to pass from person to person through coughs and sneezes, and they are also fond of passing via touch. We shake hands; we pick things up; we grasp doorknobs; and we all touch our faces, even if we think we don’t, Fenstersheib said. “We could probably decrease a lot of this with a lot of hand-washing,” he said. “It’s just so easy and it doesn’t hurt anything.” N Info: Updates on the flu season from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are available at www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluviewinteractive.htm. Reports from the California Department of Public Health Influenza Surveillance Program are posted at www.cdph.ca.gov.

About the cover: Illustration by Shannon Corey.

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

Joni Kabana

Lectures on the land Now in its 20th year, Wallace Stegner series features authors on farming, coal mining and hiking trails by Rebecca Wallace

O

“It’s about training people in this new way to farm, to make it possible to grow food without chemicals, to be able to have the maximum amount of nutritional value. And the taste of the food is really important,” Allen told the Weekly. “To do that, it’s all about the soil.” Growing Power runs on compost, made from recycled food, farm and brewery waste and coffee grounds, and worm castings that come from intensive composting in boxes. As part of his good-food mission, Allen turns a particular eye on America’s cities. He strives to bring healthful food to urban areas where grocery stores and fresh produce are less common. That includes getting his farm’s food into the Milwaukee school system — 50,000 pounds of carrots in a school year, for example. Allen spends about a quarter of his time traveling, some of it giving author talks like the one scheduled for Feb. 11 at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. His talk will kick off this year’s Wallace Stegner Lectures series, which is organized by the Peninsula Open Space District and focuses on themes of conservation and nature. “We just keep working at it, trying to transform people’s lives. Food is the most important thing in our lives,” Allen said. “It’s the one thing that we all have in common.” Allen has been profiled widely in

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the media, and in 2008 was awarded a “genius grant” by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. He also helped First Lady Michelle Obama launch her “Let’s Move!” program combatting childhood obesity. “You get top-down operators joining a grassroots network, it becomes a very powerful thing,” Allen said. Also in the lecture series is Jeff Goodell, scheduled to speak on April 8. Besides putting out “Big Coal” in 2006, he’s published several other books, including “Sunnyvale: The Rise and Fall of a Silicon Valley Family,” his own memoir of growing up here in the valley. Most recently, he wrote “How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth’s Climate.” That too came after a long time of living with his subject. “I spent several years with some of the world’s top climate modelers, as well as Cold War physicists, philosophers, politicians, and crackpot entrepreneurs, all of whom are involved with the development of new technologies that might someday be used to manipulate the earth’s climate to reduce the risks associated with global warming,” Goodell wrote on his website. His interviewees included Stephen Salter, “a cranky but brilliant Scottish (continued on next page)

Barry Wong

ne thing the speakers in this year’s Wallace Stegner Lectures series have in common is an unusual level of immersion in the topics that fascinate them. In researching his book “Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America’s Energy Future,” journalist Jeff Goodell spent a month aboard a research ship and a week in an underground mine. Cheryl Strayed’s memoir “Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” recalls her 1,100-mile solo hike on the Pacific Crest Trail. Will Allen wins the brass ring. His recent book, “The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People and Communities,” draws on his wisdom harvested from more than 50 years of farming. A former pro basketball player and son of a sharecropper, he’s a widely traveled speaker and evangelist for urban agriculture who is happiest with his hands in the soil. Home base is Growing Power, the 3-acre farm and community food center in Milwaukee that Allen founded in 1993. It includes greenhouses, farm-animal pens, an apiary, a rainwater-catchment system and composting facilities. Farmers, gardeners and various organizations come to the headquarters — and to other centers as far afield as Georgia, Colorado and New York — for schooling in chemical-free farming, composting and other skills.

From top left, the speakers for this year’s Wallace Stegner Lectures series are: Will Allen, Jeff Goodell, Cheryl Strayed and Tim Egan.

Arts & Entertainment (continued from previous page)

engineer” who “has designed boats that would spray billions of tiny droplets of seawater into the clouds to brighten them, so they will reflect more sunlight away from the earth,” Goodell wrote. A longtime contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine, Goodell is also a commentator on environmental issues. The next speaker in the lecture series is Cheryl Strayed, whose latest book, “Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar,” is a collection of straighttalking advice columns that she’s written for TheRumpus.net. Her memoir, “Wild,” recalls her lifechanging Pacific Crest Trail hike that she took in the wake of her mother’s death and a divorce. Strayed is scheduled to speak on May 13. The lectures honor the late Stanford University English professor Wallace Stegner, an active conservationist who worked with the Peninsula Open Space District to establish the series. He died just before the lectures began in 1993.

Series subscribers also get a “bonus” talk on March 18, by author and journalist Tim Egan. His most recent book is “Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis.” N What: The 20th annual Wallace Stegner Lectures series, which focuses on issues of conservation, nature and land Where: Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St. When: Four speakers are scheduled for 8 p.m. talks: Will Allen on Feb. 11, Jeff Goodell on April 8, Cheryl Strayed on May 13 and Tim Egan (in an event for subscribers only) on March 18. Cost: Single tickets are $22 each, with season subscriptions available. Info: Go to openspacetrust.org/ lectures or call 650-854-7696, ext. 310.

Public Notice

Vacancy on Board of Directors of Public Facilities Financing Corporation

www.paphil.org Topic: Santa Clara Valley Water District Notice of Intention to Fill Vacancy on Board of Directors of Public Facilities Financing Corporation.

Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 Glinka Overture to Ruslan

and Ludmilla

Pianist Sandra

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 2

8pm Saturday February 16, 2013

Wright Shen

Cubberley Theatre 4000 Middlefield Rd Palo Alto, CA Tickets: $10/$17/$20

Pre-concert talk at 7:30pm

(student / senior / general)

at the door or online

Who: The Santa Clara Valley Water District is the primary water resources agency for Santa Clara County, California. It acts not only as the county’s water wholesaler, but also as its flood protection agency and steward for its streams and creeks, underground aquifers and district-built reservoirs. What: The Board of Directors of the Santa Clara Valley Water District intends to fill a vacant director position on the Public Facilities Financing Corporation (PFFC). The PFFC is a nonprofit public benefit corporation whose primary purpose is to provide assistance to the Santa Clara Valley Water District in financing the acquisition, construction and improvement of public buildings, works and equipment for the Santa Clara Valley Water District, together with site development, landscaping, utilities, furnishings and appurtenant and related facilities. The PFFC directors serve as volunteers. Duties of the PFFC director will be to perform any and all duties imposed by law, by the Corporation’s Articles of Incorporation or Bylaws, or by resolution of the Board of Directors of the Santa Clara Valley Water District. PFFC directors meet at such times and places as required to conduct Corporation business, usually from one to three times annually. In order to be eligible for appointment, an interested party must reside within the County of Santa Clara and must continue to reside therein while serving on the PFFC. The Board is seeking interested candidates with experience and understanding of the financial market and the issuance of bonds.

way By the Ba d a o y Presents Br CATS

OLIVER

APRIL 6 - 21

JULY 12 - 21

CABARET

GUYS AND DOLLS

SEPTEMBER 13 - 29

When: Interested parties should notify the Clerk of the Board of Directors of the Santa Clara Valley Water District in writing no later than 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, February 28, 2013, at 5750 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, California, 95118. Please submit a letter of interest which includes your name, contact numbers, residential address, occupation, summary of interest in the position, and qualifications and experience. Information packets can be obtained online at www.valleywater.org or in person at District Headquarters, 5700 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, California. 12/2012_KT

NOVEMBER 8 - 17

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A RADIO PLAY DECEMBER 26 - 29

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Arts & Entertainment NOTICE OF A DIRECTOR’S HEARING To be held at 3:00 p.m., Thursday, February 21, 2013, in the Palo Alto City Council Conference Room, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review filed documents; contact Alicia Spotwood for information regarding business hours at 650-617-3168. 789 Josina Avenue [12PLN-00456] Request by Yi-Ran Wu for Single Family Review of a new two story residence. Zone District R-1. Curtis Williams Director of Planning and Community Environment

Palo Alto Unified School District Notice is hereby Given that proposals will be received from Pre- Qualified General Contractors by the Palo Alto Unified School District for bid package: Contract No. DES-13 Duveneck Elementary School - Modernization and New Construction DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: Construction of (1) two story building, (2) single story buildings and modernization of existing buildings: Work includes but is not limited to demolition, abatement, excavation, site work, concrete, structural steel, framing, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, finishes etc. Bid documents contain the full description of the work. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 02:30 p.m. on February 12, 2013 at the Duveneck Elementary School, 705 Alester Ave, Palo Alto California, 94303 Bid Submission: Proposals must be received at the District Facilities Office Building D, by 10:00 a.m. on February 27, 2013. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto Unified School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 - 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1. A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. 2. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certified copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. 3. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. 4. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. 5. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred.

Worth a Look Photos Katie Cooney

An MBA thesis brought Katie Cooney to Rwanda and Uganda; she was working on a thesis called “Ecotourism Development.” But the two 2012 trips also yielded a photography project. A widely traveled Bay Area photographer who says she specializes in “travel, cowboy and documentary” images, Cooney was drawn to documenting some of the economic struggles in the countries. Her new exhibition, “Rwanda, Land of Reconciliation,” opens today, Feb. 8, at the Community School of Music and Arts at 230 “Boys Home Kigali” is among the photos by Katie Cooney in a new San Antonio Circle in Mountain Peninsula exhibition called “Rwanda, Land of Reconciliation.” View. Cooney wrote in an artist’s The 30-voice California Bach Society will perform statement that she found Rwanda in dire need of more tourism dollars; while many people come to see the “Die Familie Bach” at 8 p.m. Feb. 23 at All Saints’ Epissilverback mountain gorillas, they don’t stay long. Her copal Church, 555 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Tickets are work includes photos taken in an orphanage for aban- $30. For more information, go to calbach.org or call doned street boys, and images of rural Rwanda. Some 650-485-1097. are mounted on wood, with branches woven around them for trim. CCRMA open house and concert The show will run through March 24 in the school’s Modern-day music meets modern-day concert hall on Mohr Gallery. A reception is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 15, and the gallery is open weekdays from 9 a.m. Feb. 15 and 16, with an open house, winter concert and to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 to 3. For more, go to “tailgate party” for unusual DIY musical instruments, courtesy of CCRMA. arts4all.org or call 650-917-6800. Also known as Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, CCRMA is a place for high-tech, uber-contemporary music study, including computer music, psychoacoustics and recording technology. People at CCRMA (pronounced “karma”) invent California Bach Society their own musical instruments and create interactive Talk about relative rivalry: There were more than 75 sound art. There’s even a laptop orchestra. musicians of note in J.S. Bach’s family. This month, The center invites the public to learn about its people the California Bach Society explores the lesser-known and projects during an open house from noon to 5 p.m. branches of the family tree with a concert called “Die Feb. 15 in the lobby of Stanford’s new Bing Concert Familie Bach.” Hall. During that time period on Feb. 16, CCRMA folks Eight composers in the Bach family are featured on will bring in some of their self-invented instruments for the program, which is divided into sections on “Fear & a “tailgate party.” Death” and “Joy & Life.” Four generations are repreAt 8 p.m. Feb. 15, center students, faculty and staff sented, including two of J.S. Bach’s sons, Johann Chris- will present a computer-music concert called “Sonic toph Friedrich and Carl Philipp Emanuel, and cousin Bing” in the hall, using the center’s multi-channel 3D Johann Christoph. Choral director Magen Solomon said sound system. Another concert follows at 8 p.m. Feb. 16, she aimed to choose a wide variety of styles and moods. with CCRMA’s Fernando Lopez-Lezcano curating live The pieces are for small groups of singers, from four computer music and fixed media to create an evening to eight. of soundscapes and electronic music. J.S. makes an appearance as well, with his “Fürchte The events are free. For more information, go to dich nicht,” a motet for double chorus. music.stanford.edu.

Music

Opera

‘Lucia di Lammermoor’

Bidders may examine Bidding Documents at Facilities Office, Building “D”. Bidders may purchase copies of Plans and Specifications at ARC Reprographics located at 1100 Industrial Rd. Unit 13, San Carlos, CA 94070. Phone: (650) 517-1895 All questions can be addressed to: Palo Alto Unified School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: Devyani Agate Phone: (650) 329-3927 Fax: (650) 327-3588

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Soprano Margaret Cohen, front, who grew up in Palo Alto, sings in the California Bach Society with Palo Altan and alto Sara Tanke.

It’s been 30 years since opera’s most notorious mad scene was presented at the Lucie Stern. This month, West Bay Opera brings back Gaetano Donizetti’s “Lucia di Lammermoor,” a bloody, dagger-y opera about a woman forced to marry a man she doesn’t love. Not to give away the plot, but murder and hallucinations ensue. The plot is based on a story by Sir Walter Scott; the opera is sung in Italian with English subtitles. Soprano Rochelle Bard, who recently played the four-part role Olympia/Antonia/Giulietta/Stella in West Bay’s production of “Les Contes d’Hoffmann,” is back as Lucia. Michel Singher conducts, and David Ostwald directs. Four performances are scheduled at the Lucie Stern Theatre at 1305 Middlefield Road in Palo Alto: at 8 p.m. Feb. 15 and Feb. 23, and at 2 p.m. Feb. 17 and 24. Tickets are $40-$75, with group discounts available. Go to wbopera.org or call 650-424-9999.

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Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW

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DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S

Cucina Venti

ay D s ’ e n entiion today!! l a V y Happe your reservat 650-254-1120 om Mak venti.c a n i c u www.c

Michelle Le

by Sheila Himmel

4HEEIGHT ITEMTHALIPLATTERFEATURESPARANTHA GARBANZOBEANS PICKLES SALAD RICE PAPADAM RICEANDACHOICEOFTWOENTREES0ICTUREDARE CHICKENTIKKAMASALA BOTTOMLEFT ANDSAAGPANEER BOTTOMRIGHT OFFERSAMIXOFMEATORTOFU PANEER ORCAULIFLOWER PEAS POTATOESAND TURMERIC YELLOW RICE 4HE BEEF WAS CHOPPED AND CHEWABLE NOT MINCED #URRY5P.OWISTHEEPITOMEOF INCLUSIVENESS WITHMAJORACCESSFOR VEGANSANDTHEGLUTEN FREE"OTHGET SEPARATEMENUSWITHLOTSOFCHOICES

INCLUDING KIDS MENU ITEMS *UST NOTE THAT THESE MENUS CONTAIN A LAWYERLY STATEMENT THAT VEGAN AND GLUTEN FREEITEMSAREPREPAREDINA COMMON KITCHEN WITH EVERYTHING ELSE SOIFYOUREREALLY REALLYSENSI TIVE BUYERBEWARE 4HE WATER MACHINE HAS BUTTONS (continued on next page)

*Four course dinner with Complementary glass of Proseco Champagne $59 per person

Valentine’s Weekend

Valentine’s Weekend Menu – February 14th thru February 17th Appetizers Bruschetta Al Pomodoro Toasted slices of Oven Baked Bread topped with Roma tomato cubes marinated with Olive Oil, Garlic and Fresh Basil Crispy Zucchini Cakes Served with marinated cucumber & mint yogurt Salad Summer in Sorrento Watermelon topped with Feta cheese square, Arugula, fresh figs, Sicilian olives with Vidalia onion dressing. Strawberry Fields Crisp Mixed Lettuce, Fresh Strawberries, Toasted Pecans, Gorgonzola Cheese and served with our tangy Vidalia Onion Dressing Entrees Filet Mignon Marinated with herbs served with in a mushroom sauce with spinach. Served with broccoli and a risotto cake filled with blue cheese. Braised Short Ribs in a light red wine sauce Served with Polenta and seasonal fresh cut Vegetables. Linguine Pescatore Fresh salmon, snapper, clams, mussels and prawns in a spicy tomato sauce. Hear t shape Ravioli A Portobello & Shitake mushroom filling with Roma tomatoes and fresh spinach, in a light Marsala cream sauce. Grilled Salmon Served with sautÊed spinach wild rice and vegetables. Dessert

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

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Tiramisu Italian dessert, consisting of alternating layers of coffee-soaked lady fingers and sweet mixture of mascarpone cheese, eggs and sugar. Linzar Hearts Cookies & Gelato Old fashioned ground nut dough cut into hearts and sandwiched with raspberry jam served with your choice of vanilla or chocolate gelato.

DITA Launch Event

Eating Out (continued from previous page)

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&ORMOREADVANCEDSTUDYOFFOOD TRUCKHISTORY SEE(EATHER3HOUSES BOOK h&OOD 4RUCKSv 4EN 3PEED 0RESS  #URRY 5P .OW GETS TOP BILLING )T INCLUDES A RECIPE FOR THE BURRITO LIKE+ATHI2OLLN Curry Up Now, 321 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto ; 650-477-1001; curryupnow.com Hours: Weekdays 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sat. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 11:30 a.m.- 9 p.m. Reservations



Catering



Credit cards



Takeout

 

Parking Highchairs



Outdoor dining

Noise level: medium-loud Bathroom Cleanliness: good

February 16

Party and banquet

ShopTalk

Lux Eyewear 1805 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Ăˆxä°ÎÓ{°Î™ÎÇÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°Â?Ă•Ă?ÂŤ>Â?Âœ>Â?ĂŒÂœÂ°Vœ“

2012

PENINSULA

by Daryl Savage

CHOCOLATE TIMES THREE ... A high-end chocolate shop is scheduled to open this week in downtown Palo Alto in the former space of hair and makeup studio Mimi & Taylor Salon at 522 Bryant St. The decision to open Alegio Chocolate in Palo Alto came after its owners, who started their first chocolate shop in Berkeley seven years ago, noticed more customers coming from Silicon Valley. “We decided to open another store near them,� said Panos Panagos, who co-owns Alegio with business partner Robbin Everson. Alegio sells truffles with ganache filling, and chocolate bars made by Italian-born tropical agronomist Claudio Corallo, a small cacao producer on a tiny island west of equatorial Africa. Alegio also offers a 45-minute chocolate-tasting tour, where customers learn about the company’s own West African plantation. Participants hear how chocolate is grown and harvested, and are given an assortment of different chocolates to sample, said Panagos, a former director/producer for the European Broadcasting Commission. The location of Alegio may raise a few eyebrows among chocolate-lovers. It is across the street from another gourmet chocolate shop, Monique’s Chocolates, which opened three years ago at 539 Bryant. Recognizing the awkward proximity of the two shops, Panagos said: “It wasn’t intentional. It just happened. But I don’t see a competition.� Monique’s owner Mark West takes a different view. “Yes, it is competition. There’s no way around it. It’s going to be interesting. Fortunately, people love chocolate,� West said, adding that there is a fundamental difference between the two shops. “At Monique’s, we make all our own chocolate right here and we don’t sell chocolate bars. Instead I do truffles, caramels, marshmallows and a lot of hot chocolate,� he said. And if that’s not enough chocolate for Palo Alto, less than two blocks

away at 654 Gilman St. is The Chocolate Garage. Owner Sunita de Tourreil offers 90-minute presentations in a small garage that has been converted into an intimate tasting room. The one-room business is decorated with dozens of chocolatebar wrappers lining the walls. Furniture consists of a single couch, two chairs and a table. For the past few years, de Tourreil has been able to combine her love for chocolate and her desire for teaching into offering corporate events and parties. A former molecular biologist, de Tourreil averages three educational tastings a week. “That’s definitely an increase from a year ago. Word is getting out,� she said. She focuses on the educational component of making chocolate. “I show (customers) the actual cacao bean. The tastings range from the very whitest chocolate to the very darkest,� she said. De Tourreil also concentrates on small-batch American chocolate producers. “When I teach about ‘happy chocolate,’ that means I screen chocolate for two criteria: It has to be really high quality and delicious, and I need to know how it is getting sourced. I want to make sure the cacao farmer is getting paid fairly,� she said. BOSTON MARKET CLOSES ... The comfort-food restaurant Boston Market closed its doors at 3375 El Camino Real in Palo Alto last month. White paper now covers all the windows of the former restaurant, with a short note thanking customers for their support and patronage. The note also advises customers that two nearby Boston Markets — one in Santa Clara, the other in Fremont — remain open. N

(EARD A RUMOR ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE STORE OR BUSINESS MOV INGOUT ORIN DOWNTHEBLOCKOR ACROSS TOWN $ARYL 3AVAGE WILL CHECKITOUT %MAIL SHOPTALK PAWEEKLY COM

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Ming’s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

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Movies OPENINGS

Side Effects ---

(Century 16, Century 20) From A to Z — from the fictional antidepressant Ablixa to the real drug Zoloft — Steven Soderbergh toys with drugs, duplicity and their side effects. The message movie grows tiresome in its hammering indictment of Big Pharma’s hold on pharmaceutical research and sales, the efficacy and effectiveness of particular drugs, and the medical community’s questionable ethics. Then moments before inducing sleep, the social-issue film surprisingly twists into a noir thriller. Although everyone seems quick to give directors the dubious title of “auteur” and all the credit, the film’s distinctive signature belongs to screenwriter Scott Z. Burns (“The

Informant!” and “Contagion”) as much as to Soderbergh, whose remarkable but schizophrenic body of work stretches from “sex, lies, and videotape” to “Erin Brockovich” and the “Ocean’s” franchise, to “Full Frontal,” “Che” and “Magic Mike.” If connective thematic and formal tissue exists in his films, the links are not readily apparent. Similar to many film-noir classics, Burns’ narrative splinters time by starting luridly in a blood-splattered New York apartment before flashing back to three months earlier. Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara) prepares for her husband’s (Channing Tatum) release from prison after serving four years for insider trading. They have lost everything of the upscale lifestyle that Emily had loved. Close-ups linger on her expressionless face and capture

W E S T

OH, INVERTED WORLD by Trey McIntyre set to music by The Shins

C OA S T

P R E M I E R E

Should you take the red pill or the blue pill? Jude Law, playing a psychiatrist in “Side Effects,” would probably prescribe both. her edginess, conveying a sense of severe depression, anxiety and suicidal tendencies. But psychiatrist Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law) has a pill — or two or three — to stop her brain from sending out so many “sad” signals. The well-intentioned

by Adam Hougland

nervous system. The fun is figuring out which character corresponds to which descriptor. Wearing poker faces, the actors never show their cards. Somewhat duplicitous himself, Soderbergh credits Peter Andrews,

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shrink even consults with Emily’s previous therapist, Dr. Victoria Siebert (Catherine Zeta-Jones). Things go terribly wrong. The victim, the investigator, the femme fatale and the psychopath are central figures in noir’s twitchy

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Movies his usual pseudonym, as director of photography. Compositions provide visual clues, such as when a face appears split in a mirror’s reflection, implying the character’s duality. Moreover, Soderbergh’s handheld camera depicts scenes from multiple points of view, gradually revealing startling story information. Situations are not what they seem. “Side Effects” portrays contemporary society as ruthlessly competitive, greedy and devoid of meaningful values. But as the plot unknots, the film itself feels empty — an exercise in narrative gymnastics and a misogynist throwback to 1950s noir. Rated: R for sexuality, nudity, violence and language. 1 hour, 45 minutes. — Susan Tavernetti

Identity Thief --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) Long known for stealing scenes, Melissa McCarthy adds to her jacket by taking on the title role of “Identity Thief.” Seth Gordon’s action-comedy follow-up to “Horrible Bosses” proves far from perfect but ultimately difficult to resist, thanks to McCarthy and co-lead Jason Bateman. Bateman plays Sandy Bigelow Patterson, a Colorado accountant and family man whose life turns upside down when McCarthy’s identity thief — let’s call her “Diana” — goes to town on his credit and gets a warrant issued for his arrest. The ensuing confusion threatens Sandy’s brand-new position as the vice president of a start-up financial institution, and with police bound up in jurisdictional red tape, it’s up to Sandy to clear his record and save his job in the one week allotted by his new boss (John Cho). That means flying down to Florida, apprehending Diana and hauling her back to face the music. Though his wife (Amanda Peet) warns, “You’re not Batman,” off he goes, to “pretty much the worst place in America,” to stand up for his self. Naturally, Diana proves plenty slippery and exceedingly dangerous, and not just because of her go-to move of throat-punching anyone who tries to stop her. Car chases and crossfire are guaranteed by those hot on Diana’s trail: a pair of drug dealers she’s crossed (Genesis Rodriguez and T.I.) and a violently unhinged bounty hunter (Robert Patrick). And so what begins as a seemingly fruitful comic premise about identity theft turns out to be two parts “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles”

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

Oscar Nominated Short Films 2013: Animated (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 12:30, 2:30 & 7 p.m.

The 39 Steps (1935) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Sun. at 5:55 & 9:15 p.m. A Good Day to Die Hard (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 10 p.m.; Thu. at 11 a.m.; 1:30, 4:05, 7 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8:05 & 10:40 p.m. Amour (PG-13) (((( Aquarius Theatre: 1:45, 4:45 & 7:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 2, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1:10, 4:10 & 7:10 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:55 p.m. Bullet to the Head (R) (1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:25, 2:55, 5:20, 7:50 & 10:15 p.m. Die Hard Marathon (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Wed. at 12:15 p.m. Django Unchained (R) ((( Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 3:50 & 8 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2:50, 6:25 & 10 p.m. Gangster Squad (R) (1/2 Century 20: 5 & 10:30 p.m. Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 4 & 9:40 p.m.; In 3D at 1:30 & 7 p.m. Century 20: 1 & 5:45 p.m.; In 3D at 3:20, 8:15 & 10:35 p.m. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; In 3D at 3:30 & 7:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 a.m. & 6:15 p.m.; In 3D at 2:40 & 9:50 p.m. Identity Thief (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1:50, 3, 4:40, 6:10, 7:40, 9:10 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:40 a.m.; 12:50, 2:25, 3:40, 5:05, 6:20, 7:45, 9:10 & 10:25 p.m. The Impossible (PG-13) ((( Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:25 & 7:50 p.m.

Les Miserables (2012) (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 12:20, 4:10 & 7:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 3:10, 6:35 & 10:05 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 20: 1:25 p.m.; In 3D at 4:20 & 10:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sun. also at 7:15 p.m. (standard 2D) Palo Alto Square: 4 p.m.; In 3D at 1 & 7 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10 p.m. (standard 2D) Lincoln (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 2:40, 6:05 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 3:35, 7 & 10:15 p.m.

evinces a moral (and morale) confusion by introducing Sandy as a guy willing to take a career risk to get the treatment and pay he deserves, and willing to travel cross-country to confront a felon — and then suggesting that taking what’s his is a lesson he needs to learn from Diana. Um, huh? Craig Mazin’s script also endorses Sandy’s Stockholm Syndrome in not only softening to Diana but himself stealing an identity. (Don’t worry, folks. It’s OK when you steal from a jerk.) Despite these pesky tangles, there’s something appealing in how the film amounts to the opposite of a revenge narrative, considering the roots of Diana’s waywardness and extending her measured generosity and chances to earn her redemption. Sure, making Diana cuddly after all is a Hollywood convention, but it also scores one for restorative justice. Rated R for sexual content and language. One hour, 52 minutes. — Peter Canavese

5BEST PICTURE

BEST BEST ACTRESS DIRECTOR

Life of Pi 3D - 1:00, 7:00 Life of Pi 2D - 4:00, 10:00 Argo - 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 9:55

Sun thru Thurs Life of Pi 3D - 1:00, 7:00 2/10 - 2/14 Life of Pi 2D - 4:00 Argo 1:10, 4:10, 7:10

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT

©HFPA

EMMANUELLE RIVA

AMOUR A Film by MICHAEL HANEKE

Side Effects (R) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1:40, 2:30, 4:20, 5, 7:20, 8:10 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:30, 1:55, 3, 4:35, 5:35, 7:10, 8:10, 9:45 & 10:45 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 3:10, 6:20 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:25 p.m. Stand Up Guys (R) (( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:10 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 2:15, 4:40, 7:05 & 9:30 p.m. Warm Bodies (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 12:10, 1:35, 2:35, 4, 5, 7:10, 8:20 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 12:40, 1:50, 3:05, 4:25, 5:30, 6:55, 8, 9:25 & 10:40 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 3:40 & 7:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2:45, 6:40 & 10:10 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding

Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260)

Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

NOTICE OF PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD AND PUBLIC HEARINGS ON PALO ALTO’S COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCKGRANT (CDBG) PROGRAM This is to notify the general public and other interested parties that a 30-day public review period of the Draft Annual Action Plan for the allocation of Fiscal Year 2014 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, will begin on March 7, 2013 and end on April 8, 2013. The Draft Annual Action Plan describes the activities the City may fund under the 2014 CDBG Program. Collectively these activities are intended to meet Palo Alto’s affordable housing and community development objectives described in the 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan. Copies of the Draft Annual Action Plan will be available on March 7, 2013 at the Department of Planning and Community Environment, 250 Hamilton Avenue, 5th Floor, Palo Alto, CA 94301, on the City’s website http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ depts/pln/advance_planning/cdbg.asp or by calling Consuelo Hernandez, Planner – CDBG, at (650) 329-2428. Interested parties are encouraged to submit written comments on the proposed Draft Annual Action Plan during the public review period, or to comment at the public hearings and meetings described below. PUBLIC HEARINGS AND MEETINGS The City of Palo Alto Human Relations Commission will hold a Public Hearing on February 28, 2013 to review the Fiscal Year 2014 CDBG funding allocations recommended by the CDBG Human Relations Selection Committee. The Public Hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, in City Hall Council Conference Room, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto. The City of Palo Alto Finance Committee will hold a Public Hearing on April 2, 2013 to review the proposed Fiscal Year 2014 CDBG funding allocations identified in the Draft Annual Action Plan. The Public Hearing will be held at 6:00 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, in City Hall Council Conference Room, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto. The Palo Alto City Council will hold a Public Hearing on May 6, 2013 to adopt the Annual Action Plan and the associated Fiscal Year 2014 CDBG allocations. The Public Hearing will be held at 7:00p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, in City Hall Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto.

WINNER

GOLDEN GLOBE® AWARD BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Fri and Sat 2/8 - 2/9

Parker (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 1:45 & 7:20 p.m. Century 20: 2:10 & 7:40 p.m.

Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264)

The Lady Vanishes (1938) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Sun. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 4:10 p.m.

® NOMINATIONS ACADEMY AWARD INCLUDING

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square

Oscar Nominated Short Films 2013: Live Action (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 4:30 & 9 p.m.

Quartet (PG-13) ((( Century 20: Noon, 2:30, 4:55, 7:25 & 9:50 p.m. Guild Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m.

Argo (R) (((1/2

and one part “Midnight Run” (and transparently so) as Sandy and Diana are forced to share a punishing road trip on which they will inevitably bond. An expert of both verbal and physical comedy, McCarthy is a worthy successor to John Candy, who also had a gift for warming up caricatures with loveable humanity. With “Identity Thief,” she gets to play even more colors, from almost ferally self-protective to emotionally vulnerable, and she’s well-matched by tried-and-true put-upon straight man Bateman. But director Seth Gordon — who made his name with the sharp, entertaining doc “The King of Kong” — still doesn’t feel quite at ease with telling a fictional narrative. “Identity Thief” feels bloated at 112 minutes, and curiously repetitive. More than once Gordon suggests a character has sustained a mortal injury, shifts into concerned slo-mo and serious music, then reveals that everyone’s fine. It’s the large-scale version of a kind of fake-out the picture tooregularly pulls for a laugh. More worryingly, “Identity Theft”

Mama (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 4:30 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 4:55 & 10:30 p.m.

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

NOW PLAYING VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.AMOURTHEMOVIE.COM

ON OVER

125

TOP TEN LISTS

Persons with disabilities who require auxiliary aids or services in using City facilities, services or programs, or who would like information on the City’s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, may contact: ADA Coordinator, City of Palo Alto, 650-329-2550 (Voice) ada@cityofpaloalto.org

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Sports Shorts

STANFORD FOOTBALL

Quality over quantity

NATIONAL CHAMP . . . Former Stanford All-American Chris Derrick has been named USA Track & Field’s Athlete of the Week after winning the USA Cross Country Championships 12-kilometer race in 35:36.6 on Saturday in St. Louis, Mo. After multiple runner-up finishes at the NCAA championships, Derrick won his first national title in his first year as a professional athlete. Derrick holds the American collegiate record in the 10,000 meters and was a 14-time NCAA Division I All-American while at Stanford. Derrick is now training in Portland, Ore. Derrick will compete at the IAAF World Cross Country Championships in Bydgoszcz, Poland on March 24. “I’m excited to test myself against some of the best runners in the world,” Derrick said. “I expect to be a bit over my head and to have to really struggle through, which I hope will give me perspective and help me grow as an athlete.”

Cardinal’s 12-man recruiting class offers a variety of talent by Rick Eymer

D

STILL PERFECT . . . The top-ranked Stanford women’s water polo team remained perfect as it posted an 8-5 win over UCLA on Sunday in the championship game of the Stanford Invitational. Kaley Dodson scored twice in the final 2:32 of play as Stanford improved to 8-0. The Bruins held a 4-3 advantage at halftime but were then shut down, scoring once in the second half. UCLA drew within 6-5 with just over six minutes remaining, but Cardinal goalie Kate Baldoni made three of her six saves in the final quarter, keeping the Bruins from tying it. Freshman Anna Yelizarova led Stanford with three goals. The Cardinal beat UC Davis, 11-2, earlier in the day as Kiley Neushul recorded a hat trick while Olympian Melissa Seidemann and Yelizarova each scored twice.

ON THE AIR Friday Women’s basketball: Arizona at Stanford, 7 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday Men’s basketball: Stanford at Arizona St., 4 p.m.; ESPNU; KNBR (1050 AM)

Sunday Women’s basketball: Arizona St. at Stanford, 2 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Thursday, Feb. 14 Men’s basketball: USC at Stanford, at Arizona St., 8 p.m.; ESPNU; KNBR (1050 AM)

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Palo Alto’s Jacey Pederson (19) and Heidi Moeser (22) head to congratulate Alyssa Maharaj on her first-half goal that gave the Vikings a 2-0 lead on the way to a 9-0 victory that clinched the team’s first league title since 2005.

PREP SOCCER

Palo Alto girls go worst to first with league title by Keith Peters t was early December and the Palo Alto girls’ soccer team was struggling once again. The Vikings, after two down years of not making the Central Coast Section playoffs after 10 straight years of qualifying, were off to a 1-4 start. Second-year coach Kurt Devlin was a little concerned, especially after having to deal with a senior class his first season that was not happy with how the new coach ran things. “It wasn’t looking good,” Devlin said. On Dec. 13, though, Palo Alto battled defending CCS Division III champ Menlo School to a 2-2 deadlock. The Vikings were missing nearly half their roster due to the holiday break, but played great in the second half to forge the tie. “That was kind of the turning point in the season,” said Devlin. “Then I thought we had something.” “They had no confidence up to that point,” said Paly assistant Eric Seedman. “They had no confidence last season and I think it carried over.” Following the tie with Menlo, everything changed for Palo Alto. “We haven’t lost since,” Devlin said. Palo Alto has a 12-match unbeaten streak since its last loss on Dec. 8. Included in that streak is a 9-0-1 mark in the SCVAL El Camino Division. The latest victory came Wednesday, a 9-0 romp over visiting Wilcox that

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Keith Peters

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Keith Peters

LIN DELIVERS . . . Palo Alto High grad Jeremy Lin made a career-high five 3-pointers as the Houston Rockets tied an NBA record and set a franchise mark with 23 treys in a 140-109 win over the visiting Golden State Warriors on Tuesday night. Lin scored 28 points and dished out nine assists in the wild victory. Lin finished 10 of 16 from the field, including 5 of 8 from 3-point range. The 28 points marked his eighth 20-plus point performance of 2012-13. On Wednesday night, in a 114-108 loss to the Miami Heat, Lin had 13 points and three assists.

Palo Alto junior Sunny Lyu scored three goals and added three assists in the 9-0 win.

avid Shaw let his Stanford football coaching staff wait near fax machines as they came to life just after 4 a.m. Wednesday, indicating official commitments on National Letter of Intent Signing Day. Looking for the right combination of brawn and brains, Stanford signed 12 players to national letters of intent, significantly fewer than last year’s highly regarded group. Shaw said not to look at the numbers, but the quality. The class was still rated as high as 16th by some groups. “When you look at this class, you will see size. You will see athleticism. You will see toughness,” Shaw said. “We made it a point in this class to find tight ends and linebackers who can physically do what we need, and we’re excited about the guys we found.” The 12 players average 6-feet-4 and 235 pounds and that’s without defensive linemen and just two offensive linemen. Among Stanford’s latest crew, five were named PrepStar AllAmericans and five were members of the ESPN 300. Nine were rated at least four stars by various recruiting services, including two five-star selections. Nine signees also were selected to play in an All-American game, while 10 were ranked top-25 in the nation at their respective positions by various services. “First and foremost before we ever start this process, you’re going to see guys that fit us,” Shaw said. “You’re going to see guys that are bright and intelligent.” Seven offensive players were signed, including a trio of tight ends to help offset the loss of Levine Toilolo and Zach Ertz, both of whom declared for the NFL draft. Two offensive linemen, a quarterback and a wide receiver were also signed. On defense, the Cardinal added two each at outside linebacker and inside linebacker. One player is listed on both sides of the ball as a wide receiver and cornerback. “Offensively, we believe that we’ve added exciting firepower,” said Shaw. “Ryan Burns is a big, athletic, strong-armed quarterback, and he is joined by Francis Owusu, who is one of the most explosive wide receivers in the nation. Up front, we have added two physical, aggressive and versatile offensive linemen who fit our style and temperament of play.” Stanford’s signing of three tight ends could be the strength of the signing class. Austin Hooper, from nearby San Ramon, is a First-Team All-State two-way standout, cap(continued on page 34)

Gunn wrestlers hope to pin down another title Palo Alto would like to join the Titans among the contenders at the SCVAL Championships this weekend by Keith Peters

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he Gunn wrestling team has been making numerous additions to the program’s history book in recent years, like last year’s team title at the SCVAL Championships — the program’s first since 1976. The Titans continued to write history this season by winning the Bianchini Memorial tournament, taking second at the San Ramon Invitational and finishing seventh at Mid Cals. Whether the history book continues to have pages added will be

determined over the new few weeks when the Titans compete at the league meet and Central Coast Section championships. First up is the SCVAL finals on Friday and Saturday at Homestead High in Cupertino. There, Gunn will attempt to defend its title. “Similar to last year, I think we have the manpower to win league again,” said Gunn coach Chris Horpel. “We have clinched the dual-meet title, so now it’s time to see what we can do with the league tournament and CCS.” Gunn scored 195.50 points to win

the 2012 league finals, holding off Los Gatos (182.50), Monta Vista (165.50) and Palo Alto (148.50). The Titans had only one individual champ, but qualified 12 to the section tournament. “We have a lot of kids who can make the finals this year,” said Horpel, “so I am hoping we will produce more league champions than our one last year.” Gunn comes into the meet ranked sixth in the CCS, but as the highest team from the SCVAL. Monta Vista is No. 10 in the section while Palo Alto is No. 11. The Titans have

three wrestlers rated at the top of the league — senior Eric Cramer (126), sophomore Ian Cramer (132) and senior Sean Lydster (195). They rank No. 2, 6 and 7 in the CCS, respectively. Eric Cramer was third last year in this meet, as was his brother. Lydster was fourth. Other top Titans include junior Michael Abramovitch at 106 (No. 3 in league), senior Daniel Papp at 120 (No. 2 in league), senior Blaze Lee at 145 (No. 3 in league), junior Stephen Martin at 170 (No. 3 in league) and senior Harsha Mokkarala at 220

(No. 3 in league). Also expected to compete is junior Cadence Lee at 106. She just won her third straight section title at the Girls’ CCS Wrestling Championships despite battling a bad knee. Lee has qualified for the girls’ CIF State Meet. “Cadence has a bad knee and her state championship has priority over our league tournament,” said Horpel. “On the other hand, she is an integral part of our being able to win this thing (as she was last year). (continued on page 35)

Prep soccer

Palo Alto’s (L-R) Erin Chang, Sunny Lyu, Nina Kelty, Lena Chang, Alyssa Maharaj, Priscella Bell (4) and Paige Bara celebrate the Vikings’ 9-0 victory over Wilcox on Wednesday, which clinched the SCVAL El Camino Division title — the team’s first league crown since 2005. cessful season and celebrated Senior Day with a 3-2 triumph over visiting King’s Academy on Tuesday. Menlo (9-0, 11-2-4) twice rallied from one-goal deficits to pull out the win. Junior Sienna Stritter tallied both those goals for the Knights, who got the winning goal with eight minutes remaining from Maya Norman off a second assist by Chandler Wickers. In Atherton, host Sacred Heart Prep moved into second place in the Foothill Division following a 1-0 victory over Crystal Springs. The Gators (4-2-4, 8-4-5) got the winning goal in the 19th minute from junior Meagan Terpening off an assist from junior Alex Bourdillon. SHP can remain in second by beating King’s Academy (Thursday) and Menlo on Saturday (3 p.m.), both at home. Meanwhile, Pinewood grabbed sole possession of first place in the WBAL Skyline Division with a 5-2 victory over host Mercy-Burlingame at Skyline College. The teams entered the match tied for first place, with the winner all but clinching the outright division championship. Pinewood (11-0-1, 12-3-2), which has two matches remaining after picking up a forfeit win over Latino Prep, took a shot at officially locking up the division title on Thursday against host Mercy-San Francisco. With that accomplished, the Panthers will move on to a playoff match against the Foothill Division’s fourth-place team to decide the WBAL’s final CCS berth.

“It was an exciting game, in which we lost one of our starting freshmen, a dynamic midfielder (Amrita Mecker), to injury in the sixth minute,” said Pinewood coach Michael Tetzlaff. “But, the team shook it off, adjusted to the bigger field and gusty wind, and just went about its business without being unnerved by the importance of this game for the standings in our division.” Freshman Kelly Branson had a hat trick to lead Pinewood. Jordan Berke and Nicole Colonna added the other tallies. Gretchen Olsen, Courtney Copriviza and Leah Hess provided assists while Hannah Ditzler was solid in the cage. In the PAL Bay Division, MenloAtherton got a first-half goal from junior Sabiha Viswanathan off of an assist by Liz Cruz for a 1-0 win over host Terra Nova on Wednesday. The Bears improved to 6-4-1 in league (8-6-3 overall) with three games remaining before playoffs. Boys’ soccer Robert Hellman tallied the winning goal and later added another tally to pace Sacred Heart Prep to a 4-1 victory over visiting Eastside Prep on Wednesday. The victory kept the Gators (9-0-2, 12-2-3) tied for first place in the WBAL with Menlo (9-1-2), both with 29 points. Nick Salzman tallied SHP’s first goal off an assist by Andrew Segre, with Segre making it a 3-1 match in the second half on an assist by Derek Chou.

Photo courtesy Priory

earned the Vikings their first league title since 2005. That capped a run from worst to first in the space of one season as the Vikings went from demotion to promotion. “It’s nice to end our senior year like this,” said Paly goalie Erin Chang, one of only four seniors on the team. “Last year was definitely a rebuilding season.” The Vikings went 1-7-4 in the SCVAL De Anza Division in 2012, tying Gunn for last place. Paly, however, was dropped to the El Camino Division on a tiebreaker. “The sad thing about last year is that we had talent,” said Devlin. “We just didn’t show it . . . being able to the league takes the bitter taste out of last year.” The Vikings (11-4-2 overall), with 28 points, can’t be caught by second-place Santa Clara (7-2-2 and 23 points), which has only once match left. Interestingly enough, the last time Palo Alto won a title, in the De Anza Division, the Vikings outscored their league opponents, 60-1. With two matches remaining, the goal differential is 51-4. Juniors Sunny Lyu and Megan Tall helped add to that growing total as Lyu had three goals (and three assists) and Tall added two goals in the win over Wilcox. Sophomore Katie Foug, junior Alyssa Maharaj, freshman Heidi Moeser and junior Julia Kwasnik (penalty kick) tallied the other goals before the Vikings took to the field for an impromptu dog pile to celebrate their longawaited league title. “We’re really balanced,” said senior Nina Kelty, who shares the captain role with Chang. “We all play well together.” Now, Palo Alto can look forward to returning to the CCS playoffs. The last time the Vikings did so out of the El Camino Division was 1999. Devlin said his team’s goals since Day 1 was to win the league title “and make a good run in CCS. If we get the right draw, the girls can do well.” The Menlo School girls, meanwhile, became the first local team to clinch a league title and CCS berth by wrapping up the West Bay Athletic League (Foothill Division) crown last Thursday with a x-x victory over host Notre Dame-San Jose. The Knights continued their suc-

Keith Peters

(continued from previous page)

Priory senior Mariana Galvan signed a national letter of intent to play soccer at Santa Clara University this fall. Just down the road, host Menlo School kept its title hopes alive by beating visiting Pinewood, 6-0, for its third straight league win. Menlo (9-1-2, 12-3-3) took the lead early on and never looked back. Senior Ryan Karle scored three times for Menlo while Timmy Costa went from goalie to striker, making the most of the rare opportunity by scoring twice. In the SCVAL El Camino Division, senior Chris Meredith scored three goals as Palo Alto defeated

host Wilcox, 5-0, and moved into second place. Meredith provided the winning goal in the third minute before Gen Murphy made it 2-0 with another unassisted goal just four minutes later. Meredith scored twice more in the first half, the second assisted by Christian Huard, before Fernando Rodriguez capped the scoring in the second half. The Vikings are 7-2-1 in league (12-4-2 overall) and trail only Fremont with two matches remaining. N

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Sports

Recruiting (continued from page 32)

tain of the CIF Open Division state champion (De La Salle) and No. 1 ranked team in the nation. Greg Taboada, out of Atlanta, also earned First-Team All-State honors and was ranked the 167th overall prospect in the nation and 18th overall player in Georgia by ESPN.com. Eric Cotton, of Nampa, Idaho, could prove to be the best kept secret of the bunch. He was offered scholarships by two Pac-12 schools. He was rated Idaho’s top prospect and the 227th best in the nation at

his position. “People have asked me the last few years, `Where do you find those tight ends?’” Shaw said. “We believe that we have three guys in this class who can be as productive in the running game and passing game as Coby Fleener, Zach Ertz and Levine Toilolo were for us.” Burns, out of Leesburg, Va, is a PrepStar Dream Team selection and U.S. Army All-American who can throw and run, ala Kevin Hogan. He ranked top-six in the nation among pro-style quarterbacks in the class by PrepStar, ESPN.com and Rivals. com. Owusu is the younger brother of former Cardinal wideout Chris

Owusu, now playing for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The younger Owusu is a taller version at 6-3 who broke his brother’s prep receiving records and ranked among the top 20 wide receivers in the nation by PrepStar and Rivals.com. The two offensive lineman are David Bright, who can play tackle or guard and is rated as a PrepStar All-American, and Thomas Oser, who is an experienced center ranked 11th in the nation by 247Sports.com and can also play offensive guard. Outside linebacker Peter Kalambayi is one of the most decorated players in the nation, earning FirstTeam All-American honors by USA Today, selected to the U.S. Army All-American Bowl and one of five finalists for the high school Butkus Award. Kevin Palma was ranked the 10th best middle linebacker in the nation and 196th overall player by Scout. com. He earned First-Team AllState honors following a senior season that saw him record 19 tackles for loss including a school-record eight in one game. Sean Barton, a PrepStar AllAmerican and consensus top-three player in Utah who played myriad positions on both sides of the ball, totaled 43 touchdowns and nearly 4,000 receiving yards on offense plus more than 200 tackles and 36 tackles for loss on defense. He will enroll in 2015 , following his two-year LDS church mission in Africa. Three-way threat Taijuan Thomas has prospects at both wide receiver

Stanford women line up another top recruiting class tanford women’s soccer coach Paul Ratcliffe has announced that eight players have signed letters of intent to play for the Cardinal next fall, including 17-year-old goalkeeper Jane Campbell, currently in camp with the full U.S. national team. The class also features seven Californians, five Bay Area products, three members of the U.S. under-18 player pool, and the reigning California player of the year. The Stanford women’s soccer class of 2017: Stephanie Amack (Pleasanton), Maddie Bauer (Newport Beach), Jane Campbell (Kennesaw, Ga.), Siobhan Cox (Los Altos Hills), Nathalie Marie (Berkeley), Carly Olszewski (Upland), Megan Turner (Danville), and Ryan Walker-Hartshorn (Oakland).

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and cornerback plus special teams for Stanford, with demonstrated track speed and playmaking football ability that earned him top-35 prospect rankings in Louisiana by ESPN. com and Rivals.com and Honorable Mention All-State honors. “It’s a small class because we didn’t have a lot of guys walking out the door,” Shaw said. “We have a lot of guys coming back with a lot of high expectations as far as their play

The class will strengthen a program coming off its fifth consecutive NCAA College Cup appearance and fourth consecutive Pac-12 Conference championship. “We are very excited to announce the addition of eight exceptional student-athletes to our program,” Ratcliffe said. “They all have unique qualities which will help rebuild our team after graduating a strong senior class in 2012.” The Cardinal returns six starters and 19 players from a team that went 21-2-1. Stanford loses senior All-Americans Alina Garciadmendez, Mariah Nogueira, and Rachel Quon, but returns 2011 All-America goalkeeper Emily Oliver, as well as regulars in defense, midfield, and all of its starting forwards. N and their improvement is concerned. We wanted to bring some guys in that could come in and compete.” On Jan. 1, Stanford outlasted Wisconsin, 20-14, to capture the program’s first Rose Bowl victory since 1972. By that time, most of this class had been secured. Shaw said he listened to music while watching film instead of waiting by the fax machine for the official letters. N

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Sports

Palo Alto boys wrap up De Anza Division hoop title; Eastside Prep girls clinch title tie

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

by Keith Peters he high school basketball regular season is coming to a close and only one league title has been wrapped up. That means there’s still a lot to be decided in the next few days. The Palo Alto boys don’t have to worry about that after they clinched the SCVAL De Anza Division title with an easy 60-19 romp over lastplace Cupertino on Tuesday night. The Vikings won their 18th straight game while improving to 10-0 in league (20-1 overall) with two games remaining in the regular season. Paly will celebrate Senior Night on Friday against visiting Los Gatos at 7:45 p.m. Senior Aubrey Dawkins will be among those honored after leading Paly with 20 points, four rebounds, three assists and two steals against Cupertino. The Vikings, who shot 53 percent from the field, grabbed a 33-9 halftime lead and coasted from there with 10 players scoring. The Eastside Prep girls, meanwhile, all but locked up their firstever West Bay Athletic League (Foothill Division) title as senior Hashima Carothers scored 22 points and grabbed 13 rebounds in a 4734 win over visiting Pinewood on Tuesday. The host Panthers (8-1, 17-5) ) won their ninth straight and clinched at least a tie for division crown by beating co-leading Pinewood (7-2, 18-5). Eastside Prep can make it official on Friday (6;30 p.m.) by beating visiting Castilleja while Pinewood visits Menlo School. The WBAL playoffs will begin next week. Eastside Prep ended Pinewood’s five-game win streak. Menlo School, meanwhile, can earn a share of second place by beating Pinewood on Friday. The third-place Knights (6-3, 16-7) got 25 points and 14 rebounds from Drew Edelman in a 53-48 win over visiting Mercy-San Francisco on Tuesday. In Atherton, Sacred Heart Prep tuned up for the WBAL playoffs by surviving a 52-49 overtime win over Castilleja in a game that featured 11 ties and 11 lead changes. Helen Gannon and Melissa Holland each tallied 14 points for SHP (4-5, 16-7) while Paige Vermeer led Castilleja (0-9, 4-19) with 17 points, 10 rebounds, five assists and six steals. Yasmeen Afifi added 10 points and 13 rebounds while Lauren Rantz, back from a broken hand, became the fifth player in Castilleja history to collect at least 700 rebounds. In the SCVAL De Anza Division, Gunn moved into a virtual tie for second place with Wilcox following a 60-38 romp over host Saratoga on Wednesday night. Olivia Tapia poured in 22 points and Zoe Zwerling added 14 as the Titans won their third straight and improved to 7-2 (13-5) heading into a big showdown with first-place Lynbrook (10-1) on Friday at Gunn (6:15 p.m.). The Titans also will host rival Palo Alto on Saturday at 4 p.m. The Vikings (4-5, 8-12), mean-

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Cadence Lee

Aubrey Dawkins

Gunn High

Palo Alto High

The junior won her third straight title at the Girls’ CCS Wrestling Championships by pinning all three of her opponents in the 103pound division and scoring 28 points as the Titans finished fourth overall.

The senior had 45 points and 14 rebounds in two basketball wins, including 26 points in a victory over Homestead that clinched a title tie in the SCVAL De Anza Division as the Vikings improved to 19-1.

Honorable mention Gabi Bade Pinewood basketball

Olivia Biggs Pinewood soccer

Hashima Carothers* Eastside Prep basketball

Chloe Eackles Pinewood basketball

Marissa Hing* Pinewood basketball

Megan Tall Palo Alto soccer

Kirby Gee Palo Alto soccer

Preston Kuppe Palo Alto soccer

Chris Meredith Palo Alto soccer

Bobby Roth Menlo basketball

Brendan Spillane Sacred Heart Prep soccer

John Strong Menlo soccer * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

Wrestling (continued from page 33)

She is a prospective league champion and has a 20-1 record against the boys. So, I am playing it by ear with her wrestling at league.” After thinking about that for a moment, Horpel added: “Right now the answer is yes. She will have to re-injure her knee a little for me to say no.” So, pencil in Lee as one of Gunn’s title contenders. While Gunn’s season has been filled with positives, Palo Alto has battled injuries and health issues that have decimated its dual-match season. “We are still dealing with some health and injury issues,” said Paly coach Dave Duran. “We are hoping to get everyone back by the weekend. If we do, we will make a splash.” Duran sees Gunn and Monta Vista as the prohibitive favorites for the team title. “Monta Vista has competed in some tough tournaments this season,” said Duran. “This will make a difference for them this weekend and through the CCS tournament. The dual-meet champions (Gunn and Cupertino) are usually a strong

contender for the tournament title. However, only one EC (El Camino Division) dual champion has won the tournament title (Los Altos in the mid-1990s). Tino is young; they may not have enough points to make a dent. Fremont and Wilcox are young and have been wrestling well. They both have a few wrestlers who can score big points this weekend.” Palo Alto also has its share of contenders and point scorers, depending once again on health issues. Senior Trent Marshall is the No. 1-ranked SCVAL wrestler at 152 pounds. He was third in this meet last year. Senior Erik Anderson is No. 1 at 182 pounds (No. 4 in CCS) and will defend the title he won last season. Paly junior Andrew Frick is rated No. 2 at 220 pounds (No. 4 in CCS) and looks to improve upon last year’s third-place finish. Paly senior Gary Hohbach, who was seventh at the league meet last year, is ranked only No. 13 in the CCS at 152 pounds but has had a very solid season and could be a big point-scorer. Junior Jordan Gans (160) and senior Alex Taussig (195) also could factor in the scoring. Wrestling begins each day at 10 a.m., with finals on Saturday evening. N

while, suffered their fourth straight setback in a 56-41 drubbing by host Wilcox (7-2, 19-2). In the PAL South Division, Menlo-Atherton saw its title hopes slip away in a 46-40 loss to previously winless Carlmont in Belmont. Emma Heath had 13 points for the Bears (7-3, 11-11) while first-place Woodside improved to 10-0 with a 43-42 win over Sequoia. Boys’ basketball Menlo School (10-1, 14-7) held on to first place in the WBAL with a 6151 win over host King’s Academy. The Knights will close their regular season with three straight home games against Pinewood, Eastside Prep and Crystal Springs —likely needing two wins to clinch no worse than a tie for the league title. Menlo won its 10th straight game with its second win in as many days. The Knights beat Priory in a makeup game Monday.

Menlo overcame a late charge by TKA, which tied the game at 48 with about four minutes remaining. Over the last few minutes, the Knights’ defense clamped down to end the game on a 13-3 run. Bobby Roth (17 points) and Liam Dunn (11 points) were instrumental in the run as they came up with big baskets and free throws to seal the game. In Atherton, host Sacred Heart Prep (9-2, 13-8) remained in second place in the WBAL with a 57-19 win over Eastside Prep (2-9 (13-10). The Gators grabbed a 30-4 halftime lead and cruised to victory. Corbin Koch led SHP with 13 points while Ricky Galliani and Ian Bennett combined for 21. In the PAL South Division, host Menlo-Atherton won its second straight with a 37-36 victory over Carlmont. The Bears moved to 5-5 in league (9-13 overall) with three games remaining. N

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Menlo Park Historical Property Values - 2012 ALPINE ROAD AREA

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 5 5 2 4 3 10 5

Median $ 1,585,000 980,000 808,000 1,367,000 1,249,000 1,322,500 975,000

Min $ 980,000 670,000 675,000 1,259,000 1,175,000 875,000 848,000

Max $ 2,405,000 1,380,000 941,000 3,350,000 1,330,000 3,575,000 3,305,000

Avg $ / SF 646 732 576 540 638 820 858

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 28 22 22 13 27 17 17

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 22 24 16 13 14 19 28

Median $ 1,881,500 1,740,000 1,702,500 1,787,000 1,803,500 2,045,000 1,907,500

Min $ 1,105,000 880,000 1,185,000 1,130,000 1,425,000 1,030,000 1,545,000

Max $ 4,300,000 4,100,000 3,710,000 2,821,000 4,900,000 4,675,000 3,800,000

Avg $ / SF 767 661 727 662 709 774 762

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 50 41 38 37 38 57 37

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 62 48 40 49 38 61 60

Median $ 1,633,000 1,408,000 1,362,500 1,400,000 2,139,813 1,590,000 1,254,500

Min $ 735,000 715,000 719,000 760,000 1,050,000 955,000 798,000

Max $ 4,800,000 2,925,000 2,349,000 2,480,000 3,242,000 3,500,000 2,753,500

Avg $ / SF 810 745 786 754 807 842 801

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 52 53 63 45 41 52 70

Median $ 1,987,500 1,850,000 2,040,000 1,945,000 2,326,000 1,976,000 1,882,500

Min $ 1,080,000 800,000 975,000 868,000 1,145,000 900,000 985,000

Max $ 7,625,000 4,482,000 5,300,000 4,250,000 4,310,000 5,375,000 5,250,000

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 37 30 36 23 25 35 36

Median $ 1,335,000 1,477,000 1,315,000 1,355,000 1,400,000 1,455,000 1,277,500

Min $ 631,000 725,000 790,000 825,000 940,000 860,000 868,000

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 18 28 20 20 21 19 18

Median $ 1,356,500 1,140,000 1,277,500 1,182,000 1,375,000 1,410,000 1,447,500

Min $ 810,000 547,000 895,000 313,000 272,000 800,000 1,056,000

MENLO OAKS

Median $ 1,952,500 2,168,000 1,842,500 2,200,000 2,620,625 2,225,000 1,910,000

Min $ 939,000 800,000 711,000 855,000 685,000 1,260,000 816,000

Max $ 3,900,000 4,700,000 3,725,000 3,054,000 4,995,000 4,990,000 4,100,000

Avg $ / SF 870 757 766 733 868 810 789

Median $ 1,017,500 1,065,000 1,012,500 930,000 1,212,250 1,119,000 970,000

Min $ 562,600 420,000 525,000 445,000 541,000 541,000 700,000

Max $ 2,300,000 1,775,000 2,100,000 1,733,000 1,850,000 2,066,000 1,650,000

Avg $ / SF 786 682 704 664 770 779 735

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold Median $ 32 1,016,500 27 835,000 29 790,000 21 825,000 27 945,000 29 975,000 36 923,000

Min $ 325,000 600,000 290,000 500,000 277,000 600,000 770,000

Max $ 1,630,000 1,525,000 1,322,500 1,165,000 1,900,000 1,300,000 1,395,000

Avg $ / SF 646 612 607 538 606 688 663

Avg $ / SF 930 817 794 791 905 892 868

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 43 37 26 32 32 35 37

Median $ 677,000 650,000 605,000 589,000 752,500 856,000 757,000

Min $ 330,000 286,000 380,000 220,000 390,000 519,900 530,000

Max $ 2,225,000 2,289,000 1,735,000 940,000 2,800,000 2,135,000 1,800,000

Avg $ / SF 567 454 488 477 599 663 655

Max $ 3,995,000 4,000,000 3,070,000 3,200,000 2,995,000 2,874,000 2,615,000

Avg $ / SF 950 806 766 779 948 974 806

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 40 53 63 50 31 63 27

Median $ 386,000 330,000 320,000 300,000 380,000 629,900 675,000

Min $ 200,000 213,000 174,000 210,000 255,000 331,000 568,000

Max $ 600,000 500,000 530,000 439,000 494,900 925,000 790,000

Avg $ / SF 276 291 289 291 341 391 629

Max $ 2,330,000 2,200,000 1,700,000 1,900,000 2,050,000 1,850,000 2,400,000

Avg $ / SF 706 622 704 687 790 801 766

Year 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

# Sold 3 4 3 3 4 2 6

Median $ 1,800,000 2,300,000 1,685,000 1,850,000 2,037,500 2,197,500 2,147,500

Min $ 1,400,000 1,825,000 1,525,000 1,625,000 1,720,000 1,920,000 1,850,000

Max $ 1,900,000 3,125,000 1,738,000 2,650,000 2,865,000 2,475,000 2,275,000

Avg $ / SF 977 882 790 926 1,051 1,025 843

SHARON HEIGHTS/STANFORD HILLS

COUNTY/ALAMEDA AREA

CENTRAL MENLO

ALLIED ARTS/DOWNTOWN

MIDDLEFIELD TO EL CAMINO

MLS data based on single family home values Page 36ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊn]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

WILLOWS/O'CONNOR

FLOOD PARK

COUNTY AREA/FAIR OAKS AVE

EAST OF 101

FELTON GABLES


Palo Alto Weekly 02.08.2013 - Section 1