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Vol. XXXIV, Number 15 N January 11, 2013 AN ALMANAC, MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE AND PALO ALTO WEEKLY PUBLICATION

HOME+GARDEN WINTER 2013

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Winter Home & Garden Design

VISION

EXPANDED IN PALO ALTO |PAGE 4

OUT-EICHLERING EICHLER IN PALO ALTO | PAGE 10 BIG BLOWOUT, SMALL BUDGET IN MOUNTAIN VIEW | PAGE 20 CREATING SPACE DOWN UNDER IN PORTOLA VALLEY | PAGE 26

A new day at City Hall Greg Scharff, Nancy Shepherd to lead City Council in 2013 PAGE 3

Donate to the HOLIDAY FUND page 14

Spectrum 16 Movies 20 Eating Out 22 Shop Talk 23 Puzzles 43 NArts Bing Concert Hall opens with Beethoven

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NSports Paly boys’ soccer having fun again

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NHome Brrr: not too late to save plants

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Featuring the World Class Collection of a Famous Collector and Palo Alto Resident Antique Agra | India | 7’10� x 9’8�

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Upfront

As of Dec. 31 479 donors $363,886

See who’s already contributed to the Holiday Fund on page 14

Goal $350,000

Donate online at PaloAltoOnline.com

with matching funds

Local news, information and analysis

Scharff, Shepherd to lead City Council in 2013 After Scharff wins unanimous support for mayor, Shepherd beats out Holman for vice mayor job by Gennady Sheyner he Palo Alto City Council ushered in the new year Monday night by choosing Greg Scharff and Nancy Shepherd as its mayor and vice mayor for 2013. At a meeting that began with a swearing-in ceremony for four council members and ended with

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an emotional send-off for two others, the council voted unanimously to select Scharff as its mayor for the next 12 months. The decision was largely a foregone conclusion, given Scharff’s position as vice mayor in 2012 and the city’s tradition of elevating its vice mayor to the council’s

top position the following year. Shepherd’s election to vice mayor was more suspenseful after she withstood a challenge from Councilwoman Karen Holman. The former school-district activist was elected by a vote of 6-3, with Councilman Pat Burt, Councilman Greg Schmid and Holman herself voting for Holman. The election to mayor completes Scharff’s meteoric rise to the top of the city’s political scene. He was elected in 2009 on the strength of a

grassroots campaign based in large part on his opposition to a proposed business-license tax. Unlike most of his colleagues, he had not served on any local boards or commissions before joining the council. Since then, he has emerged as one of the council’s most confident and assertive voices, taking a leading role in the city’s effort to curtail the rising costs of employee benefits and to promote bike-friendly initiatives. He and Holman both played a

central part in the city’s successful campaign in 2011 to repeal binding arbitration for public-safety workers. He was also an outspoken opponent of last year’s proposal to legalize medical-marijuana dispensaries in the city — a proposal that fizzled in the ballot box in November. Scharff also hasn’t shied away from the lighter components of his position, taking part in various (continued on page 6)

ENVIRONMENT

Palo Alto set to debate future of old landfill site City to consider how much of the Byxbee Park site should be left open for proposed compost plant by Gennady Sheyner alo Alto’s landfill in Byxbee Works Department, staff is recPark officially closed in the ommending capping 34 acres of summer of 2011, but the de- the 51-acre site and leave 17 acres funct facility continues to puzzle en- uncapped. The uncapped area, acvironmentalists and local officials, cording to the report, would be big who will consider this week what to enough to accommodate the new do with the former landfill’s site at plant and ancillary operations. the end of Embarcadero Road. Other options on the table include The property has been a source postponing all capping as well as of heated controversy in the green capping the entire acreage. community in recent years, with Former Councilwoman Emily many conservationists urging the Renzel, a staunch conservationist city to honor its promise of capping who opposes the construction of a the landfill and allowing the acreage facility in Byxbee Park, is lobbying to revert to public parkland. State for the latter option. In a letter to regulations also mandate that the the council, Renzel urged officials city cap the facility to prevent con- to cover the landfill as soon as postamination of the surrounding area sible with the aim of having the enfrom methane and leachate. tire 126-acre Byxbee Park reopened But another contingent of envi- to the public by 2014. The city had ronmentalists believes that a 10-acre already capped 75 acres. section should house a new com“It is time for us to complete the posting plant. The landfill previ- capping of Byxbee Park and make ously housed the city’s composting this a park like Bedwell Baylands operation, and its closure has forced Park in Menlo Park and Shoreline the city to ship its yard waste to the Park in Mountain View,� Renzel Z-Best facility in Gilroy. wrote. “For all of Palo Alto’s talk This coming week, the City Coun- of environmental leadership, this cil will wade into the messy green is one area where we have failed debate when members consider how abysmally.� much of the landfill site, if any, the But this option would come at a city should cap. The council will also price, particularly if the city elects review at its Monday night meeting to proceed with the new compost the staff’s request for proposals for plant. Staff estimates that removing vendors who could potentially build and reconstructing the cap to make a new anaerobic digester, a plant that way for the plant could cost up to $3 converts compost, food waste and million. The staff report notes that yard scraps into energy. The request the “selection of any of these landwill also allow companies to propose fill capping options will not limit options for exporting these categories the potential size or functionality of of waste for processing elsewhere. an energy/compost facility because With the city still studying the po- some cap can be removed if a larger tential costs and impacts of an anaer- facility is selected. obic digester, staff is reluctant to cap “However, options that result in the entire site, particularly if the city the removal and subsequent reconwould later have to disturb the area struction of cap acreage would inand remove the cap to make way for crease the overall development costs the waste-to-energy facility. In a new report from the Public (continued on page 10)

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Veronica Weber

Early birds for Freebirds People came from near and far to vie for free burritos for a year at the grand opening of Freebirds World Burrito on El Camino Real in Palo Alto on Thursday, Jan. 10. Among the first folks lined up Wednesday night were Gilbert Sadler of Modesto, left, Shawn Underwood of Antelope, Katie Williams of Palo Alto and Stanford University students Alex Kwiatkowski and Andrew Mather. Temperature dropped to a chilly 34 degrees overnight, but most — especially those who make standing in line for openings a habit — came well-prepared with tents and cold-weather gear.

EDUCATION

Teens enthusiastic about new school calendar In one-to-one interviews, students say ‘work-free break’ is worth tradeoffs by Chris Kenrick

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igh school students overwhelmingly endorsed recent reforms to the Palo Alto’s academic calendar in informal interviews conducted at Gunn and Palo Alto high schools this week. Among 17 students interviewed one-to-one, all but three were enthusiastic about the new calendar, which launched the school year earlier in August in order to squeeze in the first semester before the December break. Previously, the school year began in late August and first-semester exams were held in late January. Nearly all the students said the clean semester break over the holidays had allowed them to relax in a way that had not been possible when

they faced post-holiday finals. The value of that, they said, outweighed any inconveniences with the new calendar. “In high school, especially at schools like Paly and Gunn where the curriculum is so rigorous, it’s rare to have a period of time where there’s no work,� said Paly senior Emma Ketchum. “Having that break with no homework was really, really nice.� Ketchum, who said she originally had been “worried� about the new schedule, found the experience better than she expected. “I thought it would be hard (to take finals in December), but it really wasn’t,� she said. “And after everything was done, having

that break without any homework and minimal college applications you have left was really nice. You could relax and just have that time to breathe.� Like most others, Gunn senior Katherine Zu echoed those sentiments. “Having a stress-free winter break is really great, and I think that’s what makes this calendar change awesome,� Zu said. “My winter break was relatively stress-free although I did have college applications. For the first week I could just focus on college apps instead of having to balance out both finals and college apps,� she said. (continued on page 5)

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EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Tyler Hanley (223-6519) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Colin Becht, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Adam Carter (223-6574), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 2236569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Palmer (223-6588) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6546) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6544) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza

January 21, 2013 Community Day of Service

Join your neighbors and take part in a national day of service in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This event is open to all ages and includes over 20 service projects to choose from! Advance registration is REQUIRED. Presented in partnership with: BBYO, Congregation Beth Am, Congregation Beth Jacob, Congregation Etz Chayim, Congregation Kol Emeth, Gideon Hausner Jewish Day School, Hillel at Stanford, Keddem Congregation and Kehillah Jewish High School.

EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo

The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Š2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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Address: ________________________________

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PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505)

It’s the first time the break is actually a break.

— Daniel Gleeson, a Palo Alto High School sophomore, on the new academic calendar that ended the first semester in December instead of January. See story on page 3.

Around Town FIRST CHAPTER ... Palo Alto’s two newest City Council members made their dais debuts Monday night, and the differences were striking. Liz Kniss, a political veteran who has twice been a Palo Alto mayor and just concluded her last term on the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, opened the newest chapter in her council career by reverting to campaign mode and thanking supporters who helped bring her back to the council — her husband, her family and her campaign manager. Attorney Marc Berman, the only truly “new� member of the council, kept a lower profile but managed to inject a little levity to the august proceedings. His first comments after being sworn in came after Councilman Larry Klein nominated Greg Scharff to serve as the city’s mayor in 2013. At that point, Berman — who was temporarily sitting in outgoing Mayor Yiaway Yeh’s chair in the middle of the dais — asked staff for some clarification. “If Greg gets elected, do I lose this seat?� he asked. “It might change my decision.� He did lose the seat, but it didn’t change his decision. Berman praised Scharff, calling the new mayor “generous with his sage advice but also open to different viewpoints.� Scharff was elected unanimously. LAST CHAPTER ... The first council meeting of 2013 was the last meeting for two Palo Alto council members. Yiaway Yeh and Sid Espinosa, who both joined the council in 2008 and who had served as mayor, respectively, in 2012 and 2011, earned official commendations and an outpouring of praise from their colleagues. Councilwoman Karen Holman, in commenting on Yeh’s tenure, pointed out that on Jan. 7, 1992, exactly 21 years before the Monday meeting, Tom Seaver and Rolly Fingers were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. “I thought it was appropriate to mention it this evening because you, as mayor, hit it out of the park,� a somewhat verklempt Holman told Yeh. To Espinosa, she offered another date — Jan. 7, 1936. That was the day of the famous tennis match between Helen Moody and Howard Kinsley, in which the two combined for 2,001 volleys. She likened it to

Espinosa’s famous ability to go without sleep and to be seemingly everywhere at once. She referred to Espinosa’s “boundless� energy and called him “omnipresent and indefatigable — which is what the tennis record is.� Both former mayors returned the favor and heaped praise on their colleagues. Yeh, in a tearful speech, thanked his family, his fellow council members and the voters of Palo Alto who elected him in November 2007 despite his young age. “Let me close with what I know is very much in the room tonight — a deep appreciation and love for Palo Alto and all of our community.� Espinosa also had kind words to say about Palo Alto’s civic-minded populace. “We have a city full of ridiculously smart people who get involved, get the facts, rally the troops and want to be deeply involved,� he said. “I have learned how rare this is in other cities, and we are all better off for it.� BLACK AND BLUE ... One Palo Alto neighborhood could soon see a major overhaul in trash collection as soon as April. The neighborhood, which city staff is in the final stages of identifying, will be asked to say farewell to their black garbage cans. Instead, residents would now be asked to load all their waste into one of the two remaining carts — blue or green. The green one would contain yard trimmings, food waste and all other compostable materials. The blue one would contain recyclable goods and “landfill� items such as pet waste, diapers, bathroom waste and, interestingly enough, granola-bar wrappers. The pilot program was scheduled for City Council consideration in December, but staff chose to kick the item forward to early 2013. On Monday night, the council will get its chance to approve the program and give the residents in the selected neighborhood the city’s first residential compostablescollection program. According to a new report, the goals of the oneyear pilot program are to divert more recyclable and compostable items from landfills, determine whether the new system is costeffective, simplify waste-sorting for residents and reduce the number of garbage-truck trips. N

Upfront uito Cre cisq ek an

“With the old calendar, finals were three weeks after winter break, and sometimes — even if I reviewed during winter break — I’d still forget some stuff and have to review again, so it was relatively ineffective.� Two of the 17 students interviewed said they’d prefer to go back to the old calendar and a third student, Paly senior Bria Vicenti, was critical of the new calendar but believes it should be retained and tweaked. “I’m not a fan of the new calendar,� said Paly senior Charlie Dulik. “Maybe I had a little less stress over winter break, but I had a much greater amount right before the end of the semester,� he said, noting that some teachers had scheduled big unit tests the week before finals, just as many seniors were dealing with college applications. Gunn sophomore Erica Watkins said the new calendar made it nearly impossible to get feedback, or have discussions with teachers, about final exams because grades were not due until after break. Worrying about those grades created stress for her over the break, she said. Vicenti — who received early acceptance from a college the night before her final exams in December

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“It was relaxing and really nice.� Paly sophomore Daniel Gleeson got his wisdom teeth extracted over winter break but said he still preferred it to last year’s winter break. “It’s the first time the break is actually a break and that teachers don’t expect you to remember everything after you come back,� Gleeson said. “They don’t have to keep reteaching the same thing. They just move on, which is good.� As for the mid-August school start, Gleeson said, “I wasn’t too happy about it, but I’m going to be really happy to get out in May and I’m looking forward to that.� After heated debate, the new calendar was adopted by the Board of Education in an emotional 3-2 vote in 2011. It applies to the current school year as well as to 2013-14. Board action on future school calendars, starting with 2014-15, is expected late this fall, and the school district has appointed an advisory committee to evaluate the recent reforms. The committee will help survey students, parents and teachers about the pros and cons of the new schedule. Committee members are elementary parents Amy Kacher, Stuart Friedman, Lance Martin and Kathy Jordan; middle school and high school parents Susan Usman, Howard Lee, Mukund Sreenivasan and

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— said the new calendar was particularly rough for some students hit with negative early-decision news from colleges just as they were taking finals. “I do think in the long run (the new calendar) is a good idea, but it was rough to have it switch in my senior year,� Vicenti said. “I think it will take them a few years to work out the kinks.� Vicenti said the mid-August school start forced her to leave early from her camp-counseling job on the East Coast. “I wish they could find an alternative to starting school so early,� she said. But most students interviewed said the early start had not been a problem for them or their families. Paly senior Elisabeth Yan said she’d had to come back early from a summer internship in London, but the earlier end to first semester was worth the tradeoff. “We used to study during winter break, and it was nice just to have that closure so there was nothing you had to worry about,� Yan said. Yan, who spent part of her break finishing college applications, said it was nice not to have to think about upcoming finals at the same time. “And since (college applications) were due Jan. 1, we had a week left of break where there was nothing to be done.

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residents at the meeting worried that removing the bridge would make it more difficult for emergency vehicles such as ambulances to reach the area between the bridge and U.S. Highway 101. One person urged neighbors not to be “selfish� in lobbying for the removal of the bridge, saying the 3,000 cars that cross it each day would be displaced to nearby roads, some which are already traffic bottlenecks. Helen Fitzgerald, who lives on the Palo Alto side of the creek, said mixing the problems of traffic and flood control was an example of what she called “scope creep.� “Are we addressing flooding? Traffic? Traffic and flooding? We need to focus on the primary concern: flooding and flood insurance.� Len Materman, the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority’s executive director, said 5,400 homes in the creek’s floodplain currently pay about $6 million per year in federally mandated flood insurance. He said the comprehensive plan to reduce flood risk in the area might allow residents to avoid paying flood insurance. Fitzgerald said she appreciated officials for “taking a step back� to look at the issue more closely with the environmental-impact report, but another Palo Alto resident, who identified himself as Mike, voiced concern that the study might mean flood-prevention improvements might not happen soon enough. He

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ommunity members from Palo Alto and East Palo Alto jammed into the theater at the Lucie Stern Community Center in Palo Alto to voice their opinions on the proposed replacement Newell Road bridge on Tuesday night, Jan. 8. Residents at the public meeting, some of whom were forced to stand in the theater’s aisles for lack of room, brought the issues of traffic, pedestrian safety and flood control to the forefront of the discussion of replacing or removing the bridge, which has spanned the San Francisquito Creek for more than a century. The San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority and the cities of Palo Alto and East Palo Alto plan to replace the bridge as part of a larger effort to reduce the risk of flooding in adjacent neighborhoods. The bridge’s abutments currently constrict water flow and will not accommodate a major flood like the one that occurred in 1998, according to Joe Teresi, senior engineer for the City of Palo Alto. The group’s recommendation was to assess the environmental impact of a series of alternatives to the bridge. Detractors and supporters from nearly every side spoke about the options during the meeting. The 40-foot-long bridge lies at the East Palo Alto-Palo Alto border, where Newell crosses the creek. At 18 feet wide, it barely allows two vehicles to pass at the same time and

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Residents split over Newell Road bridge by Eric Van Susteren slows traffic significantly. Many meeting attendees opposed building a new, 75-foot-long, 32-footwide bridge that would allow cars to pass more easily and whose design would ease the risk of flooding at the site. The detractors said a larger bridge would increase traffic in the neighborhood and make the area less safe for pedestrians, especially for school children during the hurried morning commute. Several residents supported the idea of removing the bridge altogether, their suggestion receiving boisterous applause and cheers. One suggested it would reduce the flood risk and be far cheaper than rebuilding the bridge, which City Manager James Keene said would cost around $3 million. The proposal to rebuild the bridge on a much smaller scale to allow only pedestrians and bicyclists to cross was also popular among attendees. They said such a bridge would allow for children who bike or walk to school to use it without increasing traffic in the area. “I’d like to know why (the city) is searching for a gold-plated solution to a flood problem when it seems relatively clear that a pedestrian bridge or no bridge at all would solve it,� one Palo Alto resident said. Jaime Rodriguez, chief transportation official for the City of Palo Alto, said these options were possible, but the project would lose significant state funds designated for the bridge’s replacement. Some

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The Newell Road bridge, which was built in 1911, is 40 feet long and 18 feet wide, barely wide enough to allow two vehicles to pass at the same time. said he lost two cars in the 1998 flood and was unable to live in his house for two months. “My main concern is not to have ‘analysis paralysis,’� he said. “I want that bridge gone so that we can have the Chaucer Street bridge gone so I don’t have to worry about my house flooding.� The environmental-impact study of the possible bridge alternatives could take a year to complete, city staff said. Margaret Trujillo, a resident of East Palo Alto, spoke against removal of the bridge, saying that it would further isolate commuters and school children from East Palo Alto, where there are already few options for reaching Palo Alto. “I don’t think it’s right to categorically disenfranchise an entire community by saying, ‘We don’t want a bridge,’� she said. Anna Turner, also a resident of East Palo Alto, said removing the bridge would not be a good option for her community. “The Bay Area is growing; it’s not

separate from Palo Alto and East Palo Alto,� she said. “Tearing down a bridge and separating a community is not going to solve anything. East Palo Alto has accepted a lot of burdens; maybe it’s time to spread it out.� Keene closed the meeting after former 49ers quarterback Steve Young, a resident of Palo Alto, spoke to the crowd, encouraging them not to support a bridge design that would significantly change how traffic moves through the area now. “Maybe on both sides of the bridge we could gather enough consensus ... to not change the scope of the bridge that we’ve gotten so used to,� he said. N Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren can be emailed at evansusteren@paweekly.com.

Tekla Nee; Gunn teacher Laurie Pennington; Walter Hays Elementary School teachers Abby Bradski and Michelle Ketcham; Paly teacher Debbie Whitson; Gunn Assistant Principal Trinity Klein; Jordan Middle School Principal Greg Barnes; Gunn students Justice Tention and

Sarah Dukes-Schlossberg and Paly student Jessica Feinberg. Gunn student Neel Guha was chosen as an alternate and one more Paly student representative is to be named. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@paweekly. com.

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com What solution do you envision for the problems involving the Newell Road bridge? Share your opinion on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Jan. 7)

Mayor: The council elected Greg Scharff to serve as the city’s mayor for 2013. Yes: Unanimous Vice Mayor: The council elected Nancy Shepherd to serve as the city’s vice mayor for 2013. Voted for Shepherd: Berman, Klein, Kniss, Price, Scharff, Shepherd Voted for Holman: Burt, Holman, Schmid

Planning and Transportation Commission (Jan. 8)

Density-bonus ordinance: The commission discussed proposed changes to the city’s density-bonus ordinance, which gives developers incentives for building affordable housing. The commission voted to continue the item to a later date to give staff a chance to make minor revisions to the proposal. Action: None

Utilities Advisory Commission (Jan. 8)

Carbon neutrality: The commission voted to authorize City of Palo Alto Utilities to spend up to $0.0015 per kilowatt hour to achieve carbon neutrality for the city’s electric portfolio in 2013. The council had authorized staff to recommend a $0.0025/kWh threshold. Yes: Chang, Cook, Eglash, Hall No: Foster, Melton Absent: Waldfogel Demand response: The commission voted to extend by three years the Demand Response Pilot Program for large commercial electric customers. Yes: Chang, Cook, Eglash, Foster, Hall, Melton Absent: Waldfogel

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Upfront

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by Gennady Sheyner propose new initiatives; actively campaigning for or against ballot measures; challenging staff during technical discussions of refuse rates and utility strategies; and willingly taking the central role in the city’s bitter battle against labor unions. Scharff was at the forefront of the city’s successful 2011 ballot measure to repeal binding arbitration for police and firefighters, an issue that had split the council and frustrated the public-safety workers who have long viewed the provision as a bedrock protection of their labor agreement. He was also a leading opponent of last year’s proposal to allow up to three medical-marijuana dispensaries to open in the city and an enthusiastic advocate of the proposed renovation of California Avenue, a proposal that has enraged a group of merchants. In each case, his side won, and it wasn’t even close. Scharff managed to fight his battles with a smile on his face and without the wonky jargon that often characterizes Palo Alto’s council discussions. For example, when council members in 2010 were discussing the refuse operation’s

o most Palo Alto residents, Greg Scharff was a political wild card in 2009, the year he decided to run for City Council. Competing in a 14-candidate field full of former commissioners, school-board members and longtime community volunteers, Scharff was a true newcomer to the political scene. But it didn’t take long for the South Africa-born attorney to make an impression and narrow the namerecognition gap. In a few months, he quickly brought himself up to speed on all pressing local issues, from pension obligations to highspeed rail; took a commanding lead in cash raised; and won the blessing of major political doyens and business leaders. The effort paid off, and in January 2010, the political neophyte found himself as one of five council members (four new ones and re-elected incumbent Larry Klein) taking part in a swear-in ceremony. Since then, Scharff has established himself as one of the City Council’s most assertive and enthusiastic members, frequently coauthoring colleagues’ memos that

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struggle to reconcile its ambitious environmental goals with its financial health, Scharff summarized the dilemma in a catchy slogan, “Zero Waste is equaling zero dollars.� (The council later decided to add fees to bolster the refuse fund.) Over his three years on the council, he has managed to be assertive without apparently alienating any of his colleagues, who on Monday night unanimously elected him mayor for 2013. Scharff in many ways presents a sharp contrast to Yiaway Yeh, the 2012 mayor who took part in his final City Council meeting this week. Yeh, a former auditor, had been one of the council’s leading policy wonks, utilities experts and voices of moderation and inclusiveness. As mayor, he generally strived for compromise, whether between colleagues arguing on opposing sides of an issue or in the disputes between the council and the labor unions (Yeh was among the council members most sympathetic to the labor unions). His signature program, “The Mayor’s Challenge,� (continued on page 8)

Mayor

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groundbreaking ceremonies and city functions throughout the year. Councilman Larry Klein, who nominated Scharff, praised his ability to “keep us moving along and reach sometimes compromise solutions and sometimes better-worded resolutions.� Scharff has already chaired numerous meetings, particularly those involving Stanford University, from which outgoing Mayor Yiaway Yeh had to recuse himself. “We’ve seen he can do the job,� Klein said of Scharff. Klein also rejected the notion that a mayor is strictly a ceremonial position in Palo Alto. The position involves not only chairing meetings but also representing the city in other communities, in the United States and abroad. “I think Greg has shown that he is a leader for our community,� Klein said. In his first speech as mayor, Scharff said he has much to look forward to in 2013, including the opening of the new Mitchell Park Library and Community Center, the implementation of the city’s new Bike and Pedestrian Transportation Plan, and the city’s electric utility reaching a carbon-neutral portfolio. He also said the council still has plenty of work to do, particularly when it comes to curtailing costs. “As those of you who follow city issues know, we still have much hard work ahead and many choices that will define our community for decades,� Scharff said. “That future is now. At the end of 2013, I want all of us to look back and say, ‘Wow. We accomplished a lot.’�

Veronica Weber

(continued from page 3)

Newly elected council memeber Marc Berman laughs out loud while joking with Greg Scharff about keeping the Mayor’s seat during a council meeting on January 7, 2013. Both Scharff and Shepherd joined the council in 2009, the last council election to occur in an odd-number year. Councilwoman Gail Price and Holman also joined the council that year, while Klein was re-elected for another term. Price, who nominated Shepherd, lauded her respect for the colleagues, preparation for meetings and sense of humor. Shepherd has been heavily involved in the city’s ongoing effort to promote youth well-being and in its decision-making process over the future of the Cubberley Community Center. A Southgate resident, she took a central role in her neighborhood’s opposition to the state’s high-speedrail proposal in 2009 and has served on the council’s Rail Committee. On the cover: Newly elected Mayor Greg Scharff and Vice Mayor Nancy Shepherd smile while listening to a public comment at City Hall on Jan. 7, 2013. Photo by Veronica Weber.

Over the past year, the former PTA Council president has also chaired the council’s Finance Committee. “Nancy is well-versed on a wide variety of issues and prepares carefully and thoughtfully for all meetings and discussions,� Price said. In accepting the nomination, Shepherd called it “an honor� to serve on the council. “I think we do take rigor with all of our debate,� Shepherd said. “This is something we really want to get right for the community.� The council began its meeting by swearing in the four members elected last November — incumbents Burt and Schmid, former Mayor Liz Kniss and Marc Berman. The meeting ended on a bittersweet note, as the council said its farewell to two of its youngest members, Yiaway Yeh and Sid Espinosa. The council unanimously passed resolutions in honor of Yeh and Espinosa, with each receiving a standing ovation for his five years of service on the council. N

Upfront

REAL ESTATE TRENDS by Samia Cullen

HEALTH

2012 Local Real Estate Market Activity

‘Moderately severe’ flu season expected New, more potent vaccine available for the elderly he influenza virus, which is hammering states in other parts of the country, is slowly moving into Northern California, officials said this week. One potent strain, Influenza A (H3N2), is causing more people to become severely ill and more people to be hospitalized this season, local health officials and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said. As of Dec. 29, the strain had not yet made it into Santa Clara County, county public health officials said, but hospitals and health agencies are watching, since the strain has been associated with at least 18 child deaths. More severe illness is typical with H3N2 viruses, and officials are predicting a “moderately severe� flu season, according to the CDC. But one concern is that the season has started earlier than usual. The flu season typically begins in February, but it started in early January in many states this year, according to the CDC. The percentage of people nationwide seeing a doctor for flu-like illness is more than double last season’s peak of 2.2 percent. In the past four weeks, the percentage has jumped sharply from 2.8 to 5.6 percent, according to the CDC, which tracks the flu’s progression nationwide.

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by Sue Dremann Although 29 states have reported high levels of influenza-like illness, with another nine states reporting moderate levels, California has not yet seen many cases, according to Santa Clara County officials. Dr. Cornelia Dekker, medical director of the Stanford-Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Vaccine Program, said so far only 15 confirmed cases of influenza have been reported by the Stanford lab, which tests suspected cases coming into Stanford’s main hospital, clinics, emergency room and children’s hospital. “We’re nowhere near what the other states are experiencing, but I’m sure our time is coming,� she said. Dr. Joe Bresee of the CDC’s Influenza Division said in a statement that the number of hospitalizations is also high for this time of year. “While we can’t say for certain how severe this season will be, we can say that a lot of people are getting sick with influenza. ... Anyone who has not already been vaccinated should do so now,� he said. Dekker said that flu sets its own pace, and although it does tend to go from east to west, no one can really predict which states will be hardest hit. “Strains also mutate over time, so we’re always dealing with a new set

of characters,� she said. This year’s flu started with Influenza B infections, but now the predominant strain is the Influenza A (H3N2), she said. The old pandemic H1N1 strain from 2009 is going around this year, but is occurring relatively infrequently, she said. Dekker said there is still time to get a flu shot. It takes about two weeks to build up antibodies for protection. Three strains of influenza are in the vaccine, which uses only dead viruses. Only about 50 percent of children and adults were immunized last year, she said. The more people who are vaccinated, the smaller the potential pool of infected people who can spread the germ, she said. People who are concerned about vaccines containing preservative can obtain preservative-free flu shots, and now new micro-needles are available for people ages 18 to 64 who fear injections, she said. Another new influenza vaccine that has four times as much antigen is available for seniors to give them added protection. The alternatives are available through many pharmacies and doctors, she said. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@paweekly.com.

The local housing market showed exceptional strength throughout 2012. A broad mix of buyers, including cash investors, move-up buyers and ďŹ rsttime buyers encouraged by historic low interest rates and reports of rising prices, produced a huge demand. Inventory remained low throughout the year. As a result, most homes saw multiple offers, with cash buyers dominating the winning bids. Multiple listing service (MLS) statistics indicate that in 2012 there were 472 single-family home sales in Palo Alto and 344 sales in Menlo Park. The median price increased 21% to $1,726,000 in Palo Alto and 11% in Menlo Park to $1,325,000. Atherton had 84 sales in 2012 with a median price of $3,200,000, a decrease of 3% from 2011. However, due to strong off-market sales activity, especially in Atherton, the MLS statistics cited above do not fully reect actual market data. The townhouse/condominium mar-

ket was as strong as the market for single family houses in 2012. 147 units sold in Palo Alto, with the median sale price increasing 17% to $890,000. Menlo Park had 74 units sold with a median price of $892,000, an increase of 27%. Looking forward: Our local housing market will continue to be strong in 2013, reecting the continuing economic recovery, the pace of IPOs and the increase in hiring that should continue through the year. For sellers, there is no better time to sell your home. For buyers, if you have a stable income, it is good time to buy before further increases in house prices occur. For investors, real estate investments historically have been a more secure investment than stocks and a hedge against ination. Investing in California real estate is a good diversiďŹ cation strategy. Statistic sources are provided by MLS deemed reliable but not guaranteed and exclude private sales.

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focused on bringing neighbors together through recreational events staged citywide. Scharff, on the other hand, doesn’t mind disagreeing. He has been the council’s happy warrior, always eager to take a strong stance, offer a counterargument and spar with opposition — whether labor leaders or medical-marijuana proponents — through press releases, ballot arguments and televised debates. His style — genial but blunt, eloquent but light on the jargon — proved a popular one with his colleagues, who elected him vice mayor in January 2012 despite his lack of seniority. Councilman Pat Burt, who nominated Scharff for vice mayor a year ago, said the city needs a “strong communicator� and a leader “with a strong understanding of the issues and challenges facing the community.� Scharff, he said, demonstrated that he has those skills. “We look for a leader who can communicate spontaneously because things don’t always go according to script,� Burt said. Scharff’s election as vice mayor last year essentially ensured that he would be named mayor this year, in accordance with a city tradition. Councilman Larry Klein, who formally nominated Scharff for mayor Monday night, said he embodies all the qualities important in the position — the ability to efficiently chair meetings; to eloquently represent the council’s positions to the public; and to serve as the face of Palo Alto when dealing with other cities and with people “from other walks of life.� “In recent years, we’ve had more and more contact with cities around the world,� Klein said. “Again, our mayor is a spokesperson, our representative. I think it’s important to have the best possible person, and this year I think it’s Greg.� It doesn’t hurt that Scharff already has ample experience chairing meetings. With Yeh consistently recusing himself from discussions involving Stanford University (where his wife was employed), it was up to Scharff to lead those meetings. Klein also observed in his nominating speech that Scharff would be the first mayor since 2008 not to have been raised in Palo Alto (Klein, a Florida native, was mayor in 2008). In that sense, Klein said, Scharff represents “an interesting demographic that speaks to many of us here in Palo Alto� — the people who were not born here but who “came here, recognizing that it’s a great place to live and work.� The influx of talent from the outside, Klein said, has “added so much to our culture and economy over time.� Scharff, 49, was born in South Africa and raised in Woodstock, N.Y. He attended Bowdoin College in Maine and the Columbia University School of Law. He moved to Palo Alto more than 20 years ago and now lives in Midtown and runs a law firm on California Avenue. In his first speech as mayor, Scharff called 2013 the “lucky 13� and “the year we get things done.� He said he looks forward to the opening of the Mitchell Park Library, the

Upfront renovation of the Main Library, the implementation of the city’s new bicycle master plan, the creation of trails around the perimeter of Stanford University, the reopening of El Camino Park (which has been closed while the city builds an emergency reservoir), the reconfiguration of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course, progress on the flood-control project around San Francisquito Creek, and streetscape improvements on California Avenue, a controversial project that includes reducing the number of lanes from four to two. Scharff said the lattermost change “will be nothing short of transformative and may be the change that most improves Palo Alto residents’ enjoyment of the city.� He also said the council will have plenty of work to do in the coming year, including curbing the rising costs of employee benefits, determining the future of Cubberley Community Center, figuring out whether the city should proceed with a waste-toenergy plant in the Baylands, solving downtown’s parking woes and tackling the “lingering issues of ‘fiber to the premises’ and the undergrounding of our utilities.� “We need to do all of this and more utilizing the best of the Palo Alto process, which to me is transparency, openness and an inclusive process coupled with strong community engagement and input,� Scharff said. N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING Of the City of Palo Alto Transportation Division Public Meeting Notice Fabian way Enhanced Bikeway Improvement Project DATE:

Thursday, January 17th, 2013 at 7:00pm

TIME:

7:00pm-8:30pm

LOCATION: Cubberley Community Center 4000 MiddleďŹ eld Road Room A-6 Palo Alto, CA 94303 The City is soliciting community input on design alternatives to improve bicycle accessibility along Fabian Way between East Meadow Drive and Charleston Road. This segment of the city’s bicycle network is crucial link to help connect to future bicycle-pedestrian bridge crossing alternatives planned at Adobe Creek & Highway 101 and builds upon recent improvements along San Antonio Road. The City is soliciting input on alternatives to reduce this segment of Fabian Way from 4-lanes to 3-lanes to provide a dedicated two-way left turn lane for enhanced safety for vehicles turning into and out of driveway along the roadway while supporting wider bicycle lane facilities. Improved pedestrian crossings are also being considered. Please join the discussion and provide your input. This community meeting has been schedule to present the conceptual plans. For further information contact: transportation@cityofpaloalto.org. or call (650) 3292441.

City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during a minimum 20-day inspection period beginning January 11 through 31, 2013 during the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. This item will be considered at a public hearing by the Architectural Review Board, Thursday, January 24, 2013 at 8:30 AM. in the Palo Alto City Council Chambers on the ďŹ rst oor of the Civic Center, located at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Negative Declaration will be accepted until 5:00 PM on January 31, 2013 in the Planning and Community Environment Department Civic Center ofďŹ ces on the ďŹ fth oor of City Hall. 780 Welch Road [12PLN-00429]: Request by WRNS Studio on behalf of Stanford University Lands and Buildings for Architectural Review of the replacement of a 3 story building with a new 3 story 31,353 sq. ft. building, including one level of below grade parking and associated site improvements. The project also includes a landscape reserve in lieu of 24 parking spaces for both 780 and 800 Welch Rd. Zone District MOR. *** Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

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NOTICE OF A SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, January 24, 2013 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review filed documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 50 El Camino Real [11PLN-00388]: Request by Huiwen Hsiao on behalf of The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University for Site and Design Review of the construction of a 70-room, three story, 51,948 square foot building on a 1.57-acre site, to house an expanded Ronald McDonald House program. The project includes a rezoning to Public Facility with a Site and Design Combining District (PF(D)) zone, and Comprehensive Plan re-designation (from Streamside Open Space to Major Institution/Special Facilities), and a Conditional Use Permit amendment. Zone District: Community Commercial with a Landscape Combining District (CC(L)). Environmental Assessment: A Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared for the project in accordance with CEQA. 398 Arboretum [12PLN-00508]: Request by The Container Store Inc., on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, for Architectural Review of new exterior storefronts and signage for The Container Store at the Stanford Shopping Center. Zone District: CC (Community Commercial). 780 Welch Road [12PLN-00429]: Request by WRNS Studio on behalf of Stanford University Lands and Buildings for Architectural Review of the replacement of a 3 story building with a new 3 story 31,353 sq. ft. building, including one level of below grade parking and associated site improvements. The project also includes a landscape reserve in lieu of 24 parking spaces for both 780 and 800 Welch Rd. Zone District MOR. Environmental Assessment: An initial study/Negative Declaration has been prepared. 2209-2215 El Camino Real [12PLN- 00404]: Request by Karen Kim on behalf Tai Ning Trading & Innovations Co. for preliminary Architectural Review of construction of a new three story mixed use development on a 5,392 square foot lot. Zone District: CC(2). Amy French Chief Planning Official

Upfront

Compost

(continued from page 3)

for the energy/compost facility,� the report states. The proposal for the compost plant gained momentum in November 2011, when voters overwhelmingly approved Measure E, which allowed the city to “undedicate� 10 acres of Byxbee Park to make way for the new compost plant. Leading proponents, including former Mayor Peter Drekmeier and attorney Walt Hays, have argued that keeping composting local would be better for both the environment and for the city’s bottom line than exporting the waste. If the city agrees with the staff and opts to cap 34 of the 51 acres, Palo Alto would still need to get permission from various regulatory agencies to proceed with the facility. In August, the city received permission from the Santa Clara County Department of Environmental Health to postpone capping the 51 acres until the 2013 construction season, according to the Public Works Department. The California Regional Quality Control Board and the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery also signed off on that postponement. Palo Alto would need another extension if it chooses to leave 17 acres uncapped. If this extension were not granted, the city would be required to proceed with capping the entire 51 acres. The staff report argues 17 acres would accommodate a 5-acre facility and its ancillary operations. Such a facility, the report states, “is the most feasible from an engineering perspective.� The option also “eliminates the need for any ‘recapping’ costs for a 5-acre site without drastically changing the character of the landfill’s grading plan, and it opens up an additional 34 acres of parkland.� N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

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News Digest District explores buying Bowman campus In search of more space to accommodate growing middle-school enrollment, the Palo Alto school district is exploring the idea of purchasing the campus of Bowman International School, an independent K-8 school adjacent to Terman Middle School on Arastradero Road. The possibility of talks with Bowman is on the agenda for the Tuesday, Jan. 15, meeting of the Palo Alto Board of Education. Superintendent Kevin Skelly has been scouting the community for new space to accommodate a growing population of middle school students. Officials have said a new middle school could be needed in five years. A Bowman acquisition would mean expansion of Terman rather than the opening of a fourth middle school. Current enrollment at Terman is 682, considerably less than that at Jordan (1,023) or Jane Lathrop Stanford (1,004) middle schools. N — Chris Kenrick

Palo Alto police search for bank robber A man who robbed the Provident Credit Union in Palo Alto on Wednesday afternoon, Jan. 9, remains at large. The man, who police described as a tall white man in his 30s with a scar near his right eye and wearing flip-flops, entered the bank at around 3:30 p.m. and pointed a handgun at the tellers. He escaped with an undisclosed amount of cash, Palo Alto police said. No one was injured. The credit union is located on El Camino Real between California and Cambridge avenues. Anyone with information about the crime is asked to call Palo Alto police at 650-329-2413. N — Palo Alto Weekly staff

Two arrested in Palo Alto carjacking Saturday Palo Alto police have arrested two suspects in a Saturday night carjacking near the intersection of California Avenue and Park Boulevard. A Palo Alto resident sitting in her parked Honda Accord at about 9:40 p.m., Jan.5, heard a tap on her window and faced a man pointing a gun and demanding her car. She complied, stepping out of the car. The suspect drive off as she called 911 from her cell phone. She was not injured. The suspect drove toward El Camino Real, stopping briefly to pick up another person before turning right on Birch Street. Police spotted the vehicle, now occupied by three people, turning from College Avenue onto northbound El Camino and stopped the car in the 400 block of Oxford Avenue. A BB gun was found in the glove compartment. Police arrested the driver, 18-year-old Amador Valentin Rivera of East Palo Alto, and a 16-year-old juvenile from Menlo Park, for felony carjacking. The third occupant was released without charges after police determined he had no role in the crime, police said. N — Chris Kenrick

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to hear a presentation from Lisa Hendrickson of Avenidas, discuss options for an waste-to-energy facility and landfill capping considerations; and consider a pilot residential composting program with reduced frequency of refuse collection. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 14, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will vote on a proposed bonus for teachers and staff members equivalent to 1 percent of 2011-12 salary. The board also will discuss the possibility of talks with the independent Bowman International School about potential acquisition of Bowman property adjacent to Terman Middle School on Arastradero Road. Following a 5:30 p.m. closed session to discuss a legal matter, the board meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 15, in the boardroom of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). HISTORIC RESOURCES BOARD ... The board plans to discuss 1305 Middlefield Road, a proposal by the city’s Community Services Division for a review of a new sign program for Rinconada Park. The meeting will begin at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 16, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to discuss 135 Hamilton Ave., a proposal for a four-story mixed-use building on an existing vacant lot; and 1305 Middlefield Road, a proposal for a new sign program for Rinconada Park. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 17, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PUBLIC ART COMMISSION ... The commission plans to meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 17, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Indecent exposure reported near Cal Ave Palo Alto police are looking for a man who exposed himself to a woman while she was sitting in a parked car near California Avenue Tuesday night, Jan. 8. (Posted Jan. 10 at 8:10 a.m.)

Eshoo celebrates passage of new cancer law Flanked by the wife of the late actor and cancer victim Patrick Swayze, Rep. Anna G. Eshoo Wednesday, Jan. 9, celebrated the passage of a law that requires the federal government to fight harder against the most deadly cancers. (Posted Jan. 9 at 12:19 p.m.)

Truck swerves off Highway 101 near Moffett No one was injured Tuesday morning, Jan. 8, after the driver of a truck heading southbound on U.S. Highway 101 lost control of his vehicle, which ultimately came to rest halfway down an embankment with its rear wheels up in the air. (Posted Jan. 9 at 8:25 a.m.)

For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

Jan. 2013

Advancements in Cataract Surgery Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1 to 2 p.m. Sunnyvale City Senior Center 550 E. Remington Drive, Sunnyvale

JCC to hold Mitzvah Day for community service

Presented by Yichieh Shiuey, M.D. PAMF Ophthalmology Please call the Sunnyvale City Senior Center at 408-730-7360 to register.

Join us for this educational presentation where you’ll learn what a cataract is and ďŹ nd out about new advancements in cataract surgery and how surgery can improve your sight.

The Oshman Family Jewish Community Center will hold its sixth annual Mitzvah Day on Monday, Jan. 21, to commemorate both the Jewish spirit of doing a “mitzvah� (good deed) and the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Posted Jan. 9 at 9:05 a.m.)

Menlo Park BBC deal falls through Kill the social media buzz: A former Facebook executive’s plan to reopen the landmark British Bankers Club in Menlo Park has fallen through. (Posted Jan. 8 at 9:13 a.m.)

Arrest in decades-old Mountain View murder case After 28 years, justice may finally be served in the death of Saba Girmai, a Santa Clara County woman who was found strangled to death in a Mountain View Dumpster in 1985, according to the Mountain View Police Department and the county district attorney. (Posted

Bay Area Association of Kidney Patients Presentation

Jan. 8 at 9:09 a.m.)

Palo Alto Center 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto

Palo Alto police nab suspected package thief A Union City man who police said stole packages from homes in Palo Alto and San Jose in recent weeks was arrested Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 1, after a Midtown resident saw the man steal items off a neighbor’s porch. (Posted Jan. 6 at 12:24 p.m.) Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.

Sunday, Jan. 27, 1 to 4 p.m.

Call 650-323-2225 or email at info@baakp.org to reserve your space.

Home Peritoneal Dialysis: Exploding the Myths Anjali Saxena, M.D., a nephrologist at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, will discuss how to take control of your life by using peritoneal dialysis overnight at home or at work. Diets for all Stages of Kidney Disease Faith Tootell, M.S., R.D., CSR, FADA, a renal dietitian and nutrition services manager at Satellite Dialysis, will talk about the best diet for all stages of kidney disease.

Autism: The Path To Understanding Monday, Jan. 28, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

We believe education can be engaging and joyous.

San Carlos Library 610 Elm Street, San Carlos

Presented by Sarah Cheyette, M.D. PAMF Neurology, Pediatric Specialist Please contact Rhea Bradley at 650-591-0341, extension 237.

Join us for a look at how our understanding of autism has progressed over time. Dr. Cheyette will discuss the changes that have occurred over time in the care and treatment of those with autism spectrum disorders.

sCelebrating arts and academics UĂŠ7ÂœĂ€ÂŽÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠĂŒÂœ}iĂŒÂ…iĂ€ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠVĂ•Â?ĂŒÂˆĂ›>ĂŒiĂŠVĂ•Ă€ÂˆÂœĂƒÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂˆÂ“>}ˆ˜>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ UĂŠ-ĂŒĂ€ÂœÂ˜}ĂŠVÂœÂ“Â“Ă•Â˜ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠLĂ•ÂˆÂ?`ˆ˜}ĂŠ UĂŠÂœVĂ•ĂƒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂŤĂ€ÂœViĂƒĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠÂ?i>Ă€Â˜ÂˆÂ˜} UĂŠÂœĂœĂŠĂƒĂŒĂ•`iÂ˜ĂŒĂŠĂŒi>VÂ…iÀÊÀ>ĂŒÂˆÂœ]ĂŠĂƒÂ“>Â?Â?ĂŠVÂ?>ĂƒĂƒĂŠĂƒÂˆĂ˘i SCHOOL TOUR >Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊ£ä]ĂŠLi}ˆ˜˜ˆ˜}棊\ääÊ>°“° Parents only please–registration not required. ÂœĂ€ĂŠ>Â˜ĂŠ>ÂŤÂŤÂœÂˆÂ˜ĂŒÂ“iÂ˜ĂŒ]ĂŠÂŤÂ?i>ĂƒiĂŠV>Â?Â?ĂŠÂ­ĂˆxäŽÊÎÓx‡£xn{]ĂŠiĂ?ĂŒÂ°x APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 18, 2013

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Dr. Manuel Sanculi Gaspay May 10, 1951 – December 30, 2012 Dr. Manuel Sanculi Gaspay, 61, was born in Cebu, Philippines on May 10, 1951. After a seven and a half year long hard battle with stage IV metastatic colon cancer, he peacefully passed away on December 30, 2012 surrounded by loving family and friends. Manuel graduated with a BS in Geodetic Engineering in 1972 and MS in Industrial Engineering in 1977 from the University of the Philippines. He migrated with his family in 1984 to the United States to pursue his graduate studies. He earned his Masters in Food Research in 1986, Masters in Economics in 1988, and his Doctoral degree in Food Research in 1993 at Stanford University. He served as an Area Manager for the Farm Systems Development Corporation, collaborating with farmers to establish irrigation system cooperatives in the Philippines during the 70’s and 80’s. He later was a Professor of Economics at the Asian Institute of Management prior to his term as the Director of the Environmental Management Bureau of the Philippines. He recently served as the Dean of the School of Business at Northwestern Polytechnic University. He was also a professor at Dominican University of California, Northwestern Polytechnic University, International Technological University and National Hispanic University, ďŹ nishing out his lectures despite his illness. He was an active member of the University of the Philippines Alumni Association, his beloved UP Beta Sigma Fraternity and the Free Masons. Manuel was a good and loving husband, father and friend. He was also affectionately known as “Pogsâ€?, “Pogaâ€?, “Mannyâ€?, “Butchâ€? and most importantly “Papaâ€?. His sense of humor and love for life was infectious. He always lived and practiced the principles of fairness and justice. He is survived by his wife May, his children Mik, Karla and husband Joseph Jr., Charina, and Nerissa, his sisters Sol, Monina and Luchie, his brothers Enrico and Francis. He doted on his two grandchildren Madison and Joseph III, so much so that he took them to Disneyland even though he was weak and gravely ill. He will be sorely missed but leaves a legacy of good work ethic and love for life. Arrangements entrusted to Alta Mesa Funeral Home in Palo Alto, CA. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Transitions Births, marriages and deaths

Sandra Brown Eakins Sandra Brown Eakins, a former Palo Alto mayor and civic activist, died Jan. 2 at her home in Oakland after a long illness. She was 75. Eakins was a longtime member and past president of the Palo Alto League of Women Voters and helped organize Smart Voter, an initiative that provides unbiased election information for California voters. She co-founded New Voices for Youth, a program designed to encourage civic engagement in high school students through the media arts. Eakins was born Nov. 10, 1937, in Oklahoma City, Okla., to Ray and Rebecca Brown and was raised in the Pacific Northwest. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1959 with a degree in art history and remained an active and devoted alumna. She earned master’s degrees from Boston University and Santa Clara University. She married Gilbert Eakins in 1959 and co-founded EOS (Eakins Open Systems), a computer integra-

Margaret Belle Howard Marshall died Dec. 22, less than one month short of her 98th birthday. She was born in Miraj, India, on Jan. 17, 1915. She moved to Southern California as a child. She had two brothers, who predeceased her. Dr. Harry P. Howard, of Atherton, was an anesthetist for many years at the Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto. Ernest R. Howard, B.S. and M.S. from CalTech, was a mechanical engineer at a Texas Instruments subsidiary in Massachusetts. She is survived by several nieces, grand and great nieces, and nephews, grand and great nephews. She obtained her B.A. from Wilson College in Pennsylvania in 1936. She was an executive secretary for IBM in New York City for many years. She was the widow of Dr. Roy K. Marshall (1907-1972), Professor of astronomy and author of several scientific books. She lived in Palo Alto from 1971 until July of 2004, when she moved to Los Altos. At the age of 89, she was still driving her ‘72 Cougar. Special thanks go to Lyn Carr, who befriended her over the years and aided and accompanied her through good times and bad.

Shirley Christian Ledgerwood

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Mrs. Shirley Christian Ledgerwood of Palo Alto passed away peacefully on January 3, 2013. She was 97 years old. She was the wife of Dr. John S. Ledgerwood (1912-2005), a dentist for many years in Palo Alto. Mrs. Ledgerwood moved with her family to 2050 Waverley Street in Palo Alto in 1952. She was a native of Monterey, Tennessee. She was active for many years in the Bay Area working for world peace and was at one time active with the Girl Scouts, the PTA, and the United World Federalists. A graduate of Agnes Scott College, she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Mortar Board. At the age of 21 in 1936, while living in Chattanooga, Tennessee and favoring integration, she joined the NAACP. She received Masters Degrees in English and Librarianship, attending the University of Tennessee, the University of Colorado, the University of California Berkeley, and Harvard University. She taught English at San Jose State University for ďŹ ve years and at Foothill College for 25 years. She will be fondly remembered by many of her students as a vibrant and engaging teacher. She was also a librarian at Woodside and Portola Valley Libraries, and was a research librarian for the Santa Clara County Libraries at Cupertino and Saratoga. She had articles and stories for children published by the Pilgrim Press. She also had several poems published. She was the author of a published novel entitled “Thy Brothers Bloodâ€?. In 1995 she compiled a collection of poems by and a biographical sketch of author Catherine Marshall, her longtime friend and roommate at Agnes Scott College, published under the title “Unlocked Dreamsâ€?. Shirley also organized a book club in Palo Alto that was active for over 54 years. She is survived by her three children, Pamela Ledgerwood, Chris Ledgerwood, and April Robinson, as well as by her six grandchildren, Lynette, Todd, Nicholas, Amy, Ana, and Reid, and by her four great grandchildren, Kaitlyn, Tyler, Liam, and Cai. A memorial service will be announced at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Friends Service Committee, 1501 Cherry St. Philadelphia, PA 19102.

PaloAltoOnline.com/ obituaries

1943-2012

dedicated to his ďŹ eld and his community and had deep sentiment for his family and roots. He served as a member of the Advisory Council of the Educational Travel Conference, the Travel Committee of the Commonwealth Club, and was a devoted member of the Palo Alto University Rotary Club. He is survived by his wife of 34 years, Suzanne Hardt Voll, mother Alva Staniford, stepmother Nona Voll, daughters Vicki Voll of Capitola and Sara Voll of Hawaii, stepson Jay Backstrand of Palo Alto, stepdaughter Kendall Nash of Mill Valley, grandchildren Ian, Kaylor, Jay, Alden, William, Dylan, and O’rian; and by brothers, John Voll, Bob Staniford, Tom Staniford, and David Staniford, and stepsister Lynne Chase. A memorial service will be held to celebrate his life on Jan. 22 at 3:00 p.m. at Stanford Memorial Church. Contributions may be made in Peter’s memory to the Foundation for a College Education, East Palo Alto; The Rotary Foundation, Rotary Centers for Peace and Conict Resolution, Palo Alto University Rotary; or The Stanford Historical Society. PA I D

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Margaret Belle Howard Marshall

Lasting Memories

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Peter Voll Peter Voll passed away surrounded by his family on Dec. 14 at the age of 69. Born July 3, 1943 in Imperial, CA, Peter, a proud fourth generation Californian, grew up in the town of Coalinga in the San Joaquin Valley. In high school, he was a gifted athlete and student leader. In1962, Peter moved to Palo Alto, CA to attend Stanford University. Graduating in 1965 he was involved as a campaign consultant in both congressional and senate races. Peter joined the Stanford Alumni Association in 1972 where he eventually became director of the Association’s edgling Travel/Study Program. He spent the next 18 years developing it into one of the premier alumni travel programs in the United States. Peter’s professional vision was to open roads to understanding different societies and cultures through tourism. In 1992 he left Stanford and devoted his attention to Peter Voll Associates (PVA), running educational tours. During his career, Peter designed and implemented more than 200 tours worldwide. He launched a number of travel industry ďŹ rsts including destinations to the People’s Republic of China, Burma, and Saudi Arabia. Peter was

tion business in 1972. She was active in civic affairs for decades, beginning with founding the Palo Verde Neighborhood Association and volunteering with the PTA for her children’s schools. She served on the Palo Alto City Council from 1997-2002, including a term as mayor. She also served on the Palo Alto Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee, Planning Commission and the Santa Clara Valley Transit Authority. She shared her love of the arts through her service on the Palo Alto Public Art Commission and the board of the Palo Alto Art Center. She is survived by her husband, Gilbert, of Mountain View; their children, Robert (Julie) of Wheaton, Ill., Daniel, of Oakland and Rebecca (James) Austin of Oakland; four grandchildren, Ryan, Sophia, Meta and Thomas; and her brother Mark (Renae) Brown, of Dayville, Ore. A memorial gathering is planned for Saturday, Jan. 26, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Road, Palo Alto. The family asks that donations in Sandra Brown Eakins’ memory be made to Smart Voter (www. smartvoter.org) or the New Voices for Youth Program (www. newvoicesforyouth.org).

OBITUARY

April 9, 1915 - January 3, 2013

PA I D

OBITUARY

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Last Year’s Grant Recipients 10 Books A Home .......................................$5,000 Able Works..................................................$5,000 Adolescent Counseling Services ..........$10,000 Art in Action ................................................$5,000 Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula........7,500 Break Through the Static..........................$2,500 Breast Cancer Connections .....................$5,000 Canopy .........................................................$3,000 CASSY ........................................................$15,000 Children’s Center of the Stanford Community ..................................$4,000 Cleo Eulau Center.......................................$5,000 Collective Roots .........................................$7,500 Downtown Streets Team ........................$15,000 DreamCatchers ........................................$15,000 East Palo Alto Center for Community Media ................................$3,000 East Palo Alto Charter School .................$7,500 East Palo Alto Children’s Day ..................$5,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation ................$5,000 East Palo Alto Youth Court ........................$3,000 Environmental Volunteers ........................$3,000 Family Connections....................................$7,500 Foothill College Book Program ................$5,000 Foundation for a College Education ........$7,500 Hidden Villa .................................................$5,000 InnVision ......................................................$7,500 JLS Middle School ....................................$5,000 Jordan Middle School ..............................$5,000 Kara ............................................................$15,000 Mayview Community Health Center .....$10,000 Midpeninsula Community Media Center.........$5,000 Music in the Schools Foundation ............$5,000 My New Red Shoes ...................................$3,000 New Creation Home Ministries ...............$5,000 Nuestra Casa ..............................................$5,000 PaciďŹ c Art League .....................................$2,500 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation ..............$5,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care ..............$6,500 Palo Alto Council of PTAs .........................$2,128 Palo Alto High School Get Involved!.......$1,500 Palo Alto Housing Corporation ................$5,000 Palo Alto Library Foundation ..................$17,500 Palo Alto Youth Collaborative.................$10,000 Peninsula Bridge Program .......................$5,000 Peninsula Youth Theatre ...........................$3,000 Project Safety Net....................................$20,000 Project WeH.O.P.E. .....................................$7,500 Quest Learning Center ..............................$5,000 Ravenswood Education Foundation .......$5,000 Silicon Valley FACES..................................$7,500 South Palo Alto Food Closet .....................$1,000 St. Francis of Assisi Youth Club ...............$5,000 St. Vincent de Paul.....................................$6,000 TEDxGunnHighSchool ...............................$2,000 TheatreWorks .............................................$5,000 Youth Community Service .......................$10,000

Support our Kids with a gift to the Holiday Fund.

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ach year the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund raises money to support programs serving families and children in the Palo Alto area. Since the Weekly and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation cover all the administrative costs, every dollar raised goes directly to support community programs through grants to non-profit organizations ranging from $1,000 to $25,000. And with the generous support of matching grants from local foundations, including the Packard and Hewlett foundations, your tax-deductible gift will be doubled in size. A donation of $100 turns into $200 with the foundation matching gifts. Whether as an individual, a business or in honor of someone else, help us reach our goal of $350,000 by making a generous contribution to the Holiday Fund. With your generosity, we can give a major boost to the programs in our community helping kids and families.

Give to the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund and your donation is doubled. You give to non-profit groups that work right here in our community. It’s a great way to ensure that your charitable donations are working at home.

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Q Please withhold the amount of my contribution.

479 donors through Dec. 31 totalling $181,943; with match $363,886 has been raised for the Holiday Fund 44 Anonymous .....................21,989

Newly Received Donations John and Ruth DeVries ...............** Bjorn and Michele Liencres ...1,000 Sue Bartalo & David Fischer ....100 Al and JoAnne Russell ..............250 Larry Klein ................................500 David and Karen Backer ...........150 Tony and Jan DiJulio...................** Don and Dee Price ......................** Ellen and Mark Turbow ............200 Anna Wu Weakland ..................100 Peter and Anne Koletzke...........500 John and Martha McLaughlin ...200 Lynda and Richard Greene..........** Ruth and Dick Rosenbaum .........** Martignetti Family ......................** Melanie Austin ..........................150 Tobye and Ron Kaye ...................** Ken Bencala & Sally O’Neil.....100 Jonathan J. MacQuitty ...........1,000 Craig and Susie Thom...............100 Kenyon Scott .............................200 Carolyn Razzano .........................** Joan Norton .................................** Marion Lewenstein ................2,000 Gwen Barry ...............................100 Amy Renalds...............................** Richard Ellson...........................100 Wynn Hausser ...........................150 Jim Lobdell and Colleen Anderson......................250 John Wilkes ...............................300 Charles Katz ..............................400 Katherine Jarvis ..........................50 Alan Wachtel .............................250 Charlotte S. Epstein ..................100 Eileen E. Brennan .....................250 Elgin Lee ...................................250 Elisabeth Seaman ........................50 Gargi Mitra................................100 Jill Bicknell ...............................100 Kathleen Levitt..........................100 Kim Orumchian ........................250 Linda Selden .............................125 Lynn and Dave Torin ...................** Guido and Madeleine Smeets ...500 Madeline Wong ...........................75 Victor and Norma Hesterman .....** Stephen Westfold ......................500 Timothy P. Collins..................2,500 Marc Igler and Jennifer Cray ......50 Bryan Wilson and Geri Martin Wilson .......................................100 Kenneth Schroeder and Frances Codispoti ...............500 Ralph R. Wheeler ......................200 Susan E. Hyder............................10 Nan Prince.................................100 Gavin and Tricia Christensen ......** Reed and Judith Content ...........100 Leannah Hunt ............................250 Roland Hsu and Julia Noblitt ....250 Mr. and Mrs. Donald Stites .........** Seth and Rosalind Haber...........200 CNC Foundation .......................350 Michael and Carolyn Keeler .....200 Laura and Robert Cory..............150 Claire and Ed Lauing ................250 Donald Kennedy .......................100 Rosalie Shepherd ........................** Rita Vrhel ..................................200 Nancy Moss.................................** Ellen M. King..............................** Bob Barrett and Linda Atkinson .** Rita and John Ousterhout ..........500

Erin Redfern ................................50 Jean Doble...................................75 Nancy Lobdell ...........................150 Deirdre C. Dolan .......................500 John Muller ...............................300 Susan Graham .............................50 Thomas Rindeisch ....................** In Memory Of Paul Heft ...................................100 Emmett Lorey .............................** Daniel Cox ................................200 Becky Schaefer ...........................** Lori Nelson and Dave Thom .....300 Philip Gottheiner .........................** Kathleen & Tony Hughes ..........100 Paul Hamilton ........................1,000 Steve and Diane Ciesinski...........** Carl W. Anderson ......................100 Ellie and Earl Caustin .................** Bob Markevitch...........................** Ellie and Elliot Eisner .................** Helen Rubin ..............................150 Gary Ellmann ..............................50 Dr. Irving & Ivy Rubin..............150 Jean M. Colby .............................** Anna & Max Blanker ................150 Mr. & Mrs. K. A. Kvenvolden ....50 Nancy Payne Peter Milward........** Robert Balint .............................100 Robert Makjavich......................100 Bob and Kay Schauer................100 Our Son Nick ............................500 Judy and Warren Goodnow .......100 Gary Fazzino ...............................25 Ray and Carol Bacchetti .............** Julia Maser ..................................** Karen L. Sipprell.......................250 C. Howard Hatcher, M.D. ...........** Ruchita Parat .............................200 Fraser MacKenzie .......................** Laurence L. Spitters ...............1,000 John Johnson ...............................** Ellie and Dick MansďŹ eld ............** Winyss Acton Shepard ................** Hugh O. McDevitt.....................200 Sara Doniach-Sandra Goodwin...** Joan and John Barksdale ...........200 Mrs. Melena Kirhin.....................** Lawrence Naiman .......................50 Tad Cody .....................................** Bonnie Packer .............................50 John Tuomy.................................** Bonnie and Bryan Street .............** Tinney Family ...........................500 Win and Barbara Foster ............150 A. Carlisle Scott ..........................** In Honor Of Nancy Cassidy...........................150 Jean and Chuck Thompson .........** The Breakie Girls, The Janes, The Hoda Epstein ...............................** Teatime Bouquet .........................** Lynnie and Joe Melena ...............75 Miriam Jacob ............................100 Richard Van Dusen and Kaye H. Kelley ........................................250 Stuart and Carol Hansen .............** Paul Resnick, from Eric Richert100 Van Whitis and Laurie Miller ...200 Roy Blitzer ..................................** Ted and Jane Wassam .................** Sallie Tasto, from Sandy Sloan .100 Allan and Marilyn Brown ...........** Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mullen .....100 Robert and Connie Loarie ...........** Palo Alto High School Guidance J. and Gayle Brugler ..............1,000 Department..................................** Gil and Gail Woolley ................400 Hamilton Avenue Friends ...........** Michael Kieschnick ...............1,000 Betty Gerard ..............................100 Businesses Jay Crosson & Sharon Levine...200 & Organizations Palo Alto Business Park ..............** Anne and Greg Avis ....................** Rae Cole ....................................100 Lasecke Weil Wealth Advisory Group, LLC .................................50 Frances and Ted Jenkins .............50 Tom and Pat Sanders ...................** Previously Published Zelda Jury....................................** Donors David F. Labaree .......................150 Marcie and Chet Brown ..............** Claude Madden ...........................** Mark and Betsy Friebel...............** Daniel and Lynne Russell .........250 Annette Glanckopf Kersten and and Tom Ashton ........................100 Carol Markus Aschwanden .................250 Carol and Mahlon Hubenthal ......** John and Lynn Wiese ................100 Merrill and Lee Newman ..........250 Lori and Hal Luft ......................100 Barbara and Charles Stevens.......** Steve and Mary Chapel .............200 Ralph Britton...............................** Ludwig and Carol Tannenwald ...** Helen and Hershel Smith ..........100 The Edward Lund Family .........100 Martha Cohn .............................300 John and Olive Borgsteadt ..........** Stewart Family Trust .................100 Gerry Gilchrist ............................30 Catherine Crystal Foster and Jon Foster .............................** Dexter and Jean Dawes ...............** Roxy Rapp ..............................2000 Don and Bonnie Miller ...............** Peter and Lynn Kidder ..............100 George Cator .............................250 John Tang and Jean Hsia .............** Irene Beardsley and Dan Bloomberg.................................200 Tish Hoehl .................................100 George and Ruth Chippendale ....** Micki and Bob Cardelli...............** David & Betsy Fryberger ............** Art and Peggy Stauffer ..............500 Lani Freeman and Lawrence Yang and Jennifer Kuan .........................1,000 Stephen Monismith .....................50 Brian and Susan Ashworth........100 Steve and Nancy Levy.................** Diane Sikic ..................................** Jim and Nancy Baer ....................** Werner Graf............................1,200 Janice Bohman and Eric Keller.250 Sandy and Rajiv Jain .................101 Martha Shirk .............................500 Heidi Arnold .............................500 Robert and Betsy Gamburd .........** Joanne Koltnow .........................100 Helene Pier ..................................** Steve and Missy Reller .............250 Susie Richardson.......................250 Tversky Family ...........................** Marlene and Joe Prendergast ......** Veronica S. Tincher .....................50 John and Thelma Smith ............150 Jane Holland................................** Harry Press ................................100 Nancy S Steege .........................100 Morgan Family Fund .............5,000 Shari Ornstein ...........................200 Powar Family Fund ...................500 Patrick and Emily Radtke ......1,000 Richard A. Baumgartner

and Elizabeth M. Salzer ..............** Tony and Judy Kramer ................** Judith and Hans Steiner ..............** Brigid S. Barton ........................200 Sallie I. Brown ............................** Rich Cabrera ...............................** Don and Ann Rothblatt ...............** Dr. Richard Mazze ....................200 Neta Miller ................................100 Romola and Mark Georgia..........** Roger Lau....................................50 Carol Cleary-Schultz...................50 Katharine Esslinger ...................100 Deborah Ruskin ........................200 Theresa Carey ...........................250 Russell and Alice Evarts ...........300 Skyles Runser............................500 Michael and Lenore Roberts .....100 Meri Gruber and James Taylor....** John and Florine Galen ...............** Les Morris .................................250 Virginia E. Fehrenbacher ..........100 Bonnie Berg RN ..........................** David and Nancy Kalkbrenner ....** Matt and Donna James ................** Harry and Susan Hartzell ............** Margaret Fisher ...........................50 Mike and Cathie Foster .............500 Nanette Stringer ........................250 Nancy and Norman Rossen .......100 Ruth and Ben Hammett.............200 Ellen and Tom Wyman ..............250 William E. Reller ...................1,000 John & Michele McNellis ...10,000 Ron and Elaine Andrews...........500 Susie and Matt Glickman ..........250 Caroline Hicks and Bert Fingerhut ...........................100 Eric and Elaine Hahn .............1,000 Jean-Yves Bouguet ...................100 Scott and Kathy Schroeder..........** Lucy Berman ..........................1,500 Karen and Steve Ross .................** John and Mary Schaefer............100 Caroline and Richard Brennan ....** Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bonini.......50 Freddy and Jan Gabus .................** Ted Wassam ................................50 Barbara Klein and Stan Schrier...** Edward Kanazawa.......................** Eugene and Mabel Dong ...........200 Penny and Greg Gallo ...............500 Eve and John Melton.................500 Nancy and Joe Huber ................100 Larry Baer & Stephanie Klein ....** Bill Johnson and Terri Lobdell .500 Peter S. Stern...............................** Leif and Sharon Erickson..........250 Luca and Mary CaďŹ ero ...............** Denise Savoie & Darrell DufďŹ e .... ** Faith Braff .................................500 Tom and Neva Cotter .............2,000 Patricia Levin ............................100 Richard Kilner.............................** Bob and Corrine Aulgur..............** Roy and Carol Blitzer .................** Linda and Steve Boxer ................** Ted and Ginny Chu .....................** David and Virginia Pollard........300 Debbie Ford-Scriba & Jim Scriba ...............................** Diane Moore ...............................** Harriet and Gerry Berner ............** John and Susan Thomas ..............** Marc and Ragni Pasturel ...........200 Margot Goodman ........................** Beth and Peter Rosenthal ..........300 Don and Jacquie Rush...............200 Mark and Virginia Kreutzer ........75 Mary Houlihan ..........................100 Sally Dudley..............................200 Adrienne Dong ..........................100

Ann M. Pine ..............................100 Craig and Sally Nordlund .........500 Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green .......................100 Joseph and Diane Rolfe ............100 Richard A. Zuanich ...................100 Arthur and Helena Kraemer ......100 Bobbie and Jerry Wagger ............** Leonard Leving ...........................** Robyn H. Crumly ........................** Sue Kemp ..................................250 Andrea B. Smith........................100 Katherine Bass ..........................100 Tatyana Berezin.........................100 Gwen Luce ..................................** Roger Warnke ...........................300 Alice Smith ...............................100 Boyce and Peggy Nute ................** Richard Morris ............................** Scott Wong ................................200 Tom and Ellen Ehrlich ................** Barbara Berry ............................100 The Havern Family ................4,000 Solon Finkelstein ......................250 Walter and Kay Hays ...............100 Hal and Iris Korol .......................** Ferrell and Page Sanders ...........100 Lynn H. Drake ...........................100 Owen Vannatta .......................2,500 Arden King..................................20 Bruce F. Campbell..................1,000 George and Betsy Young.............** Doug and Barbara Spreng ...........** Andy and Liz Coe .....................100 Dena Goldberg ..........................100 Jim and Alma Phillips ...............250 John and Lee Pierce ....................** Andy and Joyce Nelsen ...............** Karen Latchfor ............................50 Mary Lorey .................................** Michael and Nancy Hall ........1,000 Patti Yanklowitz and Mark Krasnow...........................200 Phil Hanawalt and Graciela Spivak .........................500 Kathy and Steve Terry .................** Arna and Hersh Shefrin ..............** Marc and Margaret Cohen ........100 Michael and Jean Couch ...........200 Kroymann Family .....................250 Mandy Lowell .............................** Julie and Jon Jerome ...................** Jody Maxim ................................** Josephine B. Spitzer ..................150 Rick and Eileen Brooks ..............** Maria Gault .................................40 Debbie Mytels .............................50 Marcia Katz ...............................200 Bob and Edith Kirkwood ............** Jerry and Linda Elkind ..............250 Adele and Don Langendorf .......200 Susan and Doug Woodman .........** Larry Breed ...............................100 Dr. Teresa L. Roberts .............1,000

David Zlotnick MD .....................** Jim Byrnes ................................300 Audrey BernďŹ eld .......................200 John Smitham............................100 Ryan ............................................** William Settle ...........................500 Steve Fasani ..............................100 Florence Kan Ho .........................** Ro Dinkey ...................................35 Our Dad Al Pellizzari..................** Marie and Don Snow ................100 Leonard W. Ely Jr......................250 Leo Breidenbach .........................** Thomas W. and Louise L. Phinney .......................** Helene Klein ...............................** Carolyn Reller .............................** Carol Berkowitz ..........................** Al and Kay Nelson ......................** The Kurland Family & Samuel Benjamin Kurland ....300 A.L. and L.K. Brown ................100 Dorothy Horton ...........................** Alan Herrick................................50 Ernest J. Moore ...........................** Bert Page ...................................100 Isabel Mulcahy ............................** Yen-Chen Yen ...........................250 Mae and Al Kenrick ...............1,000 Al Bernal and John Warren .........50 Mary Floyd..................................** Betty Meltzer ..............................** William Kiely ............................100 Ruth & Chet Johnson ..................** Robert Lobdell ............................** Gary Fazzino ...............................** Dr. Thomas McDonald..............500 Bertha Kalson..............................** Bob Donald .................................** Gary Fazzino .............................100

In honor of Our Grandchildren ......................** Rema I. Cotton ............................** The Barnea-Smith Family ...........** Sandy Sloan ..............................100 Marilyn Sutorius .......................150 Jack Sutorius .............................150 Dr. Kenneth Weigel Stanford Animal Hospital .........100 Lady Vikes Waterpolo .................50

Businesses & Organizations

Communications & Power Industries LLC ...................................500 Zane MacGregor .........................** deLemos Properties...................200 Alta Mesa Improvement Company ................................1,000 Crescent Capital Mortgage .........** “No Limit� Drag Racing Team ...25 Harrell Remodeling, Inc..............** Thoits Bros. Insurance .........10,000 Carl King, Mortgage Broker .....250 Attorney Susan Dondershine ....200 In memory of Arrillaga Foundation ............10,000 Sally Probst .................................** Peery Foundation .................10,000 Dr. Thomas McDonald................** Palo Alto Weekly Gary Fazzino .............................500 Moonlight Run .....................28,518 Jim Burch, from Bill and Kathy Burch .........................** Derek E. Smith ..........................200 John D. Black ............................500 Pam Grady.................................200 Wanda Root and Jacques Naar ....** Robert Spinrad ..........................500 Sally and Bob ..............................30 Steve Fasani ................................** Rich Scherer ............................... ** Nate Rosenberg .........................100 August L. King............................** Paul Wythes...............................500 Helene F. Klein ...........................**

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Editorial

Bridging the flood control debate As other flood control measures move forward east of 101, Newell Road bridge replacement controversy deserves calm exploration of options t has taken more than a decade, but finally work is set to begin that ultimately will protect Palo Alto, Menlo Park and East Palo Alto from floods similar to the one that inundated hundreds of homes in 1998. With work scheduled to begin later this year, the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority, an agency made up of the local cities and counties through which the creek flows, will move forward on the first in a series of projects to alleviate the current flood dangers that force residents to pay millions of dollars annually in expensive flood insurance. Last month’s intense rain storm, in which Palo Alto was largely spared from damage but which led to a breach in a levee in East Palo Alto that resulted in localized flooding and the evacuation of some residents for several days, was a timely reminder of the importance of moving forward with these planned projects. The December storm pushed water under the Chaucer Street bridge at the third highest rate since records have been kept, dating back to 1930. Water rose to flood stage at both the Chaucer and Newell street bridges, which both create dangerous blockages of creek waters and can cause flooding even though the creek itself can handle the flow. The San Francisquito Creek authority has adopted a plan to begin improvements at the tidelands and work its way upstream, ultimately replacing both the Chaucer and Newell street crossings. The first phase will include constructing more than 2,000 feet of floodwall east of Highway 101, including adjacent to the Palo Alto golf course. But the city of Palo Alto’s plan to replace the 101-year old substandard Newell Road bridge with a modern, two-lane bridge has run into a buzz saw of concern among nearby residents in both Palo Alto and East Palo Alto. A public outreach meeting at the Children’s Theatre Tuesday night attracted an overflow audience and a wide range of opinion, including a vocal group advocating that the bridge be taken down and not replaced. City officials have wisely decided to step back and take time to conduct environmental and traffic studies and to explore several options, including a full replacement, no replacement, and replacement with only a pedestrian/bike bridge. The issue is sensitive for many reasons. The current narrow bridge, barely wide enough to permit two cars to pass at once, was not designed as an arterial, but has increasingly been used as a way to avoid traffic back-ups on University Avenue. This traffic, and the potential of more traffic if the bridge were widened, justifiably concerns the residents living on both sides. Neighborhood streets on the East Palo Alto side especially are not capable of handling additional traffic. Because the bridge connects Palo Alto and East Palo Alto, neither community can justifiably act unilaterally, regardless of the fact that Palo Alto constructed the original bridge in 1911. Both cities have plenty of incentive to solve the flood hazard created by the bridge, and both have reason to limit, not expand or encourage, increases in the number of cars (currently about 3,000 trips a day) utilizing the bridge. But the small East Palo Alto neighborhood located between San Francisquito Creek and 101 is already extremely constricted and the Newell bridge is an important access route for those residents to reach their jobs, schools and shopping destinations. Prior to the organizing efforts of Palo Alto residents living in the area, the city of Palo Alto’s plan was to use grant funds to replace the current bridge with a much wider and longer structure that would not require supporting abutments in the creek’s waterway, and which would provide for safer passage for cars, bikes and pedestrians. Pretty much everyone agrees on the need to remove the current bridge as an essential flood control measure. Similarly, we think it is also pretty obvious that at least a pedestrian and bike bridge must replace it, so that the neighborhood east of the creek is not further isolated. So the real question is whether a new bridge should accommodate cars, and if so, what design and/or traffic measures can be utilized to prevent an increase in traffic from what exists today. We are concerned that a bridge closed to traffic will result in debilitating shifted traffic impacts to University Avenue, but that can only be determined through traffic studies that will soon be conducted. As the planned studies proceed, however, it is important that the public debate not lose sight of the urgent flood control needs, nor be polluted by the few who want to discuss closing off an access point to Palo Alto in order to keep criminals out. There is a great opportunity for residents on both sides of this bridge to work together to explore solutions acceptable to each. If they can do that, we are confident that both city councils will be happy to endorse their consensus.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

This week on Town Square Town Square is an online discussion forum at www.PaloAltoOnline.com Posted Jan. 5 at 9:58 a.m. by parent, a resident of the Midtown neighborhood: What do your kids think about finishing the semester before break? Here’s what I hear from high schoolers: Teacher’s didn’t have time for review before finals. Some were still teaching new material right before the test. It was nice to have time after Christmas before going back to school. Didn’t have time to study for finals. No energy to study for finals. Exhausted by the rush. It’s good to start the new term when we get back. Good and bad — more thoughts? Posted Jan. 5 at 8:05 p.m. by wishful thinking?, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood: It seemed like the semester was on a stride until Thanksgiving, then it was like the lights went out. Grades posted on Infinite Campus became fewer and farther between, and in some case the last grades posted, previous to finals, were back in November and even October. This may have caused a crunch between new material after Thanksgiving and finals review. It was a gray area. I know this is too much to ask, but it would help if teachers would say there are X number of tests, quizzes and major assignments before Thanksgiving, X number between Thanksgiving and the week before final review dates. Posted Jan. 5 at 10:12 p.m. by THANKS BoE, a member of the Palo Alto High School community: My son enjoyed having the stressfree break and so did we. In past winter breaks, he would not study during the break, but he would feel guilty for not studying so he could not relax. This winter break has been fabulous because he could actually relax and hang out and not worry about studying. He will return to Paly fresh and ready for a new semester instead of returning with the burden of having to flip through old material and study for final exams. I don’t quite understand why “wishful thinking?� suggested students know how many tests/quizzes/assignments are upcoming. How would this help the students? Posted Jan. 6 at 5:05 p.m. by palo alto mom, a resident of the Duveneck/St. Francis neighborhood: Great stress-free winter break (OK, at least free of school related

stress...). The only downside was ending so close to Christmas, my daughter had to study for finals with a house full of company. Posted Jan. 7 at 9:10 a.m. by Colleje Graduite, a resident of the Community Center neighborhood: This is how college works. Kids should get accustomed to it. Posted Jan. 7 at 2:08 p.m. by Hated it, a member of the Palo Alto High School community: One word review of the new calendar from a parent of a senior: dreadful. While it sounds from the posts that some who don’t have seniors appreciated the “no thoughts of school� over break relief, I assure you that when their child becomes a senior they will not think that that “relief� outweighed the extraordinary weeks and weeks of additional stress the new calendar caused seniors apply-

ing to private colleges. What was the district thinking? That public high schools need only support PAUSD seniors who apply to public colleges and recruited athletes? Posted Jan. 7 at 2:39 p.m. by Palo Verde Parent, a resident of the Palo Verde neighborhood: Loved the lack of stress hanging over my student’s head. He was not worried about finals and was able to truly relax. Our older son (in college now) and his friends spent their entire winter break (a few years back) doing college applications. The college application crunch will happen over winter break regardless of when finals are held. Either way they don’t have time to do them in December before the break. If there are not finals, then there are chapter tests, projects and essays. So (continued on next page)

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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Should the city replace or remove the Newell Road bridge?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

Town Square

Guest Opinion

(continued from previous page)

for our family it was a welcome change! Hope we keep it! Posted Jan. 7 at 10:58 p.m. by Paly senior parent, a member of the Palo Alto High School community: My senior daughter (and us) thought this is great — it was so nice to be done with school before the break so that she could finish college applications (including private colleges) while done with school work for the term. The last few weeks of term were extremely full, but being done with it for the break was worth it. I agree that the anxiety of not doing work during the break that you know should be done is a huge stressor for our kids. The only thing that would have been preferable is to have the teachers manage the course better so that they weren’t teaching new material right up to the end -- but I assume they’ll get better at that as they get familiar with this schedule. Don’t change it back — this is MUCH better. Posted Jan. 7 at 2:30 p.m. by Misha, a member of the Gunn High School community: Better to ask towards end of school year. But for now, first semester notably shorter and my student not happy about the mismatch with second semester. Wondering what seniors thought with everything crashing at once ~ finals, college apps, year end performances, etc. My student ended the semester okay academically but forlorn that not much time to spend to celebrate the holidays which nipped on the heels. Christmas was rushed and then there was a long lull afterwards which was calm but bordered on the boring. Posted Jan 7. at 4:47 p.m. by not great, a resident of the Green Acres neighborhood: My 6 & 8 year olds didn’t understand why they couldn’t visit her cousins this year over the summer break.

It is the whole person who matters in Newtown by Samantha Suyon Woo grew up in Newtown, Conn. It was so painful to watch the aftermath of the tragedy there last month. Yet seeing the graciousness of the town even through the pain reminded me of the aspects I loved about Newtown growing up — a small town where everyone was known for who they were as a whole, in context. I love that the parents courageously and beautifully honored their children as whole persons, not just victims, not just as students. They told us of their children’s laughter, their willingness to help their siblings. I love that caring Newtown residents offered hot cocoa to the media people — after all, aren’t they people too? People with feelings, who could get cold being outside all day, maybe with families of their own waiting for them at home? I love that even through grief, the people of Newtown saw a bigger picture, beyond the slice of the awful, painful event, and showed an understanding of the concept of “the whole.� Growing up, I remember how integrated the whole community was in Newtown. “Mr. G� was not just my fifth-grade teacher, but also a husband to Mrs. G, and a loving father to Trina, another schoolmate. He was also a helpful handyman/neighbor to my elementary school music teacher and her husband who happened to be my piano teacher. Everyone knew everyone, their families, what they were going through, and seeing a person was not

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through a slice of their functional title, but as a whole. It was a package deal. People saw one another as whole persons with all that followed. Newtown’s grace and strength came from residents’ ability to see the whole of a person, and a situation. I wonder what would happen if more of us could learn from Newtown, and see individuals in context? Unfortunately, these days we tend to see people through the specialized functional titles we attach to them. We live in a highly compartmentalized 21st-century society where even the kids have to answer to the unspoken scrutiny: “What is your specialized identity? Are you an athlete? A computer-genius? An entrepreneur? A musician?� The workplace poses many forms of the question, “What specialized function do you serve?� In trying to answer these questions, young athletes suffer repetitive use injuries, many professionals at work feel desperate to remain functionally significant, maybe ironically resulting in the workplace becoming a feeding ground for the insecure ego, rather than a place of true progress and productivity. What if we learned of Newtown’s grace in seeing the “whole� context of a person, beyond the functional specializations? Where the co-worker is seen as a husband, father, son as well as an expert in their field? Where the child is a daughter, neighbor, friend, more than just number in the sea of students in the school system? Where that annoying person in the community can be seen as someone who is going through a rough time in their personal life? Two of the recent mass shooters this year were given the “genius� label by some. In their knowledge and areas of expertise they certain-

ly were highly specialized (especially the PhD candidate in the Colorado theater), yet both were completely maladjusted as whole persons to their community and society at large. I wonder the consequences if the shooters had been thoroughly taught the absolute whole value of every person including themselves? The grieving people of Newtown seemed to understand the dignity and value of a person beyond a person’s actions and what they did — they included the shooter and his mom among the remembered in their grief. What unfathomable grace. That is the graciousness of my hometown that tugs at my heartstrings. I have never been prouder to see the old Town Hall on Main Street. What if everyone treated themselves and others as if they had absolute value as a whole? Beyond the slices of compartmentalized accomplishments, pedigree and expertise. We once dreamed with Martin Luther King Jr. that we wanted to be judged by the contents of our character, not the color of our skin, which is basically to treat a person as a whole, right? I wonder if we still judge ourselves on the skin of specific accomplishments. Could it be that we are still at the epidermal layers, still not at the essence of a person? Do we still struggle to see the whole person? What if we can learn from Newtown’s integrated attitude of seeing “the whole� individual in our daily lives in Silicon Valley? One professional at a time? One parent at a time? One student at a time? One company at a time? One community at a time? Thank you Newtown for showing so much grace, and for raising me. ■ Samantha S. Woo lives in Palo Alto with her husband and three children.

Streetwise

What’s your New Year’s resolution for 2013? Asked on California Avenue, Palo Alto. Interviews and photographs by Ranjini Raghunath.

Robert Goodwin

Builder California Avenue, Palo Alto “Volunteer more often at CityTeam Ministries, San Francisco.�

Julia Langkamp

Stay-at-home mom College Terrace, Palo Alto “Participate in the San Francisco Half Marathon.�

John Minard

Salesperson Mountain View “I don’t have any resolutions.�

J. B. Bell

Business consultant James Road, Palo Alto “Be a better person.�

Ben Bigelow

Student Palmer Lane, Menlo Park “Start moving my body more often than typing.�

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

by Rebecca Wallace

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hen Jindong Cai was in middle school, a friend told him a dangerous secret: He had found some Beethoven records in his house, and he was going to play them. This was China during the Cultural Revolution, and Western classical music was forbidden, but the friends were too excited to heed.

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Arts & Entertainment â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just dashed to listen,â&#x20AC;? Cai said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had to lower the curtains and put the machine in the corner so no one would know what we were doing.â&#x20AC;? They had Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fourth Symphony and a movement from the Fifth, and they wound up the phonograph to play one of the thick 78s. Their delight was inexpressible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Beethoven, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost beyond Western music and the Western countries. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humanity in its highest state,â&#x20AC;? Cai said. Caiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face glows at the memory. Today, as an associate professor of music in performance at Stanford University, he has all the music he wants. Sitting in his office at the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Braun Music Center, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surrounded by bookshelves and enormous tomes of symphonic music. A blown-up photo of him conducting, his mouth open in a huge smile, is crowned by a poster of the Sydney Opera House, where he raised the baton for Verdiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Requiem in 2005. In 2008 he took his Stanford Symphony Orchestra back to China, where they performed Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ode to Joy.â&#x20AC;? Starting this month, Cai leads his greatest Beethoven celebration yet at the new Bing Concert Hall on campus. The universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season-long Beethoven Project will feature him conducting the Stanford Symphony Orchestra and the Stanford Philharmonia Orchestra in performances of all nine Beethoven symphonies and all five Beethoven piano concerti. Pianist Jon Nakamatsu, a Stanford graduate, will be the featured soloist. The series will run Jan. 18 through June 1. (The Jan. 18 and 20 concerts are already sold out, but some student seats may still be available.) Each concert will have a public pre-performance lecture, led by a Ph.D. student in musicology or by Cai and Nakamatsu. Topics will include â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pugilist at Rest: Ludwigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lighter Sideâ&#x20AC;? (given by Nate Sloan on April 26 and 27) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beethoven and the Early Viennese Symphonic State (given by Erick Arenas on May 10 and 12). A Stanford Continuing Studies class, called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beethoven: An Introduction through Performance,â&#x20AC;? begins Jan. 16 and will feature Cai and other lecturers. Seminars and classes for Stanford students are also planned on the composer. The project concludes this summer with the Stanford Symphony Orchestra jetting off to Europe to perform in places where Beethoven worked or visited, including Bonn, Berlin, Leipzig, Prague and Vienna. Cai is clearly thrilled: over both the project and the prospect of having his orchestras begin performing at the Bing Concert Hall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to change the landscape of musicmaking at Stanford,â&#x20AC;? he said of the $112 million, oval-shaped concert hall. The orchestras have been rehearsing there since November, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delighted with the acoustics. The 842-seat venue may be small in capacity compared to some concert halls, but its design is voluminous, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room for the sound

to develop.â&#x20AC;? A new hall means some adjusting. Cai has had to ask some orchestra sections to play more quietly and some more loudly than they did in the older Dinkelspiel Auditorium. Reverberation times are different, which can affect tempi. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just part of being a conductor, especially one who is used to touring and conducting in concert halls all over the globe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live performance is unique. As a conductor, we try to find something new each time in Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s symphonies,â&#x20AC;? Cai said. Cai admits that it can sometimes be daunting to interpret the works of the great master. But he knows that as an academic he brings â&#x20AC;&#x153;endless study, endless learningâ&#x20AC;? to Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works, from studying them from a historic and cultural

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Beethoven, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost beyond Western music and the Western countries. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humanity in its highest state.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

as cellist Yo-Yo Ma on Jan. 27 and violinist Midori on Feb. 6, are already sold out. At this writing, tickets were still available for the Feb. 2 and 4 concerts of the Beethoven Project. Held at 8 p.m. and 7 p.m., respectively, they will feature Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second and eighth symphonies, and his second piano concerto. Tickets are $20 general, $10-$13.50 for nonStanford students, $7.50 for children under 18, and free for Stanford students. Planned for Feb. 22 is a free symposium called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heroism in the Age of Beethoven,â&#x20AC;? from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Bing Concert Hall studio. It will be moderated by Stanford professors Stephen Hinton, Blair Hoxby and Adrian Daub. N Info: For details on the Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Philharmonia Orchestra season, go to sso.stanford.edu. A complete Bing Concert Hall season listing is on the Stanford Live website at live. stanford.edu and indicates whether performances are sold out.

WE WISH YOU ALL A HAPPY NEW YEAR AND BLESSINGS FOR THE YEAR AHEAD! NEWCOMERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COFFEE Thursday, January 17, 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. We welcome those who are new to the bay area. Please call for more information or to RSVP. 650/473-0664

january highlights FOR THIS MONTH: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Support Group â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Career Check-Up Workshops â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Goal Setting Workshops â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Journaling Circle â&#x20AC;&#x201D; French Conversation & Culture For further details, visit our website: deborahspalm.org 555 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto 650 /473-0664

debor ahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s palm

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jindong Cai perspective to examining every piece of musical notation. For example, Beethoven was very fond of the metronome and was careful to write metronomic markings on his symphonies, Cai noted. Yet some of the markings seem almost impossible to follow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; too fast or too slow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; perhaps because Beethoven was already in the midst of composing his sixth symphony when the metronome was invented. A conductor cannot blindly follow the page, but needs to make his own careful choices, Cai said. Exploring every aspect of the compositions, together with a trusted orchestra, is one of the great joys of his work. Cai, who joined Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faculty in 2004, is also the artistic director of the annual Stanford Pan-Asian Music Festival. In addition, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the principal guest conductor of the Mongolian State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet. He knows that the chance to play all of Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s symphonies and piano concerti is rare for any student musician. This year, he got a huge number of auditioners for his orchestras. The students have wide-ranging backgrounds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; engineering, French literature and neuroscience, to name a few â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all steeped in Western music. The orchestras rehearse five hours a week, which is longer than most classes meet, Cai said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music is a very, very important part of their lives.â&#x20AC;? With the Bing Concert Hall drawing intense interest even before its opening weekend on Jan. 11-13, audiences would do well to buy tickets early. Nearly all the opening events are sold out, including free events, which require mandatory tickets to ensure that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room for everyone. Even many later events, such

Opposite: Jindong Cai conducts the Stanford Symphony Orchestra. Photo courtesy of Stanford Live. Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 19

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a public hearing at a special Council meeting on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to Consider the Adoption of a Resolution Amending the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan To Incorporate Certain Findings of the Palo Alto Rail Corridor Study and Approval of a Negative Declaration. DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk

Now taking applications for the 2013 - 2014 school year!! Friends is a non-profit, play-based, modified parent cooperative with a warm and nurturing environment which promotes social skills and fosters a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-esteem and emergent developmental skills

Please visit our website for application details:

www.pafns.org. Or call our office: 650.856.6152

4

G OLDEN G LOBE NOM I N ATIONS ÂŽ

DRAMA

Best screenplay

DRAMA

BEST Picture Best director Best actress kathRyn bigelow m a r k b o a l jessica chastain

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE IN FOR A HELL OF A RIDE.

JESSICA CHASTAIN IS A MARVEL.â&#x20AC;? -PETER TRAVERS,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR .â&#x20AC;?

ANN HORNADAY

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE

LISA SCHWARZBAUM

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW

Movies OPENINGS

Amour ----

(Guild) Michael Haneke makes films that no one really wants to see. Whether heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crafting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funny Games,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time of the Wolfâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;The White Ribbon,â&#x20AC;? the Austrian writer-director deals with provocative subject matter in a very cooltoned way, asking the viewer to think critically rather than being entertained in a conventionally passive manner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amour,â&#x20AC;? the recipient of the Palme dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Or at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, may be his most masterful â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and most difficult yet rewarding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; film to watch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amourâ&#x20AC;? is a love story. But the drama opens in silence with firemen battering open the door to a locked Parisian apartment. They cover their noses. A neighbor utters, â&#x20AC;&#x153;They had a nurse.â&#x20AC;? And the men open a tapedshut door to discover a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corpse, lying amidst flower petals, on the bed. On a black background, as though the film is already in mourning, the title â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amourâ&#x20AC;? appears on screen. We know this love story will not end well. With an economy of expression, Haneke has introduced the subject in a handful of carefully selected shots that makes us wonder what happened. The film flashes back to an elderly, cultured Parisian couple attending a piano concert (Alexandre Tharaud as himself). Seeing French icons Emmanuelle Riva and JeanLouis Trintignant in their 80s is shocking in itself. The chiseled facial beauty of Riva in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hiroshima, mon amourâ&#x20AC;? (1959) and Trintignant in â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Man and a Womanâ&#x20AC;? (1966) or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zâ&#x20AC;? (1969) is frozen in cinematic time. To watch their delicate performances as Anne and Georges â&#x20AC;&#x201D; studying their aged faces and deliberate movements â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is like running unexpectedly into someone you knew years and years ago and searching for the younger person in the mature one before you. Almost the entire movie takes place in the well-appointed apartment of the long-married pair. Details of their life together slowly unspool. A tender touch on the shoulder reveals just as much about their relationship as when Anne lingers over a photograph in an album,

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A KATHRYN BIGELOW FILM â&#x20AC;&#x153;ZERO DARK THIRTYâ&#x20AC;? JESSICA CHASTAIN JASON CLARKE EXECUTIVE MUSIC JOEL EDGERTON BY ALEXANDRE DESPLAT PRODUCERS COLIN WILSON TED SCHIPPER GREG SHAPIRO PRODUCED WRITTEN DIRECTED BY MARK BOAL KATHRYN BIGELOW MEGAN ELLISON BY MARK BOAL BY KATHRYN BIGELOW

Fri & Sat 1/11-1/12 Sun & Mon 1/13 - 1/14 Tues 1/15

Weds 1/16 Thurs 1/17

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Life of Pi 3D - 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Life of Pi 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on Hudson - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 9:45 Life of Pi 3D - 4:00, 7:00 Life of 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on Hudson - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 Life of Pi 3D - 4:00 Life of Pi 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on Hudson - 1:30, 7:25 Life of Pi 3D - 1:00 Hyde Park on Hudson - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 Life of Pi 3D - 4:00, 7:00 Life of Pi 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on Hudson - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

Page 20Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

feature film is 24 lies per second.â&#x20AC;? With â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amour,â&#x20AC;? the auteur seems to achieve the impossible. Haneke unblinkingly and compassionately presents universal truths, while revealing the illusion of filmmaking and our role as spectators. Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material including a disturbing act, and brief language. In French with English subtitles. 2 hours, 7 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Susan Tavernetti

Gangster Squad -1/2

Josh Brolin, right, as the stereotypical good cop. quietly whispering, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful, life.â&#x20AC;? Unfortunately, life can change in a heartbeat. Anne has a stroke. And then a second one. Her declining health and Georgesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gallant efforts to care for her make for heartbreaking drama. Cinematographer Darius Khondjiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s camera captures the painfully slow rhythms of the actors in long master shots. During one of the rare visits of their only child, Eva (the superb Isabelle Huppert), Khondji photographs the awkwardness of the exchange. Evaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-centered blathering and critical comments contrast with Georgesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; measured calm and awareness that their daughter and her family are like strangers to them. Such is the modern condition. Eventually the camera lingers over the increasingly difficult daily tasks of caretaking, like a vulture awaiting death. The film becomes a profound meditation about dying and living, about respect and love tested to the limit. On one level, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amourâ&#x20AC;? offers a completely accessible story. On other levels, Hanekeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature style lies in wait. He plants subtle hints of impending violence, whether someone is teasingly called â&#x20AC;&#x153;a monsterâ&#x20AC;? or when the couple talks about a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funeral. Haneke also revisits his concerns of encouraging the spectator to question the act of consuming entertainment. When Anne and Georges attend the piano concert, the camera watches the audience and its reaction, never showing the pianist perform. The director alludes to his film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Piano Teacherâ&#x20AC;? multiple times, as well as providing a verbal reference to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funny Games.â&#x20AC;? Most importantly, a key plot point turns on the power of narrative as Georges calms Anne with a story about his childhood. Conventional narratives appeal to the emotions and can function as an opiate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amourâ&#x20AC;? is not one of those. Refuting Jean-Luc Godardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quote that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Film is truth at 24 frames per second,â&#x20AC;? Haneke once retorted, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A

(Century 16, Century 20) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangster Squadâ&#x20AC;? was so hardboiled itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overcooked, but that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite capture the problem with this 1940s-set would-be gangster-flick throwback. Out of his depth, director Ruben Fleischer (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zombielandâ&#x20AC;?) hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so much cooked something up as microwaved it. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a distinctly synthetic feel to this period picture, which recreates such Hollywood iconography as the then-â&#x20AC;?Hollywoodlandâ&#x20AC;? sign and nightclub Slapsy Maxieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, complete with Carmen Miranda. For all of Fleischerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flashy flourishes (and the production design is, indeed, colorful), â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangster Squadâ&#x20AC;? plays like nothing so much as a cut-rate â&#x20AC;&#x153;Untouchables.â&#x20AC;? In 1949, the Los Angeles Police Department has been greased by mob payoffs, necessitating an offthe-books response. Chief Parker (Nick Nolte) recruits â&#x20AC;&#x153;honest copâ&#x20AC;? Sgt. John Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara (Josh Brolin) to head up a special unit of stouthearted men to take down the likes of gangster Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn). Every character can be summed up pithily. Cohen? Psychopath. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara? Grimly determined. Ryan Goslingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sgt. Jerry Wooters? Playboy with a heart of gold. Robert Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Officer Kennard? Deadeye. Giovanni Ribisiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Officer Keeler? Tech support. Michael PeË&#x153;aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Officer Ramirez? Um, token MexicanAmerican? The crime of wasting PeĂąa (so good in last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s LAPD drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;End of Watchâ&#x20AC;?) demonstrates the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chronic inability to elevate its stock characters through dialogue or performance. The stellar cast â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and more familiar faces seem to parade in every three minutes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; drifts through the picture, and the sheer bulk of talent involved (top-tier technicians and designers included) turns out to be a case of water, water everywhere, and not a drop to drink. The clunky script by former cop Will Beall relies heavily on formula and thus has a tendency to telegraph; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know which characters will bite it within minutes of meeting them. While â&#x20AC;&#x153;inspired by a true storyâ&#x20AC;? (and based on the book by Paul Lieberman) about transplanted

Movies MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. A Haunted House (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 2:10, 5, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 1:20, 3:30, 5:45, 8:15 & 10:40 p.m. Amour (PG-13) (((( Guild Theatre: 1, 4, 7 & 9:55 p.m.

My Man Godfrey (1936) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Mon. at 5:45 & 9:35 p.m. Next Time We Love (1936) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Tue.-Thu. at 5:50 & 9:20 p.m. Nicholas Sparksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Safe Haven: Filmmakers, Author and Stars Live (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Thu. at 8 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 8 p.m. Not Fade Away (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10 p.m.

Anna Karenina (R) (( Aquarius Theatre: 3 & 8:30 p.m.

Parental Guidance (PG) 1/2 Century 16: 11:15 a.m.; 1:45, 4:15, 7:10 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 2:30, 5:05, 7:45 & 10:25 p.m.

Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:15 a.m. & 5:20 p.m. Century 20: 2:15 p.m.

Promised Land (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:25 a.m.; 2:15, 4:50, 7:40 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 2, 4:40, 7:15 & 9:50 p.m.

Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: In 3D at 11:05 a.m.

Rise of the Guardians (PG) ((1/2 Century 20: 11 a.m. & 8:55 p.m.; In 3D at 3:55 p.m.

Django Unchained (R) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 2:35, 6:15 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2:45, 6:25 & 10 p.m. Gangster Squad (R) (1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1:40, 2:40, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:40 & 10:35 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 12:55, 3:40, 6:20, 7:50, 9:15 & 10:40 p.m. The Guilt Trip (PG-13) ((

Show Boat (1936) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Mon. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also 3:40 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 3:20, 6:30 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:15, 5, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m.

Century 20: 1:30, 4:35, 7 & 9:30 p.m.

Skyfall (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 2 & 8:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:45, 3:55, 7:20 & 10:30 p.m.

Hitchcock (PG-13) (( Aquarius Theatre: 12:45 & 6 p.m.

The Sound of Music (1965) (G) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; In 3D at 2:45, 6:20 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 10:55 a.m.; 2:35, 6:15 & 9:55 p.m.

Texas Chainsaw (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; In 3D at 1:50, 4:10, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 1 p.m.; In 3D at 3:20, 5:40, 8 & 10:30 p.m.

Hyde Park on Hudson (R) (( Palo Alto Square: 1:30, 4:30 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:45 p.m.

This Is 40 (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 3:10, 6:40 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 4, 7:05 & 10:10 p.m.

The Impossible (PG-13) ((( Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:15, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 2:40, 5:20, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m.

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (Not Rated) (( Century 20: 5 p.m.

Jack Reacher (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 7 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 1:10, 4:20, 7:25 & 10:25 p.m.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a Sweetheart (1937) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Tue.-Thu. at 7:30 p.m.

Les Miserables (2012) (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 2:25, 6:05 & 9:35 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 3, 6:40 & 10:05 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 20: 10:50 a.m.; In 3D at 1:45, 4:40, 7:40 & 10:35 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1 p.m.; In 3D at 4, 7 & 10 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 2:40, 6:10 & 9:35 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 3:35, 6:55 & 10:20 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Aida (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Monsters, Inc. (G) (((1/2 Century 20: In 3D at 1:30 & 6:30 p.m.

Chicago hood Cohen and the secret detail after him, the filmmakersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; take is colossally ridiculous in its plot development, repeatedly raising the crazy bar. (Points, though, for briefly squeezing in Darryl Gates â&#x20AC;&#x201D; played by Josh Pence â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and more Burbank jokes than a Johnny Carson monologue.) Much of the criticism of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangster Squad,â&#x20AC;? and there will be much criticism, will note the movieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s glib ultraviolence. Kinetic fisticuffs and gunplay quickly lose their impact as Fleischer glamorizes the brutality â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and has the bad luck to do so at the worst possible cultural moment. (Indeed, the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s release was delayed to excise a gun massacre in a movie theater, replaced by a gun

massacre on a Chinatown street: Thanks for nothinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Hollywood.) The macho swag(ger) of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangster Squadâ&#x20AC;? includes an unironic use of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;slo-mo striding away from an explosion shot,â&#x20AC;? emblematizing Fleischerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clueless tastelessness. To the extent that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangster Squadâ&#x20AC;? is palatable at all, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the category of trashy fun, as in seeing Penn homage the ghosts of movie gangsters past. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here comes Santy Claus!â&#x20AC;? he hollers, before spraying bullets. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gift horse one might look in the mouth.

Zero Dark Thirty (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; 12:30, 2:30, 4:20, 6:20, 8:20 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 12:50, 2:30, 4:45, 6:50, 8:20 & 10:15 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers, theater addresses and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

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Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 21

Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW

Re-inventing a classic

L

ike many local residents, the Zankich family never forgot the Parisian burger served at Mountain Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In decades ago, with its special sauce and sourdough bun. When it came time to open their own eatery, what to serve was a no-brainer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For years and years and years, my mom would make the sauce up when we would make burgers,â&#x20AC;? Kris Zankich recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have barbecues and people would be like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You guys got to open a restaurant.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? In August that idea became reality when the Gold Rush Eatery food truck was born with Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parisian burger as its signature dish. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the up-front costs of doing a restaurant, basically we came to the conclusion that the way to do this is with a truck,â&#x20AC;? Zankich said.

by Daniel DeBolt Long since demolished, Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In was a Mountain View institution from the 1960s to the 1980s. Located on El Camino Real and Escuela Avenue, it was a favorite hangout for students of Mountain View High School when the campus was still located downtown on Castro Street. For fans of the Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burger, Twitter and Facebook announce the truckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location. On most days during lunchtime it is parked at a corporate office somewhere in Silicon Valley, often in Mountain View or Palo Alto. Zankich was 12 years old when Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s was around but he says he remembers the burgerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taste well. It had two beef patties, American cheese, a French roll bun (from a Parisian bakery) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;special sauceâ&#x20AC;?

made from ketchup, mustard, dried onions, celery seed and pepper. Tater Tots were served on the side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It all kind of melts together if you have the right roll,â&#x20AC;? Zankich said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We played around with it for a whileâ&#x20AC;? and ended up using a bakery in San Francisco. The sauce was a mystery to many fans for years, though purported recipes can now be found online. Zankich says the family learned it from a former employee of Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s used to do two small little patties,â&#x20AC;? Zankich said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think a juicier burger is better. We use a half-pound of fresh Angus beefâ&#x20AC;? for one big patty. That also means half the room is needed on the stove, an important consideration in a food truck where space is limited. With a theme inspired by the

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Cucina Venti

ns rvatio e s e r epting y!

rt day pa i l o h ur ble! for yo availa

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James Tensuan

Food truck offers its version of the Parisian burger from Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In

Customers wait to order from the Gold Rush Eatery truck, where the menu includes a revival of the Parisian burger from the late Mountain View institution Lindaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In. 49ers, the Parisian burger has been renamed the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gold Rush burgerâ&#x20AC;? on the truckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu, which also includes pulled-pork and teriyaki tritip sandwiches, Tater Tots, onion rings and root beer floats. For those trying to avoid beef, a veggie patty can be substituted in the Gold Rush burger.

The truck can serve 250 people in one lunch, Zankich said, as much as a restaurant can. Upside-down buckets with the 49ers logo are used as tables and chairs. With Gold Rush Eatery around there are now at least three ways to enjoy this classic Mountain View (continued on next page)

The origins of Spaghetti alla Carbonara are obscure but few dishes conjure up a more loyal following. The name is derived from the Italian word for charcoal where the dish was made popular as a meal for the charcoal makers. Still others going so far as to say it was named for a secret society the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carbonariâ&#x20AC;? as tribute during Italyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uniďŹ cation. Since the dish is unrecorded prior to 1927 it will forever be intertwined with the closing days of World War II. And while some historians attribute its creation to hungry American soldiers in Rome, it rarely reaches the heights in this country that it does in Rome. Beyond assumptions, it is most likely an old recipe passed down for generation to generation in the shepherding regions surrounding Rome. Carbonara is the pinnacle of perfection in pasta, surpassing even the more foundational Aglio e Olio (garlic and oil). In a good Carbonara, the creaminess comes not from cream, but from the perfect use of eggs against the residual heat of the spaghetti. Correctly done, spaghetti alla Carbonara is a textural and sensual study in classic cooking. Never made ahead of time, only to order, your culinary journey to Rome during the war years begins here at Pizzeria Venti.

From our kitchen to yours. Buon appetito! Chef Marco Salvi, Executive Chef

Spaghetti alla Carabonara s 4 eggs, at room temperature s 1 cup pecorino Romano, Parmigiano-

s 3 ounces pancetta, cut about 1/4-inch

Reggiano, or a combination s 1 /8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

s 1 tablespoon salt s 1 pound imported spaghetti

thick, slices cut into 1/2-inch long strips

Preparation:

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

Page 22Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

In a small bowl, lightly beat the eggs. Add the cheese and black pepper and set aside. In a medium skillet over low heat, cook the pancetta slowly, turning the pieces occasionally, for until they are cooked through and beginning to crisp. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the spaghetti. Cook, until the pasta is al dente. Save 1 cup hot pasta water. Drain the pasta, add back the hot pasta water and return it immediately to the skillet. Stir to combine pasta and pancetta. Stir in the egg and cheese mixture and toss well to coat the pasta thoroughly to distribute it evenly. Serve with a sprinkle of pecorino cheese.

Eating Out

ShopTalk by Daryl Savage

SURVEY MONKEY SWINGING INTO NEW HABITAT ... The online survey company Survey Monkey has signed on to be the anchor tenant for one of Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest and most ambitious developments. At the former Shell gas-station site on the corner of Alma Street and Lytton Avenue, the company will lease the top three floors and a rooftop deck of what city officials have referred to as the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four-story â&#x20AC;&#x153;gateway building.â&#x20AC;? The headquarters for Survey Monkey is now at 285 Hamilton Ave., but the growing company needs more room, spokeswoman Becky Cantieri said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are committed to Palo Alto but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been looking for a larger space,â&#x20AC;? she said, adding that the company is considering leasing out the second floor. Cantieri described the space as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;perfect opportunity for us. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

right across from the train station, and a significant number of our employees take the train.â&#x20AC;? Survey Monkey has about 200 employees; 140 of them work in Palo Alto. Councilmember Pat Burt said he is delighted with the new tenant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a growing, cutting-edge company and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thrilled theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve chosen to stay in Palo Alto,â&#x20AC;? he said. The plans needed major revisions before being approved by the City Council. The controversy stemmed from some residents expressing concern about future traffic and parking problems in an already congested area. One of the concessions was eliminating 14 housing units and scaling back the height of the building. Another was an agreement to put a retail store and a nonprofit, downtown-oriented organization on the ground floor of the building. Survey Monkeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s move-in

date is scheduled for early 2014. CREPES CAFE AND LISAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TEA CLOSING ... Two longtime restaurants are closing in Menlo Park. Both Crepes Cafe and Lisaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tea Treasures in Menlo Park will be leaving to make room for a celebrity chef who will take over the large, plantation-style building at the corner of Oak Grove Avenue and Merrill Street across from the Menlo Park train station. Bradley Ogden, a chef and restaurateur who has a home in San Jose, is poised to open B.F.D. (Bradleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fine Diner) in late summer. He plans to develop one and possibly two restaurants at 1195 Merrill St., with food served in a casual atmosphere, said a spokesman for Ogden. The space also features a 2,800-squarefoot, wraparound deck that will be used for patio dining. Ogdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business partner, former Facebook exec Chris Kelly, said a formal announcement about the new restaurant will be coming in the next few months.

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business? Daryl Savage will check it out. Email shoptalk@paweekly.com.

(continued from previous page)

burger. The Zankich family joins two other local restaurants in attempting to recreate the Parisian burger: Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Los Altos and Pezzellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Villa Napoli in Sunnyvale. Both began serving their own versions of the Parisian burger a few years ago. N

Nico Osorio cooks burgers at the Gold Rush Eatery truck.

New Year!    

Gold Rush Eatery posts its food truck locations on Twitter as @Goldrusheatery and may be found on Facebook at facebook. com/goldrush.eatery. Mountain View Voice staff writer Daniel DeBolt can be emailed at ddebolt@mv-voice.com.

  *0-3 5 

  

 

PENINSULA +-# +0-+! (/0-(++"./

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Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Chef Chuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

MENLO PARK MONGOLIAN BBQ Sister of Suâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mongolian BBQ

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

powered by

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

MP Mongolian BBQ serves up an all-you-can-eat buffet style meal. FORLUNCHsFORDINNER (Includes noodles, meats, shrimp, vegetables, and sauces.) Also Available: Wonton chips, veggie spring rolls, chicken katsu, sweet and sour pork, fried rice, and sesame biscuits.

Monday - Saturday AM PMsPM PM 700 El Camino Real, Suite 170 (next to BevMo) -ENLO0ARK #!

(650) 853-1118 facebook.com/mp.mongolian Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 23

Sports Shorts

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

Ogwumike makes a difference

STAYING AND GOING . . . Stanford evidently wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be losing as many players early to the NFL as previously thought. Linebackers Trent Murphy and Shayne Skov plus defensive end Ben Gardner all announced last weekend via Twitter that they will be returning to Stanford for another year. That trimmed the possible exodus in half because junior tight ends Zach Ertz and Levine Toilolo plus redshirt junior cornerback Terrence Brown have announced their intentions to forego their final year at Stanford to make themselves available to the NFL draft. Brown, fifth on the team with 65 tackles, including three for a loss, announced his decision Tuesday with a statement through the Sports Information Department. Ertz, an AllAmerican, led the Cardinal in receiving this season with 69 receptions for 898 yards and six touchdowns. Toilolo caught 24 passes for 393 yards and four touchdowns.

She rallies Stanford past Cal in showdown of Top 10 teams by Rick Eymer

C

ON THE AIR Saturday Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Washington at Stanford, 8 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KNBR (1050 AM)

Sunday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Cal at Stanford, 1 p.m.; ESPN2; KZSU (90.1 FM)

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

Palo Alto has been taking down opponents with regularity this season, both figuratively and physically â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Paly senior Chris Meredith (dark uniform) did earlier this week during the Vikings 3-1 win over Monta Vista.

PREP SOCCER

Palo Alto boys having fun again after worst year by Keith Peters

T

he fun has returned to the Palo Alto boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soccer team. Goals can be enjoyed, victories can be celebrated and expectations can be achieved. There is talk of winning titles again, albeit in the lower SCVAL El Camino Division, and reaching the Central Coast Section playoffs is more reality than dream. Moreover, there is hope just one year after there was none. Last season was a train wreck of massive proportions for Palo Alto, which failed to win a match for the first time ever. And this, from a program that had been in existence for more than 40 years and won or shared four CCS titles during that time. The Vikings went 0-9-3 in the SCVAL De Anza Division and 0-15-5 overall, earning a demotion to the El Camino Division. There were few, if any, positives during the season. Only three years earlier, it couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been much better for the Vikings, who finished with a 21-1-3 record for the most victories in program history, allowed only one goal during the league season and wound up sharing the Central Coast Section Division I title with Bellarmine, while earning a No. 13 national ranking at one point. (continued on page 26)

Page 24Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Keith Peters

READ MORE ONLINE

Keith Peters

NEW JOB . . . Menlo College is losing a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volleyball coach because the Stanford menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volleyball team is gaining a full-time assistant. Daniel Rasay, who has been a volunteer assistant at Stanford and the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coach at Menlo the past three years, will assume new duties at Stanford effective immediately. Rasay departs Menlo after a remarkable 2012 season, in which the Oaks finished undefeated in Cal Pac Conference play and culminated in a trip to the NAIA National Championship. Rasay, a Hawaii grad, was named the Cal Pac Coach of the Year. SPECIAL HONOR . . . Menlo School senior Drew Edelman will be honored during the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame of Northern California induction ceremony on Jan. 27 in San Francisco. Edelman and four other student-athletes will receive an award during the induction ceremony, featuring basketball legend Rick Barry, NBA coach Herb Brown, San Francisco State football and basketball coach Vic Rowen, sports agent Matt Sosnick and sportswriter Art Spander. Edelman and her fellow award-winners will be honored in a ceremony at the Four Seasons in San Francisco at 5 p.m. Edelman is only the fourth recipient from the Peninsula. Previous athletes and sports figures inducted into the Hall of Fame include Harris Barton and Keena Turner of the San Francisco 49ers, former San Francisco Giants owner Bob Lurie, former Stanford athletes Sam Warburg (tennis) and Ben Wildman-Tobriner (swimming) and Stanford tennis benefactor Tad Taube.

hiney Ogwumike continues to do amazing things for the fifth-ranked Stanford womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team. Even setting aside her 26 points in the Cardinal 62-53 victory over host No. 7 California on Tuesday night, the junior made all the right plays down the stretch on defense and on the boards. California took a page out of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game plan to dominate on the offensive boards, turning a poor shooting night into a productive offensive attack. The Golden Bears turned rebounding into a team concept and controlled the boards against Stanford (3-0 in the Pac-12, 14-1 overall) like no other team has been able to accomplish in a long time. Fortunately, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Chiney factor. Each time Cal appeared ready to start pulling away, there was Ogwumike with a short jumper, a clutch rebound, a blocked shot or a steal. Will the Golden Bears be able to adjust when they travel to Stanford for a 1 p.m. matinee Sunday? They seemed to do everything they could to nullify Ogwumikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence and she still made it her own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way I look at it was this was just the first half because we play them again Sunday,â&#x20AC;? Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see if we can knock down some 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and play better on Sunday. I think it probably will be a better game for both teams. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be rested.â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer was concerned about Calâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rebounding prowess way before the Golden Bears (2-1, 12-2) gave her a close-up look. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played teams who rebound well,â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer said before the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something our team will be disciplined and do, though I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say that for a fact.â&#x20AC;? The Cardinal will be looking to improve upon for the rematch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have a very athletic team at every position and they are experienced,â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to limit their second shots and get to the free-throw line.â&#x20AC;? Sara James gave Stanford a boost off the bench with 18 points in a win over Utah, replacing an ill Toni Kokenis, but you have to go back to the Pacific game for bench contributions from multiple people. What has been missing from the Stanford arsenal is the reliable bench player. Taylor Greenfield, who scored 18 against Gonzaga earlier in the season, was 1-of-3 from the foul line against the Golden Bears. That was the only offensive production from the bench Tuesday night. Bonnie Samuelson has reached double figures too, netting 11 in the

A goal by Paly senior Paul Stefanski (13) earned a hug from freshman Dami Bolarinwa.

(continued on page 27)

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

#! . 4/ 2 ! 243 # % . 4 % 2 3 4 ! . & / 2 $ 5 . ) 6 % 2 3 ) 4 9

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BEAUTIFUL & 5 . . 9 ALIGNMENTONFOURSCREENS

Cadence Lee

Ian Cramer

Gunn High

Gunn High

The junior wrestler became the first girl to win her weight division as she went 3-0 to capture the 106-pound division and help the Titans beat 29 teams and win the team title at the 27th annual Bianchini Memorial.

The sophomore wrestler captured the 138-pound title at the 27th annual Bianchini Memorial as he went 4-0 with four pins, all in the first or second periods, while helping the Titans win the team championship.

$ISCOVERTHE#ANTOR!RTS#ENTERANDOURNEWFAMILYPROGRAMMING    s M USEUMSTANFORDEDU

&2%%!$-)33)/. 6IDEO1UARTETISONLOANFROMTHE3AN&RANCISCO-USEUMOF-ODERN!RT4HEWORKISAGIFTOFTHEARTISTANDTHE0AULA#OOPER'ALLERYCOMMISSIONEDBYTHE 3AN&RANCISCO-USEUMOF-ODERN!R TAND-USĂ?EDg!R T-ODERNE'RAND $UC*EAN ,UXEMBOURGWITHTHEGENEROUSSUPPORTOFTHE*AMES&AMILY&OUNDATION 4HEEXHIBITIONISSUPPORTEDBYTHE#ONTEMPORARY#OLLECTORS#IRCLE THE#LUMECK&UND AND#ANTOR!RTS#ENTER-EMBERS

Honorable mention Gabi Bade

Eric Cramer

Pinewood basketball

Leanna Bade

Gunn wrestling

Keller Chryst

Pinewood basketball

Meghan Holland

Palo Alto basketball

Aubrey Dawkins*

Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Melissa Holland

Palo Alto basketball

Aldis Petriceks*

Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Lindsay Karle

Palo Alto basketball

Johnny Sun

Menlo soccer

Gunn soccer

Sunny Lyu

Cina Vazir

Palo Alto soccer

Palo Alto soccer * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

PREP FOOTBALL

SHPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lavorato is named a state coach of year t was a big year for head coach Pete Lavorato and his Sacred Heart Prep football team. The Gators set a school record for most single-season wins during a 12-1 year that included the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second Central Coast Section Division IV title. Lavorato was named the Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division Coach of the Year. He topped that recently as he was named the Cal-Hi Sports Small Schools State Coach of the Year. This marks the first time that a coach from the CCS has been awarded this honor. Once called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;guru of the fly offenseâ&#x20AC;? by current San Francisco 49ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; head coach Jim Harbaugh, Lavorato led the Gators to their second section title in the past three years in addition to their fourth league crown. Lavorato grew up in Canada and played college football at Utah State before playing professionally for the Edmonton Eskimos in the Canadian Football League. On a team that featured future NFL Hall of Famer

I

Warren Moon as the quarterback, Lavorato was a part of five Grey Cup championships and in 1977 was selected to the CFL All-Star team. After many coaching jobs in California and Canada in the 1990s, he was hired at Sacred Heart Prep in 2003. While the school was not known for football at the time and clearly took a back seat in the sport to arch-rival Menlo School, Lavorato nonetheless has built the program into a small school perennial power in Northern California. In his 10 seasons at Sacred Heart Prep, Lavorato has a record of 8330-1. He has never had a losing season at SHP, coming close only once in 2006 with a 5-5 mark. In other football news, Palo Alto junior quarterback Keller Chryst was named to the MaxPreps 2012 Junior All-American Team. The 6-foot-4, 230-pound Chryst was named to the second-team offense after throwing for 2,489 yards. Chryst also was ranked No. 63 in the nation by Tom Lemmings in his Class of 2014 Top 100 list on MaxPreps. N Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 25

Sports

Gunn wrestlers pin down history by winning a title C by Keith Peters

hris Horpel continues to be amazed by his Gunn High wrestling team. The Titans won the SCVAL De Anza Division meet championship a year ago and havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lost a step this season. A second-place finish at the Lynn Dyche Classic in December was followed by by a championship team title at the Bianchini Memorial last weekend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As usual, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a good explanation for why we won this thing,â&#x20AC;? said Horpel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe the

other teams that were supposed to be good, just arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Maybe we are over-performing! Whatever is is, I want to keep up our momentum and see what we can do in CCS.â&#x20AC;? The 30-team Bianchini Memorial celebrated its 27th year of existence on Saturday at Cupertino High School and Gunn provided plenty of highlights for the celebration. The Titans won their first-ever Bianchini title with 189 points, upsetting second-ranked Palma (161) and several other schools outside the Central Coast Section. Mitty was

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ******************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; REGULAR MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; COUNCIL CHAMBERS JANUARY 14, 2013 - 7:00 PM SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 1. Presentation from Lisa Hendrickson, Avenidas 2. Selection of Candidates to be Interviewed for the Public Art Commission for one Unexpired Term Ending on April 30, 2015 3. Selection of Candidates to be Interviewed for the Parks and Recreation Commission for two terms Ending on December 31, 2015 4. Selection of Candidates to be Interviewed for the Planning and Transportation Commission for one Unexpired Term Ending on July 31, 2014 CONSENT CALENDAR 5. Review and Acceptance of Annual Status Report on Developers' Fees for Fiscal Year 2012 and Adoption of Resolution Making Findings Regarding Continuing Need for Unexpended Parkland Development Fees in the Amount of $38,729; Community Center Development Fees in the Amount of $562,329; Library Development Fees in the Amount of $213,729 6. Adoption of Budget Amendment Ordinance in the Amount of $400,000 and Approval of Enterprise Refuse Fund Contract with (contractor) in the Total Amount of $900,000 for the New LandďŹ ll Gas Flare Project at Regional Water Quality Control Plant - Capital Improvement Program Project RF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10002 7. Adoption of a Budget Amendment Ordinance in the Amount of $230,211 to Capital Improvement Program Project RF-070001 and Approval of Contract with Wickman Development and Construction in the Amount Not to Exceed $353,000 for Improvements to the Existing Household Hazardous Waste Station Located at the Entrance to the Regional Water Quality Control Plant 8. SECOND READING: Adoption of an Ordinance Establishing Underground Utility District No. 47 (MiddleďŹ eld Road/Addison Avenue/Cowper Street/ Homer Avenue) by Amending Section 12.16.02 of the Palo Alto Municipal Code (First Reading: 12/10/2012, PASSED: 8-0 Holman not participating) 9. SECOND READING: Adoption of an Ordinance rezoning a 0.6-acre site at 423451 Page Mill Road from Single Family Residential (R-1) to Service Commercial (CS), to add a Site and Design â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dâ&#x20AC;? overlay (First Reading: 12/10/2012, PASSED: 9-0) 10. Approval of Amendment No. 1 to Mutual Cooperation and Support Agreement Between the City of Palo Alto and Friends of the Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo to Extend Term for Another Three Years 11. Approval of a Three Year Contract with West Coast Arborists, Inc. in a Total Amount Not to Exceed $1,050,000 for Tree Pruning and Removal Services 12. Adoption of a Budget Amendment Ordinance in the amount of $172,989 to Provide an Additional Appropriation for the Biosolids Facility Plan Project at the Regional Water Quality Control Plant (WQ-10001); and Approval of a Wastewater Treatment Enterprise Fund Contract with CH2M HILL Engineers, Inc. in a Total Amount Not to Exceed $421,436 for the Bio-solids Facility Plan at the Regional Water Quality Control Plant-Capital Improvement Program WQ-10001 13. Approval of the Acceptance and Expenditure of Citizens Options for Public Safety (COPS) Funds on Various Law Enforcement Equipment 14. Adoption of a Budget Amendment Ordinance in the Amount of $182,902 to Fund the Purchase of Two Ford F-250 Pickup Trucks, One Chevrolet Express 350 Cargo Van, Two Regenerative Air Sweepers and $16,000 for Vehicle OutďŹ tting Work and Approval of Purchase Orders with 1) Towne Ford in an Amount Not to Exceed $52,146 for Purchase of Two Ford F-250 Pickup Trucks; 2) Courtesy Chevrolet in an Amount Not to Exceed $39,756 for Purchase of One Chevrolet Express 3500 Cargo Van; and 3) Municipal Maintenance Equipment in an Amount Not to Exceed $539,646 for Purchase of Two Regenerative Air Sweepers; (Capital Improvement Program project VR13000) 15. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation to Approve a Policy for the OfďŹ ce of Economic Development ACTION ITEMS 16. Public Hearing: Objections to Weed Abatement and Adoption of Resolution Ordering Weed Nuisance Abated 17. Public Hearing: TEFRA Hearing and Approval of Conduit Refunding Obligations for the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center Through the California Development Authority Relating to Facilities Located at 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto, California 94303 18. Energy/compost consideration issues (landďŹ ll capping options and draft Energy/Compost Facility RFP) 19. Approval of Pilot Residential Compostables Collection Program and 67 Adjustments to Refuse Collection Frequency

Page 26Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

third with 142.50 points. Gunn produced three champions and nine medalists overall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My team keeps surprising me in a good way,â&#x20AC;? said Horpel, now in his 10th season as Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head wrestling coach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have another good bunch that is very coachable, and they are making progress quickly. I also have a good group of assistants that make my job a lot easier.â&#x20AC;? Horpel, however, lost one of those assistants â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jonas Haro â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this week. Haro accepted a job offer in New York and will be leaving the area on Friday. The Palo Alto High grad has been a valuable fixture on the football and wrestling staffs for years. Haro was on hand for the Bianchini, where the highlight for Gunn was a big sweep by Ian Cramer at 138 pounds. He pinned all four opponents in the first or second period on his way to winning the title. Despite moving up a weight class, Cramer won his division with a pin

of Andrew Corral of Summit Tahoma at 1:34, a pin of Jeremiah Bautista of Fremont at 2:23, a pin of Max Dygert of Monta Vista in 2:57 and a pin of Will Amos of Redwood in 1:29. Cramerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older brother, Eric, captured the 132-pound title with a a major decision and three pins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the last one coming in the finals against Brandon Watson of Monterey in 1:35. Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third champion was Cadence Lee at 106 pounds. She had three matches, pinning her first opponent in just 44 seconds before winning her next two by decision â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including a 5-2 win over Nick Newman of Healdsburg in the finals to become the first girl ever to win her weight class at this tournament. Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stephen Martin was second at 170 pounds after winning a pair of matches before dropping a 3-0 decision in the finals. Teammate Sean Lydster was third at 195 pounds with a 3-1 record,

Daniel Papp was fourth at 126 with a 3-2 mark, Blaze Lee (145) and Harsha Mokkarala (220) both were fifth with 3-2 marks, and Eric Calderon was seventh at 285. Gunn actually won this tournament in 1974, when it was held at Monta Vista High School and it was not yet called the Bianchini Memorial. Gunn, which wrestled at Los Altos on Thurday night, next will compete at the San Ramon Invitational on Saturday at San Ramon Valley High. At the Apple Cider Classic at Watsonville High on Saturday, Austin Wilson of Menlo-Atherton finished second at 120 pounds after being pinning by Albert Lujan-Arias of St. Francis at 4:00. Wilson, a junior, wound up earning 26 team points for his effort. He opened with a pair of pins to reach the semifinals, where he decisioned Eric Tolbertson of Newark Memorial, 9-6. N

Paly soccer

turned to the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It never crossed my mind,â&#x20AC;? Gee said of the thought of not returning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If anything, I was looking forward to this season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew that most of us would be playing together again, so we are familiar with each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s type of play. It plays a really big role in soccer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; communication, anticipation and confidence. Also, our team chemistry is real strong.â&#x20AC;? All 15 returning players had another reason to come back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are ready for a shot at redemption,â&#x20AC;? Gee said. Thus far, the Vikings are doing just that. They are 2-0 in the SCVAL El Camino Division following Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-1 victory over host Monta Vista and are 6-2-1 overall, which includes a championship title in the Oak Grove Gold Cup in December. Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season, which started with a loss to Carlmont, took off after that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We lost our first game and then won our first game in the Oak Grove Gold Cup tournament,â&#x20AC;? Briggs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did not celebrate, but it was more of a group/collective sigh of relief â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a feeling like a big weight had come off their back.â&#x20AC;? Palo Alto put together a fourmatch win streak before falling to long-time De Anza Division rival Mountain View, but has gone 2-0-1 since then and appears ready to regain its role as a postseason regular. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winning has restored our confidence,â&#x20AC;? said Gee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead of going into games wondering how bad it will be, we prepare for the game with a winning mentality. However, the biggest reason that makes us think about being successful again is that we are finally scoring. I have confidence that our back line can hold opponents to a clean sheet, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all up to our goal scores. Chris Meredith is the jolt we needed to turn the season around.â&#x20AC;? Meredith, one of eight seniors listed on the roster, did not play last season. He played on the frosh-soph team for two years before deciding to spend his junior year concentrating on his studies while getting

ready for college. He kept his soccer skills intact by playing with a Palo Alto club team. Meredith decided to return because it was his senior year. He also thought playing in the lower El Camino Division would be fun. He brings plenty of speed and experience to the team, showing both against Monta Vista as he took a bouncing ball from fellow senior Cina Vazir and headed it past the Matadorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; keeper for a 2-0 lead in the first half on Monday. Senior Paul Stefanski scored Palyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first goal in the opening eight minutes while Gee converted a penalty kick in the second half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are better this year due to the maturity of the younger players,â&#x20AC;? Briggs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are still young and have room to improve. However, we are a little faster and a little stronger with a year of experience. We have a good group and our frosh-soph team is the strongest I have seen in four or five years.â&#x20AC;? Thus, Palo Alto has closed the door on last season and opened a new one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to focus on our team, not our opponents,â&#x20AC;? Briggs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I scheduled â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; league preseason opponents because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where we want to play, and I think that will challenge us to be a better team for league play. I am trying to help our team get better. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mountain View loss showed that we needed to regroup and try to stress the things that we are doing right and work on those things to make us better. There will be some good teams in the El Camino and we need to play our best every game to improve.â&#x20AC;? Mountain View, for example, has won the De Anza Division title the past two seasons after moving up from the El Camino Division. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something Briggs would like to duplicate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to continue to grow and improve and focus on playing our best game, no matter our opponent,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we play well, we can compete with most teams in the SCVAL.â&#x20AC;?N

(continued from page 24)

Thus, Palo Alto went from the highest of highs to the lowest of lows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last season was tough as we have a history of successful expectations,â&#x20AC;? said Paly head coach Don Briggs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had no returning starters and only one returning player. We were younger, smaller, and less experienced and in a very tough division of the De Anza D1 league. At times, we had eight freshmen and sophomores on the field against teams fielding 11 upperclassmen. Teams would often simply wear us down as the game progressed.â&#x20AC;? Briggs was without players for various reasons, which included conflicts with club teams, injuries and friction with the coaching staff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead of focusing on the score, we concentrated on being better every time we played,â&#x20AC;? Briggs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As the season went on, we gave up fewer goals but still had trouble scoring (Paly had two goals in 12 league games). The team had a good attitude and (the players) supported each other and continued to work hard to improve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a team, we stressed the positive and worked to improve both individually and as a team. All I demanded is that they work hard in practice and on the field. As long as a player could walk off the field and say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I did my best, I left nothing behindâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; . . . what more could we ask for? I never saw us give up in a game.â&#x20AC;? Current senior defender Kirby Gee was among those who suffered through last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For as bad as it sounds, it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as bad as you would think,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, it felt awful to be a part of a losing team, but just like any other season, we had fun. Our goal was to get better every day and, although our record doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show it, we did. It was a great learning experience.â&#x20AC;? It was so positive that Gee and 14 teammates from last season re-

Sports

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoops (continued from page 24)

road victory over Tennessee. Those efforts, though, are few and far between. In four of the past six games, the Stanford bench combined has been limited to single digits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been searching the whole season,â&#x20AC;? VanDerveer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying to figure out our offensive identity. What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve emphasized is pace; going hard. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what is most needed.â&#x20AC;? Against Cal, Stanford won its 81st straight win against a conference opponent, a streak that figures to get challenged several times. Ogwumike provided most of the scoring and helped hold the Bears to 30 percent shooting as Stanford won for the 10th straight time in this rivalry. Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last loss to Cal, or to any conference team for that matter, came nearly four years ago. At least the pressure of an 82game home winning streak will be off Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulders for the rematch. Connecticut took care of that to finish off 2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Connecticut game was a big low,â&#x20AC;? Ogwumike said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just really proud of how we bounced back. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re discovering ourselves. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a tough preseason and a tough start to conference. Our toughness is something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discover along the way.â&#x20AC;? For a while on Tuesday it looked as though the Cardinal would be

willing to let Ogwumike carry the load. Sophomore point guard Amber Orrange and senior forward Joslyn Tinkle stepped up to lend a helping hand in the second half. Cal controlled the first half and went into the locker room up 3129 at the intermission. The Golden Bears were quicker to the ball and hungrier. They established their dominance on the boards. The Bears overcame their poor shooting with relentless rebounding, using 21 offensive boards to score 22 second-chance points. But that turned out to be a frustrating highlight due to Ogwumikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spectacular performance. Stanford started to pull away with six straight points just past the midway point of the second half with Tinkle getting out in transition for an easy layup that gave the Cardinal a 52-46 lead with six minutes left. Ogwumike then came up with the biggest play of the night after a held ball gave the Cardinal the ball at halfcourt with two seconds on the shot clock. Tinkle threw up the inbound pass off the backboard and Ogwumike converted the layup as the shot-clock expired. She drew a foul on the play but missed the free throw, keeping the lead at eight points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a short shot clock,â&#x20AC;? Ogwumike said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told Joslyn just throw it up there and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll try to get it. I tried to get it. We had two seconds to put it up. Luck of the Irish, I guess.â&#x20AC;? Or, perhaps, the mindset of an All-American. N

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

Stanford backcourt finally showing signs of life by Rick Eymer uards Aaron Bright and Chasson Randle were virtually interchangeable last year, giving Stanford a solid foundation of success en route to the NIT championship and high expectations for this season. The Cardinal menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team was picked to finish fourth in the Pac-12 by a vote of coaches and media. Bright and Randle were two big reasons why folks thought so highly of Johnny Dawkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; squad coming into the year. When Stanford takes on visiting Washington at 8 p.m. Saturday, those expectations suddenly seem within reach again. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because Randle, who hit his low point of the season in a loss at USC last week, and Bright, whose season has resembled a rollercoaster to date, played well together in Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 78-67 victory over visiting Washington State on Wednesday night in Maples Pavilion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re back in school and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to get into the mode of the Pac12 season,â&#x20AC;? Randle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a chance to redeem ourselves. You always want to protect home court but just playing at home wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t save you. You still have to play.â&#x20AC;? Randle has been one of Stan-

G

fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading scorers, with Dwight Powell, for most of the season. After missing all six shots he took in a two-point loss to the Trojans last week, Randle had to take a good look at himself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always look for something positive and something negative in every game,â&#x20AC;? Randle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That definitely had a carryover affect but then all of us found something within ourselves to use as a springboard.â&#x20AC;? Coming into Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game, Randle and Bright had a combined shooting percentage of .350, part of the reason Stanford is ranked last in the Pac-12 in shooting. Against the Cougars, the two guards combined to shoot 67 percent (10 for 15) from the field, including 5-of-7 from three-point land. It was the type of effort that produced headaches for the Cougars. Dawkins said he never lost confidence in his guards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could see signs of them coming around,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could see it in practice. They are both right there. They had a terrific season last year and they keep battling. They both still want to get better.â&#x20AC;? Washington State entered the game with the Pac-12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best defense. The 78 points Stanford scored matched the most allowed by the

Cougars this season. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly a good sign for the Cardinal while moving forward. Powell, meanwhile, continued his productive year with 16 points and 11 rebounds against the Cougars. In four career games against Washington State, Powell has 46 points and 31 rebounds. Washington, the defending Pac-12 champion, will be a different story. The Huskies average over 70 points a game, giving the Cardinal defense something to ponder. The Huskies have won eight of the past 10 meetings with Stanford. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another pivotal game for Stanford, since an unbalanced schedule has the Cardinal meeting the Washington schools just once this season. This is when protecting home court comes to play. On the other hand, Stanford only plays Arizona and Arizona State once, both on the road. The Cardinal does get a chance to avenge those losses to USC and UCLA. Bright lost his starting job this season, but that may all change after his breakout performance. Part of the reason for Brightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early season struggles was a sprained ankle that forced him out of action a total of four games. He says his ankle is about 90-95 percent healthy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s starting to come around,â&#x20AC;? Bright said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My ankle is getting better and we just focused on running a lot of motion and pushing the ball.â&#x20AC;? Dawkins was just happy to see his team finally enjoy a good shooting evening. N

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Palo Alto Weekly 01.11.13 - Section 1