Issuu on Google+

Palo Alto

Vol. XXXIV, Number 7 N November 16, 2012

State reprimands nursing home Page 3

w w w.PaloA ltoOnline.com

In

search of the car-less commute Employers try new ways to get workers to their jobs Page 29

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

2012 Holiday Gift Guide Spectrum 18

Holidays 22

Eating 38

Shop Talk 39

Movies 40

Donate to the HOLIDAY FUND page 14

NArts A new world of music through ďŹ lm clips

Page 35

NSports Stanford football faces No. 1 Oregon

Page 42

NHome Evergreen Park: Eclectic, child-friendly streets

Page 49

Finance your ride with Us! Financing up to 100% of purchase price, plus tax, license and service contracts Terms up to 7 years Convenient online application

*YOUR ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE (APR) MAY BE HIGHER BASED ON CREDIT QUALIFICATION. THE RATE SHOWN INCLUDES A 0.25% RATE DISCOUNT WITH AUTOMATIC TRANSFER AND A 0.50% RATE DISCOUNT WITH DIRECT DEPOSIT. THE RANGE OF APRS FOR NEW AND USED AUTO LOANS IS 2.25% TO 7.25% AFTER DISCOUNTS. A SAMPLE PAYMENT ON AN 84-MONTH LOAN AT 2.25% APR IS $12.88 PER $1000. A $75 FEE WILL BE ASSESSED TO REFINANCE OR MODIFY A STAR ONE AUTO LOAN. RATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

Page 2ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Lytton Gardens reprimanded over care of patients 3TATEHEALTHOFFICIALSCALLFORCORRECTIONAFTERFACILITYFAILS TOPROVIDEPROMPTASSISTANCE by Sue Dremann HE #ALIFORNIA $EPARTMENT OF (EALTH AND (UMAN 3ERVICES IS REQUIRING ,YTTON 'ARDENS 3KILLED .URSING &ACILITY IN DOWN TOWN0ALO!LTOTORETRAINANDMON ITOR ITS STAFF AFTER AN INVESTIGATION FOUNDSTAFFTOOKASLONGASONEHOUR TORESPONDWHENARESIDENTASKEDFOR

T

HELPGETTINGTOTHEBATHROOM 4HELONGWAITVIOLATESASTATERE QUIREMENT REGARDING hTHE DIGNITY AND RESPECT OF INDIVIDUALITY v AN /CTREPORTSTATED )NVESTIGATORS ACTINGONAPATIENTS COMPLAINT WENTTOTHE BEDFA CILITYON7EBSTER3TREETON!UG

AND FOUND IT FAILED TO ENSURE THAT THE CALL LIGHT WHICH PATIENTS PRESS WHENTHEYNEEDHELP WASANSWERED PROMPTLY ,YTTON'ARDENSOFFICIALSHAVENOW FILEDACORRECTIVEPLANWITHTHESTATE ANDPROMISETOCLOSELYMONITORSTAFF WHOHAVEBEENINSTRUCTEDTORESPOND QUICKLYTOCALLS !LTHOUGHTHESTATEWASACTINGONA SINGLECOMPLAINT SOME,YTTON'AR DENSPATIENTSANDTHEIRFAMILIESHAVE TOLDTHE7EEKLYTHATSTAFFFREQUENTLY

IGNORED CALL BUTTONS 3OME PEOPLE SAIDTHEYEITHEREXPERIENCEDORSAW PATIENTSWHOWERELEFTINTHEIROWN WASTEFORHOURS LEAVINGTHEMINDIS COMFORTANDFEELINGASHAMED 4HEISSUEINVESTIGATEDBYTHESTATE FIRSTCAMETOTHE7EEKLYSATTENTION IN LATE !UGUST ! PATIENT WAS AD MITTED TO THE SKILLED NURSING FACIL ITYIN*ULYWITHDIFFICULTYWALKING MUSCLE WEAKNESS AND A HISTORY OF STROKE3HEWASLUCID NOTCOGNITIVE LYIMPAIRED ANDWASABLETOREADILY

COMMUNICATE ACCORDING TO A STATE REPORT 4HE PATIENT TOLD THE INVESTIGATOR THATONHERFIRSTNIGHTAT,YTTON'AR DENSSHEWAITEDFORTOMINUTES BEFORE ANYONE ANSWERED HER CALL LIGHT ANDSHEWASINSOMEDISCOM FORT4HEINVESTIGATOR BASEDONHER OBSERVATIONS INTERVIEWSANDRECORD REVIEW CONCLUDEDTHATPATIENTSWERE WAITINGUPTOANHOURFORHELP AC (continued on page 8)

42!.30/24!4)/.

No quick fixes for downtown’s parking woes 0ALO!LTOTOSTUDYSCOPEOFTHEPARKINGSHORTAGE by Gennady Sheyner

W

THE 4UESDAY ACTIONS hTHE START OF WHAT)KNOWISASIGNIFICANTUNDER TAKINGv )NAPPROVINGTHESETOFPROPOSALS BYA VOTE WITH+AREN(OLMAN DISSENTING COUNCIL MEMBERS EM PHASIZEDTHECHALLENGESINHERENTIN SOLVINGTHEGLARINGANDOFTEN CITED PROBLEM 2ESIDENTS IN THE 0ROFES SORVILLE AND $OWNTOWN .ORTH NEIGHBORHOODS HAVE BEEN PARTICU LARLYADAMANTINRECENTYEARSABOUT DOWNTOWN WORKERS INCREASINGLY TAKING THEIR STREET SPOTS TO AVOID THETIMELIMITSONPARKINGINOTHER AREASOFDOWNTOWN /VER THE PAST TWO YEARS REPRE SENTATIVES FROM THE NEIGHBORHOODS HAVEBEENMEETINGWITHDOWNTOWN BUSINESS OWNERS AND CITY PLANNERS IN HOPES OF FINDING A SOLUTION ALL PARTIES CAN AGREE ON )N *ULY STAFF RECOMMENDEDARESIDENTIAL PERMIT PARKING PROGRAM THAT WOULD LIMIT VISITOR PARKING TO TWO HOURS IN A SECTIONOF0ROFESSORVILLE4HECOUN CILSTRUCKDOWNTHEPROPOSEDPARK INGRESTRICTIONSANDDIRECTEDSTAFFTO CONSIDERMOREHOLISTICANDCOMPRE

HENSIVESOLUTIONS 2USS #OHEN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OFTHE0ALO!LTO$OWNTOWN"USI NESSAND0ROFESSIONAL!SSOCIATION EXPRESSED SUPPORT ON 4UESDAY FOR THEPARKINGSTUDYANDSAIDDOWN TOWN BUSINESSES ARE BEHIND THE CITYS EFFORT TO SOLVE THE PARKING PROBLEM4HEBUSINESSCOMMUNITY HESAID hHASRECOGNIZEDTHENEED TOPROVIDEAPARKINGSTUDYTOMEET DEMAND HAVING SPENT MILLIONS UPON MILLIONS OF DOLLARS TO BUILD PARKINGGARAGESv h7ECONTINUETOEXPLORENEWWAYS TO MEET PARKING DEMAND v #OHEN SAID 2ESIDENTSWEREFARLESSTHRILLED 2ICHARD "RAND WHO LIVES ON !D DISON!VENUE URGEDTHECOUNCILTO FOCUSONTHEMAJORPARKINGSHORT AGES IN THE RESIDENTIAL AREAS AND NOT TO CONFLATE 0ROFESSORVILLES PROBLEMSWITHTHOSEOFDOWNTOWN ASAWHOLE4HETIMEFORGATHERING DATA "RANDSAID hISQUICKLYCOM INGTOANENDv (continued on page 7)

Veronica Weber

ITHDOWNTOWNRESIDENTSUP IN ARMS ABOUT A SHORTAGE OF PARKING SPOTS ON THEIR BLOCKS 0ALO!LTOOFFICIALSAPPROVED ON 4UESDAY A SERIES OF INITIATIVES AIMEDATDIAGNOSINGTHESEVERITYOF THEPROBLEMANDFINDINGACURE 4HROUGH A SERIES OF VOTES THE COUNCIL AGREED TO PROCEED WITH TWO MAJOR STUDIES ˆ ONE LOOKING AT DOWNTOWNS CAPACITY FOR NEW DEVELOPMENT AND ANOTHER FOCUS ING ON GARAGES AND CONSIDERING NEW PARKING FACILITIES 4HE COUN CIL ALSO DIRECTED STAFF TO CONSIDER ZONING REVISIONS TO STEM PARKING PROBLEMS RESULTING FROM NEW DE VELOPMENT PURSUEADDITIONALBIKE PARKINGSTATIONSANDCONSIDERAVA RIETYOFSHORTER TERMSOLUTIONSSUCH ASLOADINGZONESAROUNDRESIDENTIAL AREAS 7HILETHEMEASURESAREUNLIKELY TO SATISFY THE DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS LOOKINGFORIMMEDIATEFIXES COUN CILMEMBERSAGREEDTHATTHEYAREA GOODSTARTTOWHATPROMISESTOBE ALONGANDCOMPLEXSEARCHFORSO LUTIONS-AYOR9IAWAY9EHCALLED

How sweet it is !HUMMINGBIRDSEARCHESFORNECTARINAFLOWERINGALOEVERAPLANT ATTHECACTUSGARDENAT3TANFORD5NIVERSITY

%$5#!4)/.

Palo Alto high school grads offer advice 'UNN 0ALYGRADUATESFROMFEELPREPAREDACADEMICALLY LESSPREPAREDSOCIALLY ORETHANPERCENTOF0ALO !LTOS HIGH SCHOOL GRADU ATESFEELACADEMICALLYPRE PARED FOR COLLEGE BUT FEWER THAN  PERCENT OF THEM FEEL hSOCIALLY PREPARED vACCORDINGTOANALUMNI SURVEY 4HEONLINESURVEY TAKENTHISFALL BYGRADUATESFROMTHE#LASSOF OFFERSFEEDBACKONSPECIFICACADEM ICANDSOCIALAREASINWHICHALUMNI FELTPREPAREDORhUNDERPREPAREDv 4WENTY NINEPERCENTOFALUM NIRESPONDEDTOTHE QUESTIONSUR

M

by Chris Kenrick VEY WITHRESPONSESFROM'UNN (IGH 3CHOOL GRADUATES AND  RE SPONSESFROM0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOL GRADUATES 0ALO !LTO ALUMNI REPORTED SIMI LAR LEVELS OF ACADEMIC PREPARATION ˆBUTLOWERLEVELSOFSOCIALPREPA RATION ˆ THAN GRADUATES OF FOUR OTHER HIGH PERFORMING PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS INCLUDING.EW4RIERIN)L LINOIS WHOTOOKTHESAMESURVEY 7HILE ONLY  PERCENT OF 0ALO !LTO ALUMS REPORTED FEELING hPRE PAREDORVERYPREPAREDvSOCIALLY 

PERCENTOFTHEALUMNIFROMTHEOTHER SCHOOLSFELTSOCIALLYPREPARED "UT WHEN ASKED FOR WHAT ADVICE THEYDGIVETOHIGHSCHOOLSTUDENTS TO HELP THEM BEST PREPARE FOR COL LEGE MOST ALUMNI FOCUSED ON THE ACADEMIC 3TUDENT COMMENTS WERE ALL OVER THE MAP BUT NEARLY ALL INDICATED 0ALY AND 'UNN OFFERED SOLID ACA DEMICPREPARATIONEVENASTHEYWERE STRESSFULENVIRONMENTS h)FYOUDIDWELLAT0ALYOR'UNN YOULL DO FINE AT ANY COLLEGE v RE

PORTED ONE ALUMNUS IN THE ANONY MOUSSURVEY h!LTHOUGH IT SUCKS DURING THE COLLEGE APPLICATION TIME TO HAVE CLASSMATES THAT ARE NATIONAL LEVEL ATHLETES SCHOLARSORBOTH YOUCOME TOREALIZEHOWLUCKYYOUARETOHAVE BEENINTRODUCEDTOSUCHTALENT AND THEPOTENTIALYOUHAVEYOURSELF h)FYOUWERE@AVERAGEAT0ALYOR 'UNN YOULLDOQUITEWELLINMOST COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTS BOTH ACA DEMICALLY AND SOCIALLY v THE SAME STUDENTSAID 7ARNEDANOTHERh'UNNPREPARES YOUWELL BUTDONTSLACKOFF$ONT THINKYOUKNOWEVERYTHINGBECAUSE YOU WENT TO 0!53$ EVEN THOUGH 0!53$ISAGREATSCHOOLvDISTRICT -ORETHANONESTUDENTREFERREDTO HAVING FELT hCRUSHINGv PRESSURE TO

SUCCEEDINHIGHSCHOOL "UTSEVERALADVISEDTHATFINDINGA GOOD COLLEGE FIT IS MORE IMPORTANT THANATTENDINGABIG NAMESCHOOL h'UNNISTHEFARTHESTTHINGFROM ACOLLEGEENVIRONMENT vONESTUDENT WROTE h4RYANDIGNORETHEPRESSUREAND DO WHAT YOU WANT TO DO $ONT LET 'UNN MAKE YOU FEEL BAD FOR NOT GOINGTO3TANFORDORSCHOOLSOFTHE LIKEv ! 0ALY GRADUATE WROTE h0ALY IS INSANE 4HE STUDY CULTURE IS VERY MESSEDUP ANDMOSTOFTHESTUDENTS ARE SO HIGHLY PRESSURIZED THAT OF COURSETHEYREGOINGTOPOPv h"UTIFYOUGETTHROUGHTHATPOW DER KEG COLLEGE WILL BE OKAY v THE (continued on page 9)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 3

Upfront

Sand Hill School School should be fun. If you need help, call us.

At Sand Hill School you’ll find teachers who really care and know how to teach children who are bright but struggling in a conventional classroom. We have opened a few spots in our combination third-fourth grade class! It’s easy to apply at our website or sign up for a parent visit, where parents can observe classrooms and talk with Sand Hill School staff.

www.sandhillschool.org Thursday morning parent visits 10:30-11:30 Sign up online. 650 Clark Way, Palo Alto, CA

450 CAMBRIDGE AVE, PALO ALTO, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson EDITORIAL Jocelyn Dong, Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Tom Gibboney, Spectrum Editor Sue Dremann, Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Eric Van Susteren, Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Colin Becht, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Contributors Pierre Bienaimé, Lisa Kellman, Haiy Le, Editorial Interns DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung, Designers PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Samantha Mejia, Shop Product Manager Adam Carter, Elaine Clark, Janice Hoogner, Wendy Suzuki, Display Advertising Sales Neal Fine, Carolyn Oliver, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Asst. Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator BUSINESS Susie Ochoa, Payroll & Benefits Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Claire McGibeny, Cathy Stringari, Business Associates ADMINISTRATION Doris Taylor, Receptionist Ruben Espinoza, Courier EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistant Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright ©2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or email circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE!

Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: _______________________________ City/Zip: _______________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610. Palo Alto CA 94302

Page 4ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

‘‘

at Children’s Health Council Grades K-4, expanding to grade 8

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

‘‘

I’m in a position to help people, and I like it. — Ken Pierre, Downtown Streets Team manager, on his newfound purpose following years of homelessness and addiction. See story on page 6.

Around Town

GOODBYE, GARY ... Stories about Gary Fazzino’s wide-ranging tastes and singular habits abounded Tuesday evening, when the City Council held an official ceremony in honor of the former mayor and Palo Alto’s “unofficial historian.” Fazzino, who died Oct. 30, at the age of 60, was characterized by friends and former colleagues as a man of exceptional knowledge and unconditional love for the city. This love was on full display in a speech he gave to the Palo Alto Historical Association in May (a video snippet of which was shown at Tuesday’s event). “I can’t think of another city, except of medieval Florence, that is as remarkable as this community,” Fazzino said, citing Michelangelo, the Medicis and the Borgias as some of Florence’s claims to fame. He then turned to Palo Alto. “In terms of technology, this really is the center of the world and has been for 100 years.” Despite his often-cited encyclopedic knowledge of Palo Alto, Fazzino remained humble and took care never to sound like a know-it-all. This may have had something to do with his recognition that Palo Alto has no shortage of geniuses. A regular analyst of local elections, Fazzino pointed out during one of his Election Day punditry riffs that Palo Alto has “one of the most talented groups of citizens” for a city of its size. “Sixty percent of the citizens think they’re smarter than I am, and 90 percent probably are,” Fazzino said. CHANGE OF PLANNERS ... Palo Alto’s Planning and Transportation Commission lost one of its top veterans this month when Samir Tuma announced his resignation from the influential and notoriously detail-oriented commission. Tuma, who joined the commission in 2007, wrote in a letter to the city that he is leaving because his wife, Kriss Deiglmeier has “an amazing opportunity to work on a poverty-alleviation project overseas, and we will be leaving the country for six months.” When asked by phone to elaborate, Tuma declined to state where he will be traveling. But even without his presence, the Wednesday night meeting of the planning commission hit close to home for Tuma. The first item the commission considered was a proposal by Tuma and Deiglmeier to subdivide their property on Chimalus Drive in Barron Park. Though it was Deiglmeier and not Tuma who presented the item to

the commission, members noted Tuma’s recent resignation during the discussion. Vice Chair Mark Michael said it’s “important to eliminate any appearance of ethical lack of clarity” and pointed out that even if Tuma had not resigned, the commission would be able to proceed with this item (Tuma would merely have had to recuse himself from the discussion and vote). The commission agreed that Tuma and Deiglmeier’s request is straightforward and approved it by a 6-0 vote. The decision allows the couple to create a two-lot subdivision and permits them to have each lot be 55.85 feet in width, whereas 60 feet is typically the required minimum. The city’s planning staff also recommended approval, noting that the applicants’ proposal “would meet the minimum site area and eliminate the site’s existing nonconforming lot.” ALL THAT NOISE ... Faced with noise complaints, Palo Alto may soon turn down the volume at one of its most prominent gathering spots. The City Council will consider on Monday night whether to set time limits on amplified sound at Lytton Plaza, which has a long history as the city’s “free speech” zone. But it’s not speech that’s vexing critics but rather the music. The plaza was renovated in 2009, at which time the city installed several electric outlets. The intent was to use these outlets for productions of city-sponsored events, according to a new report. But these outlets have since been used by musicians to “perform amplified music at all hours of the day and night,” the report states. And it’s not just music. “People have used the outlets to power portable stereos, heaters, stoves and various other household outlets.” The city’s Parks and Recreation Commission has been trying to solve the problem of excessive noise for months, weighing various proposals. After scrapping a prior plan that would have required permits for amplified sound, the commission endorsed on Aug. 28 a policy that would allow amplified sound on a first come, first-served basis between 5 and 10 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, between noon and 11 p.m. on Saturday and between noon and 10 p.m. on Sunday. No permits would be required to use the plaza during the standard hours, but those looking to reserve a time in advance would obtain a permit for $90. N

Upfront ).&2!3425#452%

Flood-control project flows ahead

Rebuild Hwy. 101 bridge over creek

Bottlenecks homes below sea level and behind and below an

by Gennady Sheyner

Replace substandard levees, and create trails and wetland habitat for National endangered species Wildlife Refuge

THEFOCUSOFTHEAGENCYSFIRSTMAJOR PROJECT WHICHWILLDRAWMOSTOFITS FUNDINGFROMA3ANTA#LARA6ALLEY 7ATER $ISTRICT BOND 4HIS PROJECT WOULD WIDEN THE CREEK CHANNEL ADJUSTLEVEESANDCONSTRUCTABOARD WALKTHATWOULDEXTENDTHEEXISTING &RIENDSHIP "RIDGE BETWEEN 0ALO !LTOAND%AST0ALO!LTO/NAPAR ALLELTRACK THEAGENCYISPREPARING TOBEGINTHEEXPANSIONOFTHENARROW .EWELL3TREETBRIDGE APROJECTTHAT WOULDBEFUNDEDMOSTLYTHROUGHA STATEPROGRAMTARGETINGOBSOLETEIN FRASTRUCTURE 7HENCONSTRUCTIONONTHEDOWN STREAM PROJECT BEGINS NEXT YEAR IT WILL MARK THE CITIES FIRST MAJOR FLOOD PROTECTION PROJECT SINCE THE &EBRUARYFLOOD WHICHCAUSED EXTENSIVEDAMAGETONEIGHBORHOODS AROUND THE CREEK MOST NOTABLY #RESCENT0ARKAND$UVENECKIN0ALO !LTO THE'ARDENSIN%AST0ALO!LTO ANDTHE7ILLOWSIN-ENLO0ARK 4HE PROJECT WOULD NOT ELIMINATE

#ITYHASFAILEDTOTAKEADVANTAGEOFDISCOUNTHASMAJORFLAWSINITSPROCUREMENTPROCESS

P

Palo Alto

Modify bridges to

N

&LOOD CONTROLIMPROVEMENTSIMPACTING0ALO!LTO %AST0ALO!LTOAND-ENLO0ARKINCLUDEREBUILDINGLEVEES ADDINGFLOODWALLS REVAMPINGTHE0ALO!LTO-UNICIPAL'OLF#OURSEANDEXTENDINGTHENEARBY&RIENDSHIP"RIDGE

Audit: Palo Alto spends too much on office supplies OOR MANAGEMENT OF OFFICE SUPPLYEXPENDITURESMAYHAVE COST THE #ITY OF 0ALO !LTO CLOSETO BETWEEN.OVEM BERAND-AY ACCORDING TOACRITICALAUDITTHECITYRELEASED 7EDNESDAYEVENING .OV 4HE REPORT BY #ITY !UDITOR *IM 0ELLETIER FOCUSES ON THE CITYS CON TRACTS WITH /FFICE-AX WHICH AC COUNT FOR ABOUT  PERCENT OF TOTAL OFFICE SUPPLIES )T FOUND AMONG OTHER THINGS THAT /FFICE-AX OVER CHARGEDTHECITYBYATLEAST  THROUGH UNAUTHORIZED CHANGES TO PRICING THAT THE CITY HAS FAILED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF DISCOUNTS THAT IT MAY HAVE BEEN QUALIFIED FOR AND THAT THE CITYS !DMINISTRATIVE 3ER VICES $EPARTMENT hHAS NOT EFFEC TIVELYADMINISTEREDTHE#ITYSOFFICE SUPPLIESCONTRACTv 0ELLETIERS REVIEW FOUND THAT THE OFFICE SUPPLY CHAIN HAS ROUTINELY

Levee L Floodwalls F

Menlo Park

East Palo Alto

#)49"5$'%4

by Gennady Sheyner CHANGED PRICES ON SUPPLIES WITH OUTPROPERLYNOTIFYINGTHECITY/F FICE-AX REPRESENTATIVES SAID THAT THEY HAD COMMUNICATED ANY PRICE CHANGES TO THE CITY IN WRITING AND THATTHESECHANGESWERENEVERQUES TIONED ACCORDINGTOTHEREPORT"UT THEAUDITORSOFFICEhDIDNOTFINDEVI DENCETHATCONTRACT PRICELISTCHANG ESWEREAPPROPRIATELYAUTHORIZEDOR COMMUNICATEDv 4HE AUDIT RECOMMENDS THAT THE CITY REQUEST A REIMBURSEMENT FROM /FFICE-AXFORTHESEOVERCHARGES 4HECITYTAKESPARTINTHEh!MER ICA 3AVESv PROGRAM WHICH ALLOWS AGENCIES TO GET HIGH DISCOUNTS ON CERTAINITEMS"UTTHEREPORTNOTES THATTHECITYHASINFACTBEENSPEND ING MORE ON OFFICE SUPPLIES SINCE IT JOINED THE PROGRAM IN  7HEREASBEFOREITENTEREDTHEPRO GRAM 0ALO!LTOHADBEENRECEIVING ANOVERALLDISCOUNTOFABOUTPER

Remove bottlenecks in the channel and create new habitat

Extend Friendship Bridge with boardwalk

Map by Shannon Corey

F

RISEOFFEETINYEARS ARATEHE CALLEDhVERYAGGRESSIVEv h7E WANTED TO BUILD OR DESIGN TOTHATSCENARIOSOTHATTHECITIESOF 0ALO !LTO AND %AST 0ALO !LTO WILL NOTHAVETOREVISITTHEISSUEATLEAST FOR THE NEXT  YEARS v SAID -ATER MAN WHOSEAGENCYINCLUDESELECTED OFFICIALSFROMTHETHREEPARTNERCIT IES THE 3ANTA #LARA 6ALLEY 7ATER $ISTRICTANDTHE3AN-ATEO#OUNTY &LOOD#ONTROL$ISTRICT 4HE CREEK AUTHORITY HAD SPENT MUCHOFTHEPASTTWOYEARSPERFORM INGDESIGNWORKANDENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSES 4HE FINAL %NVIRONMENTAL )MPACT 2EPORT FOR THE PROJECT WAS CERTIFIEDLASTMONTH 4HEPROJECTSAPPROVALISAMAJOR MILESTONE FOR AN AGENCY THAT HAS BEEN STRUGGLING OVER THE PAST DE CADEANDAHALFTOGETFEDERALHELP FOR BOOSTING FLOOD CONTROL !FTER THE FLOOD OF  THE 53 !RMY #ORPSOF%NGINEERSEMBARKEDONA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO PROTECT THE AREAFROMA YEARFLOOD WHICH BYDEFINITIONHASAPERCENTCHANCE OFHAPPENINGINANYGIVENYEAR4HE FEDERALEFFORTHASSLOWEDTOATRICKLE INRECENTYEARS HOWEVER LARGELYBE CAUSEOFINADEQUATEFUNDING )NTHEMEANTIME THEPARTNERCITIES BEGAN TO LOOK AT MORE LIMITED AND IMMEDIATESOLUTIONS INCLUDINGARE TENTIONBASINUPSTREAMOFTHECREEK REBUILT LEVEES DOWNSTREAM AND BRIDGE UPGRADES ALONG THE CREEK 4HEDOWNSTREAMAREA WHICHISPAR TICULARLY VULNERABLE TO FLOODING IS

Bridges

and trails

0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCILBACKSPLANTOBOOSTPROTECTION FROM3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEK IFTEEN YEARS AFTER WATER FROM THE 3AN &RANCISQUITO #REEK SWEPT THROUGH THE NEIGHBOR HOODSOF0ALO!LTO %AST0ALO!LTO AND-ENLO0ARK THEPARTNERCITIES ARE PREPARING TO BREAK GROUND ON AN AMBITIOUS PROJECT THAT WOULD SHIELD THEIR CONSTITUENTS FROM FU TUREFLOODS 4HE 0ALO !LTO #ITY #OUNCIL ON 4UESDAYNIGHTSIGNEDOFFONAPRO POSALBYTHE3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEK *OINT 0OWERS !UTHORITY TO REBUILD LEVEES ADDFLOODWALLS REVAMPTHE 0ALO !LTO -UNICIPAL 'OLF #OURSE AND EXTEND THE NEARBY &RIENDSHIP "RIDGEASPARTOFAGREATEREFFORTTO STRENGTHENFLOODPROTECTIONAROUND THE THREE CITIES 4HE COUNCIL VOTED   WITH+AREN(OLMANDISSENTING TO APPROVE THE PROJECTS DESIGN TO AUTHORIZEMAJORMODIFICATIONSTOTHE GOLFCOURSEANDTOTRUCKSOILFROM 3TANFORD5NIVERSITY-EDICAL#ENTER TOTHEPROJECTSITE 4HE CREEK AUTHORITYS PROPOSAL WHICHTARGETSTHEAREABETWEENTHE 3AN&RANCISCO"AYAND53(IGH WAY  SEEKS TO GO FAR BEYOND PROTECTINGRESIDENTSFROMTHEFICKLE CREEK )T ALSO AIMS TO PROTECT THE PROPERTIES NEAR THE "AY FROM TIDAL FLOW AND A  YEAR SEA LEVEL RISE !SSUCH ITWILLBEAMONGTHE"AY !REAS FIRST MAJOR FLOOD CONTROL PROJECTSTOACCOUNTFORTHEEXPECTED EFFECTSOFCLIMATECHANGE ,EN -ATERMAN EXECUTIVE DIREC TOR OF THE CREEK AUTHORITY SAID THE AGENCYSDESIGNASSUMESASEA LEVEL

Palo Alto

CENT THEDISCOUNTDROPPEDINEACH SUBSEQUENTYEAR TOABOUTPERCENT IN h)FTHE#ITYHADCONTINUEDTORE CEIVEANAVERAGEDISCOUNTOFABOUT PERCENTFORALLITSPURCHASESSUB SEQUENT TO ENTERING THE !MERICA 3AVESPROGRAM ITWOULDHAVESAVED ATLEASTANADDITIONAL FROM .OV THROUGH-AY  v THEAUDITSTATES 4HE AUDITS OTHER RECOMMENDA TIONS ARE BROADER IN SCOPE !FTER FINDINGTHATTHECITYDOESNOTHAVE hEFFECTIVEPROCESSESANDPROCEDURES TO ENSURE THE #ITY RECEIVES CON TRACTEDDISCOUNTS vTHEAUDITRECOM MENDSTHATTHE!DMINISTRATIVE3ER VICES $EPARTMENT hDEVELOP FORMAL PROCEDURESvTOEFFECTIVELYADMINIS TERTHEOFFICESUPPLYCONTRACTANDTO PROPERLY ACCOUNT FOR ITS UNUSUALLY HIGHOFFICEEXPENDITURES )N FISCAL YEAR  THE CITY HAD

THE REQUIREMENT FOR MANY OF THE PROPERTY OWNERS IN THESE AREAS TO PURCHASE FEDERAL FLOOD INSURANCE "UTBYOFFERINGFLOODPROTECTIONAND BOOSTINGWATERCAPACITYDOWNSTREAM IT WILL ALLOW THE AGENCY TO PURSUE OTHER IMPROVEMENTS ELSEWHERE ALONG THE CREEK /NCE COMPLETED THISPACKAGEOFPROJECTSISEXPECTED TO PROVIDE  YEAR PROTECTION AND OBVIATETHENEEDFORINSURANCE 6ICE -AYOR 'REG 3CHARFF WAS ONE OF MANY COUNCIL MEMBERS TO VOICEENTHUSIASMABOUTTHEPROJECT 3CHARFF SAID HE IS hTHRILLEDv ABOUT THE PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS 4HE CITY HE SAID HAS BEEN hLIVING ON BORROWEDTIMEv h4HEFACTTHATWEREBRINGINGITTO FRUITIONISAHUGEWINFOROURCOM MUNITY v3CHARFFSAIDh)NTERMSOF THE CITYS LIABILITY IN TERMS OF PRO TECTINGOURRESIDENTSAND POSSIBLY IN TERMSOFNOTHAVINGOURRESIDENTSPAY FOR FLOOD INSURANCE ˆ ALL OF THOSE AREHUGEWINSFOROURCOMMUNITYv

#OUNCILMAN0AT"URT WHOCHAIRS THE CREEK AUTHORITYS BOARD OF DI RECTORS SAID THE COUNCIL SHOULD BE hPRETTYHAPPYWITHTHISMAJORSTEP v ASWELLASTHOSEONTHEHORIZON h7EFINALLYHAVETHEPOTENTIALTO NOT ONLY ADDRESS ONE OF OUR MOST IMPORTANTEMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEEDS BUTITSALSOADISASTER PREVEN TIONNEED v"URTSAIDh!SWEVESEEN INTHELASTFEWWEEKSWITH(URRICANE 3ANDY WENEEDTOBETHINKINGABOUT HOWWECANACTUALLYPREVENTDISAS TERSINADDITIONTOHAVINGTHERESIL IENCYONCETHEYACTUALLYOCCURv (IS COLLEAGUES GENERALLY AGREED WITH 'AIL 0RICE SAYING SHE WAS hVERY EXCITEDv ABOUT THE COMING IMPROVEMENTS AND -AYOR 9IAWAY 9EHCALLINGTHEPROJECTAhGREATOP PORTUNITYv %VEN(OLMAN THELONEDISSENTER SAID SHE IS hVERY VERY SUPPORTIVEv OFTHEFLOOD CONTROLEFFORT3HEDIS

SPENT ABOUT  PER FULL TIME EQUIVALENTEMPLOYEE FARMORETHAN OTHER COMPARABLE JURISDICTIONS -OUNTAIN 6IEW FOR EXAMPLE HAD EXPENDITURESOFPEREMPLOYEE 3UNNYVALES WERE  AND 3ANTA #LARASWERE "UTWHILETHEAUDITACKNOWLEDGED THATTHECITYHASSPENThCONSIDERABLY MOREFOROFFICESUPPLIESTHANOTHER LOCAL JURISDICTION SAMPLED v IT ALSO NOTEDTHEDIFFICULTYOFLINKINGMANY OFTHESEEXPENDITURESWITHVENDORS &URTHERMORE THE AUDIT FOUND THAT NEARLYHALFOFALLCITYCONTRACTSARE EXEMPTEDFROMCOMPETITIVEBIDDING WHICHMAYALSOKEEPTHECITYFROM GETTINGTHEMOSTFORITSMONEY4HE REVIEW ALSO CONCLUDED THAT hABOUT PERCENTOFEXPENDITURESCODEDAS OFFICESUPPLIESINTHE#ITYSFINAN CIAL SYSTEMS COULD NOT NECESSARILY BE ASSOCIATED WITH OFFICE SUPPLIES VENDORSv 4HE AUDIT RECOMMENDS THAT THE !DMINISTRATIVE 3ERVICES $EPART MENT hENSURE CONTRACT ADMINISTRA TION ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ARE DEFINED AND APPROPRIATELY COMMU NICATEDv )N REVIEWING THE EXISTING OPERATION THE AUDITORS OFFICE hDID NOTFINDANYEVIDENCEOFADEFINED DOCUMENTED OR EFFECTIVE PROCESSv TO ADMINISTER ITS CONTRACTS ,ALO 0EREZ THE CITYS CHIEF FINANCIAL OF

FICERANDDIRECTOROFADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES CALLEDTHESERECOMMENDA TIONShREASONABLEv h7HILEWEHAVESAVEDSIGNIFICANT DOLLARS IN OTHER AREAS SUCH AS REFI NANCINGOURLONG TERMDEBT WECAN MAKEIMPROVEMENTSINTHECONTRACT SERVICESAREA v0EREZSAIDINASTATE MENTh7EFEELTHATTHEAUDITRECOM MENDATIONSAREREASONABLE ANDWE HAVEALREADYBEGUNMAKINGPROCESS IMPROVEMENTSv #ITY -ANAGER *AMES +EENE SAID THE CITY APPRECIATES THE AUDIT AND WILL MAKE IMPROVEMENTS TO THE PROCUREMENT PROCESS BASED ON ITS RECOMMENDATIONS3OMEOFTHEOP PORTUNITIES LOST HE SAID IN A STATE MENT hMAYHAVEBEENGENERATEDBY STAFFCUTBACKSMADETOSAVETHE#ITY MONEYv h4HESE TRADEOFFS WILL BE EXAM INED MORE DEEPLY IN THE ONGOING AUDITRESPONSE v+EENESAID 7HILE0ELLETIERSAUDITISSHARPLY CRITICAL OF !DMINISTRATIVE 3ERVICE $EPARTMENTSPROCUREMENTPOLICIES 0ELLETIERLAUDEDTHEDEPARTMENTSEF FORTINADDRESSINGTHEPROBLEMSUN COVEREDBYTHEAUDIT h)FEELCONFIDENTTHATTHE#ITYCAN MAKEPROCESSIMPROVEMENTSINCON TRACT ADMINISTRATION THAT WILL SAVE MONEYANDPOSITIVELYIMPACTTHEEN TIREORGANIZATION v0ELLETIERSAIDN

(continued on page 13)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 5

Upfront (/,)$!9&5.$

Reaching out to the streets by Sue Dremann EN 0IERRE WAS LIVING ON THE STREETSFORMORETHANYEARS SPIRALINGDOWNWARDAMIDDRUG ANDALCOHOLADDICTION%VERYTIMETHE DISABLED53!RMYVETERANGOTAJOB HEWASFIREDBECAUSEOFHISDRINKING HESAID%VERYDAYWASASTRUGGLEEV ERYNIGHTWASWORSE h)WASINALOTOFPROGRAMSWITH THE6! BUT)COULDNTGETITTOGETH ER vHERECALLED 0IERREHADNOFAMILYNEARBY(E CONSTANTLYWORRIEDABOUTWHEREHE WAS GOING TO SLEEP AND HOWHEWASGOINGTOEAT &ORATIMEHELIVEDINTHE BACKSEATOFHISCAR SHIV ERING IN THE COLD DAMP NIGHTS HESAID "UT HIS LIFE TOOK A FORTUITOUS TURN WHEN HE MADE CONTACT WITH AN OTHER DISABLED VETERAN THROUGH0ROJECT(OMELESS#ONNECT AND JOINED THE $OWNTOWN 3TREETS 4EAM HE SAID /UTREACH PROGRAMS ALLOWEDHIMTOCONNECTWITHSERVIC ESTHATHELPEDHIMENDHISCYCLEOF ADDICTIONSANDHOMELESSNESS h) NEVER WANT TO LIVE LIKE THAT AGAIN vHESAID .OWTHEAFFABLE6IETNAM ERAVET ERANISA3TREETS4EAMMANAGERWHO HELPSOTHERSRECLAIMTHEIRLIVES(E SUPERVISESTWOTEAMSOFFIVEANDSIX PEOPLEWHOKEEPDOWNTOWN0ALO!L TOSBUSINESSDISTRICTCLEAN HESAID

K

h)T SEEMED LIKE A MIRACLE OVER NIGHT -Y LIFESTYLE CHANGED AND ) WORKEDONMYTOOLS)TCONNECTEDME TO OTHER PEOPLE WHO WERE WORKING ONCHANGINGTHEIRLIVES vHESAID 4HE $OWNTOWN 3TREETS 4EAM WHICH STARTED IN  EMPOWERS HOMELESS MEN AND WOMEN WITH SKILLS COUNSELING AND DIGNITY SO THEY CAN BECOME SELF SUFFICIENT )T USESJOBS SEARCHCLASSES CASEWORK ERS HOUSING PLACEMENT AND MORE TO HELP PEOPLE PUT AN END TO THEIR HOMELESSNESS-ORETHANPEOPLE HAVEFOUNDJOBSORPERMA NENTHOUSINGBYBECOMING PARTOFhTHETEAMv 3INCE  THE 3TREETS 4EAMS 0ROJECT (OMELESS #ONNECT PROGRAM HAS RE CEIVED FINANCIAL SUPPORT THROUGH THE 0ALO !LTO 7EEKLY (OLIDAY &UND 4HE(OLIDAY&UNDDISTRIB UTES MONETARY DONATIONS FROM THE 0ALO !LTO COMMUNITY TO HELP LOCAL NONPROFITGROUPSWHOSERVECHILDREN FAMILIES AND UNDERSERVED INDIVIDU ALSIN0ALO!LTOAND%AST0ALO!LTO 4HIS PAST YEAR THE (OLIDAY &UND AWARDED 0ROJECT (OMELESS #ON NECT ASPARTOFATHREE YEAR GRANT 4HE PROGRAM HAS A PEER TO PEEROUTREACHPROGRAMANDHIREDAN INTENSIVE OUTREACHCASEWORKERTOHELP HOMELESSMENANDWOMENANDSTREETS TEAMMEMBERSACCESSSERVICES h) HEAR ALL KINDS OF MIRACLES ALL

%$5#!4)/.

Palo Alto reports improved ‘college readiness’ rates

Veronica Weber

$OWNTOWN3TREETS4EAMS0ROJECT(OMELESS#ONNECTGIVES LOSTSOULSANEWCONNECTION

$OWNTOWN3TREETS4EAMMEMBER/TIS(ARTLEFT TEAMLEAD*OE*OHNSONANDTEAMMANAGER+ENNETH0IERRE WORKTOGETHERTOSWEEPDEBRISFROMANALLEYNEAR&LORENCE3TREETIN0ALO!LTO BETWEEN5NIVERSITYAND,YTTON AVENUES ON.OV THETIME v0IERRESAID h0EOPLENOWSTAYINAPARTMENTSWHO WERENEVERABLETODOITBEFORE,AW YERSHELPGUYSGETON3OCIAL3ECURITY -ANYVETERANSAREDISABLEDANDDIDNT KNOWIT'UYSGETBACKONTRACK AND THEREISRECONNECTIONTOSOCIETYv 0IERRE SAID HE LEARNED ABOUT THE PROGRAM THROUGH ANOTHER DISABLED VETERANWHOHADREACHEDOUTTOHIM 3TREETS 4EAM MEMBERS PROVIDE  HOURSOFPEER TO PEEROUTREACHTHROUGH 0ROJECT(OMELESS#ONNECT WHICHIS

ONGOINGWHILETHEYWORKTHEIRSHIFTS ACCORDINGTO#OMMUNICATIONS-AN AGER!NN -ARIE-EACHAM 0IERRE WAS ABLE TO TAKE PART IN A LOTTERYTHATPROVIDEDHIMWITHPAID FORHOUSINGFORONEYEAR(ERECEIVED FOODANDCLOTHINGANDCOUNSELINGTHAT HELPEDHIMCONQUERHISADDICTIONS (E HAS GAINED CONFIDENCE BY LEARNING TO MANAGE PEOPLE ON THE STREETS TEAM AND THROUGH PUBLIC SPEAKING (E IS NOW A LECTURER ON BEHALF OF THE $OWNTOWN 3TREETS

4EAM TALKING TO DIGNITARIES ABOUT HISSITUATIONANDHOW0ROJECT(OME LESS #ONNECT AND OTHER TEAM PRO GRAMSHAVECHANGEDHISLIFE h7EHAVEALOTOF6)0SWHOHAVE BEEN HELPFUL WITH THE $OWNTOWN 3TREETS4EAMPROBATIONANDPAROLE AGENTS POLICE AND MAYORS ) KNOW THEMBYNAME ANDTHEYKNOWME v HESAIDPROUDLY 0IERREGETSUPEVERYMORNINGAND (continued on page 10)

Palo Alto public school graduates who didn’t complete a-g courses 172 Graduates that don’t meet A-G

92 white

32 hispanic

24 Asian

17 black

12 other

3CHOOLSDIGINTODATAONSTRUGGLINGSTUDENTS by Chris Kenrick STHEYPREPARETOENACTSTIFFER HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RE QUIREMENTS 0ALO!LTOSCHOOLS AREANALYZINGINDIVIDUALSTUDENTTEST DATATOHELPKIDSGETREADYTOMEET THEHIGHERBAR 4HE TOUGHER REQUIREMENTS SET TO TAKEEFFECTWITHTHEGRADUATINGCLASS OFˆTODAYSNINTH GRADERSˆ WILLREQUIRESTUDENTSTOCOMPLETEALL PREREQUISITESFOR#ALIFORNIASPUBLIC FOUR YEAR UNIVERSITIES UNLESS THEY NEGOTIATE CUSTOMIZED hALTERNATIVE REQUIREMENTSvWITHSCHOOLOFFICIALS 4HE NEW RULES RAISE THE BAR FOR THENEARLYPERCENTOF0ALO!LTO STUDENTS CURRENTLY NOT COMPLETING THE FOUR YEAR COLLEGE PREP CUR RICULUM4HEYWILLNOTAFFECTMORE THAN  PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO ALREADYDOSO 3CHOOLOFFICIALSTHISWEEKREPORT ED PROGRESS TOWARD A FOUR YEAR OLD GOAL OF GETTING  PERCENT OF STU DENTS TO COMPLETE THE COLLEGE PREP CURRICULUM KNOWNINSTATEPARLANCE ASTHEhA GREQUIREMENTSv 4HAT GOAL WAS EXCEEDED FOR THE FIRSTTIMEBYTHE'UNN(IGH3CHOOL #LASS OF  WITH  PERCENT

A

COMPLETINGTHEA GCOURSEWORK!T 0ALY COMPLETIONRATESLAGGED WITH PERCENTOF*UNESGRADUATESFIN ISHINGA G FORADISTRICT WIDEAVER AGEOFPERCENT h7HENYOULOOKATOURSTRATEGIC PLANGOALSAROUNDCOLLEGEREADINESS WERE GETTING CLOSER TO REACHING THEM v SAID SCHOOL DISTRICT STATISTI CIAN $IANA 7ILMOT )N  ONLY  OF SENIORS GRADUATED WITH THE FOUR YEAR COLLEGE PREP COURSEWORK UNDERTHEIRBELTS SHESAID 4HE"OARDOF%DUCATIONVOTEDIN -AY TO BOOST GRADUATION REQUIRE MENTS ALIGNINGTHEMBYWITH THEA GCURRICULUM4HEMOVEWAS STRONGLYBACKEDBYTHE3TUDENT%Q UITY!CTION,EAGUEANDTHE0ARENT .ETWORKFOR3TUDENTSOF#OLOR NOW KNOWNAS0ARENT!DVOCATESFOR3TU DENT3UCCESS0!33  0!33CO CHAIR+IM"OMAR WHOSE CHILDREN ATTEND .IXON %LEMENTARY 3CHOOL SAIDTHEPROGRESSREPORTON A GCOMPLETIONhISALMOSTALLGOOD NEWS vBUTSHESTILLWORRIESINPAR TICULARABOUTACHIEVEMENTLEVELSOF !FRICAN !MERICANSTUDENTS h7ELOBBIEDVERYSTRONGLYTORAISE

Page 6ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

146 not socio-economically disadvantaged

85 parents with graduate degree

41 with college degree

26 disadvantaged

19 with some college

17 graduated 5* 5** high school *no high school **declined to state

162 not in voluntary transfer program (VTP)

THE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS v "O MARSAID h"UT MANY OF US LOSE SLEEP AT NIGHTWONDERINGWHETHERTHEDISTRICT WILLDOTHEINTERVENTION MONITORING IDENTIFYING SCAFFOLDING AND ADVIS ING NECESSARY  TO MAKE SURE THAT STUDENTSCANMEETTHEMv 7ILMOTANALYZEDDATAONTHE *UNE GRADUATES WHO DID NOT COM PLETE A G SEEKING CLUES THAT COULD GUIDESCHOOLSTAFFTOWARDEARLIERIN TERVENTIONFORFUTURESTUDENTS 4HEMOSTRELIABLEPREDICTOROFFAIL URETOCOMPLETETHECOLLEGE PREPCUR RICULUMWASLOWMATHEMATICSSCORES INELEMENTARYSCHOOL SHESAID %LEMENTARYSTUDENTSSCORINGhBE LOWORFARBELOWBASICvONTHE#ALI FORNIA 3TANDARDS 34!2 4EST HAD ONLY A  PERCENT CHANCE OF COM

PLETING A G WHILE STUDENTS SCORING hPROFICIENTvORABOVEINELEMENTARY MATH HAD A  PERCENT CHANCE OF COMPLETINGTHEM !FRICAN !MERICAN AND (ISPANIC STUDENTS WERE OVER REPRESENTED AMONGTHE*UNEGRADUATESWHO DIDNOTCOMPLETEA G WITHBLACK AND  (ISPANIC STUDENTS AMONG THEM 7ILMOTSAID .ONETHELESS MOST OF THE NON COMPLETINGSTUDENTSˆˆWERE WHITE AND HALF HAD PARENTS WHO EARNEDGRADUATEDEGREES4ENOFTHE WERE%AST0ALO!LTOOREASTERN -ENLO 0ARK STUDENTS WHO ATTEND 0ALO!LTOSCHOOLSUNDERTHE4INSLEY 6OLUNTARY4RANSFER0ROGRAM "OMARNOTEDTHATEVENTHOUGHJUST  OF THE  NOT MEETING A G LAST *UNE WERE 4INSLEY STUDENTS THOSE

10 in VTP

 REPRESENTED  PERCENT OF THE 4INSLEY STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED IN  h7EVEMADEPROGRESS BUTTHERES STILL A LOT OF HARD WORK TO BE DONE TODEALWITHTHESEMOREINTRACTABLE CASES vSHESAID ADDINGTHATPUBLIC SCHOOLS SHOULD ASPIRE TO HELP KIDS GOBEYONDTHEEDUCATIONALLEVELSOF THEIRPARENTS 3UPERINTENDENT+EVIN3KELLYSAID h7ERENOTGOINGTORESTONOURLAU RELS IFTHEREAREANYLAURELS4OGET THENEXTTHIRDOFKIDSISGOINGTOTAKE ADIFFERENTSTRATEGY ANDTHISISCON STANTLYMOVING7EHAVETOCONTINUE TOWORKANDBRINGNEWENERGYAND IDEASvN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

Upfront

REAL ESTATE TRENDS by Samia Cullen

%$5#!4)/.

Timeline set for decision on new elementary school 7ITHSCHOOLBOUNDARIESINTHEBALANCE BOARDSEEKSCOMMUNITYINPUT by Chris Kenrick ACING THE POLITICALLY FRAUGHT PROSPECT OF REDRAWING SCHOOL ATTENDANCE BOUNDARIES 0ALO !LTOSCHOOLOFFICIALSTHISWEEKLAID THE GROUNDWORK FOR COMMUNITY PARTICIPATIONINCHOOSINGASITEFOR ANEWELEMENTARYSCHOOL LIKELYTO OPENBYTHEFALLOF 4WO POSSIBLE LOCATIONS ˆ 'AR LAND AT  . #ALIFORNIA !VE OR 'REENDELL AT-IDDLEFIELD2OAD ˆHAVEBEENNAMEDBYSCHOOLSTAFF ANDRATIFIEDBYTHE"OARDOF%DUCA TION ! YET TO BE APPOINTED ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF SCHOOL DISTRICT STAFF PARENTS 04!ANDTRAFFICSAFETYREP RESENTATIVES WILL MEET PUBLICLY BE TWEEN *ANUARY AND !PRIL CHARGED WITH IDENTIFYING THE PROS AND CONS OFEACHCAMPUS "Y -AY 3UPERINTENDENT +EVIN 3KELLY WILL RECOMMEND ONE OF THE SITES TO THE "OARD OF %DUCATION ACCORDING TO A TIMELINE APPROVED 4UESDAY .OV BYTHEBOARD 4HESCHOOLDISTRICTS#HIEF4ECH NOLOGY /FFICER !NN $UNKIN AND $IRECTOR OF %LEMENTARY %DUCATION +ATHLEEN-EAGHERWILLLEADTHEAD VISORYCOMMITTEE

4HE BOARD DIRECTED THE TWO TO hHOLD AN OPEN APPLICATION PROCESS FORCOMMITTEEMEMBERSv 0ALO !LTOS ENROLLMENT HAS BEEN ON AN UPWARD TRAJECTORY FOR MORE THANTWODECADESAFTERFALLINGTOA POST "ABY "OOM NADIR OF   IN  4ODAY WITHHEADCOUNTAT  0ALO!LTOHASELEMENTARYSCHOOLS THREEMIDDLESCHOOLSANDTWOHIGH SCHOOLS !T ITS HISTORIC HIGH OF   IN  0ALO!LTOHADELEMENTARY SCHOOLS THREE MIDDLE SCHOOLS AND THREEHIGHSCHOOLS 4HEPASTDECADEHASSEENANAN NUALPERCENTGROWTH EVENDURING THE RECESSION WHICH APPEARED TO SURPRISESCHOOLOFFICIALS &ORMORETHANTWOYEARSOFFICIALS HAVEAGONIZEDOVERWHENNEWCAM PUSESWOULDBENEEDED EMPLOYING TWOSEPARATEDEMOGRAPHERSASWELL AS TRYING TO PROJECT TRENDS THROUGH REGRESSIONMODELING 4HISWEEK$UNKINTOLDTHEBOARD THATADDINGCLASSROOMSPACETOEX ISTINGSITESUNDERTHEh3TRONG 3CHOOLSvBONDMEASUREWILLACCOM MODATE ELEMENTARY NEEDS THROUGH

THE SCHOOLYEAR 3KELLYISSCOUTINGFORALOCATIONFOR AFOURTHMIDDLESCHOOL WHICHOFFI CIALSHAVESAIDWILLBENEEDEDINTHE NEXTFIVEYEARS(ESAIDHEHOPESTO FINDANALTERNATIVETOSCHOOL OWNED PROPERTY AT #UBBERLEY #OMMUNITY #ENTER IN SOUTH 0ALO !LTO BECAUSE THATLOCATION NEARTOBOTH*,3AND 4ERMAN WOULD SEVERELY DISRUPT EXISTING MIDDLE SCHOOL ATTENDANCE BOUNDARIES #APACITY AT 'UNN AND 0ALO !LTO HIGHSCHOOLSISBEINGEXPANDEDUN DER h3TRONG 3CHOOLSv CONSTRUCTION TO ACCOMMODATE   STUDENTS APIECE WHICH OFFICIALS HAVE SAID WILL SUFFICE UNTIL SOMETIME AFTER N 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

Parking

ONTHEPROGRESSOFTHESTUDY !T THE SAME TIME CITY OFFICIALS PLANTOESTABLISHTHEPARAMETERSOF THE hDOWNTOWN CAPv STUDY WHICH ACCORDING TO 2ODRIGUEZ REPORT WILL CONSIDER THE hLAND USE TYPES DENSITIES AND RECENT AND PROJECTED DEVELOPMENTAROUNDTHEDOWNTOWN TO DETERMINE FUTURE LAND USE AND PARKINGNEEDSSTRATEGIESTOSUPPORT LANDUSECHANGESv0LANNERSLOOKTO HAMMEROUTTHESCOPEOFTHEDOWN TOWN STUDY IN THE NEXT MONTH OR TWO 0LANNING$IRECTOR#URTIS7IL LIAMSSAID 4HE COUNCIL ALSO BACKED STAFFS RECOMMENDATIONS TO STUDY INSTAL LATION OF MORE ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND BIKE PARKINGSTATIONSANDTODISCUSS WITH0ROFESSORVILLEAND$OWNTOWN .ORTH RESIDENTS THE POTENTIAL FOR SHORT TERM SOLUTIONS SUCH AS LOAD ING ZONES AND ON STREET PARKING PERMITSFOR0ROFESSORVILLERESIDENTS WHOSEHOMESDONTHAVEPARKINGOR DRIVEWAYS4HELATTERMOSTPROPOSAL PROVEDTHEMOSTCONTROVERSIAL PASS ING WITH A   VOTE 6ICE -AYOR 'REG3CHARFFAND#OUNCILMEMBERS ,ARRY+LEIN 'AIL0RICEAND.ANCY 3HEPHERDDISSENTED  3CHARFF MADE THE MOTION TO EN DORSE MOST OF THE PROPOSALS IN THE NEWSTAFFREPORT INCLUDINGTHETWO MAJOR STUDIES (E ALSO SUGGESTED THATTHECITYS0LANNINGAND4RANS PORTATION #OMMISSION REVIEW THE PROGRESS OF THE VARIOUS INITIATIVES BEFORETHEYRETURNTOTHECOUNCILFOR FURTHER CONSIDERATION -OST OF HIS COLLEAGUESAGREED h)THINKTHISISAPRELIMINARYAP PROACHBYSTAFF v3CHARFFSAIDh)TS A GOOD ONE AND )D LIKE TO SEE IT MOVEv

+AREN(OLMANSAIDITWASAhSYS TEMIC PROBLEMv THAT NEEDS A NEAR TERM SOLUTION 3HE ARGUED THAT THE CITYSHOULDCREATEARESIDENTIAL PER MIT PARKING PROGRAM IN THE DOWN TOWNNEIGHBORHOODSANDURGEDSTAFF TO CONSIDER MORE IMMEDIATE REVI SIONSTOTHEZONINGCODE INCLUDING CHANGESTHATWOULDROLLBACKSOME OFTHEPARKINGEXEMPTIONSFORNEW DEVELOPMENTS 3HEDISSENTEDBECAUSETHEPROPOS ALS DIDNT COME WITH A FIRM TIME LINE #OUNCILMAN'REG3CHMIDCALLED DOWNTOWN PARKING A hCRITICAL IS SUEv AND AGREED WITH !LSMANS POINT THAT STAFF SHOULD DEVOTE ITS NEAR TERMEFFORTSTOACCURATELYPIN NINGDOWNTHESCOPEOFTHEPARKING PROBLEM)TIShESSENTIAL v3CHMID SAID THATSTAFFRESOURCESGETSPENT ONTHEISSUEOFFIGURINGOUTWHETHER THECITYHASAhSYSTEMATICDEFICITv 4HATSHOULDBETHESTARTINGPOINT HESAID h9OUCANNOTLEAVETHE#ITY#OUN CIL HERE MAKING DECISIONS ONE AP PLICATION AT A TIME WITHOUT HAVING ANOTIONOFWHATTHATDEFICITISAND WHATITMEANSTOEVERYBODYDOWN TOWN v3CHMIDSAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

F

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com What are the pros and cons of reopening Garland or Greendell as Palo Alto’s 13th elementary school? Share your thoughts on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

Guidelines to Generate Multiple Offers Many houses in our local market are selling fast with multiple offers but others are sitting on the market for long periods of time before selling. Why does this occur? Selling a home fast does not happen by accident. There are steps that need to be carefully implemented in order for a house to sell with multiple offers. Following are the four most important ones: 1) Your home needs to be in an optimal condition: You have to not only make your house look good - it has to look better than any competing listing on the market. Buyers are carefully previewing and comparing houses to get the best value. Make sure there are no obvious defects as such as leaks, peeling paint, broken windows, dirty carpet or worn-out hardwood oors. Finish by staging your home with quality furnishings that effectively utilize the space in your home. 2) Price your home just below

the fair market value: Carefully review the market analysis prepared by your agent and price your home just below the price of the lowest comparable in your neighborhood. You need to portray your home as a good value to generate excitement among buyers. 3) Accommodate buyers’ showings promptly: Many listings allow agents to go directly and show the homes. Some others require only a phone call. The easier it is to show your home, the more buyers are going to see it and the more offers you are going to get. 4) Marketing your home: Your home needs to have an extensive marketing campaign utilizing all kinds of media from the day it is listed to give it sufďŹ cient exposure to generate multiple offers. Careful execution of the above steps will help generate multiple offers and enable you to realize the highest possible price for your home.

I offer complimentary staging when I list your home. Contact me at (650) 384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors. To learn more, log-on to samiacullen.com

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC £™nxĂŠÂœĂ•ÂˆĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`]ĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠUĂŠÂ­ĂˆxäŽÊnxĂˆÂ‡ĂˆĂˆĂˆĂ“ĂŠUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°vVVÂŤ>Â°ÂœĂ€}ĂŠ

(continued from page 3)

h7HATWEHAVEISADEVELOPMENT SITUATION IN THE CITY THATS OUT OF CONTROL v "RAND SAID h4OO MANY DEVELOPMENTSWITHTOOFEWPARKING SPACES ARE BEING APPROVED BY THE CITYANDTHAT )THINK ISTHECRUXOF THEPROBLEMv +EN !LSMAN A 2AMONA 3TREET RESIDENTWHOHASLONGLOBBIEDTHE COUNCILTOCREATEARESIDENTIALPARK ING PROGRAM IN HIS NEIGHBORHOOD OF 0ROFESSORVILLE COMPARED THE PARKING PROBLEM IN HIS AREA TO A FLOOD AND TOLD THE COUNCIL MEM BERS THAT THEY SHOULD BE ASHAMED FORLETTINGTHEPARKINGPROBLEMGET SOOUTOFHANDONTHEIRWATCH4HE PROCESS FOR FINDING PARKING SOLU TIONS HE ARGUED hHAS BEEN HOR RIBLY MISMANAGED AND HORRIBLY PLANNEDv(EURGEDTHECOUNCILTO FOCUSONWHATHECALLEDTHEhCORE ISSUEv)STHEREASYSTEMICDEFICITIN PARKING DOWNTOWN !ND HOW BIG ISTHATDEFICIT h4HERE IS NO VIABLE DATA IN ANY THING v!LSMANSAID REFERRINGTOTHE STAFFSPROPOSEDAPPROACH 4HE CITY HOPES THAT ITS PARKING STUDY WILL ADDRESS THE ISSUE OF IN ADEQUATEDATA THOUGHTHEANSWERS ARENT EXPECTED TO COME FOR SOME TIME 0ALO !LTOS #HIEF 4RANSPOR TATION /FFICIAL *AIME 2ODRIGUEZ SAID THE CITY WANTS TO GET RELIABLE INDEPENDENTLY VERIFIED NUMBERS 3TAFF IS SCHEDULED TO RETURN TO THE COUNCILNEXTWEEKWITHAPROPOSED CONTRACTFORACONSULTANTTOCONDUCT THESTUDY4HECOUNCILDIRECTEDSTAFF TORETURNINSIXMONTHSWITHAREPORT

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com What do you think of the parking situation downtown? Share your experiences and ideas on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m and 5:00 p.m. Church School at 10 a.m.

This Sunday: Resenting Our Blessings Worship in the Manner of the Pilgrims Rev. David Howell preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

3500/249/52#/--5.)49

DONATETOTHE 0ALO!LTO7EEKLY(OLIDAY&UND Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/paw-holiday-fund ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ ÂœĂ›i“LiĂ€ĂŠÂŁĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 7

Upfront #/--5.)49

Bald eagle plants herself in Palo Alto &EMALERAPTORNAMED3EQUOIAJOINSTHE0ALO!LTO*UNIOR-USEUMAND:OO HE 0ALO !LTO *UNIOR -USEUM AND :OO HAS BEEN KNOWN AS MANYTHINGSOVERTHEDECADES BUTITSSAFETOSAYTHATARETIREMENT HOME HASNT BEEN ONE OF THEM ˆ UNTILNOW 3EQUOIA THE0ALO!LTOZOOSFIRST BALDEAGLE ARRIVEDON/CTAFTER SPENDINGMOSTOFHERLIFEATTHE3AN &RANCISCO:OO4HEZOOSAGREEDTHAT THE0ALO!LTO:OOWOULDBEAhGOOD RETIREMENTHOMEvFORTHE YEAR OLD BIRD LARGELYDUETO*OHN!IKIN THE 0ALO!LTOZOOSEXECUTIVEDIRECTOR 5NTIL FOUR YEARS AGO !IKIN WORKEDATTHE3AN&RANCISCO:OOFOR YEARSASCURATOROFBIRDSANDLATER DIRECTOR OF CONSERVATION (E WAS ALSOONEOF3EQUOIASFIRSTTRAINERS 3EQUOIAWASHATCHEDON3WANSON )SLANDIN"RITISH#OLOMBIAIN ASPARTOFANENDANGERED SPECIESRE COVERYEFFORT7ILDERNESSSANCTUAR IESTHERECOLLECTEDYOUNGEAGLES AND RELEASED THEM OFF THE COAST OF "IG 3UR "ALD EAGLES WILL BREED IN ANEWHABITATIFTHEYAREINTRODUCED TOTHATHABITATWITHINTHEIRFIRSTEIGHT WEEKS OF LIFE 3EQUOIA WAS ONE OF THEBIRDSRELEASEDTHATYEAR h) WAS WORKING ON A RECOVERY EFFORT OF BALD EAGLES AT THE TIME BREEDING AND REINTRODUCING BALD EAGLES WHEN WE ACQUIRED A BIRD WHO WAS FOUND SHOT IN &ERNDALE

#ALIF vHESAID 4HE BIRD LATER NAMED 3EQUOIA COULD NOT BE SET FREE BECAUSE THE GUNSHOTWOULDLEFTHERWITHAPARA LYZED TAIL 4HE 3AN &RANCISCO :OO ACCEPTED3EQUOIAASASALVAGEBIRD AND!IKINTOOKONTHERESPONSIBIL ITYOFTRAININGHERTOBEABALDEAGLE AMBASSADOR 4WENTY FOUR YEARS LATER HE WAS THEOBVIOUSCHOICETOBETHERAPTORS NEWOWNER 7ITH FUNDING FROM THE "RIN 7OJCICKI &OUNDATION RUN BY 'OOGLECO FOUNDER3ERGEY"RINAND HISWIFE THE0ALO!LTOZOORECEIVED ENOUGH MONEY ˆ ROUGHLY   AYEARˆTOFUNDRETIREMENTFORTHE MIDDLE AGEDBIRD-OSTOFTHATGOES TOHERDIETOFFROZENRATS MICE FRESH FISH QUAIL CHICKENANDRABBIT ! BALD EAGLE CAN LIVE FOR MORE THAN  YEARS THOUGH MOST DIE AS JUVENILES !T THE 0ALO !LTO ZOO 3EQUOIA LIVESINAMEW AHOUSEFORBIRDSOF PREY2ATHERTHANLIVINGINANAVIARY LARGE ENOUGH TO HOLD A BIRD OF HER SIZE 3EQUOIAHASBEENCONDITIONED TOBEAROUNDPEOPLEANDCANBELET OUTSIDEBYHERHANDLERS%VERYDAY TRAINERS EXERCISE 3EQUOIA AND TAKE HEROUTOFTHEMEWTOSITONAPERCH ANDPREENINTHESUN 4HE POUNDEAGLECANFLYBACK

TOHERTRAINERTORECEIVEFOODANDIS COMFORTABLEWITHCROWDSOFCHILDREN ANDADULTS !CCORDING TO !IKIN 3EQUOIA IS ONEOFTHEBEST TRAINEDEAGLESINTHE 5NITED3TATES MAKINGHERTHEIDEAL BIRDFOREDUCATIONPROGRAMS-ANY TYPESOFBIRDSCANBETRAINED BUTAS !IKINSAID h)TSHARDERTOINSPIREA CHILDWITHACHICKENTHANWITHABALD EAGLEv 5NLIKEOTHERANIMALSATTHE0ALO !LTO :OO 3EQUOIA WILL NOT BE ON DISPLAY FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC BUT RATHER USED FOR EDUCATIONAL PRO GRAMSANDEVENTS h3HE IS A WONDERFUL ADDITION TO THE 0ALO !LTO ZOO BECAUSE SHE THE NATIONALSYMBOL3HEHELPSTOIN SPIRE KIDS TO WONDER AND IS AN EX AMPLE OF A RECOVERED ENDANGERED SPECIES SOTHEREARELOTSOFSTORIES TOTELL v!IKINSAID "ALD EAGLES RECENTLY RETURNED TO 3AN-ATEO#OUNTYAFTERNEARLYACEN TURY AND !IKIN HOPES 3EQUOIA WILL HELP EDUCATE THE COMMUNITY ABOUT LIFE IN WATERSHED PROPERTIES WHERE THEONCE ENDANGEREDSPECIESRESIDES "ECAUSE OF ENDANGERED SPECIES RE COVERY EFFORTS BALD EAGLES LEFT THE ENDANGEREDSPECIESLISTINN %DITORIAL )NTERN ,ISA +ELLMAN CANBEEMAILEDAT,KELLMAN EM BARCADEROPUBLISHINGCOM

Lytton Gardens

WITHWAITINGTOBEHELPEDFROMHER WHEELCHAIRTOHERBEDTHATSHETRIED TO MOVE HERSELF AND RISKED A FALL 7ALANSAID /NONEOCCASION 7ALANSAIDSHE SAWAPATIENTWITH0ARKINSONSDISEASE SLIPDOWNINHERWHEELCHAIRONTOTHE FLOOR7ALANSAIDSHEPRESSEDACALL BUTTON BUTNOONECAME4HEPATIENT WAS FINALLY HELPED AFTER A  YEAR OLDBOYVISITINGARELATIVESOUGHTOUT AN ASSISTANT TO HELP GET THE WOMAN BACKINTOTHECHAIR SHESAID 7ALANS MOTHER IS NO LONGER AT ,YTTON SHESAID h9OUREINACOMPASSIONATEPOSI TION v SHE SAID REFERRING TO ,YTTON 'ARDENSSTAFFh4HISISPEOPLEYOURE DEALINGWITHTHISISNOTDATAENTRYv 4HEDAUGHTEROFONERESIDENT WHO SPOKE UNDER THE CONDITION OF ANO NYMITY SAID EARLIER THIS WEEK THAT HERMOTHERSROOMMATEWASLEFTSIT TINGONHERBEDPANANDWASHOLLER INGFORHELP4HEROOMMATEWAITED FORALONGTIMEUNTILHERPLEASWERE FINALLYADDRESSED h-ARYANNvSAID 4HE NURSING ASSISTANT INSISTED TO -ARYANN THAT THE ROOMMATE HAD ALREADY BEEN REMOVED FROM THE BEDPAN h9OURE NOT ON YOUR BEDPAN ˆ OH ) GUESS YOU ARE v THE NURSING ASSISTANT FINALLY SAID AFTER COMING IN TO SEE THE PATIENT ACCORDING TO -ARYANN h0EOPLE ARE SITTING IN THEIR OWN DIRTY DIAPERS 0EOPLE ARE TURNING THEIR LIGHTS ON AND NOBODY IS AN SWERINGTHEM v-ARYANNSAID 3TAFFALSOUSEDHARSHPAPERTOWELS TOCLEANTHEPATIENTSANDDIDNOTPUT OINTMENTONTHEIRBOTTOMS SHESAID 0ATIENTSWHOWEREABLETOGETTOTHE

BATHROOMONTIMEWEREBROUGHTOUT OFTHETOILETANDPUTTOBEDWITHOUT WASHINGTHEIRHANDSORBEINGGIVEN HAND SANITIZER SHE SAID SHE OB SERVED3HEADDEDTHATSHEPLANSTO FILEACOMPLAINTWITHTHESTATE /NEPATIENTSPOKETOTHE7EEKLY BYPHONEINLATE!UGUSTWHILEATTHE FACILITY h)RISvHADCONTRACTEDANINTESTINAL INFECTIONANDWASINADIAPERDUETO PERSISTENT DIARRHEA SHE SAID 3HE FREQUENTLY EMPLOYED THE CALL BUT TON BUTSHEWASSOMETIMESLEFTFOR TWOTOTHREEHOURSWITHOUTADIAPER CHANGE SHESAID h9OU DARE NOT BOTHER THEM DUR INGTHEIRDINNERHOURORFROMTO PMDURINGTHE/LYMPICS vSHESAID h4HE ASSISTANTS WOULD SAY @9OUR NURSEISBUSYNOWv 3HE SAID THE STAFF WAS ALWAYS PLEASANT BUT SHE WOULD PRESS THE CALLBUTTONANDAYOUNGNURSINGAS SISTANT WOULD COME IN AND TURN IT OFF 4HE ASSISTANTS WOULD SAY THEY TOLD HER ATTENDANT TO COME IN BUT SHEWOULDHAVETOPRESSTHEBUTTON AGAINANDAGAIN h)TSHOULDNTBEADISGRACE BUTITIS TOBELEFTINYOURWASTE vSHESAID h4HEPOORNURSESAREHARRIEDAND FLUSTERED4HEYAREBEGGINGYOUTO WAITANDTHEYWILLBEINSOON4HE NURSESSAY @)MSOSORRY)HAVEEIGHT PATIENTSTODAY4HEYAREDOINGTHEIR BEST vSHESAID "UT)VY!DJIVON SENIORDIRECTOROF HEALTHSERVICES SAID,YTTON'ARDENS HASANURSINGASSISTANT TO PATIENTRA TIO THAT IS BETTER THAN THE STATE RE QUIREMENT4HESTATEREQUIRESEACH STAFFMEMBERTOSUPPLYHOURSOF CAREPERPATIENTPERDAY,YTTON'AR

T

(continued from page 3)

CORDINGTOTHEREPORT !CERTIFIEDNURSINGASSISTANTALSO ALLEGEDLYTOLDTHEPATIENTTOYELLFOR HELP IF THE CALL LIGHT WAS NOT AN SWERED RIGHT AWAY 4HE FACILITYS DIRECTOROFNURSINGTOLDTHEINVESTI GATORSHEHADLOOKEDINTOTHECOM PLAINTTHENEXTDAY BUTSHECOULDNOT SUBSTANTIATE IT BECAUSE THE PATIENT WASNOTABLETOIDENTIFYTHENURSING ASSISTANT3HECOUNSELEDTHENURSING ASSISTANTWHOWASINCHARGEOFTHE PATIENTTHATEVENING SHESAID $URINGANINSPECTIONATPMON !UG  THE INVESTIGATOR OBSERVED CALLLIGHTSWEREBEINGANSWEREDINhA REASONABLETIMEvOFONETOFIVEMIN UTES!FACILITYPOLICYABOUTCALL LIGHTSDIRECTSNURSESANDASSISTANTSTO hANSWERTHERESIDENTSCALLASSOONAS POSSIBLE vTHEINVESTIGATORSTATED 4HE INVESTIGATION ONLY PERTAINED TOTHESINGLECOMPLAINT ANDTHEEN TIRE FACILITY WAS NOT REVIEWED THE REPORTNOTED "UT OTHER RESIDENTS AND FAMILY MEMBERSOFPATIENTSSAIDTHEPROB LEMWASMOREPERVASIVE ,ISELI 7ALAN SAID HER MOTHER HAD TO WAIT MORE THAN AN HOUR AF TER PRESSING THE CALL BUTTON7ALAN SAIDDURINGVISITSTOHERMOTHERSHE OBSERVED MULTIPLE CALL LIGHTS THAT WEREACTIVATEDOUTSIDEOFROOMSAND STAYEDONFORTOMINUTES!T ONEPOINTSHEBECAMESOFEDUPWITH SEEINGTHECALLSUNANSWEREDTHATSHE WENTINTOAROOMTOHELPAPATIENTGET HERDENTURESTOTHESINK SHESAID (ERMOTHERBECAMESOFRUSTRATED

Page 8ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Veronica Weber

by Lisa Kellman

*OHN!IKIN EXECUTIVEDIRECTOROFTHE0ALO!LTO*UNIOR-USEUM:OO HOLDSUP3EQUOIA AFEMALEBALDEAGLEORIGINALLYFROMTHE3AN&RANCISCO :OOTHAT0ALO!LTORECENTLYACQUIRED!IKINHASBEENHANDLING3EQUOIA FORYEARS DENSPROVIDESHOURSOFSTAFFCARE PERPATIENTPERDAY SHESAID ,YTTON 'ARDENS SUBMITTED ITS CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN TO THE STATE ON /CT  WHICH WAS ACCEPTED )NIT ADMINISTRATORSACKNOWLEDGED THATALTHOUGHTHEPATIENTMENTIONED INTHECOMPLAINTNOLONGERLIVESAT ,YTTON'ARDENS hALLRESIDENTSHAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BE AFFECTED BY THE SAMEPRACTICEv 4HE DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICES HELD MEETINGS WITH NURSING ASSIS TANTSANDNURSESREGARDINGCALL LIGHT COMPLIANCEON/CT AND $EPARTMENTDIRECTORSWERETOBERE EDUCATEDABOUTTHECALL LIGHTPOLICY ON /CT  $AILY ROUNDS WILL BE CONDUCTEDTOMONITORSTAFFRESPONSE TIMETOANSWERINGTHELIGHTSBYTHE DIRECTOROFSTAFFDEVELOPMENT!ND NURSING SUPERVISORS WILL REMIND NURSING ASSISTANTS AND STAFF AT THE START OF SHIFTS ABOUT THE POLICY OF ANSWERINGTHELIGHTS !CALL LIGHTSTUDYWILLBECONDUCT EDMONTHLYBYTHEDIRECTOROFNURS INGSERVICETOENSUREPOLICYISBEING FOLLOWED ANDDEPARTMENTDIRECTORS WILLINTERVIEWPATIENTSTOMAKESURE THEYARECOMFORTABLEWITHTHECALL LIGHTRESPONSES AMONGOTHERMONI TORINGPROCEDURES $EE !NN #AMPBELL SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTOF%PISCOPAL3ENIOR#OM MUNITIES THE PARENT COMPANY OF ,YTTON 'ARDENS SAID THE COMPANY TAKES COMPLAINTS SERIOUSLY AND WORKS TO CORRECT THE PROBLEMS ! PLAN OF CORRECTION IS AN IMPORTANT PIECEOFREMEDYING A PROBLEM BUT COMMUNICATIONISALSOIMPORTANTON AREGULARBASIS SHESAID 4HECORRECTIONPLANhISNOTAONE

TIMEREMINDER vSHESAID 2ALPH-ONTANO ASPOKESMANFOR THE #ALIFORNIA $EPARTMENT OF 0UB LIC (EALTH SAID NURSING HOMES ARE INSPECTED ABOUT EVERY NINE TO  MONTHS BUTINVESTIGATORSGOINMORE FREQUENTLYWHENTHEREARECOMPLAINTS 3OMECOMPLAINTSAREDEEMEDUNSUB STANTIATED BUTTHATDOESNTMEANTHE VIOLATIONDIDNTOCCUR JUSTTHATATTHE TIMEOFINSPECTION NOPROOFCOULDBE FOUND HESAID (E SAID IT IS IMPORTANT TO FILE COMPLAINTS WITH THE DEPARTMENT WHENEVERSOMEONESEESSOMETHING OCCURRINGTHATISCONCERNING#OM PLAINTSHAVEBEENFILEDBYRESIDENTS NURSES AND PATIENTS FAMILIES 4HE DEPARTMENTS OMBUDSMAN CAN BE CALLEDTOLL FREEAT  !LL REPORTSAREANONYMOUS HESAID h7ECONDUCTTHOUSANDSOFON SITE INSPECTIONSEACHYEAR4HESEARETHE KINDSOFCOMPLAINTSWEAREHERETO RESPONDTO vHESAID 3INCE THE !FFORDABLE #ARE !CT THE STATE NOW POSTS COMPLAINT IN FORMATIONABOUTEACHFACILITYONITS WEBSITE AT WWWCDPHCAGOV #LICK ONhHEALTHINFORMATIONvANDhHEALTH FACILITYCONSUMERINFORMATIONvN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com Numerous senior-living facilities in the area — including Palo Alto, Mountain View, Menlo Park and Portola Valley — have been investigated by the state Department of Public Health this year. Read a summary of the violations on Palo Alto Online.

Upfront

Survey

(continued from page 3)

SAME0ALYGRADUATEWROTE h7HEN ) FIRST GOT TO MY UNIVER SITY ) WAS REALLY SCARED BECAUSE PEOPLEKEPTSAYING @THISISNOTLIKE HIGHSCHOOL!NDITSNOTLIKEHIGH SCHOOL)FYOUWENTTO0ALY ITSPROB ABLYEASIER7HICHISNTTOSAYYOU CANLETTHINGSSLIP JUSTDONTPANIC ABOUTITTOOHARD h9OUVEBEENTHROUGHTHEWORST NOWITHASTOGETBETTER'OD)HOPE THISTHINGISANONYMOUSv !NOTHER STUDENT WROTE h5NLESS YOU GO TO 3TANFORD -)4 #ALTECH 0RINCETON ETC YOUWILLNEVERAGAIN BEAROUNDPEOPLEASSMARTASTHOSE AT 'UNN %NJOY IT AND TAKE ADVAN TAGEOFITv 3EVERAL WARNED THAT COLLEGE ˆ PARTICULARLYATLARGERINSTITUTIONSLIKE "ERKELEYˆDEMANDSAMUCHHIGHER LEVELOFINDIVIDUALINITIATIVE h)FYOUREGOINGTOATTENDAPUBLIC UNIVERSITY GET USED TO FENDING FOR YOURSELFMUCHMORE vONESAID !NOTHERRECOMMENDEDCOMMUNI TYCOLLEGEASAPATHTOAVOIDTHEHIGH COSTOFTUITIONATFOUR YEARCOLLEGES 3EVERAL RECOMMENDED TAKING A GAPYEAR h4RYANDKNOWWHATYOUWANTTO DO BEFORE YOU ENTER COLLEGE v ONE STUDENTWROTEh!GAPYEARISAGREAT IDEA!NDDOWHATYOUWANT4HISIS YOURLIFE NOTYOURPARENTSv !NOTHERSUGGESTEDTHAT0ALO!LTO STUDENTSAREOVERPROTECTED h4HEREISANOVERUSEOFCODDLING JARGON THROUGHOUT THE DISTRICT EG TALKINGATGREATLENGTHABOUT@STRESS AND @ACADEMIC PRESSURE ALL THE TIME THATMAKESITSEEMASTHOUGH 0ALO!LTOSTUDENTSARESOMEHOWDEL ICATE GENTLYBRED CHILDARISTOCRATS v AGRADUATEWROTE h7ELL INCOLLEGEEVERYONEISONTHE SAMELEVELANDINTHESAMESITUATION .OBODYCARESABOUTHOW@STRESSED YOU ARE ˆ HARD WORK IS NECESSARY TOGETWHEREYOUWANTTOBE h9OUR PERFECT HIGH SCHOOL TRAN SCRIPT IS IRRELEVANT ONCE YOU GET TO COLLEGE AND HOWEVER UNIQUE AND SPECIAL YOU THOUGHT YOU WERE IN HIGH SCHOOL YOURE NOBODY NOW 3TOP WHINING AND START FROM THE GROUNDUPv )NTHESOCIALAREA MANYSTUDENTS ADVISEDREACHINGOUTTOMAKEAWIDE GROUPOFNEWFRIENDS h%VERYONE IS STARTING ALL OVER v WROTEONESTUDENT h4HE POPULAR KIDS ARE NOBODIES AND EVERYONE IS AN EQUAL 4HATS WHYALMOSTEVERYONEYOUWILLMEET WILLBEFRIENDLY4HEYAREALLLOOK INGFORPEOPLETOBEFRIENDSWITHTOO 3AYHITOSTRANGERSBECAUSECHANCES ARETHEYMAYNOTKNOWANYONEYET EITHERv

How socially prepared did you feel for college? 40

35

Consortium members*

Housecleaner interrupts Palo Alto burglary

Palo Alto Unified

30

25

20

15

10

5

0 Not Prepared

News Digest

Somewhat Prepared

Prepared

Very Prepared

*comparable U.S. school districts

How academically prepared did you feel for college? 80

70

!0ALO!LTORESIDENT ALERTEDBYHISHOUSECLEANER CAMEHOMETOFIND AMANALLEGEDLYTRYINGTOSTEALHISVEHICLE-ONDAYAFTERNOON .OV 0OLICEARRESTEDTHEMAN !XEL-ORALESOF0ALO!LTO ONSEVERALCHARGES INCLUDING RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY AND ATTEMPTED VEHICLE THEFT POLICE AN NOUNCED4UESDAY 4HEINCIDENTOCCURREDINTHEBLOCKOF#HANNING!VENUE BETWEEN 'REER2OADAND2HODES$RIVE 4HERESIDENTHADRECEIVEDATELEPHONECALLFROMHISHOUSECLEANER WHO HADARRIVEDATTHEHOMETOFINDAMANINSIDE RUMMAGING4HERESIDENT WASNEARBYANDRETURNEDTODISCOVERED-ORALES  INTHEFRONTSEATOF HISVEHICLE WHICHWASPARKEDINTHEDRIVEWAY-ORALESWASALLEGEDLY TRYINGTOSTARTTHERESIDENTSCAR POLICESAIDINAPRESSRELEASE -ORALESWASSTILLINSIDETHEVEHICLEWHENPOLICEARRIVED.OONEWAS INJUREDDURINGTHEARREST !NINVESTIGATIONSHOWEDTHAT-ORALESALSOHADALLEGEDLYBURGLARIZED THERESIDENTSHOMETWODAYSEARLIER4HATBURGLARYWASNOTINITIALLYRE PORTEDBECAUSETHERESIDENTWASUNAWARETHATITHADOCCURRED 0OLICEWEREABLETORECOVERTHEPROPERTYSTOLENINBOTHBURGLARIESAND RETURNITTOTHERESIDENT4HESTOLENPROPERTYINCLUDEDJEWELRYANDKEYS)N BOTHCASES -ORALESALLEGEDLYENTEREDTHEHOUSEUSINGAHIDE A KEYTHAT THERESIDENTHADPLACEDOUTSIDE 0OLICEASKANYONEHAVINGINFORMATIONABOUTTHERECENTRESIDENTIALBUR GLARIESTOCONTACTTHE HOURDISPATCHCENTERAT  !NONY MOUSTIPSCANBEEMAILEDTOPALOALTO TIPNOWORGORSENTVIATEXTMESSAGE ORVOICEMAILTO  N ˆ0ALO!LTO7EEKLYSTAFF

Palo Alto ponders restrictions on living in cars Consortium members

60

Palo Alto Unified 50

40

30

20

10

0 Not Prepared

Somewhat Prepared

Prepared

Very Prepared

3OURCE0ALO!LTO5NIFIED3CHOOL$ISTRICT

7ROTE ANOTHER h1UIT DRINKING PARTYINGANDSLEEPATAREGULARHOUR 4HEREAREPARTIESLITERALLYEVERYHOUR OFTHEWEEK BUTYOULLEASILYDROP OUTIFYOURENOTCAREFULv 3EVERAL SUGGESTED THE REQUIRED HIGHSCHOOL,IVING3KILLSCLASSCOULD BEIMPROVEDTOOFFERSTUDENTSBETTER PREPARATION h-AKE ,IVING 3KILLS NOT SUCH A TERRIBLECLASS vTHESTUDENTWROTE h)TS FAR TOO STERILE FOR ANYONE TO LEARN ANYTHING )F ,IVING 3KILLS COULDTURNINTOALEGITIMATEDISCUS SIONOFLIFEISSUES ITWOULDSTARTTO BECOMEUSEFUL BUTRIGHTNOWITSA JOKEANDAWASTEOFVALUABLETIMEv -ANYSUGGESTEDTHATLIFEIN0ALO

!LTOOFFERSLITTLEPREPARATIONFORTHE COLLEGESOCIALSCENE h)F YOU HAVE DONE WELL AT 'UNN YOUWILLBEWELL PREPAREDACADEMI CALLY vONESTUDENTWROTE h(OWEVER THE @SOCIAL STRUCTURE MAY BE QUITE DIFFERENT $O NOT BE SURPRISED TO SEE HEAVY DRINKING PARTYING DRUG USE AND PROMISCU ITYv 4HEADVICEOFMANYGRADUATESWAS SUMMED UP BY ONE h3TUDY HARD BUTHAVEAGOODTIME-AKEFRIENDS ANDPUTYOURSELFOUTTHERETOTRYNEW THINGSANDNEWSITUATIONSvN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

Are you a holiday volunteer? Tell us your story. $OYOUCELEBRATETHEHOLIDAYSBYGIVINGBACKTOTHECOMMUNITY$OESYOURFAMILYHAVEATRADI TIONOFVOLUNTEERINGDURINGTHEHOLIDAYSEASON4HE0ALO!LTO7EEKLYWANTSTOHEARYOURSTORY 0RACTICESCOULDBEANYTHINGFROMRINGINGTHE3ALVATION!RMYBELLTOVOLUNTEERINGATASOUP KITCHENORENCOURAGINGYOURCHILDRENTOPERFORMARANDOMACTOFKINDNESS3UBMITSHORTWRITE UPS  WORDS ONYOURPERSONALFAMILYTRADITION WHICHWILLBEPUBLISHEDINTHE 7EEKLYATTHEENDOF.OVEMBER0LEASEEMAIL/NLINE%DITOR4YLER(ANLEYAT THANLEY PAWEEKLYCOMORCONTACTHIMBYPHONEAT  BY.OV

0ALO !LTOS DEEPLY DIVISIVE DEBATE OVER WHETHER TO BAN PEOPLE FROM LIVING IN THEIR VEHICLES COULD GET CLOSER TO RESOLUTION 4UESDAY EVENING WHENA#ITY#OUNCILCOMMITTEECONSIDERSTHESTAFFSLATESTPROPOSALFOR DEALINGWITHTHEISSUE 5NLIKENEIGHBORINGJURISDICTIONS 0ALO!LTOCURRENTLYDOESNTHAVEA LAWREGARDINGVEHICLEDWELLING2ESIDENTSINSOMENEIGHBORHOODS PARTIC ULARLY#OLLEGE4ERRACE HAVECOMPLAINEDINRECENTYEARSABOUTTHESAFETY ANDSANITATIONISSUESCREATEDBYTHESITUATION#ITYOFFICIALSHADINITIALLY PROPOSEDALAWTHATWOULDPROHIBITVEHICLEDWELLINGBUTBACKEDOFFAFTER INTENSEOPPOSITIONFROMHOMELESSRESIDENTSANDTHEIRADVOCATES .OW STAFFISCONSIDERINGSOFTERAPPROACHES/NEWOULDINVOLVEATHREE MONTH PILOT PROGRAM UNDER WHICH THE HOMELESS WOULD PARK IN CERTAIN PARKINGLOTS GENERALLYATCHURCHESORBUSINESSES)TWOULDBEMODELEDAF TERTHEONEIN%UGENE /RE WHICHINCLUDESSITESTHATSERVEPEOPLE &OROUTREACH 0ALO!LTOSPROPOSEDPROGRAMWOULDLEANHEAVILYONTHE $OWNTOWN3TREETS4EAM WHICHPROVIDESWORKOPPORTUNITIESTOHOMELESS PEOPLEANDHASVOLUNTEEREDTOADMINISTERTHEPROGRAMDURINGTHETHREE MONTHPILOTPROGRAMATNOCOST !NOTHEROPTIONISTHEhDONOTHINGvAPPROACHˆTHATIS KEEPINGLAWS ASISBUTENHANCINGOUTREACHTOTHEHOMELESSCOMMUNITY h4HISAPPROACHMAYHELPTOTARGETTHERELATIVELYFEWINSTANCESOFCON CERNWITHOUTIMPOSINGANORDINANCEANDCOULDBEIMPLEMENTEDONATRIAL BASISFORSEVERALMONTHS vTHEPLANNINGDEPARTMENTREPORTSTATES 0LANNINGSTAFFHAVEBEENMEETINGPERIODICALLYWITHAWORKINGGROUPOF HOMELESSADVOCATESANDNEIGHBORHOODLEADERSTOCOMEUPWITHAMUTU ALLYACCEPTABLESOLUTION4HEOVERALLPERCEPTION ACCORDINGTOTHEREPORT hISTHATANORDINANCETOPROHIBITTHEHUMANHABITATIONOFVEHICLESISNOT NECESSARYvN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

Can you help out for Thanksgiving? 6OLUNTEERSARENEEDEDTOPREPARETURKEYS MASHEDPOTATOESORSWEET POTATOES WHICHWILLBESERVEDATTHE)NN6ISION3HELTER.ETWORK%STELLE #HALFIN#OMMUNITY4HANKSGIVING-EALAT!LL3AINTS#HURCHON4HANKS GIVING$AY.OV  2ECIPESWILLBEPROVIDEDFORCONSISTENCY ANDTHEFOODMUSTBEDELIV EREDTO!LL3AINTS AT7AVERLEY3T 0ALO!LTO BYNOONON7EDNES DAY .OV -OREVOLUNTEERSARENEEDEDTOPURCHASEITEMSANDDROPTHEMOFFATTHE CHURCHBYNOONON7EDNESDAYASWELL !CCORDINGTO%ILEEN2ICHARDSONAND/WEN"YRD WHOAREORGANIZING THEMEAL h2IGHTNOWTHEBIGGESTNEEDSINORDEROFIMPORTANCE IFYOU CANTCOOKANDWANTTOHELPMAKETHEMEALSUCCESSFULARELARGECANSOF SWEETPOTATOESLBOZ ORCANSCRANBERRYMEATSANDCHEESESFORTHE BAGGEDLUNCHWESENDHOMEWITHTHEMENANDWOMENON4DAYLARGE BAGSOFPOTATOESWECANPEELANDCOOK DELIVEREDON7EDNESDAYMORN ING .OVLARGECRATESOFFRESHGREENBEANSJUICEBOXES FRESHFRUIT GRANOLABARSANDCOOKIESFORTHETAKE HOMELUNCHESANDLOAVESOFBREAD FORTHETAKE HOMELUNCHESv ,ASTYEARVOLUNTEERSSERVEDCLOSETOMEALShANDWILLLIKELYDOMORE THISYEAR v2ICHARDSONWROTEINANEMAILh9OURHELPISCRUCIALINMAKING THISCOMMUNITYPOTLUCKASUCCESSv 4HOSE INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING CAN EMAIL PALOALTOTHANKSGIVING GMAILCOMN ˆ0ALO!LTO7EEKLYSTAFF ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 9

Upfront

Streets

(continued from page 6)

HITS THE STREETS AT  AM .OW ITS NOTABOUTLIVINGONTHEMBUTABOUT MANAGINGHISCREW(EMANAGESTWO SHIFTSFROMAMTONOONANDFROM TOPM.OWHEALWAYSSHOWSUP FORWORKONTIME h)CANDOTHINGS)COULDNTDOBE FORE)TSNATURALFORMENOWTOPAY MY RENT ON TIME AND MY BILLS ON TIME vHESAID 7HAT 0IERRE REALLY LIKES ARE THE 4HURSDAY MEETINGS WHEN THE TEAMS GATHERATTHE/PPORTUNITY#ENTERON %NCINA !VENUE TO TALK BUSINESS HE SAID )TS ALSO A TIME FOR OPEN COM

MUNICATIONWHENPEOPLECANAIRTHEIR CONCERNSANDRECEIVESUPPORTFORTHEIR ACHIEVEMENTS#ASEMANAGERSAREON HAND ANDTHEREISALWAYSSUPPORTAND WISDOMFROMOTHERSWHOHAVEBEEN INTHESAMESITUATIONS HESAID h-YCONFIDENCEWENTUPPER CENT BY ME HELPING PEOPLE )TS AL WAYSABOUTHELPINGSOMEBODY4HEY NEEDTOHEARFROMPEOPLEWHOHAVE BEEN THROUGH WHAT THEY ARE GOING THROUGH vHESAID 0IERRE SAID HE ALWAYS TELLS PEO PLE h)FYOUDOEVERYTHINGTHEYTELL YOUTODO YOULLPROBABLYNEVERBE HOMELESSAGAINv (ISNEXTGOALISMOVINGFROMHIS TINYSTUDIOTOAONE BEDROOMAPART MENT (E HAS SECURED THE FUNDING

BUT HE NEEDS TO FIND AN AFFORDABLE PLACE"ECAUSEOFHISDISABILITIES HE CANT WORK A REGULAR JOB BUT IF THE 3TREETS4EAMEXPANDSTOOTHERLOCA TIONS HEWOULDLIKETOHELP HESAID 7HEN HE WAS MOST NEEDY IT WAS THE OUTREACH THAT HELPED HIM THROUGH HESAID h)FOUNDALOTOFPEOPLEVERYHELP FUL 4HEY WERE TOTAL STRANGERS BUT THEY WERE VERY KIND ) ONLY MET THEM A COUPLE OF TIMES BUT THEY DIDNTFORGETME vHESAID 0ROJECT(OMELESS#ONNECTANDTHE $OWNTOWN3TREETS4EAMHAVEBEEN ANINSPIRATION 0IERRESAID h)VESEENALOTOFPEOPLECHANGE )MINAPOSITIONTOHELPPEOPLE AND )LIKEITvN

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Barron Park outraged over donkey attack "ARRON0ARKSBELOVEDDONKEYSHAVEBEENATTACKEDBYADOGFORTHE SECONDTIME4HEDONKEYS 0ERRYAND-INER&ORTY.INER WEREPLACIDLY RESIDINGINTHEIRPASTURENEAR"OL0ARKWHENTHEATTACKOCCURRED.OV  ACCORDINGTO"ARRON0ARK!SSOCIATION"OARD-EMBER$OUG-ORAN (Posted Nov. 15 at 9:37 a.m.)

Bay Area gas prices continue to drop $RIVERSGOINGTOTHEPUMPTHROUGHOUTTHE"AY!REAWILLBEPAYING LESSTOFILLUPTHEIRTANKSINTHENEXTCOUPLEWEEKS AN!MERICAN!U TOMOBILE!SSOCIATION.ORTHERN#ALIFORNIASPOKESWOMANSAID (Posted Nov. 15 at 8:52 a.m.)

Native American remains found in Menlo Park .ATIVE !MERICAN REMAINS WERE UNEARTHED BY CONSTRUCTION CREWS WORKINGIN-ENLO0ARKON4UESDAY .OV POLICESAID (Posted Nov. L U C I L E PA C K A R D

C H I L D R E N ’ S H O S P I TA L

14 at 10:25 a.m.)

Second Harvest hunting for turkey donations &OODBANKSAROUNDTHE"AY!REAAREASKINGFORMOREDONATIONSAS THE4HANKSGIVINGHOLIDAYAPPROACHES(Posted Nov. 14 at 9:20 a.m.) PROVIDED BY LUCILE PACKARD CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Attorney General to appeal tossed murder case

"(% /& '!)%&', Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital offers classes and seminars designed to foster good health and enhance the lives of parents and children.

!.OVDECISIONTOTHROWOUTMURDERCHARGESAGAINSTACCUSEDKILLER 'REGORY%LARMS3RWILLBEAPPEALEDINSTATECOURTBYTHE#ALIFORNIA !TTORNEY'ENERAL 3AN-ATEO$ISTRICT!TTORNEY3TEVE7AGSTAFFESAID 4UESDAY .OV(Posted Nov. 14 at 7:59 a.m.)

Memorial for Ellen Fletcher set for Sunday, Nov. 18 4HEMEMORIALFOR%LLEN&LETCHER 0ALO!LTOSICONICBICYCLEADVOCATE AND LONGTIME #ITY #OUNCILWOMAN WILL BE HELD 3UNDAY AFTERNOON .OV ATTHE/SHMAN&AMILY*EWISH#OMMUNITY#ENTER(Posted Nov. 13 at 9:14 a.m.)

CAR SEAT EDUCATION & INSTALLATION ;"/& ',!('%%"% '% %!/& "&#'":%&% %&'!!&''"!('"! ##"!' !'&! "!!"%,! 6507362981

Stolen wheelchair-adapted vehicles recovered 4WOSTOLENVEHICLESADAPTEDFORWHEELCHAIRSVANISHEDFROMA-ENLO 0ARKWOMANSHOMEON.OV BUTRETURNEDTHREEDAYSLATER THANKSTO THEPOLICE(Posted Nov. 13 at 9:04 a.m.)

Palo Alto police officer reflects on Veterans Day GRANDPARENTS SEMINAR &!"%!*!+#'!'%!#%!'&'&&&+ !&!&!"%! )%,#%'&''&'%" !'"!&"%!!'%!'(!$(%"" %!#%!'&!'"'%%! 

 



SIBLING PREPARATION CLASS ;&&&"%%!'*",%&"!"%*##%#%&!&"%' "'"! !#,&%'&"'%%)"!*"%! 

 

 

&OR MANY 6ETERANS $AY IS A DAY OFF FROM WORK OR SCHOOL TO PAY TRIBUTETOTHOSEWHOHAVERISKEDTHEIRLIVESANDSERVEDINTHEARMED FORCESh)TSADAYTOHONOROURMILITARYVETERANSINTHE5NITED3TATES v 0ALO!LTOPOLICE3GT#URTISS*ACKSONSAIDh"EINGAVETERANMYSELF ) THINKITSIMPORTANTv(Posted Nov. 12 at 4:55 p.m.)

Gunn student advances in science competition 'UNN(IGH3CHOOLSOPHOMORE*OY*INISPARTOFATWO PERSONTEAM THATWILLCOMPETENATIONALLYAGAINSTFIVEOTHERTEAMSNEXTMONTHFOR THETOP PRIZEINTHE3IEMENS#OMPETITIONIN-ATH 3CIENCE 4ECHNOLOGY(Posted Nov. 12 at 2:05 p.m.)

Two Menlo Park homes hit by gunfire 0OLICEFOLLOWEDTHEECHOESOFGUNFIRETOTWOBULLET POCKEDHOUSES IN-ENLO0ARKEARLY-ONDAYMORNING .OV (Posted Nov. 12 at 10:52 a.m.)

PEDIATRIC WEIGHT CONTROL PROGRAM '%''!*,%*' ,&)"%!('"!*' ! !' #%"% ''#%" "'&','!!+%&'&"%")%*'%!! '% &"%'!80."%!)"!'% *'"&&'%"('& #%"% -!#%!'&"&*''""

!%"!"*6507254424'"%&'%#&% '

6507244601"%)&'!%#"%'"%&'%"%"'! "% !"% '"!"!'' &"'"!&!&"%'&!"'%"(%&&

Drive-by shooting strikes East Palo Alto man ! YEAR OLDMANWASINJUREDBYAGUNSHOTINADRIVE BYSHOOTING IN%AST0ALO!LTOJUSTBEFOREMIDNIGHT&RIDAY .OV(Posted Nov. 10 at 3:36 p.m.)

Cat returned as if by Magic 7HEN.ICOLA+EATINGMOVEDFROM#UPERTINOTO,OS!LTOSSIXYEARS AGO SHEKEPTALLOFHERIMPORTANTBELONGINGS BUTLOSTHER YEAR OLD CAT -AGIC4HEORANGETABBYHADLOSTHISCOLLARINAFIGHTAND+EATING HAD SCHEDULED A VETERINARIAN APPOINTMENT THE DAY HE DISAPPEARED (Posted Nov. 10 at 3:12 p.m.)

Police uncover Mountain View DMT drug lab ,AWENFORCEMENTOFFICIALSARRESTEDFOURPEOPLE4HURSDAY .OV AFTERBUSTINGA$-4DRUGLABANDSUSPECTEDDRUG PEDDLINGOPERATION IN-OUNTAIN6IEW(Posted Nov. 10 at 3:09 p.m.)

VI S IT LP CH.ORG TO S IG N U P FOR CLAS S E S Page 10ĂŠUĂŠ ÂœĂ›i“LiĂ€ĂŠÂŁĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.

TRENDING NOW S H C H

EXCEPTIONAL HARON EIGHTS USTOM 1052 SIERRA DRIVE, MENLO PARK

OME

Custom built from the ground up just 10 years ago is this traditional style dream home on one of Sharon Heights best streets and locations, Sierra Drive! The home has all the features that one would expect for a home of this caliber, fabulous chef’s kitchen which includes island seating and adjacent family room, master bedroom suite with a room sized walk-in closet, and adjoining the living room is a spacious room suitable for music enjoyment, library, or home office. There is one bedroom suite and guest bath on the main floor and 3 bedrooms and 2 baths including the master suite and a large landing upstairs! The gracious entry with curved railings, slate tiled patios and gorgeous backyard completes this lovely home.

Features include:

1052 Sierra Drive, Menlo Park La Loma Dr

Tioga Dr

Cascade Dr Mont eR o sa

Sierra Dr Continental Dr

Dr

Downstairs: s Gracious foyer s Formal living room s Formal dining room s Music room/library/home office s Chef’s kitchen with gas cook-top includes island seating s Family room with fireplace s Bedroom with full bath s Guest bath s Mud area s Large two car garage with area for storage

Sand H

ill Road

280

Upstairs: s Gorgeous master suite with French doors and fireplace, fabulous bathroom and room-sized dressing area and closet. s Two additional bedrooms one with French doors, and full bath s Wonderful landing area with built-in cabinetry, great for a homework area or reading s Laundry room with built-in cabinetry Outside and Additional Features: s Gracious foyer with curved railings s Large and totally private backyard s House is air-conditioned upstairs s Cat-5 wiring s Dual pane windows

Listed at $2,950,000

Maya Sewald

Jason Sewald

cell: 650.346.1228

cell: 650.307.8060

mayasold@pacbell.net

jason@jasonsewald.com

DRE# 0993290

DRE# 01732384

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 11

Upfront

Creating a ‘world in harmony’

Photos by Veronica Weber &IVE MONKS FROM THE $REPUNG ,OSELING 0HYKHANG -ONASTERY IN )NDIASPENT.OV AT"E9OGAIN 0ALO !LTO CRAFTING A COLORFUL SAND MANDALA WHICHIN3ANSKRITMEANS hWORLDINHARMONYv !CCORDING TO AN EXPLANATION OF THEARTFORMFROM"E9OGAh7HO EVERVIEWSTHEMANDALAEXPERIENCES PROFOUNDPEACEANDJOYv 4HEMONKSBEGANWITHANOPEN INGCEREMONY WITHCHANTING MUSIC AND MANTRA RECITATION 4HEN CAME SEVERAL DAYS OF PAINSTAKINGLY LAY INGOUTTHEGRAINSOFSANDTOCREATE THEMANDALA6ISITORSCAMETOWATCH THE PROCESS AND VIEW THE FINISHED MANDALA AFTER WHICH THE MONKS PERFORMED A CLOSING CEREMONY IN WHICHTHEYSWEPTAWAYTHEMANDALA DISTRIBUTINGHALFTHESANDTOTHEAU DIENCETOBEKEPTINTHEIRHOMEShAS ABLESSINGFORTHEIRPERSONALHEALTH ANDHEALINGvN 6ISITORSAT"E9OGATAKEALOOKAT THEFINISHEDSANDMANDALACRAFTED BYMONKSOFTHE$REPUNG,OSELING 0HYKHANG-ONASTERY BEFOREIT WASDESTROYEDON.OV

!BOVE#REATEDINTHREEDAYS THESANDMANDALAISMEANT TODEPICTTHEHOUSEOF4ARA AFEMALE"UDDHISTDEITYTHAT REPRESENTSCOMPASSIONANDACTION#ENTER4IBETANMONK .AWANG9AYANGWORKSONTHESANDMANDALAHEANDFIVE OTHERMONKSCONSTRUCTEDAT"E9OGA BESIDEANALTARWITH AFRAMEDPHOTOOFTHE$ALAI,AMA

Page 12ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

!BOVE4IBETAN MONK,OBSANG 9ESHIDECONSTRUCTS THESANDMANDALA ASAWAYOF SHOWINGTHAT EVERYTHINGIS IMPERMANENT ANDHASANEND ,EFT+ALSANG 4SERINGLEFT .AWANG4ENPHEL AND.AWANG #HOEGYL 4IBETAN MONKSFROMTHE $REPUNG,OSELING 0HYKHANG -ONASTERY CHANT DURINGTHECLOSING CEREMONYOFTHE SANDMANDALA THEYCONSTRUCTED FROM.OV 

Upfront

Creek

(continued from page 5)

SENTED ON PROCEDURAL GROUNDS AND ARGUEDTHATTHECOUNCILSHOULDHAVE BEEN GIVEN MORE OPPORTUNITY TO PUBLICLY REVIEW THE ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENTS h)MJUSTNOTCOMFORTABLEPUTTING

Support Local Business

MY NAME AND VOTE ON SOMETHING THAT HAS NOT BEEN REVIEWED BY ME PERSONALLY v(OLMANSAID 4HECREEKAUTHORITYPLANSTOSTART CONSTRUCTION IN !PRIL  AND TO COMPLETE THE PROJECT IN /CTOBER N 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

Correction A photograph in the Nov. 9 cover story, “Proud remembrances,� misidentified a bombed area as Nagasaki. The photograph is a view of Fukuoka, Japan, and shows the effects of heavy incendiary bombing rather than a nuclear bomb. The one remaining building was the hospital where Dr. Leland Felton worked during the occupation. To request a correction, contact Editor Jocelyn Dong at 650-223-6514, jdong@paweekly.com or P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302.

Home is where the heart is.

Khaled Hosseini Author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns

Fri., Nov. 30 | 7:30 p.m.

The online guide to Palo Alto businesses

Photo by John Dolan

Adult: $10, Student: $5

Enjoy a Private Reception with the Author! 6:30-7:30 p.m., $125

Includes a personalized copy of “A Thousand Splendid Suns� with inscription, appetizers and a reserved seat at 7:30 presentation.

t.BLFQVSDIBTFT t8SJUFBOESFBESFWJFXT t'JOEEFBMTBOEDPVQPOT t#VZHJGUDFSUJĂśDBUFT t%JTDPWFSMPDBMCVTJOFTTFT

RSVP Required

Tickets: www.harker.org All proceeds from both events will be donated to the Khaled Hosseini Foundation.

The Harker School | 500 Saratoga Ave. | San Jose

ShopPaloAlto.com

THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS LEARNING IN GERMAN AND ENGLLISH MOUNTAIN VIEW, BERKELEY & SAN FRANCISCO

So who says you have to leave it just because you’ve gotten older? Avenidas Village can help you stay in the home you love. For a private consultation, call (650)289-5405 or visit www.avenidasvillage.org

t)WXEFPMWLIHdual-immersionPERKYEKITVSKVEQW +IVQERERH )RKPMWL JVSQTVIWGLSSPXSLMKL WGLSSP

OPEN HOUSE, Mountain View: Saturday, November 17, 2012 from 11am to 1pm

tHigh-standard FMPMRKYEPIHYGEXMSREPGSRGITXXLEXJSWXIVWholistic and individual development t7EJIERHRYVXYVMRKPIEVRMRK IRZMVSRQIRXWEXthree locations MRXLI7ER*VERGMWGS&E]%VIE

Your life, your way, in your home

Phone: 650 254 0748 | Web: www.gissv.org | Email: office@gissv.org

What school is meant to be.

Why Home Care Assistance Is The Leading Provider of 24/7 Live-In Care: ‡ We offer experienced, bonded and insured caregivers, who are trained in our Balanced Care MethodTM of promoting healthy aging. ‡ We provide culinary training for our caregivers at Sur La Table to improve their skills and our clients’ meals. ‡ Our founders wrote the book Handbook for Live-In Care, which is a resource for the industry as well as families. Call us for a FREE consultation:

650-462-6900 1-866-4-LiveIn (454-8346)

www.HomeCareAssistance.com 148 Hawthorne Ave, Palo Alto, CA

Open Houses: Upper School Oct. 28, Dec. 2 Middle School Oct. 7, Nov. 4

www.menloschool.org/admissions ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ ÂœĂ›i“LiĂ€ĂŠÂŁĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 13

Last Year’s Grant Recipients 10 Books A Home .......................................$5,000 Able Works..................................................$5,000 Adolescent Counseling Services ..........$10,000 Art in Action ................................................$5,000 Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula........7,500 Break Through the Static..........................$2,500 Breast Cancer Connections .....................$5,000 Canopy .........................................................$3,000 CASSY ........................................................$15,000 Children’s Center of the Stanford Community ..................................$4,000 Cleo Eulau Center.......................................$5,000 Collective Roots .........................................$7,500 Downtown Streets Team ........................$15,000 DreamCatchers ........................................$15,000 East Palo Alto Center for Community Media ................................$3,000 East Palo Alto Charter School .................$7,500 East Palo Alto Children’s Day ..................$5,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation ................$5,000 East Palo Alto Youth Court ........................$3,000 Environmental Volunteers ........................$3,000 Family Connections....................................$7,500 Foothill College Book Program ................$5,000 Foundation for a College Education ........$7,500 Hidden Villa .................................................$5,000 InnVision ......................................................$7,500 JLS Middle School ....................................$5,000 Jordan Middle School ..............................$5,000 Kara ............................................................$15,000 Mayview Community Health Center .....$10,000 Midpeninsula Community Media Center.........$5,000 Music in the Schools Foundation ............$5,000 My New Red Shoes ...................................$3,000 New Creation Home Ministries ...............$5,000 Nuestra Casa ..............................................$5,000 Pacific Art League .....................................$2,500 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation ..............$5,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care ..............$6,500 Palo Alto Council of PTAs .........................$2,128 Palo Alto High School Get Involved!.......$1,500 Palo Alto Housing Corporation ................$5,000 Palo Alto Library Foundation ..................$17,500 Palo Alto Youth Collaborative.................$10,000 Peninsula Bridge Program .......................$5,000 Peninsula Youth Theatre ...........................$3,000 Project Safety Net....................................$20,000 Project WeH.O.P.E. .....................................$7,500 Quest Learning Center ..............................$5,000 Ravenswood Education Foundation .......$5,000 Silicon Valley FACES..................................$7,500 South Palo Alto Food Closet .....................$1,000 St. Francis of Assisi Youth Club ...............$5,000 St. Vincent de Paul.....................................$6,000 TEDxGunnHighSchool ...............................$2,000 TheatreWorks .............................................$5,000 Youth Community Service .......................$10,000

Support our Kids with a gift to the Holiday Fund.

E

ach year the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund raises money to suppor t programs ser ving families and children in the Palo Alto area. Since the Weekly and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation cover all the administrative costs, every dollar raised goes directly to suppor t community programs through grants to non-profit organizations ranging from $1,000 to $25,000. And with the generous suppor t of matching grants from local foundations, including the Packard and Hewlett foundations, your taxdeductible gift will be doubled in size. A donation of $100 turns into $200 with the foundation matching gifts. Whether as an individual, a business or in honor of someone else, help us reach our goal of $350,000 by making a generous contribution to the Holiday Fund. With your generosity, we can give a major boost to the programs in our community helping kids and families.

Give to the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund and your donation is doubled. You give to non-profit groups that work right here in our community. It’s a great way to ensure that your charitable donations are working at home.

CLICK AND GIVE

Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/paw-holiday-fund

Enclosed is a donation of $_______________ Name __________________________________________________ Business Name __________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________

Please Make checks payable to: Silicon Valley Community Foundation and send to: Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund c/o Silicon Valley Community Foundation 2440 W. El Camino Real, Suite 300 Mountain View, CA 94040

City/State/Zip ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________________ Phone ______________________

Q Credit Card (MC, VISA, or AMEX) _____________________________________________ Expires _______/_______ Signature _______________________________________________________ I wish to designate my contribution as follows: (select one)

Non-profits: Grant application and guidelines at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/holidayfund

Q In my name as shown above – OR –

Q In name of business above:

Q In honor of:

Q In memory of:

Q As a gift for:

________________________________________________ (Name of person) For information on making contributions of appreciated stock, contact Bill Johnson at (650) 326-8210. The Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund is a donor advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization. A contribution to this fund allows your donation to be tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law. All donors and gifts amounts will be published in the Palo Alto Weekly unless the boxes below are checked.

Q I wish to contribute anonymously.

Page 14ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Q Please withhold the amount of my contribution.

Upfront 9/54(

‘Unplug your kids,’ psychologist advises 0ALO!LTO5NIVERSITYS2OBERT2USSELLSPEAKSATFOURTH@4OWN'OWNGATHERING NPLUGYOURKIDSv 4HATWASTHEMESSAGE &RIDAY .OV  OF PSY CHOLOGIST2OBERT2USSELL WHOSPOKE INTHEFOURTHh4OWN'OWNvPRE

“U

by Chris Kenrick SENTATIONBY0ALO!LTO5NIVERSITY 2USSELL WHODIRECTSCLINICALTRAIN INGFORTHEUNIVERSITYTHATOFFERSDE GREESINCOUNSELINGANDPSYCHOLOGY SPOKEATTHE3TANFORD&ACULTY#LUB

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Nov. 13)

Parking: The council voted to support most of the strategies proposed by staff for dealing with downtown’s parking shortage, including a new study of city garages, a “downtown cap� study and installation of new bike-parking spots and electric-vehicle charging stations. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Klein, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd, Yeh No: Holman Creek: The council voted to support the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority’s proposed flood-control project, which targets the area between San Francisco Bay and U.S. Highway 101. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Klein, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd, Yeh No: Holman

Board of Education (Nov. 13)

New elementary school: The board adopted a timeline calling for a recommendation by May 2013 on a location for the opening of a 13th elementary school, likely by the fall of 2017. Yes: Unanimous College readiness: The board reviewed statistics on the percentage of 2012 high school graduates who completed entrance requirements for California’s public, fouryear universities. Action: None

Council Finance Committee (Nov. 14)

Palo Alto CLEAN: The committee voted to continue the Utility Department’s solar feed-in tariff program, Palo Alto Clean Local Energy Available Now (CLEAN). The committee decided to increase the price from 14 cents per kilowatt hour to 16.5 cents and to lower the program’s capacity from 4 megawatts to 2 megawatts. Yes: Unanimous Goals: The committee approved the proposed update of the city’s 10-year energyefficiency goals for gas and electric utilities. Yes: Unanimous

Planning and Transportation Commission (Nov. 14)

827 Chimalus Drive: The commission voted to support a proposal by Samir Tuma and Kriss Deiglemeier for an exception to create a two-lot subdivision on their property at 827 Chimalus Drive. Yes: Unanimous 50 El Camino Real: The commission supported the proposed zone changes and design for the expansion of the Ronald McDonald House, which looks to add 70 rooms to accommodate demand. Yes: Unanimous

Architectural Review Board (Nov. 15)

135 Hamilton Ave.: The board held a study session to discuss the later changes to 135 Hamilton Ave., a proposal by Charles “Chop� Keenan for a new four-story building at a site currently occupied by a parking lot. Action: None 636 Waverley St.:The board held a preliminary review for a proposed four-story office building at 636 Waverley St., which would include two stories of office space and two stories of residential units. Action: None

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to discuss the status of labor negotiations with the Utilities Management and Professional Association of Palo Alto (UMPAPA). The council also plans to consider potential topics of discussion for a study session with the Palo Alto Youth Council; to pass a resolution honoring former Councilwoman Ellen Fletcher, consider a moratorium for certain parking exemptions for new developments downtown and California Avenue; consider a request for a $3.2 million loan from the Palo Alto Housing Corporation for acquisition of 567-595 Maybell Ave., and discuss proposed time restrictions for amplified sound at Lytton Plaza. The closed session will begin at 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 19, followed by the study session on the Palo Alto Youth Council in the Council Conference Room and the regular meeting in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to consider proposals to restrict vehicle dwelling, including a three-month pilot program that would allow vehicle dwelling at religious institutions or businesses with written permission of the property owner. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

TOABOUTSTUDENTSANDCOUNSELORS WITHSTRONGREPRESENTATIONFROMTHE 0ALO!LTO5NIFIED3CHOOL$ISTRICT 4ODAYS CHILDREN AVERAGE NINE HOURS A DAY OF ENGAGEMENT WITH MEDIA 2USSELLSAID h'IVENTHATMEDIAEXPOSURE YOU HAVE TO WONDER ABOUT WHO IS OUT TOCONTROLTHEDEVELOPMENTOFYOUR CHILDSCONSCIOUSNESS#ONSUMERISM AND MEDIA HAVE LED SOME TO CON CLUDE THAT CORPORATIONS ARE REALLY NOWCONSTRUCTINGTHEVIEWTHATWE ANDCHILDRENTHEMSELVES ADOPT vHE SAID h4HIS RAISES THE SPECTER OF THE VULNERABILITYOFCHILDHOODITSELFv 3OCIETYS PERCEPTION OF CHILDREN HAS CHANGED RADICALLY SINCE  WHEN THEY WERE VIEWED AS hHARDY COURAGEOUS STURDY WHOLESOME SELF SUFFICIENTANDCAPABLE v2USSELL SAID 4ODAY HE SAID KIDS ARE SEEN AS FRAGILE PRECIOUS VULNERABLE SICKLY DEPENDENTANDINCAPABLE WITHMORE THANPERCENTLIVINGINPOVERTYAND HIGHLEVELSOFOBESITYANDDIABETES +IDS ARE FIRMLY ENTRENCHED IN A hCONSUMER CULTURE WHERE WERE BOMBARDED BY MESSAGES TO @BUY BUY BUY v2USSELLSAID h9OU HAVE AN UPHILL BATTLE AS ADULTSTOENGAGECHILDRENINADEVEL OPMENTALSTAGEvFREEFROMTHEESCA LATINGELECTRONICCOMPETITION 2USSELL SAID PARENTS SHOULD hGET YOURCHILDRENOFFTHECOUCHANDBACK INTONATURE%NGAGETHEMINRATIONAL CONVERSATION h#REATECHALLENGESFROMTHEMTHAT AREDIFFICULTBUTSOLVABLE$ONTLEVEL ADVERSITYENCOURAGEADVENTURE vHE SAID 3O CALLEDhHELICOPTERPARENTSvˆ THOSEWHOHOVERAROUNDTHECHILDREN ˆ MAKE THE MISTAKE OF TRYING TO MICRO MANAGETHEIRKIDSANDSHIELD THEMFROMFAILURE STUNTINGAUTONO MYANDINDEPENDENCE h4AKE SOME CONTROL v HE SAID h) TALK TO PARENTS WHO ASK ME QUES TIONSSUCHAS @)SITABADTHINGFOR MY YEAR OLDTOSLEEPWITHTHEIRCELL PHONE h9ES ITIS ACTUALLY vHESAID h5NPLUG YOUR KIDS AND CONTROL ITv 0ALO !LTO 5NIVERSITY FOUNDED IN  AND KNOWN UNTIL  AS THE 0ACIFIC'RADUATE3CHOOLOF0SYCHOL OGY HAS A CAMPUS ON !RASTRADERO 2OADANDCOOPERATIVEARRANGEMENTS WITHTHE&OOTHILL $E!NZA#OMMU NITY #OLLEGE $ISTRICT AND 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY 4HIS PAST *UNE IT AWARDED  DOCTORATES  DOCTORATES IN PSY CHOLOGY FIVE MASTERS DEGREES  UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN BUSINESS PSYCHOLOGY AND  UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIAL ACTION 4HE UNIVERSITY OFFERS LOW COST MENTALHEALTHSERVICESTOTHECOM MUNITY THROUGH SLIDING SCALE FEES ATTHE'RONOWSKI#ENTER ACLINICIN ,OS!LTOSN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

CHRISTMAS TREES &WREATHS Nativity School will be selling Christmas Trees & Wreaths beginning Friday, November 23rd and ending on Saturday, December 15th. This is a fundraiser for Nativity School. HOURS – Closed Mondays Opening day has extended hours from 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday .....................4:00 Friday ......................................4:00 Saturday ..................................9:00 Sunday ....................................9:00

p.m. p.m. a.m. a.m. -

8:00 9:00 9:00 5:00

p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.

NATIVITY SCHOOL

Corner of Oak Grove & Laurel, Menlo Park For information go to www.nativitytrees.com Fire-Proofing and Delivery Service are available THIS SPACE IS DONATED AS A COMMUNITY SERVICE BY THE PALO ALTO WEEKLY

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ********************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA–SPECIAL MEETING-COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2012 5:00 PM

CLOSED SESSION 1. Labor STUDY SESSION 2. Palo Alto Youth Council SPECIAL ORDERS 3. Resolution Honoring Former Council Member Ellen Fletcher CONSENT CALENDAR 4. Approval of a Naming Recognition Plan for Designated Play Zones at the Magical Bridge Playground for Individuals or Businesses that Contribute at Least $200,000 per Zone 5. Approval of a Contract Term Extension with SAIC to Perform Utility Organizational Study 6. Approval of Contract with Sandis in an Amount Not to Exceed $110,000 for Parking Garage Feasibility and Attendant Parking Study in Downtown Palo Alto 7. Adoption of Resolution of Intent to Fix the Employer’s Contribution Under the Public Employee’s Medical and Hospital Care Act with Respect to Members of the Palo Alto Police OfďŹ cers Association and Rescinding Resolution No. 8896 ACTION ITEMS 8. Public Hearing: Parking Exemptions and Moratorium Extension 9. $5.8 Million Loan Request by Palo Alto Housing Corporation for the Acquisition of 567-595 Maybell Avenue(continued from 11/13/12) 10. Recommendation of the Parks and Recreation Commission Concerning Amendment of Section 22.04.180 of Chapter 24.04 of Title 22 [Park And Recreation Building Use And Regulations] of the Palo Alto Municipal Code and Amendment of Park and Open Space Regulations R1-4, R1-5a, R1-5b, and R1-10b to Impose Time Use Limitations on Sound AmpliďŹ cation Equipment at Lytton Plaza STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Policy and Services Committee meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 6:00 PM regarding; 1) Human Habitation; 2) Contract Oversight Audit, and 3) Auditor’s OfďŹ ce Quarterly Report as of September 30, 2012.

26th Annual Palo Alto Weekly

Short Story Contest

Entry Deadline is December 28th See PaloAltoOnline.com for details ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ ÂœĂ›i“LiĂ€ĂŠÂŁĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 15

Audrey Avis Aasen-Hull Audrey Avis Aasen-Hull died peacefully at her home on Oct. 31, 2012. She was born in Coquille, Oregon, on July 9, 1916. Audrey Avis was the beneficiary of scholarships at the University of Oregon, graduating with a degree in music in 1939. She felt most fortunate to have studied violin with Rex Underwood at the University and with Joseph Roisman of the Budapest String Quartet at Mills College during several summers in the 1930s. She received her Master’s Degree in Musicology from Stanford University in 1946. Audrey Avis was a music teacher in the San Francisco school system before becoming a private music teacher in Menlo Park. She was a professional in both piano and violin and was very involved with the Music Teachers’ Association of California. Her many students will remember her for her teaching excellence, not just her technical proficiency in both piano and violin but also her ability to teach music appreciation, theory, harmony, and history. In addition to her professional status as a teacher she performed regularly during her entire life. Her devotion to music, music education and fellow music-lovers has benefited all those who knew her. In 1962 she married James Byrne Hull. They loved to travel, especially to Paris and New York. She loved her gardens and for many years had a beautiful rose garden. Friends will remember her for her love too for her poodles and cats, French champagne, and trips to San Francisco for the musical events there. Audrey Avis made very important contributions to the community not only personally, but also through her gift-giving. Some of the organizations which she loved and made contributions to include the San Francisco Symphony, San Francisco Performances, Music@Menlo, California Institute of Technology’s music program, California Summer Chamber Music, Lively Arts at Stanford, the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and the Music Academy of the West. Audrey Avis is survived by her husband Byrne who took wonderful care of her in her last years. Special thanks go to those who helped her during her last years: Sally Young, Deon Hilger, Suzanne Koonce, Dr. Rebecca Leon, Hazelle Milaradovitch, Paul Eisenman, and John Wells, and special recognition and thanks go to Senior Helpers, Pathways Hospice, and Home Care Assistance for their help in caring for Audrey Avis in her last years. A gathering of friends will take place at her home on Nov. 18 from 5:00 - 7:00. In lieu of flowers, please give in her memory to the musical organization of your choice. PA I D

OBITUARY

Page 16ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Transitions

Longtime bike activist Ellen Fletcher dies

Ellen Fletcher, a former Palo Alto City Councilwoman who spearheaded the city’s transformation into a nationally recognized bike-fr iendly c o m m u n i t y, died Wednesday, Nov. 7, after a battle with lung cancer, according to her friends and family. She was 83. Fletcher, whose name has become virtually synonymous with Palo Alto’s bicycle improvements, had been involved in bike-related issues for more than half a century. Her political activism began in the 1960s, when she took part in the grassroots campaign to prevent the expansion of Oregon Expressway, said her daughter, Terry Fletcher. She remained committed to local politics long after that, often advocating for bicycle improvements and various environmental causes. In the early 1970s, she had served as safety chair at Fairmeadow Elementary School, where her son was a student. She continued to be a fierce advocate for bicycling and other environmental causes in 1977. Her leadership was instrumental in

getting the city to launch the city’s household-hazardous-waste program, pass anti-smoking laws and establish Palo Alto as a “nuclearfree zone.” She was also an enthusiastic campaigner for local candidates, Terry Fletcher recalled. A Berlin native whose parents divorced when she was very young, Fletcher spent her early childhood in a series of foster homes and in a Jewish orphanage. With the Nazis coming to power, she was deported from Germany because her father was a Polish citizen, Terry Fletcher said. Though she was slated to go to Poland, she was able to change course and reach London in 1938 thanks to the Kindertransport program, which focused on shipping Jewish children out of Nazi Germany and into Great Britain. It was in London where she discovered bicycling. In a 2011 interview with the Weekly, she recalled coming to England and seeing that everyone out there was biking. She fell in love with bicycling and brought her passion to New York City, where she immigrated in 1946. As a 17-year-old student at Hunter College, Fletcher rode a bike on campus year-round, a rare sight at the time. She told the Weekly that she was the “only one in college who had a bike on campus.” Fletcher moved to the Peninsula shortly after her college graduation, settling first in Menlo Park and later in Palo Alto. She lobbied persistently for biking improvements as a volunteer in the school district and as a council member. She had told the Weekly that her aim in the 1970s was to put bicyclists on the radar of policy makers, who at the time were concerned exclusively with cars. Thanks in large part to her efforts, bicycle commuting became part of the city’s transportation planning in the 1980s, according to Ward Winslow’s “Palo Alto: Centennial History.” The Bryant Street “bike boulevard” opened in 1982. Her legislative efforts didn’t stop with bicycling improvements. As a resident of Greenhouse, an apartment complex on San Antonio Road, Fletcher once hung her clothes out to dry on a clothesline and was told by apartment officials that this violated the building’s policy. She led the city in changing the law so that apartments would not be able to prevent residents from drying their clothes outside. “They messed with the wrong person there,” Terry Fletcher recalled. The city recognized her leadership on bicycling in 2002, when the council officially named Bryant Street as the “Ellen Fletcher Bicycle Boulevard.” Her efforts helped the city attain the designation of “Bicycle Friendly Community” from the League of American Bicyclists, a Washington, D.C.-based organization. Her long list of awards includes the Palo Alto Civic League Citizen

of the Year (1975); the Women’s Transportation Seminar Woman of the Year (1989); the League of American Bicyclists Volunteer of the Year (1996); and the Bay Area Air Quality District Clean Air Champion Award (1997). Fletcher’s local legacy is expected to stretch for decades as the city embarks on a slew of other bicycle projects, including trails, a bike bridge over U.S. Highway 101 and new bicycle boulevards modeled after Bryant Street. In July, the city approved an ambitious new bike master plan that aims to make Palo Alto one of the nation’s top bicycling destination. Even at 83 and suffering from cancer, Fletcher rode her bicycle to City Hall to attend public hearings on the plan and to advocate for bike improvements. Former Mayor Peter Drekmeier called Fletcher a “hero” for her advocacy of bike issues. Drekmeier recalled attending meetings all over the Peninsula in recent years and seeing Fletcher there. No matter where the meetings took place, she got there by bike, he said. He also remembered an episode in which Fletcher received a ticket for running a stop sign while on her bike. She had no qualms about telling a local newspaper about the ticket, Drekmeier said. She thought it would send a good message — even elected officials need to follow the law. Though Fletcher owned a car, a 1964 Plymouth Valiant, she was famous for almost never using it. The site of her pedaling through the city streets has been a common one for decades. She continued the tradition even in her early 80s, while afflicted with lung cancer. A lifelong champion of bicycling, she told the Weekly that she hopes to demonstrate to people that just about everyone can do it. Fletcher is survived by children Linda of Palo Alto, Terry of Berkeley and Jeff of Sacramento, and grandchildren Simon and Martin of Sacramento. Her memorial will be held Sunday, Nov. 18, at 1:15 p.m. at the Albert and Janet Schultz Cultural Arts Hall in the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Donations in Fletcher’s memory can be made to the Silicon Valley Coalition, 1922 The Alameda, Ste. 420, San Jose, CA 95126, bikesiliconvalley.org.

Memorial Services John Clyde Loftis Jr. A memorial service will be held for John Clyde Loftis Jr., a longtime resident of Portola Valley and member of the Stanford English department from 1952 to 1981, on Friday, Nov. 23, at 2 p.m. at the First Congregational Church of Palo Alto, 1985 Louis Road.

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Nov. 7-13 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle related Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .2 Driving without a license . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .5 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Brandishing a weapon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .3 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Menlo Park Nov. 7-13 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Shooting at occupied dwelling . . . . . . . .1 Spousal abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle related Auto burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .1

Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Atherton Nov. 7-13 Vehicle related Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .6 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hang-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Menlo Park 1100 block Carlton Avenue, 11/7, 7:25 p.m.; battery. 200 block Van Buren Road, 11/11, 12:45 a.m.; spousal abuse. 1100 block Valparaiso Avenue, 11/11, 3:58 p.m.; battery. 1400 block Modoc Avenue, 11/11, 6:07 p.m.; battery. 1200 block Madera Ave, 11/12, 4:30 a.m.; shooting at occupied dwelling.

Donate to the

Holiday Fund Learn more at Palo Alto Online

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Unlisted block Embarcadero Road, 11/7, 3:54 p.m.; battery.

Are you a holiday volunteer? Tell us your story. Do you celebrate the holidays by giving back to the community? Does your family have a tradition of volunteering during the holiday season? The Palo Alto Weekly wants to hear your story. Practices could be anything from ringing the Salvation Army bell to volunteering at a soup kitchen or encouraging your children to perform a random act of kindness. Submit short write-ups (100-400 words) on your personal/family tradition, which will be published in the Weekly at the end of November. Please email Online Editor Tyler Hanley at thanley@paweekly.com by Nov. 18.

CITY OF PALO ALTO POLICE DEPARTMENT NOTICE OF CITY MANAGER’S PUBLIC HEARING CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Manager will consider the application of Stanford Yellow Cab Inc. for a CertiďŹ cate of Public Convenience and Necessity to operate a taxicab service in the City of Palo Alto under the business name of Stanford Yellow Cab Inc., at a special meeting on Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 9:30AM, at Cubberley Community Center, located at 4000 MiddleďŹ eld Road Room A-7, Palo Alto.



&+(()  &($&%(&(%! &(%*+(# %")!,!%+(".- % .&+'(&((.(!.&,$(  Â&#x203A;E   <:<JJ8IPÂ&#x203A; *Supplies limited, order early

&+%*(.+%*+(#&&) ++'J:Xc`]fie`X8m\Â&#x203A;GXcf8ckfÂ&#x203A;-,'%*)+%0(0'

  &+(& #*+(#&&)*&(

&+%*(.+%  &''!% 

n`k_GliZ_Xj\f],fidfi\

One coupon per household per day per purchase of $5 or more.

<OG@I<J((&*'&() 

ANNOUNCING T H E 2 7 TH A N N U A L PA L O A L T O W E E K L Y

JUDGES: ADULT/YOUNG ADULT

PRIZES

Tom Parker, Award winning novelist and short story writer, UC Extension and Foothill College Instructor and former Stanford Instructor Meg Waite Clayton, is the nationally best selling author of The Four Ms. Bradwells, The Wednesday Sisters, and The Bellwether Prize finalist The Language of Light. Ellen Sussman Author of New York Times best selling novel French Lessons and San Francisco Chronicle best seller On A Night Like This

CHILDREN/TEEN Katy Obringer, Former supervisor of Palo Alto Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Library Caryn Huberman Yacowitz, Playwright and Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book author Nancy Etchemendy, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book author

New online submission

ENTRY DEADLINE:

All Writers: December 28, 2012, 5:30 p.m.

FOR ADULTS: $500 Cash - FIRST PLACE $300 Cash - SECOND PLACE $200 Cash - THIRD PLACE FOR YOUNG ADULT/CHILDREN/TEEN: $100 Gift Certificate - FIRST PLACE $75 Gift Certificate - SECOND PLACE $50 Gift Certificate - THIRD PLACE Certificates are from co-sponsoring area bookstores. Bellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books (*ages 15-17) Keplerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (*ages 12-14) Linden Tree (*ages 9-11) *age as of entry deadline

All adult winners and first place young winners in each category will be announced in the Palo Alto Weekly in February 2013. All winning stories will be published online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

CONTEST RULES

1. The contest is open to anyone who lives, works or attends school full-time in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Stanford, Portola Valley, Woodside, Mountain View, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, and East Palo Alto. 2. Limit of one entry per person. 3. Stories must be typed, double-spaced. Maximum 2,500 words. Longer stories will be disqualified. 4. $15 entry fee, along with 2 hard copies, for all ADULT stories; $5 entry fee for YOUNG WRITERS under 18. Make checks payable to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palo Alto Weekly.â&#x20AC;? 5. Entries may not have been previously published. 6. Signed entry form must accompany story. Authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name should NOT appear anywhere on pages of story. 7. All winners are required to email their story to the Palo Alto Weekly in a Microsoft Word Document as an attachment. Mail manuscripts to: Palo Alto Weekly Short Story Contest, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302 or deliver to 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto Questions: shortstory@paweekly.com Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 17

Editorial

Kicking the can down the road Council approves more studies on downtown parking problems, leaving residents waiting for relief, again nce again, residents of downtown neighborhoods have been told to be patient about the impacts of employee parking spilling onto their streets. That’s been the city’s consistent refrain for years as neighborhoods have been increasingly inundated with employees working in bustling downtown offices who opt against purchasing parking permits for city lots and garages. On Tuesday, the City Council complicated and delayed the day of reckoning by combining efforts to address the current parking problems with an evaluation of overall future development downtown and an assessment of future parking needs as more development occurs. To city residents, it’s just more of the same. The study plans adopted by the Council will likely delay any further action on residential parking issues for at least a year, probably longer. To be sure, the dynamics of downtown parking are complicated and affected by many different variables. And some good work is being done to improve the utilization of existing city garages. But relief for downtown residents can’t wait for the financing and construction of hypothetical future parking garages years from now. After a long discussion Tuesday, the council voted 8-1 to assess the potential parking needs for new downtown development and to look again at utilization of parking-garage space and whether construction of another garage is warranted. While these studies will shed some light on what the city can do to provide adequate parking downtown in anticipation of more development, there is nothing in either one to provide direct relief for the neighborhoods. The only minor help came when the council narrowly approved short-term measures creating some loading zones and issuing permits for the few Professorville residents whose homes do not have any off-street parking. As they have before, council members acknowledged that solving the long-standing parking shortage will be a challenge. Mayor Yiaway Yeh said the action is “the start of what I know is a significant undertaking.” But perhaps a more telling assessment is the varying points of view offered by business and neighborhood representatives, who have been working over the last two years with city planners to find a solution. Russ Cohen, executive director of the Downtown Business and Professional Association, expressed support for the parking study and the city’s effort to solve the parking problem. Richard Brand, who lives on Addison Avenue in Professorville, was decidedly less enthusiastic. The council should focus on parking shortages in the neighborhood, he said, rather than relating the problems in Professorville with the downtown as a whole. Member Karen Holman picked up the neighborhood torch, calling downtown parking a “systemic problem” that needs a solution soon, adding that the city should act soon to create a residential permit-parking program in the downtown neighborhoods. She cast the lone no-vote on the plan, which she said was due to her dissatisfaction that the plans did not have a specific timeline. Council member Greg Schmid said the staff should do more work to accurately assess the scope of the downtown parking problem. Schmid called parking a “critical” issue that will require staff resources be spent on finding out whether the city has a “systemic deficit” in parking. The council and staff’s reluctance to implement a residential parkingpermit system is in part based on the fear that it will leave employees with insufficient places to park, and then deprive shoppers of easily accessible short-term parking in city lots as employees move around their cars. Those are important concerns, but until there is 100 percent utilization of all permit-only parking spaces in city lots and garages, the city is not managing its parking program to maximum efficiency. That’s why the highest priority, as Schmid suggested, should be to focus on defining just how big a parking shortage we have. Without that knowledge, the city has no idea how many spaces it will take to meet downtown demand, present or future, and also entice downtown workers away from parking in neighborhoods. Some overdue improvements in the permit system are coming soon in response to direction given by council in July. Just a year ago studies showed that 1,200 of the city’s 3,000-plus downtown parking spaces were vacant much of the time due to an unwieldy and poorly managed permit system and to an unwillingness of employees to buy permits when they can park free in the neighborhoods. An online management system is about to be implemented that will enable the city to release permits weekly, rather than on the old quarterly schedule that increased wait times. It should improve utilization of available parking space and make it easier for employees to acquire permits. But the patience of downtown residents is understandably running out, and the council should be including the development of a residential permit-parking system in the staff’s work plan. Otherwise, a year from now we could be no closer to actually solving this problem, in spite of a large pile of consultants’ reports.

O

Page 18ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Address Dauber issues Editor, Congratulations to Melissa, Camille and Heidi as they start a new term on the board. I supported Ken Dauber for one of the school board seats and think it is worth recognizing that even in losing, Ken’s entry to the race brought greater discussion about important aspects of education and governance in the district. With that came much community engagement around these issues and the candidates. Thank you, Ken. Ken has been committed and outspoken on various issues that have languished in the district for years. His more than 10,000 votes are impressive; in the offyear 2007 election, neither incumbent received as many votes. Ken entered the race late, but his message resonated well to many, especially students. Calling out deficiencies in certain areas of our high-achieving school system and advocating for improved analysis, policies and practices beyond the periphery is not for the faint of heart. Members of the community united with Ken around his assessments on tough issues like unhealthy stress levels, education equity and guidance counseling. Student organizations overwhelmingly supported him because he understood the issues that affect them most and was willing to go out on a limb to change them. I trust that administrators and the board will take on these issues fearlessly and work efficiently to ensure improvements where needed in these areas. Sara Woodham-Johnsson Bryant Street Palo Alto

Development priorities Editor, I envision the proposal for 27 University Ave. being accepted by the City Council after considerable debate. Project heights might be changed and footprints modified, but livability for local residents will be diminished. Moderation in accepting Arrillaga’s proposal is not the answer. Council should direct its attention to preserving the beauty and pleasures that come from living in Palo Alto. For example, the Page Mill/Oregon corridor needs a traffic solution. Why not go to the county and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and get a study and funding to improve traffic patterns in Palo Alto instead of shoe-horning more jobs into our community. Traffic is a virus that is destroying Palo

Alto. Will we wait until elevated expressways will be needed to accommodate future high-rise development? Bob Roth Middlefield Road Palo Alto

Goodbye, quiet Editor, The Palo Alto Planning Department has recently reinterpreted the Palo Alto noise code, to allow noise levels on residential streets and sidewalks that normally would only be allowed in public areas, such as parks. This was done to permit AT&T to install its noisy Distributed Antenna System (DAS) equipment on telephone poles in residentially zoned neighborhoods. The residential noise code limits noise to no more than 6 dB above ambient at the residential property line. Four months ago, in an email to me, the Planning Department agreed that this 6 dB noise standard also applied to noise gener-

ated on sidewalks and streets in a residential area. Now, because of pressure from AT&T, that decision has been reversed. The Planning Department now says someone can come to the sidewalk in front of a residential property, and they are limited only by the public area noise standard, which is 15 dB above ambient at 25 feet, even when that 25 feet is completely on the residential property. This new noise code interpretation would allow someone on the sidewalk in front of a residence to make as much noise as a noisy vacuum cleaner. They could do this 24 hours a day, seven days a week. I find this new interpretation of the Palo Alto noise code unbelievable and completely contrary to the intent of the noise code. If this new interpretation of the noise code is allowed to stand, we can all say goodbye to our quiet residential neighborhoods. Tony Kramer Ferne Avenue Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

?

What do you think of the parking situation downtown?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

Guest Opinion What you and your family can do to prepare for a major emergency by Divya Saini f you are reading this, my second column, you have already taken the first step towards becoming prepared. You have changed your mindset towards preparedness, and you have acknowledged the need to be ready for any type of disaster. Congratulations, you’ve gotten through the hardest part. Now, it’s time to invest in making the necessary preparations. There is a four-pronged approach that we recommend. Although these four steps are simple, they will take a bit of time. Think back. How much time did you put into getting ready for your last vacation? Be ready to invest at least that much time in getting fully prepared. If you do, you and your family will be on the right path.

I

Step 1: Becoming aware Superstorm Sandy has been a stark reminder of the power of Mother Nature and for us here in the Bay Area, our worry is the earthquakes that undoubtedly are going to strike. As they say, the next one could very well be the Big One. It is important to be aware of local systems, such as the AlertSCC program (AlertSCC. com) and Nixle (Nixle.com). By signing-up for these programs, you can get updates about flooding, wildfires, subsequent evacuations, public-safety incidents, neighborhood crimes, and post-disaster information about shelters,

transportation and supplies. Additionally, you should know that the local radio stations, KZSU-90.1 FM, and KCBS 740 AM/106.9 FM would broadcast vital information during an emergency. It’s important to have these stations readily available. Most people find it easiest to put these stations on their radio’s memory button. Finally, you should also be aware that during a disaster, there are resources for getting life-saving help from your local emergency-services volunteers (more on this in Step 4).

Step 2: Making a family plan Just imagine, it’s a hectic Saturday afternoon, and the entire family is scattered. Mom is running errands. Daughter is at home. Dad is out of town. Son is playing soccer with his team. The Big One suddenly strikes. The ground shakes violently, and trees are falling everywhere. Broken shards of glass cover the ground, and phone lines and electricity are down. Chaos erupts as Mom goes rushing to find Son at the soccer field, but Son dashes to the grocery store to find Mom. Daughter notices that her neighbor’s house is on fire, and she struggles to decide whether to get far away from her neighborhood or whether to stay home and wait for her family. The entire family is separate in this situation, and none of them knows how to contact the other. This brings up the second step in becoming prepared: making a family plan. A family emergency plan is a simple way to start the discussion with your family about where to meet, and whom to call in case of a disaster. Starting this discussion is absolutely vital to make sure everybody is on the same page, and everybody understands the plan

clearly in order to minimize any confusion and avoidable chaos during a disaster. The family plan is also a vital step in mental preparedness. By discussing, and accepting the fact that a disaster could strike, children, teens and adults become more resilient, and in the unfortunate case of a disaster, nobody panics, and everybody is able to make smart, logical decisions. This is what directly impacts the safety and well-being of the entire family. When everybody is calm, and nobody goes into a state of shock, the family and community can respond faster and more efficiently. With this is mind, there are many family plans online that you can fill out with your families, but the one that we recommend can be found at: www.californiavolunteers.org/ familyplan/pdf/familyplan.pdf.

Step 3: An emergency kit Suppose that Mom, Dad, Daughter and Son were finally able to reunite at home. Now they face a multitude of issues. Due to the lack of electricity, they can’t see anything in the pitch darkness of their house. They are hungry, thirsty and tired. Son got injured while tripping over some debris and needs some items from the first-aid kit. Daughter needs a sturdy pair of tennis shoes to insure that she doesn’t step, with bare feet, on any broken glass. Mom is frantically searching for some vital house documents. For all these reasons, and many others, it is essential for every family to build a kit. Typically, a kit should include enough survival essentials for the family to live for a minimum of one week with the assumption that help will not arrive immediately, and that there may be severe disruption in water, electricity, sewage and telephone services.

The kit should include food, water, first aid, batteries, flashlights, cash, important documents, sleeping bags, battery-powered radio, cell-phone chargers and pet food, among several other things. Typically items should be kept in airtight plastic bags and all the supplies can be placed in a couple easy-to-carry containers, such as unused trashcans, camping backpacks or duffel bags. Be sure to write the date of storage on all containers, and refresh perishable items every six months. Keep this kit in a designated place and make sure all family members know where it is kept. You can build your own kit by referring to the checklist we have available at: http:// paneighborhoods.org/ep. The link provides information on recommended items for incorporation into your kits. For those of you who find it easier to purchase a kit rather than to build your own, the website also contains information about where to buy ready-made kits online. Check out the “Buy Supplies” section of the PAN EPrep site for the long list of suppliers. Local stores such as Palo Alto Hardware and Costco also sell kits.

Step 4: Getting involved Mom, Dad, Daughter and Son realize that, since phone lines are down during the disaster, they have absolutely no way to contacting 911 or emergency services should they need to do so. In the case of a disaster, getting help during these situations could be the difference between life and death. We are lucky to live in a city where this fact is recognized, and where it is extremely easy for anybody and everybody to get involved. (continued on page 21)

Streetwise

What are your plans for Thanksgiving? Asked on Cambridge Avenue. Interviews and photographs by Haiy Le.

Tracy Dawkins

Stay-at-home mom Olmsted Road “I’ll be at home with my boys. My husband and girls are going to the Bahamas for a basketball tournament.”

Cathe Wright

Substitute teacher Louis Road “Going to Mexico City with my husband to see my family.”

Sheila Gholson

Healer Dartmouth Street “I’m looking forward to spending a traditional Thanksgiving with my favorite people.”

Sheralee Iglehart

Reading specialist Tolman Drive “Wonderful plans. All the family is going to be together.”

Tim Bell

Software engineer Oxford Avenue “The plans are still up in the air, but we’re probably going out. The family connections are busy elsewhere.”

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 19

Spectrum

Developer, environmental activist square off on 50-foot height limit PRO

Retain the 50-foot height limit to protect residents

by Douglas Moran alo Alto is a built-out city — it is increasingly difficult and expensive to expand public facilities such as schools and streets. Traffic congestion covers more and more of the day, and more and more of the city. Yet the City continues to approve projects despite having tried and failed to figure out how to handle the resulting over-burdening of these facilities. The Stanford hospital expansion alone is going to make this worse. And the Stanford campus and Stanford Research Park have approvals for substantial expansion. Zoning is about protecting property rights, one aspect being protecting your access to a fair share of public resources. Breaking the long-established 50-foot limit would allow favored developers to profit at everyone else’s expense. The increased traffic congestion makes you pay in small increments: in the extra time to get places and in the events you decide to skip. The advocates of taller buildings want Palo Alto to become even more of a regional job center. Their mantra of “near transit” ignores extensive local experience: Less than 10 percent of commuters living immediately next to a station will use Caltrain, and even with an aggressive tripreduction effort, 50-60 percent of employees will arrive by car. Studies have repeatedly found that for a region to have widely usable transit — reasonable trip times and schedules — it needs a population density much greater than ours. Will these office workers provide additional revenues for

P

the city? Unlikely. The city’s analysis is that new revenues are roughly offset by additional costs. As to the effect on retail businesses, it would only worsen the current trend of driving out the retail that residents need in favor of yet more coffee shops, restaurants and expensive boutiques. Palo Alto has struggled with its large jobs-housing imbalance, not only with where to build so much housing, but how to accommodate all the accompanying students and traffic. When you are in a deep hole, why choose to keep digging? Should we sacrifice to have Palo Alto become home to even more high-profile companies? It is already very expensive to do business here, and the consequent rising house prices would not only make that worse, but force more employees into longer commutes, which then increases congestion. Palo Alto’s cachet, once lost, could be difficult to regain. So why is there support within the city for something that benefits the few at the expense of the community? The “public benefits” attached to these projects are an indirect tax. The city has the developer redirect some of his profits to projects that you the voters aren’t likely to approve, and you pay with degradation in your quality of life. The benefits are often only for narrow special interests, not the broader community. Realize that this isn’t just about the project at 27 University with over 1,000 additional commuters. The desire is for taller buildings in the University and California Avenue downtowns, and along El Camino. Massive overdevelopment is routinely followed by a crash and slow painful recovery. The 50-foot limit is a crucial firewall to protect the community’s quality of life from the excessive growth being promoted by developers and city officials. N Douglas Moran has been active in development and traffic issues for two decades. He is a past co-chair of Palo Alto Neighborhoods (PAN), the umbrella group of neighborhood associations. By profession, he is a computer scientist.

CON

In today’s market, 62 feet is needed downtown

by Chop Keenan

T

he community is abuzz about the inviolate 50-foot height limit being breached in the AOL (Park Boulevard) and MacArthur Park (27 University Ave.) proposals. These two plans are unique situations and are entirely distinct from the downtown 50-foot height limit. Let’s start with the downtown 50foot height limit that was established in the 1970s in reaction to a “super block” 15-story building proposed where the Stanford Theater sits. In today’s work environment of LEED light and energy optimization and architectural excellence, a structural steel building with 12-15 foot ground-floor retail ceilings (think the new Apple store) and 10-foot office ceilings requires 60-62 feet of height. It’s still a fourstory building, but designed for a healthy light-filled environment. Interior environment healthiness has appropriately become paramount and natural light has proven to make a significant difference to employee morale, well-being and productivity. To transport sunlight into the workspace, taller windows and higher ceilings are critical. The best designs embrace this goal and some even incorporate floor-to-ceiling glass with reflectors to enhance the sunlight’s penetration to the interior spaces. The secret sauce of the Valley has been our unique ability to innovate and create. Our entrepreneurial spirit thrives when people have serendipitous encounters and

300

How the city’s tallest buildings stack up 250

200

150

Palo Alto City Hall 127 feet

Building height in feet

100

50

Page 20ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Channing House 142 feet

Spectrum

Guest opinion

Courtesy of City of Palo Alto

(continued from page 19)

Architect’s rendering shows the proposed development by John Arrillaga at 27 University Ave. buildings play an important role. Offering people a healthier and more productive work environment is best and is one great way downtown Palo Alto can continue to lead. All of this means offices ideally have ceilings that are at least 10 feet tall. Building codes have changed the construction of buildings. To incorporate greater seismic and safety prevention improvements along with the many great LEED best practices the interstitial spaces between ceilings and floors have increased. While there are many factors to consider it is commonly held that the appropriate space needed for a building’s HVAC, electrical, plumbing, fire sprinklers, data cabling, and so on is at least four feet. Palo Alto should adopt a new height standard of 62 feet in the downtown area. This would permit each building to have a traditional structure with interior spaces that are modern, high-quality, flexible and cost effec-

Hoover Tower 285 feet

Palo Alto Square 132 feet

tive. It eliminates the conflict of form at the expense of function. And finally, it translates a Class A desire into a Class A experience for residents, visitors and employees. Four-story buildings are architectural exclamation points, particularly on corner locations. The AOL and MacArthur Park proposals are unique in their proximity to Caltrain, remote due to lack of immediate surrounding residential neighborhoods, properly parked, and most importantly they offer extraordinary public benefits. Each attribute needs to stand on its own, with the public benefits being the game changer. A new police building and the TheatreWorks Performing Art Center are unattainable without a public/private partnership. Also, both proposals will add to the long term retail vitality of California Avenue and downtown Palo Alto respectively. People may get worried about height but this is misguided, as it is only a portion of a

successful building equation. We should enable our community to grow and evolve with the industry’s best practices. Our downtown will be a better place with first-class buildings that can be taller than three stories. The AOL and MacArthur Park projects are well thought-out tradeoffs for important public benefits in an era of ever-dwindling public capital. These projects are truly responsive to the Planned Community District mandate for public benefits. With great design the issue will not be the height, but rather a proposed building’s context and influence on the neighborhood and community. N Chop Keenan has been an active developer in the Bay Area and other parts of the state since 1968. His current Palo Alto project is a four-story, 26,000-square-foot office project at 135 Hamilton Ave. downtown.

Editor’s Note: On Dec. 3 the City Council is scheduled to discuss the huge project proposed by John Arrillaga at 27 University Ave. Among other things, the developer is asking the council to relax the city’s 50-foot height limit on downtown buildings to make way for the project. Here are two guest opinions on the limit, from developer Chop Keenan and environmentalist Doug Moran.

27 University Ave. 162 feet (proposed)

You’ve probably heard about the Neighborhood Watch Program. The basis of this program is that neighbors will be our first responders in case of any incident or disaster. In Palo Alto, this core message has led to the foundation of our Block Preparedness Coordinator Program, Neighborhoods Preparedness Coordinator Program, and CERT Program, which all fall under the title of the “Emergency Services Volunteers Program.” In a disaster, your neighbors will be the first people who will be able to help you and your family. Building strong communities, in which we know our neighbors and have set up the tools and processes to help each other, is perhaps the strongest investment we can make in preparing our families and ourselves. If each block in the city has a Block Preparedness Coordinator (BPC), theoretically, during the response phase after a disaster, each block will be able to safely and calmly communicate with authorities to get help. During a disaster, BPCs will prove key in creating this communication link, and blocks without BPCs will probably be impaired in the sense that they won’t be able to communicate with authorities to ask for medical help. The BPC program doesn’t require much time or intense training, but is a vital component of our city’s emergency-service program. You should get to know your BPC, and in case your block does not have one, please coordinate an effort with your neighbors to get one selected and trained. Additional information on the BPC program is available at: www. paneighborhoods.org. Information is also available on the website for people who are willing to invest slightly more time into the community’s safety, to participate in programs including the NPC (Neighborhood Preparedness Coordinator) and CERT program. A full calendar of the year’s trainings and classes can be found at: www.cityofpaloalto.org/ccc. Take the time to research your options, to prepare, to plan and stock up on emergency supplies and to get involved in the community’s programs. Also feel free to check out our Facebook page (facebook. com/PaloAltoEarthquakePrep) for simple weekly tips on how to get prepared. Consider following these four steps as an insurance policy that will give you peace of mind, but more importantly, that could potentially save your life, or the life of a loved one during a disaster. The disaster doesn’t always strike somewhere else, and although we cannot control when and where it will strike, we can control how prepared we are. Let’s build resilience in ourselves, our families, our neighborhoods and our community. Let’s be prepared. N Divya Saini is a junior at Gunn High School and a member of FEMA’s first federal National Youth Preparedness Council. Her first column appeared in the Weekly Oct. 19.

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 21

)PMJEBZT ❉

❉❉

of Gifts experience ❉

give ❉ more ❉

Page 22ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

H A P P Y H O L I D AY S

From left, Ramona Barrantes, Lesley Wiley, Shari L., and Michelle Baran laugh while preparing pan-roasted chicken with chasseur sauce during a cooking class at Sur La Table in Palo Alto.

From flying lessons to cooking classes — giving imaginative presents Story by Lisa Kellman Photos by Veronica Weber

B

uying gifts for friends on the Peninsula can be like buying gifts for the Little Mermaid. They already have “gadgets and gizmos aplenty” and “whosits and whatsits galore.” When everyone is already carrying the latest gadget and wearing the best the season has to offer, it can be a struggle to pick out gifts that won’t turn up in the back of a closet. One gift that takes up no physical space is knowledge. Gifts of experience are not only enjoyable but can be social and educational. As Peninsula cooking teacher Rashmi Rustagi said: “Knowledge empowers people and inspires them to do something different. It brings people together.” Cheese plates, scarves, iPods and video games (continued on page 22)

miki’s

Hours: Sunday 9am-7pm, Monday - Saturday 7am-8pm Prices Effective Nov. 14 - 30, 2012

E. Charleston

Oregon Expy

101

E. Meadow

Farm Fresh Market

Organics Galore With more than 50 years of experience in the food industry, you can count on us to bring you only the freshest, high-quality organic food on the market.

Alma Street

Friendly Shopping

El Camino Real

Come in and meet our friendly staff and discover great organic products from local farmers at amazing prices.

3445 Alma Street, Palo Alto • mikisfarmfreshmarket.com • 650.485.8600

BAKERY - DELI

Miki’s 9’’ Pumpkin Pie House Made

$2.39 lb.

Columbus Holiday Carving Ham

Mary Organic Turkey

$7.99 lb. Reg. Price $9.99,

$3.89 lb.

Save $2.00

Columbus Pan Roasted Turkey

GROCERIES

$7.99 lb.

Reg. Price $9.99, Save $2.00

6” Pumpkin Harvest Cake Reg. Price $23.99, Save $5.00

Please stop by our bakery for the holidays currently featuring: Cuccidati Di Isabella, St Honore, Sfogliatelle, Tiramisu, Grande Cannoli

Save $5.00

Vernay Rosé

Ronco Blanchis Pinot Grigio

$11.99 Save $3.00

Montfaucon $9.99 Save $5.00 Les Gardettes Rosé Tilia Mendoza Chardonnay $8.99 Save 4.00 $7.99 Save $3.00 Georges Duboeuf Poppy Beaujolais Pinot Noir Villages

$11.99 Save $3.00 $7.99

KING ARTHUR FLOUR ORGANIC 5#

$4.99 Reg. Price $6.99, Save $2.00

DE CECCO PASTA (ASSORTED)

$1.99

Reg. Price $2.69, Save 70¢

CRYSTAL GEYSER WATER

WINE

$9.99

COLEMAN MEAT BALLS Mary Free Range Turkey

Save $2.00

Vernay Brut

PRODUCE

$4.39

$5.99 Reg. Price $7.99,

$ 18.99

MEAT

Save 3.00

California Organic Spring Mix Lettuce California Organic Small Fuji Apples USA Green Beans California Butternut Squash California Russet Potatoes Washington Yukon Gold Large Potatoes California Italian Sweet Onions Argentina Blueberries Ecuador Bananas California Yellow Onions California Brussel Sprouts – loose California Brussel Sprouts - stalks California Medium Yams California Medium Sweet Potatoes Massachusetts Cranberries

$1.29 pkg

¢ 1.25 Liter 99 Reg. Price $1.79, Save 80¢

SONOMA SPARKLERS

$3.99

Reg. Price $5.99, Save $2.00

$1.99

Reg. Price $2.69, Save .70¢

POMI (STRAINED, CHOPPED) PIETRO CORICELLI EVOO 3 LT

$14.99 Reg. Price 19.99, Save $5.00

$1.99 lb 99¢ lb 99¢ lb 19¢ lb 19¢ lb 39¢ lb 59¢ lb $1.69 pkg 39¢ lb 4lb for $1.00 99¢ lb $1.99 ea. 4lb for $1.00 4lb for $1.00

Hafod

CHEESE

$24.99

Reg. Price $31.99, Save$7.00

$15.99

Reg. Price $19.99, Save $4.00

$34.99

Reg Price $39.99, Save $5.00

$9.99

Reg. Price $16.99, Save $7.00

Raclette Fume’ de Savoie Caciocavallo Podolico Colantuono Mojave Desert Raisins on the Vine

Shop Miki’s Farm Fresh Market For All Your Organic Grocery Needs ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 23

A community health education series from Stanford Hospital & Clinics

Advanced Lung Cancer Can Yield to Treatment Tony Ricciardi remembers precisely when he quit smoking. It was 1 a.m., on Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 2001. A late night trip to buy cigarettes left him feeling so disgusted by his need for nicotine that it became the last trip he ever made to support behavior he knew was bad for his health.

This doctor “did some kind of X-ray and then called me back to his conference room,” Ricciardi said. The man looked so serious that Ricciardi tried a joke. “Could I buy green bananas?” he asked. The answer was not what Ricciardi expected. That tiny, bug-bitelike growth near his collarbone was actually the tip of a cancerous tumor that had expanded out of his lungs up into his neck. If Ricciardi responded to treatment, he might have a year left. Ricciardi, stunned at this verdict, talked to another doctor acquaintance who

Wakelee ordered more detailed images to be taken of Ricciardi’s chest and then told him what she thought. “She just handled it like I had a runny nose,” Ricciardi said. He remembers her saying, “ ‘We cure people like you all the time.’ I was confused a little bit — this other person was saying, ‘Curtains’— but I liked her and I liked her manner and I just kind of surrendered myself to her. What did I have to lose?”

Options Still Open Each year, 225,000 Americans are diagnosed with lung cancer. Eighty-five to 90 percent of them has a history of smoking, although the number of lung cancer patients with no such history is growing. The disease is the leading cause of cancer deaths, in large part because the vast majority of patients are not diagnosed until the cancer has reached its later stages.

Norbert von der Groeben

“When Tony came to us, he had a large mass of cancer in his chest and in his lymph nodes,” Wakelee said. “Many believe that when it’s spread like that there’s no hope. We work hard to overcome that, to let people know that there is hope, even within the reality that this is a hard disease to treat. There are patients who get through it, who survive to tell about it.”

Medical oncologist Heather Wakelee, MD, who leads the Stanford Cancer Institute’s Thoracic Oncology group, and Billy W. Loo, Jr., MD, PhD, program leader of thoracic radiation oncology, compare images of Ricciardi’s chest, before and after his combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiation. Four years after he was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer, Ricciardi is free of that cancer.

Ricciardi’s cancer had spread to his lymph nodes, making surgery no longer an option. In such cases, “we look to other treatment modalities,” Wakelee said. “Radiation is critical,

Page 24ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Norbert von der Groeben

But he has no idea when his lung cancer began to grow inside him. It might have already been there, starting a journey Ricciardi didn’t notice until several years later, when he happened to notice a lump on his neck, just above his collar bone. “It felt like a bug bite,” he said, “and it didn’t hurt.” But he mentioned it to an acquaintance who was a retired physician. He recommended that Ricciardi have it examined by a doctor.

sent him to see Heather Wakelee, MD, at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. Her special focus is lung cancer, and she is the lead medical oncologist of the Stanford Cancer Institute’s Thoracic Oncology group.

Tony Ricciardi quit smoking in 2001, but apart from a small lump that he noticed just above his collarbone several years later, he had no symptoms of the lung cancer that had grown to an advanced stage. but we know from many studies that adding chemotherapy to the radiation is far more effective than doing either radiation alone or doing radiation after chemotherapy or vice versa.” The big advantage of the combination treatment is that chemotherapy is a radiation sensitizer, Wakelee said. “It improves the effectiveness of radiation, and unlike focused radiation, it reaches throughout the body. When someone comes in with cancer as developed as Tony’s, the likelihood is that cancer cells have escaped to other areas of the body. That’s why we do both therapies and why we do them together.”

“Many believe that when it’s spread like that there’s no hope. We work hard to overcome that, to let people know that there is hope, even within the reality that this is a hard disease to treat.”

prognosis of advanced lung cancer is poor, and in the minds of many people, even physicians, what often gets overlooked is that there are patients who are cured with aggressive therapy and we don’t want to take away hope.”

Taking Precise Aim The radiation Ricciardi received was delivered by technology that has advanced so rapidly that the physician in charge of Ricciardi’s care, Billy W. Loo Jr., MD, PhD, has learned a completely new set of skills from those he acquired during his radiation oncology residency training at Stanford. “The change of pace has been really impressive,” said Loo, Stanford’s program leader in thoracic radiation oncology

– Heather Wakelee, MD, lead medical oncologist of the Stanford Cancer Institute’s Thoracic Oncology group Both the chemotherapy and the radiation alter the DNA of cancer cells so they are less able to divide and grow. Patients can experience side effects from both types of treatment. “We chose to go through an aggressive course of treatment for him because he was relatively young—62 and otherwise healthy,” Wakelee said. “The

Every day for three months, Ricciardi came to Stanford Hospital & Clin improves outcome. Ricciardi formed strong bonds with his medical on

special feature

Screening for Lung Cancer t The screening criteria match those followed in a single large study known as the National Lung Screening Trial, published in 2011 in the New England Journal of Medicine, which found a 20 percent lower risk of death from lung cancer among more than 26,000 people screened with low-dose CT annually for three years, compared to those who were tested with chest radiographs instead.

t A panel of Stanford lung cancer experts will discuss the newest approaches to lung cancer treatment and lung cancer screening at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Francis C. Arrillaga Alumni Center, 326 Galvez St., on the Stanford campus. Seating is limited; pre-registration is encouraged. To register, call (650) 498-7826. t The leading cause of cancer death, lung cancer kills about 160,000 people in America each year, and 1.3 million worldwide. An estimated 225,000 Americans will be diagnosed with the disease this year. Eighty-five to 90 percent will have a history of smoking. Unfortunately, lung cancer is most often not diagnosed until its later stages, which increases the difficulty of successful treatment. t This spring, the American College of Chest Physicians and the American Society for Clinical Oncology endorsed new CT lung cancer screening guidelines. Screening is recommended for people age 50 and over with a 20-pack year history of smoking and one additional risk factor. Those risk factors include exposure to radon and several other carcinogenic chemicals, family history of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or previous personal history of cancer.

Symptoms of Lung Cancer Lung cancer usually does not cause symptoms when it first develops. A cough is the most common symptom of lung cancer. The following are the common symptoms for lung cancer; however each individual may experience them differently. t Bloody or rust colored sputum t Shortness of breath

t Recurring lung infections such as pneumonia or bronchitis

t Wheezing

t Hoarseness

t Chest pain

t Fever for unknown reason

For more information about lung cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment, visit stanfordhospital.org/lungcancermonth or phone (650) 498-6000. Join us at http://stanfordhospital.org/socialmedia. Watch the new Stanford Hospital Health Notes television show on Comcast: channel 28 on Mondays at 8:30 p.m., Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m. and Fridays at 8:30 a.m.; channel 30 Saturdays at 10:30 p.m. It can also be viewed at www.youtube.com/stanfordhospital.

“We can make three-dimensional moving pictures so we can adjust the radiation beams to turn on only at a certain portion of the breathing cycle, and we can track tumors as they move.” – Billy W. Loo Jr., MD, PhD, Stanford Cancer Institute program leader in thoracic radiation oncology Keeping the radiation contained just to cancerous areas means fewer side effects; in the past, many patients who hain the past, many patients who received radiation to the chest experienced such damage to the esophagus

“I did get a reprieve for however long that might be—and it’s given me so much.”

that they could not swallow without difficulty and needed temporary feeding tubes. “Since implementing focused radiation techniques for lung cancer at Stanford I’ve never had to place a feeding tube in a patient,” Loo said. “That’s a dramatic change from the past.”

– Tony Ricciardi, patient, Stanford Hospital & Clinics

The newer radiation machines can also deliver more radiation in a short period of time, which reduces the number of dosage sessions. But that intensity of dose makes it all the more important that the target is hit accurately. “In the lungs we’re aiming at moving targets,” Loo said. “That’s a technical challenge. We have to be able to see how the tumors are moving—and advances in imaging technology allow us to do that. We can make threedimensional moving pictures so we can adjust the radiation beams to turn on only at a certain portion of the breathing cycle, and we can track tumors as they move.”

A Solid Future Even in the short time since Ricciardi’s treatment was completed, new advances have become available. If he arrived at Stanford now, his cancer cells would be analyzed with greater molecular detail and typed for their response to chemotherapies designed to attack certain gene mutations or cellular growth factors. “We now know that almost every tumor is going to have one of these specific molecular changes,” Wakelee said, “and as we get smarter, and add more knowledge, we’re able to define that in more and more patients.” Ricciardi is still rather amazed at his survival, now four years since complet-

Norbert von der Groeben

nics for an aggressive treatment that combined chemotherapy with radiation, an approach that studies have shown ncologist, Heather Wakelee (center photo), Cancer Center clinic assistants Cornelius Smith (left) and Mary Arroyo (right).

In the past, Ricciardi might have received just radiation or just chemotherapy; by treating him with both at the same time, he became someone who represents “the best outcomes we’ve seen to date,” Loo said.

Norbert von der Groeben

and an expert in image-guided focused radiation therapy. “The main changes have been in the way we can focus the radiation from many different directions. We can focus so precisely that we minimize the spillover radiation to healthy surrounding organs.”

“I haven’t done any victory dances,” Ricciardi said, “but I did get a reprieve for however long that might be—and it’s given me so much.” ing radiation and chemotherapy. “The echo of that guy’s voice still rings in my ears,” he said. “I haven’t done any victory dances, but I did get a reprieve for however long that might be—and it’s given me so much.”

Stanford Hospital & Clinics is known worldwide for advanced treatment of complex disorders in areas such as cardiovascular care, cancer treatment, neurosciences, surgery, and organ transplants. It is currently ranked No. 17 on the U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Hospitals” list and No. 1 in the San Jose Metropolitan area. Stanford Hospital & Clinics is internationally recognized for translating medical breakthroughs into the care of patients. The Stanford University Medical Center is comprised of three world renowned institutions: Stanford Hospital & Clinics, the Stanford University School of Medicine, the oldest medical school in the Western United States, and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, an adjacent pediatric teaching hospital providing general acute and tertiary care. For more information, visit stanfordhospital.org.

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 25

❉❉

H A P P Y H O L I D AY S

Holiday

(continued from page 22)



will always be in stores. Experiences that expand one’s skills and strengthen connections don’t come around every day. A gift can teach participants how to cook, do yoga, paint, ride a horse and even fly a plane. Locally, for those interested in expanding their creativity and improving brushstrokes, the Palo Alto Art Center, Create It, Gryphon Stringed Instruments, the Pacific Art League and other organizations provide art classes for all ages. “It is a great gift to enable somebody to express themselves,” said Robin Scholl of the Pacific Art League. Students can dabble in music, ceramics, watercolor, acrylic painting, glass fusing, drawing, jewelry making and photography. Many of these classes also provide studio space and art supplies, so students

H A PPY

H O L I DAYS

Amazing Gifts, Amazing Framing, Amazing Holiday Sale!

don’t need to use additional space in their homes. Instead of receiving a home-decor item as a gift, friends can furnish their home with their own artwork and awaken a new passion. Cooking classes are another cre-

ative outlet and can be a clever way to tell a friend “I care about what you feed me.” In a single class, students of all abilities can learn how to saute, grill, chop and bake, and thereby improve their own cooking repertoire. Kara Rosenburg, principal of the Palo Alto Adult School, recommends cooking classes as gifts. “Since they are one evening, they don’t commit the receivers to too much time, and they get dinner to boot,” she said. Cooking-class participants can learn to make Indian delicacies at iheartcurry.com and on Rashmi Rustagi’s blog; a Moroccan feast at CasablancaMarket.com; or a cornucopia of cuisines at Draeger’s markets, Sur La Table, Whole Foods, Williams-Sonoma, and the Palo Alto Adult School. Instead of learning how to stuff their stomachs, friends may appreciate the opportunity to work their abs. Yoga and pilates studios can be found all around Palo Alto, Mountain View, and Menlo Park. These presents can help people improve flexibility, relaxation and health. Lisa Haley of Be Yoga in Palo Alto said that a gift of yoga can help people “explore personal growth, relieve stress and empower themselves.” Talei Morgan, a yoga instructor at Palo Alto’s Loloma Living, added, “It is the gift of presence rather than presents.”

If it’s creative...its here! art supplies...kids stuff...framing...unique gifts... cards & calendars...and more!

Downtown Palo Alto 267 Hamilton Ave. 650-328-3500 Also in San Jose and Sacramento

UniversityArt.com

Page 26ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Top: Guitar teacher Carol McComb helps Jan Maarse tune his guitar before leading the beginning-intermediate lesson at Gryphon Stringed Instruments in Palo Alto. Above left: Pilot Steve Blonstein, general manager of the West Valley Flying Club, takes a passenger up in the air over the Peninsula.

❉❉

Along with yoga, gifts of groupexercise and martial-arts classes, or of personal trainers, can help fulfill someone’s New Year’s resolution. These exercise classes give participants a taste of the various ways to get in shape. Personal trainers fulfill specific exercise and body goals, while classes come in many flavors, including kickboxing, zumba, step, karate, taekwondo and judo. Those seeking more adventure outdoors need not go far. The California Riding Academy in Menlo Park teaches English, hunter/jumper and dressage horseback-riding lessons to people who have never touched a horse, those who have not ridden in a while, and experienced riders. In addition, many local flying clubs offer flying lessons and simulation sessions out of the Palo Alto Airport. “It gives them their first opportunity to go flying and see if they want to continue or not,” said Carl Honaker, the director of county airports. Finally, for the friend too tired of working his or her brain, massages, manicures/pedicures, facials, spa days and a night at a hotel or bed and breakfast can help them forget the stresses of the world. Just as The Little Mermaid gets to be “part of that world,” with a little creativity, a gift can send loved ones

H A P P Y H O L I D AY S

into the world of a master chef, a professional horseback rider, a pampered socialite or even a pilot. As Rustagi put it: “Physical gifts are short-lived. A class is a gift

that keeps on giving; it never gets used up.” V Editorial intern Lisa Kellman can be emailed at Lkellman@ embarcaderopublishing.com.

THANKSGIVING AT THE POOLSIDE GRILL RESTAURANT Thursday November 22, 2012 $36.00 for Adults, $19.00 for Seniors (65 and over) and Children (12 and under) 2:00 p.m to 9:00 p.m

4M\\e 4[XUPMe_ from Indochine Thai Restaurant welcomes you to a world of fine Thai & Vietnamese Iourndochine Cuisines served and enjoyed in the elegant surroundings of restaurant. e also provide catering W services for special occasions, banquets or

corporate meetings. Our chefs use the finest ingredients, combined with exotic spices and a passionate belief in food. Whether it is an intimate dinner party, a corporate meeting, or an elaborate wedding, Indochine is dedicated to making every aspect of your function a wonderful experience for you and your guests. Lunch menu: 11:00am-2:30pm Mon-Sat Dinner menu: 5:00pm-9:00pm Sun-Thurs 5:00pm-9:30pm Fri-Sat

2710 Middlefield Rd, Palo Alto, CA, 94306 /i\Ê­Èxä®ÊnxÎÊ£ÓÎnÊUÊÜÜÜ°ˆ˜`œV…ˆ˜i̅>ˆ°Vœ“

S TA R T E R S (Choice of) Butternut Squash Soup, Roasted Pumpkin Seeds with Cinnamon Cream OR Baby Iceberg Lettuce Served with Gorgonzola Cheese Dressing and Roasted Maple Walnuts ENTREES (Choice of) Traditional Roasted Turkey Dinner Served with Gravy, Sage Stuffing, Yams, Mashed Potatoes and Cranberry Sauce OR Angus Prime Rib au Jus Served with Baked Potato and Seasonal Vegetables and Creamy Horseradish OR Salmon Wellington Served with Roasted Winter Squash, Mushroom Risotto and Cranberry Beurre Blanc

Pumpkin Cheesecake with Cranberry Coulis

or

DE S S E R T S (Choice of) Traditional Pumpkin Pie with Crème Fraiche

or

Pecan Tart with Rum Sauce

Call Today for Reservations 625 El Camino Real · Palo Alto, CA 94301

(650) 328-2800

Complimentary Valet Parking is Available The restaurant is also open for breakfast and lunch 6:00 am – 2:00 p.m. Limited space is available for your office Holiday party ... For more info, call our Catering Department

DOWNTOWN LOS ALTOS SHOP – DINE – STROLL With over 150 locally-owned boutiques, restaurants, and shops decorated for the season, Downtown Los Altos is where you want to be! Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides Convenient Free Parking Sparkling Tree-Lined Streets

Reserve Your Holiday Carriage Ride Today! Call 650.949.5282

The Los Altos Village Association downtownlosaltos.org ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 27

Cranberry Scoop

â?&#x2030;â?&#x2030;

â?&#x2030;

H A P P Y H O L I D AY S

Shopping with a heart

â?&#x2030;

Boutiques and fairs benefit local nonprofits Personal Accessories, Stationery, Seasonal and so much moreâ&#x20AC;Ś 3TATE3TREETs$OWNTOWN,OS!LTOS WWWTHECRANBERRYSCOOPCOM (650) 948-2554

GET

CR E A I V E T

T

hrough boutiques, bazaars, fairs and festivals, local nonprofits will be offering unusual and handmade crafts as gifts for the holiday season. Expect to find everything from fresh flower arrangements to a magic show or pet adoption at the wide variety of events. St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holiday Bazaar: Vendors will sell goods and all the proceeds will be donated to nonprofits on Nov. 17, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at 178 Clinton St., Redwood City. 2012 Holiday Bazaar: Attendees can find homemade crafts, an ornament contest, a do-it-yourself craft table and a raffle Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the City of Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Fair Trade Holiday Gift Fair: Open Door Church of Mountain View will be teaming up with Trade as One to sell a variety of fair-trade items on Nov. 17 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Nov. 18 from noon-3p.m., Open Door Church, 1667 Miramonte Ave., Mountain View. Woodside High School Har-

All varieties of

Dog Food 29 & 33lb bags

$25.99

jewelry, tableware, textiles, glass Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve reopened and are better than ever!

t hS As

ve aA aci c A ino am El C al Re

Page 28Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Lisa Kellman

Your one-stop pet shop!

PALO ALTO ART CENTER

The Gallery Shop Palo Alto Art Center 1313 Newell Road www.paacf.org

Holiday Craft Fair at First Presbyterian Church of Palo Alto: This annual fair, co-sponsored by the Peninsula Peace and Justice Center, will sell gifts from all over the world. The Mikaboo Bird rescue will also be there for pet adoption. The fair Is Dec. 11, 11 a.m.-2:40 p.m., at the First Presbyterian Church of Palo Alto, 1140 Cowper St., Palo Alto. Chanukah Festival: This festival features games, food (latkes and more), a magician, jumpy house and vendors selling Chanukah candles, gift items, jewelry, olive oil and more. Proceeds benefit the Beth Jacob Preschool. The festival is Dec. 11, from 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at 1550 Alameda de las Pulgas, Redwood City. V

Family owned and operated since 1986

THE GALLERY SHOP Unusual gifts of distinction from renowned West Coast Artists

vest Festival and Craft Faire: Holiday gift ideas, jewelry, clothing, crafts and more will be sold. Admission is $1. The faire is Nov. 19, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside. Garden Club of Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holiday Affaire: This winter marketplace will have fresh flower arrangements, wreaths, jams, marmalades and birch products. All goods are made by Garden Club members. It will occur Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., at the First Presbyterian Church, 1140 Cowper St., Palo Alto. Holiday Bazaar at Deborahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm: Hand-crafted gifts and unique goods, Including toffee, jewelry, knitted goods, wreaths and more will all be sold on Dec. 1 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at 555 Lytton Ave., Palo Alto. Christmas Market at Allied Arts: Carolers, Santa and his elf plus handcrafted pieces from local artists and the Palo Alto Auxiliary will be available on Dec. 1, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at 75 Arbor Road (at Cambridge Avenue), Menlo Park.

Fryâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s

ve eA ag t r Po 425 Portage Ave Palo Alto

Care Fresh Litter, 60 Ltr $11.99 Cat Treats 30% OFF Kaytee & Four Paws Products 20% OFF Pet Toys 20% OFF Wee Wee Pads 20% OFF Metal Crates & X-Pens 20% OFF Offers valid through November 22, 2012

425 Portage Avenue, Palo Alto 650-852-1277 www.PetFoodDepot.com Mon - Fri 9:30am -7pm, Sat 9am - 6pm, Sun 10am - 6pm

by Jocelyn Dong | photographs by Veronica weber

Cover Story

O

n any weekday morning, upwards of 17,000 commuters — some in buses, others on bicycles, but the majority in cars — stream onto north Shoreline Boulevard and North Rengstorff Avenue in Mountain View. By their sheer numbers, they could almost fill Shoreline Amphitheatre. Instead, they’re on their way to Google, LinkedIn, Microsoft and other companies whose office complexes populate the area between U.S. Highway 101 and the San Francisco Bay. At peak hours, the line of cars on Shoreline is so long, it backs up on the off ramp from 101 north. The traffic is only projected to get worse. The Mountain View City Council in July approved a plan that allows companies in what it calls the North Bayshore Area to expand to 10.7 million square feet of buildings by 2030, or almost one-and-a-half times the current square footage. Conservatively, that growth (continued on page 32)

Clockwise, from top: Michael Gratz, executive director of Stanford Hospitality & Auxiliaries, started by riding Caltrain from San Francisco twice a week, but now rides the train daily; Valeries Ojha walks past the cactus garden at Stanford University on her way to work at the Stanford School of Medicine; one of Stanford’s Marguerite shuttles drives along Serra Mall.

In

SEARCH

of the

car-less

COMMUTE

Cities, companies look to convince employees to try new ways of getting to work ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 29

Cover Story

Bicyclists head down Palm Drive during the morning commute in mid-November.

Getting to ‘yes’ Stanford employees navigate ins and outs of alternative commutes, with programs easing the way by Jocelyn Dong here’s a phrase that Brodie Hamilton uses to describe people’s reluctance to switch from commuting by car to taking an alternate form of transportation: “Yes, but ...” “Yes, I’d use alternative transportation, but it costs too much.” “Well, I’d use alternative transportation, but sometimes I need to get home if there’s an emergency and I don’t have a car.” “I’d use alternative transporta-

T

tion, but sometimes ... I have to use a car for work or errands, or I’ve got appointments.” Over the past decade, Stanford University’s Parking and Transportation Services staff has heard it all. But they’ve used that knowledge to skillfully sway more than 2,000 commuters to give up their cars as a way to get to work. That total — which represents 26 percent of Stanford employees — and the overall program

Technology and the 10 percent Stanford University researchers mount program to catch people’s ‘good behavior’

W

hen it comes to making traffic less congested, Stanford University Professor Balaji Prabhakar is betting on commuters’ good behavior and the power of a raffle. The Capri program tracks when cars arrive on and leave campus, rewarding commuters with the chance to win money when they avoid rush hours. Modeled after a successful program in India, Prabhakar and research associates launched the Stanford version in April. More than 2,000 people have al-

ready signed up for Capri, which stands for Congestion and Parking Relief Incentives. Depending on how frequently they side-step peak commute hours, commuters earn chances to win random cash amounts ranging from $2 to $50. Unlike other Stanford programs that try to get people to leave their cars at home, Capri is designed for employees and students who drive, targeting those who have “A” or “C” parking permits. Some 12,000 people could participate, according to the university. What might surprise people is

Page 30ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

have earned Stanford recognition and awards, including the “Best Workplace for Commuters” from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2002 to 2012, including the singular top honor in January. Valerie Ojha is one employee who’s helped get the university there. For 10 years, Ojha drove to her job at the Stanford School of Medicine. The 11-mile commute up U.S. Highway 101 from Sunny-

the fact that a relatively small number of rush-hour commuters — 10 percent — can dramatically affect traffic, said Prabhakar, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science. “The extra 10 percent drives it from small congestion to high congestion,” Prabhakar said. Thus, the amount of people in the program doesn’t have to be high to make a difference. To track cars, each Capri participant is given a radio-frequency identification tag (RFID) for his or her windshield. Much like with California’s FasTrak system, gates around campus are equipped with scanners to detect the tags when cars pass by. It’s an idea that couldn’t have been implemented without recent advances in technology, Prabhakar said.

vale took about 45 minutes. She had occasionally given thought to taking the train instead of her car, but like most everyone, she was in the habit of driving and saw no need to change. Then a car accident left her family with just one car, and suddenly, commuting by train made a bit more sense, she said. “I’ve always had it in the back of my mind because Stanford gave such a great incentive,” she said, referring to the free train passes the university provides its employees. “I said, ‘OK, that’s it. I’m just going to do it. And that was April 1 of last year, and I’ve never looked back.” Now, Ojha’s commute still takes about 45 minutes, but it includes dropping off her kids at their school and chatting briefly with other parents, taking a 10-minute ride on Caltrain and briskly walking one mile from the University Avenue station to the medical center. When returning to the train station after work, she takes the Marguerite shuttle. Her husband picks her up at the Sunnyvale train station. Finally getting on board with the train commute was a turning point for Ojha, and she is quick to extol the virtues of her new commute habit. Before the shift, exercise was foreign to her lifestyle, as she is busy with two young children. Now she looks forward to her daily stroll from the train station. “It wakes me up in the morning. It also gives me a sense of serenity walking out here,” she said on one of her jaunts, dressed in a blue-and-white striped shirt and hoisting a purple backpack. “You see the sunlight hitting the dew on the grass. You see the fresh morning green grass in the spring. You hear the bird singing and the day waking up.” The train ride, though not long, has also brought unexpected benefits, she said. “I’ve been reading a lot more than I ever have since I’ve had children,” she said, referencing political books, historical romances and other literature. Then, too, she’s gotten to know other people by riding the train. “What’s fun about commuting,

“We have the technology for doing these things. It wasn’t this easy 10 years ago,” he said. So far, it appears the program is working. By examining the flow of traffic, researchers have seen an increase in the number of people arriving on campus just before 8 a.m., the hour the peak commute officially begins, and leaving right after 6 p.m., after the evening commute hour ends. “There’s a fairly clear behavior shift,” Prabhakar said. His team is already devising ways to expand the program, creating a mobile-phone app that could substitute for the radio ID tag, and including bicyclists and walkers in the effort. The program may stir fears of Big Brother watching over people’s shoulders, but participation, even after signing on to the program, re-

too, is you do see the same people over and over again, so you get to know them,” she said. “When you’re driving, everybody’s distant. You’re boxed in your own, separate compartment. People are just eager to get to work, and they don’t care who’s in the other car.” Given her own long-standing driving habit, Ojha understands that hesitation many feel about switching up their commutes. “It’s hard for people to do something they’re not familiar with,” she said. When contemplating taking the train, she worried about making the connection between the train and the Marguerite shuttle to get to work — a common worry known by transportation planners as the “last mile” connection. However, she quickly learned that Marguerites run continuously to the campus. The potential unreliability of the train also gave her pause. In the first six weeks, she was delayed twice. “That was a bit of a challenge,” she admitted, noting that she had to take a bus home once. But since then, she said, the service has been consistent. Her flexible work schedule, admittedly, has allowed her to avoid consequences of arriving late to work. “It would be more challenging for those without flexible schedules,” she acknowledged. “If they had a delay in the morning, it might be risky.” Ojha also points out that, once on campus, she doesn’t necessarily feel stranded. Stanford has programs in place to provide rides — whether by taxi or rental car — in emergencies. One of the biggest pluses of Ojha’s new commute has been the effect it’s had on her family. Taking the train has given Ojha “transition” time on her way home that she never had before, she said. When her family picks her up from the Sunnyvale train station, they have 10 minutes together before getting home and starting the evening routine. “It was an opportunity for us to exchange events of the day. It was sort of a more relaxed transition into the evening,” she said. “Before, from the moment I walked in the door, it’s a high-pressure need

mains optional, Prabhakar said. A commuter can remove the tag or turn off the app on any day he or she doesn’t want to be tracked. “The nice thing about incentives is you can do the good behavior but it ... puts the decision to share that behavior or make the behavior known on the commuter,” he said. When a “penalty” approach is taken to change behavior, such as catching solo drivers in the carpool lane, people simply try to hide their bad behavior. Capri’s system of rewards works on another principle, he said: “You let me know when you’re doing the good behavior.” The project is funded by Stanford and a grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, according to the university. N — Jocelyn Dong

Cover Story

How Stanford employees get to work Percentage who used each form as their main transportation method

Year

2002

2005

2008

2011

Drive alone Caltrain Bicycle Carpool Shuttle/Bus Walk Other Vanpool

72.0 4.0 7.0 10.0 4.0 2.0 -1.0

57.8 14.3 9.9 9.7 4.2 2.2 1.3 0.5

50.3 19.9 11.2 9.3 5.1 2.7 1.1 0.4

45.5 20.9 12.7 9.8 7.3 2.7 0.7 0.2

Commuters can pick up the free Marguerite shuttle at the top of the Oval at Stanford University.

What Stanford offers

- Free passes for bus, train for employees - Marguerite shuttle around campus, Palo Alto area - Commute Club for alternative commuters -Rides home in an emergency -Car-sharing program -Carpooling service -Bicycle program - Car rentals by hour or half-day

to get things done and to get the evening progressing. “When you’re driving on a highway, and you get home, your transition is closing the car door and walking up to the front entrance. ... That was a big difference, and I notice a reduction in my stress level.”

A

few people who cling to their car habit say that Stanford promotes a culture of guilt

-East Bay Express bus -Public-transit information -Commute planning - Pre-tax purchase of transit passes, commuter checks -Charter services -Shifting work schedules -Extensive website - Increased parking permit fees - Freshmen can’t have cars on campus

about using a car. Hamilton, director of the university’s parking and transportation services, acknowledged the situation but denies that’s the intent. “I have had some people say, ‘I see the banner when I come in to the campus ... I see your emails. I see the poster in the office and everything. I tell you, I feel a little guilty for not using alternative transportation.’ “We’re not trying to guilt people

into it. We’ve got a series of incentives, and we’ve got the one stick in the form of the cost of the parking permit,” Hamilton said. The program never forces people to make an immediate, all-ornothing decision, he said, mainly because experience has shown that people want a safety net — for a time — as they try something new. “One thing we found out in the early years ... was we’ve always al-

lowed people to keep their parking permit,” Hamilton said. Even as the university provided free passes for the train and Valley Transportation Authority buses, the university didn’t demand that the commuters give up their parking permits in exchange. “We got a lot of people hooked in because they’d try it once a week, and then maybe go to twice a week. But they could still drive if they wanted to,” he said. Michael Gratz was one such part-time alternative-transportation commuter, and if there were anyone who could be excused for driving himself to work everyday, it might be Gratz. The executive director of the university’s Hospitality & Auxiliaries, he maintains an all-hours-of-the-day-and-night schedule. When the university hosts special evening events, Gratz is on campus till 10 p.m. Morning meetings occasionally require him to be in before 7 a.m. And, he lives in San Francisco. But last March, Gratz took the plunge, agreeing to commute to work by train at least twice a week. The idea of giving up his car commute wasn’t a sure thing, though. “It was a huge mind-shift for me,” he said. “You always think about, ‘Well, what can go wrong?’” But having grown up in Europe, where use of mass transit is much more common, and because he believes taking the train is a more environmentally responsible way to travel, he decided to give it a try. The first hurdle he ran into didn’t have anything to do with taking a train versus a car. It was getting to the train station from his home, a problem that transportation planners call “the first mile.” It can be a major deterrent for people converting to alternative transportation. “I do not have a good connection between where I live and where I take the train,” said Gratz, a Noe Valley resident. “To take the bus is not convenient — not only would I have to change two buses, but it would add another hour on to my commute.” Instead, he drives 15 minutes to the station. Parking can be a bit of a bear, with no availability close by the station. Sometimes he ends up three long blocks from the depot and has to run to make the train. Like Ojha, he was initially concerned about entrusting his commute to Caltrain. “The ‘but’ was: What if I can’t get to work? What if I miss the train?” he said. “If I have to be at a meeting, what if I get stuck on the train?” He was able to test that fear soon enough when the train did get delayed, with no estimate on how long it would take to start up again. Thinking about his network of coworkers, he called one person and explained his predicament. She came and picked him up. Gratz now gets up at 5:30 a.m. to make the 7 a.m. train — a bit challenging, he admitted. Likewise, he must leave campus on time in order to catch the late afternoon trains back to San Francisco. But paradoxically, adding structure to his life is exactly what has

created the benefits he now cherishes. “I love the idea of being early in the office,” he said. During the 30-minute train ride, he can start work or attend to personal business. “I consider that to be quality time.” And while some people may find it hard to pull themselves away from work, he no longer finds himself tempted to stay late every night, so he now has a better work/life balance. The ride home has also become a way for him to decompress. “That may be a tough sell, the idea that the train is relaxing,” he said. But “it gives me a chance to really reflect on the day, and by the time I do get home, I feel I have an extra two hours that normally if I do commute by car, I don’t have.” If he had kept driving — and starting and ending the workday slightly later — he wouldn’t get home until 7:30 or 8:30 p.m., when stores are closed, and he’s too tired to run errands. Adhering to the train schedule has freed up his evenings in a way he’d never expected. “So tonight, for instance, I’m going to take the 5:06 p.m., and I get home to the city by 6 p.m. Could I make an appointment after 6 p.m. if I wanted to? Yes, I can, because most businesses open till 7 o’clock. And can I still do some grocery shopping? Yes, I can,” he said. During the summer, he was able to walk his dogs while it was still light and chat with neighbors, something he never used to do. “It puts your whole day at a different level. It helps you do other things you normally wouldn’t be able to do,” he said. Given his sometimes-odd hours, he has learned to adjust his commuting to his work demands. On driving days, he’s scheduled more meetings. On train days, he’s communicated more by email. Driving was more a matter of sticking to his comfort zone than overall efficiency. “I think it’s less efficient taking your car,” he said, citing the impossibility of texting, reading or emailing while driving. While not downplaying the challenges of commuting by train, he’s found ways to turn the lemons into lemonade. For instance, he views his occasional morning dash to catch the train a form of exercise. For those considering trying a new commute, he offered some advice. “I do recommend you at least try it out and then form an opinion about how it really works and what are the pieces that you know make it better and some of the pieces you need to get adapted to. Take it for a test run and get comfortable with it, and then try to overcome the obstacles you kind of think exist or may not be real,” he said. Focusing on the positive instead of worrying about the negative has led Gratz to embrace his new commute routine. The biggest benefit to him has been peace of mind — so much so that in late October, he turned in his parking permit and is now commuting by train fulltime. N

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 31

Cover Story

NOTICE OF VACANCIES ON THE THREE PALO ALTO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council is seeking applications for volunteers on the following Boards and Commissions: • • •

Planning and Transportation Commission Public Art Commission Parks and Recreation Commission

All Commission Members serve without pay and are appointed by the City Council. Experience, duties, time commitments, and residency requirements vary per Commission. For detailed information, please visit the City of Palo Alto Website at www. cityofpaloalto.org/clerk, or call the City Clerk’s Office at 650-329-2571. Applications are due by 5:30 pm on December 20, 2012. DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk The Marguerite shuttle stops along Serra Street at Stanford University.

Commute

(continued from page 29)

City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during a minimum 20-day inspection period beginning November 16, 2012 during the hours of 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. This item is tentatively scheduled to be considered at a public hearing by the Architectural Review Board, Thursday, December 6, 2012 at 8:30 am in the Palo Alto City Council Chambers on the first floor of the Civic Center, located at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Negative Declaration should be provided to Russ Reich, Department of Planning and Community Environment, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, or via email at russ.reich@cityofpaloalto.org, by 5:00 PM on December 6, 2012. 260 California Avenue [12PLN-00352]: Request by Hayes Group Architects on behalf of Tarob M&C Investors, LLC for Architectural Review of the demolition of a one-story building and construction of a new three story building having approximately 27,000 square feet of floor area. Zone District: Community Commercial with Retail and Pedestrian combining districts (CC(2)(R)(P)). *** Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

Sign up today at www.PaloAltoOnline.com Page 32ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

could bring the number of employees trundling their way to work each day to 28,000. The roads weren’t designed for that much traffic. About 25 percent more cars could squeeze onto the streets, officials say, but after that it would be perpetual gridlock. Mountain View’s not the only city where traffic jams are a part of daily life. The Page Mill Road exit from Interstate Highway 280 south is a logjam on most weekday mornings. Ditto the Willow Road exit from 101 south in Menlo Park. And it’s not just highway intersections that transportation planners are scratching their heads over. Officials in Palo Alto are puzzling over traffic and parking downtown. Residents in neighborhoods near University Avenue have been clamoring for relief from downtown workers who park their cars all day along neighborhood streets, leaving residents to park blocks from their homes. And when a 21,700-square-foot office building on the edge of downtown Palo Alto was approved by the City Council in May, it came with one fairly novel requirement: Its owners must manage how people working in the building commute to and from work. The city is banking on having at least 20 percent fewer cars parking there than would normally be allotted. And those workers ought to arrive by bike, carpool, bus or train — not park their cars on adjacent streets, residents have already said. The Lytton Gateway project, as it’s called, as well as other upcoming developments downtown, have triggered a study of parking and commute options that planners are hoping to get off the ground this fall. In the Bay Area and nationwide, transportation experts have long examined roads, parking and public transportation, aiming to make them as efficient as possible. They’ve considered a raft of ques-

tions: Are there enough lanes? Are traffic signals timed to allow for a smooth flow of cars? Is parking sufficient for the demand? Are routes laid out so buses pick up the most people and deliver them as quickly as they can? Increasingly, however, officials are turning to additional transportation tools to ease congestion, techniques that go squarely to one central goal: convincing people to leave their cars at home. As with other efforts to get people to change their habits, transportation-demand management programs, as they are known, offer people both carrots and sticks — rewards and penalties — to motivate them to adopt new ways. The toolbox includes passes for free public transit, shuttle buses, van- or carpools, car- and bikesharing and even cash and raffles for those who convert to alternate modes of transportation. Many of the larger companies in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Mountain View have started to tackle these issues. Ubiquitous Bauer’s Intelligent Transportation shuttles and white double-decker Google buses pick up high-tech workers as far away as Marin and the East Bay and deliver them to work. Free bicycles, painted in primary colors, allow Google employees to get quickly from building to building without hopping in a car. Palo Alto’s Hewlett-Packard Co. lets its employees buy transit passes with pre-tax income and partners with rideshare.org to encourage workers to carpool. Facebook, now located in Menlo Park, provides workers with free passes to ride Caltrain and runs shuttles from the nearest stations to its campus along Bayfront Expressway. The efforts have shown decided results. More than 40 percent of Facebook’s workforce take the train or bus, hop on Facebook-run shuttles, join van- and carpools, bike or walk, according to the company. In Mountain View’s North Bayshore Area, 25 percent of employees at the four largest companies take

transit or employer-run shuttles, while 6.4 percent use a car- or vanpool, and another 5.6 percent bicycle, according to a consultant’s study released in October. Some 61 percent drive to work by themselves. “Compared to the typical Bay Area business park where 80 percent or more of the employees drive alone, the current modal share for the North Bayshore Area shows the effectiveness of the programs the existing employers use to encourage use of alternative travel modes,” the report states. Palo Alto, meanwhile, is contemplating how to work with its downtown businesses and their merchants group, Palo Alto Downtown Business and Professional Association, to make stores and offices aware of the many ways their employees could get to work. By banding together, they might even be able to make a car-sharing program or discounted transit passes available. It’s all about economies of scale, according to Jaime Rodriguez, the city’s chief transportation official. “If I’m a seven-person business, how can I take advantage ... and create a transit-pass program?” he asked hypothetically. The city already has in place a commute-alternatives program for its own staff, but encouraging — or outright requiring — businesses to do likewise is an area under exploration, Planning Director Curtis Williams said recently. The challenges the city faces in getting people to leave their cars at home are unlike those of private companies. In terms of the city’s own employees, union contracts prohibit the city from taking away benefits, such as parking, that otherwise could be used as a means to get people onto trains, buses and bikes. And some developers might balk at requiring tenants to run a transportation program, fearing it would scare off potential tenants because of the costs. While companies such as hightech security firm Palantir “are progressive on their own,” Williams said, “other businesses think,

Cover Story

Traffic starts to line up between 5 and 6 p.m. on Campus Drive West at Palm Drive on the Stanford campus. ‘Well, that’s going to cost me money to provide transit passes for all my employees.’” But offering commute options could be a perk for employees and help the business to attract workers, he said. The city’s role could be to make companies aware of what they could offer, and at what cost, if they join with other businesses. Unlike Mountain View, which surveyed the North Bayshore Area companies, Palo Alto doesn’t yet have firm data on the driving habits of commuters, let alone its residents on the whole. To better assess these habits and devise a transportationmanagement strategy, the city is looking to start an annual transportation study, Rodriguez said. It could document both how people are getting to and from where they want to go and also, over time, how people shift from traveling by one mode of transportation to another.

W

hile city planners look for ways to keep their roads and parking lots from clogging, they already have one local organization to look to when it comes to getting people out of their cars: Stanford University. Partly by choice and partly because of limits imposed on it by Santa Clara County, Stanford’s become a national leader in transportation-demand management. The university has managed to keep the number of cars coming onto and leaving campus steady for the past 10 years, even while the campus population has grown from some 10,300 employees (not including those at the hospitals) in 200102 to about 12,700 during the last academic year. Add to that thousands of undergraduate and graduate students. As part of a 2000 agreement with the county, which governs the conditions under which Stanford can con-

struct new buildings and add more employees, the university agreed not to allow the amount of traffic to increase. Twice-yearly measurements show the university’s succeeded: In 2002, 3,474 cars arrived during a peak morning commute hour of 8 to 9 a.m.; in 2011, the count was 3,081. The number of cars leaving campus one day between 5 and 6 p.m., the evening commute, was 3,591 in 2002 and 3,540 last year. The success has been consistent but not necessarily easy. One year,

decade ago. Stanford’s success has relied on introducing and expanding a host of programs that draw on psychology, access to transit information, publicity, new infrastructure and even giving people cash in order to convince them to commute differently. “When I got here (in 2000), it had a good TDM program,” Hamilton said, referencing some of its features: a program that guaranteed rides to a commuter in a personal emergency, the Marguerite service,

Increasingly, officials are turning to additional transportation tools to ease congestion, techniques that go squarely to one central goal: convincing people to leave their cars at home. the count of evening commuters exceeded the 2002 “cap” by 144 cars; however, the university only has to implement measures to ease the traffic if the surplus occurs in two of three consecutive years. The commute counts may be the official measure of compliance, but the real success of its transportation program is seen in the number of people who no longer drive themselves to work, according to Brodie Hamilton, the university’s director of parking and transportation services. Today, just 46 percent of employees drive alone to campus, down from 72 percent 10 years ago. Those taking Caltrain to work has jumped to 21 percent from 4 percent. The bicycling population has grown to nearly 13 percent from 7 percent. People taking the free Marguerite Shuttle, Stanford’s fleet of 41 redand-white buses that roam campus and the Palo Area, account for more than 7 percent, up from 4 percent a

and Clean Air Cash, which rewards alternate-commuters with money. “What we needed to do ... was enhance that.” One of the program’s biggest successes has been a partnership with Caltrain to offer employees free rides, a ticket now known as the GO Pass. So many people took the university up on the offer that the Marguerite system, which stopped at the train stations, had to expand, he said. “If you’re ever out there from between 7 and 8 a.m., the train pulls up and they disgorge all those people, and they pile into the buses and off they go,” Hamilton said of the seamless transition for commuters. In fact, the number of rides Marguerite buses provide to and from the train has doubled since 2004 — growing from 212,000 rides to 449,000 last year. Another major initiative for the program was the creation of the Commute Club, a way to offer rec-

ognition to alternative commuters. “The idea was, ‘Let’s create this group, an identity, a sense of belonging, and people who are having a common cause, if you will: ‘We’re alternative-transportation users!’” Hamilton said. To create a buzz and raise awareness, the department held a competition for the best testimonials from people who loved their alternative commute. It featured the winners on posters and postcards. “It was like putting a face to members of the Commute Club,” he said. Soon groups of people from departments contacted his office wanting to be featured as well. “Now we’re up to 8,000 Commute Club members. That sense of identity is there,” he said. In addition to recognition, cold hard cash has helped the Commute Club grow from an initial group of 3,700. Commute Club members receive $25 a month in exchange for not having a parking permit. Stanford also has a way to nudge those not swayed by rewards, in the form of one fairly large “stick”: the price of a parking permit. The annual price of an “A” permit, which allows prime parking, is $792, more than twice of what it cost in 2001. A “C” permit, which allows parking farther away from most buildings, costs $309 a year, nearly three times the price in 2001. With more than 20,000 parking spaces on campus, the university has been able to avoid building any parking for new commuters, according to Hamilton. “Most of our parking now is replacement parking, or if a new dorm is built, we do need to meet that demand,” he said. The same agreement with the county that limits traffic has put a cap on parking at 2,300 new spaces — much to the dismay of visitors to Stanford who circle around for the

better part of the hour looking for a slot. As the numbers show, limiting parking and raising the price have been effective. Demand for parking has dropped more than 6 percent since 2002, even as buildings and employees have been added, according to a university report. In spite of the successes, Hamilton admitted there have been a few bumps in the road to the alternative-commute lifestyle. About eight years ago, the university decided to mount a pilot program for its East Bay residents by offering free passes for BART. “It was going to be a piece of cake. We knew we had 2,000 to 3,000 people living in the East Bay ... that would be eligible,” Hamilton said. But the response was underwhelming, to say the least. “We had 11 people take us up on this,” he said. “We said, ‘Wait a minute; it’s free!” It may have been free, but getting to campus on public transit still felt too onerous for most people. The typical commuter would have to get to BART, then transfer from BART to another transit line, and then leave that transit line to hop on Caltrain or the Marguerite, Hamilton said. “That was telling us that was a long way to come with maybe too many connections,” he said. It was either an idea that was before its time, or it was just not a good idea, he added.

S

o what lessons can be learned from Stanford’s decade-long program? “The biggest takeaway I would offer is: With the right mix of incentives, and maybe some sort of disincentive, you can change people’s commuting behavior,” Hamilton said. There is no single service that has been responsible for the university’s success, he said, but rather a vast array that have met the needs of Stanford’s commuters. Free transit passes, the Marguerite system and the Commute Club form the pillars of the overall program, but car-sharing, emergency rides home, help with planning one’s commute, one-day parking passes and bicycle-repair stations, to name just a few additional services, all make the program work. Hamilton believes, however, that not all of Stanford’s services are directly transferable to other organizations, in part because of differences in location, budget and other factors. Stanford, for example, spends more than $5 million to run its program, he said. Then, there’s control. “Universities, because they are like small communities on their own, have the flexibility to do things municipalities don’t. We can control our parking. Very few universities don’t charge for parking,” he said. “We’re in a situation where we can do that, and it works out very well.” Likewise, Stanford commuters rely on Caltrain, but a company located away from a train line would have to consider whether that option makes sense, as the business might have to run shuttles to get workers from the depot to the office. (continued on next page)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 33

Cover Story NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Commute

(continued from previous page)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a public hearing at the Council meeting on December 3, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to consider Adoption of an Ordinance Rezoning a 0.6-acre site from Single Family Residential (R-1) to Service Commercial (CS), Adoption of a Resolution Amending the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Designation from Single Family Residential to Service Commercial, and Approval of the Negative Declaration for the properties located at 423-451 Page Mill Road. DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk



 



NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY of a Draft Environmental Impact Report NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Notice of Availability for a Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the expansion of the City of Palo Alto ordinance prohibiting single use checkout bags to include all retail and food service establishments has been prepared by the City of Palo Alto Department of Public Worksâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Environmental Services. "#* ',%&+ .#$$  -#$$ ') )-#. &

'%%&+ ,)#&!  0 ()#' !#&&#&!

.4&,#&0 2)0.3()"-3"06 '&$#& +

555$*26.'/"+."+2..0(/+"12*$1 & #+#'& ")

'(#* %0  )-#. ,)#&! +" ,*#&** "',)*

'&01)#0   +'  + +" ()+%&+

' $&&#&! & '%%,&#+0 &-#)'&%&+

 %#$+'& -&, $' $+'  /$,#&! "'$#0*

SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY

donate to the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/paw-holiday-fund

 

AUTHORS LUNCHEON november 17 10:30 am - 3:00 pm

Two public meetings will be held regarding this project:

     9:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:00 AM

     6:00 PMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00 PM

all proceeds benefit Abilities United www.AbilitiesUnited.org

see and meet these acclaimed authors        " for information call 650-618-3330    

Library

  !

 

Anonymous

Books Inc. Allegro Framing Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel Prodigy Press J. Lohr Vineyards and Wines Judi and Wilf Jaeger Ladera Travel

!

3##&0+&6.,,3-*26&-2&0

      

 ! !  0', .#*" +' '%%&+ '& +"  ($*

*,%#+ 0',) .)#++& '%%&+* 0 "-3"06  +' 3+*&!&*117-4*0.-,&-2"+&04*$&1  ,#"0$"%&0.!"6"+.+2. 

') -# %#$ /+"12*$1$*26.'/"+."+2..0(

Page 34Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Laurie Jarrett Chris Kenrick Carol and Mike Shealy Anonymous   

Where employees live and whether there is a sufficient concentration of them there could also determine whether an option, such as a company-sponsored shuttle, would make sense. The City of Palo Alto has been working on a few initiatives that could make life easier for train and bus commuters. A rental bicycle program, in which 100 bikes would be stationed at train depots and other strategic locations around town, is aimed at helping commuters get from public transit to their workplaces. That connection, known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;last mile,â&#x20AC;? can be one of the thorniest problems of public transportation, planners say. The timeline for deploying those bikes, officially part of the Valley Transportation Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bicycle Share Program, is due at the end of the year. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also rolling out bike corrals downtown â&#x20AC;&#x201D; green rectangles the size of one car parking space that can fit up to 10 parked bicycles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to motivate more people to travel by bike. In the bigger picture, the city is hoping to work with merchants, through the Palo Alto downtown association, to make small-business owners aware of commute options for their employees. And the council took a huge step in pushing alternative transportation when it approved the expansion of Stanford Medical Center in June 2011. As part of an agreement with the city, the medical center pledged to provide GO Passes for free Caltrain rides to all of its current and future workers, thus stemming a potential flood of thousands of cars driven by employees. As of midDecember last year, 2,000 workers had already signed on. Mountain View officials, meanwhile, are continuing to examine the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s options for the North Bayshore Area. Among those could be automated and magnetically levitated â&#x20AC;&#x153;pod carsâ&#x20AC;? that run on an overhead track, akin to a monorail, from downtown Mountain View to the North Bayshore Area and NASA Ames, according to the October study and city officials. It is also considering launching a Transportation Management Agency, a partnership of the city and employers that would organize transportation-management programs and institute incentives and penalties. Such groups, usually nonprofit organizations, have sprung up over the past several decades around the country and have been successful in getting people to leave their cars at home. City planners intend to return to the council in January for direction on action steps, once stakeholders have weighed in this fall and a list of â&#x20AC;&#x153;preferred optionsâ&#x20AC;? has been defined. N Editor Jocelyn Dong can be emailed at jdong@paweekly.com.

About the cover Car-less commutes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including biking and walking â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are encouraged at Stanford University. Photo by Veronica Weber.

Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

Photo courtesy of the Cantor Arts Center

Visitors watch an installation of “Video Quartet,” Christian Marclay’s 2002 four-channel video-production work with sound. The piece is on display at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center.

Artist Christian Marclay has created a new world of music and film in his kaleidoscope of clips by Rebecca Wallace

A

t first, when the kaleidoscope of film clips that is “Video Quartet” unfurls on four screens, the impulse is to try to recognize people. There’s Tony Curtis, Rita Hayworth, Michael J. Fox. That scream is definitely Janet Leigh’s. Then the viewer starts to appreciate the meticulous musical mastery that artist Christian Marclay has employed in assembling this Hollywood collage. All the snippets taken from more than 700 films depict people making music and sound: with instruments, with their voices and feet, by smashing and knocking and breaking and blowing things up. Marclay has woven them together with the insight and intensity of an experimental composer. Pairs of hands skip across piano keyboards on the four screens. Kirk Douglas in “Young Man With a Horn” is juxtaposed with a weeping trumpeter playing “Taps.”

The violinist in “Fiddler on the Roof” laments atop his house; Jimmy Stewart toots on the harmonica; Sinatra whistles. Drums and gongs give way to the screech of a car chase. Throughout this 14-minute video mashup, Marclay creates harmonies and dissonances by blending the films, creating combinations of pitch that the movie directors never intended. He comes up with something entirely new that is part hectic, part gentle, part stirring and part funny. At Wednesday’s preview of the work at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center, the audience kept tittering at one clip of the young Jane Fonda crooning with a feather in bed. The piece ebbs and flows, as loud as a cacophony of marching bands and bagpipes — and a symphony of screams — and as soft as Audrey Hepburn singing

“Moon River,” which is melded smoothly with Julie Andrews’ “so la ti do.” “Marclay is magical in how he thinks about sound, how he thinks about the visual,” Cantor director Connie Wolf said at the preview. The work is the museum’s first major video installation, and Wolf promised that it won’t be the last. The bank of four screens is hung in a darkened room on the museum’s ground floor, with “Video Quartet” continually playing. Visitors are urged to watch the piece more than once to fully appreciate it. “Incredible synchronization,” Cantor docent Carol Toppel said after her visit to the installation. The 2002 work is on loan through Feb. 10 from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, which commissioned it with the Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean

in Luxembourg. Marclay, 57, a Swiss-American artist, has been creating video collages and musical works for years. His 2010 video work “The Clock” drew curiosity and long lines to galleries on several continents, with many visitors coming prepared to watch the 24-hour creation in its entirety. Marclay had created that immense montage of film clips of timepieces to run in real time throughout a full day. “The Clock” went on to win the Gold Lion at the Venice Biennale. Marclay also has a background as a DJ and was a “pioneering turntablist” in the 1970s, one of the first to “cross the lines between gallery and performance space,” according to a press release from SFMOMA. “Constructing a musical com(continued on page 37)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 35

Arts & Entertainment

             " /",)

)2-36 )%08,)28)6 )(%6%:-0-32 }Â Â { 6%283%(K9-8) 3928%-2-);K              q 63:-()%'')7783*900=-28)+6%8)(K'3146),)27-:)  '%6)737)2-367'%26)1%-2,)%08,=%2(-2()4)2()28  %7032+%74377-&0) q %2%+)',632-'%2(%'98),)%08,'%6)-779)7-2'09(-2+  '%6)3*8,)*6%-0)0()60= q 63:-()%446346-%8)7'6))2-2+%2(46):)28%8-:),)%08,'%6) q )6:)8,)46-1%6='%6)2))(73*7)2-367;-8,  )(-'%6)%68

 

     q ))88,)4,=7-'-%27%2('0-2-'%08)%1 q J97,387 q &033(46)7796)7'6))2-2+7 q %'-0-8=83967 q -+,86)*6)7,1)287

"!#" " $((&+-)+-%'*&+-)$.'+*

Page 36Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Rasika Raghavan and Sam Bertken live in the real world â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and online â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in Sharyn Rothsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play â&#x20AC;&#x153;March.â&#x20AC;?

A heartfelt goodbye â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;March,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last play in Palo Alto, is honest and compassionate by Kevin Kirby

I

n February of THEATER 2006, Dragon Productions took up residence in a newly converted theater space on Alma Street in downtown Palo Alto. Its first offering in the space was â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Heidi Chroniclesâ&#x20AC;? by Wendy Wasserstein, a production that I had the honor to review. Now, nearly seven years later, I find myself reviewing â&#x20AC;&#x153;March,â&#x20AC;? the final show that the company will present in its narrow, 42-seat black box theater before moving to a new, larger home in Redwood City next year. In the intervening years, Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fans (I include myself among them) have followed the company on many a journey. Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shows have taken us to small-town Texas, Disney World, New Orleans and the Alaskan wilderness. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve visited a juvenile-detention facility, a terroristâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hideout and a peasant village in the Caucasus Mountains. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made several trips to New York and the U.K., and spent an evening on a cruise ship in the north Atlantic. Along the way, Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s productions have explored everything from college politics to Gothic horror, from the evolution of humanoid lizards to the age-defying whimsy of childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s author Shel Silverstein. In their current offering, Sharyn Rothsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;March,â&#x20AC;? the company transports us to a location seldom seen on stage: cyberspace. In many ways, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marchâ&#x20AC;? is a perfect example of the work that Dragon has presented over the past seven years. Like most of the plays chosen by Dragon founder and artistic director Meredith Hagedorn, it is a lesser-known, contemporary show featuring strong roles for women and inhabiting a middle ground between comedy and drama. And, like

many of Hagedornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choices, it is slightly more ambitious than the company can comfortably handle. I hasten to add that this is in no way a bad thing. Hagedornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graspexceeding reach has kept Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seasons interesting, and I believe it has helped her draw a certain caliber of talent to the theater: namely, performers who enjoy a challenge. Certainly, the eight actors who make up the cast of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marchâ&#x20AC;? have several challenges before them. For Sam Bertken and Rasika Raghavan, who play Michael and Eva, two semi-troubled teens who meet in a simulated online world reminiscent of Second Life, the primary challenge is in playing not only the human characters but their pixel-world avatars as well. Anyone familiar with Second Life will appreciate their attempt to capture the limited repertoire of stiff poses that these avatars adopt. Bertken and Raghavan could have used more dedicated rehearsal time to hone their avatar schtick in front of a mirror, but the idea comes across. Bertken has an added challenge. The actor is at least eight years too old for his role, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playing opposite Raghavan, who might plausibly be 14. Bertken is smart, energetic and wholly likable, and he makes Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exasperation at his dysfunctional family evident. But he never quite captures the sense of desperation that comes with being trapped in this familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home for at least three more years. Challenges are also faced by Leticia Duarte and David Madwin, who play Evaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother and Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older brother, respectively. Both characters suffer from some sort of mental illness, but playwright Roth-

REVIEW

Arts & Entertainment stein never pins down a diagnosis for either. Madwin’s character is most likely schizophrenic with a strong dose of paranoia thrown in, and Madwin is at his best when in the grips of a particular delusion. As for Duarte’s character, her family behaves as though she has a temper that keeps them living in fear, but we rarely see any hint of danger. Like Madwin, she is a strong performer when given a specific rant to deliver, but her overall performance has too much irony, too much self-awareness to justify her family’s walking on eggshells. (Duarte also has the happy problem of being far too slim to play a character who, we are given to believe, is so obese that she is loathe to leave the house.) These issues aside, the cast (which also includes George Mauro and Glenn Havlan as the teens’ fathers, Janine Evans as Michael’s mother, and Katie Zeisl as various real and virtual girls) rises to the task at hand, playing their roles with honesty and compassion, and landing enough of the key moments to solicit real laughs and tug on real heartstrings. It’s a feat that I have watched numerous Dragon casts pull off over the years: finding the emotional heart of a piece despite difficulties in casting, staging, etc. The technical elements, too, are typical of Dragon’s work. Longtime collaborator Ron Gasparinetti returns to design the play’s minimal set. Constrained by the small stage, Gasparinetti has produced a handful of abstract set pieces that can be rearranged to form all of the play’s locales. To create the online fantasy world inhabited by Michael and Eva’s avatars, he uses rear-project-

Dragon Productions founder Meredith Hagedorn. ed slides of virtual forests and pixel fortresses. (Rear projection has been a common element in Dragon scenic design ever since “The Heidi Chronicles.”) As usual, the minimal approach is effective and the scene changes drag only slightly. With limited props and set pieces, sound design is extremely important to this production. Actor George Mauro doubles as sound designer for “March,” and he has done a splendid job of creating effects — everything from car doors to laser blasters — that enhance both the real and virtual worlds. The uncredited individual (stage manager Solia Martinez-Jacobs, perhaps?) who pushes the buttons in the booth deserves a nod as well; the timing of sound cues was spot-on at Friday’s opening. My only objection to the

sound design was the irritating, synthesized scene-change music, which was more reminiscent of early Atari video games than of the lush, multitimbral orchestrations for modern computer games and simulations. The cast and crew of “March,” including director Lennon Smith and producer Hagedorn, have much to be proud of with this show. It is yet another example of what can be achieved by a committed group of artists willing to work on a shoestring. It’s worth making one last visit to the Alma Street storefront theater. As for the future, Dragon’s new home is outside the Palo Alto Weekly’s coverage area, so I am unlikely to ever review another Dragon production. But will I make the drive to Redwood City in January to see what this resourceful company can achieve in a larger venue? You bet I will. And so should you. N What: “March,” a play presented by Dragon Productions

NEW PALO ALTO RESTAURANT

JOB FAIR!

>“«œÊ*ˆââiÀˆ>ʈÃÊ>Ê`iˆVˆœÕÃʘiÜÊ `iÃ̈˜>̈œ˜Êˆ˜Ê`œÜ˜ÌœÜ˜Ê*>œÊÌœ]Ê vi>ÌÕÀˆ˜}Êthin-crust artisan pizza, handmade pasta, >˜`Ê freshly stretched Mozzarella vÀœ“ÊœÕÀÊœââ>Ài>Ê >À° Stop by our job fair – open interviews for all positions.

Where: Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto When: Thursday-Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m., through Dec. 2

SATURDAY

Cost: $25 general admission, with discounts for students and seniors

NOVEMBER 17 TH

11am - 4pm

Info: For more information, or for ticketing online, go to dragonproductions.net/tickets. htm. For 24/7 box office help, call 800-838-3006.

œÃÌiÃÃiÃÊUÊ-iÀÛiÀÃÊUʏœœÀÊ>˜>}iÀÃÊ >ÀÌi˜`iÀÃÊUÊ >ÀÊ >VŽÃÊUÊœœ`Ê,՘˜iÀÃÊ ÕÃÃiÀÃÊUÊ-œÕÃÊ …ivÃÊUʈ˜iÊ œœŽÃÊ *Ài«Ê œœŽÃÊUÊ ˆÃ…Ü>ÅiÀÃ

Photo courtesy of the Cantor Arts Center

185 University Ave, Palo Alto www.campopizzeria.com jobs@campopizzeria.com 26th Annual Palo Alto Weekly

Short Story Contest

Entry Deadline is December 28th See PaloAltoOnline.com for details

Christian Marclay’s music-themed clips create an entirely new soundtrack for the films they mingle.

Movie montage (continued from page 35)

position as well as a visual narrative (with music as a theme or purpose) out of found objects, images or sounds is at the core of Marclay’s creative process.” He created “Video Quartet” on a home computer in 2001, sifting through thousands of Hollywood films before choosing the 700 to utilize in the work, according to a Cantor center release. Wolf said she’s watched the piece dozens of times, continually seeing something new. She also recommends that visitors sit in the gallery with their eyes closed, to hear the collage’s soundtrack on its own. “He’s made a new work of music.” N

FREE CONSULTATION WITH THIS AD

What: “Video Quartet,” a 14-minute video collage of music-themed clips of 700plus movies, by artist Christian Marclay Where: Cantor Arts Center, Lomita Drive at Museum Way, Stanford University When: The installation is on display through Feb. 10, open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursdays until 8 p.m. Cost: Free Info: Go to museum.stanford. edu or call 650-723-4177.

A Place to Heal with Hyperbaric Oxygen Hyperbaric Oxygen Treats: s0ROBLEMSWITHSLOWHEALING s0OST CANCERRADIATIONINJURIES s$IABETICWOUNDS s-ANYFORMSOFINSURANCEACCEPTED INCLUDING+AISER-EDICARE

We’ve specialized in wound healing for 15 years www.oxygenheals.com

PALO ALTO/LOS ALTOS

SAN JOSE/LOS GATOS

%L#AMINO2EAL 650.567.9110

3OUTH"ASCOM!VENUE 408.356.7438

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 37

Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW

Local ingredients, local wine 6INO,OCALEKEEPSEVERYTHINGCLOSETOHOME by Dale F. HERE ARENT MANY RESTAURANTS AS COM MUNITY SUPPORTIVEAS6INO,OCALE.OT ONLYDOTHEOWNERSSOURCETHEIRFOODAND WINESWITHINA MILERADIUS THELIVEMU SICISFROMLOCALARTISTS ASISALLTHEFEATURED ARTWORKONTHEWALLS 6INO ,OCALE IS IN A  YEAR OLD #OLONIAL REVIVALHOUSEON+IPLING3TREETINDOWNTOWN 0ALO!LTO4HEINTERIORISSEPARATEDINTOSMALL COZYDININGROOMS ONEWITHABAR4HEBEST SEATING THOUGH ISINTHELOVELYGARDENBEHIND WEATHERPERMITTING ) RECENTLY CHATTED WITH %MILY -ATHEWS WHO IN/CTOBERJOINEDPARTNERS$EBRA3ZE CSEI AND *OCELYN !LEXANDER AS A CO OWNER 3ZECSEIAND!LEXANDERBOUGHTTHERESTAURANT IN/CTOBER-ATHEWS AREFUGEEFROMTHE TECHWORLD CAMEWITHNORESTAURANTEXPERI ENCEBUTPLENTYOFENTHUSIASM -ATHEWS KNOWS COOKING THOUGH AND HER PASTITSIO WASTHESPECIALMAINCOURSEONE EVENING4HE'REEKDISH CONSISTINGOFLAYERSOF GROUNDLAMBANDBEEF PASTA OREGANO ONIONS

T

Veronica Weber

'RILLEDCHICKENWITHVEGETABLESAT6INO ,OCALE

Bentson SPICES CHEESE YOGURT AND A BECHAMEL SAUCE WASPIPING HOTANDDELICIOUS4HEWORDPASTIT SIOMEANShDIRTYKITCHENvBECAUSEOFTHEMANY INGREDIENTS NEEDED -ATHEWS VERSION SHOULD BECOMEAMENUSTAPLE 4HEKITCHENISLIMITEDAT6INO,OCALE SIZE WISE AND FUNCTION WISE 4HERE IS NO MASSIVE MULTI BURNERRANGE MULTIFACETEDGRILLORBRICK OVEN NOR HUGE EXHAUST SYSTEM 2ATHER THE KITCHENUSESSMALLAPPLIANCESTOCOMPLETEOR DERS-UCHOFTHEMENUCONSISTSOFCOLDPLATES THATAREASSEMBLEDRATHERTHANCOOKED#HEF!N DREW#HAVEZABLYHANDLESTHEKITCHENDETAILS 4OSTART THE-EDITERRANEANPLATE WAS COMPOSEDOFTHREE#OWGIRL#REAMERYCHEESES SALAMI PROSCIUTTO #ASTELVETRANO OLIVES AND SLICES OF CRUSTY &RENCH BREAD 'LUTEN FREE CRACKERSAREAVAILABLE )TWASAMPLEFORTWO AND ) WAS IMPRESSED WITH THE HIGH QUALITY COMPONENTS !LSO OFFERED WERE CHARCUTERIE AND CHEESE PLATES EACH  (ALF PLATES AVAILABLE FOR  7ITHAGLASSOFWINEORTWO ASATISFYINGDINNER

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Cucina Venti

ations

reserv epting

ble a l i a v ng a cateri c Now ac

4HERE WERE OTHER WAYS TO START /NE WAS FOURDATESSTUFFEDWITHGOATCHEESEANDROAST ED WALNUTS  ATOP A HANDFUL OF ARUGULA LEAVES4HEDATESWERETASTYBUT ATAPOP A TADPRICEY/NEMOREDATEONTHEPLATEWOULD HAVEMADEMEHAPPIER -AINDISHESWEREMOUTHWATERING4HEGRILLED CHICKEN CONSISTEDOFTENDERCHICKENBREAST WITH SWEET BELL PEPPERS HERBS AND SPINACH COVEREDINALIGHTCHEESESAUCE)NALL ALOTOF CHEESEAFTERWEHADJUSTDEVOUREDTHECHEESE CENTRIC-EDITERRANEANPLATEASANAPPETIZER /NEFINALDISHOFNOTEWASTHEPULLED PORK SLIDERS 4HELIP SMACKINGPORKHADBEEN SLOW ROASTED WITHBARBECUESAUCE ANDSERVED ONTHREEMINIBRIOCHEBUNS )HADTHESLIDERSFORLUNCHONEDAY4HEPLATE CAMEWITHNOTHINGONITBUTTHESLIDERS)TNEED EDASLICEOFPICKLE AFEWCHIPS SOMEKINDOF GARNISH 0LATE APPEAL IS IMPORTANT &IRST OFF THE PRESENTATION IS MORE APPEALING 3ECOND THE DINER IS IMMEDIATELY REASSURED THAT HIS CHOICE WAS WORTHY NOT SKIMPY 4HIRD WITH NOTHING ELSE TO NIBBLE THERE IS NO ALLOWANCE FORCONTRASTINGTASTES NOPAUSETHATALLOWSTHE PALATETORELOADANDRESPONDTOOTHERTEXTURES ANDFLAVORS7HILETHESLIDERSWEREDELICIOUS (continued on next page)

Scaloppine divitello al Marsala The town of Marsala is a seaport city located in the Province of Trapani on the island of Sicily in Italy. The low coast on which it is situated is the westernmost point of the island. It is best known as the source of Marsala wine. Chicken Marsala is an ancient dish made with this wonderful wine. So great was thought the power of this wine, a Greek warlord even believed his men fought with more ďŹ&#x201A; air by drinking a little before battle. But it was the English who settled in Sicily in the early 1800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who are credited with â&#x20AC;&#x153;upgradingâ&#x20AC;? the dish with the use of veal. It is our distinct pleasure to offer Scaloppine di vitello al Marsala as this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special dish.

Bon appetito! Chef Marco Salvi SCALOPPINE DIVITELLO AL MARSALA sPOUNDVEALMEDALLIONS sTABLESPOONSOLIVEOIL s!LL PURPOSEmOUR s3ALTANDPEPPERTOTASTE sLARGESHALLOT MINCED

sPOUNDFRESHBUTTONMUSHROOMS sliced sÂ&#x17E;CUPDRY-ARSALAWINE sCLOVEGARLIC CHOPPED sTABLESPOONBUTTER

Preparation: Add 2 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Lightly season the veal with salt and pepper coat each medallion in ďŹ&#x201A; our, shaking to remove excess ďŹ&#x201A; our. Place in the heated skillet until golden brown on each side, about 5 minutes. Remove medallions from the skillet, place in a baking dish covered with foil, and keep warm in the preheated oven until ready to serve.

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

Page 38Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Heat the remaining olive oil in the skillet over medium low heat, and sautĂŠ the shallot, garlic and mushrooms, scraping up any browned bits, until shallots are tender. Increase heat to medium high, and stir in the Marsala. Cook and stir until thickened. Remove from heat, and whisk in the butter until melted. Pour sauce over the veal and serve with a wedge of lemon. Serves 4

Eating Out (continued from previous page)

MYINITIALREACTIONTOTHEPLATEWAS h$ID)ORDERTHERIGHTTHINGv &OODISHALFTHEEQUATIONAT6INO ,OCALE7INEISTHEOTHER4HERES TAURANTFEATURESDOZENSOF.ORTHERN #ALIFORNIAWINERIESAVAILABLEBYTHE TASTE THEGLASSANDTHEBOTTLE0RIC INGISREASONABLE ) WASNT KEEN ON A COUPLE OF THE WINES ) TRIED AND WONDERED HOW CRITICAL THE STAFF DECISIONS ARE IN MAKING CHOICES 4HE 3ONNET 4ON DRES 'RAPEFIELD  0INOT .OIR AGLASS PERBOTTLE WASNOT AWINE)WARMEDUPTO)TWASONTHE BITTERSIDE STEMMY EARTHYANDTAN NIC0INOT.OIRISADIFFICULTGRAPETO COAX NOT ALL EFFORTS ARE REWARDED 0ROBABLYDRUNKFIVEYEARSTOOSOON ITWASNOTWORTHPERGLASS 4HE1UINTA#RUZ  3AN!NTO NIO6ALLEY 4EMPRANILLO AGLASS PERBOTTLE WASBETTER MEDIUM BODY WITHFRUITYOVERTONES.OTHING SUBTLEBUTFINEWITHFOOD&INALLY THE  $OWNHILL #ELLARS 0INOT .OIR AGLASS PERBOTTLE WASLIGHT

#! . 4/ 2

ANDFRUITY7HILENOTAGREATEXPRES SIONOF0INOT.OIR)DIDNTEXPECTIT FORTHEPRICE ITWENTDOWNEASYAND )OPTEDFORASECONDGLASS 6INO ,OCALE HAS A SPLENDID GAR DEN LOVELY INTERIOR AMBIANCE TASTY FOOD AND A VERY FRIENDLY WAITSTAFF 7HILEITSNOTASCHICASSOMEOFITS NEIGHBORING RESTAURANTS ITS RELAXED ANDTRANQUIL COMFORTABLE ALMOSTLIKE BEINGINVITEDTOAFRIENDSHOUSEN Vino Locale, 431 Kipling St., Palo Alto; 650-328-0450; vinolocale.com Hours: Lunch: Tues.-Fri. 11 a.m. -2 p.m.; Sat. noon-3 p.m, Dinner: Tues.-Sat. 5-9 p.m.

 

Reservations

 

Alcohol Children Catering



Takeout

3 4 ! . & / 2 $ 5 . ) 6 % 2 3 ) 4 9

#(2)34)!.-!2#,!93 6 )$ %/ 15! 2 4%4 4(2/5'(&%"25!29

%XPERIENCETHISENCHANTINGWORLDOF345..).'MUSIC FAVORITE FILMS AND2 % - ! 2 + ! " , % PAIRINGSOFACTORSANDMUSICIANS$ELIGHT INMONTAGESFROMHUNDREDSOF(OLLYWOODFILMSBROUGHTINTO0%2&%#4



Outdoor dining

BEAUTIFUL & 5 . . 9 ALIGNMENTONFOURSCREENS



Private parties

Credit cards Lot Parking

! 243 # % . 4 % 2

Noise level: Low

$ISCOVERTHE#ANTOR!RTS#ENTERANDOURNEWFAMILYPROGRAMMING    s M U SEUMSTANFORDEDU

Bathroom cleanliness: Excellent

&2%%!$-)33)/. 6IDEO1UARTETISONLOANFROMTHE3AN&RANCISCO-USEUMOF-ODERN!RT4HEWORKISAGIFTOFTHEARTISTANDTHE0AULA#OOPER'ALLERYCOMMISSIONEDBYTHE 3AN&RANCISCO-USEUMOF-ODERN!RTAND-USĂ?EDg!RT-ODERNE'RAND $UC*EAN ,UXEMBOURGWITHTHEGENEROUSSUPPORTOFTHE*AMES&AMILY&OUNDATION 4HEEXHIBITIONISSUPPORTEDBYTHE#ONTEMPORARY#OLLECTORS#IRCLE THE#LUMECK&UND AND#ANTOR!RTS#ENTER-EMBERS

ShopTalk

PENINSULA

by Daryl Savage

DINAHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUIETLY REOPENS ... After closing in September after 40 years in business, Dinahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poolside Restaurant reopened on Nov. 1. Located on the property of Dinahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Hotel at 4261 El Camino Real in Palo Alto, the old-fashioned restaurant had been shuttered after a legal battle between its operator and the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owner. The new Dinahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is decidedly more upscale. It has several updates including new hardwood floors, new tables and chairs and a new menu. Gone are the swivel stools and the counter service. The hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other new restaurant, The Sea by Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse, opened Nov. 9 in the former spot of Trader Vicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, which closed in early August. The high-end seafood restaurant seats 148 diners with an additional 50 seats in its outdoor patio. MIDTOWN GETS SCHOOL OF ROCK ... Palo Alto resident Hansel Lynn is bringing a new music school to the Midtown neighborhood of Palo Alto. School of Rock, a national franchise, is scheduled to open in mid-January at 2645 Middlefield Road, in the former space of Best Video. The school teaches young musicians to perform like rock stars. School of Rock was made famous in 2003 when Jack Black played a substitute music teacher in the movie of the same name. The film â&#x20AC;&#x153;was loosely based on the school and Jack Blackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character was loosely based on the creator of School of Rock, Paul Green,â&#x20AC;? Lynn said. An amateur musician and former singer for a cover band, Lynn was employed in the high-tech industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t looking for a business, but I saw an ad for School of Rock and I made the decision last year to open it,â&#x20AC;? he said. He liked the live-performance aspect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although we are a music school, we get the kids up on stage. They will be per-

forming in live venues,â&#x20AC;? he said. Lynn has three young children who he says are not yet musically inclined. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But they will be,â&#x20AC;? he said. MALL LOSES TWO LONGTIME TENANTS ... Talbots is leaving the Stanford Shopping Center. The womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing store has slashed prices on all inventory, including store fixtures and furniture, in an effort to clear out and close the mall store. There is no date yet when it will shut its bright red doors, but a store employee said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stay open until everything is gone, even though they keep bringing in additional merchandise.â&#x20AC;? Talbots at Stanford is one of the more than 100 stores nationwide to close through fiscal year 2013 as part of a chain cost-reduction program, according to a statement made by Talbots COO Michael Scarpa. Stanford Shopping Center has also lost Haagen-Dazs. The ice cream store is completely dark, although tables are still bolted down and chairs still surround the shop. A peek inside reveals everything is still set up for business. No word yet on a new retailer for that spot. MORE GONERS ... Papa Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a â&#x20AC;&#x153;take â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bakeâ&#x20AC;? pizza place in Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Midtown neighborhood, is gone. The business closed last month at 2730 Middlefield Road, leaving a small sign in the window advising customers that the restaurant chose not to renew its lease. Also departed is Natalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Salon, the corner nail spa at 539 Alma St. in Palo Alto. It closed its doors for good on Oct. 29. Its sister store in San Mateo has also closed.

(EARD A RUMOR ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE STORE OR BUSINESS MOV INGOUT ORIN DOWNTHEBLOCKOR ACROSS TOWN $ARYL 3AVAGE WILL CHECK IT OUT %MAIL SHOPTALK PAWEEKLYCOM

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Chef Chuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

powered by

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 39

Movies

ery) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; plays a bit like a $50 million history lesson. And while thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a boon for history buffs, the pacing suffers sporadically. All of the backand-forth politicking doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;? has more in common with Spielbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;War Horseâ&#x20AC;? than, say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saving Private Ryanâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Schindlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List.â&#x20AC;? Still, Spielberg and his team (including an A-list cast that features a spotlight-stealing performance by Tommy Lee Jones) deserve a wealth of credit for embracing a monumental task and succeeding admirably. The film follows Lincoln (DayLewis) as he seeks to outlaw slavery and, thus, end the bloody Civil War. Lincoln and his fellow Republicans â&#x20AC;&#x201D; many of who are themselves ambivalent about passage of the 13th Amendment â&#x20AC;&#x201D; need a handful of votes from the mostly pro-slavery Democrats. Secretary of State William Seward (David Strathairn, born for roles like this) turns to help from a conniving but convincing trio: W.N. Bilbo (James Spader), Robert Latham (John Hawkes) and Richard

OPENINGS

Lincoln ---1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) To many, British-born actor Daniel Day-Lewis represents the pinnacle of thespian prowess. Director Steven Spielberg is considered among Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best and has the Oscar gold to back it up. And Abraham Lincoln is one of the most important figures in U.S. history. So it stands to reason that a union of the three would result in canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tmiss cinema. And, for the most part, it does. Day-Lewis shines with yet another towering performance; Spielberg directs with a meticulous, deft touch; and the exquisite production values (especially the costuming and set design) establish the time period beautifully. But Spielbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which focuses on Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragically shortened second term in office, the conclusion of the Civil War and the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fight to pass the 13th Amendment (abolishing slav-

â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;HE YE ARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

â&#x20AC;?. S M T L I F F O G E ON CAPTIVATIN ACTING F O D IN M OS T K S THE .â&#x20AC;?

KES DOERE INVENTED FOR W A H N H â&#x20AC;&#x153;JO RDS WE A L W A T A H T Y AND SOU AN ANYTHING D O B R E H NT BARES MANCE BE T TER TH U H N E L E H . â&#x20AC;&#x153;A+ ERFOR P G N I V O IN A MS DONE BEFORE.â&#x20AC;? SHE HA

EPER

RD RO

RICHA

EE ÂŽ OMIN ARD N EMY AW ACAD

ES HAWK JOHN INNER RD W A AW EMY ACAD HUNT HELEN D NOMINEE AR EMY AW CY ACAD H. MA M A I LL DWI ÂŽ

ÂŽ

AN

B

HE ON T ASED

CAMPBELL %-'2% 25.'7%2&     CUPERTINO 50'24*./15%2'   !

INC

R

DALY CITY '.4527 %,7*47#  PALO ALTO *.8243%4%,/,4/15%2' 

LE EDIB

TRU

R E S TO

Y

SAN JOSE REDWOOD CITY '.4527 '&6//&/6.4/6. # '.4527 %+2*&)'#   SAN BRUNO    '.4527%4 %.(/2%.#  $  " 

A Royal Affair ---1/2

Daniel Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln. Schell (Tim Blake Nelson). Meanwhile, the battle over slavery rages on in the House of Representatives, with stone-faced Pennsylvanian Thaddeus Stevens (Jones, brilliant) fighting for abolition with every breath. Lincoln juggles nationchanging decisions with personallife issues: his wife Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Sally Field) debilitating migraines, his older son Robertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Joseph GordonLevitt) military ambitions and his young son Tadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Gulliver McGrath of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dark Shadowsâ&#x20AC;?) upbringing. Day-Lewis captures Lincoln as well as any actor could. From his vocal inflections to his mannerisms, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clear he truly immersed himself in the difficult role. In one early scene he lies down beside Tad, who has dozed off in front of the fireplace. The moment humanizes Lincoln and allows the viewer to see him as more than just a good president â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we see him as a good person. A slew of recognizable actors are virtually shoehorned into the film. And while Spader, for instance, is fantastic as the tactless Bilbo (helping with needed comic relief), Gordon-Levitt is more window dressing with very limited screen time. And while most viewers will be talking about Day-Lewis, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance as Stevens that lends the film the vibrant spark it needed and would not have otherwise had. Spielberg is among the best at presenting â&#x20AC;&#x153;cinema with a conscience.â&#x20AC;? Sure, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directed plenty of popcorn flicks along the lines of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jawsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jurassic Park,â&#x20AC;? but he also brings moral and emotional punch in pictures like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Schindlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amistadâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;? (a scene in which Lincoln talks about Euclidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elements is profound). Four score and seven years from now, Spielbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;? may well be considered the most accurate and honest film ever made about the 16th president. Rated PG-13 for intense scenes of war violence, brief strong language and some images of carnage. 2 hours, 29 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tyler Hanley

Page 40Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

(Guild) The new historical drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Royal Affairâ&#x20AC;? helps us to remember what should be obvious: History is in the making every day, in cycles of doomed repetition. Just ask David Petraeus. The red meat that Petraeus has provided to ravenous media outlets has created a feeding frenzy, one that reduces a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth to unpleasant but commonplace sexual missteps. Yes, the mighty fall easily, but at least Petraeus doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it as bad as Count Johann Friedrich Struensee of Denmark, who had the poor form to fall in love with a married queen. Denmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official Oscar submission for Best Foreign Language Film transports audiences to 1766 Copenhagen, where a freshly acquired British princess becomes Queen Caroline Matilda (Alicia Vikander) to King Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Følsgaard). A hopeful innocent, the teen queen quickly discovers sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incompatible with her demonstrably spoiled-childish husband, who drinks, whores and lives on the edge of insanity. That last concern allows a couple of rejected courtiers to regain favor, by presenting their candidate for the job of personal physician to the king. This is Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casino Royaleâ&#x20AC;?), the only doctor who manages, with irreverence and good humor, to insinuate himself with the wanton Christian. As a canny social mover, Streunsee observes and listens to the affairs of state and swiftly recognizes that the addled king has all but ceded authority to the council of state, full up with self-satisfied power brokers who rule as they see fit. Meanwhile, Matilda strikes up a friendship with Streunsee, and in spite of better judgement, their spark of chemistry catches fire. Though the affair should make the couple more fearful, it seems to embolden them to pursue their common political aim of a progressive Denmark. If the council of state can effectively usurp sovereign power, Streunsee reasons, why not him, on behalf of Enlightenment idealists? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dangerous game, on political and personal levels, with incredibly high stakes: the fate of a country and the livelihoods and lives of those who could be accused of treason for legislatively and sexually circumventing the king. Working from Bodil Steensen-Lethâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prinsesse af blodet,â&#x20AC;?director Nikolaj Arcel (who scripted the Danish film of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl with the Dragon Tattooâ&#x20AC;?) and co-writer Rasmus Heisterberg nimbly steer the narrative, keeping the charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ambitious and romantic motivations clear and relatable. And of course, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Royal Affairâ&#x20AC;? supplements its palace intrigue with the good old-fashioned pull of romance and costume drama. Though narrator Caroline Matilda somewhat comes off as a swoony zero, Vikander is never less than believable. Certainly the stage actor Følsgaard keeps Christian colorful, and Mikkelsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s magnetism and sly expression hold the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center with a quiet potency. Ultimately, the exhilaration of new love and political action contends with the audienceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dreadful certainty that the truth will out and devastate these characters, giving â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Royal Affairâ&#x20AC;? a productive ten-

sion that insures its history lesson will not be forgotten. Rated R for sexual content and some violent images. Two hours, 17 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2 --

(Century 16, Century 20) A misty tree line by a river. Rising peaks. A waterfall. A CGI wolf. Heavenly shades of night are falling: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilightâ&#x20AC;? time ... again. What to say about this franchise juggernaut that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already been said? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still an â&#x20AC;&#x153;undecided voterâ&#x20AC;? when it comes to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilight,â&#x20AC;? slowly back away from the polls. But for those millions who will be compelled to watch the tensiondeprived wrap-up episode â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2â&#x20AC;? (wrap-up, that is, until the inevitable spinoffs), nothing I say will keep them away, and the vast majority of that contingent will find this unabashedly sentimental valedictory both satisfying and heartwarming. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always been the raison dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŞtre of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Twilight Saga.â&#x20AC;? Like any romance-novel narrative, its job is to tease, stoke, withhold and finally deliver on the audienceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desires. Add in vampires and werewolves and psychics (oh my!), and you get a blockbuster franchise with â&#x20AC;&#x153;crossoverâ&#x20AC;? tolerance if not crossover appeal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part 2â&#x20AC;? of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking Dawnâ&#x20AC;? picks up the very second â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part 1â&#x20AC;? left off (spoiler alert for newbies): with Bella (Kristen Stewart) freshly â&#x20AC;&#x153;turnedâ&#x20AC;? and ready to explore life as a vamp and a mother to newborn human-vampire-hybrid Renesmee (played first by weird-lookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CGI and later by Mackenzie Foy). Taking a cue from superhero cinema, returning screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg and returning director Bill Condon carve out some time for Bellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhilarating discovery of her new powers and sensual vividness, under the watchful guidance of husband Edward (Robert Pattinson). Feminists get tossed a bone here. At last an empowered Bella can take care of herself (and others), prompting the ever-courtly Edward to confess, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a bad habit of underestimating you.â&#x20AC;? But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still something inherently regressive about Stephenie Meyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novels and their attendant films. Bella continues to fit snugly into the Vampire Barbie mold: last time with her just-so forest wedding, this time with â&#x20AC;&#x153;honeymoon periodâ&#x20AC;? sex accessorized by a conspicuous close-up of her morally approving ring-bling, as well as a tour of her new house that briefly, blithely turns the movie into an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Architectural Digestâ&#x20AC;? vodcast. Call it â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lifestyles of the Rich and Bloodless.â&#x20AC;? Hunky, impulsive werewolf Jacob (Tyler Lautner) continues to hang around, get in fights, make wry comments and offer soulful love, now directed at liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Renesmee, on whom Jacob has ferally imprinted (but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not at all skeevy, honest). The filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plot, such as it is, concerns the troublesome existence of Renesmee, who becomes a target of the pimped-out Roman vampire contingent known as the Volturi

Movies

Looking for a

Holiday Party Venue? The Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club of Palo Alto

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

â&#x20AC;˘ Company Parties â&#x20AC;˘Weddings â&#x20AC;˘Business Off-sites

inquiry@womansclubofpaloalto.org 650.321.5821

A Late Quartet (R) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7:15 & 9:55 p.m.

475 Homer Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301

A Royal Affair (R) (((1/2 Guild Theatre: 2, 5 & 8:15 p.m. Anna Karenina (R) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 2:30, 4, 5:30, 7, 8:30 & 9:55 p.m.

Ecole internationale de la PĂŠninsule

Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 9:30 a.m.; 12:20, 3:40, 7:40 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 12:55, 3:55, 6:45 & 9:30 p.m. Back Street (1941) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat. & Sun. at 3:50 & 7:30 p.m.

Ě˝ ŕŁ&#x2018; ੢ á&#x201E;&#x2018; á&#x2039;&#x2022; ŕ¤&#x201C;

Chasing Mavericks (PG) ((1/2 Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 2:10 & 4:50 p.m.; Fri. & Sun. also at 7:35 & 10:25 p.m. Cloud Atlas (R) ( Century 20: 12:40 & 6:40 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 3:40 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:55 p.m. Crazy House (1943) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 6 & 8:55 p.m. The Flat (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 1:45 & 6:30 p.m. Flight (R) ((( Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 3, 6:50 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 2:30, 5:35, 7, 8:40 & 10:15 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 9:20 & 11 a.m.; 12:50, 3, 4:30, 7, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m.; 12:20, 2:10, 3:35, 5:40, 6:55, 9 & 10:20 p.m. Looper (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 4:40 & 10:15 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1 & 7:15 p.m.

WHEN ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S YOUR CHILD, EXPERIENCE MATTERS.

PRE-SCHOOL Outstanding fullday program.

LANGUAGE

TEACHING MANDARIN CHINESE IMMERSION FOR 15 YEARS. A LEADER IN FRENCH IMMERSION IN PALO ALTO. ACCEPTING PRE-SCHOOL APPLICATIONS.

Longest running bilingual immersion school in the area. Experienced native-speaking faculty.

The Mummyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hand (1940) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 6:10 & 8:50 p.m. The Other Son (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 4 & 8:45 p.m. The Perks of Being a Wallflower (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 10:30 a.m.; Fri. & Sun. also at 1:20, 3:50, 6:40 & 9:30 p.m.; Sat. also at 1 & 3:30 p.m.

RSVP FOR A TOUR! PRE-SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE NOVEMBER 10, 2012

ACADEMICS Established English curriculum. Rigorous program in a nurturing environment. Low student-to-teacher ratio.

Pitch Perfect (PG-13) ((( Century 20: 2 & 7:30 p.m. The Scarlet Claw (1944) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 7:30 p.m.

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF THE PENINSULA 7%"777)340/2's0(/.%  

The Sessions (R) ((( Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:40, 5:05, 7:40 & 10 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 2, 4:30 & 7:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:45 p.m. Shadow of a Doubt (1943) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat. & Sun. at 5:30 & 9:10 p.m. Skyfall (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 9:20, 10:20, 11 & 11:40 a.m.; 12:40, 1:40, 2:40, 3:20, 4:20, 5:20, 6:10, 7, 8, 9, 9:50 & 10:40 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:20 p.m. Century 20: 10:25, 11 & 11:55 a.m.; 12:45, 1:35, 2:20, 3:05, 4, 4:45, 5:30, 6:25, 7:25, 8, 8:45, 9:40 & 10:35 p.m. Taken 2 (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 4:20 & 10:30 p.m. The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13) (( Century 16: 9, 10, 10:40 & 11:20 a.m.; noon, 1, 1:50, 2:30, 3:10, 4, 5, 5:50, 6:20, 7:10, 8:20, 9:10, 9:40 & 10:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:30, 11:05 & 11:40 a.m.; 12:15, 12:50, 1:25, 2, 2:35, 3:15, 3:45, 4:20, 4:55, 5:25, 6:10, 6:40, 7:15, 7:50, 8:25, 9:05, 9:30, 10:10 & 10:45 p.m. UFC 154: St-Pierre vs. Condit (PG-13) Century 16: Sat. at 7 p.m. Century 20: Sat. at 7 p.m.

wellness at your door NEW!

The Wolf Man (1941) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m. Wreck-It Ralph (PG) ((( Century 16: 9:10, 11:10 & 11:50 a.m.; 2, 2:50, 5:10, 6, 8:30 & 9:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:05, 1:50, 2:45, 4:30, 5:20, 7:10, 8:10 & 9:50 p.m.; In 3D at 1, 3:40 & 10:45 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260)

Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260)

Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264)

Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700)

Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264)

Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456)

Order Online for

(Michael Sheen excels with his hilariously overripe performance as Volturi leader Aro). And so, again, vampires train to fight, leading to a climactic battle that marks a have-it-both-ways semi-departure from Meyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel. This ponderous, protracted and finally propulsive confrontation will have non-believers checking their watches, then dropping their jaws. Can I just say? Nothing says romance like multiple beheadings. And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the rub. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilightâ&#x20AC;? has always been borderline comical

in its moments of greatest sincerity, and that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed in this ungainly, awkwardly paced, insularly fan-friendly installment (which ends with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;curtain callâ&#x20AC;? for the entire â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sagaâ&#x20AC;? cast). Any similarity to actual persons, living or undead, is entirely coincidental. Rated PG-13 for sequences of violence including disturbing images, sensuality and partial nudity. One hour, 55 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

FREE DELIVERY or In-store Pick-up

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri & Sat The Sessions- 2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45 11/16 - 11/17 Looper- 1:00, 7:15, Cloud Atlas- 3:40, 9:55 Sun thru Wed The Sessions-2:00, 4:30, 7:15 11/18 - 11/21 Looper- 1:00, 7:15 Cloud Atlas- 3:40 Thurs 11/22

The Sessions- 2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45 Looper- 1:00, 7:15 Cloud Atlas- 3:40, 9:55

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

                   (see map online)

(888) 99-Harborside

www.harborsidehealthcenter.com/ep  $$"!*!'"" &!"%e      )# (

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 41

Sports Shorts

ON THE AIR Friday Women’s basketball: Stanford vs. Baylor, 4:30 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM) Prep football: Sequoia at MenloAtherton, 7 p.m.; KCEA (89.1 FM)

Saturday College football: Stanford at Oregon, 5 p.m., ABC (7); KNBR (1050 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM) Women’s basketball: Stanford at Hawaii, 9 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Sunday

Wednesday Women’s volleyball: Colorado at Stanford, 8 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

Plenty is riding on outcome of Pac-12 showdown by Rick Eymer

S

tanford football coach David Shaw’s eyes are blurry after watching hours of tape on Oregon. Even after all of that, he’s still has more questions than answers. How do you stop the top-ranked Ducks powerful, lightening-fast offense? “I have no idea,” Shaw said. “We talk about slowing everybody down. There’s no stopping them. You always know they will spring a couple on you. When the defense does slow them down, we have to score. You’re not holding them down all the time.” It’s an interesting matchup, with No. 14 Stanford (6-1, 8-2) entering the game with the NCAA’s top rushing defensive (58.6) team going up against the nation’s third-best rushing offensive (325.1) team. The Ducks (7-0, 10-0) average 54.8 points a game while the Cardinal allows just 17.2 points a game. There’s a lot riding on the game, the least of which is the winner will likely represent the North Division and host the Pac-12 championship game against the South Division. If Oregon wins, it clinches the berth. If Stanford wins, the Cardinal will still have to beat UCLA, on the road, in the regular-season finale. Stanford doesn’t have to win to

Stanford defenders (L-R) Shayne Skov, Josh Mauro and David Yankey will be among those responsible for slowing down Oregon’s high-powered offense on Saturday in a Pac-12 game wit bowl-game and title-game ramifications.

(continued on next page)

NCAA SOCCER

CCS FOOTBALL

Stanford, SCU women renew their rivalry

It’s a first for Paly-Serra in postseason

by Rick Eymer

by Keith Peters alo Alto has enjoyed its fair share of success against West Catholic Athletic League teams the Central Coast Section football playoffs. The Vikings hold wins over Bellarmine, Valley Christian and St. Francis and are 5-4 against the WCAL all-time in the postseason. One team Palo Alto has never beaten in the playoffs is Serra. The obvious reason for that is the two have never faced each other outside the regular season. The Padres beat the Vikings in 1973 (42-21) and 1974 (34-6) and Paly holds a 62-0 triumph in 1947. Fourth-seeded Palo Alto and No. 5 seed Serra, however, will meet for the first time in the postseason on Friday night in the first round of the CCS Open Division playoffs on the Vikings’ field. Kickoff is 7 p.m.

I

n Northern California, there is no better rivalry in women’s college soccer than Stanford and Santa Clara. Friday night, the teams will meet for the ninth time in the NCAA tournament. The 17th-ranked Broncos (123-6) own a national title just as top-ranked Stanford (18-1-1) is the defending national champion. They will meet, in a second-round match of the NCAA tournament, at 7 p.m., at Stanford for anther chance to add another. The Cardinal may have had the upper hand in recent years, winning the past seven consecutive meetings, but it’s been anything but easy. And forget that season-opening 6-1 victory over Santa Clara. The teams have four common opponents. Stanford went 4-0 against California, Boston University, (continued on next page)

Page 42ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

P

Grant Shorin/THE VIKING

Men’s basketball: Belmont at Stanford, 6 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KNBR (1050 AM) Women’s basketball: Stanford vs. Tennessee-Martin, 7 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Slowing the Ducks is crucial

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

GOING TO NATIONALS . . . The Menlo College women’s volleyball team will take a 14-match winning streak into the NAIA National Championships this weekend in Caldwell, Idaho, where the Oaks will face No. 14-ranked College of Idaho on Saturday afternoon. The Coyotes (21-6), who were 13-1 at home, were the Cascade Conference regular season and postseason tournament champions, slipping past Eastern Oregon University in three sets this past Saturday to claim the tournament crown. Menlo (17-6) earned its ticket to the national tournament with a three-set sweep of Embry-Riddle on Saturday in Atherton to take home the California Pacific Conference Tournament championship. Menlo enters the opening match having not lost since Sept. 13. Up two sets to none in the conference playoff finals and leading 21-19 in Game 3, Menlo’s Stephenie Monderine set Nicole Yap, who rose atop the net and let one loose. The ball ricocheted off of Embry-Riddle’s defensive efforts and, just like that, Menlo was on its way to the NAIA Tournament. The top-seeded Oaks toppled the No. 2 Eagles, 25-13, 25-22, 25-23. The Oaks took nothing to chance in their three-set sweep. Menlo trailed 19-18 but, thanks to a Courtney Calicdan kill and ace, an attack error by Riddle, and a Stephanie Wertz kill, the Oaks took a 22-19 advantage. The Eagles rallied with two of their own to trim the Menlo lead to one, before making an attack error to pad the Oaks’ lead to 23-21. Menlo then made an error of its own, before two Yap kills, with a Mahlet Lee kill sandwiched in the middle, gave the Oaks the set and the match. “I was overwhelmed with emotion,” Menlo head coach Daniel Rasay said on capturing his first conference crown since joining the Oaks in 2010. “Every season you go through your ups and downs with injuries, emotions, and all of those kinds of things. To endure it though and come through to win a championship makes all those emotions come back to you, and to see the look on the girls’ faces is awesome.”

STANFORD FOOTBALL

Palo Alto junior quarterback Keller Chryst, who accounted for five TDs last week, leads the Vikings against Serra in a CCS opener Friday.

(continued on page 44)

Showdown

STANFORD ROUNDUP

(continued from previous page)

NCAA soccer (continued from previous page)

Georgetown and San Diego State. Santa Clara went 2-0-2 against those same teams. The Broncos also own a scoreless draw against No. 2 BYU. “It’s obviously a huge game,” Cardinal coach Paul Ratcliffe said. We know each other really well. We can use things we’ve learned from the past and realize it will be an emotional game.” The Broncos own an 18-14-5 advantage in the series with Stanford, including a 5-3 edge in NCAA matches. “Hopefully we’ll get some decent weather but the key thing is we’re at home and I hope the fans come out and support us,” Ratcliffe said.

Women’s water polo, hoops stock up again Top recruits also headed to The Farm in women’s swimming; Cardinal women’s basketball takes on No. 1-ranked Baylor by Rick Eymer

J

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

reach the Rose Bowl should they go on to beat the Bruins. In all likelihood, an Oregon victory would launch the Ducks into the national championship game, pending the outcome of the Civil War — Oregon against Oregon State in their rivalry game. The Cardinal would not necessarily be the automatic bid for the Rose Bowl, which traditionally has involved the Pac-12 champion against the Big 10 champion. Oregon, Ohio State and Penn State aside, there’s Notre Dame pawing its hooves in the dirt outside the Rose Bowl, which does not have to take a non-champion from the Pac-12. “This is pretty much our Pac-12 championship game,” Stanford senior Chase Thomas said of Saturday’s 5 p.m. game at Oregon. “This is the best team in the conference.” Cardinal quarterback Kevin Hogan, who will be making his second career start, and first on the road, spent last season running the scout team and was responsible for imitating opposition offenses. “They run a fun offense,” he said. “It’s based on quarterback reads and getting the ball out fast. It’s fast.” Shaw said Oregon’s offense is deceptively simple. “It’s not complicated after the fact,” he said. “It’s just complicated during the game. They adjust so subtlety you don’t realize it until they’ve scored three times. They spend time looking at you and then run simple plays, which is the brilliance of it.” Stanford hopes to counter with a plodding offense. Stepfan Taylor, Anthony Wilkerson, Ryan Hewitt could become important players in keeping long drives going and keeping Oregon’s offense on the sideline. “We want to control the ball and clock,” Hogan said. “We want 10play drives that use up the clock.” Taylor, the first Stanford player to rush for at least 1,000 yards in three successive seasons, is 169 yards short of 4,000 and 202 from matching Darrin Nelson’s career rushing record. Impressive enough and even more impressive considering he was sharing time with Toby Gerhart at one point. “The offensive line usually doesn’t get actual recognition,” Stanford senior center Sam Schwartzstein said. “Allowing the

Stanford redshirt freshman quarterback Kevin Hogan will make his first start on the road Saturday at nationally No. 1-ranked Oregon. least amount of sacks and high rushing totals has meant a lot. It’s a great feeling and a sense of recognition. If we do our job, this guy can do unbelievable things.” Shaw said Schwartzstein has become an effective leader through the years, able to communicate even amid the loudest of atmospheres. Autzen Stadium in Eugene is considered one of the loudest stadiums in America. “His ability to decipher things on the line is phenomenal,” Shaw said. “And he can communicate that. It’s a vital part of what we’re doing.” How does he get the message across in Eugene? “There’s no talking,” Schwartzstein said. “There’s only screaming. Jonathan Martin told me that when you put your hands on the ground, you’ll see pebbles bouncing.” Schwartzstein gets his vocal cords ready during the week with honey and tea, a method he learned from

Andrew Luck. Oregon is the only school on Stanford’s schedule with more than a one-game winning streak against the Cardinal. An overwhelming offense can do that. “I’ve become a believer,” Shaw said. “It’s a sound system and has components of every NFL offense. It just looks a little different. It’s up to us to play to our capabilities.” Stanford senior nose tackle Terrence Stephens said the speed and efficiency of the Ducks’ offense can disorient teams. “They are an extraordinary team with great play-calling which can make adjustments,” Stephens said. “It’s going to take our best game. One of the keys of stopping them is to get penetration up the middle. You’ll get gashed trying to play side to side. It’s important to get penetration and disrupt the timing of their schemes. I want the game to be in the trenches.” N

Stanford owns a 64-match home unbeaten streak (62-0-2), secondlongest in NCAA history. The last home loss was a third-round match in the 2007 tournament against Connecticut. The Cardinal can boast of having one national team member on its current squad in senior Alina Garciamendez, who participates with Team Mexico. Garciamendez is one of 10 seniors who have compiled a tremendous record of service over their college careers. Stanford is 91-3-4 over the past four years, 49-0-1 at home and 400-0 in Pac-12 play. In addition to Garciamendez, seniors include Annie Case, Lindsay Dickerson, Aly Gleason, Marjani Hing-Glover, Mariah Nogueira, Rachel Quon, Madeleine Thomp-

son, Courtney Verloo, and Nina Watkins. “We have a strong senior class that will give it everything they have,” Ratcliffe said. “We’re growing as a team and playing well. We realize this is a do-or-die situation now. We realize we are fortunate to get to this point. You only get so many chances. It was a great experience to win last year but we want to win again. There is no relaxing at this stage.” The winner of Stanford-Santa Clara will play Sunday at 1 p.m. against either Denver (16-2-4) or No. 9 Maryland (14-6-2), who play Friday at 4:30 p.m. “Denver is a good team and wellcoached. It’s a tough pod,” Ratcliffe said. “Maryland is always competitive and playing in the ACC toughens you up.” N

ohn Tanner and Tara VanDerveer each have a level of success that would be difficult to match. Tanner has led the Stanford women’s water polo team to the past two NCAA titles and VanDerveer has led the women’s basketball team to five consecutive Final Four appearances. Talk about a recruiting tool. They both announced the next wave of Cardinal standouts this week. On Wednesday, Tanner announced that Julia Hermann, Danijela Jackovich, Sophia Monaghan, Jamie Neushul and Jessica Webster will join the water polo program. “This group has an extremely bright future,” said Tanner. “They’ve had college-level coaching for much or all of their careers, and they have the work ethic to embrace the intensity of play here. It’s really exciting that they’ve all been focused on Stanford for some time and can’t wait to get started.” On Thursday, VanDerveer announced that forwards Kailee Johnson and Erica McCall, wing Karlie Samuelson and point guard Khaliyah “Lili” Thompson will join her crew. “Some words that I think really describe this class are versatile, athletic, and competitive,” VanDerveer said. “Our players are coming out of high school very skilled, and we will continue to have good team speed. All four are a great fit for Stanford academically, will be a great fit for our team. These are players who have played not only for USA Basketball, but for elite summer basketball programs and great coaches, so the experienced competition they have excelled against will help them acclimate quickly to the college game.” Water polo Hermann, a 5-8 goalie, is one of four Southern Californians in the class and was named to the All-CIF San Diego Section Division I first team last season after leading Torrey Pines High School to its second straight Palomar League title. Jackovich, a 6-0 center, brings a strong international resume to the program, having captained the U.S. Youth National Team in 2011. Next month she will represent the USA at the FINA Youth World Championships in Perth, Australia. Monaghan helped lead the U.S. Junior National Team to the gold medal at the U-19 Pan-American Games. The 5-9 center-defender was also previously a member of the youth national team. Neushul , a 5-7 driver, helped lead Dos Pueblos High to consecutive CIF Southern Section Division I titles in her freshman and sophomore years. In 2011 and 2012, she was named to the All-CIF Southern Section Division I First Team for her accomplishments. Webster, a 5-10 driver from The Bishop’s School, She was twice

named to the All-CIF San Diego Section first team. Women’s basketball Johnson and McCall will add additional depth to the Cardinal frontcourt upon arrival during the summer of 2013. Johnson, a 6-3 forward, brings a wide-ranging skill set to The Farm. The Portland, Ore. native utilizes her length and size to make herself a formidable defender and rebounder. McCall, also 6-3, has already burnished her credentials against international competition as a two-time gold medalist with the USA Basketball U16 and U17 National Teams. Samuelson joins older sister, Bonnie, on the squad next season, adding her own deadly long-range accuracy to the Cardinal fold. Thompson, a 5-7 point guard from Mansfield, Texas, bolsters not only the Cardinal backcourt but also its sizable contingent from the Lone Star State. Women’s swimming Greg Meehan and Rick Schavone announced Thursday that six student-athletes have signed a National Letter of Intent to join the swimming and diving program. The six-person signing class — Meehan’s first since arriving on The Farm in August — includes swimmers Lia Neal, Grace Carlson, Nicole Stafford, Tara Halsted, Bridget Boushka and diver Kassidy Cook. Women’s basketball Sophomore guard Amber Orrange and junior All-America Chiney Ogwumike will lead the fourth-ranked Cardinal into the mouth of a Bear on Friday when Stanford takes on top-ranked Baylor and the massively talented Brittney Griner at the Rainbow Wahine Invitational in Hawaii. Baylor (2-0) is coming off a 34point win over No. 6 Kentucky, which was held to just over 27 percent shooting. Griner recorded her 82nd consecutive double-figure scoring game and also had five blocked shots. She holds the Big 12 record with 606 career blocks and needs 57 to match the NCAA mark. Stanford (2-0) beat Santa Clara, 92-57, on Sunday with Ogwumike scoring 22 points and the Cardinal shooting 63.5 percent from the field. The defending national champion Bears provide Stanford with what Ogwumike terms a “gut check,” or an early test to see how Stanford stacks up against the best team in the nation. Baylor, of course, ended Stanford’s season last year, 59-47, in the national semifinal game. The Cardinal played a tactical defensive strategy against Griner and plans to employ many of the same things this time around. That means guard play will be important. N

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 43

Sports YOUTH FOOTBALL

Big day for the Knights means trip to nationals by Keith Peters

I

t was only a few weeks ago that the Palo Alto Knights’ Jr. Midgets football team suffered its first loss of the season. The setback came long-time rival Oak Grove, a stinging 22-8 setback. Afterward, Palo Alto coach Mike Piha promised his team would be better the next time the teams met. “We probably watched film of that game almost every night for three weeks,” said Piha, who used that time with his coaches to devise a way to beat Oak Grove when the teams faced off Sunday in the American Youth Football NorCal Regional Championship game at Oak Grove High. The game plan worked perfectly as the Knights rolled to a 24-6 triumph and qualified for the AYF National Championships in Orlando, Fla. Piha will be making a seventh trip to the national playoffs and the fourth straight with most of his players who have come up through the ranks. Palo Alto improved to 10-1. Oak Grove, which fell to 10-1, received a wild-card berth into the national playoffs on Monday. The Knights are planning to leave for Florida on Nov. 30 with games beginning on Dec. 2.

CCS football (continued from page 42)

The winner will advance to the semifinals next weekend at Independence High in San Jose at 7 p.m. The likely opponent will be No. 1 seed Bellarmine (9-1), which hosts No. 8 Terra Nova in the first round. Palo Alto and Serra, meanwhile, will match 8-2 records and highpowered offenses that will put the defenses to the test. The Vikings are averaging 41.5 points a game, which ranks No. 4 in the CCS this season, while the Padres are averaging 36.1 points a contest. Both defenses, coincidently, are holding opponents to 19.1 points a game. Serra comes in averaging 332 rushing yards a game and only 50.7 through the air, which pretty much sums up what the Padres plan to do Friday. Palo Alto head coach Earl Hansen has faced run-oriented teams before — like Bellarmine — and has had mixed results in stopping them. “They (Serra) run that same double wing that Bellarmine does,” said Hansen. “They just get their running back in behind the big linemen and go.” The Padres will bank on senior running back Eric Redwood to carry their hopes. He’s carried 172 times for 1,309 yards and 20 touchdowns. “He’s not overly fast,” Hansen said of Redwood. “But, their linemen are

“This was one of the signature victories for our program,” said Piha, who has announced this will be his last season coaching the Knights after 16 years with the program. “We have not dominated an Oak Grove team like we did . . . ever. The players played an almost perfect game. They were confident and executed on offense, defense and special teams.” In the first meeting between the teams, Oak Grove had one player who ran roughshod over the Knights while scoring three touchdowns. Piha had Jordan Schilling shadow that player wherever he went and helped hold him to under 30 yards rushing. Oak Grove did score first, completing a 98-yard touchdown on a broken play in the first quarter. That, however, was all the offense the home team could muster as Palo Alto’s defense rose to the challenge. Palo Alto bounced back from the early deficit and scored as quarterback Jake Rittman fired a TD pass to Ty Cox following a 73-yard run by Ethan Stern set up the score that gave the Knights an 8-6 halftime lead. “When we took that halftime lead, it really changed the momen-

Linda Cullen

Palo Alto Jr. Midgets’ team heading once again to Florida after capturing the AYF NorCal Regional Championships

Jake Rittman (1) of the Palo Alto Knights’ Jr. Midgets shows off his interception in the second half of his team’s 24-6 victory over host Oak Grove in the AYF NorCal Regional Championship game last weekend. tum of the game,” Piha said. “It was the first time Oak Grove had been behind all season. You could see how frustrated they were. They just folded after that.” The second half was all Palo Alto as Rittman hit Ben Cleasby for a 27-yard TD and Stern scored on a six-yard run. The Knights also converted all three two-point PATS on kicks by Luca Zaharias. The Knights’ defense held Oak Grove to 23 yards rushing, its lowest output of the season. Oak Grove also came into the game averaging 30 points an outing. Palo Alto’s defense was led by Ty Wilcox, Schilling, Stern, Cleasby and had interceptions by Logan Johnson and Rittman in the second half when

2012 CCS FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS OPEN DIVISION Friday’s games No. 6 St. Ignatius (7-3) vs. No. 3 Palma (8-2) at Salinas Sports Complex, 7 p.m. No. 7 Mitty (7-3) at No. 2 Oak Grove (10-0), 7 p.m. No. 5 Serra (8-2) at No. 4 Palo Alto (8-2), 7 p.m. No. 8 Terra Nova (6-4) vs. No. 1 Bellarmine (9-1) at San Jose City College, 7 p.m. DIVISION I Friday’s games No. 6 San Benito (5-5) at No. 3 Alisal (8-2), 7 p.m. No. 7 Fremont (8-2) at No. 2 Salinas (6-4), 7 p.m. No. 5 Sequoia (8-2) at No. 4 MenloAtherton (6-4), 7 p.m. No. 8 Silver Creek (5-5) at No. 1 Milpitas (7-3), 7 p.m. DIVISION II Friday’s games No. 6 S. San Francisco (7-3) at No. 3 Wilcox (7-3), 7 p.m. No. 7 Pioneer (4-6) at No. 2 Los Gatos (6-4), 7 p.m. No. 5 Aragon (7-3) at No. 4 Leland (6-4),

big and strong.” Serra comes into the game following an upsetting 24-0 loss to St. Francis last Saturday. “They didn’t play well,” Hansen said of the Padres. “They just go flat out beat. St. Francis played great defense. Redwood had around 100 yards (107), but tons of carries (27). St. Francis came out throwing and didn’t stop.” Interestingly enough, neither team

Page 44ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

7 p.m. No. 8 Overfelt (6-4) at No. 1 St. Francis (5-5), 7 p.m. DIVISION III Friday’s games No. 5 Aptos (8-2) at No. 4 Saratoga (6-4), 7 p.m. No. 8 Soledad (6-4) at No. 1 Monterey (8-2) at Monterey Peninsula College, 7 p.m. Saturday’s games No. 6 Burlingame (5-5) at No. 3 Valley Christian (4-6), 7 p.m. No. 7 Riordan (3-7) vs. No. 2 Sobrato (7-3) at Live Oak High, 7 p.m. DIVISION IV Friday’s games No. 6 Soquel (8-2) vs. No. 3 Carmel (9-1) at Pacific Grove High, 7 p.m. No. 5 Monte Vista Christian (8-2) vs. No. 4 Menlo School (8-2) at Sequoia High, 7 p.m. No. 8 Capuchino (6-4) at No. 1 Seaside (10-0), 7 p.m. Saturday’s game No. 7 Pacific Grove (7-3) at No. 2 Sacred Heart Prep (9-1), 1 p.m.

generated much yardage. The Lancers rushed for only 37 yards and finished with 244 total yards. The Padres passed for only 57 yards and finished with 273 total. Defense and turnovers proved to be the difference as St. Francis picked off three passes and recovered a fumble. “In close games like this one,” said Hansen, “we can’t make mistakes, like we did against Milpitas.” Paly lost its SCVAL De Anza Di-

Oak Grove was forced to pass in an attempt to catch up. Palo Alto will be looking to reach the AYF championship game for the first time since 2002. He expects the Knights to receive a No. 2 of 3 seed but knows the competition will be tough. The program that eliminated Palo Alto last season from Mesa, Ariz., will be making a return visit to Orlando. “We’re much more diversified this year,” Piha explained. “We have three solid running backs, a good quarterback and good receivers.” Piha figures he has 23 players who’ll be playing with the Knights for the final time before heading off to high school next year. Thus, the time to bring home the program’s

first national title is now. Said Piha: “It’s about time we bring one home to Palo Alto.” The Knights are seeking to raise $24,000 over the next two weeks to help cover the air fare, lodging, meals and transportation. Tax deductible donations can be made by going to www.paloaltoknights. com. “This is my last year coaching the Palo Alto Knights,” said Piha, “so I am looking forward to a ‘special’ week in Orlando with this team. These boys are fortunate to have this opportunity to travel and play for a national championship four years in a row. The Knights have not experienced this with any other team. N

vision opener to Milpitas, 24-19, in a game that saw junior quarterback Keller Chryst throw five interceptions and senior wideout Malcolm Davis drop an wide-open touchdown pass. In Paly’s only other loss, to Mitty, the Vikings missed an extra point and gave up a 99-yard kickoff return in a 28-27 nonleague decision. Take away one mistake in each game and Palo Alto could be sitting at 10-0. The Vikings, to their credit, recovered from those setbacks. Since the loss to Milpitas, Paly has won six straight. One more win will give the Vikings a record of 100-25-2 in the past 10 seasons for an average of 10 wins per year. Palo Alto is averaging 46.8 points during its win streak and has scored more points in 10 games (415) than its state championship team did in 2010 when it produced 323 before running the table in the postseason to finish 14-0. Even last season’s team, with B.J. Boyd, scored only 402 points after the first 10 games. Clearly, the Vikings have reloaded instead of rebuilding. It starts with Chryst, who has completed 123 of 240 passes for 2,278 yards and 26 touchdowns with 11 interceptions while averaging 227.8 yards per game. Senior Jayshawn GatesMouton has caught 33 passes for 678 yards and junior Malcolm Davis has 32 receptions for 666 yards. Senior Matt Tolbert leads the run game with 1,061 yards on 139 hauls and

12 touchdowns while Justin GatesMouton has added 454 yards on 49 carries with five TDs. A defensive line that includes senior Spencer Drazovich, junior Jack Anderson, junior Justin Rittman, junior Pedro Gomez, senior De’Antay Williams and senior Larry Allen will play a key role in controlling the line of scrimmage. If the Vikings can do that, it’s on to the semifinals and a rematch with defending champion Bellarmine. In other CCS openers Friday, No. 4-seeded Menlo-Atherton (6-4) will host No. 5 Sequoia (8-2) in Division I play and No. 4 Menlo School (8-2) will take on No. 5 Monte Vista Christian (8-2) of Watsonville in Division IV action at Sequoia High. Both games are at 7 p.m. On Saturday, No. 2 Sacred Heart Prep (9-1) will host No. 7 Pacific Grove (7-3) at 1 p.m. For Menlo-Atherton and Menlo, first-round wins will earn them semifinal games with top-seeded teams — Milpitas (7-3) for the Bears and Seaside (10-0) for the Knights. The Gators have a potentially easier route with No. 3 Carmel (9-1) providing a test in the semifinals. Menlo opens the postseason as the No. 1 scoring team in the CCS with 49.7 points a game while Sacred Heart Prep is the top defensive squad, allowing just nine points a contest — despite giving up 28 points to Menlo last week in the Gators’ 31-28 victory in the Valparaiso Bowl. N

Sports CCS WATER POLO

SHP teams are back in finals

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs Cranio Sacral Therapy Cupping, Ear Seeds, Tuina

SPECIALIZING IN:

M-A boys pull off upset of St. Francis to reach title match

Yaping Chen, L.Ac.

Call Today for Appointment 650.853.8889

by Rick Eymer t will be a different place, but a familiar setting, for the Sacred Heart Prep boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; water polo teams on Saturday when they seek to add to their growing collection of Central Coast Section titles. While the championship matches have been moved from Independence High to the George F. Haines International Swim Center in Santa Clara, both SHP teams are back playing once again on the final day of the season. For the boys, it will be their 10th straight appearance in the Division II title match. For the SHP girls, it will be their seventh consecutive date in the Division II finals. Not too surprisingly, all those appearances have provided opportunities. The SHP boys have won four of the past five CCS titles and five overall since winning their first in 2003. For the girls, they have won a record five straight and have a good shot at extending that win streak to six. Both teams posted impressive victories this week in their respective semifinals. On Wednesday, the SHP boys jumped out of the pool at Serra High School in San Mateo following a 15-3 dunking of Soquel as they would following a particularly good practice. Reaching the CCS championship game is cool, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still work to be done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always been difficult against Soquel,â&#x20AC;? Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; coach Brian Kreutzkamp said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was the third year in a row weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played them in the semifinals and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been done entering the final quarter the past two years.â&#x20AC;? This time around the top-seeded Gators took matters into their own hands early, scoring the first 11 goals before the fourth-seeded Knights could respond with one of their own in the third period. Sacred Heart Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victory was methodical and it did the job. Junior Harrison Enright led the charge with three goals for the Gators (24-4), who will meet Los Altos for the title at 11:30 a.m. The No. 3-seeded Eagles (18-11) beat St. Ignatius, 15-8, to qualify themselves for the championship. Menlo-Atherton and Bellarmine play for the Division I title, two teams the Gators already have beaten this season. Sacred Heart, which beat Los Altos for the CCS title last year, can lay claim to being the best in the section should it repeat. Defensively the Gators shut down Soquel, allowing very few shots. The shots the Knights were able to get off often landed safely in the

Sports Injuries Chronic Pain Stress and Mood Swings Insomia and Fatigue Depression and Anxiety Weight Management Menopause Symptoms

INFO ACUPUNCTUREOFPALOALTOCOMsACUPUNCTUREOFPALOALTOCOM

Insurance Accepted

I

Peninsula School Keith Peters

OVSTFSZUISPVHIUIHSBEFtQSPHSFTTJWFFEVDBUJPOTJODF

We believe education can be engaging and joyous.

Senior goalie Will Runkel came up with nine saves in Sacred Heart Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15-3 victory over Soquel in the CCS Division II semifinals. SHP roll to a 6-0 halftime lead. By the time Castilleja finally scored on a shot by Grace Arnold, it was 7-1 late in the third period. Camille Zelinger, P.J. Bigley and Malaika Koshy all scored twice for SHP while Arnold tallied three goals and Anna Yu two for Castilleja. While both SHP teams were expected to reach the finals, the thirdseeded Menlo-Atherton boys were not. However, the Bears pulled the upset of the tournament by topping No. 2 St. Francis, 11-10, in a Division I semifinal at Serra High on Tuesday night. The Bears (14-12) will face No. 1 Bellarmine (17-11), a 16-12 winner over Mountain View, in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship match at 2:30 p.m. Harrison Holland-McCowan scored six goals and Evan McClelland added three for the Bears, who will be making their first appearance in the finals since 2008 and in only their third title game. M-A scored four unanswered goals in the third quarter for an 11-6 lead and held on from there behind goalie Peter Berquist while preventing a fourth straight Bellarmine-St. Francis matchup in the finals. This will be M-A coach Dante Dettamantiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second appearance in a CCS finale. In his first, he guided Sacred Heart Prep to the Division II in 2003. In girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Division I semifinal Wednesday, No. 3 Menlo-Atherton came up short in its bid to reach the finals while dropping an 8-7 decision to No. 2 Leland at Gunn High. The Bears (15-11) got four goals from junior Jessica Heilman and 16 saves from junior goalie Sierra Sheeper while falling to the Chargers for a third time this season. M-A had a shot to tie with 20 seconds remaining, but a seven-meter shot hit the post and defending Division I champion Leland ran out the clock. The Bears lose only one senior, Jenna Swartz, off the team that dropped two blowout matches to Leland earlier in the season but improved to the point of taking the champs to the brink. N

Ä&#x2018;Ĺ?Ĺ?!(!.0%*#Ĺ?.0/Ĺ?* Ĺ? !)%/ Ä&#x2018;Ĺ?Ĺ?+.'%*#Ĺ?0+#!0$!.Ĺ?0+Ĺ?1(0%20!Ĺ?1.%+/%05Ĺ?* Ĺ?%)#%*0%+*Ĺ? Ä&#x2018;Ĺ?Ĺ?0.+*#Ĺ?+))1*%05Ĺ?1%( %*# Ä&#x2018;Ĺ?Ĺ?+1/%*#Ĺ?+*Ĺ?0$!Ĺ?,.+!//Ĺ?+"Ĺ?(!.*%*# Ä&#x2018;Ĺ?Ĺ? +3Ĺ?/01 !*0Ĺ?0!$!.Ĺ?.0%+Ä&#x152;Ĺ?/)((Ĺ?(//Ĺ?/%6! 

Ĺ?1./!.5Ä&#x152;Ĺ? %* !.#.0!*Ä&#x152;Ĺ?%./0Ĺ?. ! 01. 5Ä&#x152;Ĺ?0+!.Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x2C6;Ä&#x152;Ĺ? Ä Ä&#x20AC;Ä˘Ä Ä Ä?Ä&#x192;Ä&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x2039;)Ä&#x2039;Ĺ?Ĺ?   

  0+!.Ĺ?Ä Ä Ĺ?Ä&#x2019;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x152;Ĺ?+2!)!.Ĺ?Ä&#x2030;Ĺ?Ä&#x2019;Ĺ?Ä Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x152;Ĺ? !!)!.Ĺ?Ä&#x2021;Ĺ?Ä&#x2019;Ĺ?Ä Ä&#x192;Ä&#x152;Ĺ? *1.5Ĺ?Ä Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x152;Ĺ?!#%**%*#Ĺ?0Ĺ?Ä Ä&#x20AC;Ä?Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x2039;)Ä&#x2039;Ĺ?Ĺ?       +.Ĺ?*Ĺ?,,+%*0)!*0Ä&#x152;Ĺ?,(!/!Ĺ?((Ĺ?ĨÄ&#x2021;Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x20AC;ÄŠĹ?Ä&#x192;Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x2020;ÄĄÄ Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2030;Ä&#x2026;Ä&#x152;Ĺ?!40Ä&#x2039;Ĺ?Ä&#x2020; Photo: Marc Silber

arms of Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; goalie Will Runkel, who recorded nine saves in 3 1/2 periods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy we came out and took care of business,â&#x20AC;? Kreutzkamp said. Bret Hinrichs, Will Conner and Zach Churukian each added two goals for the Gators, while six others each added a goal. On Tuesday, the Sacred Heart Prep girls also defended their No. 1 seed while rolling to an 11-5 win over No. 4 Castilleja (12-14) in a Division II semifinal at Gunn High. SHP will face No. 2 St. Ignatius (1114) in the finals at 10 a.m. The Gators topped the Wildcats, 14-6, to open the West Catholic Athletic League regular season in September. The teams last met in a CCS title game in 2009, with SHP winning 6-2. Thus, the Gators appear heavily favored once again while playing what amounts to a league match. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anti-climactic? No, not at all,â&#x20AC;? said SHP coach Jon Burke. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any opportunity to play for a CCS title is a privilege and is a real testament to the effort and dedication this group of girls have demonstrated this season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having graduated five starters from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team, one of whom was the CCS Player of the Year (Pippa Temple), we were well aware that we would have our work cut out for us this year. This team rose to the challenge and has unequivocally set a new standard for work ethic in our program. We are very proud of what we have accomplished and are excited to play in the finals. St. Ignatius has been improving all season and is no doubt playing their best water polo right now. We are going to need to be focused and well prepared for Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game.â&#x20AC;? The (20-8) got three goals from junior Caitlin Stuewe and 14 saves from junior goalie Kelly Moran in an 11-5 triumph over No. 4 Castilleja (12-14) in a Division II semifinal at Gunn High. Stuewe converted a pair of penalty shots in the first quarter to help

  Ĺ? Ä?Ĺ? Ĺ?Ä Ä&#x2030;Ä&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x20AC;Ä Ä&#x192;

920 peninsula way, menlo park, ca | 650.325.1584 www.peninsulaschool.org

Serving

Nurturing Minds and Hearts Come grow with us

Preschool - 4th Grade 2 0 13 - 2 0 14

Ventana is an Episcopal school taking its inspiration from the schools of Reggio Emilia and other progressive models which encourage artistic expression, critical thinking and hands-on investigative learning.

Elementary School Information Night November 29, 2012 Kindergarten: 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7pm Elementary: 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8pm

Kindergarten Readiness Discussion Panel January 10, 2013, 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8pm

Elementary School Open House January 17, 2013, 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30pm

Limited spaces available for current year. Young 5s, Grades 1-3

To RSVP, or schedule a tour, call 650.948.2121 or email:ventanaschool@ccla.us 1040 Border Road, Los Altos Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 45

Sports

M-A, SHP and Priory girls reach the title matches in CCS volleyball

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

by Andrew Preimesberger alo Alto wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be playing for a third straight Central Coast Section girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volleyball title, but Sacred Heart Prep will be joined by Menlo-Atherton and Priory on Saturday in section title matches. Seniors Ellie Shannon and Payton Smith provided a huge onetwo punch for Sacred Heart Prep on Wednesday night as the Gators advanced to the Division IV final for a fourth straight year, sweeping neighborhood rival Menlo School. Shannon and Smith combined for 16 kills and 10 blocks as No. 2-seeded Gators prevailed, 25-16, 25-17, 25-10. SHP will face top-seeded Harbor (30-5) in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship match at Independence High in San Jose at 4:30 p.m. Both teams also have earned berths in next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CIF NorCal playoffs. The win over No. 3 Menlo (2310) came two weeks after the Gators lost to the Knights on the same floor, giving Menlo a share of the West Bay Athletic League (Foothill Division) title. SHP players said that four-game loss helped motivate them in Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rematch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like to lose the rivalry match,â&#x20AC;? said SHP coach Damien Hardy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge rivalry we have to win; I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like losing anyway.â&#x20AC;? Sacred Heart began the match on a 12-3 run with senior Sonia AbuelSaud providing two kills. Abuel-Saud finished the game with eight kills and 10 digs. Menlo had no answer as the Gators took the first game. The second game was controlled by Shannon and Smith. The duo combined for eight kills. The third game started out in similar fashion for the Gators as they began with an impressive 14-4 run. At one point during the run, Sacred Heart scored 12 points in a row,

P

Lucy Tashman

Jayshawn Gates-Mouton

Castilleja School

Palo Alto High

The senior outside hitter helped rally the Gators in a CCS Division V volleyball quarterfinal by producing 29 kills, 29 digs and three blocks in a 3-2 win that moved the defending champs into the semifinals.

The senior wide receiver/ defensive back caught four passes for 156 yards and touchdowns of 55 and 69 yards in addition to intercepting two passes as the Vikings clinched the SCVAL De Anza Division football title.

Honorable mention Katelyn Doherty*

Keller Chryst

Menlo-Atherton volleyball

Palo Alto football

Fiona Maloney-McCrystle Castilleja cross country

Ryan Gaertner Sacred Heart Prep football

Kelly Moran

Steven Glassmoyer

Sacred Heart Prep water polo

Giannina Ong

Sacred Heart Prep cross country

Chris Gregory

Menlo tennis

Priory cross country

Becca Raffel*

Derek Hunter

Palo Alto volleyball

Sacred Heart Prep football

Anna Zhou*

Zack Moore

Gunn golf

Menlo-Atherton football * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

S

ER V IN

G TH

OR E CHILDREN OF THE W

    

LD

.FOMP1BSL,JXBOJT$MVC $ISJTUNBT5SFFT Our 41st Year! Beautiful Noble Fir Trees delivered FRESH WEEKLY from Oregon Located: On the Stanford Campus next to the Football Stadium on El Camino Real near Embarcadero Road in Palo Alto

       

  

  

((+"()

'!#' *#'! # %# '

(&)-, *# ' $, (*#'! ,*,)+



 

.

Opens: Friday, Nov. 23, 2012

with Smith contributing four kills. Abuel-Saud spiked the last two balls to give the Gators the win. Victoria Garrick added 10 kills and nine digs to the SHP attack with Helen Gannon producing 20 digs and fellow senior Cammie Merten adding 30 assists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonight, we just could not pass the ball,â&#x20AC;? said Menlo coach Atlee Hubbard, who lost setter Elisa Merten to a foot injury in Game 2. Sacred Heart Prep, meanwhile, moves on with hopes of reaching the state finals for the first time since 2010. Harbor, however, will provide a tough test Saturday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to stay focused,â&#x20AC;? said Shannon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we lose our energy weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re definitely not as strong as when we have it. We have to keep that energy.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harbor is another tough team,â&#x20AC;? said Hardy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to play how we did tonight. If our kids listen to what we tell them to do, we play a good game.â&#x20AC;? After SHP takes on Harbor in the Division IV finals, Menlo-Atherton will take the court for a fourth straight appearance in the Division I finals. The No. 3-seeded Bears (26-7) are still looking for their first section title. M-A will take on No. 4 Homestead (23-8) at 7 p.m. The Mustangs opened the door for the Bears with a shocking sweep of two-time defending state champion Palo Alto. The Bears now need to take advantage after eliminating No. 2 Salinas, 25-9, 25-19, 20-25, 21-25, 15-8, in the semifinals at Santa Clara High on Wednesday night. Senior Ali Spindt had 22 kills plus 29 assists while junior Pauli King added 18 kills to pace M-A. Both players battled back from injuries during the regular season, with

Hours: Daily - 2 PM to 8 PM Weekends - 9 AM to 8 PM

Delivery Available Proceeds from your tree purchases goes to support many local organizations.

Page 46Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;



     !   

Spindt missing much of the PAL Bay Division campaign. While both players were sidelined, senior Katelyn Doherty helped carry the team. It was a role she provided against Salinas (23-9) with 10 kills, 29 assist and 23 digs. Virginia Lane also stood out with 27 digs. In the deciding game, Doherty fed King for a kill and 13-7 lead with Spindt appropriately finishing it off with back-to-back kills. In the second Division I semifinal at Santa Clara, Palo Alto lost an opportunity to play for a third straight section crown by being swept by Homestead, 25-20, 27-25, 25-17. The top-seeded Vikings (28-7) had beaten the Mustangs twice during the SCVAL De Anza Division season and at Spikefest II. Paly had a chance to win Game 2 with the match deadlocked at 24, but a serving error opened the door for the Mustangs to pull it out. In Game 3, the Vikings led by 10-3 before Homestead went on a 22-7 run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes the planets just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t align and your team doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play its best when they need to,â&#x20AC;? said Paly coach Dave Winn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Certainly, Homestead played great, but we had one our worst passing and digging nights from several of our players. Homestead had a lot to do with that by them minimizing errors, but I think a lot of Paly players will feel like they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have their best mental or physical performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m confident that our underclassmen will be using this match as motivation to improve through their club seasons and come back next year even more determined to put Paly back into the CCS finals again.â&#x20AC;? Co-captains Shelby Knowles and Sophia Bono, the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only seniors, did what they could to keep the Vikings in the match on an off passing night. Knowles had 17 kills and 12 digs with Bono contributing 29 assists. Junior Keri Gee finished with 18 digs. Knowles played four years on teams with a combined record of 141-16, the second-best four-year mark in school history. Teams from 2008-11 went 146-16. In Division V, No. 2-seeded Priory (20-8) returned to the finals for a second straight year with a 25-16, 25-22, 25-23 semifinal win over No. 3 Santa Catalina at St. Francis-Central Coast Catholic in Watsonville. Junior Marine Hall-Poirier led the Panthers with 16 kills, 16 digs and three aces and senior Briana Willhite added nine kills, three blocks and hit .474. Emily Tonogai and Michaela Koval provided 16 and 14 digs, respectively. Priory will be looking for its first CCS title since 2004. The Panthers fell to Castilleja in last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Division V title match and were hoping for a rematch. The scenario didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pan out as the No. 4 Gators (17-16) were eliminated by No. 1 Notre Dame-Salinas, 26-24, 23-25, 25-22, 25-21, in the other semifinal. Senior outside hitter Lucy Tashman led the Gators with 20 kills and 23 digs. N

Sports CROSS COUNTRY

Runners heading to state meet Two teams and nine individuals qualify at CCS Championships by Keith Peters

T

wo teams and nine individuals will extend the cross-country season for another week after qualifying for the CIF State Meet on Saturday at the Central Coast Section Championships at Toro Park in Salinas. The teams headed to Fresno’s Woodward Park on Nov. 24 are the Division V Priory boys and Castilleja. Priory finished second with 52 points over the 3.0-mile layout as junior Chris Gregory led the way in 17:13 while taking third overall. Teammate Andrew Christensen was fifth (17:21). Other Panthers scoring included Joe Farned (ninth in 17:31), Leo Berez (12th, 17:32) and Ross Corey (24th, 18:26). Castilleja also will send its team to Fresno after the Gators finished third with 66 points. Fiona Maloney-McCrystle led the way with a third-place finish of 19:44. Alina Brown was eighth (20:31), Abby Holsten 17th (21:42), Julia Lodgen 23rd (22:59) and Teni Amos 27th (23:42). Fewer team berths were available at the higher divisions with the Menlo-Atherton boys and Palo Alto girls just missing state meet berths after finishing third in their respective races. The Bears will send one runner to the state meet in senior George Baier, who was seventh in 16:01. The Palo Alto girls were much closer to a state berth by scoring 106 points. Menlo-Atherton was fourth with 115 and Gunn took seventh with 204. Paly sophomore Katie Foug earned a state meet berth with a third-place finish of 18:57. Gunn freshman Gillian Meeks also earned a trip to Fresno after taking fifth in 19:02. In the boys’ Division IV race, Sacred Heart Prep was fifth and Menlo eighth. The Gators, however, will send two runners to the state meet after senior Steven Glassmoyer took third in 16:07 and sophomore Daniel Hill was seventh in 16:26. It was a similar story in the Division IV girls’ race as Menlo finished out of the running in seventh and SHP likewise in 10th. Menlo freshman Zoe Enright, however, earned a state meet berth by taking fourth in 18:57. Teammate Lizzie Lacy, a sophomore, also is headed to Fresno following her seventh-place finish of 19:11. Joining them will be Sacred Heart Prep’s Gillian Belton, who finished eighth in 19:26. Also advancing to the state meet as an individual was Eastside Prep’s Christian Rosales, who finished 13th in the Division V boys’ race in 17:33. N

I LIVE MY LIFE. Offering new hope for lung cancer HOSPITALS NATIONAL CANCER

Every day, patients facing the challenge of fighting lung cancer come to the Stanford Cancer Center for help, hope, and healing. The multidisciplinary lung cancer team at Stanford has extensive

experience in treating both early stage and complex cases of lung cancer. With new knowledge about the genetic makeup of tumor types, our team of specialists provides personalized treatment plans that match individual patient needs. Learn how the Stanford Thoracic Cancer Program can help you.

For more info, call 650.498.6000 or visit cancer.stanford.edu/lungcancer

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 47

SOLD 657 College, Menlo Park represented buyer

Beds 3 | Baths 2 | Home ~ 1,780 sq. ft. | Lot ~ 7,950 sq. ft. www.schoelerman.com

Page 48ÊUÊ œÛi“LiÀÊ£È]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“


Palo Alto Weekly 11.16.2012 - Section 1