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Vol. XXXIV, Number 3 N October 19, 2012

School board candidates air issues Page 3

Having lots of kids defies Palo Alto trend

Transitions 17

Spectrum 18

Eating Out 30

Shop Talk 32

Movies 33

PAGE 22

Puzzles 62

NArts United Nations ďŹ lm festival inspires action

Page 27

NSports Another Big Game challenge for Stanford

Page 35

NHome A well-located, yet leisurely paced neighborhood Page 41

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Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

Palo Alto in ‘uncharted’ territory on compost City to explore a range of technologies, export options for dealing with three types of organic waste by Gennady Sheyner HEFUTUREOFORGANICWASTEIN 0ALO!LTOREMAINSMURKY BUT CITYOFFICIALSHOPETOSOLVETHIS MESSYANDDIVISIVEDILEMMABYEAR LYANDARENOWLOOKINGTOTHE FREEMARKETFORHELP 4HECITYISINTHEMIDSTOFAMULTI YEAREFFORTTOFIGUREOUTWHATTODO

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WITHITSFOODSCRAPS YARDTRIMMINGS AND BIOSOLID WASTE !S OFFICIALS WEIGHTHEPROSANDCONSOFSHIPPING WASTEELSEWHEREORBUILDINGAPLANT TO CONVERT THE WASTE INTO ENERGY THEYAREPREPARINGTOSOLICITPROPOS ALSTHATWILLHELPTHEMREFINETHEIR COSTESTIMATESFORBOTH

4HE QUESTION OF WHAT TO DO WITH LOCALCOMPOSTTOOKONASENSEOFUR GENCYLASTYEAR WHENTHECITYSHUT DOWNITS"YXBEE0ARKLANDFILLˆA  ACRE SPRAWL NEAR THE "AYLANDS THATHADHOUSEDTHECITYSCOMPOST INGOPERATION 4HEIDEAOFBUILDINGAPLANTGAINED ABURSTOFMOMENTUMIN.OVEMBER  WHENVOTERSOVERWHELMINGLY PASSED -EASURE % 4HE MEASURE WHICHWASPLACEDONTHEBALLOTBYA COALITIONOFLOCALENVIRONMENTALISTS

AUTHORIZES THE CITY TO USE  ACRES OFPREVIOUSLYDEDICATEDPARKLANDFOR ANANAEROBICDIGESTERˆANENCLOSED PLANT IN WHICH MICRO ORGANISMS BREAK DOWN YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOODWASTEANDTURNTHEMINTONATU RAL GAS /PPONENTS OF THE MEASURE ˆAGROUPTHATINCLUDESSOMEOFTHE CITYSMOSTPROMINENTCONSERVATION ISTSˆHAVEVOCIFEROUSLYARGUEDTHAT "YXBEE0ARKISNOPLACEFORAWASTE FACILITY AND HAVE URGED THE CITY TO EXPORT THE WASTE AND TURN THE FOR

MERLANDFILLSITEINTOAPUBLICPARK ASHADLONGBEENPLANNED 7HILE -EASURE % ANSWERED THE MAINQUESTIONINTHECOMPOSTDE BATE ˆ WHERE A PLANT COULD BE BUILT ˆ MANY OTHER QUESTIONS REMAIN 4HESE INCLUDE $OES IT MAKEECONOMICSENSETOCONSTRUCT A LOCAL PLANT 7HICH TECHNOLOGY SHOULDTHECITYADOPT4OWHATEX TENTSHOULDTHECITYBEINVOLVEDIN (continued on page 9)

EDUCATION

School board candidates air issues at forum Site-based decision-making, teacher evaluations, among topics in panel led by state Sen. Joe Simitian by Chris Kenrick NCUMBENTSTOUTEDTHEACADEMIC ANDFISCALSTRENGTHOF0ALO!LTO SCHOOLS WHILE CHALLENGERS SAID THE SCHOOL DISTRICT COULD BE DOING BETTERONARANGEOFISSUES-ONDAY NIGHT /CT  AT A SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATESFORUM 4HREEOFTHEFOURCANDIDATESSAID THEY WOULD BACK A LONGER PROBA TIONARYPERIODFORTEACHERSBEFORE TENUREISGRANTEDWHILETHEFOURTH +EN$AUBER SAIDHEWOULDSUPPORT DATA GATHERING TO SEE WHETHER THE CURRENTTWO YEARPROBATIONARYPE RIODISORISNTWORKING%XTENDING THE TWO YEAR PROBATIONARY PERIOD WOULD REQUIRE A CHANGE IN STATE LAW &OUR CANDIDATES ˆ CHALLENGERS (EIDI %MBERLING AND $AUBER AND INCUMBENTS #AMILLE 4OWNSEND AND -ELISSA "ATEN #ASWELL ˆ ARE COMPETING FOR THREE SEATS ON THE 0ALO!LTOSCHOOLBOARDINTHE.OV ELECTION $AUBERCAMEACROSSASTHESTRON GESTCRITIC SAYINGTHEBOARDNEEDSTO hBRIDGETHEGAPBETWEENSENTIMENT ANDREALITYvONARANGEOFISSUESRE LATEDTOACADEMICSTRESS h7ENEEDTOMOVEBEYONDTHEIDEA THATTHERESAPROBLEM ANDWENEED TODOSOMETHINGABOUTIT vHESAID #ASWELL %MBERLINGAND4OWNSEND POINTEDTOANTI STRESSPROGRAMSTHAT RECENTLYHAVEBEENPUTINPLACE h3OMETIMES YOU JUST HAVE TO LET PEOPLE DO THEIR WORK v 4OWNSEND SAID #ITING THE DISTRICTS NEW HOME WORK POLICY ADOPTION OF THE WELL NESS PROGRAM $EVELOPMENTAL !SSETS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE COM MUNITY COALITION 0ROJECT 3AFETY .ET 4OWNSEND SAID h4HE DISTRICT HASTAKENALOTOFACTIONINTHELAST FEWYEARSv )N !CADEMIC 0ERFORMANCE )NDEX SCORES THAT LAST WEEK RANKED 0ALO

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Veronica Weber

Towards the end of day The setting sun casts a reddish glow over the Baylands and silhouettes a bird.

U.S. CONSTITUTION

Palo Alto considers Citizens United City may join movement for an amendment to address Supreme Court decision on corporate spending by Gennady Sheyner ORPORATIONS ARE NOT PEOPLE -ONEYISNOTSPEECH 4HESE MAXIMS HAVE BE COME A RALLYING CRY FOR OPPONENTS OFTHERECENTDECISIONINTHECASEOF #ITIZENS 5NITED VS &EDERAL %LEC TION#OMMISSION INWHICHTHE53 3UPREME#OURTRULEDBYA VOTE THATPOLITICALSPENDINGISAFORMOF

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FREE SPEECH PROTECTED BY THE &IRST !MENDMENT.OW OPPONENTSOFTHE RULING HOPE TO ADD THESE WORDS TO THE53#ONSTITUTION 4HEDRIVETOAMENDTHE#ONSTITU TIONANDTOSPECIFYTHATˆ#ITIZENS 5NITEDNOTWITHSTANDINGˆCORPORA TIONSAREINFACTNOTPEOPLEHASBEEN PERCOLATING AT THE GRASSROOTS LEVEL

EVERSINCETHENATIONSHIGHESTCOURT MADEITSDECISIONIN*ANUARY /N -ONDAY NIGHT THE 0ALO !LTO #ITY#OUNCILWILLCONSIDERWHETHER THECITYSHOULDTHROWITSSUPPORTBE HINDTHISMOVEMENT !T LEAST ONE LOCAL COMMISSION (continued on page 6)

!LTO SIXTH IN THE STATE THE BIGGEST GAINS CAME FROM LOW INCOME AND MINORITYSTUDENTS SHESAID $AUBERSAIDHEANDAPARENTGROUP HE COFOUNDED 7E #AN $O "ET TER0ALO!LTO COULDTAKECREDITFOR PRODDINGTHEBOARDONSOMEOFTHE NEWANTI STRESSPOLICIES h7EVE MADE SOME PROGRESS ON THIS AND )VE BEEN INVOLVED v HE SAID $AUBERSAIDTHEDISTRICTSCULTURE OFLETTINGSCHOOLSCHOOSETHEIROWN PROGRAMSANDPROCESSESˆKNOWN AS SITE BASED DECISION MAKING ˆ HASGONETOOFAR STIFLINGTHESPREAD OFBESTPRACTICESACROSSTHESCHOOL DISTRICT h4OO OFTEN DEFERENCE TO SITE BASED DECISION MAKING MEANS WE DELIVER UNEVEN QUALITY v HE SAID MENTIONINGTHEDIFFERINGCOUNSELING PROGRAMS AT THE TWO HIGH SCHOOLS THETIMELAGBEFORETHE*,3-IDDLE 3CHOOL ORIENTATION FOR SIXTH GRAD ERSSPREADTOTHETWOOTHERMIDDLE SCHOOLS AND THE hPATCHYv IMPLE MENTATIONOFTHETECHNOLOGY BASED COMMUNICATIONTOOLh3CHOOLOGYv #ASWELL SAID THERES A hDELI CATE BALANCEv BETWEEN SITE BASED DECISION MAKING AND CENTRALIZED CONTROL#ITINGHERMANAGEMENTEX PERIENCEINTECHNOLOGYCOMPANIES SHESAIDPROFESSIONALSDOTHEIRBEST WORKWHENTHEYREGIVENCLEARGOALS ANDMETRICS NOTWHENTHEYAREMI CRO MANAGED h4HEDISTRICTSHOULDSETPOLICYAND METRICSVERYCLEARLY MAKESUREPEO PLEUNDERSTANDTHEM ANDLETINNOVA TIONHAPPENATTHESITES vSHESAID #ASWELL AND 4OWNSEND ACKNOWL EDGEDTHEBOARDCOULDHAVEDONEBET TERSETTINGCLEARPOLICYANDMETRICSIN SOMEINSTANCES BUTNOTEDAGENDASFOR BOARDMEETINGSHAVEBEENCHANGEDTO (continued on page 9)

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Upfront

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EDITORIAL Jocelyn Dong, Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Tom Gibboney, Spectrum Editor Sue Dremann, Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Eric Van Susteren, Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Colin Becht, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Contributors Pierre BienaimÊ, Lisa Kellman, Haiy Le, Editorial Interns DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung, Designers PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Samantha Mejia, Shop Product Manager Adam Carter, Elaine Clark, Janice Hoogner, Wendy Suzuki, Display Advertising Sales Neal Fine, Carolyn Oliver, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Asst. Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator BUSINESS Susie Ochoa, Payroll & Benefits Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Claire McGibeny, Cathy Stringari, Business Associates ADMINISTRATION Doris Taylor, Receptionist Ruben Espinoza, Courier EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistant Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright Š2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or email circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

‘‘

‘‘

The Woman’s Club of Palo Alto

That just defies common sense. —Claude Ezran, chair of the Palo Alto Human Relations Commission, on the idea that corporations have the same rights as people. See story on page 3.

Around Town HOT TOPIC ... Global warming is a subject that rarely strays far from the minds of Palo Alto’s elected leaders, who often tout the city’s position as a green leader. This week, they will weigh whether the city should participate in one of the most ambitious efforts to date to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. The City Council is scheduled to consider joining the “Cool City Challenge,� an effort spearheaded by the Empowerment Institute that relies on small groups of volunteers in each participating community to spread the gospel of emission reductions and, if all goes as planned, dramatically bring down the city’s emissions. David Gershon, co-founder of the Empowerment Institute, introduced the idea to the council in July and characterized the effort as one that seeks to “reinvent the cities from the ground up.� The program would engage residents and businesses throughout the city and set environmental goals that each will strive to meet. At the July meeting, the council tempered its enthusiasm for participating in the program with concerns about the cost and time commitments of pursuing the challenge. Councilman Larry Klein was among those who expressed great interest in having Palo Alto participate in the challenge. The effort, he said, is something that the city should “very seriously pursue.� City staff now concurs with Klein. “The Cool Cities Challenge gives Palo Alto a chance to contribute to developing a potentially gamechanging local solution to climate change,� the report states. “Palo Alto is already a leader in climate protection in many ways, so this is an opportunity to achieve the next level and advance our climate action and energy efficiency goals.� The effort would be funded largely by the Empowerment Institute, though it would also include heavy involvement by city staff. Officials don’t expect the latter to be a problem. In a letter of intent that the council is scheduled to approve Monday, City Manager James Keene wrote that the city “has a track record as an early adopter city including a desire to take on big challenges, lead the way for other cities, civic pride in past accomplishments, high tolerance for experimentation, and a can-do community culture.�

FLAPPING JACKS ... Project Safety Net’s first annual Pancake Breakfast is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 20. The fundraiser is the brainchild of Palo Alto firefighters, who had been looking to forge a relationship with a local collaborative for youth well-being. Fire Department Captain Carter French said that when five youths died by suicide in 2009 and 2010, “It was difficult. ... We had to deal with that.� Since that time, Project Safety Net has developed education, prevention and intervention strategies in order to boost youth well-being and mental health. For those pancake lovers who fear firefighter-cooked pancakes could end up a bit, well, burnt — never fear. Chefs from Facebook plan to do the actual pancake cooking. Other Pancake Breakfast activities will include a fire engine show, a Jaws of Life demonstration, door prizes and a safety fair. The breakfast will be held at Fire Station 6 on the Stanford campus, 711 Serra St., starting at 9 a.m. Tickets are $5. FOLLOW THE MONEY ... While Palo Alto considers whether to wade into the national debate over political expenditures by corporations, state legislators are celebrating their own recent contribution to the controversial issue. State Assemblyman Rich Gordon, whose district includes Palo Alto and Menlo Park, this week celebrated a bill that was recently signed by Gov. Jerry Brown to add disclosure requirements for political contributors. Assembly Bill 481 targets “independent expenditure committees� — that is, those not affiliated with a particular candidate or a ballot measure. It requires disclosures of major independent expenditures before an election and disclosure of major top donors on all advertisement by the committees. It also holds the principal officers of the independent expenditure committees liable for potential ethics violations. The bill, which Gordon authored, received Brown’s endorsement on Sept. 24. “The growth of independent expenditures makes appropriate disclosure all the more necessary,� Gordon said in a statement this week. “In order for voters to make fully informed decisions, it is important they know who, if not the candidate or ballot measure campaign, is paying for political messaging and in what amounts.� N

Upfront COMMUNITY

For new ‘Athena,’ making a contribution is key HEN 2EBECCA -ATTESON .ELSON LEARNED SHE WAS THE 0ALO !LTO #HAMBER OF #OMMERCES  !THENA !WARD WINNER SHE WAS SURPRISED BY HER OWNREACTION ASWASHERFRIENDAND !THENAALUMNA-ARILYN7INKLEBY h"ECKY THISISTHEFIRSTTIME)VE EVERHEARDYOUSPEECHLESS v.ELSON RECALLED 7INKLEBY SAYING WHEN SHECALLEDTOINFORM.ELSONOFTHE AWARD 4HE !THENA HONORS WOMEN WHO DEMONSTRATEEXCELLENCEANDCREATIV ITY IN BUSINESS WHO CONTRIBUTE TO QUALITYOFLIFEINTHEIRCOMMUNITIES ANDWHOHELPOTHERWOMENREALIZE THEIRLEADERSHIPPOTENTIAL .ELSONMEETSALLOFTHOSECRITERIA 4HESENIORVICEPRESIDENTOFWEALTH MANAGEMENT AT 4ECHNOLOGY #REDIT 5NION .ELSONHASFORYEARSHELD HIGHPOSITIONSINFINANCIALSERVICES AT COMPANIES WITHIN AND OUTSIDE 0ALO !LTO INCLUDING 5NION "ANKS 0RIVATE "ANK !DDISON !VENUE #REDIT5NION 'REATER"AY"ANCORP AND'REAT7ESTERN"ANK .ELSON CREDITS HER MOTHER AS AN EARLY INFLUENCE ON HER BELIEF THAT WOMENCOULDCREATETHEIROWNDES TINIES(ERMOTHERSTARTEDABUSINESS

W

by Sue Dremann WHENWOMENJUSTDIDNT(ER#ARLISLE 3CHOOL TAUGHT WELL EDUCATED 5NI VERSITY OF #ALIFORNIA "ERKELEY AND 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY FEMALE GRADU ATES SHORTHAND BECAUSE SECRETARIAL JOBSWEREALLTHEYCOULDOBTAIN .OW .ELSON IS PART OF THE FIRST GENERATION TO SUCCEED IN BREAKING THEGLASSCEILING ,IKEWISE THEINFLUENCEOFHERFA THER ANEXECUTIVEFOR!MERICAN#AN #OMPANYIN3AN&RANCISCO HELPED SHAPEHERDEDICATIONTOCOMMUNITY SERVICE PHILANTHROPY AND HELPING WOMEN SHESAID h-YFATHERWASAWONDERFULROLE MODEL(EINSTILLEDTHEINTRINSICVAL UE OF WORK !S HE WALKED THROUGH THEHOUSE HEHUMMED @-AKEACON TRIBUTION-AKEACONTRIBUTION!SA CHILD )REMEMBEREDTHAT vSHESAID %NTERING ADULTHOOD .ELSON BE CAMEINVOLVEDINNONPROFITORGANIZA TIONS0ITCHINGINFORSOMETHINGSHE BELIEVED IN MADE THAT CAUSE MORE TANGIBLE MOREVALUABLE SHESAID .ELSONHASLOVEDWORKINGWITHOR GANIZATIONS DEDICATED TO MEDICINE EDUCATIONANDCHILDREN SHESAID3HE HASBEENCOMMITTEDTOTHE3TANFORD -EDICAL 9OUTH 3CIENCE 0ROGRAM 0ALO !LTO !RT #ENTER &OUNDATION

0ALO!LTO-EDICAL&OUNDATION 2ON ALD -C$ONALD (OUSE AT 3TANFORD ,UCILE0ACKARD&OUNDATIONFOR#HIL DRENS (EALTH AND THE %L #AMINO (OSPITAL&OUNDATION AMONGOTHERS .ELSON HAS A BACHELORS DEGREE INSOCIOLOGYFROMTHE5NIVERSITYOF #ALIFORNIA ,OS !NGELES 5#,! AND HAS COMPLETED POSTGRADUATE EXECUTIVEPROGRAMSATTHE3TANFORD 'RADUATE 3CHOOL OF "USINESS )N !PRIL THE 3AN *OSE "USINESS *OUR NAL NAMED HER ONE OF THE TOP  h7OMENOF)NFLUENCEv 3HE SAID SHE HAS ALWAYS WORKED FOR COMPANIES THAT WERE DEDICATED TOCOMMUNITYINVOLVEMENT h)VEBEENDRAWNTOTHEMTHEYRE INMY$.! vSHESAID 3HEWASATTRACTEDTOCREDITUNIONS BECAUSE THE ORGANIZATIONS SEEK TO HAVEASOCIALIMPACTANDINTERESTIN POLICYMAKING SHESAID 'ROWINGUPIN0ALO!LTOhWHERE ROOTS ARE STRONG v .ELSON WAS THE YOUNGESTOFTHREECHILDRENWITHSEV ERALYEARSBETWEENHERANDHEROLDER BROTHERANDSISTER SHESAID .EARHERCHILDHOODHOMEON-AR TIN!VENUE .ELSONRECALLEDIDYLLIC (continued on page 13)

Veronica Weber

Rebecca Nelson of Technology Credit Union to receive 2012 Athena Award

Rebecca Matteson Nelson, vice president of wealth management for Technology Credit Union, was honored by the Palo Alto Chamber of Commerce with this year’s Athena Award for her contributions to the community and for helping other women realize their leadership potential.

SENIORS

Defying age, defining champions New PBS documentary about Senior Olympics to screen Monday in Palo Alto NEW DOCUMENTARY FILM IS PROVINGTHATFORSOMEATHLETES GETTINGOLDERISNOTADETERRENT ˆITSAMOTIVATOR h!GE OF #HAMPIONSv FOCUSES ON SEVERALSENIORATHLETESASTHEYPRE PAREFORTHE3UMMER.ATIONAL 3ENIOR'AMES COMMONLYKNOWNAS THE 3ENIOR /LYMPICS -UCH OF THE FILM WAS SHOT DURING THE COMPETI TIONAT3TANFORD5NIVERSITY 4HE MINUTEDOCUMENTARYWILL BESCREENED-ONDAY /CT AT PM AT THE !LBERT  *ANET 3CHULTZ #ULTURAL!RTS(ALLONTHE4AUBE+O RET#AMPUSFOR*EWISH,IFEIN0ALO !LTO4HEFILMWILLALSOAIRON0"3 NEXTSUMMER h!GEOF#HAMPIONSvWASTHEBRAIN CHILDOFTHE3ACRAMENTO BASEDFILM MAKINGTEAMOFPRODUCER+EITH/CH WAT AND DIRECTOR #HRISTOPHER 2UFO

A

What: “Age of Champions,” a documentary film about the 2009 Summer National Senior Games Where: Albert & Janet Schultz Cultural Arts Hall on the Taube Koret Campus for Jewish Life, 899 East Charleston Road, Palo Alto When: Monday, Oct. 22, at 2 p.m. Cost: Free and open to the public Info: www.Moldaw.org/Events or 800-873-9614

4HE  YEAR OLD FILMMAKERS HAVE BEEN FRIENDS SINCE HIGH SCHOOL AND LAUNCHED THE $OCUMENTARY &OUN DATION A C  NONPROFIT BASED OUT OF 3ACRAMENTO AFTER TRAVELING TO-ONGOLIAINANDPRODUCING THEIRFIRSTDOCUMENTARYSHORTFOR0"3 h2OUGHING)Tv/CHWATSAIDTHEIDEA FORh!GEvCAMEAFTERMEETING3ENIOR 'AMES#%/!NNE7ARNER#RIBBSAT ACONFERENCEFORNONPROFITS h7HEN WE HEARD ABOUT THE SUB JECT WE KNEW WE HAD TO MAKE A FILM v /CHWAT SAID h7E KNEW IN STANTLY WE WANTED TO TELL A STORY ABOUTTHE3ENIOR/LYMPICSv /CHWAT SAID THE $OCUMENTARY &OUNDATION PARTNERED WITH THE .A TIONAL3ENIOR'AMES!SSOCIATIONAND ACASTINGCALLWASPUTOUTTOTHE3ENIOR 'AMES ATHLETES !FTER CONSIDERING MORETHAN RESPONSES /CHWAT AND2UFOSETTLEDONAHANDFULOFATH LETESFROMACROSSTHECOUNTRY INCLUD ING YEAR OLDTENNISPLAYER2OGER 'ENTILHOMME OF #APE #OD -ASS  AND YEAR OLDSWIMMERS*OHN AND"RADFORD4ATUMOF7ASHINGTON $# YEAR OLDPOLEVAULTER!DOLPH (OFFMAN OF 3OMERSET 4EXAS AND THE4IGERETTES A BASKETBALLTEAM FROM"ATON2OUGE ,A /CHWAT 2UFOANDTHERESTOFTHE FILMMAKINGTEAMSPENTTWOMONTHS FILMINGTHEATHLETESINTHEIRHOME

Courtesy of the Documentary Foundation

by Tyler Hanley

The Tigerettes, a 65+ championship basketball team from Baton Rouge, La., are featured in the new documentary “Age of Champions.” TOWNSBEFOREMOVINGONTO3TANFORD FORTHEOFFICIAL'AMES/CHWATSAID THEGOALOFTHE$OCUMENTARY&OUN DATION AND THE FILM ITSELF IS TO EN COURAGEPEOPLETOLIVEAMOREACTIVE ANDHEALTHYLIFE h@!GE OF #HAMPIONS HAS REALLY BEENANINSPIRATIONFORALOTOFPEO PLETODOSO vHESAID 2UFO SAID BOTH HE AND /CHWAT LEARNEDALOTWHILEMAKINGTHEDOC UMENTARY h"EFORE WE MADE THE FILM WE THOUGHT THE SECRET TO STAYING FIT AS YOUAGEHADTODOWITHGOODGENES OREATINGHEALTHY vHESAIDh7EDIS COVEREDTHATASTRONGSENSEOFCOM MUNITYANDENCOURAGEMENTAREACTU

ALLYTHESECRETINGREDIENTS7EHOPE THISFILMINFLUENCESSENIORSTOLIVEA HEALTHYLIFESTYLEANDENJOYTHECOM MUNITYATMOSPHEREAROUNDTHEMv !S/CHWATAND2UFOPREPAREFOR THE FILMS BROADCAST ON 0"3 NEXT SUMMER THEYHAVELAUNCHEDAGRASS ROOTSCAMPAIGNTOENCOURAGEHEALTHY LIVING WITH SCREENINGSACROSS THE COUNTRY IN PLACES SUCH AS THE ATERS RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES AND FITNESSCENTERS-ONDAYSSHOWINGIS BEINGHOSTEDBY-OLDAW2ESIDENC ES THEFIRSTSENIOR LIVINGCOMMUNITY INTHE3OUTH"AYTOSCREENTHEFILM ORGANIZERSSAID h4HIS HIGHLY INSPIRATIONAL FILM PROVES THAT YOU CAN FOLLOW YOUR

DREAMS AT ANY AGE v 'ERRY 6AD NAIS EXECUTIVEDIRECTOROF-OLDAW 2ESIDENCES STATEDINAPRESSRELEASE h7ECANNOTWAITTOMEETTHEDIREC TORANDSHARETHEENCOURAGINGMES SAGEWITHTHECOMMUNITYv 2UFOWILLBEINATTENDANCE-ONDAY ANDWILLHOSTA1!AFTERTHESCREEN ING AND 0AT +ELLER A  YEAR OLD -ENLO 0ARK SWIMMER WHO APPEARS INTHEFILM WILLALSOATTENDANDSEE THEDOCUMENTARYFORTHEFIRSTTIME h"EING AROUND INSPIRING OLDER ADULTSHASMADETHISAFANTASTICPROJ ECTTOWORKON v/CHWATSAIDN Palo Alto Online Editor Tyler Hanley can be emailed at thanley@paweekly.com.

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Upfront

News Digest

CITY HALL

City braces for turnover in workforce

Credit union robbed on El Camino Real in Palo Alto 0ALO!LTOPOLICEARESEARCHINGFORAMANWHOALLEGEDLYVAULTEDOVERA COUNTERAT3TAR/NE#REDIT5NION REMOVEDCASHFROMTELLERDRAWERSAND MADEOFFWITHANUNDISCLOSEDAMOUNTOFMONEY7EDNESDAY /CT 4HEROBBERYOCCURREDATABOUTAMAT%L#AMINO2EAL/F FICERSRECEIVEDCALLSFROMWITNESSES INCLUDINGACUSTOMERWHOWASATTHE CREDITUNIONANDWHOFLEDWHENHEREALIZEDTHATA ROBBERYWASINPROGRESS"YTHETIMETHEOFFICERS ARRIVED THE ROBBER HAD RUN AWAY EASTBOUND ON 6ENTURA!VENUE !CCORDINGTOPOLICE OFFICERSWEREUNABLETOLO CATETHESUSPECTDESPITEhANEXTENSIVECHECKOFTHE AREAv.OONEWASINJUREDDURINGTHEROBBERY 0OLICESAIDONEWITNESSREPORTEDPOSSIBLYSEEING THESUSPECTHOLDINGAHANDGUN.OONEELSESAW AWEAPON 7ITNESSESDESCRIBEDTHEROBBERASABLACKMALE ABOUTTOYEARSOLD BETWEENFEETINCHES ANDFEETINCHESANDABOUTTOPOUNDS Robbery suspect (E REPORTEDLY HAD CLOSE CROPPED HAIR AND WAS WEARINGAPAIROFREFLECTIVE/AKLEY STYLESUNGLASSES ASHORT SLEEVEDDARK POLOSHIRT BAGGYBLUEJEANSANDBLUE AND WHITETENNISSHOES 0OLICEHADALSOCAPTUREDASURVEILLANCEPHOTOOFTHEALLEGEDROBBER !NYONEWHORECOGNIZESTHEMANORHASINFORMATIONABOUTTHEINCIDENT ISASKEDTOCALLTHEPOLICEAT  !NONYMOUSTIPSCANALSOBE SENTTOPALOALTO TIPNOWORGORTHROUGHTEXTMESSAGESORVOICEMAILTO   N — Gennady Sheyner

Worker plunges 25 feet into elevator shaft ! CONSTRUCTION WORKER IN THE 3TANFORD 2ESEARCH 0ARK WAS INJURED 7EDNESDAYMORNING /CT AFTERFALLINGFEETDOWNANELEVATORSHAFT THE0ALO!LTO&IRE$EPARTMENTSAID 4HE YEAR OLDMANHADPLUNGEDTHROUGHANOPENINGINTHESECOND STORYFLOORAT(ILLVIEW!VE THESITEOFTHECOMPANY6-WARE 0ARAMEDICSTREATEDTHEMANFORHISINJURIES PREPAREDHIMTOBERE MOVED FROM THE SHAFT AND THEN TRANSPORTED HIM TO 3TANFORD (OSPITAL "ATTALION#HIEF$OUG#ONNSAID 4HEINJUREDWORKERISANEMPLOYEEOF3WINERTON"UILDERS ACONSTRUC TION COMPANY WORKING ON THE SITE SAID 0ATRICIA /RTIZ SPOKESWOMAN FOR THE #ALIFORNIA $IVISION OF /CCUPATIONAL 3AFETY AND (EALTH #AL /3(!  /N4HURSDAYASPOKESPERSONFOR3WINERTONSAIDTHEEMPLOYEEISSTABLE ANDININTENSIVECARE(ISDOCTORSARECONTINUINGTOEVALUATEHISPROGRESS ANDHISFAMILYISWITHHIM 4HEINVESTIGATIONISONGOINGN — Sue Dremann

Palo Alto student stays home pending court ruling !N YEAR OLD0ALO!LTOBOYISHOMEFROMSCHOOLPENDINGAN/CT COURTHEARINGONWHETHERHISGENETICCONDITIONPOSESARISKTOOTHER STUDENTSAT*ORDAN-IDDLE3CHOOLWHOHAVECYSTICFIBROSIS 4HE DISPUTE APPEARS TO REFLECT CONFLICTING JUDGMENTS ABOUT THE RISK OFhCROSS INFECTIONvAMONGSTUDENTSWHOHAVECYSTICFIBROSISORAREAT GENETICRISKFORTHEDISEASE 3AYINGTHEYHADCONSULTEDWITHMEDICALEXPERTSANDWEREACTINGON CONCERNSABOUTSTUDENTSAFETY SCHOOLOFFICIALSLASTWEEKˆEIGHTWEEKS INTOTHESCHOOLYEARˆASKEDTHEFAMILYOF#OLMAN#HADAMTOTRANSFER THEBOYTO4ERMAN-IDDLE3CHOOL 4HEYBELIEVEHISCONDITIONCREATESARISKOFDANGEROUShCROSS INFECTIONv OFOTHER*ORDANSTUDENTSWHOHAVECYSTICFIBROSIS )NSISTINGTHATTHEIRSONDOESNOTHAVECYSTICFIBROSIS JUSTAGENETICCON DITIONTHATSBEINGMONITORED #OLMANSPARENTSWENTTOCOURT/CTTO TRYTOSTOPTHETRANSFER #OLMANSMOTHER *ENNIFER#HADAM TOLDTHE3AN&RANCISCO#HRONICLE #OLMAN NEVER HAS HAD A CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS 3HE HAD DISCLOSEDTHEGENETICCONDITIONONASCHOOLHEALTHFORMREQUIREDATTHE STARTOFTHESCHOOLYEAR h4HEYTHESCHOOLDISTRICT MADETHEDECISIONWITHOUTSEEINGONEMEDI CALRECORDONMYSON v#HADAMTOLDTHE#HRONICLE 3HE TOLD ."# .EWS 4ODAY 3HOW THAT HER SON HAS ATTENDED OTHER SCHOOLS WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS CHILDREN AND h)TS NEVER BEEN AN ISSUE ˆ NEVERv h7HYTAKEACHILDWHOISNEWTOTHEDISTRICT WHOSJUSTMAKINGFRIENDS WHOSJUSTBUILDINGASUPPORTNETWORKWHOSBEENWELLHISWHOLELIFEˆ WHYSTIGMATIZEHIMvHISFATHER *AIMY#HADAM SAIDON4ODAY h)WASSAD BUTATTHESAMETIME)WASMADBECAUSE)UNDERSTOOD) HADNTDONEANYTHINGWRONG v#OLMANSAIDONTHESHOWh)TFEELSLIKE)M BEINGBULLIED INAWAYTHATSNOTRIGHTvN — Palo Alto Weekly staff

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

Page 6ÊUÊ"V̜LiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Palo Alto looks for new ways to recruit and retain employees ITHWORKHABITSSHIFTINGAND EMPLOYEE BENEFITS UNDER FIRE 0ALO !LTO IS BRACING FORANEXODUSOFWORKERSFROM#ITY (ALL OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS AND SCRAMBLINGTOFINDNEWWAYSTOAT TRACTANDRETAINYOUNGEMPLOYEES 4HECITYEXPECTSTOLOSEMOSTOF ITSWORKFORCEOVERTHENEXTDECADE ASMORE"ABY"OOMERSRETIREANDAS SNOWBALLINGEMPLOYEEBENEFITSARE REINEDINBYTHE#ITY#OUNCIL4HE COUNCILDISCUSSEDTHETREND-ONDAY NIGHT /CT THEFIRSTMEETINGINA SERIESAIMEDATFINDINGWAYSTORE DUCECOSTSWHILELEAVINGEMPLOYEE MORALEINTACT +ATHRYN3HEN DIRECTOROFTHECITYS (UMAN2ESOURCES$EPARTMENT TOLD THE COUNCIL -ONDAY THAT ABOUT HALF OFTHECITYSWORKFORCEWILLBEELIGIBLE FORRETIREMENTWITHINFIVEYEARS!ND WHILESHESAIDSHEDOESNTEXPECTALL THESE WORKERS TO LEAVE AT ONCE THE NUMBERISSIGNIFICANTENOUGHTOWAR RANTPREPARATIONBYTHECITY h%VEN IF HALF OF THOSE EMPLOY EES RETIRE WELLSTILLBEINAWORLD OF HURT IF WE DONT PLAN FOR THAT v 3HENSAID 4HE AVERAGE AGE OF THE CURRENT WORKFORCEIS SHESAID)NYEARS SHENOTED THECITYWILLhHAVEATURN OVEROFALMOSTTHEENTIREWORKFORCEv 4ODEALWITHTHELOOMINGCHANGES (UMAN 2ESOURCES HAS JUST ESTAB LISHEDATASKFORCETHATOVERTHENEXT

W

Council

(continued from page 3)

THINKSITSHOULD4HE(UMAN2ELA TIONS#OMMISSIONHASALREADYDIS CUSSEDTHEPROPOSEDAMENDMENTAT TWO MEETINGS AND VOTED   WITH $ARYL 3AVAGE ABSENT ON 3EPT  TO SUPPORT THE GRASSROOTS EFFORT BY THEGROUP3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY-OVE TO!MEND3EVERALMEMBERSOFTHE ORGANIZATION ATTENDED THAT MEET INGANDURGEDTHECITYTOBACKTHEIR PROPOSEDRESOLUTION WHICHMAKESA CLEAR DISTINCTION BETWEEN CORPORA TIONSANDPEOPLE $EBBIE-YTELS A0ALO!LTORESI DENT CALLEDCORPORATIONShVERYUSE FUL CONSTRUCTIONS FOR HUMAN SOCI ETIESv AND ONES THAT ARE NEEDED TO CARRYOUTBUSINESSANDFACILITATEIN VESTMENTS"UT SHEADDED h7EALSO FEEL THAT ITS IMPORTANT THAT THESE ENTITIES BE REGULATED AND THAT THEY DONOTHAVETHERIGHTSTHATTHE#ON STITUTION GIVES TO US AS INDIVIDUAL REALPEOPLEv h7ERE NOT ASKING THAT CORPORA TIONS BE ABOLISHED v -YTELS SAID h7EREREALLYASKINGFORREGULATIONS ANDLIMITATIONSONTHEMASARTIFICIAL CONSTRUCTIONSFORHUMANSOCIETYv 4HERESOLUTIONPASSEDBYTHE(U MAN 2ELATIONS #OMMISSION STATES THAT CORPORATIONS ARE hNOT NATU RALLY ENDOWED WITH CONSCIENCE OR THE RIGHTS OF HUMAN BEINGSv AND THAT THEY HAVE hUNDULY INFLUENCED ANDUNFAIRLYINTERFEREDWITHDEMO CRATIC PROCESSES BY PRESSURING OUR

by Gennady Sheyner FEW MONTHS WILL BE MEETING WITH LABORLEADERSANDRANK AND FILESTAFF AND CONSIDERING THE BEST WAYS TO RECRUITANDRETAINTALENTDESPITETHE BENEFITREDUCTIONS 0ALO !LTO HAS BEEN EXPERIENCING ABRAINDRAINSINCE WHENTHE CITYBEGANTORENEGOTIATETHEBENEFIT PACKAGES FOR CITY WORKERS 2ECENT REFORMS INCLUDE A SECOND PENSION TIERFORNEWEMPLOYEES ELIMINATION OF A BONUS PROGRAM FOR MANAGERS ELIMINATION OF THE MINIMUM STAFF INGPROVISIONFROMTHEFIREFIGHTERS CONTRACT AND A REQUIREMENT THAT WORKERSINEACHOFTHECITYSMAJOR LABOR UNIONS CONTRIBUTE UP TO  PERCENTFORTHEIRMEDICALCOSTSTHE CITYHADPREVIOUSLYFOOTEDTHEENTIRE BILL  4HESE REDUCTIONS PROMPTED A WAVE OF RETIREMENTS OVER THE PAST TWO YEARS AND TURNOVER IN SENIOR MANAGERSANDDEPARTMENTHEADSAT JUSTABOUTEVERYLEVELOF#ITY(ALL !CCORDING TO A REPORT FROM (U MAN2ESOURCES BETWEENAND TODAY HALF OF THE CITYS EMPLOYEES HAVERETIREDANDBEENREPLACED %VENWITHTHERECENTREFORMS THE CITYS FINANCIAL OUTLOOK IS FAR FROM ROSY )TS PENSION OBLIGATIONS HAVE BEENRISINGATANASTRONOMICALCLIP GOINGFROMMILLIONINTO  MILLION IN THE CURRENT FISCAL YEAR 4HEY ARE PROJECTED TO REACH MILLIONIN ANINCREASEOF MORETHANPERCENTINYEARS

(EALTHCARECOSTSHAVEALSOBEEN CLIMBINGATABRISKPACE7HILETHE CITY SPENT  MILLION ON MEDICAL COSTSINANDMILLIONIN  THE NUMBER IS PROJECTED TO CLIMB TO  MILLION IN THE CUR RENTFISCALYEAR 7ITH PENSION AND MEDICAL COSTS SPIKING THE CITYS BENEFIT EXPENDI TURESARENOWTAKINGAGREATERSHARE OF OVERALL EMPLOYEE COSTS )N  BENEFITSCOMPRISEDABOUTPERCENT OFSALARIES4ODAY THEYMAKEUP PERCENT ANDBYTHEYAREPROJECT EDTOEQUALSALARIES APROSPECTTHAT 3HENCALLEDhPRETTYFRIGHTENINGv &ACED WITH THESE GRIM PROJEC TIONS THE COUNCIL IS TRYING TO BAL ANCETHENEEDFORREDUCINGEXPENSES WHILESTEMMINGTHE#ITY(ALLEXO DUS WHICH ISNT EXPECTED TO ABATE ANYTIMESOON)NADDITIONTODEMO GRAPHICS AND ECONOMICS THE WAVE OF EMPLOYEES HEADING TOWARD THE EXITISALSOAREFLECTIONOFCHANGING WORKHABITS 3HENTOLDTHECOUNCIL "EFORE EMPLOYEESOFTENSTAYEDWITH ONE COMPANY THEIR ENTIRE CAREERS 4HATISNOLONGERTHECASE SHESAID h-YGENERATIONANDMYCHILDRENS GENERATION REALLY LOOK AT MOVING AROUNDBETWEENPRIVATE PUBLICAND NONPROFITEMPLOYERS ANDCONTRIBUT ING WHERE THEY CAN CONTRIBUTE AND GROWINGTHEIRSKILLS v3HENSAID

LEGISLATORSANDDOMINATINGELECTION CAMPAIGNSWITHVIRTUALLYUNLIMITED CONTRIBUTIONSv h7HENFREEDOMTOSPEAKISEQUAT ED WITH FREEDOM TO SPEND MONEY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE LESS MONEYAREDEFACTODISENFRANCHISED BECAUSE THEIR FREE SPEECH IS OVER WHELMED BY THE MESSAGE OF THOSE SPENDINGMILLIONSOFDOLLARSv )F THE COUNCIL FOLLOWS THE COM MISSIONS LEAD IT WOULD JOIN ABOUT TWO DOZEN LOCAL GOVERNMENTS IN #ALIFORNIATHATHAVEALREADYPASSED SIMILAR RESOLUTIONS INCLUDING 3AN &RANCISCO "ERKELEY ,OS !NGELES /AKLAND AND -OUNTAIN 6IEW 2AY "ACCHETTI AMEMBEROFTHE(UMAN 2ELATIONS #OMMISSION SAID THAT IT MAKESSENSETODISCUSSTHEISSUEAT THE LOCAL LEVEL BECAUSE LOCAL ELEC TIONSARELESSLIKELYTOBEINFLUENCED BY CORPORATE MONEY THAN THOSE AT STATEANDNATIONALLEVELS h4HATS A WAY OF STARTING SOME THINGTHATSOFABENEFITTOTHEWHOLE NATIONATTHELEVELWHEREITHASTHE BEST CHANCE OF BEING THOUGHTFULLY CONSIDERED RATHER THAN INFLUENCED BY PEOPLE WHO WANT A PARTICULAR OUTCOME v"ACCHETTISAIDATTHE3EP TEMBERDISCUSSION #LAUDE %ZRAN WHO CHAIRS THE COMMISSION WAS ONE OF SEV ERAL MEMBERS WHO SAID THEY WERE SWAYED BY THE DISSENTING OPINION OF *USTICE *OHN 0AUL 3TEVENS WHO ARGUEDTHATTHEMAJORITYHADFAILED TORECOGNIZETHEPOTENTIALOFMONEY TOCORRUPTANDUNDULYINFLUENCEPO LITICALELECTIONS3TEVENSHADARGUED

THAT CORPORATIONS ARE NOT MEMBERS OFTHEGROUPTHATISREFERREDTOINTHE #ONSTITUTIONASh7ETHE0EOPLEv h!LTHOUGH THEY MAKE ENORMOUS CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUR SOCIETY COR PORATIONSARENOTACTUALLYMEMBERS OFIT v3TEVENSWROTEINHISDISSENT h4HEYCANNOTVOTEORRUNFOROFFICE "ECAUSETHEYMAYBEMANAGEDAND CONTROLLEDBYNONRESIDENTS THEIRIN TERESTSMAYCONFLICTINFUNDAMENTAL RESPECTSWITHTHEINTERESTSOFELIGIBLE VOTERSv %ZRANAGREEDWITH3TEVENSPOINT ABOUT MONEYS INFLUENCE ON ELEC TIONSANDNOTEDTHAThHAVINGAMUCH BIGGERMEGAPHONETHATDROWNSOUT ANY OTHER VOICE IS FUNDAMENTALLY UNDEMOCRATICv h4HINKING THAT CORPORATIONS WHICH ARE ENTITIES WOULD HAVE THE SAME RIGHTS AS PEOPLE ˆ THAT JUST DEFIESCOMMONSENSE v%ZRANSAID h)MAGINE SOMEBODY FROM MAYBE ANOTHER COUNTRY OR PLANET COMING HERE AND WERE ARGUING WHETHER CORPORATIONS ARE PEOPLE ˆ THEYD THINK THAT WOULD BE COMPLETELY CRAZYv 4HE-ONDAYDISCUSSIONWILLMARK THESECONDTIMETHISMONTHTHATTHE COUNCIL THRUSTS ITSELF INTO A DEBATE WITH IMPLICATIONS FAR BEYOND THE CITYS BORDERS 4HE COUNCIL VOTED  WITH'AIL0RICEABSENT EARLIER THIS MONTH TO SUPPORT 0ROPOSITION  WHICHWOULDBANTHEDEATHPEN ALTYIN#ALIFORNIAANDCREATEAFUND THAT WOULD BE DISTRIBUTED TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES THROUGHOUT THESTATEN

(continued on page 13)

Upfront

REAL ESTATE TRENDS by Samia Cullen

LAND USE

The Importance of Complete Seller Disclosures

Palo Alto beefs up rules for downtown parking City halts parking exemptions for new developments downtown, near California Avenue by Gennady Sheyner 0ALO !LTO LAW THAT RELAXED PARKING REGULATIONS FOR DE VELOPERS WITH DOWNTOWN PROJECTS BEGAN ITS TRANSITION FROM THECITYSZONINGCODETOITSHISTORY BOOKS-ONDAYNIGHTAFTERTHE#ITY #OUNCILPASSEDANhURGENCYORDI NANCEvTEMPORARILYHALTINGIT 4HEORDINANCE WHICHTHECOUN CIL APPROVED ON AN   VOTE WITH 'REG 3CHMID ABSENT IMPOSES A MORATORIUMONTHEPARKINGEXEMP TIONGRANTEDTODEVELOPERSLOOKING TOBUILDDENSEDEVELOPMENTSDOWN TOWNANDINTHE#ALIFORNIA!VENUE BUSINESS DISTRICT 4HE CITY ADDED THESE EXEMPTIONS TO ITS ZONING CODEINTHEMID SASAWAYTO ENCOURAGEDOWNTOWNDEVELOPMENT AFTER BUILDING REGULATIONS WERE TIGHTENED 3INCE THEN CONDITIONS HAVE CHANGED DRAMATICALLY $OWNTOWN VACANCIES ARE ALMOST NONEXISTENT DEVELOPERS ARE FILING APPLICATIONS ATABRISKPACEANDDOWNTOWNRESI DENTSAREREPORTINGASEVERESHORT AGE OF PARKING ON NEIGHBORHOOD STREETSANDURGINGTHECOUNCILTODO SOMETHING ABOUT IT ! NEW REPORT FROMTHECITYS0LANNINGAND#OM

A

MUNITY %NVIRONMENT $EPARTMENT NOTES THAT THE PARKING EXEMPTION hIS LIKELY TO IMMEDIATELY EXACER BATE PARKING PROBLEMS WITHOUT SEEMINGTOPROVIDEFORANYPUBLIC PURPOSEv )N RECENT MONTHS SEVERAL DE VELOPERS INVOKED THE PARKING EX EMPTION AS PART OF THEIR APPLICA TIONS 4HESE INCLUDE THE RECENTLY APPROVED FOUR STORY ,YTTON 'ATE WAYPROJECTON,YTTON!VENUEAND !LMA 3TREET THE PROPOSED FOUR STORYOFFICEBUILDINGAT(AM ILTON !VE AND A SMALLER OFFICE BUILDING AT  7AVERLEY 3T 4HE ,YTTON'ATEWAYDEVELOPERSDIDNOT GETTHEEXEMPTIONBECAUSETHEYAP PLIEDUNDERhPLANNEDCOMMUNITYv ZONING WHICH GIVES THE COUNCIL GREATER LATITUDE TO NEGOTIATE WITH THEAPPLICANTS 4HEONLYTHINGTHECOUNCILDIDNT RULEON-ONDAYWASWHETHERTHE MORATORIUM SHOULD APPLY TO THE OTHERTWOPROJECTS WHICHARECUR RENTLYGOINGTHROUGHTHEAPPROVAL PROCESS 4HE APPLICANTS FOR EACH PROJECT ARGUED THAT IT SHOULD NOT #HARLESh#HOPv+EENAN APROMI NENT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPER URGED

THE COUNCIL NOT TO CHANGE THE RULESFORHISPROJECTAT(AMIL TONWHILEHEISGOINGTHROUGHTHE PROCESS h!TTHEVERYLASTSECOND THERULES SEEMTOBECHANGING v+EENANSAID h)M ASKING TO BE GRANDFATHERED THE WAY YOU HAVE GRANDFATHERED PROJECTSNOTJUSTINTHEPIPELINEBUT WAYINTHEPIPELINEv $AVID +LEIMAN THE APPLICANT BEHIND7AVERLEY MADEASIMI LARARGUMENTANDSAIDITSNOTFAIR FORTHECITYTONOWDEMANDFEESFOR PARKING SPOTS THAT HE THOUGHT HIS COMPANYWOULDBEEXEMPTEDFROM PROVIDING h7EVE SPENT A SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNTOFMONEYANDTIMEGETTING THEPROJECTREADYTOASTATEWHEREIT NOWEXISTS v+LEIMANSAID 7HILE STAFF HAD RECOMMENDED APPLYING THE MORATORIUM TO THESE PROJECTS THECOUNCILDECIDEDNOTTO DOTHATJUSTYET)NSTEAD THECOUN CIL DIRECTED STAFF TO RETURN WITHIN DAYSWITHAPOTENTIALEXEMPTION PROPOSALFORTHETWOPROJECTS3TAFF WOULDALSOCONSIDERSTRATEGIESTHAT

In our fast moving market, many houses are selling within a week, and prices are rising rapidly. As a result, some buyers are rushing to buy without taking the needed time to investigate thoroughly the houses they are buying. Sellers should be keenly aware of the importance of the different reports and documents that they are ďŹ lling out and signing in the course of selling a home. Full and complete disclosures protect the seller in the event of a subsequent lawsuit by the buyer; conversely, incomplete disclosures can come back and haunt them in court. Unfortunately, in the course of my business I often see disclosure forms that are not ďŹ lled out properly, including questions that are not even answered at all. Most lawsuits against sellers relate to these disclosures. California law requires sellers disclose all material facts of which they are aware, or of which they reason-

ably should be aware, bearing on the value or desirability of the property, including negative conditions that arose during or prior to ownership. Therefore if the seller is in doubt as to whether a condition constitutes a defect, it is always prudent to disclose rather than to remain silent. Some sellers react negatively to ďŹ lling out these disclosures at a time where they are busy preparing their home for sale. Many also feel that if they disclose all the problems, their house may not sell. Obviously, this could happen if there is a major issue, but typical disclosures normally do not discourage serious buyers. As you prepare your home for sale, spend a few minutes in every room of the home and note the defects and issues that you know of or have encountered in that room. Full disclosures of all material facts reduce the risk of subsequent disputes and lawsuits regarding the property.

I offer complimentary staging when I list your home. Contact me at Alain Pinel Realtors (650) 384-5392 or send me and email at scullen@apr.com. To learn more, log on to www.samiacullen.com.

Support Palo Alto Weekly’s print and online coverage of our community. Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org/PaloAlto

(continued on page 8)

Miki’s Farm

Fresh Market Now Open 9am - 9pm in Palo Alto F ind Us ĂŽ{{xĂŠÂ?“>ĂŠ-ĂŒĂ€iiĂŒ]ĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂŽÂˆĂƒv>À“vĂ€iĂƒÂ…Â“>ÀŽiĂŒÂ°Vœ“ ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ"VĂŒÂœLiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 7

Upfront

Parking

(continued from page 7)

APPLICANTS WOULD HAVE TO IMPLE MENT TO REDUCE THE DEMAND FOR PARKINGSPOTS #OUNCILMEN 3ID %SPINOSA AND ,ARRY +LEIN BOTH SAID THAT IT WOULDNTBEFAIRTOCHANGETHERULES FOR+EENANAND+LEIMAN h)MABIGBELIEVERINFAIRNESSAND EQUITY)THINKWESOMETIMESFORGET THEAMOUNTSPENTINBOTHTIMEAND COST TO GET PROJECTS THROUGH THE CITYSSYSTEM v%SPINOSASAID $OWNTOWNPARKINGHASBECOME ONEOF0ALO!LTOSMOSTCONTROVER SIALTOPICSANDACONSISTENTSOURCE OF ANGST IN 0ROFESSORVILLE $OWN TOWN .ORTH AND OTHER NEIGHBOR HOODS NEAR THE CITYS COMMERCIAL CORE!FTERYEARSOFLOBBYINGFROM 0ROFESSORVILLERESIDENTS STAFFPRO POSEDIN*ULYIMPLEMENTINGARESI DENTIAL PERMIT PARKINGPROGRAMIN

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‘Seventy people looking for parking somewhere — and there’s no parking downtown. I can only guess where it’s going to go.’ —Ken Alsman, resident, Professorville

LIVE OUR LIVES. We Know Our Risks—And Our Options

The strongest predictor of developing breast cancer is a family history of the disease. Stanford physicians and researchers have been instrumental in developing many of the leading technologies used to understand and screen for hereditary cancer syndromes. The Stanford Cancer Genetics Program provides genetic counseling and testing to anyone concerned about the risk of an inherited cancer predisposition, and our expert specialists offer personalized plans for managing cancer risk.

For more info, call 650.498.6004 or visit cancer.stanford.edu/breastcancer

Page 8ĂŠUĂŠ"VĂŒÂœLiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

ASECTIONOFTHENEIGHBORHOOD4HE COUNCILREJECTEDTHISPILOTPROGRAM AND DIRECTED STAFF TO SEEK MORE COMPREHENSIVESOLUTIONSTODOWN TOWNS PARKING WOES INCLUDING A FULLANALYSISTHATCONSIDERSZONING CHANGES AND ASSESS THE NEED FOR NEWFACILITIES +EN !LSMAN A 0ROFESSORVILLE RESIDENT WHO HAS BEEN THE NEIGH BORHOODS LEADING ADVOCATE FOR PARKINGRELIEF URGEDTHECOUNCILTO ADOPTTHEMORATORIUMANDTOAPPLY ITTOALLPROJECTS EVENTHEONESCUR RENTLYGOINGTHROUGHTHEPLANNING PROCESS%XEMPTING(AMILTON !LSMAN SAID WOULD EXACERBATE DOWNTOWNS PARKING SHORTAGE AND LEAD DOZENS OF OFFICE WORKERS TO PARKINADJACENTNEIGHBORHOODS h3EVENTY PEOPLE LOOKING FOR PARKINGSOMEWHEREˆANDTHERES NO PARKING DOWNTOWN v !LSMAN SAID h) CAN ONLY GUESS WHERE ITS GOINGTOGOv 7ITH THE ORDINANCE PASSED THE COUNCILNOWHASDAYSTOCONSID ER AN hINTERIMv REPORT FROM STAFF 4HEMORATORIUM WHILETEMPORARY COULD BE EXTENDED BY  MONTHS AND  DAYS THE MAXIMUM AL LOWED UNDER STATE LAW WHILE THE CITYCONSIDERSFURTHERREVISIONSTO ITSZONINGCODEANDOTHERMETHODS FOR ALLEVIATING DOWNTOWNS PARK INGWOES SUCHASNEWPARKINGFA CILITIES 4HE FINAL PROPOSAL WOULD BE REVIEWED BY THE 0LANNING AND 4RANSPORTATION #OMMISSION AND WOULDBESUBJECTTOAPUBLICHEAR INGBEFOREITWOULDBEADOPTEDN Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

Upfront

Compost

(continued from page 3)

OPERATINGTHEFACILITY 4HEREQUESTFORPROPOSALS WHICH THECITYPLANSTOSENDOUTTOPOTEN TIAL VENDORS IN &EBRUARY COULD OF FERSOMEMUCH NEEDEDANSWERS!T APUBLICMEETING7EDNESDAYNIGHT 0UBLIC7ORKSSTAFFANDCONSULTANTS SHAREDTHEIRPLANANDRECEIVEDINPUT FROMRESIDENTSABOUTTHECRITERIATHE CITYSREQUESTSHOULDCONTAIN *IM"INDEROFTHECONSULTINGFIRM !LTERNATIVE2ESOURCES )NC SAIDTHE PROPOSALS ON BOTH OPTIONS WILL BE DUEBYNEXT*ULY4HEDEPARTMENTS ACTIONPLANCALLSFORTHE#ITY#OUN CILTOMAKETHEKEYDECISIONSABOUT THEFUTUREOFORGANIC WASTEDISPOSAL IN&EBRUARY h7EREHOPINGTOGETFIRMPRICING IN RESPONSE TO BOTH OF THOSE ALTER NATIVES v "INDER SAID h4HAT INFOR MATION WILL BE USED AS PART OF THE ECONOMICANALYSISTHATGOESBEFORE

THECOUNCILSOTHATTHEYCANMAKEA DECISIONIN&EBRUARY WHATDI RECTIONYOUWANTTHECITYTOGOINv !S PART OF THE PROCESS THE CITY WILLALSOALLOWVENDORSTOPROPOSE TECHNOLOGIES OTHER THAN ANAEROBIC DIGESTERS ˆ INCLUDING PLASMA GAS IFICATION WHICH CONVERTS ORGANIC WASTE INTO SYNTHETIC GAS THROUGH A HIGH TEMPERATURE hELECTRIC ARCv #LEAN ENERGY PROPONENTS SUCH AS FORMER-AYOR0ETER$REKMEIERAND ENVIRONMENTAL ATTORNEY 7ALT (AYS HAVE ALSO EXPRESSED ENTHUSIASM ABOUT A hWETv ANAEROBIC DIGESTER WHICHWOULDACCEPTBIOSOLIDWASTE INADDITIONTOFOODSCRAPSANDYARD TRIMMINGS 0HIL "OBEL ASSISTANT DIRECTOR AT 0UBLIC7ORKS STRESSEDTHATTHECITYIS TRYING SOMETHING VERY RARE IN SEEK INGATECHNOLOGYTHATWILLTAKECAREOF ALLTHREETYPESOFWASTEFOODSCRAPS YARDTRIMMINGSANDBIOSOLIDS h)TS UNCHARTED GROUND v "OBEL SAID 7HILETHETECHNOLOGYQUESTIONIS

COMPLEXENOUGHINITSELF THECITYIS ALSOWRESTLINGWITHTHEQUESTIONOF WHATTODOABOUTTHERECENTLYCLOSED LANDFILL 4HE ORIGINAL PLAN WAS TO CAP THE LANDFILL ONCE IT REACHES ITS CAPACITY ˆ A REQUIREMENT OF STATE LAWˆANDADDTHELANDTO"YXBEE 0ARK 4HAT PLAN WAS TOSSED ASIDE ONCE-EASURE%PASSED h"ECAUSE OF CONSIDERATION OF PUTTING ENERGY COMPOSTING THERE IT RAISES THE QUESTION 3HOULD WE CAP IT NOW OR SHOULD WE WAIT AND DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT WHILE WE DECIDE WHAT WERE DOING WITH THE ENERGY COMPOSTING FACILITYv "O BELSAID 2ON!RP WHOMANAGESTHECITYS ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL PROGRAMS SAID THE CITY HAD PLANNED TO CAP THE LANDFILL THIS YEAR BUT RECEIVED PERMISSIONFROMTHETHREEAGENCIES OVERSEEING LANDFILL OPERATIONS ˆ #AL 2ECYCLE 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY AND THE 2EGIONAL 7ATER 1UALITY #ONTROL"OARDˆTODELAYTHECAP PINGBYAYEAR)TISNOWSCHEDULED

TOOCCURIN 3O FAR THE CITY HAD CAPPED AND REOPENEDABOUTACRESOF"YXBEE 0ARK WHILETHEOTHERREMAINUN CAPPED !RPSAID h7EDIDNTWANTTOJUMPRIGHTINTO CAPPING WHILE THERES A PLAN FOR A

POSSIBLEFACILITYOUTTHERE vHESAID 4HE COUNCIL IS SCHEDULED TO DIS CUSSTHECITYSPROGRESSONCOMPOST INGOPTIONSIN$ECEMBERN Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

Melissa Baten Caswell has demonstrated unwavering commitment to effective teaching and learning in our schools.

She has my vote and endorsement.

Forum

(continued from page 3)

PUSHFORMORECLARITY $AUBERADVOCATEDMOREFREQUENT BOARD VOTES RATHER THAN INCONCLU SIVEDISCUSSIONS ASAMEANSTOPRO VIDECLEARDIRECTIONFORTHESUPERIN TENDENT !SKEDTOSUMUPTHESINGLEITEM ATTHETOPOFTHEIRTO DOLISTTOBOOST

STUDENT LEARNING #ASWELL SAID 4O MAKE STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS TO EN SURE STUDENTS HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TOTRYNEWTHINGS FINDTHEIRPASSIONS ANDBECOMELEADERS $AUBERSAID4OENSURETHEDISTRICT ISLISTENINGTOSTUDENTSTHROUGHTHE USEOFDATA %MBERLINGSAID4OMAKESUREALL STUDENTSFEELCONNECTEDTOACARING ADULTONCAMPUSANDHAVEAPOSITIVE CONNECTIONTOSCHOOL

4OWNSEND SAID 4O KEEP DOORS OPENFORSTUDENTS INCLUDINGAHIGHER BARFORGRADUATION SOTHEYWILLHAVE THECLASSESTHEYNEED -ONDAYS FORUM THE SEVENTH OF NINEINTHESCHOOLBOARDRACE WAS MODERATED BY STATE 3EN *OE 3IMI TIAN $ 0ALO!LTO ANDSPONSOREDBY THE0ALO!LTO7EEKLYN Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@paweekly. com.

Senator Joe Simitian

Endorsed by

ect

Reel

Melissa Baten

www.melissabatencaswell.org Paid by Melissa Baten Caswell for School Board Committee  Campaign ID#1298752

Finance your ride with Us! Financing up to 100% of purchase price, plus tax, license and service contracts Terms up to 7 years Convenient online application

*YOUR ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE (APR) MAY BE HIGHER BASED ON CREDIT QUALIFICATION. THE RATE SHOWN INCLUDES A 0.25% RATE DISCOUNT WITH AUTOMATIC TRANSFER AND A 0.50% RATE DISCOUNT WITH DIRECT DEPOSIT. THE RANGE OF APRS FOR NEW AND USED AUTO LOANS IS 2.25% TO 7.25% AFTER DISCOUNTS. A SAMPLE PAYMENT ON AN 84-MONTH LOAN AT 2.25% APR IS $12.88 PER $1000. A $75 FEE WILL BE ASSESSED TO REFINANCE OR MODIFY A STAR ONE AUTO LOAN. RATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

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Upfront

Neighborhoods

A roundup of neighborhood news edited by Sue Dremann

AROUND THE BLOCK WATCHING WORKS ... Credit a watchful resident in Redwood City with the Oct. 12 arrest of three men who allegedly had stolen property from a Palo Alto home three days earlier. The resident on Pine Street in Redwood City dialed 911 after seeing three men enter a neighbor’s home through a back window, police said. Officers surrounded the home and took the men — Raphaelle Jones, 23, of Citrus Heights, Wyatt King, 34, of Sacramento, and Gabriel Carter, 35, of Oakland — into custody. The men were also in possession of property from a Belmont home that had been burgled earlier on Oct. 12 and were later linked to the Palo Alto burglary.

NOT A MODEL TRAIN ... When part of a Union Pacific train catapulted into Palo Alto resident Daniel Peters’ Chevrolet Suburban last week, it wasn’t the only piece to end up where it shouldn’t have. Another resident also found pieces and was puzzled by them until he read about Peters’ predicament. The three smaller fragments, weighing 1, 2 and 5 pounds, had landed along Alma Street near Ely Place. Police declined to get involved as no property was damaged, the resident said. HALLOWEEN HAUNTS ... On Oct. 31’s bewitching hour, neighborhood haunts will fill with ghosts and goblins. Two neighborhoods that could be particularly haunting include the Duffie family’s Haunted Yard at 343 Oxford Ave. in the Evergreen Park neighborhood and South Court in Midtown Palo Alto, which always offers a streetful of scary encounters on Halloween night. Danilo Oxford promises his Realm of Darkness, now in its 15th year, will be the scariest ever. It will be open Oct. 20, 21, 27 and 28 from 6 to 9 p.m. — but not on Halloween. He says it is not for the faint of heart, the very young or pregnant women. The address is 1034 Moffett Circle, between Greer Road and Colorado and Amarillo avenues. N

Send announcements of neighborhood events, meetings and news to Sue Dremann, Neighborhoods editor, at sdremann@paweekly.com. Or talk about your neighborhood news on Town Square at www. PaloAltoOnline.com.

Sue Dremann

ALMA ADDITION ... As the Weekly reported last Friday, Miki’s Farm Fresh Market has opened at Alma Plaza, some seven years after the Albertsons closed. A ribbon cutting will be held at the grocery store, 3445-A Alma St., on Thursday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 a.m.

Jan Steele points to one of her 87 witches, collected from all over the world, which she displays before Halloween each year.

UNIVERSITY SOUTH

Palo Alto resident is bewitched by witches Spellbound, Jan Steele has collected crones for 30 years by Sue Dremann ACH 3EPTEMBER AND /CTOBER *AN3TEELES0ALO!LTOCONDO MINIUMFALLSUNDERAMAGICAL SPELL 4HERE ARE WITCHES SITTING ON THE MANTLE AND WITCHES FLYING IN THEKITCHENˆTHEREISEVENONETHAT MOONSVISITORSWHILESHERIDESHER BROOMSTICK 3TEELE HAS  OF THEM COLLECTED FROMALLOVERTHEWORLD4HEREISA THIMBLEWITCHFROM#ORDOBA 3PAIN ANDABEADEDWITCHFROM3ANTA&E .- AND ONE FROM 0RAGUE THAT SINGS 3OMEAREFATANDCHERUBICOTHERS AREWRINKLED GRAYANDWARTY4HEY AREFASHIONEDFROMGLASS CLAY FAB RICANDEVENDRIED FRUITPEELS 3TEELEENLISTSHERHUSBAND 4IM TO BRINGDOWNTHEBOXESEACHYEARAND HELP SET UP THEIR 5NIVERSITY 3OUTH HOME FOR (ALLOWEEN )TS MOSTLY A PRIVATEAFFAIR TOBESAVOREDBYTHE COUPLES YOUNG GRANDCHILDREN "UT 3TEELE ALSO INVITES CHILDREN OF THE

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ONETHAThISSOUGLYSHEEVENHASHAIR COMINGFROMTHEWARTONHERNOSE v SHESAID 3HE HELD UP ONE OF VARIOUSLY COLORED BLOWN GLASS WITH A FINELY HOOKEDNOSE h4HISONEISEXQUISITE vSHESAID h)JUSTTHINKTHEYARECHARACTERS 4HEY ARE PORTRAYED IN SO MANY WAYS vSHEADDED 4HEWITCHESGOBACKINTHEBOXON .OV BUTTHATSNOTTHEENDOFTHE 3TEELESFESTIVITIES4HECRONESWILL MAKE WAY FOR THE  PILGRIMS AND TURKEYS SHELL DISPLAY FOR 4HANKS GIVING *OVIAL 3ANTA #LAUSES WILL SUPPLANT THE TURKEYS AND PILGRIMS FOR#HRISTMAS !NDIFWITCHESSEEMTOBEAN AWESOMEQUANTITY 3TEELEHASASUR PRISEh4HEREAREMORE3ANTA#LAUS ESTHANWITCHESvN Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@paweekly.com.

Upfront SUBURBAN FARMING

Tour de Coop shows off backyard chickens Bike ride for garden and urban-homesteading enthusiasts takes place Oct. 27 by Sue Dremann ITH NAMES LIKE #HICKEN 3PA #OUPE$E0LUMEAND #ALIFORNIA #OOP THE FIRST 3ILICON6ALLEY4OURDE#OOPBICY CLETOURWILLFEATURECHICKENCOOPS RANGINGFROMTHEFUNKYTOARCHITEC TURALLYREFINED 4HESELF GUIDEDTOUROFCOOPS AND GARDENS WILL TAKE PLACE 3ATUR DAY /CT IN0ALO!LTO ,OS!L TOS AND ,OS !LTOS (ILLS "ACKYARD URBANHOMESTEADERSWILLSHARETHEIR EXPERIENCES WITH CYCLISTS AND DIS PLAY THEIR COOPS BEES AND ORGANIC GARDENS /RGANIZER 3COTT 6ANDERLIP SAID HE WAS INSPIRED TO START THE 4OUR DE #OOP AFTER LEARNING ABOUT THE 4OUR DE #LUCK WHICH HAS TAKEN PLACE IN $AVIS FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS h9OUDONTREALIZETHEAMOUNTOF ACTIVITIES AND FUN THINGS THAT ARE GOING ON IN PEOPLES BACKYARDS URBAN HOMESTEADING COMPOSTING VERMICULTURE WORMS  #HICKENS COMBINE THAT LOOP 9OU GET FRESH EGGS POOP COMPOST ˆANDITSA GREATWAYTOCONNECTWITHPEOPLE v HESAID 6ANDERLIP A ,OS !LTOS (ILLS RESIDENT HAS KEPT CHICKENS FOR FIVE YEARS (E CURRENTLY HAS FIVE $OODLES AN !MERICAUNA -IMI ABUFFCOCHIN 2OSIE A 2HODE )S LANDREDGOLDENSEX LINKANDTWO BLACK !USTRALORPS &EATHERS AND 0ERCY%ACHCOMESWITHADISTINCT PERSONALITY h/NECANBESTUBBORN ANDANOTH ERCANBEREALLYWILD vHESAID &IVE 0ALO !LTO COOPS WILL BE ON THE TOUR IN ADDITION TO SIX IN ,OS

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by Siobhan O’Sullivan

Managing Moves & More!

Sue Dremann

(continued on page 15)

D OWNSIZING B Y D ESIGN

Barron Park resident Debbie Nielsen’s chicken coop is one of 12 featured on the Oct. 27 Tour de Coop bicycle tour. The event covers organic gardens and coops of urban homesteaders in Palo Alto, Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Moving is hard enough, but when you’ve lived in a place for many years, in some people’s case decades, the challenges and hurdles are compounded. People accumulate stuff. My mom always said, “Nature abhors a vacuum!� and people tend to fill up the space they have with more stuff than they could ever need or use or enjoy. Cindy Hofen, owner of Managing Moves & More, began her business to help people to simplify their clutter chaos. Cindy recognized the need for a service like hers when her mother moved into a smaller place, and in 2009, she set up her company to help people with their home clearing outs and relocation efforts. Among the services her company provides are: total move management from organizing a time-line, to sorting and organizing personal belongs, helping people to decide wheather to keep,

sell, donate or discard, to managing the professional packers, coordinating the Move-Day to unpacking, and setting up the new home. She also helps those who are not planning on moving but want to reduce stress with a more organized and clutter free home. Her service to help organize and manage vital life documents is a total stress reducer. Managing Moves & More offers complimentary consultations and strive to keep their rates competitive. You can reach Cindy at 650-450-0928 or visit their website www. ManagingMoves.com. It makes infinite sense. Whether you are moving or staying put the quality of your life in a less cluttered environment, where you can put your hands on that important document at a moment’s notice leads to a more peaceful existence! And Peace of Mind is a great life enhancer!

For answers to any questions you may have, or, advice or tips you may want to share relating to downsizing by design, please email me at sos@osullivanteam.com Siobhan is a residential real estate specialist with Dreyfus Properties.

Exclusive Peninsula Debut Trunk Show Saturday, October 20 From 10-3

1805 El Camino Real Palo Alto 650.324.3937 www.luxpaloalto.com ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ"VĂŒÂœLiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 11

“It’s my

No Guilt No Calorie

No Sticker Shock

All Grown Up Fun!” the shopping here is just that

Fun www.thehomeconsignmentcenter.com Campbell

930 West Hamilton Ave. Suite 190 408-871-8890

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Corte Madera

801 Tamalpais Drive Corte Madera, CA 94925 415-924-6691

Danville

1901-F Camino Ramon Danville, CA 94526 925-866-6164

Mountain View

141 E. El Camino Real Mountain View, CA 94040 650-964-7212

San Carlos 1123 Industrial

(near Best Buy/Ross)

650-508-8317

Upfront

Workforce

(continued from page 6)

4OCOPEWITHTHECHANGES THECITY IS TRYING TO INJECT MORE FLEXIBILITY TOITSEMPLOYEEPOLICIESANDTOCRE ATEMOREOPPORTUNITIESFOREMPLOY EES TO ADVANCE THEIR CAREERS 3HEN POINTED TO A RECENT STUDY BY THE )NTERNATIONAL 0UBLIC -ANAGEMENT !SSOCIATIONFOR(UMAN2ESOURCES WHICHPOLLEDMORETHAN PUB LIC SECTORWORKERS7HENEMPLOYEES WEREASKEDTONAMEONETHINGTHAT WOULD IMPROVE THEIR JOB SATISFAC TION THE TOP RESPONSES WERE MORE OPPORTUNITIES TO DO WHAT THEY DO BEST MORE CAREER DEVELOPMENT OP PORTUNITIESANDMOREFLEXIBILITYAND CONTROLOVERHOWWORKISDONE !CCORDINGTOTHENEWREPORT STAFF PLANSTOUSETHESESTUDIESTOhDEVELOP ARECRUITMENTANDRETENTIONSTRATEGY THAT FOCUSES ON A HIGH PERFORMING WORKFORCEANDCOMBINESAPPROPRI ATELEVELSOFTRAINING EDUCATION JOB FLEXIBILITY ANDAT WILLEMPLOYMENT TOBUILDASTCENTURYEMPLOYMENT PROGRAMIN0ALO!LTODURINGATIME OFCHANGESTOTRADITIONALBENEFITS h3TAFF INTENDS TO CONTINUE OPEN DIALOGUEWITHEMPLOYEESABOUTTHE FACTORS THAT PROMOTE ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION INCLUDING SURVEYS FOCUS GROUPS AND INTERVIEWS v THE (UMAN2ESOURCESREPORTSTATES !T-ONDAYSMEETING THECOUN CIL VOICED SUPPORT FOR 3HENSPRO POSALTOENGAGECITYWORKERS-AY OR9IAWAY9EHSAIDTHAThGIVENTHE POTENTIAL LOSS OF THE INSTITUTIONAL KNOWLEDGE IN SUCH A CONCENTRAT ED AMOUNT OF TIME v ITS ESSENTIAL FOR EVERYONE AT #ITY (ALL TO START THINKINGABOUTTHECHANGINGWORK PLACECULTURE #OUNCILMEMBERSALSOHADPLENTY OFQUESTIONSABOUTTHECITYSPOWER TO FURTHER CUT PENSION AND HEALTH CARECOSTS4HEFORMER INPARTICU LAR IS A THORNY SUBJECT GIVEN THE MANYRESTRICTIONSFACEDBYLOCALJU RISDICTIONS WHOSEPENSIONPLANSARE ADMINISTEREDBY#AL0%23#ALIFOR NIA 0UBLIC %MPLOYEES 2ETIREMENT 3YSTEM  4HE PROCESS WAS MADE EVENMORECOMPLICATEDLASTMONTH WHEN 'OV *ERRY "ROWN AND THE STATE ,EGISLATURE AGREED ON A PLAN THATINCLUDESNEWPENSIONTIERSAND OTHERPENSIONREFORMS 3TAFF PLANS TO CONDUCT MORE RE SEARCH ABOUT THE CHANGES IN #ALI FORNIASPENSIONLAWSINPREPARATION FORTHECOUNCILSNEXTDISCUSSIONON EMPLOYEEBENEFITS WHICHISSCHED ULEDFORNEXTMONTHANDWHICHWILL FOCUS EXCLUSIVELY ON PENSIONS &U TUREMEETINGSWILLCENTERONMEDICAL COSTSANDOTHERBENEFITS #ITY -ANAGER *AMES +EENE SAID THE CITYS TREND OF RISING EMPLOYEE COSTS BEGAN LONG BEFORE THE 'REAT 2ECESSION "UT THE ECONOMIC COL LAPSE ADDED A SENSE OF URGENCY TO 0ALO!LTOSREFORMEFFORTS h/UR #ITY #OUNCIL REALLY MOVED SWIFTLY AND STRATEGICALLY TO BEGIN FOCUSING ON THE STRUCTURAL ISSUES THATSURFACEDRIGHTAWAYWHENSUD DENLY SOME OF THE SUPPORTS WERE REMOVED v+EENESAIDh4HATBEING SAID EVEN DESPITE THE ACTIONS THAT HAVEBEENTAKEN WHENYOULOOKAT THETRENDLINESINPENSIONCOSTSAND THEWAY#AL0%23ACTUALLYALLOCATES THECOSTSTOTHECITIESWEWILLSTILLSEE RISINGTRAJECTORIESINTHEFUTUREvN

Athena

(continued from page 5)

DAYSOFPLAYINGINFIELDSANDCATCH ING BUTTERFLIES 4HAT ENVIRONMENT HELPED FOSTER CHILDHOOD CREATIVITY SHESAID3HEREPORTEDFORANDSOLD SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE -ARTIN -ES SENGER A NEIGHBORHOOD NEWSPAPER LAUNCHEDBYACHILDONHERBLOCK (ERINTERESTSCOULDHAVETAKENHER INANYNUMBEROFDIRECTIONS INCLUD ING JOURNALISM OR EVEN MEDICINE FORWHICHSHESTILLHASAPASSION)N TENSELYFOCUSEDWITHASTRONGBUSI NESSBENT NOWSHECONSIDERSHERSELF AFINANCIALPHYSICIAN SHESAID 0ALO !LTO ISNT SMALL TOWN QUIET

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Upfront

1MH4IRMRWYPE ,MKL7GLSSP OPEN HOUSE Saturday, October 20, 2012 10:30am-Noon

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Meteor zips over Bay Area, lands with sonic boom !LARGEMETEORSTREAKEDACROSSTHENIGHTSKY7EDNESDAYNIGHT /CT  ANDWASSEENANDHEARDTHROUGHOUTTHE"AY!REA(Posted Oct. 18 at 8:03 a.m.)

Stanford demands anti-Prop. 37 ad be changed !POLITICALCAMPAIGNOPPOSING#ALIFORNIAS0ROPOSITIONHASLAND ED IN HOT WATER WITH 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY AFTER THE UNIVERSITY SAID A POLITICALADVERTISEMENTANDCAMPAIGNLITERATUREVIOLATEDITSPOLICIES (Posted Oct. 17 at 4:40 p.m.)

Nathaniel Healy is new head of Menlo School

6)74)'8ˆ/-2(2)77ˆ%'')48%2')ˆ6)74327-&-0-8= Mid-Peninsula High School, a community for learning since 1979, offers students a stimulating, nurturing, safe environment that empowers them to reach their full academic and social potential. UĂŠĂ€>`iĂƒĂŠÂ™Â‡ÂŁĂ“ UĂŠ1 ĂŠ>VVĂ€i`ÂˆĂŒi` UĂŠ/i>“Ê-ÂŤÂœĂ€ĂŒĂƒ (650) 321-1991

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www.mid-pen.com

4HEASSISTANTHEADOFA3EATTLEPRIVATESCHOOLWILLBECOMETHENEW HEADAT-ENLO3CHOOL*ULY -ENLOANNOUNCED7EDNESDAY /CT .ATHANIEL 4HAN (EALY WHO HAS TAUGHT HISTORY AND PSYCHOLOGY IN PRIVATESCHOOLS WILLREPLACE.ORM#OLB(Posted Oct. 17 at 4:13 p.m.)

Mountain View council says no to Chick-Fil-A -OUNTAIN6IEWS#ITY#OUNCILVOTED 4UESDAYEVENING /CT AGAINSTALLOWINGA#HICK &IL !TOOPENAT%L#AMINO2EAL SAY INGTHATADRIVE THROUGHRESTAURANTWOULDBEATODDSWITHVISIONSOFA BIKE ANDPEDESTRIAN FRIENDLYCITY(Posted Oct. 17 at 3:28 p.m.)

Plea for suspect in Jobs burglary postponed +ARIEM-C&ARLIN THE!LAMEDAMANCHARGEDWITHBURGLARIZINGTHE 0ALO!LTOHOMEOFTHELATE3TEVE*OBS MADEABRIEFCOURTAPPEARANCE 7EDNESDAYMORNING /CT BUTDIDNOTENTERPLEA (Posted Oct. 17 at 12:27 p.m.)

Lost driver’s ‘wrong turn’ flips car near Peers Park 1340 Willow Road, Menlo Park

!DRIVERWHOWASLOSTINSOUTH0ALO!LTOSTRUCKATREEANDFLIPPED HERVEHICLENEAR0EERS0ARK7EDNESDAYMORNING /CT 0ALO!LTO POLICESAID(Posted Oct. 17 at 11:08 a.m.)

Pilot killed after plane crashes in Half Moon Bay 4HEWRECKAGEOFAN!RIZONA BOUNDAIRPLANETHATDISAPPEAREDAFTER TAKING OFF FROM THE (ALF -OON "AY !IRPORT -ONDAY /CT  WAS FOUNDONACOASTALBLUFFWESTOFTHEAIRPORT4UESDAYAFTERNOON /CT ASHERIFFSPOKESWOMANSAID4HEPILOTWASKILLEDINTHECRASH(Posted Oct. 17 at 8:56 a.m.)

Police arrest transient for attempted robbery

    

        

    

  

                   

      

   

!3UNNYVALEMANWASARRESTEDFORANATTEMPTEDROBBERYINDOWN TOWN0ALO!LTO3ATURDAY /CT AFTERHEREPEATEDLYSTRUCKANOTHER MANINTHEFACEAFTERDEMANDINGMONEY(Posted Oct. 16 at 9:49 a.m.)

Stanford visiting professor shares Nobel ! 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY VISITING PROFESSOR WAS AWARDED THE .OBEL 0RIZEINECONOMICS-ONDAY /CT FORHISWORKONMARKETDESIGN !LVIN 2OTH A PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AT (ARVARD 5NIVERSITY WHO WILL JOIN 3TANFORDS PERMANENT FACULTY IN  SHARES THE PRIZE WITH ,LOYD 3HAPLEY PROFESSOR EMERITUS AT 5#,!(Posted Oct. 15 at 12:01 p.m.)

East Palo Alto residents march against violence %AST 0ALO!LTOCOMMUNITYORGANIZERSHELDAh3TOPTHE6IOLENCEv MARCHANDRALLY3UNDAY /CT INTHEWAKEOFAPAIROFHOMICIDES THATOCCURREDWITHINTHREEBLOCKSOFEACHOTHERON/CT (Posted Oct. 15 at 9:56 a.m.)

Highway crash in Palo Alto shuts down lanes !MULTI VEHICLECRASHINVOLVINGALARGEBUSLEFTATLEASTONEPERSON INJUREDANDSHUTDOWNTHREELANESON53(IGHWAYFORMORETHAN ANHOUREARLY3UNDAYMORNING /CT ACCORDINGTOTHE#ALIFORNIA (IGHWAY0ATROL(Posted Oct. 14 at 8:13 a.m.)

       

     !

$10,000 in eyeglasses stolen in Palo Alto

    

"URGLARSSTOLE INEYEGLASSESANDSUNGLASSESFROMADOWN TOWN0ALO!LTOOPTOMETRIST4HURSDAY /CT POLICESAID(Posted Oct.

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Upfront

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Oct. 15)

Pension reform: The council discussed the city’s rising costs of employee benefits and the plan to recruit and retain staff. Members directed staff to do more research into the potential impact of the pension reforms recently passed by the state Legislature on the city’s reform efforts. Action: None Parking: The council passed an urgency ordinance that imposes a moratorium on parking exemptions granted to developers with new projects downtown and near California Avenue. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Holman, Klein, Price, Scharff, Shepherd, Yeh Absent: Schmid

Architectural Review Board (Oct. 18)

Rinconada Park: The board held a study session to consider the proposed design changes in the long-range plan for Rinconada Park. Action: None 1845 El Camino Real: The board discussed but did not vote on a proposal by The Hayes Group on behalf of Yeh Jen Fy for a three-story building with 2,663 square feet of commercial space and one residential unit at 1845 El Camino Real. Action: None

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to discuss the city’s negotiations with the Utilities Management and Professional Association of Palo Alto. The council then plans to hold a joint session with state Sen. Joe Simitian; consider participating in the Cool Cities Challenge; consider adopting a resolution supporting an amendment to the California and United States constitutions to specify that “corporations are not people and money is not speech� in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Citizens United vs. Federal Communications Commission; and discuss a memo from Mayor Yiaway Yeh and Councilwomen Gail Price and Nancy Shepherd regarding a Council Youth Commission liaison. The closed session will begin at 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 22, in the Council Conference Room and will be followed by the meeting with Simitian. The rest of the meeting will follow in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). BOARD OF EDUCATION ... In the earlier meeting, elementary school principals will report on their plans for student achievement. In the later meeting, the board will hear a report on assessment results of high school students as well as a report on 2012 summer school. The meetings will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 8:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. in the board room of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to hear an update on the city’s progress in addressing the recommendations of the Fire Resources Services and Utilization Study. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 23, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

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(continued from page 11)

!LTOS AND ONE IN ,OS !LTOS (ILLS HESAID !SIDE FROM THE OBVIOUS PERKS OF FRESH EGGS AND AN INTERESTING NEW PROJECT 0ALO !LTO COOP OWNER !N WYN (URXTHAL SAID HER FAMILY WAS DRAWNTOTHEIDEAOFHAVINGBACKYARD CHICKENS TO DEEPEN THEIR EASE WITH DIFFERENTSPECIESOTHERTHANDOGSAND CATSTHATLIVEINANURBANSETTING 4HE (URXTHAL#OLLINS #OUPE DE 0LUMEISACONDOMINIUM LIKEAFFAIR FORTWOBIRDS COMPLETEWITHYELLOW WINDOWCURTAINS h)TWASOURWAYOFREACHING EVER SO SLIGHTLY PAST STANDARD URBAN HOMEMAKINGINTOTHEWIDEREXPERI ENCEOFOURFOODCHAIN7HATSTARTED ASADESIREFORFRESHLYLAIDEGGSAND A COOL COOP HAS RESULTED IN A DEEP RESPECT AND APPRECIATION FOR THESE TWOINDIVIDUALBIRDS NOWFEATHERED MEMBERS OF OUR LITTLE URBAN CLAN v SHESAID 3EVEN YEAR OLD DAUGHTER *ESSA #OLLINSSAIDh7HENYOUGETCHICKS THEYREREALLYCUTE BUTASTHEYGROW OLDER THEYRE EVEN BETTER BECAUSE THEYACTUALLYLOVEYOUBACKv /-ALLEY 3TOUMANS #ALIFORNIA #OOPWASDESIGNEDBYHERARCHITECT HUSBAND *ONATHAN 4HE TRI LEVEL STRUCTURE HAS A PAGODA STYLE ROOF ANDISMADEFROMRECYCLEDWOOD! SOLIDCINDERBLOCKFLOORKEEPSPREDA TORSFROMDIGGINGUNDERNEATHTOGET THE CHICKENS SHE SAID 4HE BIRDS ALSO HAVE AN AUTOMATIC FEEDER AND WATERDISPENSERFORWHENSHEISOUT OFTOWN SHESAID 3TOUMANS CHICKEN PHOTOS HAVE BECOMESOPOPULARWITHFAMILYAND FRIENDS THAT SHE STARTED A WEBSITE WORKDAYCHICKENPICTURESCOM TO GIVEPEOPLEALAUGHEACHDAYBEFORE THEY SET OFF FOR THEIR JOBS 3HE HAS  SUBSCRIBERS AND A &ACEBOOK PAGE SHESAID h7HEN)LIVEDONARANCH )HAD

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NEIGHBORS AND ALL HAVE BEEN SUP PORTIVE h4HEREAREALOTOFCHICKENSISTERS HERE 3EVERAL LADIES ON THE STREET HAVECHICKENS vSHESAID !SIGNOVERTHECOOPPROCLAIMSIT THEh"IRD&ARMv3HEUSEDTHESAME NAMEANDFONTASTHATOFTHE)LLINOIS SAUSAGE COMPANY STARTED BY HER GRANDFATHER AND UNCLE "IRD &ARM 3AUSAGE #O SHE SAID 4REVOR HER  YEAR OLD SON HELPED DESIGN THE COOP 3HE ADMITTED THAT SHE PULLED OUT ALL THE STOPS BUT SHE WANTED SOMETHING TO LOOK OUT ON THAT WAS PLEASING FROM HER KITCHEN WINDOW ANDDININGROOM WHERESHESPENDS MUCHTIMESTUDYING h)M FROM THE -IDWEST AND THEYRELIKEYARDART vSHESAID 4HE 4OUR DE #OOP TAKES PLACE FROM  AM TO  PM $OWNLOAD ABLE MAPS ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE FOR REGISTRANTS -ORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION IS AVAILABLE AT WWW TOURDECOOPORGN Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@paweekly.com.

Schola Cantorum and Stanford Talisman A musical journey to “Southern Latitudes� Sat, Nov. 3, 8:00 pm First Congregational Church of Palo Alto 1985 Louis Road Sun, Nov. 4, 2:00 pm Los Altos Methodist Church 655 Magdalena Avenue

Bright new interpretations of authentic songs and shanties give voice to stories from Australia, Samoa, New Zealand and Africa!

Tickets $25 at www.scholacantorum.org or call 650.254.1700 Students to age 25 FREE

Endorsed by:

PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss progress on the Rinconada Park Master Plan and consider commission involvement in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 23, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the flood-protection plan proposed by the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority; have a joint study session with the Architectural Review Board about the proposed new office towers and theater at 27 University Ave.; and then discuss the land-use issues regarding 27 University Ave. The meeting will begin at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 24, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). The joint session with the ARB will begin at 6 p.m. and the commission’s discussion of 27 University Ave. will begin at 8 p.m. BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will hold a study session on facilities and enrollment growth. The meeting will be on Thursday, Oct. 25, at 9 a.m. at school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to discuss labor negotiations with council-appointed officers. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25, at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). LIBRARY ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission is scheduled to plan for its joint session with the City Council and consider its 2012-13 priorities. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

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Jacqueline Srill Thielen

!UGUST TO/CTOBER sResident of Palo Alto, CA Jackie passed away peacefully in her sleep on October 5, 2012 at the age of 84. She is survived by her loving sons Mark, Ed, Peter and John Thielen, her loving daughters Laura Thielen and Sarah Thielen Frey, her cherished sons- and daughtersin-law George Eldred, Jess Frey, Janet Stevenson, and Karen Thielen, and five beloved grandchildren Caelina Eldred-Thielen, Rebecca Thielen, Maia Thielen, and Noah and Ava Frey. She also leaves behind her dearest sister Jane Caverly and many nieces and nephews. Born in Oak Park, Illinois, Jackie was the youngest of Edward and Irene Srill’s four daughters. She attended Vassar College where she received her Bachelor of Arts in English Literature in 1950. In the early 50s, she met her husband Lawrence Raymond Thielen at Bell Labs. Married on June 6, 1954, they shared a full life until Larry’s death in 1983. In 1959 they moved to Palo Alto, which Jackie called home until her death. The wife of an early Silicon Valley entrepreneur, she is credited with creating the name of his successful company, Avantek. Shortly after settling in Palo Alto, Jackie

became involved in Abilities United (formerly known as the Community Association for the Retarded), a volunteer commitment she was proud of and that endured for 50 years. Jackie lived a full life that embraced family, friends, travel, and an enduring passion for the arts. Kind and ever patient, she is warmly remembered for her quiet wit and love of beautiful things be it the flowers in her garden, a good book or a fine performance. Fond of joyful gatherings, Jackie always opened her home to family and friends, creating eagerly anticipated festive celebrations like Thanksgiving, Christmas, chocolate cake birthdays, and her annual crab feed with secret sauce. Most importantly, Jackie’s gentle, generously loving nature embraced and influenced family, friends and others in profound, enduring ways. Warmly cherished by all who were touched by her sweet spirit, Jackie is greatly missed. In lieu of flowers, her family requests that donations may be made on her behalf to Abilities United 525 East Charleston Road, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 4940550. PA I D

OBITUARY

Norwick “Wick” Beauford Houston Goodspeed October 21, 1949 – October 15, 2012

Wick Goodspeed, a long-time resident of Palo Alto, passed away at his home in Glen Ellyn, Illinois on Monday after a heroic struggle with ALS. He was 62. Wick was born in New Haven, Connecticut, growing up in Fairfield and attending Fairfield Country Day school. He spent his high school years at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts and enrolled in a post-graduate year at Tonbridge School in Kent, England. In 1972, he received his BA from Yale, where he played on the ice hockey team, and his MBA from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business in 1977. He was a successful business leader in the fast-changing medical technology field, working as a marketing and executive manager for nearly 35 years. He served as president of several successful medical companies, including McGaw, Transvascular and most recently Flowcardia. His greatest joy was his family. He married Mary Detmer in 1985 and together they raised three children, Nick, Will and Molly. After a series of job-related moves, they settled in Palo Alto, where Wick said he spent the happiest years of his life. Wick was an avid sportsman who ran several marathons, enjoyed tennis, and played competitive ice hockey until he was 50. He shared his love of sports with his children and moved from the playing field to the sidelines, coaching, cheering and supporting their many teams. He and Mary led the Palo Alto High School Sports Boosters for many years, turning it into one of the school’s most successful fundraising orga-

nizations. A passionate musician, Wick and another local father grew weary of seeing the same deejay play the music at the Walter Hays school fundraiser every year and decided to form a band of “rocker dads.” In 2001, they took out an ad in the school newsletter seeking musicians and within weeks, seven fathers formed “The Wildcats,” with Wick playing bass. The group attracted a loyal following, playing at events and parties for more than a decade and raising over $100,000 for local schools. Wick was honest and humble, a gentle and kind man with a quick wit, keen intellect and gracious spirit. He dearly loved his family and friends and gave generously of his time and of his heart. He leaves behind his devoted wife Mary, his three loving children Nick, Will, and Molly, his mother Elizabeth Reeves Goodspeed, his brother Roger, many nieces, nephews, and in-laws, and legions of friends who will forever love and miss him. Celebrations of his life will be held in both Chicago and Palo Alto. The local memorial will be held at 11 am, Saturday, October 27, at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 600 Colorado Avenue, Palo Alto. In lieu of flowers, his family would appreciate donations in his memory to any of the following organizations: Les Turner ALS Foundation, 550 W. Touhy Ave., #302, Skokie, IL 60077; Adventist St. Thomas Hospice, 119 Ogden Ave., #111, Hinsdale, IL 60521; or, Palo Alto High School Sports Boosters, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA 94301. PA I D

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OBITUARY

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Oct. 11-16 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Sex crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Sexual assault. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Strong-arm robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Abandoned bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .7 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . 12 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .4 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of paraphernalia. . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Muni. code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of stolen property . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Menlo Park Oct. 11-16 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Child abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Auto burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .4 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Atherton Oct. 11-16 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Construction complaint . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .6 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Unlisted block University Avenue, 10/5, 7:22 p.m.; family violence/battery. Unlisted block Deodar Street, 10/11, 8:30 a.m.; child abuse/physical. Unlisted block Ventura Avenue, 10/11, 9:12 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Kenneth Drive, 10/11, 9:16 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Old Adobe Road, 10/11, 10:50 p.m.; sex crime/misc.

Menlo Park 300 block Oak Court, 10/11, 9:08 p.m.; robbery. 1200 block Madera Avenue, 10/13, 1:15 p.m.; child abuse. 1300 block Willow Road, 10/16, 9:30 a.m.; battery.

Edwin Bernard Bucholtz Ed was born in San Francisco on 4/7/24, and died 10/10/12 following an accident. His parents were Mabel Latapie and Walter Bucholtz. At a young age, he moved to Palo Alto with his family, where he spent the rest of his life. He attended Addison School, was in the first graduating class of Jordan Middle school, and graduated from Palo Alto High School. When World War II broke out, he joined the service as a paratrooper with the 511th Airborne and saw action in the Pacific Theater of Operation. After the war, he returned to school and spent his working years in the air-conditioning and sheet metal industry. He is survived by his wife Char, of 65 years; son Roger and partner Bob; daughter Marianne and partner Agnes, and two grandchildren, Jamie and Josh; his brother Bob and wife Kerstin and beloved niece and nephew. A celebration of his life will take place on Sunday, October 21st from 2-5 p.m., at Michael’s at Shoreline, 2960 N. Shoreline Blvd. Mt. View, CA. Roller Hapgood Tinney PA I D

OBITUARY

Transitions Eve Marion Agiewich Eve Agiewich, 68, died at her Palo Alto home Oct. 13. She was born in New York City and moved to Palo Alto in 1978. An attorney and lifelong advocate for others, she once described her background by saying, “I was raised in a household that believed, implicitly, in the worth of every human being, in equality, and in the right of every person to be treated with dignity and fairness. Social action was in the water I drank.” After closing her Silicon Valley law practice in 2000, she worked

with Clara Mateo Alliance — a shelter for homeless families and adults. She also served on the board of the Community Working Group, helping to create Palo Alto’s Opportunity Center. In 2009, she was named a Peninsula Interfaith Action Local Hero. Her most recent position was Director of the Fatherhood Collaborative of San Mateo County. When not working, she pursued travel, photography, reading and hiking. She was preceded in death by her husband of 34 years, Arnold R. Agiewich. She is survived by her daughter, Erica Agiewich, son-in-law, Miles Davis, and grandchildren, Owen and Adele Davis, all of Palo Alto; her daughter, Rebecca Agiewich, and son-in-law, David Taylor, of Seattle, Wash.; and her brother, Norman Tischler of Cleveland, Ohio. N

Miriam Roth MacKenzie Miriam Roth MacKenzie passed away Oct. 3, 2012, at her home in Menlo Park where she had lived for 62 years. She was born in San Francisco on Jan. 8, 1917, and lived most of her life on the Peninsula. She was the daughter of Almon E. Roth and Mildred Hayes Roth and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.O. Hayes of Edenvale, San Jose. She grew up living on the Stanford campus where her father served as Comptroller of the University for 18 years. She attended Castilleja School in Palo Alto and graduated from Stanford in 1938. There she was president of her sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma, graduated with Great Distinction and was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa National Scholastic Honor Society. In 1941, she married Alexander Scott Gray MacKenzie who was then in Stanford Medical School. He served for three-and-a-half years in the Navy Medical Corps in World War II, after which he returned to Stanford Hospital for his surgical residency. In 1950, he joined the Palo Alto Clinic and the family established a home in Menlo Park. Life was never dull in the MacKenzie household and Mrs. MacKenzie lived an extraordinarily busy but very happy life occupied with the raising of her six children and participation in their activities. She also provided a home for two grandparents for 23 years and nine foreign students who came and went. She served as President of the Stanford Mother’s Club (now Parent’s Club) and volunteered for auxiliaries to Stanford Children’s Hospital (now Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital). When her children were grown, she transferred her energies to her garden, creating and maintaining such a beautiful one that it was enjoyed by many. The family’s love of the High Sierra resulted in many wonderful summer experiences in the High Country. Dr. MacKenzie died in 2000. His wife is survived by her daughter, Alexandra Standing (Douglas) of Sunnyvale; her five sons, David (Helen) of Palo Alto, James (Janet) of Atherton, William of Menlo Park, Duncan (Phyllis) of College Station, Texas, and Donald (Janice) of Newark; eight grandchildren; six great grandchildren and her brother William Roth (Deborah) of Palo Alto. Private services will be held. The family requests any memorial donations be made to the Peninsula Open Space Trust, 222 High St., Palo Alto, CA 94301; or the Roth Auxiliary at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, 725 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Julie Kohls Julie Kohls passed away suddenly on Sept. 29, 2012, at the age of 51. She was an amazing woman with a beautiful smile and laugh that would brighten any room! Julie was raised in Palo Alto, Calif., and graduated from Cubberley High School. Julie and her husband raised their three boys in Rio Vista, Calif. During those years Julie was active in St. Joseph’s Parish as a youth group leader and various fundraising activities. She volunteered as a counselor for “At Risk” teens, coached for Little League Baseball and AYSO youth soccer and was a member of the Rio Vista Soroptimists Intls. Julie had a successful career in Real Estate, work-

ing for Shea Homes, Warmington and Olsen Homes as well as O.C. Jones Construction Company. She is survived by her husband of 29 years, Alan; sons, Jarrod, Grayson and Mitchell; father, William Lipp; step-mother, Soon; sister, Leanne King; and many nephews and nieces. Predeceased by mother, Carole Robertson; step-father, Earl Robertson; sister, Barbara Smith; and brother, Bill Lipp. Public memorial Saturday, Oct. 20, at 1:30 p.m. at Valley Presbyterian Church, 945 Portola Road, Portola Valley. Donations can be made to Shriners Hospital Link: http://support.shrinershospitals.org/goto/JulieLippKohls PA I D

OBITUARY

Marilyn S. Wilson Marilyn S. Wilson passed away on September 21, 2012, at her home in Palo Alto, hours after she would have celebrated her 65th wedding anniversary to her husband Bert Wilson, who preceded her in death in 2008. She was surrounded by her loving family, who for weeks had stayed close by her side. Marilyn was born in Chicago on March 30, 1927 to Otto and Veda Stratton. She grew up in small towns throughout the west, where her parents owned and operated several successful hotels She studied architecture at the University of Oregon, an active member of the Delta Gamma sorority, but left a year before graduation to marry a handsome Marine Corps pilot, just returned from World War II – Bert Wilson. Marilyn was bright and beautiful, talented and artistic. They soon settled in Portland, Oregon, where they raised their three children. The Wilson family moved to Los Altos in 1964 to take over operation of the family hotel in Palo Alto, The Flamingo Motor Lodge, which they expanded, remodeled, and re-named The Creekside Inn. Marilyn used her artistic skills extensively in her role as interior designer and purchaser for the highly successful business. Marilyn’s hobbies included golf, painting, and competitive bridge. She was a longtime member of the Los Altos Golf and Country Club, an active member of the 18Hole group there. She was an exceptional bridge player, winning many duplicate bridge tournaments.

And she loved to paint – especially portraits of her children and grandchildren, and beautiful landscapes of places she had visited. She continued to paint until the final months of her life. Marilyn was also a voracious reader – novels, non-fiction, magazines – it didn’t matter. She read non-stop, and especially enjoyed her decadeslong association with her book club. In 2007, having sold their Los Altos residence, and after spending several years at their Carmel home, Marilyn and Bert moved to the Vi (formerly the Classic Residence by Hyatt), near Stanford University. She loved living at the Vi, where she could read, paint, play bridge, and where she became close friends with many intelligent and interesting people, as she told her family. Her friends and family remember Marilyn for her ready smile, quick intelligence and a positive and brave attitude towards life until the end of her days. Marilyn is survived by her daughter, Lynn Wilson Roberts of Los Altos (Howard), sons Mark Wilson of Seattle, Stan Wilson (Caryn) of Rancho Mirage, and her brother Stan Stratton of Palo Alto. She is also survived by three grandchildren, Elizabeth Rood, Annie Roberts, Will Roberts, and two greatgrandchildren, Amelia and Samuel. In lieu of flowers, donations to Pathways Hospice or Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital, where Marilyn served on the auxiliary for many years, would be welcomed by her family. PA I D

OBITUARY

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

Give blood for life! bloodcenter.stanford.edu

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Editorial

State ballot recommendations Proposition 30: Yes on Brown tax proposal

Proposition 37: No on genetically engineered food labeling

Prop. 30 would raise income taxes on those earning $250,000 or more for seven years, and raise the sales tax by a quarter-cent for four years. Most of the $6.8 billion raised from the tax hike will go to K-12 schools, and some will go to community and state colleges and universities. Prop. 30 is a critical part of Governor Brown’s effort to stabilize the state’s financial situation after the Legislature was unable to pass a tax-increase measure. Its failure would trigger cuts to education spending at all levels. Even with these tax increases, due to taxes that have expired over the last two years, the actual tax burden will be lower than it was two years ago.

Prop. 37 would require that genetically engineered foods sold in California be specifically labeled as such. Genetic engineering has been used for some 15 years to make plants grow bigger, stronger, faster and resist spoilage or insect damage. It is estimated that more than 40 percent of food products contain some genetically engineered ingredients. Although no studies have found any health impacts, the industry is too young to know with certainty. Labeling isn’t a bad idea, but imposing it by initiative in California prior to further studies and absent any evidence of harmful effects seems premature, and better addressed on a national level by the FDA or Congress.

Proposition 31: Yes for political reforms

Proposition 38: Yes on school tax measure

Prop. 31 packages a number of measures developed by the bipartisan California Forward political reform group. It will establish a two-year state budget, which will at the very least make the current annual state-budget crisis an every-other-year embarrassment. It will also require bills before the Legislature be made public three days prior to a vote — preventing laws from being rushed through before state-elected officials have a chance to digest what’s really in them. It would also allow the governor to make “emergency” spending cuts if the Legislature fails to act.

Prop. 38 is presented as a more ambitious alternative to Prop. 30, but unfortunately it has created sufficient controversy to imperil both measures. And it is critical that at least one of these two propositions passes in order to maintain needed funding of schools. Prop. 38 raises income taxes for the next 12 years by increasing the marginal tax rates on a sliding scale up to 2.2 percent for those making over $2.5 million. It would raise about $10 billion a year and would support K-12 schools and early childhood programs. Prop. 38 has a number of flaws. It is overly complicated and proscriptive in how funds get distributed and spent (for example, no money can be spent on teacher salaries) and it moves us further away from needed reform of our entire public education financing system. Flaws and all, we recommend voting for both Prop. 30 and 38.

Proposition 32: No on banning payroll deductions for political action Prop. 32 would change campaign-finance rules in California to prohibit collecting voluntary union dues through payroll deductions for political purposes. It’s touted as a political reform measure, but in fact is designed to severely limit union political activity. Both the League of Women Voters and Common Cause oppose it, based on the fact that free-flowing corporate and Super PAC money would continue to be allowed. Even if you don’t like unions, this isn’t reform and it’s undemocratic.

Proposition 33: No on latest auto-insurance scheme Prop. 33 is a virtual repeat of the attempt by Mercury Insurance in 2010 to overturn current law that prevents auto-insurance companies from discriminating against drivers who have had a lapse in their coverage, even in the absence of any claims or points on their driving record. The campaign for Prop. 33 is being financed almost entirely by Mercury chairman George Joseph.

Proposition 34: Yes to end death penalty Prop. 34 would replace California’s death penalty with life in prison with no chance of parole, and would convert the sentences of the 725 prisoners currently on death row to life in prison with no possibility of parole. It has cost the state a total of $4 billion to put to death 13 inmates, an absurd use of public funds. Whether due to the financial drain of the system or a belief that vengeance shouldn’t be a part of our criminal-justice system, it’s time to join the 17 other states and 135 nations that have banned the death penalty.

Proposition 35: Yes to increase penalties for human trafficking Prop. 35 would establish longer prison sentences and larger fines for people convicted in California of human-trafficking crimes, and require them to register as sex offenders. Modeled after a New York law, it would address what law enforcement says is a rapidly growing problem in California, and especially in the Bay Area and Los Angeles.

Proposition 36: Yes to revise Three Strikes Prop. 36 would revise California’s Three Strikes law to impose a life sentence only when the third felony is “serious or violent.” It would also authorize re-sentencing for current Three Strikes lifers whose third conviction was not serious or violent. District attorneys currently have discretion about how to charge third-strike offenses so that minor drug or other offenses won’t lead to life sentences, but that has led to inconsistent practices across the state and to many unfair results. Jeff Rosen, our district attorney in Santa Clara County, supports the measure. Page 18ÊUÊ"V̜LiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Proposition 39: Yes to fix tax loophole Prop. 39 would generate an estimated $1 billion in new tax revenue by simply requiring companies located outside of California to pay income taxes based on their sales within the state. It corrects a loophole passed at the end of the 2009 legislative session, and it eliminates a horrible incentive for companies to not have a physical presence in the state. About half of the new revenues would go toward clean-energy programs for the first five years, after which all funding would go to the general fund, where it would primarily benefit public education.

Proposition 40: Yes to confirm redistricting Prop. 40 challenges the redistricting of California’s Senate districts, completed in 2011 by the independent Citizens Redistricting Commission. The State Supreme Court has already ruled in favor of the new boundaries, which are the districts in place for this November’s election for all state and federal legislative races in California. As a result, opponents have suspended their campaign, but too late for Prop. 40 to be removed from the ballot.

Other recommendations: Palo Alto School Board (See editorial published Oct. 12) Melissa Baten Caswell (i) Ken Dauber Heidi Emberling

Palo Alto City Council (See editorial published Oct. 5) Marc Berman Pat Burt (i) Liz Kniss Greg Schmid (i)

Foothill-DeAnza College Board Joan Barram (i) Betsy Bechtel (i) Laura Casas Frier (i)

County Board of Education Grace Mah (i)

State Assembly Rich Gordon (D) (i)

State Senate Jerry Hill (D)

U. S. Congress Anna Eshoo (D)

Palo Alto Measure C (marijuana dispensaries) No (See editorial published Sept. 14) (i) = incumbent

Correction A typo was edited into Kathy Torgersen’s Oct. 12 letter, “Bechtel for Trustee.” It should have read: “She chaired a successful $490 million bond campaign that made possible the renovation of our 50-year-old campuses.” The Weekly regrets the error. To request a correction, contact Editor Jocelyn Dong at 650-223-6514, jdong@paweekly.com or P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302.

Letters

Bikes on the loose Editor, This morning I was nearly knocked over by a speeding cyclist riding on the sidewalk on Homer Avenue from Alma as he headed up to Whole Foods. He was a fit, 20ish guy on an expensive bike. I assume he speeds in a Bimmer when he isn’t busy terrorizing pedestrians. I’m a fit, oldish cyclist who bikes in the streets, the law in Palo Alto, when I’m not walking. Whole Foods is a major pedestrian area, and many of its patrons are not really able to hop out of the way of bikers who seem to feel they’re too important to obey the rules. It’s great that more and more people are using bikes for transport, but this is the seventh time in two days that I’ve been sideswiped, startled or intimidated by people riding on the downtown sidewalks of Palo Alto in mid-morning. Two months ago I was forced off University Avenue at High Street and into a tree well, twisting my ankle, by a young man hell-bent toward Palm Drive. Is the Palo Alto Police Department waiting until there’s a major accident before it starts enforcing the law? Janice Berman Waverley Street Palo Alto

Buena Vista diversity Editor, I grew up in Barron Park, went to Barron Park School, Terman and

Cubberley (which gives you some idea of how old I am). My parents lived here until they passed away, and though I lived other places, I have always sighed a great sigh of relief and contentment as I drove into Palo Alto from wherever I lived, knowing and feeling I was at home. One of the qualities I have always loved about our neighborhood is the diversity. Even as the McMansions started popping up, there remained a sense of inclusion, of acceptance, of community and social responsibility with which I grew up here in Palo Alto The Buena Vista Mobile Home Park, it seems to me, has always been part of our neighborhood, a rich and vibrant community within our community. The children there go to school with our children. My grandson is engaged to a lovely girl that he went to Gunn with, who lives there. These are families, honest, hard-working people with wonderful values, many of whom are struggling to make ends meet and to give their kids the opportunities so many of us take for granted. To my knowledge, there is no equivalent place in our community for these families to move, and I think it would be detrimental to our community to lose this important part of what makes Barron Park a special place to live and grow up. Fran Kitt Shauna Lane Palo Alto

Reschedule Menlo meeting Editor, What is quite possibly the most

important City Council meeting in Menlo Park’s history is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 22, at 6 p.m. There are three problems with this. First, our City Council meetings are regularly scheduled on Tuesdays, and that is what people expect. Therefore many people may miss this important meeting. Second, it just so happens to be scheduled exactly on the day and time of the third and final presidential debate, which most people will probably want to watch, especially during this all-important election year. Third, having a crucial meeting on a matter of citywide concern at 6 p.m. on any day, virtually excludes huge segments of our population, who are either just getting off work, or who need to be home making dinner for their children and families. Our City Council meetings regularly start at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. Could it be that the city of Menlo Park wants to discourage residents from attending this vitally important meeting involving high-density zoning in numerous locations all over our city? It sure looks like it. And to further complicate matters, the city is holding its regular Tuesday 7 p.m. meeting the following day — but not allowing anyone who managed, against all odds, to attend the Monday night meeting and make a public comment, to speak out at the Tuesday night meeting. So we’re likely to have an under-attended meeting on Monday, followed by a largely silenced audience on Tuesday. Concerned residents should email or phone the city and insist on making Tuesday, Oct. 23, the initial meeting on this

topic, and adding Wednesday, Oct. 24 as an overflow meeting to give all residents the opportunity to voice their opinions. Cherie Zaslawsky Oak Lane Menlo Park

School board endorsements Editor, I agree with your endorsement of Melissa Baten Caswell and Heidi Emberling for School Board, but believe you are wrong to endorse Ken Dauber over Camille Townsend. Your recommendation acknowledged that the “criticism and aggressive style (of the group We Can Do Better, which Dauber represents) has made some uncomfortable and put the board and superintendent on the defensive,” but argued that

those concerns are overridden by the value of the group’s new ideas. I beg to differ. The district is thriving under its current leadership, and a key factor has been their collegiality. Some of Dauber’s ideas may be good, but his conduct over the past year makes it highly doubtful that cooperation among board members would be maintained if he replaced Townsend. While he has come across as more moderate in candidate forums, his past conduct is probably a better predictor of what he would do if elected. Camille Townsend’s consistently positive relationship with her colleagues has been an important factor in the district’s success. I urge your readers to cast their vote for her as well as Caswell and Emberling. Walter Hays Parkside Drive Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

?

Do you think the City should rethink downtown and California Avenue parking options?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Streetwise

Should genetically engineered foods require labeling? Asked on California Avenue, Palo Alto. Interviews and photographs by Lisa Kellman.

Deborah Neville

Patent attorney Palo Alto “A simple indicator should be required.”

Rick Walker

Electrical engineer College Terrace, Palo Alto “Yes. What they’re doing are manipulations on a scale that have never been possible before. They are doing things like breeding pesticides into the plants so the plants themselves have pesticides and some humans are allergic to those. We don’t know what the impacts are.”

Stephanie Beach

Retired Midtown, Palo Alto “I think that would be helpful. I’m in favor of consumers being able to make educated choices.”

Cedric de La Beaujardiere

Software engineer Palo Alto “Yes I do. There is very little testing done on the safety of genetically modified crops. Consumers should have a right to know what’s in your food.”

Lydia Li

Retired Menlo Park “I think we should so I know what I’m eating.”

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special feature with me, got very serious and told me I wouldn’t be working anymore,” that she had early onset Alzheimer’s. She was 53. “He was very thorough about outlining the tests they’d done and what each test meant and how he came to his conclusion that she had Alzheimer’s,” Baker said. “There wasn’t a lot of doubt when he said it.”

A community health education series from Stanford Hospital & Clinics

“I was upset at first,” Harvell said. “I was surprised. I was in denial. I thought the whole party was over—work and everything. I can’t work. I can’t drive. It was like everything was going past me. It’s hard.”

When Fading Memory Raises Questions, Neuropsychology Can Point To Answers

Harvell’s husband, Dave Baker, became concerned when he saw that his highly intelligent wife wasn’t just asking him the kind of computer questions that all non-technical folks ask; instead, she was posing questions about content. Her emotions around her work had altered, too. “She’d been a very confident, capable individual and she was becoming more anxious and upset and worried,” he said. “It started to become obvious that something was changing.” Baker was like many people who notice such differences, and begin to look for answers, especially as advancing age begins to interfere with the dozens of daily tasks once youthfully taken for granted. In the United States, more than 40 million people are over 65 years old; another 80 million are age 45-64. Of all the diseases related to age, dementia may be the most feared—a condition that attacks the core of all those qualities that distinguish one person from another and erodes those memories that bind together families and friends.

Looking for answers “My job is to try and figure out first if there’s anything we can fix right away,” said Geoffrey Kerchner, MD, PhD, a behavioral neurologist who became Harvell’s doctor. “When a patient comes to me with a complaint about memory, my approach is like that of any physician—I have to understand what medicines they’re on, what surgeries they’ve had, what their thyroid function or vitamin B12 levels are—to try to discover what the cause could be.” Harvell’s tests included an MRI to look for signs of a stroke or other brain injury. All came back with no obvious cause for her cognitive struggles. The next step, Kerchner said, was objective neuropsychological assessment, a set of tests that solve the dilemma for many who wonder if their memory lapses are something to worry about.

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“When we look at behavior and Susan Harvell “is vibrant and carries on a lively conversation,” said her doctor, Stanford the brain, we behavioral neurobiologist Geoffrey Kerchner, MD, PhD, “and it’s difficult in the course of find there’s a a routine medical appointment to see that there’s anything the matter.” complex inner relationship,” Sometimes people with different kinds said Stanford neuropsychologist Gayle of dementia may seem to be less careful Deutsch, PhD. “A lot of our behaviors about reading social cues. Or they may become automatic over our lifetime, but become apathetic and show no interest when we break them apart, there is a in activities. That can’t always be meagreat deal of complexity.” Deutsch began sured in a standardized test.” the process of teasing apart the components of cognition to ascertain where Harvell’s problems truly began. That territory includes intellectual and executive function, language skills, visual-spatial Going through a full evaluation is really abilities, attention, memory, motor skills the only way to pinpoint what’s going on, and mood. Deutsch begins with a set of Deutsch said. “You can have a quick astests that take into account a full range sessment in a doctor’s office—and that’s of demographic information used to disgood, but it’s not as sensitive as the tinguish those changes that emerge with whole battery of tests you get in a neunormal aging and those linked to neuroropsychological evaluation. And having degenerative conditions. that knowledge puts you and your family in the right direction to get the right treatment.” “You can have a quick assessment

What the data showed

in a doctor’s office—and that’s good, but it’s not as sensitive as the whole battery of tests you get in a neuropsychological evaluation.” – Stanford neuropsychologist Gayle Deutsch, PhD The tests themselves are designed to evaluate, in the most straightforward way, how the mind is working. Just reading out loud, for example, won’t show much. “Pronouncing words is something that is less sensitive to age-related cognitive decline,” Deutsch said. A hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, however, is a decline in the brain’s ability to retain new information, so the tests Deutsch administers challenge how long someone can remember a list of words or reproduce a set of shapes, or follow directions. As Deutsch moves to test executive function, she will engage a patient’s family and friends for their observations. “Our tests are good at measuring conceptual reasoning and problem solving,” she said, “but it’s also important to look at everyday behavior. Are people showing social skills appropriate for their age?

“Having an answer helps a patient understand more about their prognosis and what’s likely to happen in the coming years— and we have a lot of data and understanding about that.” – Stanford behavioral neurobiologist Geoffrey Kerchner, MD, PhD Baker said, “The day we got the diagnosis we came home and Susan’s sister and brother-in-law had come to visit and we didn’t know whether to tell them or not. We were kind of just sitting there in shock, and I think for a number of months there was this shock, and this mourning. We did a lot of crying and mourning and a lot of being upset. We’ve moved through that now and we’re just looking for the positive sides, for how we can help other people going through this disease, how Susan can help with research and how we can just enjoy ourselves in our day.”

keeps losing his cell phone, for instance. Your scores could mean you’re completely within the norm for your age. Or, it could mean that you started out life being very smart, so the testing can be insensitive as to whether it’s a decline for you. In that case, having those tests done can be extremely valuable as a baseline.”

Finding peace Being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s “is a big hit,” Kerchner said, “but by the time a patient has a physician tell them, ‘I think you have Alzheimer’s disease,’ it’s not a mystery to them that something’s going on with their brain. They know it and they’re worried. Having an answer helps a patient understand more about their prognosis and what’s likely to happen in the coming years—and we have a lot of data and understanding about that. I think people achieve a lot of peace of mind in having a name on what they have and in being acknowledged by the medical community.”

Kerchner agrees with others in the memory disorder care community that within a decade biomarker tests, such as the ones that show elevated levels of Alzheimer’s particular chemistry, will likely become part of standard screening tests, as colonoscopies are now part of every 50-year-old’s health exams. Until then, the current combination of physical and neuropsychological exams will remain the best and most critically important avenue to diagnosis, especially “with the rising prevalence of concern,” Kerchner said. “We get more and more referrals from people with mild symptoms who are worried—the husband who

While the tests Deutsch conducts allow very specific measurements of brain dysfunction, standard brain imaging doesn’t show the atrophy classic to dementia until middle to late stages of the disease. But two new tests are now available that analyze levels of two proteins in the body associated with Alzheimer’s disease—amyloid beta and tau. “The cerebral spinal fluid test is an example of a new test that actually looks for abnormalities that are caused by the disease itself,” Kerchner said, “so it can provide positive evidence of the disease.” A second test, just approved by the FDA, uses radioactive particles that seek out and mark amyloid plaques in the brain. Those two tests, he said, are so sensitive to Alzheimer’s that for select patients they may reduce the need for other tests. Susan Harvell’s daughter, Claire, can’t list specific moments when her mother Finally came the moment when, as Harvell remembers it, Kerchner “got nose to nose

“Having a garden and a dog is really healthy if you’re going through something like this,” said Susan Harvell. “I read. I paint. I have things to do. I have great friends.”

seemed to be off her game. “It wasn’t anything drastic,” she said. “She could tell you a million stories about when I was 3 years old, but if I told her I was going to do something, she’d ask me five minutes later if I was going to do something.”

“Having a garden and a dog is really healthy if you’re going through something like this,” Harvell said. “I read. I paint. I have things to do. I have great friends. My job right now is to go to Stanford and do what I need to do with Dr. Kerchner, to be there for somebody, to have conversations. It’s good to connect with someone else who’s going through what you are so you don’t just feel like, ‘Oh, it’s just me. I’m the purple goose going down the street.’ I want to get it out and talk about it—to be a waving flag for Alzheimer’s and for Stanford.” Norbert von der Groeben

Norbert von der Groeben

“She’d been a very confident, capable individual and she was becoming more anxious and upset and worried,” said Harvell’s husband, Dave Baker. “It started to become obvious that something was changing.”

The hospital’s neuropsychology service, where Harvell was evaluated, does assessments on adults and children. It is focused on the cognitive and behavioral effects of conditions including head injury, cerebrovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia, brain tumor, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and attention deficit/hyperactivity. Its expertise is essential in the diagnostic process.

Harvell “is vibrant and carries on a lively conversation,” Kerchner said, “and it’s difficult in the course of a routine medical appointment to see that there’s anything the matter.”

Norbert von der Groeben

Many of her friends’ mothers were about the same age, she said, “and they would tell me, ‘My mom asked me the same thing 5,000 times.’ That’s why I didn’t think anything was too different.”

Dementia can take many forms; Alzheimer’s disease is the most often diagnosed variety and its toll is rapidly rising. The Alzheimer’s Association estimated that in 2011 5.4 million Americans—about one in eight of those 65 or older—were living with its consequences. Researchers have yet to understand what triggers the imbalance in brain chemistry that degrades its normal function, shrinking its overall size, and depositing tangles and plaques that block the millions of daily neuronal interactions. Progress has been made, however, in diagnosing the disease. Until recently, physicians were left only autopsy for definitive diagnosis. Now, at facilities like Stanford Hospital & Clinics’ Center for Memory Disorders, where Harvell was advised to seek care, patients have new options that, in combination with traditional tests, provide a much earlier sense of direction.

Norbert von der Groeben

Susan Harvell’s daughter, Claire, can’t list specific moments when her mother, a longtime human resources executive in her early 50s, seemed to be off her game. “It wasn’t anything drastic,” she said. “She could tell you a million stories about when I was 3 years old, but if I told her I was going to do something, she’d ask me five minutes later if I was going to do something.”

Could You Have Alzheimer’s Disease?

The garden in particular gives her a sense of purpose and reward. “I see the color every day and I’m like, ‘Life is beautiful.’”

Worrying about Alzheimer’s is something more and more of us are doing. Age-related cognitive decline happens to most of us: As we get older, we might forget why we went into the kitchen or the name of a character in a movie. That’s normal. Some of us might do that more than others, but typically, that’s about as far as our forgetfulness goes. Here are some basics about Alzheimer’s and dementia to consider: t Alzheimer’s affects short-term memory most dramatically. Asking the same question over and over again is a hallmark of that loss of function. t Brain scans might show some physical changes indicative of Alzheimer’s, but cognitive tests are the only way to objectively measure functional changes. t Memory loss is often accompanied by a loss of executive function: the ability to plan a task and then complete it. Losing the ability to call things by their names is another indicator. t Changes in personality also emerge. Someone once very calm and steady may become irritable, sad, anxious, impulsive or apathetic.

What Else Might Cause Cognitive Impairment? t Medications, on their own or in combination, may produce dementia-like symptoms. These symptoms can appear suddenly or over time. t Thyroid imbalance, hypoglycemia, too much sodium or calcium, dehydration and nutritional deficiencies can also trigger changes in cognition and emotional state. t Brain tumors and bleeding between the brain and its lining can interfere with brain function; so can lack of oxygen to the brain, originating with heart and lung problems. Other health issues, including smoke or carbon inhalation or coma, can have an impact on brain function.

What Tests Can Help t Physical exam, including blood and organ function tests, along with a complete medical history, is helpful in ruling out a treatable medical condition. t MRI, CT and PET scans provide more detail; an EEG (electroencephalogram) tracks electrical activity in the brain through electrodes attached to the scalp. Spinal fluid may also be tested. t Neuropsychological and psychiatric evaluation complete the picture. For more information, call 650.723.6469 or visit stanfordhospital.org/ memoryclinic Join the Stanford Hospital & Clinics team at the Oct. 20 Walk to End Alzheimer’s. For more information visit stanfordhospital.org/events Join us at stanfordhospital.org/socialmedia. Watch the new Stanford Hospital Health Notes television show on Comcast: channel 28 on Mondays at 8:30 p.m., Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m. and Fridays at 8:30 a.m.; channel 30 Saturdays at 10:30 p.m. It can also be viewed at www.youtube.com/stanfordhospital.

“I know there’s a lot more in our future around this, too,” Baker said. “Every day we just get up and do the best we can, and where we end up is in somebody else’s hands.” Baker was diagnosed with heart failure several years ago, and his condition has been stabilized. “There were some advances “I know there’s a lot more in our future around this, too,” said Susan Harvell’s husband, in therapies and Dave Baker. “Every day we just get up and do the best we can, and where we end up is I’m still around,” in somebody else’s hands.” he said. “We’re really hoping the same thing can happen for Susan’s get there for all the people who have Aldisease—and that at least we can help zheimer’s as well.”

Stanford Hospital & Clinics is dedicated to providing leading edge and coordinated care to each and every patient. It is internationally renowned for expertise in areas such as cancer treatment, neuroscience, surgery, cardiovascular medicine and organ transplant, as well as for translating medical breakthroughs into patient care. Throughout its history, Stanford has been at the forefront of discovery and innovation, as researchers and clinicians work together to improve health on a global level. Stanford Hospital & Clinics: Healing humanity through science and compassion, one patient at a time. For more information, visit www.stanfordhospital.org.

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Cover Story

Below: Sally Kadifa gives her daughter Sophie, 10, a hug at Walter Hays Elementary as son George, 21, looks on.

Above: Sondra Zenger helps prepare breakfast for daughters (from left) Mara, 14, Nori, 12, Ali, 10, and Mia, 11, before they head off to school. Right: Holding baby August, Lillie Peery oversees dinner with her children (from left), Sam, 7, Maggie, 4, Lia, 2, and Ben, 5, at their Palo Alto home.

LIVING

Parents of big broods buck Palo Alto trends

Large by Sue Dremann | p hotograp hs by Veronica Web er

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little more than a century ago, women in the U.S. on average gave birth to seven children each. That number has steadily dropped to 2.1 children today, and in Palo Alto, the average family is downright petite — 3.06 persons, according to the 2010 U.S. Census. The reasons are many: the urbanization of the country, the rise of the two-income household, both sexes postponing marriage and families, and even concerns about population growth. Raising a child also is not cheap. It costs at least $266,770 per child for a low- to middle-income household, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The sum can be double for a family earning above $100,000.

But some Palo Altans are bucking the trends, opting to raise large families in a world where small is considered beautiful — or at least practical. Many were raised in large households themselves and found the experience rich and loving. Others hold strong spiritual beliefs that children are the blessing of a loving god. Their choices are not without consequences. With more children comes a greater scarcity of time and weightier financial decisions. Unlike their neighbors who have one or two kids, parents of big broods have to work hard to maintain family cohesion and to give each child adequate individual time, they said. Fathers with demanding Silicon Valley careers that pay for their families’ needs must balance work with a focus on being

present with their children in targeted ways. Mothers, some of them formerly career driven, must adjust to managing the chaos of an always bustling household. But amid the hubbub of shifting play dates, sports activities and recitals, these Palo Alto couples say they have learned to manage their wealth of children and the challenges that accompany them. Five large families sat down with the Weekly to discuss the joys and challenges of raising children in Palo Alto.

The Kadifas: The diversity is enriching

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hen people learn that Sally and Abdo (George) Kadifa have five kids, they always get a reaction, she said. “Our family is on the large side,� she conceded, but it’s not that unusual from her perspective. Sally, 52, was also raised in a family of five children, a number that was not considered large when she was growing up. In her Minnesota community, she recalled families with six to 13 children. George has only one brother, but his parents’ home in Lebanon was always filled with extended family, she said. Growing up with her siblings was enriching, she said. “They are totally different from me. But I like that there are these people I’m very close to who I wouldn’t have known otherwise. They are some of my closest friends,� she said. And she wanted to give her children — George, 21, Margaret, 19, J.J., 16, Charlotte, 12, and Sophie, 10 — the same experience. The Kadifas married when Sally was 29 and George was 30. They knew they wanted a big family, and they were willing to make the sacrifices, they said. When their first child was about to be born, George was embarking on a high-tech career that would take much of his concentration and time. Sally was in her medical residency. She decided not to complete her training. Sally said she knew George could not build his career if he had to split his time with managing the household and children while she continued her career. For Sally, giving up her career “was a difficult decision,� George said. “I was lucky to have her make that family choice. It hasn’t been easy.� When the children were young, he worked at Oracle during an intense time. His job became 24/7, and “it was critical how to balance travel with being present,� he said. “When our first son was born, I had to go to Japan. A kid his age, every few weeks they look different,� he said. He founded a company whose IPO kept him on the road for four weeks, he recalled. “Sally was the support that protected everything. I couldn’t imagine the family moving forward at that time without her. In some ways, I feel she did all the work and I didn’t,� he said. George said he never imagined he would have five children, but he loves having a large family. “The more children we had, the more we enjoyed it,� he said. To keep close to his children and balance his busy schedule, he will have dinner at home sometimes and take a red-eye flight for business. He will fly back the next day so the children will have the continuity of seeing him. In some ways, that arrangement has been advantageous, he said. “Sometimes I felt that I got more sleep on the red eye than at home,� he said, somewhat sheepishly. “With large families, the key is patience. To be fair with everyone is critical and to make sure that everyone is equal,� he said. Sally said that with a 12-year spread in ages, it is important that the children find common ground with one another. She looked for things they could do together. Everyone took part in the Peninsula Swim Association Summer Swim League, and the family took part in the First Congregational Church’s spring musical, including Sally. “That made it less crazy for me. We never did club soccer or volleyball. When there are five kids, you can’t have one parent leave for out-of-town games on a regular basis,� she said.

If there are shortcomings from having many children, Sally said it hasn’t seemed to affect her children negatively. “One thing they give each other is a lot of attention. Where I sometimes feel I fall short, they do a lot for each other,� she said. There are things she wishes she could have done, however. “We never got to Disneyland when my oldest daughter was in the middle of the princess phase. We couldn’t go with an infant and a baby,� she said. Ironically, her toughest parenting challenges haven’t come from within the family but from the Palo Alto school community, she said. Parent volunteers make many of the activities happen, but the volunteer opportunities — and what is expected — are set up for parents of two kids. Schools rely on parents for everything from classroom help to driving on field trips, she said. “Many nursery schools require parents to help out weekly or monthly during the school day. There are informational meetings to attend for many activities. By participating, parents get to know other parents and build community and support each other in raising their families. This is very positive, but sometimes with a large family it can be overwhelming to try to participate in some way in everything each child is doing — even if that is limited to two activities per

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SONDRA ZENGER child,� she said. “That is 10 activities ... in addition to school and church involvement. “With a large family, it sometimes feels that there just aren’t enough hours in the week for two parents to do it all,� she said. “You can’t do everything that people expect from you. Sometimes I feel I haven’t done everything I should do. I do what I can do,� she said. As her own parents have aged, Sally said she’s been grateful to have many siblings to help share in decision-making. “In any kind of tough time, it’s nice to have that family there for you. You’re sharing that long history together. There aren’t many people you can say that about,� she said.

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The Etheringtons: Teaching tolerance and responsibility

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photo-mural of family covers an entire wall of Linda and Robert Etherington’s home. There are little girls in dresses on a spacious front lawn and the family posed on the front porch. One part of the giant mural contains a family joke of sorts: all seven girls sit lined up with their backs to the camera. Each wears a sports jersey with her position in the family on the back — numbers 1 through 7. Linda Etherington smiled at the mural. “We love kids. We love being around kids,� said Etherington, who has six brothers and sisters. Robert was also raised in a family with six children, she added. “There was always someone to play with, always someone to go somewhere with. My mom was easygoing. She let us go play for hours. When she wanted us, she had a giant bell and she’d gong it,� she recalled. The Etheringtons’ brood includes Avianne, 21; Allyson, 20; Holly, 18; Cassidy, 17; Amy, 15; Taylor, 9; and Elizabeth, 7. “Because of our faith we consider children to be a great blessing and opportunity,� Etherington, who is Mormon, said. She said she understands and doesn’t discount concerns about overpopulation, but the family believes God loves children and wants them to be brought up to do good in the world. From a young age, the Etheringtons’ children have learned compassion, tolerance and self-sufficiency. (continued on next page)

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Robert and Linda Etherington sit down with daughters (from left) Amy, 15, Elizabeth, 8, Cassidy, 17, Taylor, 9, Avianne Germany, 21, Avianne’s daughter, Addison, and husband, Glenn Germany.

Living large

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“Their first job started at 18 months. When I changed their diaper, they would walk over and throw it away. Everyone has something to do,” she said. Etherington said she was amazed at how even at age 4 her children could read what was going on around them and instinctively knew what to do. Eldest daughter Avianne Germany, who is married and has a baby daughter, said she was always aware of what needed to be done. When she turned 8 years old, she was responsible for making the school lunches. That was her job until she was a high school freshman. “And laundry. I always loved doing the laundry and would gather it from everyone’s rooms,” she said. Avianne never liked doing the dishes, but fortunately she had sisters who did. Allyson loved the task and had it down to a science, she said. Etherington said the children were raised knowing that their family does not spend money on extravagances. The children have not received iPads and other trendy equipment. “Our experience is you can spend as much on one kid as you can on seven. Our oldest daughter buys everything on Craigslist; another daughter is a high school senior and works at Sprinkles, and she saves (her money),” she said. And when it comes to college, the Etheringtons pay for room and board, but their daughters are responsible for paying tuition. The college-bound daughters made it work by applying for scholarships.

a bench in the sun and she told me about school and her friends and she leaned on my arm. It only added 10 more minutes to our outing, but this was precious look-in-her-eyes, sittogether-and-listen time. Children in big families need this one-on-one time because big families are made out of many individuals — individuals who need to be enjoyed and appreciated for their unique selves,” she said. Like the Kadifas, the Etheringtons tend to clump activities together. The piano teacher comes to the home for two hours to teach five kids. The family might have an all-day outing once a month. The family has one special-needs child. Her challenges have taught her siblings to have compassion for others, but that quality also develops simply from having a large family, she said. “Living with that many people teaches you tolerance,” she said. For some of the children, good grades come easily; for others it is harder. One child is an elegant dancer; another is quiet and likes to read. One daughter would have a tantrum if she didn’t have one-on-one time; another was content to draw or play on the swing. Fortunately, the older girls were happy when taking the younger ones shopping for a pair of pants or a dress for the prom, she said. Avianne said living in a large family means always having someone to play with. As she and her siblings grew older, there was always someone awake late at night to talk to. “I never felt like I didn’t have enough attention. It just changes through the years,” she said. She added that she and her husband would like a large family, but the number is still up for discussion: She wants five; he wants fewer.

The Peerys: Working in sync

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Sally Kadifa, her daughter Sophie and husband, Abdo, wait for daughter Charlotte to finish getting her hair cut at Julian Chase design. Kadifa arranges for the entire family to have their hair cut every five weeks. Avianne attended Brigham Young University; one daughter is currently in the nursing program there, she said. “We expect them to suck it up and make it work,” she said. Mothering changes the more children one has, Etherington said. “With two or three, you can teach them manners and focus so much more on them than with four or five or six. You get spread a lot thinner. You only have time for the things that are most important. I’m less in their lives; you have to trust them more,” she said. The Etheringtons hold a weekly family meeting. Linda grew up having “Family Home Evening” each

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Monday night. The idea is actually part of what members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints do, she said. It has been in place for many decades. “We include a topic which seems like we need to hit because of either where we need help as a family, or something we want to teach, or we just have some family fun together. “If you see something wrong, you bring it up. If someone’s been lying, you might address it immediately, but at the meeting you bring it up for a longer talk,” she said. Other important ways for a large family to connect? “Dinner together,” she said. “I think that when we sit down and

share a meal together at home we connect in ways that are meaningful and safe and full of friendship. It helps us enjoy and like each other when we are in the regular busy-ness of life. I don’t know if you call eatas-many-meals-together-as-a-family a strategy, but I have read statistics that support it as one of the most meaningful things families can do together,” she said. One-on-one time is also important, she said. “Today I took Elizabeth to go to her orthodontist appointment during school. It only took about 10 minutes at the doctor, but on the way home I stopped and got her an ice cream cone and we sat together on

n a recent evening, the screeching and squeals of little boys echoed through Lisa and Jason Peery’s home, as their son Brady, 6, and his cousin Ben, 5, dueled with their toy light sabers. Lisa stopped to listen for a moment and smiled. “That’s what I call music,” she said. Being around large numbers of children is not unusual for Lisa. She is the seventh of eight. When it came to growing their own families, Lisa said she and Jason didn’t plan on how many they might have. The Peerys have six; the oldest is a senior in high school and the youngest is 6 years old. Lisa credited the strength of their marriage to successfully raising a large family. Without each other’s support, it would not be possible, she said. Jason said he and Lisa have to plan carefully to make sure they are in sync. “I work hard and try not to travel much. When I’m home, I’m home. I really try to play lots of games and do things face-to-face with the kids every night. A lot of board games, playing catch, just goofing around. There’s no substitute for face-to-face time. “With my oldest child leaving for

Cover Story Ecole internationale de la PĂŠninsule college, I’m shocked at how quickly time goes, so I really cherish every moment. I quit a very fun high school head-coaching job as varsity boys basketball coach at Pinewood after 4 years because I just couldn’t sacrifice any more time with the family,â€? he said. The most challenging aspect is that there is physically an enormous amount of work to be done every day, he said. Lisa said it took a month to get the kids all settled in at school, as she had to attend every back-to-school night, she said. Also, there are eight totally different personalities under one roof, Jason said. Trying to attend to the needs of each takes some creativity and much thought. It’s tricky, he said. “We are just crazy about each child. Each one really has us wrapped around their finger. You’d think with shared genetics there would be more similarity, but they are completely different. We try to do lots of one-on-one time, doing overnight trips, even if it’s just to a local hotel. The kids love it, and there are always good memories. ... The most rewarding thing is just being together. My happiest times are when all eight of us are together — doing anything, no matter what it is,â€? he said. He and Lisa regularly touch base about each child, he added. “We try to spend a lot of time together early every morning just talking about the kids and how we can do better,â€? he said. The couple has learned to coordinate the work of child-rearing, with flexibility being one key. “My husband and I have learned to divide and conquer,â€? Lisa said. “Sometimes he takes the big ones, and I take the littles. Other times we may switch.â€? If Lisa attends the older daughter’s volleyball game, Jason may concentrate on the little ones, she said. “I think in both cases we both had parents who put family as their unquestioned No. 1 priority,â€? said Jason of his and Lisa’s parents. “There was never any doubt to us whether family or work came first. It was family,â€? he said. Jason’s brother Dave and sisterin-law Lillie Peery also live in town and have five children. The oldest is 7, and the youngest, August Steele, is 6 weeks old. Lillie described Dave and Jason as “incredible spouses. That is key to having a large family. You have to have a strong marriage,â€? she said. Dave will see when she needs something — a helping hand or space for herself — and he will see that she gets it, she said. On the recent Friday that Brady and Ben rambled through the sitting room with light sabers brandished, Lillie reflected on what she has learned from her brood. “I’m no longer under this false impression that I’m in control of anybody. I changed with each child,â€? she said. With the first child, who had an easy-going personality, she thought she had more authority than she did, she realizes now. “When more children came with different personalities, I realized that I didn’t really have control — just a small amount of influence but no control.

The children “have a certain amount of independence; you’re not necessarily all over them. But it’s not like I leave them to the wolves. There’s a certain amount of space that you naturally give them because there’s only so much energy,� she said. Lisa agreed. “People say, ‘How do you manage?’ Well, I don’t manage. I gave up on child No. 3 on having to always have the kitchen clean,� she said. Dave said there are challenges for

work; you have to put things in place at the office so there’s room for some of that, without leaving everything in a lurch. I truly believe that no professional accomplishment will compensate for, or justify, my failure at home,� he said. Dave said he feels that any family is in constant competition with an ever-growing list of opportunities worth pursuing: boards to be on, projects to undertake, various things anyone could justify taking part in. “So at some point you have to draw a boundary around your fam-

Ironically, Sally Kadifa’s toughest parenting challenges haven’t come from within the family but from the Palo Alto school community. ... The volunteer opportunities — and what is expected — are set up for parents of two kids. a father and husband in balancing work and family. “I wish I could say I’ve figured out the work/life balance issue. I constantly feel that if I excel in one area of my life, the inevitable my performance will be sub-par everywhere else. Then I think, well maybe I should get up earlier, or stay up later, or not watch a movie. But you’re human, and there’s obviously a limit to what each person can accomplish before completely burning out. “Being present with my kids requires the acceptance that things might slip through the cracks at

ily and make sure absolutely nothing encroaches. The moment you make an exception, it becomes very difficult to protect precious family time and relationships for things that are worthwhile, but not most important. Once you’ve given up territory, it’s hard to get it back,� he said. Lillie’s mother had 10 children in 13 years, and she remembered her mother didn’t have much time to focus on each child. Older kids helped with the younger kids, and she and her siblings understood that (continued on next page)

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Cover Story

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A framed photo of the Lisa and Jason Peery’s family sits in the family’s Palo Alto home. Sadie, 8, Scotty, 17, and Brady, 6, watch television in the background.

Living large

(continued from previous page)

their parents couldn’t be at many school events. It didn’t bother her, she said. The competitive needs of their children can sometimes be challenging, she said. She and Dave make sure the kids have their individual time. They make dates with their kids, she said. One thing Lillie has learned is that isolation from other families grows the more kids one has, she said. So she has become more of an inviter. “It’s not like people say, ‘Come over to my house on Sunday and bring all five of your kids,’� she said. Dave agreed. “As a husband, making sure my wife is able to live a balanced life is extremely hard. People oversimplify this and say ‘Just get help,’ as if the complexities of our family dynamic can be managed by hiring ‘help.’ “We get help from family and sitters, but there is very little one can do to truly share the load of a mother,� he said. Dave said what is most rewarding about having a big family is that they have each other. “It’s when I see my kids having a blast together, I can’t help but think how lucky they are to have each other. The friendships I share with my siblings are the greatest blessings in my life. “Because they have each other we’re not worried about their so-

cialization or having to schedule a million play dates. One benefit of having them close in age is that they play with each other. ... Do we have to break up fights fairly regularly? Yes, but we also get to do other things while they play for stretches of time. Dave said that having a long-term vision for the family helps ease them through the days when raising a family takes more effort. “I think that once parents get through those exhausting but short years of raising little ones and teenagers, they find that the return on investment is huge — and comes in the form of rich family relationships, grandchildren and a powerful network of support,� he said.

The Zengers: Running a ‘powerful’ household

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s a child, Sondra Zenger was separated from her two siblings by a considerable age gap, and as a result, she felt left out, she said. “I was really driven by the lack of closeness I and my siblings had and watching the relationships my husband and his (five) siblings had and their closeness,� she said. Zenger didn’t want to have an only child. She felt there would be more advantages for her kids with more siblings. And everything she saw about large families she liked, she said. Now her four girls are close in age: 10, 11, 12 and 13 years old. “We run a powerful household,�

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Downtown Library, Community Room 270 Forest Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301 The City of Palo Alto seeks community input on this beautiďŹ cation project. Email pwecips@cityofpaloalto.org for more information. Meeting hosted by City of Palo Alto Public Works, (650) 617-3183

Page 26ĂŠUĂŠ"VĂŒÂœLiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

she said, smiling at their family of daughters. Zenger, who was an outside sales representative for an engineering firm and a pharmaceuticals representative, initially found the isolation of motherhood daunting. Few mothers came to the park during outings with her child. In Palo Alto, the playgrounds were full of children accompanied by nannies. And it was hard to give up her career, she said. “I was embarrassed to be a stayat-home mom. I even fibbed about it,� she recalled. Not that being a mother was any less challenging than a career outside the home — quite the contrary, as it turned out. “When we had three, I really, really contemplated the fourth. I felt overwhelmed,� she recalled. But now the favorite part of the weekend is watching her children’s multiple soccer games, she said. Every night the family sits down together to a home-cooked meal Zenger has made, and her husband, Drew, is always home by 5:30 or 6 p.m. He also helps the children with their homework, she said. Zenger has found friends with whom she can laugh and complain, and over time her isolation has eased, she said. Taking some time for themselves, Drew plays soccer with friends after the children are in bed. Zenger reads every chance that she gets. “My kids think I’m a dork because I read everywhere,� she said. The family has a very strong foundation based on their Mormon faith and a set of family values that de-emphasizes material acquisition, she said. All of the children have friends who understand the family’s values, which makes navigating raising kids in an affluent community more manageable, she added. The family makes a point of communicating openly and often, and often the discussion is about peer pressure, she said. “We say, ‘That’s our family,’ or ‘That’s not our family.’ We make these choices that others don’t. They are not all going to have iPhones — no Uggs, stuff like that. We talk about it very openly. They know things cost a lot of money. ... We joke about it a lot. It’s not embarrassing that they won’t have all the bells and whistles,� she said. Zenger said the family hasn’t had to make any hard choices. The family is financially secure and makes judicious decisions about how they spend their money. Managing the home is a balancing act, but having kids who have similar interests, such as soccer, helps, she said. “Sometimes having the kids, I’ve lost a lot of brain cells. It’s so many little unimportant things. I’ve never left my kids anywhere; I’ve never forgotten them. But when we’re going somewhere in the car, I always count,� she said. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@paweekly.com.

About the cover Illustration by Shannon Corey

Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

At the forefront of film

Stanford’s Jasmina Bojic sees documentary film as a powerful tool in human-rights education today by Rebecca Wallace

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university, she teaches courses on documentary filmmaking and human rights both for Stanford and for the general public, including her current Continuing Studies class, “Camera as Witness: Women Around the World From Victims to Leaders.” One of her major projects, the all-documentary UNAFF, turns 15 this year and is now ongoing through Oct. 28, with 70 screenings and several talks at Stanford and in Palo Alto, East Palo Alto, San Francisco and San Jose. In addition, Bojic founded and directs the Camera as Witness Program, which is in its second year and based at Stanford’s School of Education. Camera as Witness presents the film festival and serves as an expansion of the event throughout the year, with screenings, panel discussions and filmmaker talks. Many of the non-festival events are smaller and presented in more intimate settings such as dorms to spark discussion. The program also has an archive of a few thousand rare documentary films that Stanford folks can use for research. Bojic said her dream is to have a larger dedicated space on campus for a documentary-film institute, with a library and an auditorium for screenings. The UNAFF happens in various locations on campus and in the community, and “it’s always difficult to find ven-

Veronica Weber

hen you ask Jasmina Bojic, educator, film critic and film-festival director, what means most to her about her work, she’s apt to mention a young girl in Nepal. Last year, the United Nations Association Film Festival, the Stanford University-based institution that Bojic founded and heads, screened a documentary called “Big Sister Punam.” It followed a motherless girl named Punam Tamang who dreamed of becoming a teacher but had to drop out of school because her family needed her to work. Immediately after the film, several people in the Palo Alto audience jumped up, wanting to know how to help Punam, Bojic recalled. Ultimately, their contributions helped fund a scholarship for her, and now she’s back in school. “This is something that’s fulfilling the purpose of the festival, and it’s fulfilling my heart,” Bojic said during an interview in her Stanford office surrounded by UNAFF fliers, calendars, pencils and giant posters. Other festival catalogues on her bookshelves have the big names: Sundance, Venice, Tribeca. Throughout her 20 years at Stanford, Bojic has focused on a common theme in her work: educating people on human-rights issues and other global topics, and illustrating how film can be a vehicle for both teaching and change. At the

Jasmina Bojic has taught for 20 years at Stanford University, where she founded the United Nations Association Film Festival 15 years ago. ues,” she said. Bojic grew up in the former Yugoslavia, where she attended law school and began working as a film critic in television and radio. She came to Stanford to work on a research project, and when teaching opportunities opened up, she stayed. (By the way, she’s no relation to

the Jasmina Bojic who is the pastry chef at The Plaza in Manhattan, though she once met her name twin on a trip to New York.) Bojic still works as a film critic for several European newspapers and travels widely, attending all the big festivals. But she keeps coming back to Stanford, where she enjoys the students’ interest

in global issues and the opportunity she has to educate them even more. “These students are the future politicians and diplomats,” she said. “These are the students who are going to be making the future decisions about our lives.” (continued on next page)

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She also appreciates the proximity to East Palo Alto. Early on she decided it was important to have film screenings in this less-privileged area, and to provide free events for students and teachers. “Six years ago, when we started screenings in East Palo Alto, the kids said they were not worthy to come to Stanford to attend screenings,” she said. “That was shocking.” Bojic’s work at Stanford and with UNAFF has proved popular. The film festival has grown from a three-day affair to an 11-day event that also includes the Camera as Witness and other screenings, including films at the Avenidas senior center in Palo Alto. In 2007, Bojic was honored in Stanford’s “Community Treasures” program, in which select Stanford staff were singled out for their community volunteer work. Bojic follows the films in her festival and clearly takes pleasure in their success. One film from this

year, “Inocente,” about an undocumented immigrant artist coming of age in a troubling family environment, was just short-listed by the Academy Awards for Best Short Documentary, she said with a broad smile. It will be shown at UNAFF at 3:20 p.m. Oct. 23, at the Eastside College Preparatory School at 1041 Myrtle St. in East Palo Alto. Bojic founded UNAFF because she wasn’t seeing a good crop of documentaries in other festivals, especially those dealing with human rights. When most people thought of documentaries, they thought only of Ken Burns and Michael Moore. Now the genre is flourishing and the number of filmmakers has soared. “It’s a golden age of documentary filmmaking,” she said. N Info: For details on the United Nations Association Film Festival, which runs through Oct. 28, go to unaff.org. The Weekly also ran an overview of the festival in its Oct. 5 issue; go to PaloAltoOnline.com and click on “Palo Alto Weekly.”

Arts & Entertainment

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The tenor Christopher Bengochea, center, sings the lead role in “Les Contes d’Hoffman (The Tales of Hoffman).”

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Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community

Local company succeeds with Offenbach’s challenging fantasy by Mort Levine

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est Bay Opera has brought in one of the most imaginative, emotional and intricate works in the entire standard operatic repertory, and made it work. “Les Contes d’Hoffmann (The Tales of Hoffmann),” is the pinnacle of Jacques Offenbach’s vast career, by the 19th-century fabulist poet E.T.A Hoffmann. After 116 delightfully shallow but singable comic operettas, Offenbach spent his last years on a genuine masterwork of serious grand opera. On opening night on Oct. 12, the small stage of Palo Alto’s Lucie Stern Theatre came alive with a remarkably balanced cast of excellent voices and a most imaginative setting. A series of moving projections took us on a tour of the four locations (Nuremberg, Paris, Munich and Venice) where Hoffmann’s alcohol-sozzled imagination met the four loves of his life. And where he was outwitted each time by a Mephistopheles-like adversary (Counselor Lindorf). Fortunately, his muse, a sort of fairy godmother, brought him back from despair; the ceaseless struggle between self-destruction and artistic creativity was decided in favor of the latter. Jose Luis Moscovich, West Bay Opera’s general director and conductor, has found and honed a brilliant cast headed by a trio of singers who took on the demanding roles of four diverse characters as the four fated love affairs came crashing down on Hoffmann, sung with great brio by dramatic tenor Christopher Bengochea. The craftily satanic lawyer Lindorf was masterfully presented

by bass-baritone Robert Stafford, who then was transfixed into a fiendish inventor; the evil Dr. Miracle; and finally a devilish captain. Soprano Rochelle Bard sang all four female lovers with velvety floating tones. She was a robotic wind-up doll as Olympia, and also sang Antonia, the tragic singer who must die when she sings too much; the courtesan Giulietta, who drives Hoffmann to murder a rival; and the one real-life love, Stella the opera diva. Mezzo Betany Coffland sang the pants role of Nicklausse, alternately a classic muse figure and a student sidekick of Hoffmann’s. Her magical vocal flights along with an athleticism brought the difficult role to life. Others in the cast giving outstanding performances included veteran bass Carlos Aguilar as Crespel, the desperately protective father of Antonia. Martin Bell, as the innkeeper Luther and also the murdered Schlemiel, showed a stirring baritone instrument, while Michael Desnoyers was a convincing Spalanzani, the tinkerer who put Olympia together. Trey Costerisan masterfully handled three grotesque lesser roles of a valet, an aide and a comic bumbler. Director Ragnar Conde moved his forces seamlessly as they danced and maneuvered the confines of the small stage. Jean-François Revon also deserves accolades for the set and video design. As conductor, Moscovich proved adept at smoothly bringing along the West Bay orchestra through the extreme difficulties of a score with music of uncompromising precision

and frequent tempo changes. At the curtain, the opening-night audience rose in cheers and exited humming wonderful melodies. Over the past 130 years, critics and musicologists have debated what “Tales of Hoffmann” is really all about. There are theories about its resemblance to Faust and the devil. Others prefer the idea that the poet was seeing three strikingly different personalities in his varied fantasy lovers: the innocent (Olympia), the sensuous (Antonia), and the libertine (Giulietta). Others point to the conflict-ridden, emotional roller coaster as just a rousing good opera. But above all, this is a singers’ vehicle. There are the vivacious drinking songs, and Stafford’s many great low-register arias, including the showpiece “Scintille diamant,” where as the devilish captain he presents Giulietta with a dazzling ring that can steal a man’s reflection and his soul. Most famous of all the tunes is the barcarolle “Belle nuit, o nuit,” the infectious song sung by Bard. Toward the end of his life, Offenbach wrote, “I have one terrible, incorrigible vice, that of working all the time and certainly I shall die with a melody at the end of my pen ...” And for that every opera lover is eternally grateful. N Info: Remaining performances are at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, at the Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road in Palo Alto. Tickets are $40-$75. Go to wbopera.org or call 650-424-9999.

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This Sunday: Being the Best at Being the Worst Rev. David Howell preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

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Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW

  

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Michelle Le

  

Oren’s Hummus Shop features hummus beef, classic hummus topped with Moroccan-spiced all-natural ground beef.



The hummus among us

   

Oren’s Hummus Shop mixes Israeli flavor with Silicon Valley aesthetic

Twenty Years Transforming Lives

ITY THE HUMMUS EVER THE BRIDESMAID THEWINGMAN THE RELIABLE SIDEKICK OF -IDDLE %ASTERNCUISINE 4HAT ATLEAST ISTHENORMAROUND DOWNTOWN 0ALO !LTO WHERE -ED ITERRANEAN THEMED RESTAURANTS DISH OUTBURSTINGFALAFELSANDWICHESAND SIZZLINGSHAWARMAWRAPSTOTHESALI

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! NOVEL IDEA PERHAPS FOR LOCAL FOODIES BUT NOT SO MUCH FOR /REN $OBRONSKY AN)SRAELI BORNTECHNOL OGY ENTREPRENEUR WHO OPENED THE RESTAURANT ON 5NIVERSITY !VENUE LASTYEARWITHTHEHOPEOFBRINGINGA TASTEOFHISHOMELANDTO0ALO!LTO !FTERASTINTIN.EW9ORK#ITY $O BRONSKY MOVED TO 0ALO !LTO ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO (IS WIFE .ANCY OPERATED A 1UEENS RESTAURANT SPE CIALIZING IN SALADS WRAPS AND PA NINI/REN$OBRONSKYSAIDHEBEGAN THINKING ABOUT OPENING A HUMMUS SHOP ALMOST IMMEDIATELY AFTER HE ARRIVED IN 0ALO !LTO AND FOUND THE CITYSHUMMUSSELECTIONLACKING(E DECIDEDTODOSOMETHINGABOUTIT h)N )SRAEL PEOPLE TREAT HUMMUS VERY SERIOUSLY v $OBRONSKY SAID h)TSKINDOFLIKEWINEINOTHERCOUN TRIES0EOPLEHAVEDEBATESABOUTWHO MAKES THE BEST HUMMUS AND HOW ITSMADEv 4HINGSWEREDAUNTINGATFIRST HE SAID 4HOUGH /REN $OBRONSKY HAS PLENTYOFEXPERIENCEWITHSTARTUPS THE RESTAURANT BUSINESS PRESENTED HIMWITHAFRESHSETOFCHALLENGES 4HESTARTUPWORLDHASACERTAINDE GREEOFTOLERANCEANDFLEXIBILITY)N THE RESTAURANT WORLD HE SAID CUS TOMERS CAN BE VERY UNFORGIVING 4HE LOGISTICAL CHALLENGES ARE ALSO FAR MORE INTENSE IN THE FOOD BUSI NESS HESAID h9OUNEEDATLEASTPEOPLEFOR DIFFERENTSHIFTSSTARTINGINTHESAME WEEK AND KNOWING THE FOOD THAT THEY MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FAMILIAR WITH vHESAID /RENS (UMMUS 3HOP PROUDLY TOUTS ITS )SRAELI CONNECTION 4HE (continued on next page)

Eating Out

Michelle Le

Oren’s Hummus Shop features free-range chicken skewers with sides of herbed quinoa and hummus. (continued from previous page)

Oren’s Hummus Shop, 261 University Ave., Palo Alto; Orenshummus.com; 650-752-6492 Hours: Daily 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

Michelle Le

GIANTCHALKBOARDTHATLINESTHERES TAURANTS WESTERN WALL PROCLAIMS h&INALLYANAUTHENTIC)SRAELIRESTAU RANTINTHE3ILICON6ALLEYv4HESHOP IMPORTSMANYOFITSINGREDIENTS IN CLUDINGTAHINI GARBANZOBEANSAND COFFEE FROM)SRAEL h7E REALLY WANTED TO KEEP IT AU THENTIC v.ANCY$OBRONSKYSAIDh7E SHIP OUR INGREDIENTS FROM )SRAEL DI RECTLYJUSTTOGETTHATAUTHENTICITYv !MONG THE MOST IMPORTANT IM

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Patrons eat during the lunch hour at Oren’s Hummus Shop on Oct. 2. ITS MOST POPULAR DISHES .ANCY $OBRONSKYSAID "UT IN THE END ITS THE HUMMUS THAT STEALS THE SHOW 4HE CREAMY SPREADARRIVESINABOWLALONGWITH ASTACKOFWARMPITABREAD WHICH IS BAKED FRESH ON THE PREMISES 7HILEAPURISTCANSTICKTOJUSTTHE HUMMUS THOSE LOOKING FOR A MIX OF TEXTURES CAN CHOOSE A FANCIER PLATELIKETHEh(UMMUS4RIANGLE v WHERETHEHUMMUSSETSTHESTAGEFOR

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ABOUT HUMMUS  GRAMS OF THE STUFF FOR INSTANCE CONTAINS  CALORIES AND CATALOGS THE BENEFI CIALCHEMICALSCONTAINEDWITHINIF YOURE LOOKING TO LOAD UP ON TY ROSINE TRYPTOPHANORPHENYALANINE LOOK NO FARTHER  !ND LEST YOURE STILL UNSURE ABOUT WHAT REGION YOUREIN ANOTICEONTHEBIGBOARD INCLUDES A WIRELESS PASSWORD AND THE MODEST ACKNOWLEDGMENT h7E ARECURRENTLYIN"ETAvN

Experience the taste of Italia from the 7 hills of Rome

TOTHESEABREEZESOFTHE!MALlCOASTANDWINDINGBACKTHROUGHTHEANCIENTTOWNSOF4USCANY #UCINADI6ENTIHASCAPTUREDTHESOULOF)TALIANCOOKING7ETAKEPRIDEINBRINGINGYOUTHEVERYBEST 4HEINGREDIENTSARESIMPLEˆ)MPORTED)TALIANWATERFOR the dough; fresh herbs to bring out the true taste of the regions and extra VIRGINOLIVEOILENHANCECLASSICDISHESFROMTHEWORLDSlNESTCUISINE

Featuring our Executive Chef

Antonio Zamora

/URLOVEOF)TALIANFOODKNOWSNOBOUNDS

!NTONIOHASSPECIALIZEDTRAININGIN )TALIANAND-EDITERRANEANCUISINE "ELIEVINGTOONLYUSETHEFRESHEST SEASONALINGREDIENTSFOUNDLOCALLY !NTONIOSYEARSOFEXPERIENCECAN be tasted in his dishes.

From our Kitchen to yours. Bon Appetit!

Cucina Venti

ANAMERICANTRATTORIAINTHEITALIANTRADITION™ 0EAR!VE -OUNTAIN6IEWs  sWWWCUCINAVENTICOM (OURS3UNDAYTHROUGH4HURSDAYˆAMTOPMs&RIDAYTHROUGH3ATURDAYˆAMTOPM ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ"V̜LiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 31

Eating Out

Tour Palo Alto’s New Passive Home

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PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Ming’s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

BACON IN A BOTTLE ... Imagine this: soda that tastes like bacon. “And if you add a little salt, it tastes exactly like a crisp strip of sizzling bacon,� claims the owner of Rocket Fizz, a soda/candy/toy store that’s preparing to open at 250 University Ave. in Palo Alto. San Jose resident Chris Dunn, who co-owns the store with his wife, Lisa Pelgrim, says Rocket Fizz is a step back in time. The inventory includes 1,500 different candies, 60 types of saltwater taffy and at least 500 flavors of soda. “The nostalgia aspect here is big. It brings you back to your childhood,� Dunn said. The Palo Alto store will be the couple’s second Rocket Fizz franchise. “We opened a store in Campbell last June. It’s been so successful and fun that we wanted to bring it to Palo Alto,� he said. In addition to the dizzying array of candy and the unusual variety of beverages, which also includes buffalo-wing soda and cotton-candy soda, there are vintage signs and gag gifts. It’s a lot to fit into the long and narrow 1,600-square-foot shop that previously housed the American Express Travel store. A November opening is planned. ROBAII REINVENTED ... It wasn’t easy for Dar Nafar, owner of Robaii Falafel and Persian, a 12-year-old restaurant that closed in 2010, to find a location for his new venture. “For two years, I was looking for opportunities and

studying my options,� he said. His persistence paid off, and Nafar opened Thyme to Eat at 448 University Ave. in Palo Alto on Oct. 6. It replaces Hyderabad House, which closed earlier this year. Nafar said his new restaurant, although a little more upscale, is a continuation of the old Robaii, which was on the corner of Hamilton Avenue and Cowper Street. “I’ve missed my customers. I always hoped to return to Palo Alto,� he said. Nafar has created a more extensive menu at Thyme to Eat. New items include vegan and gluten-free options, along with a few beverages such as Chia Rose Water Fresca and Sekanjeh Bean, a concoction of vinegar syrup and Persian-cucumber puree. PIAZZA ADDITION DELAYED ... The 4,000-square-foot expansion project for Piazza Fine Foods in Palo Alto’s Charleston Center that will dramatically increase the size of its cheese shop is in full swing, but taking longer than expected. Initial projections had pegged the opening for Oct. 1. “A small portion will open the first week in November; the rest will open in early January,� assistant store manager Mike de Jesus said.

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business moving out, or in, down the block or across town? Daryl Savage will check it out. Email shoptalk@ paweekly.com.

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Movies MOVIE TIMES

All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954) (G) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. A House Divided (1931) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 6:10 & 8:50 p.m. Alex Cross (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 12:25, 1:50, 2:55, 4:20, 5:25, 6:50, 7:55, 9:25 & 10:30 p.m. Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1:45, 2:45, 4:30, 5:30, 7:40, 8:50 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:55, 2:10, 3:45, 5, 6:45, 7:50, 9:35 & 10:40 p.m. Atlas Shrugged: Part II (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 5:10 & 10:35 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m. & 7:35 p.m. Cameraman Ganga tho Rambabu (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Fri. & Sat. at 8 p.m.; Sat. also at 4:30 p.m. End of Watch (R) ((1/2 Century 20: 2:15, 4:55 & 10:15 p.m. Frankenstein/Bride of Frankenstein Double Feature (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Frankenweenie (PG) ((( Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 4 & 9 p.m.; In 3D at 1:40 & 6:30 p.m. Century 20: 1:40, 6:10 & 10:35 p.m.; In 3D at 11:30 a.m.; 3:55 & 8:25 p.m.

NOW PLAYING The following is a sampling of movies recently reviewed in the Weekly:

Argo ---1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) The Ben Affleck of old has been shed like an unwanted husk, and what remains is a sharp and thoughtful filmmaker who is still in the embryonic phase of a very impressive career. Sure, Affleck the actor is also along for the ride (and he fares well in “Argo�), but his skill behind the camera is what truly shines. After the assault on the U.S. Embassy in Tehran on Nov. 4, 1979, fifty-two Americans are taken hostage as Iranian revolutionaries storm the embassy, but six Americans manage to escape amidst the turmoil and hide out in the home of Canadian Ambassador Ken Taylor (Victor Garber). Back in the U.S., CIA operative Jack O’Donnell (Bryan Cranston) tasks “exfiltration specialist� Tony Mendez (Affleck) with hatching a plan to get the six Americans safely out of Iran before their true identities and whereabouts are discovered. Mendez conceives of a faux movie production that would make the six part of his filmmaking team. “Argo� is a nail-biter from beginning to end, and easily one of the year’s best films. The production values — costuming, set design, cinematography and score — are impressive throughout. Affleck and his crew do a phenomenal job capturing the time period and casting actors who both look like their real-life counterparts and have the thespian chops to hit all the right emotional notes. A goofy sci-fi film dubbed “Argo� never got made in 1980.

Fortunately for moviegoers, a brilliant, Oscar-worthy drama/thriller of the same name did get made in 2012. Rated R for language and some violent images. 2 hours.— T.H. (Reviewed Oct. 12, 2012)

Looper ---1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) Of all the projects Joseph Gordon-Levitt has been involved with, “Looper� may well be the one to launch him into superstardom. The picture takes place in the year 2044,

30 years before the invention of time travel. The mob has a stranglehold on the advanced technology, using time travel to send people back to the year 2044 for termination by highly paid Loopers like Joe (Gordon-Levitt). Occasionally the mob will send back the older version of the Loopers themselves to “close the loop,� When Joe’s older self (Bruce Willis) appears in the year 2044 and young Joe can’t pull the trigger,

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Halloween (1978) (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Thu. at 7 & 9:30 p.m. Here Comes the Boom (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:25 & 10 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:15, 1:45, 2:45, 4:15, 5:15, 6:50, 7:55, 9:25 & 10:25 p.m. Hotel Transylvania (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 3:40 & 9:20 p.m.; In 3D at 1:20 & 6:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 1:45, 4:05 & 6:30 p.m.; In 3D at 12:45, 3:05, 5:35, 8 & 10:20 p.m. The Invisible Man (1933) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Sun. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 4:30 p.m. Ladies Must Love (1933) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 7:30 p.m. The Levi Effect: The Story of Levi Leipheimer (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Tue. at 7:30 p.m. Century 20: Tue. at 7:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Tue. at 7:30 p.m. Looper (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4:20, 7:20 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 2, 4:45, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:15 a.m. The Master (R) (((1/2 Guild Theatre: 1:45, 5 & 8:15 p.m. Mystery of Edwin Drood (1935) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Sun. at 5:55 & 8:55 p.m.

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The Other Dream Team (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Paperboy (R) (( Palo Alto Square: 4:30 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:30 p.m. Paranormal Activity 4 (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1:30, 2:30, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9:40 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 12:15, 1, 1:40, 2:25, 3:10, 3:50, 4:40, 5:25, 6, 7, 7:45, 8:20, 9:20, 10:05 & 10:40 p.m. The Perks of Being a Wallflower (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:15 a.m.; 1:45, 4:15, 6:50 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 & 10 p.m. Pitch Perfect (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 12:30, 3:30, 7:10 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:25, 5:05, 7:45 & 10:25 p.m. RiffTrax Live: BIRDEMIC (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Thu. at 8 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 8 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Thu. at 8 p.m. Searching for Sugar Man (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Palo Alto Square: 2:15 & 7:15 p.m. Seven Psychopaths (R) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:35, 2:35, 4:10, 7, 8 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 2, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:50 p.m. Sinister (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:25, 7:15 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 1:20, 2:40, 4, 5:20, 6:55, 8:05, 9:30 & 10:45 p.m. Smashed (R) (Not Reviewed) Palo Alto Square: 2, 4:45 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:45 p.m. Taken 2 (PG-13) (1/2 Century 16: 11 & 11:50 a.m.; 1:20, 2:20, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sun. also at 3:50 p.m.; Sun. also at 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 1:05, 3:25, 5:45, 8:10, 9:10 & 10:30 p.m. Teatro Alla Scala: L’altra Meta Del Cielo (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Sun. at noon; Tue. at 7 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Sun. at noon; Tue. at 7 p.m.

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nternet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers, theater addresses and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

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Movies Athena

(continued from previous page)



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older Joe escapes. The episode sets off a hunt-and-chase that ropes in brassy farmer Sara (Emily Blunt) and her young son Cid (Pierce Gagnon). Director Rian Johnson (“Brick”) demonstrates a deft touch and infuses “Looper” with subtleties and soulful moments. Gordon-Levitt nails Willis’ mannerisms, so it’s easy to believe the two are versions of the same person, and showcases his depth with toughness and compassion. Blunt is also remarkably good as a protective mother, and youngster Gagnon is a revelation. The visual effects underwhelm at times, but the story doesn’t suffer.Ultimately, “Looper” is a thoughtful genre-bender that brings science-fiction, action and

mystery together in one tight package. Rated R for strong violence, drug content, sexuality/nudity and language. 1 hour, 59 minutes. — T.H. (Reviewed Sept. 28, 2012)

Seven Psychopaths --(Century 16, Century 20) “Seven Psychopaths,” as written and directed by playwright Martin McDonagh, the film investigates the absurdity of Southern California, where movie crime shares real estate with real crime. As aspiring screenwriter Marty (Colin Farrell) tussles with his screenplay “Seven Psychopaths,” he gets not entirely welcome kibitzing from Billy Bickle (Sam Rockwell). Bickle’s day job involves kidnapping pets so partner Hans (Christopher Walken)

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can return them and collect reward money, a scheme that hits a snag when they inadvertently put their hands on a Shih Tzu belonging to a gangster (Woody Harrelson). And so the gleefully violent, comically profane “Seven Psychopaths” represents a sort of evolutionary step from Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction,” but without that picture’s coked-up energy and propulsive narrative drive. The picture is smart enough to work on multiple levels. It can be a witty salute to masculine ‘70s cinema or a deconstruction of same. It can also be seen as an existential consideration of the role of self-expression in ascribing meaning to life, including the question of artistic “responsibility.” Farrell, Rockwell and Walken play off their own screen personas while reminding us of their extensive comic capabilities. Accompanied by the empathetic funereal strains of customary Coen Brothers composer Carter Burwell, these men make beautiful music out of the mortal fear of living to die. Rated R for strong violence, bloody images, pervasive language, sexuality/nudity and drug use. One hour, 49 minutes.— P.C. (Reviewed Oct. 12)

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Smashed- 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 9:45 Searching for Sugar Man- 2:15, 7:15 The Paperboy- 4:30, 9:30 Smashed- 2:00, 4:45, 7:25 Searching for Sugar Man- 2:15, 7:15 The Paperboy- 4:30 Smashed- 2:00, 4:45, 7:25 Searching for Sugar Man- 2:15, 7:15 The Paperboy- 4:30 Smashed- 2:00 Searching for Sugar Man2:15 The Paperboy- 4:30 Smashed- 7:25 Searching for Sugar Man2:15 The Paperboy- 4:30

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

Become a Zero Waste Block Leader Do you want to help us keep recyclables, reusables and compostables out of the landfill? Zero Waste Palo Alto is looking for residents just like you to become one of our neighborhood Zero Waste Block Leaders. For more info, visit www.cityofpaloalto.org/zwbl zerowaste@cityofpaloalto.org (650) 496-5910 Page 34ÊUÊ"V̜LiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Sports Shorts

PREP ALUMS . . . Swarthmore College senior Allie Coleman from Palo Alto has been named Centennial Conference women’s volleyball Player of the Week for the week ending October 14, as announced by the conference office Monday afternoon. Coleman, a Palo Alto High grad and team co-captain, handed out 34 assists in the Garnet’s 3-1 victory against McDaniel, becoming the second player in school history and the 20th CC player to register 3,000 assists in a career. She averaged 6.8 assists per set in a 2-0 week.

ON THE AIR Friday Women’s volleyball: Stanford at Washington, 6 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks

Saturday

Sunday Women’s volleyball: Stanford at Washington St., 11 a.m.; Pac-12 Networks Men’s soccer: Washington at Stanford, 3 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks Women’s soccer: Washington at Stanford, 5:30 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks

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www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

Stanford has celebrated after winning the past two Big Games, last year in Stanford Stadium, but has lost four of the past five games held in Berkeley — site of the 115th annual showdown on Saturday.

New date, but same Big Game challenge Stanford’s wealth of linebackers is hoping to contain Cal’s No. 3 rushing offense in the Pac-12 by Rick Eymer

D

avid Shaw has a problem any college football coach would love to have. He has too many good inside linebackers. The position was severely tested when Shayne Skov went down for the season last year and A.J. Tarpley and Jarek Lancaster were expected to carry the baton, which they did admirably.

Skov’s return this season meant Tarpley and Lancaster were regulated to reserve roles again. But that has been a blessing for Shaw because it means one or more of them, with James Vaughters also in the mix, will be fresh for special teams action. Shaw considers his linebackers key to that aspect of the game plan. Calling them reserves may not be

the best description for them either. All four linebackers see plenty of action. “We can consider ourselves starters,” Tarpley said. “We all prepare as starters.” And Shaw has continually downplayed the starting role, saying it doesn’t matter who participates in the first play of the game. No matter who starts when No. 22

Stanford (2-1, 4-2) travels to Berkeley to take on California (2-2, 3-4) in the 115th annual Big Game on Saturday at noon, it’s pretty clear someone else may be in as soon as the second play. Skov, fourth on the team with 31 tackles, is credited with five starts (he sat out the game against San (continued on page 37)

PREP ROUNDUP

STANFORD ROUNDUP

Gunn, Castilleja golf teams wrap up titles

Top women tee it up at Stanford

by Keith Peters he regular season is just about over for local girls’ golf teams, two of which wrapped up their respective division championships this week. Now, the going gets a bit tougher for Gunn, Castilleja and a host of others. The Central Coast Section has toughened up its qualifying standards this year, with each league getting only one automatic berth with only five at-large berths available. In previous seasons, the regular-season champ got a free pass to CCS along with the winner of the league tournament. While the decision on how the league champion is decided rests with each individual league, Gunn

T

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by Rick Eymer hen Dr. Condoleezza Rice needs help with her golf swing, she turns to Stanford women’s golf assistant coach Kathryn Imrie. When Stanford senior Sally Watson looks for life advice, she turns to Rice. All three of them join forces this weekend when the Cardinal hosts the Stanford Intercollegiate, turning a routine tournament into a Big Game Week event. It was Imrie’s idea to involve Rice, a long-time golf fan who has a holein-one to her credit. “It’s turned out to be tremendous,” Stanford coach Anne Walker said.

W Richard C. Ersted/stanfordphoto.com

Men’s water polo: Stanford at Cal, 9:30 a.m.; Pac-12 Networks College football: Stanford at Cal, noon; FOX (2); KNBR (1050 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)

John Todd/isiphotos.com

STILL PERFECT The Palo Alto Knights’ Jr. Midgets football team has a history with its counterpart Oak Grove of San Jose. The teams have met in the NorCal Championship game in each of the past three seasons, with Palo Alto winning all three and advancing to the national playoffs. While there’s a good chance the two will meet once again in the playoffs, it won’t be the only time. In fact, a preview of the postseason will be on display Sunday at Palo Alto High when the teams meet at 4:30 p.m. Both teams will bring 8-0 records to the showdown. The Knights are currently ranked No. 5 in the nation while Oak Grove is ranked No. 8 in the American Youth Football Division I Power Rankings. In addition to the Jr. Midgets’ game on Sunday, the Knights will host Oak Grove in Jr. Pee Wee (11 a.m.), Tiny Mites (1 p.m.) and Cadets (2:30 p.m.). The Palo Alto Jr. Midgets improved to 8-0 with a 40-6 victory over the San Francisco Seahawks on Sunday at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco. Palo Alto coaches were expecting a much-closer game, but Jordan Schilling and his teammates had other expectations as they scored 40 or more points for the third time this season. Schilling had more than 100 yards rushing and scored a touchdown on a 96-yard halfback pass from Ethan Stern with one second left in the first half — catching the ball on the 20-yard line and racing 80 yards down the sideline. The Knights also scored on a 35-yard pass from Jake Rittman to Ty Wilcox while Stern added an eight-yard TD run while surpassing 100 rushing yards for for a fifth straight game.

Senior Sally Watson will lead the Cardinal women in this weekend’s Stanford Invitational at the Stanford Golf Course.

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Sports

Stanford roundup (continued from previous page)

Women’s volleyball Second-ranked Stanford travels to Seattle for its biggest test yet of the Pac-12 season against No. 5 Washington, which is coming off its first loss of the season, a four-set setback in Eugene to No. 3 Oregon.

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ********************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA–SPECIAL MEETING-COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM Monday, October 22, 2012– 5:00 PM

CLOSED SESSION 1. Labor STUDY SESSION 2. City Council Study Session with Senator Simitian Proposed Topics of Discussion SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 3. Presentation From the City of Heidelberg, Germany 4. Selection of Candidates to Interview for the Library Advisory Commission 5. Selection of Candidates to Interview for the Parks and Recreation Commission 6. Selection of Candidates to Interview for the Public Arts Commission CONSENT CALENDAR 7. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation to Accept the Report on the Status of Audit Recommendations (June 2012) 8. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation to Accept the Auditor’s Office Quarterly Report as of June 30, 2012 9. Approval of Increase to Purchase Order with One Workplace to Add $71,646 for a Total Amount Not to Exceed $703,794 for Standard Furniture for the Mitchell Park Library and Community Center 10. Approval of Annual Report on Williamson Act Contracts Within the City of Palo Alto 11. Approval of a Contract with NOVA Partners, Inc. in the Amount of $xxx,xxx for Construction Management Services for the Main Library Measure N Project ACTION ITEMS 12. Approval of Letter of Intent to Participate in the Cool Cities Challenge 13. Human Relations Commission Recommends Adoption of a Resolution In Support of an Amendment to the United States and California Constitutions to State Corporations are not People and Money is not Speech. 14. Colleague’s Memo From Mayor Yeh, Council Members Price and Shepherd Regarding a Council Youth Commission Liaison STANDING COMMITTEE and SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETINGS The Policy and Services Committee will meet on October 23, 2012 at 6:00 PM to discuss; 1) Fire Utilization Study Update, 2), Economic Development. The City Council will hold a Special Closed Session meeting on October 25, 2012 at 6:00 PM.

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A loss to the Huskies (7-1, 17-1) would not mean the end of the season for Stanford (8-0, 16-2) but a win could put the Cardinal in control of the conference race at its midpoint. The Cardinal also play at Washington State at 11 a.m. Sunday. As usual, any win in the Pac-12 is a big win. Five of the top seven teams in the country are from the conference. The five teams — Stanford, Oregon, Washington, USC, UCLA — have a combined record of 78-11, an .876 winning percentage. Oregon State handed top-ranked Penn State its only loss of the season, Oregon has lost only to Stanford and Washington has lost only to Oregon. Stanford middle blocker Inky Ajanaku and libero Kyle Gilbert are the reigning Pac-12 Freshman and Defensive Players of the Week, respectively. Ajanaku led the team last week with a .458 attack percentage and averaged 3.62 kills, 1.62 blocks and 4.44 points per set, including a career high 17 kills against UCLA. Gilbert averaged 5.88 digs per set against the Los Angeles school, tallying a career-best 25 digs against the Bruins. Field hockey Only three games remain in the regular season for No. 14 Stanford (9-6, 3-0 NorPac), which has the opportunity to lock up another conference title while building momentum heading into the postseason. The Cardinal will play three games over a five-day stretch, with all of those contests coming against NorPac opponents. The busy sequence begins on Friday when Stanford hosts Pacific in a 4 p.m. tilt at the Varsity Turf. After a road game at UC Davis the next day, the Cardinal returns to The Farm and hosts rival California in a rare Tuesday game that was moved up three days to accommodate a Pac-12 Networks telecast. Stanford has already defeated all three teams during the first round of conference play. The Cardinal can claim the regular season title outright with a pair of victories this weekend. Up first is Pacific (5-10, 1-3 NorPac), a program Stanford has won 12 in a row against since 2006. Meanwhile, a 5-0 shutout of UC Davis two weeks ago gives Stanford the inside track and tiebreaker edge over the Aggies (6-9, 2-1 NorPac). While the upcoming schedule obviously presents a challenge, Stanford is well-equipped to deal with the rapid-fire stretch thanks to its balanced depth. A solid bounce-back effort would be a welcomed sight, as the Cardinal suffered hard-fought losses to No. 1 Syracuse and No. 4 Connecticut over the weekend. For only the fifth time in the last four years, Stanford has lost back-to-back games. The Cardinal has appeared in the national rankings every week of this year, topping out at No. 11 on two occasions last month. In the latest edition of the RPI, published bi-weekly during the season and considered a vital tool in the NCAA Tournament selection process, Stanford checks in at No. 13. Courtney Haldeman’s career-high eight goals leads the club while Becky Dru has compiled team-best

John Todd/isiphotos.com

“The teams are excited and we’re getting positive feedback.” The tournament opens Friday on the par-71 Stanford Golf Course at 8:30 a.m., the first of three rounds. Stanford is joined by 16 teams and several individuals. Also competing are Arizona, Arizona State, California, Georgia, Harvard, Oklahoma State, Oregon, Oregon State, Pepperdine, San Jose State, Texas, UC Davis, UCLA, USC, Vanderbilt and Washington. Castilleja grad Brenna Nelsen will be playing for Harvard. It’s the final of three fall tournaments for the Cardinal, which is coming off a third-place finish at the Edean Ihlanfeldt Invitational in Washington. “It’s kind of a short fall season, which is unusual,” Walker said. “But there has been quite a bit of improvement since the first day of practice.” Stanford played its first tournament without Watson, who was involved in the World Amateur Championship at the time. That gave freshman Lauren Kim a chance to shine. The Los Altos resident shot the low round for the Cardinal. “She has been fantastic,” Walker said. “She had a top-25 finish against a strong field in her first tournament. She’s a consistent, mature player.” In Washington, Watson finished tied for second while freshman Ma-

riah Stackhouse also earned a top 10 finish. “Anyone in collegiate golf knows Sally Watson,” said Walker, in her first year at Stanford and coaching at UC Davis the past few years. “She was highly sought after and has a lot of international experience. She’s had a tremendous amateur career and she’s an All-American in college. I know she’s determined to have a good senior year.” Pinewood grad and Atherton resident Audrey Proulx will be playing as an individual for Stanford. “She’s new to competitive golf and she fights it out on the course,” Walker said. “This should help her gain some experience.” Watson and Kristina Wong, who has several top-10 finishes to her credit, are the lone seniors on the team. Proulx is a junior, along with Danielle Fraiser and Marrisa Mar. Mariko Tumangan is the lone sophomore, with Kim and Stackhouse both freshmen. Walker, raised in Scotland (as was Imrie, a former pro, and Watson), played golf at California before moving into coaching. “Yeah I get a bad time about it,” Walker said of her affiliation with Cal. “But both schools have a lot of connections. It’s a neat thing.”

Stanford’s Nicole Gibbs will defend her title at the ITA Northwest Regional Championships, hosted by the Cardinal this weekend. totals in assists (7), points (21) and shots (36) to go along with seven goals of her own. Hope Burke (four goals, six assists, 14 points), Maddie Secco (four goals, 10 points, 24 shots) and Katie Mitchell (4 goals, nine points, 14 shots) are close behind. Men’s water polo No. 5 Stanford visits No. 7 California in the Big Splash at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, a Mountain Pacific Sports Federation match to be televised by the Pac-12 networks. The Cardinal (2-1, 8-3) also play Bucknell and Air Force in nonconference matches at Santa Clara on Sunday. Stanford is coming off a pair of victories, led by freshman driver Bret Bonanni, who was named MPSF Player of the Week for his contributions. Bonanni scored a total of six goals as the Cardinal beat No. 2 UC Santa Barbara, 9-7, and No. 8 Pepperdine,11-6, on the road. On the year Bonanni ranks second on the team with 26 goals over 11 games. Men’s golf Stanford is one of 15 teams that will be competing at the U.S. Collegiate Championship beginning Friday at the Golf Club of Georgia in Alpharetta. The Cardinal will be joined by Auburn, Georgia Tech, Clemson, Iowa, USC, Virginia, Wake Forest, Duke, Kent State, Washington, Texas A&M, East Tennessee State, Oklahoma State and UCLA. Tennis Both Stanford tennis programs are in action this weekend, beginning Friday, competing in their respective Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Northwest Regional Championships. In addition to Stanford, the ITA’s Northwest Region school’s are comprised of California, Eastern Washington, Fresno State, Gonzaga, Oregon, Pacific, Portland, Portland State, Sacramento State, St. Mary’s, San Francisco, San Jose State, Santa Clara, UC Davis, Washington and Washington State. Twenty-four other ITA Regional Championships for NCAA Division I men and women are taking place during this month at campuses throughout the country. The singles

finalists and doubles champion from each regional earn berths to the ITA National Intercollegiate Indoor Championships, slated for Nov. 8-11 in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Winners and finalists from the various ITA Regional Championships around the country, plus at-large selections, will make up the singles field of 32 and the 16-team doubles draw. For the sixth straight season, the Taube Family Tennis Center will serve as the host site for the women’s tournament. Participating in the singles draw for Stanford are Kristie Ahn, Natalie Dillon, Nicole Gibbs, Krista Hardebeck, Lindsey Kostas, Stacey Tan and Ellen Tsay. The Cardinal will be represented in doubles with teams of Tan/Tsay and Dillon/Hardebeck. Gibbs is looking to defend her crown after defeating Mallory Burdette 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (3) in last year’s final. A three-time All-American, Gibbs is coming off one of the best seasons in school history, becoming only the third player in NCAA history to capture both the NCAA singles and doubles titles in the same season. Stanford’s first NCAA singles champion since Amber Liu in 2004, Gibbs has produced an 8711 overall record and 48-2 mark in dual-match play. The tandem of Tan and Tsay will be seeking its second straight doubles crown, defeating Sacramento State’s Clarisse Baca and Maria Meliuk 8-4 in last year’s match. On the men’s side, this year’s event will be hosted by St. Mary’s in Moraga. Set to compete in singles for Stanford are Jamin Ball, Sam Ecker, Daniel Ho, Fawaz Hourani, Matt Kandath, Walker Kehrer, Denis Lin, John Morrissey, Nolan Paige, Maciek Romanowicz, Robert Stineman, Trey Strobel and Anthony Tsodikov. There are six Cardinal doubles teams entered in the draw: Hourani/ Tsodikov, Ball/Ho, Lin/Romanowicz, Morrissey/Strobel, Kehrer/ Stineman and Kandath/Paige. Kandath advanced to the semifinals of last year’s tournament, falling to teammate and eventual champion Ryan Thacher. The duo of Kehrer and Stineman earned a runner-up finish in the doubles final, dropping a 9-8 (8) decision to California’s Carlos Cueto and Ben McLachlan. N

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It has been 30 years since ‘The Play’ became history by Keith Peters nly four seconds showed on the scoreboard clock as Mark Harmon’s 35-yard field goals sailed through the uprights. The Big Game implausible had happened again: Stanford had found a way to score in the waning seconds, overcoming a 19-17 deficit to take the lead. “I was going to cry,� said Cal defensive tackle Reggie Camp, “and then I see everybody tossing the ball all over the place. Then I heard the cannon. I wondered what was going on. Then I went crazy.� Camp wasn’t alone in his crazi-

O

This Saturday’s 115th annual Big Game marks anniversary of one of the game’s most iconic moments when Cal beat Stanford with a 57-yard, five-lateral play ness. What had transpired in the final four seconds was indeed crazy, almost indescribable. Wrote one columnist: “The description of mortals are rendered useless.� Stanford, holding a 20-19 lead with four ticks left, kicked off from its own 25 after being penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct. Cardinal players were pouring onto the field to celebrate Harmon’s apparent game-winning field goal. Instead of kicking deep, Harmon squibbed the ball. Cal’s Kevin Moen fielded it as

his own 43. Thus began what forever will be known as “The Play�. Moen was stopped, so he threw a spiral laterally across the field to Richard Rodgers, who was forced to lateral to Dwight Garner. Quickly surrounded, Garner lateraled back to Rodgers before his knee touched the ground. At this point, the Stanford band and an army of Cardinal fans, believing Garner was down, began marching on the field. But, The Play was not over. Rodgers took the lateral from

Garner at midfield, then lateraled to Mariet Ford at the Stanford 45. Ford took it down to the 25 before flipping the ball, without looking, back over his head to Moen. What ensured was pure pandemonium, as Moen weaved his way 20 yards through football players and Stanford band members, crashed into a trombone player and scored the winning touchdown. Cal had traveled 57 yards on five laterals, earning a place in history for The Play. Stanford players and coaches, of course, were furious with the outcome. “Those guys (officials) ruined my last game as a college football player,� said Stanford’s senior quarterback John Elway, who had completed 25 of 39 passes for 330 yards and two touchdowns. “This is a farce and a joke. This is an insult to college football.�

Stanford coach Paul Wiggin, whose team finished 5-6 after dropping its final three games, was still steaming 24 hours after the game. “That, along with four or five other inexcusable calls made by a group of officials, erased one of the great comebacks in the history of the Big Game, if not in college football,� Wiggin said. Cal’s first-year coach Joe Kapp, who had told his players they were going to win the game even after Harmon’s field goal, was ecstatic. His team, picked to finish near the Pac-10 cellar, had completed a fine 7-4 season. “The Bear just would not quite,� Kapp said over and over. “The Bear would not die. This is something.� Something for the history books. N (This story, written by the author, originally appeared in the program for the centennial Big Game in November of 1997)

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Notice is hereby given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District for multiple work bid packages. Description of the projects/work is as follows:

Art Ray

Stanford senior quarterback John Elway (7) shakes hands with Cal’s Kevin Moen, who scored on the famous 57-yard, five-lateral play to lift the Bears to an improbable 25-20 victory in the 1982 Big Game in Berkeley.

Big Game (continued from page 35)

Jose State). Vaughters, with 15 tackles including a sack, has four starts. Tarpley gets three starts next to his name and Lancaster (19 tackles including a sack) zero. Yet all have played in every game for which they have been eligible. Expect more of the same against the Bears, who have lost the past two Big Games — including a 31-28 nail-biter last year in the rain. “With the loss last week (a 20-13 overtime setback at Notre Dame), we have to be as urgent as we can be,� said Tarpley, who has 20 tackles, including a sack. The annual showdown will feature the Pac-12’s No. 2 rushing defense of Stanford (89.5 yards per game) against the No. 3 rushing offense of Cal (195.0). The Cardinal is back on the road again, where success has been hard to achieve. It’s just Stanford’s third game away from home, and even Shaw is concerned about the team’s ability to make plays — with Stanford facing five of its final seven games on the road. When it comes to the Big Game, Stanford has lost four of the past

five in Berkeley. “I’m concerned but we’re closer to home,� he said. “We have not played great offense on the road. We’ve dropped a lot of balls, we have too many long third downs and we’re not as good in the red zone.� The offense has yet to score a touchdown on the road this season, though Jordan Williamson has connected on two field goals in each contest and the defense has added a score in each game. Overall, though, Shaw is upbeat about the first half of the season. “Six games in and we sit at 4-2,� he said. “Those two games we could have won however. Thinking about the conference race, it’s a good place to be. We still have our main goal available to us and that is winning the Pac-12 championship.� Stanford has played up to 11 freshmen thus far in the season and Shaw thinks they will only get better as the season progresses. “We’re not a finished product,� Shaw said. “And yet we went toeto-toe with one of the best teams in the nation. The question is can we finish those games, particularly on the road? Can we pull these out?� California would be a good start. “A lot of us, from both sides, look forward to this game,� Shaw said.

“It doesn’t matter when it’s played, it will still be a hostile environment.� Shaw was a true freshman in 1990, taking in the sights and sounds of his first Big Game. “It’s still the most memorable Big Game in my mind,� Shaw said. “I’m standing on the sideline and we score (with 12 seconds left) but fail on the two-point conversion and the fans rush the field. They clear the field, assess a 15-yard penalty and Stanford recovers the onside kick.� A roughing-the-passer penalty against Cal gave Stanford one last chance, with Jon Hopkins delivering a 37-yard field goal with no time left. “I’m standing there watching all of this unfold,� Shaw said. “I look over to Hopkins and he’s looking to warm up for the possible field goal. There was no net. It had been taken away when the fans stormed the field. Hopkins just shrugged his shoulders and started kicking balls into the stands to get his timing down. Then he goes out and kicks the game-winner.� As for playing the game in October? (It’s never been played any earlier than November). “I don’t like it,� Shaw said. “It’s weird. It’s different but it’s still Big Game week and still a snapshot in time. This week is its own entity.� N

s'UNN(IGH3CHOOL'AS$ISTRIBUTION3YSTEM s'UNN(IGH3CHOOL2EPLACEMENTOF&URNACESIN%XISTING'YM

Mandatory Job Walk: There will be a pre-bid conference and site visit for each project. Bid Submission:0ROPOSALSMUSTBERECEIVEDATTHE$ISTRICT&ACILITIES/FďŹ ce, Building “Dâ€?. &ORMOREDETAILSONOBTAININGPLANSANDSPECIlCATIONS THEMANDATORYJOB walk, bid submission, prevailing wage laws, or the bid packages, please see the contact below. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code SECTIONS  n  ! COPY OF THE $ISTRICTS ,#0 IS AVAILABLE FOR REVIEWAT#HURCHILL!VENUE "UILDING$ 0ALO!LTO #! 1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certiďŹ ed copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred.

"IDDERSMAYEXAMINE"IDDING$OCUMENTSAT&ACILITIES/FlCE Building “Dâ€?. Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building “Dâ€? 0ALO!LTO #!  0HONE   &AX  

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COMMUNITY MEETING Draft Walk and Roll Maps for Barron Park Elementary School

Prep roundup

Review and comment on Walk and Roll Maps

and Castilleja perhaps have different paths to the CCS Tournament that will be held Oct. 30 at Rancho Canada (East Course) in Carmel Valley. Despite winning the Blossom Valley Athletic League (Santa Teresa Division) regular-season title with a 10-0 mark, Gunn (13-1) still has to win the BVAL Tournament next Wednesday at Santa Teresa Golf Course to reach CCS. Gunn, in only its first season of existence, wrapped up its first regular title with a 204-299 win over host Sobrato at Coyote Creek Golf Course in San Jose. Anna Zhou, who aced a 279yard, par-4 on Monday at Santa Clara Golf & Tennis Club for a rare double-eagle and finished with a 2-under 34, joined with Tiffany Yang on Wednesday to shoot 1-over 35s. Jayshree Sarathy finished with a 38. Lianna McFarlane (44) and Sandrea Herchen (50) rounded out the scoring for Gunn, which next season will move closer to home for its own league — the SCVAL. Castilleja (9-0, 10-0), meanwhile, remained unbeaten and clinched its sixth straight West Bay Athletic League (Foothill Division) title with a 216-230 win over Sacred Heart Prep at Palo Alto Hills Golf & Country Club on Wednesday. Caroline Debs (40), Taylor Wilkerson (44), Ellie Zales (46) and Nicole Mitchell (47) rounded out the scoring for Castilleja, which concludes round-robin play on Friday at Los Lagos GC against host Harker before joining Sacred Heart Prep in the WBAL Tournament at Poplar Creek GC in San Mateo next Wednesday. Castilleja defeated Harker on Monday, 219-252, at Palo Alto Muni.

Tuesday, October 23, 7:00 - 8:30 PM Barron Park Elementary, 800 Barron Ave. The Palo Alto Safe Routes to School program is documenting suggested routes to school and identifying opportunities for engineering improvements and enforcement which, when combined with safety education and promotion activities, will encourage more families to choosealternatives to driving to school solo.

More info: Contact Sylvia.Star-Lack@cityofpaloalto.org or 329-2156

CITY OF PALO ALTO POLICE DEPARTMENT NOTICE OF CITY MANAGER’S PUBLIC HEARING CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Manager will consider the application of Classic Cab for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to operate a taxicab service in the City of Palo Alto under the business name of Classic Cab, at a special meeting on Wednesday November 7, 2012 at 10:00AM, at Cubberley Community Center, located at 4000 Middlefield Road Room A-7, Palo Alto.

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, November 1, 2012 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review filed documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 180 El Camino Real [12PLN-00329]: Request by Metro Inc. for Drybar, on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, for Architectural Review of façade improvements, including a new awning and lighting fixtures, and two wall signs, at the Stanford Shopping Center. Zone District CC. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the provisions of CEQA, 15301 (Existing Facilities). San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority (JPA) Flood Protection Project [12PLN-00378]: Request by the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority (JPA) for Site and Design Review of a project to provide 1% (100-year) flood protection improvements, riparian corridor enhancements, and recreational opportunities along San Francisquito Creek between Highway 101 and San Francisco Bay. Zoning District: PF(D). Environmental Review: An Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the lead agency (JPA) and was certified by the JPA Board on October 18, 2012. 27 University Avenue: Study session to allow for additional public comment and ARB discussion of site planning and urban design concepts related to the potential project presented on October 24, 2012 to the ARB and Planning and Transportation Commission, for comments in advance of further City Council consideration. The area bounded by El Camino Real, University Avenue, the improved areas of El Camino Park and the Caltrain Station and Right of Way, is the potential site of a new Arts and Innovation District. Included in the concepts are the relocation of the Intermodal Transit Center from Mitchell Lane to a transit circle at University Avenue and Urban Lane to enhance transit accessibility and capacity, improved connections across the site, and provision of an urban destination including a performing arts theater and contemporary office space. Amy French Chief Planning Official

Page 38ÊUÊ"V̜LiÀÊ£™]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

(continued from page 35)

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Katelyn Doherty (L), Pauli King Menlo-Atherton High Doherty, a senior, had 87 digs, 70 kills and 94 assists in a 6-2 volleyball week while King, a junior, added 58 kills and 98 digs and made the all-tournament team as the Bears took sixth at the NorCal Classic.

James McDaniel Priory School The junior running back carried 25 times for 247 yards and scored on runs of 7, 4, 35, 1 and 38 yards in addition to adding two conversions and a sack as the Panthers (5-0) romped to a 58-22 win and stayed tied for first place.

Honorable mention P.J. Bigley Sacred Heart Prep water polo

Zoe Enright Menlo cross country

Ellie Shannon Sacred Heart Prep volleyball

Lucy Tashman Castilleja volleyball

Stephanie Zhang Gunn tennis

Anna Zhou Gunn golf

Keller Chryst Palo Alto football

Zach Churukian Sacred Heart Prep water polo

Justin Gates-Mouton Palo Alto football

Jack Heneghan* Menlo football

Will Runkel* Sacred Heart Prep water polo

Tasi Teu Menlo-Atherton football * previous winner

Cross country The Palo Alto girls didn’t have any runners among the top 10, but still finished second at the SCVAL Preview No. 2 meet on Tuesday over a 3.1-mile layout at Sunnyvale’s Baylands Park. The Vikings scored 89 points while trailing only Monta Vista (73). Nora Rosati led Paly with a 12th-place finish of 20:38. Katie Foug (15th, 20:43.1), Chika Kasahara (16th, 20:43.6), Audrey DeBruine (20th, 21:18) and Emma Ramey (26th, 21:25) rounded out the Vikings’ scoring. The Gunn girls, still missing junior standout Sarah Robinson, finished fifth in the team scoring and were led by Gillian Meeks. She took sixth in 20:12. Robinson has run in one one meet this season due to a medical condition and first-year coach Craig Blockhus is unsure if Robinson will run again this season. Girls’ tennis Gunn’s run toward perfection in the SCVAL El Camino Division ended on Wednesday in a 4-3 loss to host Homestead. The match originally was scheduled for next week. The loss dropped the Titans to 10-1 in the division (12-8 overall) and into a tie for first place with the

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

Mustangs (10-1, 12-5). Each team has one match remaining and both are expected to win, thus setting up a playoff for the title — possibly on Oct. 29 at Fremont High. Gunn managed just one win in singles, by Lucy Oyer at No. 3, and thus needed to sweep the doubles. The Mustangs, however, picked up a win at No. 1 doubles over Gunn’s Ebba Nord and Devyani Bhadkamkar, 6-4, 7-5, to pull out the victory. In the WBAL Skyline Division, Castilleja maintained its hold on first place following a 6-1 victory over host King’s Academy at the Sunnyvale Municipal Tennis Center. Paulette Wolak, Julia McKay and Celeste Wolyshen all won in doubles to lead the Gators (5-0, 5-3). On Tuesday, Menlo-Atherton avenged a first-round loss to Carlmont on its own courts by handing the host Scots a 4-3 loss on their courts, forcing a two-way tie for first place in the PAL Bay Division race. Carlmont and M-A are both 11-1 in league. Perhaps the most crucial match for the Bears (13-5 overall) came at No. 1 singles where M-A’s Samantha Andrew upset Cori Sidell, 6-3,

6-3. Sidell is considered the No. 1 singles player in the league. In the SCVAL De Anza Division, Palo Alto won its third straight match and avenged an earlier loss to Los Altos with a 4-3 triumph on the Eagles’ courts. Junior standout Ashlii Budhiraja posted a 6-4, 6-1 win at No. 1 singles for the Vikings (4-5, 13-7) while senior Tiffany Nguyen and junior Julianne Le teamed for a 7-5, 7-6 (7-3) win at No. 1 doubles. On Monday, Menlo School moved closer to winning its 19th straight league title following a 7-0 blanking of visiting Notre Dame-San Jose in WBALeague (Foothill Division). The Knights (7-0, 12-7) improved to 195-0 in league dual matches since 1994. Girls’ water polo Jenna Swartz, Sophia Caryotakis and Jessica Heilman all scored three goals to pace host Menlo-Atherton to a 17-3 dunking of visiting Carlmont on Wednesday. The victory, coupled with previously unbeaten Castilleja’s loss to Burlingame, moved the Bears (3-0, 10-6) into sole possession of first place in the PAL Bay Division race.

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Football There is no more room for losses for a handful of local teams hoping to challenge for titles this season. Must win is attached to nearly every game starting Friday. If Palo Alto (2-1, 4-2) has any thoughts of winning the SCVAL De Anza Division crown, it has to beat visiting Los Gatos (2-0, 4-2) in their showdown at 7:30 p.m. The Wildcats have to face co-leader Milpitas (3-0, 5-1) next week, which could result in a three-way tie for first should Paly beat Los Gatos. Paly is coming off a big 38-12 win over host Wilcox last week. If Gunn continues to harbor hopes of a possible SCVAL De Anza Division title, the Titans (2-0, 4-2) have to beat Los Altos (0-2, 0-5) in a homecoming game at 7:30 p.m. Gunn’s remaining games are against Monta Vista (2-0), Cupertino (2-1) and Fremont (2-1). If Menlo-Atherton wants to win the PAL Bay Division crown, the Bears (2-0, 4-2) need to keep winning — starting Friday at Half Moon Bay (0-1, 1-5) at 7 p.m. M-A has won three straight — including last week’s 28-14 win over Burlingame — but finishes the division against Sacred Heart Prep and coleader Terra Nova. Sacred Heart Prep (1-1, 5-1) will need someone to beat Terra Nova to have any shot at the Bay Division crown after dropping a 20-13 decision to the Tigers last week. The Gators host Aragon (1-1, 5-1) in a crucial matchup Friday at 3 p.m. N

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Sunday,

Boys’ water polo Sacred Heart Prep maintained its one-game lead over St. Francis and Bellarmine in the West Catholic Athletic League following a 17-9 dunking of host Serra on Wednesday night. The Gators improved to 5-0 (16-3 overall) as Harrison Enright and Michael Holloway each scored four goals. Zach Churukian and Bret Hinrichs added three each as the Gators tuned up for this weekend’s North vs. South Challenge in Atherton. In the PAL Bay Division, host Menlo-Atherton held on to sole possession of first place with a 14-3 victory over Carlmont. Harrison Holland-McCowan and John Knox each tallied three goals for the Bears (3-0, 9-7).

Peninsula School

Photo: Marc Silber

In Burlingame, Castilleja (2-1, 9-8) battled the Panthers to a 6-6 halftime deadlock before being outscored in the third quarter, 2-0. That proved to be the difference in the match as the Gators fell, 9-7. In the PAL Ocean Division, Menlo School won its fourth straight with a 12-7 victory over visiting Half Moon Bay. The Knights improved to 8-2 in league (9-5 overall) as Audrey Flower scored four goals. In the West Catholic Athletic League, host Sacred Heart Prep held on to first place with an 18-2 swamping of Notre Dame-Belmont. The Gators (5-0, 13-4) got four goals from Morgan McCracken and Caitlin Stuewe. On Tuesday, Gunn saw its perfect season in the SCVAL De Anza Division disappear in a 9-8 upset loss to host Los Gatos on Tuesday. The Titans (8-1, 12-5) held a 6-4 halftime lead.

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EL CAMINO REAL & EMBARCADERO ROAD, PALO ALTO

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Palo Alto Weekly 10.19.2012 - Section 1