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City OKs plan for golf course, fields Page 3

Spirit of

a winner Paly teen makes her Olympics debut PAGE 24

Transitions 12

Pulse 13

Spectrum 14

Movies 22

Puzzles 66

NArts Film festival explores humor in tough topics

Page 18

NSports Palo Alto Oaks make pitch for World Series Page 29 NHome How to get mosquitoes to buzz off

Page 33

City of Palo Alto Presents the 28th annual

5K walk, 5K & 10K run — Great for kids and families A benefit event for local non-profits supporting kids and families

Register online: PaloAltoOnline.com/moonlight_run TIME & PLACE

Corporate Sponsors

5K walk 7:00pm, 10K run 8:15pm, 5K run 8:45pm. Race-night registration 6 to 8pm at City of Palo Alto Baylands Athletic Center, Embarcadero & Geng Roads (just east of the Embarcadero Exit off Highway 101). Parking — go to PaloAltoOnline.com to check for specific parking locations.

COURSE 5K and 10K loop courses over Palo Alto Baylands levee, through the marshlands by the light of the Harvest Moon! Course is flat, USAT&F certified (10k run only) on levee and paved roads. Water at all stops. Course map available at www.PaloAltoOnline.com.

REGISTRATIONS & ENTRY FEE

Event Sponsors

Adult Registration (13 +) registration fee is $30 per entrant by 9/14/12. Includes a long-sleeved t-shirt. Youth Registration (6 - 12) registration is $20 per entrant by 9/14/12. Includes a long-sleeved t-shirt. Youth (5 and under) run free with an adult, but must be registered through Evenbrite with signed parental guardian waiver, or may bring/fill out a signed waiver to race-night registration. Late Registration fee is $35 for adults, $25 for youth from 9/15 - 9/26. Race night registration fee is $40 for adult; $30 for youth from 6 to 8pm. T-shirts available only while supplies last. Refunds will not be issued for no-show registrations and t-shirts will not be held. MINORS: If not pre-registered, minors under 18 MUST bring signed parental/waiver form on race night.

SPORTS TEAM/CLUBS: Online pre-registration opportunity for organizations of 10 or more runners; e-mail MoonlightRun@paweekly.com.

DIVISIONS Age divisions: 9 & under; 10 - 12; 13 - 15; 16 - 19; 20 - 24; 25 - 29; 30 - 34; 35 - 39; 40 - 44; 45 - 49; 50 - 54; 55 - 59; 60 - 64; 65 - 69; 70 & over with separate divisions for male and female runners in each age group. Race timing provided for 5K and 10K runs only.

COMPUTERIZED RESULTS BY A Change of Pace Chip timing results will be posted on PaloAltoOnline.com by 11pm race night. Race organizers are not responsible for incorrect results caused by incomplete/incorrect registration forms.

AWARDS/PRIZES/ENTERTAINMENT Top three finishers in each division. Prize giveaways and refreshments. Pre-race warmups by Noxcuses Fitness, Palo Alto

PALO ALTO GRAND PRIX Road Race Series — Moonlight Run, 9/28; Marsh Madness, 10/27; Home Run, 9/11, for more information go to www.paloaltogp.org.

BENEFICIARY Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund. A holiday-giving fund to benefit Palo Alto area non-profits and charitable organizations. In April 2012, 55 organizations received a total of $353,000 (from the 2011-2012 Holiday Fund.)

MORE INFORMATION Call (650) 463-4920, (650) 326-8210, email MoonlightRun@paweekly.com or go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com. For safety reasons, no dogs allowed on course for the 5K and 10K runs. They are welcome on the 5K walk only. No retractable leashes. Bring your own clean-up bag. Jogging strollers welcome in the 5K walk or at the back of either run.

Friday

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Community Sponsors

Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

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(continued on page 11)

(continued on page 10)

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Upfront

COMMUNITY MEETING

Thursday, August 2, 2012, 6:30-8 PM Lucie Stern Center Ball Room 1305 MiddleďŹ eld Road, Palo Alto, CA 94301 The City of Palo Alto seeks the community’s input on the proposed concept plans. Email pwecips@cityofpaloalto.org for more information.

Meeting hosted by City of Palo Alto Public Works, (650) 617-3183

Music@Menlo t e n t h

a n n i v e r s a r y

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450 CAMBRIDGE AVE, PALO ALTO, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson EDITORIAL Jocelyn Dong, Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Tom Gibboney, Spectrum Editor Sue Dremann, Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Eric Van Susteren, Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Dale F. Bentson, Colin Becht, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Contributors Helen Carefoot, Junesung Lee, Maytal Mark, Bryce Druzin, Lauren-Marie Sliter, Dean McArdle Editorial Interns DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Lili Cao, Designer PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Samantha Mejia, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Adam Carter, Elaine Clark, Janice Hoogner, Brent Triantos, Display Advertising Sales Neal Fine, Carolyn Oliver, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Asst. Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. Wendy Suzuki, Advertising Sales Intern EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Hatch, Multimedia Product Manager

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BUSINESS Susie Ochoa, Payroll & Benefits Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Claire McGibeny, Cathy Stringari, Business Associates ADMINISTRATION Janice Covolo, Doris Taylor, Receptionists Ruben Espinoza, Courier

Don’t Miss the Tenth-Anniversary Season ?jan'%¡6j\jhi&&!'%&'$6i]Zgidc™BZcadEVg`™EVad6aid

Now celebrating its tenth season, Music@Menlo—the Bay Area’s premier chamber music festival—offers an incomparable musical experience including world-class concerts and numerous free opportunities to explore classical music. The 2012 festival, Resonance, examines music’s impact on humanity—its ability to nurture mind and spirit, to transport listeners to new places, and, ultimately, to delight us all. ™ :mXZei^dcVa8dcXZgih  WnLdgaY"GZcdlcZY  8]VbWZgBjh^X^Vch ™ :c\V\^c\Hnbedh^V  VcYAZXijgZh

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EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistant Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright Š2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or email circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: _______________________________

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City/Zip: _______________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610. Palo Alto CA 94302

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

Review the proposed concept designs for the Rinconada Park Long Range Plan.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking the golfer to pay for athletic fields.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Craig Allen, president of the Palo Alto Golf Club, registering objections to how the plan to renovate the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golf course would be financed. See story on page 3.

Around Town BEATING THE DEADLINE... Three new playing fields. A redesigned Baylands golf course with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wowâ&#x20AC;? factor. New plazas and wider sidewalks on a soon-to-be two-lane California Avenue. A revised massage ordinance. A refreshed Cogswell Plaza. New contracts for workers represented by the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest labor union and by its police-managers union. These are just some of the bigticket items the Palo Alto City Council green-lighted Monday in its final meeting before a month-long break. There was one item, however, that the council didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to during the sevenand-a-half-hour meeting: high-speed rail. Lawmakers were scheduled to consider endorsing a citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; initiative to cut off future funding for the locally unpopular $68 billion project. Shortly before midnight, the council agreed to address the issue at its first meeting after the break. Even this proved to be a blessing in disguise. The two Republicans leading the initiative announced Wednesday that they are suspending their campaign for the revote. Former U.S. Rep. George Radanovich and current state Sen. Doug LaMalfa issued a statement on the campaign website that the initiative is suspended â&#x20AC;&#x153;while litigation brought against high-speed rail in Central Valley moves through the court system.â&#x20AC;? They vowed, however, that the effort is not dead, just delayed for a while. Radanovich called the decision to suspend the campaign â&#x20AC;&#x153;a postponement of what I see as a future initiative allowing voters the opportunity to tell politicians in Sacramento that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want a California high-speed rail system plagued with budget overruns and repeated failure to meet every deadline.â&#x20AC;? MIT OF THE WEST? ... Is Stanford getting a reputation as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;MIT of the West?â&#x20AC;? Stanford philosopher Debra Satz, a popular teacher and senior associate dean for the humanities and arts, worries that this reputation could deter talented students in the humanities. One strategy to broaden the image is to invite talented, humanities-oriented high school students to attend a summer program at Stanford â&#x20AC;&#x201D; possibly leading them later to apply for undergraduate study in something besides engineering. This year Satz launched the Summer Humanities Institute, in which 50 high school students from across the country immersed themselves in the American and French revolutions. The cost of the three-week institute, which ended July 13, was $5,150, but fund-

ing from the School of Humanities and Sciences and the provostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office enabled the program to offer â&#x20AC;&#x153;need-blind admission,â&#x20AC;? Stanford said. WHAT MAKES ME TICK ... Hey, high school seniors out there, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collegeessay time! Twenty-seven Gunn and Palo Alto high school students assembled this past week to get a jump on the task of trying to explain themselves, in writing, to admissions officers. The goal by weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end was to have working drafts of the Common Application essay as well as â&#x20AC;&#x153;clear direction for how to work on UC and supplemental essays,â&#x20AC;? said Paly English teacher Shirley Tokheim, who led the group. The class was part of a stated effort by the school district to boost support for seniors writing their college essays. In the past, that work has been done in some English classes, at the discretion of the teacher. This fall, at least at Paly, an after-school essay-writing workshop will be offered and essay-writing help also will be available on College Awareness Day, scheduled for Oct 17, Tokheim said. PLANNING AHEAD ... Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Planning and Transportation Commission will exchange institutional knowledge for fresh eyes next month, when Vice Chair Susan Fineberg concludes her tenure on the famously thorough and painstakingly detail-oriented board. Fineberg is best known for her encyclopedic knowledge of the Comprehensive Plan and a general skepticism toward major new developments that could impact existing neighborhoods. On Monday, the City Council voted 6-3 to appoint Michael Alcheck, a real-estate attorney who works as general counsel for the Loyola Management Company, as its newest commissioner. According to his application, Alcheck is involved in the San Francisco chapter of Urban Land Institute and sits on the San Francisco board of directors of the Jewish Community Relations Council. At a prior meeting, both Fineberg and Alcheck received four council votes. This week, with all nine council members present, Alcheck received six votes (Karen Holman, Greg Schmid and Yiaway Yeh voted for Fineberg). His isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only new face that will soon be making its commission debut. Earlier in the month, the council named Alex Panelli to replace architect Dan Garber, who recently stepped down to work on the proposed office-and-theater development near the downtown Caltrain station. N

Upfront ,!.$53%

Commission: Proposal to move MacArthur Park is premature 0ARKSBOARDBACKSOFFFROMVOTEONPLANTOMOVEHISTORICBUILDINGTOGOLFCOURSE PROPOSALTOMOVETHEBUILDING HOUSING-AC!RTHUR0ARK2ES TAURANTTOTHE0ALO!LTO-U NICIPAL'OLF#OURSEWASTABLEDBY THE0ALO!LTO0ARKSAND2ECREATION #OMMISSION4UESDAY *ULY AFTER MEMBERSSAIDTHEYNEEDMORETIME TOCONSIDERTHEOPTIONS !THREE MEMBERADHOCSUBCOM MITTEEOFTHECOMMISSIONHADPRO POSEDMOVINGTHE YEAR OLD *ULIA -ORGAN DESIGNEDBUILDING LOCATED NEARTHE5NIVERSITY!VENUE#ALTRAIN STATION TOMAKEWAYFORAMULTI STO RYOFFICEBUILDINGANDPERFORMING ARTS CENTER 4HE NEW CENTER ALONG WITH UNDERGROUND PARKING HAS

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REAL ESTATE TRENDS

Upfront

Buyer Protections In â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;As Isâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Real Estate Contract

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by Samia Cullen

In todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s active real estate market, whether you are a home buyer or seller, you will probably encounter the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;asisâ&#x20AC;? sale. An â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? home sale has been deďŹ ned overtime in lawsuits to mean that the buyer is taking the property in â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? disclosed condition. This includes all disclosures and inspections identiďŹ ed in the package received by the buyer under the contract. In California sellers have the obligation to disclose all known â&#x20AC;&#x153;materialâ&#x20AC;? defects to the property that would have some inďŹ&#x201A;uence on the decision-making process of a reasonable buyer. It is possible that a seller will have no knowledge about certain defects, or even that the professional inspector hired by the seller will fail to discover a serious defect. If you purchase the home and these defects show up later, you may not be able to take any legal action against the seller unless you can prove that the seller knew about the defects during the transaction.

The best way for a buyer to protect against a seller who does not disclose a serious defect or an inspector missing a serious defect is to have a home inspection contingency included in the purchase offer. Hire your own trusted professional inspectors and if serious defects are discovered during the inspections, follow up with specialty inspections and repair bids. If serious defects are discovered, a buyer with a home inspection contingency may ask the seller to repair the newly discovered defects, or alternatively may attempt to negotiate a price reduction with the seller. The seller of course is not obligated to make the repairs or reduce the sale price, but if the seller refuses, the buyer can back out of the transaction and request their deposit back before the contingency expires. While buying a home in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;as-isâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; condition may help you win the home you like, you may not want to buy a home with serious defects at a high price.

If you have a real estate question or would like a free market analysis for your home, please call me at 650-384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors, or email me at scullen@apr.com. For the latest news, follow my blog at www.samiacullen.com.

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Birch Street Rendering courtesy of City of Palo Alto

California Avenue changes OK’d, no test of two-lane plan

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GROUPHADTOBEIMPOSEDUNILATER ALLYBYTHECITY-ONDAY 4HE 3%)5 CONTRACT IS THE LATEST STEPINTHECITYSFOUR YEAREFFORTTO CONTROLRAPIDLYRISINGPENSIONAND HEALTHCARECOSTSTHATARECONSUM INGAGREATERPARTOFTHECITYBUD GET0ENSIONEXPENSESHAVETRIPLED IN THE PAST DECADE AND MEDICAL EXPENDITURESHAVEMORETHANDOU BLED ACCORDING TO THE CITY 4HE DRIVETOCURBTHESECOSTSHASBEEN CONTENTIOUSINTHEPAST PARTICULARLY INWHENTHECITYUNILATERALLY

IMPOSED ON THE 3%)5 A CONTRACT THATESTABLISHEDASECONDPENSION TIERFORNEWEMPLOYEES ONEBASED ONALESSGENEROUSFORMULA 4HE NEW CONTRACT WHICH THE COUNCIL VOTED   TO ADOPT 6ICE -AYOR 'REG 3CHARFF WAS ABSENT INCLUDES FURTHER REFORMS INCLUD ING A REQUIREMENT THAT WORKERS PAYTHEENTIREhEMPLOYEESHAREvOF THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE #ALIFOR NIA0UBLIC%MPLOYEES2ETIREMENT 3YSTEM4HEhEMPLOYEEvCONTRIBU TION WHICHRANGESBETWEENPER

OF THE LATTER STREETS HAVE TWO LANES WHILE#ALIFORNIA!VENUEHASFOUR 3OME AREA RESIDENTS SUPPORTED THIS DATA WITH PERSONAL OBSERVA TIONS AND URGED THE COUNCIL TO GET THEPROJECTGOING h#ALIFORNIA !VENUE IS SUPPOSED TO BE A PEDESTRIAN CENTERED PLACE WHERE PEOPLE CAN COME AND ENJOY THEBUSINESSESANDTOREALLYGETOUT OFTHECAR vSAID#HRISTOPHER"USH ANAREARESIDENT (ECOMPAREDTHEMERCHANTSOP POSITIONTOAGAMEOF7HAC A -OLE ˆASSOONASONEEFFORTATOPPOSI TIONFAILS THEYFINDANOTHER -ICHAEL%AGER WHOLIVESSEVERAL BLOCKSFROM#ALIFORNIA!VENUE ALSO DISPUTED THE ASSERTION FROM MER CHANTS THAT THE STREET IS CONGESTED 4HE PROJECT HE ARGUED HAS BEEN DELAYEDENOUGH4HESTREET HESAID IS NOT ATTRACTIVE AND THE PLAZA CUR RENTLYINPLACEIShDOWNRIGHTUGLYv ! TRIAL WOULD MAKE THE AREA EVEN MOREUGLY HESAID #OUNCILMAN ,ARRY +LEIN AGREED THATATRIALISUNNECESSARYANDSAID HESNOTWILLINGTOPAYFORONEJUST FORhPOLITICALEXPEDIENCYv h)DONTTHINKTHATSHOWOURCITI ZENSWANTUSTOSPENDTHEMONEY v +LEINSAID /THERCOUNCILMEMBERSSAIDTHEY WERE CONCERNED ABOUT THE OUTPOUR INGOFCRITICISMFROMAREAMERCHANTS #OUNCILMAN 3ID %SPINOSA SAID THE OPPOSITION FROM A LARGE SEGMENT OF THECOMMUNITYHASGIVENHIMPAUSE THOUGHHEDISPUTEDTHEASSERTIONFROM CRITICSTHATTHECITYHASNTLISTENEDTO CENT AND  PERCENT OF THE SALARY WAS FORMERLY PICKED UP ENTIRELY BY THE CITY )N EXCHANGE FOR THE INCREASED CONTRIBUTIONS THE CITY GRANTED 3%)5 EMPLOYEES A COST OF LIVINGINCREASEOFPERCENT !LSO PENSIONS WILL ALSO NOW BE CALCULATED BASED ON THE WORKERS THREEHIGHESTYEARSOFSALARYRATHER THANONTHESINGLEHIGHESTYEAR AS HASBEENTHEPRACTICE 4HE CONTRACT ALSO REQUIRES THE 3%)5 EMPLOYEES TO CONTRIBUTE  PERCENT TOWARD HEALTH CARE COSTS WITH THE CITY PAYING THE REMAIN INGPERCENT)NTHEPAST THECITY ABSORBED THE ENTIRE COST )T ALSO ELIMINATESONEOFTHE3%)5MEM BERSTHREEFLOATINGHOLIDAYS 4HE CONTRACT WAS REACHED AFTER  MEETINGS BETWEEN -ARCH AND *ULY -AYOR 9IAWAY 9EH PRAISED THE NEGOTIATION PROCESS SAYING IT hHIGHLIGHTEDTHEABILITYOFNEGOTIA

THEIR CONCERNS 3TAFF HE SAID HAS TRIED HARD TO RESPOND TO CONCERNS FROMTHEBUSINESSCOMMUNITY h)REALLYTAKEISSUEWITHTHISCON STANT CHIME OF PEOPLE SAYING THEY HAVENTBEENHEARD v%SPINOSASAID "URT WHOHADSERVEDONTHEPLAN NINGCOMMISSIONBEFOREJOININGTHE COUNCIL ATTRIBUTEDTHEHIGHLEVELOF OPPOSITIONTOhMISINFORMATIONvPUT OUTBYMERCHANTS h)REALLYDONTTHINK)VEEVEREN COUNTERED A PROJECT WHERE THERES BEEN SO MUCH MISREPRESENTATION DISSEMINATEDˆWHEREPEOPLEHEAR THINGSTHATARECLAIMSANDTHEYTEND TO THINK THERE IS SOME TRUTH TO IT v "URTSAID 4HE ELEMENTS OF THE PROJECT THAT THECOUNCILAPPROVED-ONDAYADD ED ABOUT   TO THE PROJECTS COST RAISING THE PRICE TAG TO MORE THANMILLION4HECITYEXPECTS TO GET A  MILLION GRANT FOR THE PROJECT FROM THE -ETROPOLITAN 4RANSPORTATION #OMMISSION AND SPEND   OF ITS OWN MONEY FOR THE PROJECT 4HE BALANCE OF THE FUNDS WOULD COME FROM A VEHICLE REGISTRATION FEES PROGRAM ADMIN ISTRATED BY THE 3ANTA #LARA 6ALLEY 4RANSPORTATION !UTHORITY 7ITHOUT THECOUNCILSCOMMITMENTTOREDUCE THE NUMBER OF LANES FROM FOUR TO TWO THECITYWOULDHAVELOSTTHEOP PORTUNITYTOAPPLYFORGRANTFUNDING FORTHE STREETSCAPEPROJECT ACCORD INGTOSTAFFN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM TIONS TO UNFOLD ON A CONSTRUCTIVE TIMEFRAMEv h)TSHOWSTHATTHEREWASALOTOF REALLY GOOD FAITH DISCUSSIONS THAT OCCURRED v9EHSAID 4HE 3%)5S ACCEPTANCE OF THE CITYSPROPOSEDPENSIONANDHEALTH CAREREFORMSFOLLOWSSIMILARCON CESSIONSMADEBY0ALO!LTOSFIRE ANDPOLICEUNIONS 4HECITYHADLESSLUCKWITHTHE CITYS 0OLICE -ANAGERS !SSOCIA TION WHICHISMADEUPOFTWOPO LICECAPTAINSANDFIVELIEUTENANTS 4HE GROUP AGREED TO MOST OF THE CITYSPROPOSALS INCLUDINGITSIM PLEMENTATIONOFASECONDPENSION TIER FOR NEW EMPLOYEES %MPLOY EES IN THIS TIER WOULD FALL UNDER THE h PERCENT AT v FORMULA  PERCENT OF SALARY FOR EVERY YEAR SERVED WITHRETIREMENTATAGE ANDTHEPENSIONAMOUNTWOULDBE (continued on page 9)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊՏÞÊÓÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 7

Upfront (continued from page 3)

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BUT WOULD CREATE ONLY MINIMAL ENHANCEMENTS TO THE COURSE "UT MEMBERSAGREEDEVENTHEMIL LIONPRICETAGISABARGAINCONSIDER INGWHATTHECITYWOULDBEGETTING FORITSMONEYˆNAMELY IMPROVED FLOODPROTECTION AGOLFCOURSEWITH AhWOWvFACTORANDTHREENEWFULL SIZEDATHLETICFIELDS #OUNCILMAN0AT"URT CHANNELING THE CONSENSUS OPINION CALLED IT A hWIN WIN WIN WIN WINvSITUATIONˆ ACHANCEFORTHECITYTOIMPROVETHE GOLFCOURSE BOOSTFLOODPROTECTION PURSUE THE MOST FINANCIALLY LUCRA TIVEDESIGN OPENTHREENEWPLAYING FIELDSANDBETTERINTEGRATETHECOURSE WITHITSSURROUNDINGS h)TS GOING TO BE TURNED INTO AN EXCITING COURSE THAT HAS A NATURAL HABITATANDWILLBECOMEINTEGRATED WITHTHE"AYLANDSANDBEPARTOFTHE "AYLANDSRATHERTHANAPARTFROMTHE "AYLANDSASITISTODAY v"URTSAID 4HEOPTIONENTAILSREMOVING ACRESFROMTHE ACRECOURSEAND PUTTING ON THIS LAND THREE ATHLETIC FIELDS A SMALL PLAYGROUND A WET

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com What do you think of the City Council’s decision to have golfers fund the changes to the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course, including the addition of sports fields? Share your opinion on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

LANDSPARKANDPICNICSPACE 4HE COUNCILS DECISION TO PUR SUE/PTION'WASSUPPORTEDBYAN ANALYSIS FROM THE CONSULTING FIRM .'& #ONSULTING WHICH PROJECTED THIS OPTION WOULD HAVE THE HIGH ESTRETURNONINVESTMENTOVERTIME 5NDERTHEFIRMSESTIMATE THEGOLF COURSE WOULD RUN AT A DEFICIT OF   IN  AND   IN THEYEARSOFCONSTRUCTION !FTER THAT THE COURSES BOTTOM LINE WOULD GRADUALLY RISE REACH ING   IN  5NDER THE MOST PESSIMISTIC SCENARIO ONE IN WHICHTHEGOLFERFEESANDTHENUM BER OF ROUNDS PLAYED BOTH DROP THE COURSE WOULDNT START MAKING MONEYUNTIL .OTEVERYONE HOWEVER BOUGHTTHE ECONOMICARGUMENT4HECITYS'OLF !DVISORY #OMMITTEE QUESTIONED .'&SANALYSISANDURGEDTHECOUN CILTOAPPROVETHEMORECONSERVATIVE /PTION$'OLFERSWEREPARTICULARLY PUTOFFBYTHECOSTSTHATTHEYWOULD HAVETOSHOULDERTHROUGHTHEIRPLAY INGFEES#RAIG!LLEN PRESIDENTOFTHE 0ALO!LTO'OLF#LUB SAIDHEWOULD HAPPILYPLAYONTHEREDESIGNEDGOLF COURSEBUTURGEDTHECOUNCILNOTTO FORCETHEGOLFERSTOFOOTTHEBILLFOR THEENTIREPROJECT h9OURE ASKING THE GOLFER TO PAY FOR ATHLETIC FIELDS v !LLEN SAID h) THINKITSINAPPROPRIATEv "UT OTHERS PRAISED THE MOST AM BITIOUS OPTION AS BY FAR THE MOST BENEFICIAL 4HE CITYS 0ARKS AND 2ECREATION #OMMISSION HAD VOTED TO SUPPORT /PTION ' 3O DID THE COUNCILS&INANCE#OMMITTEE

Courtesy of City of Palo Alto

Golf

4HE0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCIL APPROVEDPLANTOREDESIGNTHE0ALO!LTO -UNICIPAL'OLF#OURSE KNOWNASh/PTION' vCALLSFORMOVINGATLEAST OFTHECOURSESHOLES ADDINGTHREESPORTSFIELDSANDCREATINGANEW LEVEETOBOLSTERFLOODPROTECTIONAROUNDTHE3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEK 3OME MEMBERS SHARED THE GOLF ERS CONCERNS ABOUT THE PROJECTS COST PARTICULARLYIFTHECONSULTANTS PROJECTIONS ABOUT THE GOLF COURSES FUTUREREVENUESDONTPANOUT#OUN CILWOMAN+AREN(OLMANSAIDSHED BEMORECOMFORTABLEWITHANOPTION THATDOESNTREQUIRETHECITYTOTAKE ONLONG TERMDEBT -AYOR 9IAWAY 9EH SAID HES EX CITEDTOADDRECREATIONALOPPORTUNI TIESTOTHE"AYLANDSBUTENCOURAGED HISCOLLEAGUESTOSTARTCONSIDERING ASSOONASPOSSIBLE WAYSTOPAYFOR THE ADDITIONAL IMPROVEMENTS %VEN

WITHTHEFINANCIALUNCERTAINTY 9EH PRAISED CITYS DECISION TO INVEST IN THEGOLFCOURSE #OUNCILMAN ,ARRY +LEIN SAID THE BIGGER RISK WOULD BE NOT TO PURSUE/PTION' h7EHAVEANOPPORTUNITYHERETO INEFFECT CREATEACRESOFLANDFOR MILLIONORSO v+LEINSAID +LEINESTIMATEDTHATITWOULDCOST SOMEWHEREBETWEENMILLIONAND MILLIONTOBUYANACREOFLAND FOR ATHLETIC FIELDS ELSEWHERE IN THE CITY(ECALLEDTHEMILLIONEXPEN DITURESAhGOODDEALvN

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J o i n U s ! M e m b e r s h i p i s o p e n t o i n d i v i d u a l s w h o l i v e , w o r k o r a t t e n d s c h o o l i n S a n t a C l a r a C o u n t y. Page 8ÊUÊՏÞÊÓÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News” in the left, green column.

Careening car narrowly misses infant in bassinet !NOUT OF CONTROLCARCRASHEDINTOTWOHOMESIN%AST0ALO!LTOEARLY 4HURSDAYMORNING *ULY INCLUDINGONEWHEREANINFANTWASSLEEP INGINABASSINET %AST0ALO!LTOPOLICESAID(Posted July 26 at 9:24 a.m.)

Palo Alto 11-year-old competes on ‘Jeopardy!’ !N YEAR OLDFROM0ALO!LTOISAMONGhWHIZKIDSvTOBEFEA TUREDNEXTWEEK *ULYTHROUGH!UG ONTHETELEVISIONSHOWh*EOP ARDY+IDS7EEKv(Posted July 26 at 9:02 a.m.)

Altercation in Palo Alto sparks attack on two

Union

(continued from page 7)

BASEDONTHEAVERAGEOFTHREEHIGH ESTYEARS#URRENTEMPLOYEESWOULD KEEPTHEEXISTINGhPERCENTATv FORMULA ANDTHEIRPENSIONSWOULD CONTINUETOBEBASEDONTHESINGLE HIGHESTYEAR0OLICEMANAGERSALSO AGREED TO HAVE ACTIVE EMPLOYEES CONTRIBUTEPERCENTTOWARDHEALTH CARECOSTS "UTTHESIDESHITANIMPASSEWHEN ITCAMETOHEALTHCARECONTRIBUTIONS FORRETIREES-UCHLIKETHE0ALO!LTO 0OLICE/FFICERS!SSOCIATION WHICH REPRESENTS MOST OF THE OFFICERS IN THE DEPARTMENT THE MANAGERS RE

JECTEDTHECITYSATTEMPTTOHAVERE TIREESPAYPERCENTOFTHEIRMEDI CAL COSTS 5NLIKE THE LARGER POLICE UNION THEMANAGERSGROUPDIDNOT REQUESTTHATTHECITYPROCEEDWITHA FACT FINDINGPROCEDURETORESOLVETHE ISSUEINDISPUTE 7ITH THE MANAGERS UNION NOT MOVING ON THE ISSUE OF RETIREES HEALTH CARE CONTRIBUTIONS THE #ITY #OUNCILON-ONDAYVOTED  WITH 3CHARFF ABSENT TO IMPOSE THESE CONDITIONS UNILATERALLY /FFICIALS NOTED IN THE REPORT THAT THE POLICE MANAGERSGROUPISSUEDSEVERALPRO POSALS BUT THAT NONE OF THESE PRO POSALS REQUIRED RETIREES TO PAY FOR HEALTHCARE h4HECITYREJECTEDTHOSEPROPOS

ALSONTHEBASISTHATTHECITYSEEKSA CONSISTENTANDEQUITABLEAPPROACH TOSTRUCTURALCHANGEINTHERETIREE MEDICALBENEFITANDEXEMPTINGONE UNITOFHIGHLYPAIDMANAGERSFROM MODEST COST SHARE DOES NOT MEET THE #ITYS PHILOSOPHICAL OR ECO NOMIC GOALS v (UMAN 2ESOURCES $IRECTOR+ATHRYN3HENSTATEDINA REPORT 4HOUGH#OUNCILMAN'REG3CHMID CALLEDIThUNFORTUNATEvTHATTHECITY WASNTABLETOAGREEONEVERYISSUE WITHTHEPOLICEMANAGERSGROUP HE AGREED THAT THE CITY SHOULD GO FOR WARDWITHIMPOSINGTHECONDITIONS 4HECITYANDTHEUNIONHAVEALREADY METTIMESBUTCOULDNOTREACHAN AGREEMENTN

!-ENLO0ARKMANISFACINGMULTIPLEFELONYCHARGESAFTERHEALLEG EDLYASSAULTEDAWOMANANDANOTHERMANOUTSIDEA0ALO!LTOHOMEAND ATTEMPTEDTORUNTHEMANDOWNWITHHISTRUCK 0ALO!LTOPOLICESAID

Rotary Club of Menlo Park

(Posted July 25 at 12:26 p.m.)

Rent notices stir fears in East Palo Alto %AST0ALO!LTOSLARGESTLANDLORDHASISSUEDHUNDREDSOFTHREE DAY NOTICESTOPAYRENTTOITSTENANTSINTHE7OODLAND0ARKNEIGHBORHOOD IN RECENT MONTHS SPARKING CONCERN AMONG CITY OFFICIALS ABOUT THE PROSPECTOFRESIDENTSGETTINGEVICTED(Posted July 25 at 9:51 a.m.)

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Menlo Park man drowns in Minnesota ! YEAR OLD-ENLO0ARKMANWASSWIMMINGINA-INNESOTALAKE ON3ATURDAYAFTERNOON *ULY WHENHEWENTUNDER ACCORDINGTOTHE 7RIGHT#OUNTYSHERIFF(Posted July 24 at 4:24 p.m.)

Staff cuts, fee hikes for animal shelter 0ALO!LTOSANIMALSHELTERMAYHAVEBEENSAVEDFROMTHECHOPPING BLOCKLASTMONTH BUTTHECITYSCASH STRAPPEDANIMAL SERVICESOPERA TIONWILLSOONSEESIGNIFICANTCHANGES INCLUDINGHIGHERFEESANDFEWER STAFFMEMBERS UNDERAPROPOSALTHE#ITY#OUNCILAPPROVED-ONDAY NIGHT *ULY(Posted July 24 at 11:53 a.m.)

To

3TANFORD5NIVERSITY,AW3CHOOLANNOUNCEDTHEHIRINGOF-ARY%LIZ ABETH-AGILLASITSNEWDEAN4UESDAY *ULY-AGILLSWITCHESCOASTS WITH HER NEW POSITION LEAVINGTHE5NIVERSITYOF6IRGINIA3CHOOLOF ,AW WHERESHESERVEDASTHEVICEDEAN(Posted July 24 at 11:46 a.m.) ,ONGTIME"AY!REAFIXTURE0EETS#OFFEE4EA)NCWILLBESOLD TOA'ERMANCOMPANYFORBILLION THE%MERYVILLE BASEDCOMPANY ANNOUNCEDINASTATEMENT-ONDAY0EETSHASSEVERALLOCATIONSIN0ALO !LTO(Posted July 24 at 11:18 a.m.)

VIDEO: EcoCenter opens at Palo Alto Baylands /N3UNDAY *ULY THE YEAR OLDNONPROFIT%NVIRONMENTAL6OLUN TEERSOPENEDITSNEWHEADQUARTERSˆTHE%CO#ENTERˆINTHEFORMER3EA 3COUTBUILDINGFOLLOWINGANEIGHT YEAR MILLIONEFFORTTORESTOREIT 6IDEOBY3IERRA$UREN0ALO!LTO/NLINE(Posted July 24 at 9:23 a.m.)

Menlo Park squirrel infected with West Nile virus !GRAYSQUIRRELTRAPPEDBYTHECOUNTYIN-ENLO0ARKHASTESTEDPOSI TIVEFORTHE7EST.ILEVIRUS 3AN-ATEO#OUNTYOFFICIALSSAID-ONDAY *ULY(Posted July 23 at 3:16 p.m.)

PG&E pipeline replacement disrupts traffic $ISRUPTIONSTO0ALO!LTOTRAFFICCONTINUEAS0'%WORKERSINSPECT GASLINESRUNNINGBENEATHTHECITY#HARLESTON2OAD -IRANDA!VENUE ANDTHEINTERSECTIONOF%MBARCADERO2OADAND%AST"AYSHORE2OADARE AMONGTHEAFFECTEDAREAS(Posted July 23 at 9:48 a.m.)

M

6 5 , 4 6 , 35 mile routes

S a t u rd a y, Au g u s t 1 8 Register online at www.tourdemenlo.com Ride day registraion: 8 a.m. - 10 a.m. at Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefirld Rd, Atherton s&ULLYSUPPORTEDWATERRESTSTOPS

Facelift planned for popular Eleanor Pardee Park

s""1LUNCHCATEREDBY,UTTICKENS$ELI

)TS BEEN THE SITE OF CONTROVERSY DUE TO LIMB DROPPING EUCALYPTUS TREESANDAPUBLICRESTROOMTHATSOMERESIDENTSFEAREDWOULDATTRACT VAGRANTS BUTWITHTHOSEISSUESNOWINTHEPAST %LEANOR0ARDEE0ARK IN0ALO!LTOISBEINGPREPAREDFORAGENTEELMAKEOVER (Posted July 22

s&REE4 SHIRTFOREVERYRIDERWHO REGISTERSONLINE

at 10:02 a.m.)

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Stanford University Law School names new dean

Peet’s Coffee & Tea selling for $1 billion

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presents

s'REATVIEWSOF0ICCHETTI/PEN3PACE 0RESERVEAND7INERY

sAMORAMSTARTTIMEAT -ENLO !THERTON(IGH3CHOOL s!LLPROCEEDSGOTO2OTARY4UTORING SCHOLARSHIPSANDNONPROlTS SUCH AS"OYSAND'IRLS#LUBAND3ECOND (ARVEST&OOD"ANK s/PPORTUNITYTOLEARNABOUTTHE2OTARY

Elected officials ponder Cubberley options &IVEOF0ALO!LTOSELECTEDOFFICIALSˆTHREEFROMTHE#ITY#OUNCIL ANDTWOFROMTHESCHOOLBOARDˆDISCUSSEDTHEFUTUREOF#UBBERLEY #OMMUNITY#ENTER4HURSDAY *ULY ILLUMINATINGSOMEOFTHEVEXING ISSUES(Posted July 20 at 5:07 p.m.)

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ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊՏÞÊÓÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 9

Upfront

Zumot

(continued from page 3)

THE COMMON LAW 'ARDNER WROTE THISEXEMPTIONhAPPLIEDONLYTOTHE UNAVAILABLEWITNESSWHOHADMADE STATEMENTS OR GIVEN A TESTIMONY AT APRIORPROCEEDINGv'ARDNERWROTE THAT 3CHIPSI HAD NOT TESTIFIED OR MADE STATEMENTS AGAINST :UMOT AT ANYPRIORPROCEEDING h!DMISSION OF THE UNCONFRONTED HEARSAYWAS THEREFORE NOTJUSTIFIED BY THE FORFEITURE BY WRONGDOING EXCEPTION v 'ARDNER WROTE IN THE APPEAL h"ECAUSE -R :UMOT HAD NOOPPORTUNITYTOCONFRONTTHISEVI DENCE ADMISSION OF THE EVIDENCE VIOLATED HIS CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT TO CONFRONTATIONv 4HESTATEMENTSINCLUDECOMMENTS 3CHIPSIMADETO0ALO!LTOPOLICEOF FICERSIN!UGUST SHORTLYAFTER SHEAND:UMOTHADAFIGHT3HETOLD THE OFFICERS ABOUT :UMOTS hSHADY THOUGHT PROCESSv AND hINFATUATION WITHMURDERvANDASKEDFORANEMER GENCYRESTRAININGORDER WHICHWAS GRANTED 3HE ALSO TOLD POLICE THAT :UMOT HAD PLANNED TO BURN DOWN HIS5NIVERSITY!VENUEHOOKAHSHOP $A(OOKAH3POT ANDCOLLECTTHEIN SURANCEMONEY 'ARDNERALSOARGUEDTHATTESTIMO NYABOUT:UMOTSHISTORYOFDOMES TIC VIOLENCE SHOULD NOT HAVE BEEN USED TO DETERMINE WHETHER HE HAD KILLED3CHIPSI4HEPROSECUTIONSEX TENSIVEDISCUSSIONOF:UMOTSPRIOR INCIDENTSOFDOMESTICVIOLENCE COU PLED WITH WHAT 'ARDNER CALLED THE JUDGEShCONFLICTINGINSTRUCTIONSvTO THEJURYABOUTHOWTHISEVIDENCECAN BE USED VIOLATED DUE PROCESS THE APPEALSTATES'ARDNERWROTETHATIT IS hUNIVERSALLY RECOGNIZED THAT ER RONEOUSADMISSIONOFUNCHARGEDOF FENSESISHIGHLYPREJUDICIALv h4HIS IS ESPECIALLY TRUE HERE v THEAPPEALSTATESh4HESTATESCASE RESTED ALMOST ENTIRELY ON THE PRIOR INCIDENTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN CONJUNCTIONWITHEVIDENCETHAT-R :UMOT AND -S 3CHIPSI ARGUED ON THEDAYSHEWASKILLED4HEDEFENSE CASE RESTED ALMOST ENTIRELY ON -R :UMOTSTESTIMONYTHATHEWASCOM PLETELYINNOCENTANDHADNOTHINGTO DOWITH-S3CHIPSISMURDER%VI DENCETHAT-R:UMOTHADPRIORIN CIDENTSOFDOMESTICVIOLENCEINVOLV INGHISGIRLFRIEND -S3CHIPSI FROM WHICH THE JURY COULD INFER HE WAS GUILTYOFMURDERWASDEVASTATINGTO HISCASEv 'ARDNERISALSOARGUINGTHAT#E NASINSTRUCTIONSTOTHEJURYHADhUN DERCUTTHEPRESUMPTIONOFINNOCENCE ANDTHERIGHTTOPROOFBEYONDAREA SONABLEDOUBTv4HECOURT 'ARDNER WROTE TOLDTHEJURYTHATTHEPROSE CUTIONHADTOPROVETHAT:UMOTWAS INVOLVEDINTHEPRIORINCIDENTSBYA hPREPONDERANCE OF EVIDENCEv STAN DARD Â&#x2C6; A LOWER BAR THAN THE hBE YONDTHEREASONABLEDOUBTvSTANDARD REQUIREDFORAMURDERCONVICTION 4HECOURTALSOINSTRUCTEDTHEJURY THATONCETHEPROSECUTIONHASPROVEN THE PRIOR INCIDENTS THE JURY COULD INFER FROM THESE INCIDENTS WHETHER THE DEFENDANT IS LIKELY TO COMMIT ANDhDIDCOMMITvMURDER4HEJURY 'ARDNERWROTE hWASEFFECTIVELYTOLD THAT THE FINDING OF CRIMINALDISPO SITION Â&#x2C6; FROM WHICH GUILT COLD BE INFERREDÂ&#x2C6;NEEDONLYTOBEPROVED BY A PREPONDERANCE OF EVIDENCEv

4HEINCIDENTS WHICHTHEJURYHEARD ABOUT DURING THE TRIAL INCLUDE EPI SODES IN WHICH :UMOT HAD SPAT AT 3CHIPSI HIT HER CAR THREATENED HER AND FLOODED HER WITH HUNDREDS OF TEXTMESSAGES h/FCOURSE THEULTIMATEDETERMI NATIONOFGUILTWASONEINWHICHTHE STATEHADTHEBURDENOFPROOFBEYOND AREASONABLEDOUBT v'ARDNERWROTE h"ECAUSETHE COMBINATION OF INSTRUC TIONSPERMIT TED THE JURY TO MAKE THIS DETER M INA TION BASED ON EVIDENCE WHICH THE STATE WAS ONLYREQUIRED TOPROVEBYA "ULOSh0AULv:UMOT PREPONDER ANCE OF THE EVIDENCE DUE PROCESS WASVIOLATEDv 4HE OPENING BRIEF FROM :UMOTS ATTORNEYWASFILEDINTHESTATES3IXTH !PPELLATE$ISTRICT WHICHREPRESENTS

3ANTA#LARA 3AN"ENITEZAND3ANTA #RUZ COUNTIES 4HE RESPONDENTS BRIEF IN THIS CASE HAS NOT YET BEEN FILED :UMOT  WAS REPRESENTED DUR ING THE TRIAL BY HIGH PROFILE ATTOR NEY-ARK'ERAGOS WHOSEPREVIOUS CLIENTS INCLUDED -ICHAEL *ACKSON AND 7INONA 2YDER :UMOT FIRED 'ERAGOSSHORTLYBEFORETHESENTENCE HEARINGLASTFALL 'ARDNER ALSO CRITICIZED THE TRIAL COURTFORFAILINGTOASSIGN:UMOTA PUBLIC DEFENDER AFTER LEARNING THAT 'ERAGOS WAS FIRED !TTORNEY 4INA 'LANDIAN PART OF 'ERAGOS LEGAL TEAM REPRESENTED:UMOTDURINGTHE SENTENCING 'ARDNER WROTE THAT THE COURTS REFUSAL TO EITHER APPOINT A PUBLIC DEFENDERORCONTINUETHESENTENCING TOANOTHERDAYSOTHAT:UMOTCOULD RETAIN NEW COUNSEL hDEPRIVED -R :UMOTOFHISRIGHTTOTHEEFFECTIVEAS SISTANCEOFCOUNSELATSENTENCINGv :UMOTISSERVINGHISSENTENCEAT THE#ALIPATRIA3TATE0RISONIN)MPE RIAL #OUNTY ACCORDING TO THE STATE $EPARTMENTOF#ORRECTIONSN

News Digest Cyclist robbed at gunpoint near Town & Country 0ALO!LTOPOLICESAIDTHEYAREINVESTIGATINGANARMEDROBBERYTHATTOOK PLACE4UESDAY *ULY AROUNDPMONTHEBICYCLEPATHBETWEEN 4OWN#OUNTRY6ILLAGEANDTHE#ALTRAINTRACKS !S THE VICTIM BICYCLED HOME FROM WORK HE WAS CONFRONTED BY A SUSPECT HOLDING A BLACK HANDGUN WHO DEMANDED THE CONTENTS OF HIS POCKETS POLICE SAID IN A STATEMENT ISSUED LATE 7EDNESDAY *ULY &EARINGFORHISSAFETY THEBICYCLISTCOMPLIED HANDING OVER A CELL PHONE AND A SMALL AMOUNT OFCASH !FTERTAKINGTHEITEMSTHESUSPECTFLEDONFOOT LEAVINGTHEBIKEPATHANDHEADINGON%NCINA7AY TOWARD%L#AMINO2EAL POLICESAID 0OLICE DESCRIBED THE SUSPECT AS AN !FRICAN !MERICANMALEhOFAVERAGEHEIGHT vINHISSWEARINGJEANSANDABLACK HOODEDSWEATSHIRT 4HEVICTIMWASNOTINJURED 0OLICESAIDTHEYAREACTIVELYINVESTIGATINGTHECRIME /FFICERSAREURGINGANYONEWITHINFORMATIONTOCALLA HOURDISPATCH CENTERAT  !NONYMOUSTIPSCANBEEMAILEDTOPALOALTO TIPNOWORGORSENTBYTEXTORVOICEMAILTO  N Â&#x2C6;#HRIS+ENRICK

No settlement in high-speed-rail lawsuit

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

Public Art Commission (July 19)

Website design: The commission voted to approve up to $2,000 for its website design. Yes: Collins, Ross, Tobak, Usich, Walsh Absent: Ambrose, Richter Budget: The commission voted to approve up to $1,000 for its enews service, and $500 for permitting, materials and artist costs for two temporary art installations. The funds will be matched by arts network Zero 1. The commission also voted to approve $4,250 for framing and repairs of the Skyhook Boca Raton art piece and $1,000 for permitting fees for its Talenthouse art project. Yes: Collins, Ross, Tobak, Usich, Walsh Absent: Ambrose, Richter

City Council (July 23)

Labor: The council approved a new contract with the 580 employees represented by the Service Employees International Union, Labor 521. The council also imposed a new contract on the seven-member Police Managers Association. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Holman, Klein, Price, Schmid, Shepherd, Yeh Absent: Scharff California Avenue: The council approved the latest design elements for the California Avenue streetscape plan, including wider sidewalks and a new plaza. The council also rejected a trial period for lane reduction on California Avenue. Yes: Unanimous Animals: The council approved a plan to raise fees and cut 2.6 full-time-equivalent positions in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animal-services division. Yes: Unanimous

Parks and Recreation Commission (July 24)

27 University Ave.: The commission deferred a vote on relocation of the historic Julia Morgan building to the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course and directed staff to get more information about the development proposed for the site at 27 University Ave. Action: None

Planning and Transportation Commission (July 25)

Arastradero: The commission voted to make permanent the recently modified lane configuration on Arastradero Road. Yes: Fineberg, Keller, Martinez, Michael, Tanaka Absent: Tuma

Council Rail Committee (July 26)

Funding: The committee directed staff to draft proposed modifications to Senate Bill 1029, the appropriation bill for high-speed rail. Yes: Burt, Klein, Scharff Absent: Shepherd

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week The City Council has no meetings scheduled this week. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD... The board is tentatively scheduled to discuss the Regional Bike Sharing Program proposed by the city and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. The program includes bike kiosks and docking stations downtown and on California Avenue. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 2, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

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Woman allegedly steals jewelry while man sleeps !MANWHOBEFRIENDEDAWOMANAT0ALO!LTOSNONPROFIT/PPORTUNITY #ENTERWASROBBEDOF TO WORTHOFJEWELRYASHESLEPT 0ALO!LTOPOLICESAID h)TWASBASICALLYABOYMEETSGIRLBOYINVITESGIRLINTOHISROOMBOY FALLSASLEEPANDGIRLTAKESJEWELRYvSTORY 3GT#ON-ALONEYSAID 4HERESIDENTTOLDPOLICEHEMETTHEWOMANON&RIDAY *ULY ATABOUT AMASHEWASRETURNINGTOTHECENTERAT%NCINA!VE4HE/P PORTUNITY#ENTERPROVIDESCOMPREHENSIVESERVICESTOHOMELESSANDAT RISK PERSONS INCLUDINGSOMERESIDENTIALHOUSING 4HEWOMANTOLDTHERESIDENTSHEWASTHERETOVISITFRIENDSBUTCOULD NOTGETINTOTHEBUILDING4HEMANLETHERINTOTHEBUILDING BUTWHENHER FRIENDSDIDNOTANSWERTHEIRDOOR THEMANBEFRIENDEDHER 4HEVICTIMALLOWEDTHEWOMANTOSTAYINHISROOMANDCOOKEDDINNERFOR HER(EFELLASLEEPATABOUTAM HETOLDPOLICE4HEMANAWOKEAROUND NOONTOFINDTHEWOMANWASGONEANDSOWASTHEJEWELRY WHICHINCLUDED GOLDCHAINS PENDANTS EARRINGSANDACOLLECTORSEDITION2OLEXWATCH 4HEWOMANISDESCRIBEDASA TO YEAR OLD!FRICAN!MERICANWITH STRAIGHTBLACKHAIR BROWNEYESANDASLENDERBUILD3HEISFEETINCHES TOFEETINCHESTALLANDBETWEENTOPOUNDS3HEWOREALONG SLEEVEDSHIRT BLUEJEANSANDCARRIEDASMALLWHITEHANDBAGN Â&#x2C6;3UE$REMANN

Palo Alto Weekly Photo Contest DEADLINE EXTENDED!

ENTRY DEADLINE IS TODAY For entr y form and rules: www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Upfront

Stripes

(continued from page 5)

(ESAIDHEWASTEMPTEDTOADDAN AMENDMENTTOTHECOMMISSIONVOTE TO REQUIRE A NEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFIC SURVEY WHICHWOULDEXTENDTHEROAD TEST FOR SEVERAL MONTHS (E ASKED 2ODRIGUEZ TO COMMIT TO A STUDY WITHOUTTHEFORMALAMENDMENT 2ODRIGUEZAGREED SAYINGITWOULD BEPARTOFANANALYSISCOMPLETEDFOR THE CITYS 0EDESTRIAN AND "ICYCLE -ASTER0LAN(EHASALREADYRECOM MENDEDTHATTHEBIKE BOULEVARDDE SIGNALONG-AYBELL!VENUEBEACCEL ERATEDBECAUSEITALREADYFUNCTIONS ASABICYCLEBOULEVARD HESAID #OMMISSIONER'REG4ANAKASAID -AYBELL !VENUE HAS THREE SPEED TABLES AND TWO STOP SIGNS TO SLOW TRAFFIC AND HE ASKED ABOUT WHAT OTHER MEASURES COULD BE ADDED TO SLOW TRAFFIC DOWN 2ODRIGUEZ SAID ACOMBINATIONOFSPEEDBUMPSAND STRIPINGMIGHTBEPARTOFADESIGN "UTITWASNTJUSTDIVERTEDTRAFFIC THAT SOME RESIDENTS SAID THEY DIS LIKEDABOUTTHE!RASTRADEROPLAN 2ESIDENT *OSEPH (IRSCHS MORN ING COMMUTE ALONG !RASTRADERO HASGONEFROMABOUTMINUTESTO AT LEAST  HE SAID (E ASKED THAT THE CHANGES NOT BE APPROVED UNTIL THERE ARE IMPROVEMENTS ALONG %L #AMINO2EAL WHICHCITYSTAFFHAVE POINTEDTOASCAUSINGBACKUPSALONG #HARLESTON !RASTRADERO 4HE #ALI FORNIA $EPARTMENT OF 4RANSPORTA TION #ALTRANS IS IN CHARGE OF %L #AMINO AND ANY DESIGN IMPROVE MENTSTOTHESTATEHIGHWAYAREUNDER #ALTRANSAUTHORITY HOWEVER "ARBARA&REEMAN A$ONALD$RIVE RESIDENT SINCE  SAID SHE DOES NOT FEEL SAFE CROSSING !RASTRADERO

NOW -OVING TRAFFIC THROUGH MORE CONSISTENTLY HAS NOT IMPROVED PE DESTRIANSAFETY SHESAID h4RAFFICUSEDTOGOLIKESCHOOLSOF FISH .OW ITS LIKE ONE UNRELENTING FREIGHTTRAIN vSHESAID 3OMERESIDENTSSAIDTHETRIALHAS ACCOMPLISHED ITS GOALS CHIEF OF WHICH IS TO IMPROVE SAFETY 4HEY POINTED TO THE REDUCED NUMBER OF ACCIDENTSTHESTUDYSHOWEDFORVE HICLES BICYCLISTSANDPEDESTRIANS h7EMUSTREMEMBERTHEPURPOSE OF THIS TRIAL PERIOD v SAID "ETTY ,UM A 3UZANNE $RIVE RESIDENT SINCE .INA "ELL TOLD THE COMMISSION SHE SUPPORTS THE CHANGES PARTICU LARLYTHEADDITIONOFSHAREDLEFT TURN LANES h7ITH THE CENTER TURN LANE ) NO LONGERHAVETOWAITINFEAROFSOME ONEREAR ENDINGMEWHENTHEYCOME UPFROMBEHIND vSHESAID %LIZABETH !LEXIS SAID THE STUDY SHOWED A  PERCENT REDUCTION IN FAST VEHICLE SPEEDS WHICH WERE ABOVEMPH h3LOWINGCARSSAVESLIVES)FYOU AREHITATMPH YOUAREPROBABLY

DEAD vSHESAID CITINGSTUDIES #OMMISSIONER%DUARDO-ARTINEZ SAIDHEWASSTRUCKBYTHEPOLARIZA TIONAMONGRESIDENTS h)MHOPINGTHATWESEETHEVALUE OFWHATTHECITYHASATTEMPTEDTODO ANDTHATTHECITYWILLCONTINUETO DOvTOENSURETHESAFETYOFSCHOOL CHILDREN HESAID #OMMISSIONER !RTHUR +ELLER AGREED h!RASTRADERO2OADPRIORTOTHETRI ALWASARACEWAY!FOUR LANESTREET WITHOUTLEFT TURNLANESISSIMPLYNOT ACCEPTABLE ) THINK THERES ENOUGH IMPROVEMENT IN THE TRIAL TO MOVE FORWARDWITHTHIS vHESAID 4HECOMMISSIONERSASKEDSTAFFTO WORKWITHTHEPOLICEDEPARTMENTTO INCREASEENFORCEMENTALONG!RASTRA DEROANDIN"ARRON0ARKON-AYBELL !VENUE AND -ATADERO WHERE RESI DENTSCOMPLAINEDOFSPEEDING h)T MAKES SENSE TO INCREASE LAW ENFORCEMENT PARTICULARLY FOCUSING INTHEBEGINNINGOFTHESCHOOLYEAR v +ELLERSAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

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School board (continued from page 3)

EDSPIRITOFINNOVATIONANDIMPROVE MENTANDTOHELPBRINGABOUTAWAY FORUSTOMAKETHEMOSTOFOURBEST EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES BY SHARINGTHEM MORE EFFI CIENTLY AND E Q U I T A B L Y TH ROUGHOUT THE DISTRICT v SHEWROTE h) HAVE COME TO UN DERSTAND THE "ARBARA+LAUSNER ROLE THAT THE BOARD HAS CHOSEN FOR ITSELF AND ) R E C O G N I Z E ITS MERITS v + L A U S N E R SAID ADD ING THAT SHE PLANS TO RE TURN TO HER hROOTS IN E D U C A T I O N #AMILLE4OWNSEND AND WORK WITH FELLOW EDUCATORSTOIMPROVETHELIVESAND PROSPECTSOFSTUDENTSvN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

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Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 11

Dorothy R. McGrew Resident of Palo Alto

Passed away peacefully at home from congestive heart failure at the age of 98 with her family surrounding her. Predeceased by her beloved husband of 50 years, William B. McGrew. She is survived by her children Judy Eda, Jane McGrew, and Jerry McGrew, by her grandchildren Maria Winkler (Paton Lewis) and Paul Winkler (Abby Fleischer), and by her great-granddaughter, Riley Winkler. She was a loving wife, mother, daughter, sister, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend who opened her heart to all. Dorothy was a faithful member of First Methodist Church and a member of P.E.O. for 50 years. She will be truly missed and will be re-

membered for her many acts of loving kindness and service. Our memories of her will remain in our hearts forever. A memorial service is scheduled for July 27, 2012, at 1:00pm in the chapel at First United Methodist Church, 625 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto. In lieu of ďŹ&#x201A;owers, a donation to P.E.O. or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. PA I D

OBITUARY

Miriam Eller Bjornson Miriam Eller Bjornson, 93, died in Palo Alto on July 18, 2012. Born on an Iowa farm, Miriam will be remembered as an enthusiastic, vibrant â&#x20AC;&#x153;mover and shaker.â&#x20AC;? She and her husband Harold lived in Oakland, CA, Waterloo, IA, McMinnville, OR, and Palo Alto, CA where Harold served in American Baptist churches as Senior Pastor. Miriam was a teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aide for hearing-impaired junior high students in Palo Alto public schools. Miriam held many leadership roles: national president of American Baptist Ministersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wives; featured speaker (with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.) at the 1954 national convention of American Baptist Churches; board member of ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Ministries; chair of the American Baptist Service Corporation; board member, then president, of American Baptist Churches of the West. At Pilgrim Haven Retirement Community in Los Altos, CA, where Harold served as Chaplain until his death, Miriam served as VP of the Resident Association, as President, as Chair of the Arts Committee, and

on Pilgrim Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foundation Board. A member of Los Altos Art Association, Miriam enjoyed painting landscapes in oil and watercolor. In 2001, Miriam married Charles Walker, enjoying nine years together in Pilgrim Haven until his death in 2010. Miriam is survived by daughters Mary, Joyce, and Anita; stepdaughter Kathy; 6 grandchildren; and 7 great grandchildren. Donations in Miriamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory may be made to the Harold and Miriam Bjornson Scholarship Fund, American Baptist Seminary of the West, 2606 Dwight Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. A memorial service will be held Sunday, August 19, at 2:30 PM at the Terraces at Los Altos (formerly Pilgrim Haven). PA I D

OBITUARY

David Negrin died July 21 at the Palo Alto VA Hospice Center, surrounded by his family and loved ones. He was 87. He was born and raised in New York City, N.Y., and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, where he was involved in the invasion of Normandy. He received both his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees in electrical engineering from NYU. He held managerial positions in several companies, the longest being IBM, where he worked for 24 years. He loved giving back to his community and was an active member in the Palo Alto Rotary, Palo Alto Arts Commission, Leadership Palo Alto, SCORE, The Experience Corps, Literacy Program for Immigrants and the ACLU, where he served on the board. He enjoyed working in the darkroom, playing tennis and bridge, and traveling with his wife to exotic places ranging from Antarctica to Bhutan. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Shirley Negrin; children, Lenore Arnberg, Alison Negrin and Robert Negrin; sons-in-law, Thomas Prytz and Kevin Barnett; daughter-in-law, Bonnie Goodman; brother, Norman Negrin; and three grandchildren. A memorial service will be held Friday, July 27, at 11 a.m. at Congregation Beth Am, 26790 Arastradero Road, Los Altos Hills. In lieu of flowers he has requested that donations be made to Congregation Beth Am (www.betham.org) or The Palo Alto Rotary (www.rotarypaloalto. org).

Elaine Windrich Political scientist and scholar Elaine Windrich died in Redwood City, Calif., on July 18 from complications of emphysema. She was 90. She was born Elaine Windreich in

San Francisco on Nov. 29, 1921, the daughter of Sam and Ruth (Miller) Windreich. Her father, who worked as a salesman, was a native of Austria; her mother was from California. She earned three degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, culminating with a Ph.D. in 1947. Her dissertation topic was British foreign policy during the Spanish Civil War. She was an assistant professor of political science at Stanford from 1948 to 1953. She moved to London to be a lecturer at the University of London and served as a research officer for the Parliamentary Labour Party from 1959 to 1964. She returned to Stanford as a visiting scholar from 1973 to 1980 and lived in Zimbabwe from 1980 to 1984, serving as a consultant to Zimbabwe Mass Media Trust and the Ministry of Information. She was also a visiting scholar at the University of California, Los Angeles, for several years before retiring at Stanford. She authored â&#x20AC;&#x153;The British Labour Partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foreign Policyâ&#x20AC;? (Stanford University Press, 1953), â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rhodesian Problem: A Documentary Recordâ&#x20AC;? (Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1975), â&#x20AC;&#x153;Britain and the Politics of Rhodesian Independenceâ&#x20AC;? (Holmes & Meier, 1978), â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mass Media and the Struggle for Zimbabweâ&#x20AC;? (Mambo Press, 1981) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cold War Guerrilla: Jona Savimbi, the U.S. Media, and the Angolan Warâ&#x20AC;? (Greenwood Press, 1992). She is survived by her brother, Leland Windreich of Vancouver, Canada; and many friends and colleagues. Memorial donations may be made to the Memorial Fund, Stanford University Libraries; the Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University; or Amnesty International, USA.

February 9, 1933-July 21, 2012

Aug. 1, 1912-Aug. 24, 1973 ful she was our mother. She would be so proud of her children, and the Grands and great Grands. We all love our mom.â&#x20AC;? Abikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shares this thought, To Clara Dell, a truly wonderfully insightful human being and mother. We remember you now and honor your memory.â&#x20AC;? George, remarks, Moms would feed all the kids when the came home for lunch with us from school. She was a great motivatior for any one she spoke with. She was very active in her church and taught Sunday school. George, Velva, Abikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, James and Cathy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;God hath not promised skies always blue, Flower-strewn pathways all our lives through; God hath not promised sun without rain, Joy without sorrow, peace without pain. But God hath promised strength for the day....â&#x20AC;? PA I D

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David Albert Negrin

Arnold L. Cooley

Clara Dell Marshall Our mother was born 100 years ago, in a place called Bagley, Louisiana (near Shrevesport), on Aug. 1, 1912, to the Reverend James A. and Gertrude Wilkes. She was a sister to ďŹ ve siblings, a loving wife to husband Mike Marshall, a great mother to nine offspring (a total of 16 were born to this union of our parents). We all have lifelong memories of our loving mother. Here are some of our most cherished memories, beginning with Cathyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite memory of my beautiful mother is that she was always willing to see each of us as an individual. Once you told her what you wanted to do, she took steps to help you attain your goal.â&#x20AC;? Velva remembers the all around teaching of caregiving, cooking, sewing and gardening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember the way she organized a community garden project that was talked about for years and was so popular with all the neighborhood.â&#x20AC;? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not forget, Mom sure knew how to wear a â&#x20AC;&#x153;fancy hat.â&#x20AC;? James says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I remember most is that Mom was Kind and Loving and always tried to help others! She taught me so much! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thank-

Transitions

MEMORIAL

Arnold L. Cooley, who was a prominent executive in Silicon Valley, died July 21 in Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene, Idaho. He was 79. Mr. Cooley was born in Palo Alto, California in 1933 and was a member of the Cooley family that founded San Carlos Airport and the original Ravenswood Ranch that is now part of Cooley Landing Park. He attended Palo Alto High School and later served in the U.S. Army in Japan during the Korean War. Upon his return he embarked on a 35-year career in Silicon Valley, including 25 years as a leading executive in the hard disc storage industry before retiring to northern Idaho. Mr. Cooley is survived by his wife of 35 years, Barbara Cooley, and his son Brian Cooley, 50. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS

Unattended death. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Palo Alto July 19-25

al Photo Co u n An

Menlo Park July 19-25 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .4 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .7 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Resisting arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Atherton July 19-25 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

t ntes

21 st

Violence related Armed robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Elder abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .6 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . 11 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . 10 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Liquor law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Animal call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .2 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Resisting arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Terrorist threat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .1 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Miscellaneous Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Pedestrian check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Shots fired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Tree blocking roadway . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Watermain break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto 0 block Encina Avenue, 7/20, 12:48 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Emerson Street, 7/22, 11:58 a.m.; domestic violence. Unlisted block Curtner Avenue, 7/23, 12:50 a.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Mackay Drive, 7/23, 11:24 a.m.; domestic violence/battery. 100 block Monroe Drive, 7/23, 2:24 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block University Avenue, 7/23, 7:58 p.m.; elder abuse. 0 block Encina Avenue, 7/24, 10:31 a.m.; armed robbery.

Give blood for life!

Menlo Park

b l o o d c e n t e r. s t a n f o r d . e d u

1300 block Henderson Avenue, 7/22, 2:45 p.m.; battery.

Call for Entries

21st Annual Palo Alto Weekly Photo Contest Cash and gift certificate prizes will be awarded to 1st - 3rd place winners in the following Adult and Youth categories: Portraits, Bay Area Images, Views Beyond the Bay For complete rules and submissions details go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/photo_contest Age: â?&#x2018; Adult â?&#x2018; Youth (17 yrs. or younger as of 7/6/12) Category: â?&#x2018; Bay Area Images â?&#x2018; Views Beyond the Bay Area â?&#x2018; Portraits Photo Title: __________________________________________________________________________________ Photo Location: ______________________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE TODAY Entry fees: Adult $25 per image Youth $15 per image One entry per category

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City/Zip: _____________________

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and/or to mail your images on a Matted prints for winning entries

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will be requested of the photogra-

This photograph is my original work and was taken in the past 5 years. I understand that the Palo Alto Weekly reserves ďŹ rst publishing and online rights to winning entries and those chosen for exhibition. Judges will use their discretion as to whether an image needs to be recatagorized. Judges decisions are ďŹ nal.

pher for exhibition.

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For questions call 650.223.6588 or e-mail photocontest@paweekly.com

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Editorial

A pair of strong City Council decisions With purpose and decisiveness, Palo Alto council moves forward with major improvements for California Avenue and the golf course t is infrequent when one can celebrate decisiveness in process-obsessed Palo Alto, but Monday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Council meeting demonstrated that the current council is ready and willing to leave some constituents unhappy in order to move forward with important projects after doing their homework. It probably didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt that the meeting was the last before the monthlong summer break and was packed with decision items, requiring that discussions be focused and efficient. And in the case of both improvements to California Avenue and the golf course, deadlines outside of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s control created pressure to act. Bold change is not easy for many Palo Altans, and both of these issues will bring major changes to two important areas of the community. On California Avenue, the council stuck by its many earlier decisions and approved an exciting renovation plan that includes reducing the street to two lanes, widening sidewalks, improving public spaces and creating an environment that will benefit both businesses and shoppers. Sadly, a combination of poor early city staff outreach, the disastrous tree-cutting and a great deal of fear among local merchants, fueled by misinformation, made this an unnecessarily controversial and contentious project. Lawsuits challenging the process achieved nothing but delay and fomented additional tensions between some business owners and the city. In reality, the plan is consistent with and significantly better than what the leaders of the merchant opposition themselves had previously supported. The lane reduction from four to two lanes, contrary to what many merchants have been led to believe, has been part of the plan for years and was developed and endorsed by the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s association of merchants and property owners. It is grossly unfair and wrong for opponents to pretend this was prompted by grant funding being available, as has been repeatedly argued. In the end, the merchants opposing the plan decided they liked everything but the lane reduction, which they feared would create congestion and drive away customers. They asked for a trial period of temporary markings to test the impact of only two lanes, but the council rejected that plan as unnecessary and of little value, believing a temporary re-striping would create confusion, not reflect any of the benefits of a permanent reconfiguration, and result in little or no useful data. They were right to do so. All traffic data and the experiences of other retail-oriented streets similar to California Avenue that have gone from four to two lanes point to this being an easy decision. In fact, no one has been able to find an example of where a lane reduction has hurt local merchants, and there are many cases where it has contributed to great retail revitalization. The lesson learned from this issue is that a natural fear of change and a lack of trust and confidence in the government are strong motivators to action, even when the facts and data donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t support it. We are huge supporters of California Avenue businesses, especially since moving our offices to the district almost three years ago and experiencing on a daily basis the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special qualities. The plan approved this week by the council will support the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continued evolution into a treasured community shopping and dining area and is long overdue. The golf course project has generated less controversy, primarily because it surfaced indirectly as a result of a flood-control project undertaken by the multi-city agency charged with reducing the risk of San Francisquito Creek going over its banks. With that agency offering Palo Alto $3.2 million to redesign and rebuild parts of the golf course that would be affected by the construction of new levees adjacent to the course, the city developed a range of options, from doing the minimum required to supplementing the funding and undertaking a major and long overdue overhaul of the course. The council unanimously opted for the most ambitious plan, which will add $4.3 million in cost and result in a major course redesign and the construction of three new playing fields to the Baylands Athletic Center. In spite of some complaining from golfers about future higher green fees to pay for the project, this was clearly the best option and one that will rescue the tired and uninspired golf course and create needed new athletic fields in addition to reducing flood risks in north Palo Alto. Both of these projects are great examples of long-term community investments that will pay for themselves many times over yet that so often are beaten back by the Palo Alto process and indecision. Especially in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment of operating budget constraints, the council is to be commended for moving forward with these important improvements. N

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Support trial reduction Editor, Our business has been on California Avenue for 15 years. For us, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;processâ&#x20AC;? and discussions surrounding the plans for California Avenue have been frustrating. We feel as though we talk, the city hears, but no one really listens. We are dismayed by the negativity and frankly, unacceptable lack of civility that we have personally witnessed and read on both sides of the issue. It is confusing that, as a community, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disagree without being disagreeable. We have always and will continue to support the upgrades to safety and aesthetics that this business district has long needed, and we believe that almost all of the upgrades can be accomplished without a lane reduction. There are many opponents to the reduction. Fifty-five merchants and businesses went on the record supporting the plan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; except for the lane reduction. Others opposed the reduction but for many reasons felt they could not go on the record. There has been no clear explanation on how the lane reduction will support development in the area as it relates to this district being designated a pedestrian- and transit-oriented development. This designation will increase business and residential density, while at the same time, constrict access? It would be safer to divert the majority of bicycle traffic off California Avenue and onto a quieter street. We make this statement as bicycle riders. This is a business district with autos, delivery trucks and buses. The city agrees. That explains why Bryant Street, not Middlefield, is the major crosstown bike artery in Palo Alto. Yet, they push California Avenue as a major bike thoroughfare. Many in the City are angry because a group of citizens have taken legal action as a final recourse (we are not a part of any legal action, but certainly understand the right to do so). The irony is that after unanimously supporting highspeed rail, our city decided to take legal action and protect its rights when the ongoing debates about the credibility of the HSR â&#x20AC;&#x153;planâ&#x20AC;? came to light. We feel as though a trial reduction is realistic and necessary. It should not be the $60,000 or so it might cost â&#x20AC;&#x201D; take a look at the contract the city offered the designer of the project; put a 3 in front of the $60,000 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that should give us all pause. We sincerely appeal to the city and residents to support a trial. The reality is that if the lane reduction is a success, great, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine-tune the plan and move forward. If the trial fails, then we can trim the sails and change course before we spend too much on a

plan that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deliver on what it promised. Lara & Michael Ekwall La Bodeguita del Medio California Avenue

Applause for council Editor, I applaud you, the current council, for attempting to fix the fiscal mess left by prior decades of gross mismanagement. Our past decision makers never took their rose-colored glasses off when making revenue forecasts and cost projections. With sleight of hand, they used their ever-growing pot of utility charges (paid for by the ratepayers of the city) to fill the holes in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operating budget. Past leadership failed to structure pay and pension benefits that were economically realistic. Now retirees, employees and citizens are all at risk. What to do now? First, I hope you already have a committee looking at how Cupertino achieves a debt-per-resident figure ($629) that is one-sixth of ours ($4,021). As a matter of fact, I hope you are looking at every other city around us; they are all in better financial

condition. How are they holding down their debt per resident? Second, outsource whatever services you can. If we can get an adequate level of service for less money, outsource it. Other cities in both Santa Clara and San Mateo counties have outsourced fire and police with success. Boasting that we have our own higher cost â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palo Alto thisâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palo Alto thatâ&#x20AC;? only drives us further down the road toward insolvency. Third, start to prepare for a possible bankruptcy now before you are in fiscal extremis. I hope it never comes to this, but if doors to solutions begin to close, you are better off declaring bankruptcy early, while you still have room to maneuver and time to draw up plans. Bankruptcy is not a death knell; in fact, it can be a rebirth. There are many businesses that will attest to this. You will be able to start with a clean slate, negotiate reasonable contracts with all city employees, and put the city back on the road to fiscal sanity. Micheline Horstmeyer Ramona Street Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

?

What do you think about changing California Avenue to become more pedestrian and bicycle-friendly?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

This week on Town Square Town Square is an online discussion forum at www.PaloAltoOnline.com Blog: London 94301 Posted July 25 at 9:47 a.m. by David Vinokur, a former resident of the Crescent Park neighborhood: Allow me, dear reader, to continue with close focus on London and the 2012 Games. In the week leading to the Opening Ceremony, and for the first time this year, high-pressure weather is driving 80-degree sunshine. Cautiously folks across the British Isles hope for a warm and dry Olympics, fickle British weather notwithstanding. Well-soaked, green London is springing to life in the baking hot sun with a collective â&#x20AC;&#x153;ahhh....â&#x20AC;? To be fair, this city is arguably the most verdant large city in the world. Greater London has over 150 square miles of public parks, gardens, cemeteries and squares. As with the amazing parks and open spaces in and around my hometown of Palo Alto, parks here are well loved and utilized. Hyde Park and many others play host this summer to the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad, a free citywide cultural celebration running day and night in parallel to the Olympics and Para-Olympics. And this week the Olympic Torch Relay nightly party was held on good old Tooting Common. We walked the few yards from our home to greet the passing torch, and even had our photo taken with it (gold chrome, dotted with holes and surprisingly light without the requisite gas canister). This is all certainly a very long way from my youth of attending concerts at Lucie Stern Community Center and May Day parades down University Avenue. Brits were recently awarded the â&#x20AC;&#x153;gold

medal for grumblingâ&#x20AC;? by the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Culture Secretary, with the unsurprising consistent hum of discord over cost, traffic/ transport and security. Probably the most notable hiccup in the run up to the Games is the recent contingency call-up of several thousand additional British military personnel to participate in event security. Security staffing headcount requirements changed last winter, and the private security firm hired to source and train these staff was unable to meet its obligation or communicate their shortfall sooner. Troops stationed across London were always a key component of what is, by most measures, a solid security operation. That one doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need reminding of war in London partially explains some of the concerns people have around the 2012 Games. Many consider these Olympics to be the largest peacetime security operation since WWII. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ground-toair missiles posted around the East End, street and shopping center parking removed for miles around and strict airportstyle security at all ticketed events. Add to that a 100-mile network of Olympicsonly VIP lanes (even non-Olympic government officials are barred) and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a populace on full alert â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or at least with both eyes open. From my countless conversations with colleagues, familiars and strangers, the overwhelming sense here is excitement and anticipation for a fantastic London 2012 Games. See you after the lighting of the Olympic Torch. Read more online by going to www. paloaltoonline.com/square and clicking â&#x20AC;&#x153;London 94301.â&#x20AC;?

Guest Opinion Stanford recreation funding should benefit entire region by Steve Schmidt he Guest Opinion submitted by James Sweeney of the Stanford Campus Residential Leaseholders (June 29) is laden with misleading and selectively chosen arguments. A review of the 2000 General Use Permit (GUP) history would reveal that in 2000 Stanford agreed to construct a multi-use trail, designated C-1, on Stanford University land in Santa Clara County in exchange for 5 million square feet of new campus development. Rather than honor its obligations, and while building its newly granted entitlements, Stanford spent five years lobbying the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors that the C-1 Trail should be in San Mateo County, mostly in the right-of-way of Alpine Road. I was a Menlo Park City Council member in 2000 actively involved in the discussion of the mitigations for the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expansion, and I know that a trail along Alpine Road was not a consideration included in the GUP. However, it soon became clear that Stanford apparently had no intention of ever allowing public easements for a trail on Stanford land, even for groups like Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leaseholders. By 2006, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relentless efforts had paid off; the C-1 Trail had become the responsibility of San Mateo County. Three times the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors rejected Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal to build a multi-use trail next to Alpine Road, in part because it violated

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well-established design standards for locating combined pedestrian and bicycle facilities within a few feet of a heavily traveled arterial road, ironically populated largely by car and truck traffic generated by Stanford construction and growth. The $10.3 million that Sweeney thinks should be used to supplement his already generous oncampus recreational opportunities has now returned to Santa Clara County. Residents of both Santa Clara and San Mateo counties experience the loss of recreational opportunities caused by limiting public access to the Stanford Dish and the negative effects of unending Stanford expansion in both counties. It behooves the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to fund recreational improvements with this money that provide the widest benefits to local residents, including but not limited to the Stanford Leaseholders. I urge the Supervisors in their Aug. 7 meeting to direct these funds for the completion of the Bay Trail in Palo Alto and to partially fund the bicyclepedestrian over-crossing of U.S. Highway 101 at Adobe Creek. For years the region has endured the impacts of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twice-a-day employee commute traffic, two world-renowned hospitals, a regional shopping mall, disruptive sports events and the heavy use of local public roads for dangerous construction vehicles. The entire region deserves genuine mitigations. Thinking regionally is appropriate when one realizes the extent of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s footprint on the Peninsula. N Steve Schmidt is a former mayor of Menlo Park and served on the council from 1994 to 2002.

Streetwise

Which Olympic event are you most excited to watch? Asked on California Avenue, Palo Alto. Interviews by Helen Carefoot and photographs by Soo Song.

George Auberger

Software engineer Waverley Street, Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not planning to watch, but possibly cycling.â&#x20AC;?

John Gregorski

Software engineer Wright Place, Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to watch gymnastics and sprinting.â&#x20AC;?

Alice Chao

Emergency medicine resident College Avenue, Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gymnastics.â&#x20AC;?

Earl Christensen

Transportation specialist Colorado Avenue, Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really watch the Olympics, but I might this year because I like the idea of them.â&#x20AC;?

Doris Petrosky

Student Lincoln Avenue, Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;Preferably none.â&#x20AC;?

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Arts & Entertainment Comedy in conflict A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

by Maytal Mark

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hava Nagila (The Movie)â&#x20AC;? explores the traditional melody that is commonly played at Jewish weddings.

Norman Issa in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arab Labor.â&#x20AC;?

The film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life in Stillsâ&#x20AC;? follows a family who owns a Tel Aviv photo studio. t might seem impossible to find humor in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but at least one comedy being shown in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s San Francisco Jewish Film Festival challenges that notion. Along with a slew of powerful dramas, several comedies screening this summer in Palo Alto, San Francisco and other cities will tackle a range of issues with a tongue-in-cheek approach, including the conflict, Jewish identity and family dynamics. All have â&#x20AC;&#x153;strains of something we recognize as a Jewish sensibility, of a people who love to laugh and make others laugh with them,â&#x20AC;? according to a festival press release. The Israeli sitcom â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arab Laborâ&#x20AC;? faces Israeli and Palestinian stereotypes headon. A festival screening in Palo Alto on July 30 will feature episodes from the third season, written by Sayeed Kashua and directed by Shai Capon. Billed as the first Israeli show to center on a PalestinianIsraeli family, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arab Laborâ&#x20AC;? follows protagonist Amjad (Norman Issa), an ArabIsraeli journalist, and is shown in Arabic and Hebrew with English subtitles. In one of the episodes, Amjad joins the cast of the (fictional) Israeli version of the reality TV show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Brotherâ&#x20AC;? in an at-

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SAN FRANCISCO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL EXPLORES THE HUMOR IN TOUGH TOPICS

Filmmaker Renaud Cohen stars in his own autobiography-based â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Case I Never Win the Golden Palm.â&#x20AC;? Page 18Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

T GREA S W SHORY EVE T! NIGH

7/19

Vertical Vo ices â&#x20AC;&#x153;All at once, everyone in the room realized that something special was happening.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Washington Post

7/21

Houston Person

7/25

Charles McPherson

7/28

Wycliffe Gordon

Photo: John Abbott

Soak up the sounds of summer at these and other shows: 7/22 7/29

More shows, details & tickets at

Julian Lage:

7/30

Taylor Eigsti/Kendrick Scott

Le Jazz Hot

7/31

Kenny Barron/Terell Stafford/

stanfordjazz.org

Dayna Stephens

650-725-2787

Matt Wilson

In â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Dad is Baryshnikov,â&#x20AC;? a young boy without much talent aspires to be a ballet dancer.

tempt to prove that Arabs and Jews can live peacefully together. Tension rises when the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Brotherâ&#x20AC;? producers ask Amjad to pass as a Jew and challenge the competitors to guess who in the house is secretly Arab, in order to be safe from elimination. Stereotypes erupt both in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Brotherâ&#x20AC;? house and in Amjadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own home when the reality-TV residents buy the cover story that Amjad (now â&#x20AC;&#x153;Danny Epsteinâ&#x20AC;?) has created, and decide that another competitor, Itzik, is the secret Arab. Itzikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fellow Jewish competitors single him out for acting in such an obviously â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arabâ&#x20AC;? manner: He wants cardamom in his coffee, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bored by old army stories. The girls in the house become squeamish when they are in their bathing suits, claiming, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not used to seeing girls like this; he might get ideas.â&#x20AC;? They become incredibly offended when he attempts to perform the Sabbath prayer. The judgmental glances exchanged after every word Itzik says create an aura of absurdism, as the residents feel themselves proven correct at every turn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arab Laborâ&#x20AC;? is not alone in the mission to reflect Jewish conflicts and issues in a humorous light. Other comedies to be featured this year include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dorfman,â&#x20AC;? a template romantic comedy about an awkward and quiet young woman (Sara Rue of TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Less Than Perfectâ&#x20AC;?) living in Los Angeles. She undergoes a surface-level makeover as she begins to speak her mind for the first time, realizing that her role as a doormat for those around her has left her unsatisfied. Her family also undergoes a transformation when her widowed father and irresponsible brother must confront their own personal issues. Playing the father is veteran actor Elliott Gould, who is also being honored by the festival with its annual Freedom of Expression Award at a ceremony at San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castro Theatre. Other comedies that will be shown this year in Palo Alto include â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Dad is Baryshnikov,â&#x20AC;? the story of a young boy in the last days of the Soviet Union who is training to be a ballet dancer, despite his lack of talent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Case I Never Win the Golden Palmâ&#x20AC;? is a film-withina-film directed by and starring Renaud Cohen, based on the ups and downs of his own career as a filmmaker. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival will also include several documentaries, many centering on music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under African Skiesâ&#x20AC;? follows the musician Paul Simon as he returns to South Africa for a reunion concert for his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gracelandâ&#x20AC;? albums. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hava Nagila (The Movie)â&#x20AC;? follows the traditional â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hava Nagilaâ&#x20AC;? melody around the world, where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been performed at countless bar mitzvahs and Jewish weddings. The Palo Alto lineup also features the Sam Ball film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joann Sfar Draws From Memory,â&#x20AC;? which paints a portrait of the French graphic novelist Sfar. Palo Alto resident Valerie Joseph is the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive producer. This year is the 32nd for the festival. Running from July 28 through Aug. 6, it will make the rounds at theaters in San Francisco, Berkeley, Palo Alto, San Rafael and Oakland. Most of the films are set to have at least one screening in Palo Alto. N What: The 32nd annual San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, with screenings of shorts and feature-length films in Palo Alto and other cities Where: Local screenings are at the CineArts movie theater at Palo Alto Square, 3000 El Camino Real. When: Palo Alto screenings are July 28 through Aug. 2, with screenings from the late morning through the evening. Cost: Individual screening programs are $12 general, $11 for seniors and students, and $10 for Jewish Film Forum members. Matinees (weekdays through 4 p.m.) are $10 general and $9 for members. Ticket packages are available, including a $25 pass for ages 30 and under; it can be used at all regularly priced screenings (not special events). Info: Go to sfjff.org or call 415-621-0523.

L U C I L E PA C K A R D

C H I L D R E N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H O S P I TA L

PROVIDED BY LUCILE PACKARD CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOSPITAL

Your Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health University Lucile Packard Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital offers classes and seminars designed to foster good health and enhance the lives of parents and children. COMFORT TECHNIQUES FOR LABOR For couples who have already completed Childbirth Prep, this class provides additional tools and practice for relaxation, breathing and comfort measures for labor. - Tuesday, September 11: 7:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 pm

BRINGING BABY HOME A two-part workshop for expectant couples and new parents in their ďŹ rst postpartum trimester, this program designed by Drs. John and Julie Schwartz Gottman will assist in preserving the couple relationship and developing the relationship between parents and baby. - Saturday, September 15 & Sunday, September 23: 10:00 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 pm

SIBLING PREPARATION CLASS This class for children two years of age and older will help prepare siblings for the emotional and physical realities of the arrival of a newborn. - Saturday, September 22: 10:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:00 pm

HEART TO HEART SEMINARS ON GROWING UP Informative, humorous and lively discussions between parents and their pre-teens on puberty, the opposite sex and growing up. Girls attend these two-part sessions with their moms and boys attend with their dads. - Fall dates available for Girls & Boys classes

Call (650) 724-4601 or visit calendar.lpch.org to register or obtain more information on the times, locations and fees for these and other courses.

VI S IT LP CH.ORG TO S IG N U P FOR CLAS S E S Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 19

Arts & Entertainment rate song and dance and whining. Katie Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryon plays office maven Smitty to a tee, smirking and mugging to great effect; she brightens â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cinderella, Darlingâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Been a Long Dayâ&#x20AC;? with her strong vocals and comic skills. Other standouts include Mayes as Biggley, whose ability to play against his imposing physical presence makes certain moments even funnier; and Griner, wonderfully shameless as the hot tomato LaRue, whose lovely singing voice is an unexpected treat. The whole ensemble of junior clerks, executives and secretaries keeps it lively and engaging. Joe Rageyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colorful fantasia on office decor and Janis Bergmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neon jewel-tone costume palette superbly deliver the early 1960s through a comedic time warp. Music director Catherine Snider ably guides her small, capable orchestra through a demanding score. One caveat: The show is uncut, running close to three hours including intermission. Plan accordingly, and then sit back and enjoy this superb summer romp. N

Delightfully dated â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How to Succeedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; has a charming period look â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but making fun of corporations never gets old by Jeanie K. Smith

THEATER REVIEW rie Lenn Borris) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and fends off the bossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scheming nephew, Bud Frump (David Mister). The boss, J. B. Biggley (Walter M. Mayes), has entanglements of his own â&#x20AC;&#x201D; namely his mistress, Miss Hedy LaRue (Sarah Griner) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and hopes Finch will solve his problems. When Finch launches his â&#x20AC;&#x153;big ideaâ&#x20AC;? and it gets bungled on national television, all hell breaks loose. But hey, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a musical comedy, so you know it will work out. The fun is seeing how Finch manages to escape a disaster â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and how yet another corporation cover-up can be a happy ending. The standard numbers include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm,â&#x20AC;? sung by Rosemary after falling in love at first sight; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosemary,â&#x20AC;? when the penny finally drops for Finch; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Believe in You,â&#x20AC;? when Finch gives himself a pep talk in the executive washroom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Brotherhood of Man,â&#x20AC;? a knockout number by the whole company, is a Broadway showstopper complete with dancing on tables. The controversial number â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Secretary is not a Toyâ&#x20AC;? is given a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s sitcom gloss of tongue-in-cheek innocence, with

Michael Rhone riding high as J. Pierrepont Finch, with Walter M. Mayes as boss J.B. Biggley. lots of fanny-ogling. Rhone is spot-on perfect for Finch, with his boyish good looks, dynamite voice and impish grin. You would swear heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s channeling Morse, although heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even cuter and

Multimedia Advertising Sales Representative Embarcadero Media is a multimedia company with websites, email news digests (Express) and community newspapers on the Peninsula, in the East Bay and in Marin. We are the leader in community news and local advertising solutions in the markets we serve. More residents in our communities turn to our websites, email news digests and print media as the primary choice for local news and information. We are looking for an aggressive, sophisticated Outside Sales Representative for a prime display ad sales territory on the Peninsula. Experience in online, social media, search marketing, and print media sales is a plus. Familiarity with the advertising industry and selling solutions to local and regional businesses is required. We offer salary, commission, bonus plan, health benefits, paid time off and an environment where success and achievement is rewarded. Most importantly, the successful candidate must have a drive to be a top performer and enjoy working with clients who are looking to our company to provide them with cost effective and efficient advertising solutions. Consultative selling approaches are key to success in this position. If you have the passion to achieve great success in your career and believe you can contribute significantly to our leadership position in the market, please send your resume and a brief summary as to why you believe you are the right candidate for this outstanding opportunity. Qualified candidates will be contacted for an interview. Please submit your resume and cover letter to: Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales and Marketing tzahiralis@embarcaderopublishing.com

450 Cambridge Avenue | Palo Alto, CA 94306 | 650.326.8210 PaloAltoOnline.com | TheAlmanacOnline.com | MountainViewOnline.com

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What: â&#x20AC;&#x153;How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,â&#x20AC;? presented by Foothill Music Theatre Where: Smithwick Theatre, Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills When: Through Aug. 12, with 8 p.m. shows Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. matinees on Sundays Cost: Tickets are $10-$28. Info: Go to foothillmusicals.com or call 650-949-7360.

David Allen

F

oothill Music Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer musical is an anticipated event by musical lovers, as director Jay Manley always manages to assemble a talented team. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;How to Succeed in Business Without Really Tryingâ&#x20AC;? is no exception, sporting a terrific cast and technical elements to match. After taking Broadway by storm in 1961 with Robert Morse in the lead, this musical languished in the archives for decades, deemed too politically incorrect to salvage for a modern audience, because of its presumably dated material regarding corporate ethics and office shenanigans. But a couple of revivals (1995 with Matthew Broderick and 2011 with Daniel Radcliffe) have rediscovered the fun and the heart of the show. And having a good laugh at a corporate spoof remains therapeutic. Based on a satirical book of 1955 about how to climb the corporate ladder, the musical takes our hero, J. Pierrepont Finch (Michael Rhone), on a journey through the World Wide Wicket company as he follows the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice. Starting in the mailroom, he miraculously maneuvers promotions without training or tenure, acquires a girlfriend along the way â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rosemary (Cor-

livelier. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-matched by Borris as Rosemary, who has a beautiful voice and just the right mix of girlish eagerness and womanly bravado. Mister gleefully inhabits the villainous Frump, charming us with first-

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF FINAL DATES ON OR BEFORE WHICH DIRECT AND REBUTTAL ARGUMENTS MAY BE SUBMITTED TO THE CITY CLERK IN SUPPORT OF OR AGAINST THE MEASURE TO PERMIT THREE MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES TO OPERATE IN PALO ALTO TO BE SUBMITTED TO THE ELECTORS OF PALO ALTO AT A SPECIAL ELECTION, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Tuesday, August 14, 2012, at 5:30 p.m., has been ďŹ xed as the ďŹ nal date and time when direct arguments for or against the following measure may be submitted to the City Clerk for printing and distribution to the voters of the City. Copies of the direct arguments will be available from the City Clerk on Wednesday, August 15, 2012. The deadline for ďŹ ling rebuttal arguments with the City Clerk has been set for Tuesday, August 21, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. Copies of the rebuttal arguments will be available from the City Clerk on Wednesday, August 22, 2012. CITY OF PALO ALTO (MEASURE â&#x20AC;&#x153;___â&#x20AC;?) Shall the Palo Alto Municipal Code be amended to permit three medical marijuana dispensaries to operate in Palo Alto in any commercial or industrial zone subject to prescribing zoning criteria? FOR THE ORDINANCE AGAINST THE ORDINANCE

____ ____

The polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 6, 2012. Copies of the resolution placing this proposition on the ballot and containing the full text of the measure are available in the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OfďŹ ce, City Hall, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94301. All materials to be printed in the Sample Ballot regarding the measure will be available for public examination from Wednesday, August 22, 2012 through Friday, August 31, 2012, at the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce on the seventh ďŹ&#x201A;oor. DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk

Arts & Entertainment

Stefanie Okuda

Jessica Waldman in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Curse of the Starving Class.â&#x20AC;?

Full house Unsettling Shepard play is replete with woes financial and familial by Karla Kane

A

n American family on the verge of economic and emotional collapse takes center stage in the grimly comic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Curse of the Starving Class,â&#x20AC;? now running at Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pigott Theater. The production is part of Stanford Summer Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival celebrating the work of writer/director/actor Sam Shepard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Curse of the Starving Class,â&#x20AC;? though written in 1976, is full of relevance to todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s era of mortgage and foreclosure crises. The focus of the play is the dysfunctional Tate family. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abusive, alcoholic patriarch Weston (Marty Pistone), whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deep in debt thanks to realestate schemes, over-borrowing and a bevy of bad decisions. Also: fedup, clueless mom Ella (Courtney Walsh); increasingly unhinged son Wesley (Max Sosna-Spear); and clever but manic adolescent daughter Emma (Stanford student Jessica Waldman). The Tates run a dilapidated farm in rural Southern California, and dad and mom each secretly plot to sell the property (dad because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in desperate need of cash to pay back his creditors, mom with dreams of escaping her crummy situation and starting over). The kids, though unhappy there, are firmly against losing the only home theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever known. As the hapless clan destroys itself from within, sharks in the form of developers, eager to get their paws on the lucrative land, are circling, taking advantage of the splintered familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one flawed

THEATER REVIEW certainty: that real estate can never depreciate and that their ramshackle home harbors untapped value. The action takes place over the course of three days, each corresponding to an act, with two brief intermissions. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all set within the Tatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rundown kitchen, which is nicely designed by Chad Bonaker, although perhaps a bit too cutely for the storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bleakness. The oldfashioned refrigerator plays a key part, as characters constantly look to the fridge as a beacon of hope, only to slam it shut when dissatisfied by what they find (or more often donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find) there. Though the play is set in the 1970s, the choice of older songs, particularly the Dust Bowl-era songs of Woody Guthrie, serve as poignant reminders that California is the land of plenty only for those who can afford it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Curse of the Starving Classâ&#x20AC;? is essentially full of unpleasant people doing and saying unpleasant things, which can make for squirm-inducingly compelling entertainment, but leaves one with a sour taste in the mouth. Though the themes of the play are relatable, ultimately the abrasive characters fail to fully emotionally resonate, leaving the audience frustrated. The four leading actors turn in strong performances â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sometimes too strong in the volume/scenerychewing department. The Tate char-

acters are so often shouting, stomping or slamming doors that the production lacks the dynamic range that might make it more effective. As I heard some fellow viewers behind me wonder, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Does it have to be so loud?â&#x20AC;? The interplay between the main players is so consistently amped up that the rare quiet moments, including the poetic monologues scattered throughout, are welcome, if sometimes awkward. Presumably one is meant to root for the Tates as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the little guyâ&#x20AC;? against an all-powerful corporate menace. But Bennett Fisher and Keith Marshallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning performances as shady lawyer/speculator Taylor and roughneck bar owner Ellis, both of whom stand to gain from the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s misfortune, are so affable that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re impossible to dislike. Though their roles are small, both are standouts. Scene-stealing, too, is the live sheep in the role of a doomed lamb. He or she (not credited) delivers a surprisingly engaged performance, seeming to follow Pistoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s every word in their scenes together and even chiming in with well-timed bleats. The Tate family members are for the most part unlikeable: selfish, hostile and foolish. You want them to just pipe down much of the time. However, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but feel sympathy for their apparently hopeless struggle to move up in the world, as their nebulous American Dream slips away from them. As noted in the program, the play is both tragedy and comedy, sometimes making it difficult to discern the intended tone, but it is decidedly darkly unsettling and depressing in the end. N What: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Curse of the Starving Class,â&#x20AC;? a Sam Shepard play presented by Stanford Summer Theater Where: Pigott Theater, Stanford University When: Through Aug. 12, Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Post-show discussions with the cast and director planned for July 29, Aug. 5 and Aug. 12. Cost: Tickets are $25 general and $15 for students and seniors, with group discounts available. Info: Go to summertheater.stanford. edu or call 650-798-4072. Note: This production contains strong language, adult content and brief nudity.

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SAN FRANCISQUITO CREEK JOINT POWERS AUTHORITY NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY Draft Environmental Impact Report for the San Francisquito Creek Flood Protection Project East Bayshore Road to San Francisco Bay The San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority (SFCJPA) has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the San Francisquito Creek Flood Protection and Ecosystem Restoration Project - East Bayshore Road to San Francisco Bay (Project) and is making this document available for public review. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Project would ultimately protect properties and infrastructure between East Bayshore Road and the San Francisco Bay from San Francisquito Creek (Creek) ďŹ&#x201A;ows resulting from 100-year ďŹ&#x201A;uvial ďŹ&#x201A;ood ďŹ&#x201A;ows occurring at the same time as a 100-year tide, accounting for projected sea level rise through 2067. The Project would reduce local ďŹ&#x201A;uvial ďŹ&#x201A;ood risks in the Project area during storm events, provide the capacity needed for future upstream improvements, increase and improve ecological habitat, and provide for improved recreational opportunities. The Project components proposed to improve management of ďŹ&#x201A;ood ďŹ&#x201A;ows along the Creek from East Bayshore Road to San Francisco Bay include opening the Creek channel to ďŹ&#x201A;ow into the Baylands Preserve, reconďŹ guring and raising levees, creating a marshplain terrace to convey high ďŹ&#x201A;ows, installing ďŹ&#x201A;oodwalls, widening the Creek channel, and constructing access roads for maintenance purposes. The majority of the Project elements would occur on properties in Palo Alto and East Palo Alto and owned by the City of Palo Alto, or within Santa Clara Valley Water District or City of East Palo Alto rights-of-way. PROJECT IMPACTS: Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act, the SFCJPA, as the lead agency for the Project, has prepared a DEIR to evaluate environmental impacts of the proposed Project. The DEIR identiďŹ es potentially signiďŹ cant environmental impacts associated with aesthetics, air quality, biological resources, cultural and paleontological resources, geology and soils, greenhouse gases, water resources, noise and vibration, public health, recreation, and trafďŹ c. Most of the impacts were determined to be less than signiďŹ cant after the implementation of mitigation measures proposed for the Project. Construction impacts related to air quality were determined to be signiďŹ cant and unavoidable even after implementation of trafďŹ c and air quality mitigation measures. Additionally, because implementation of the mitigation measures proposed to compensate for recreational impacts to the Palo Alto Golf Course are outside the lead agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jurisdiction and fulďŹ llment cannot be guaranteed, a signiďŹ cant and unavoidable impact on the Golf Course is also assumed. SFCJPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s judgment is that the ďŹ&#x201A;ood control beneďŹ ts to residents in East Palo Alto and Palo Alto outweigh the identiďŹ ed signiďŹ cant and unavoidable impacts. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The DEIR will be available for public review at the following locations: San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority 615 B Menlo Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025

City of Palo Alto Main Library 1213 Newell Rd. Palo Alto, CA 94303

City of East Palo Alto Library 2415 University Ave. East Palo Alto, CA 94303

A limited number of copies of the DEIR are available on a ďŹ rst request basis, by contacting the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority at the address, telephone number, or electronic mail address indicated herein. It is also available at on the SFCJPA website at http://sfcjpa.org/web/documents/sanfrancisquito-creek-jpa/. The public comment period on the DEIR closes at 5 p.m. on September 13th, 2012. PUBLIC MEETING: In conjunction with public review, the SFCJPA will also conduct two public hearings to take comments on the DEIR on August 15th and August 29th, 2012, both occurring at 6:00 p.m. at East Palo Alto City Hall (2415 University Avenue).

The online guide to Palo Alto businesses ShopPaloAlto.com

COMMENT PERIOD: The public is encouraged to ask questions and provide comments on the DEIR by email, direct mail or fax. Comments and feedback received between July 30th and September 13th, 2012 will be reviewed and incorporated into the Final EIR, as appropriate. Comments on this document should be directed to:. Kevin Murray, Project Manager San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority 615-B Menlo Avenue Menlo Park, California 94025 650-324-1972 email: kmurray@sfcjpa.org Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 21

Movies OPENINGS

The Watch --

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PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Chef Chuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

Cheese Steak Shop

Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

326-1628 2305-B El Camino Real, Palo Alto

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

Luttickenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 854-0291 3535 Alameda, Menlo Park www.luttickens.com

The Old Pro 326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com STEAKHOUSE

Sundance the Steakhouse 321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

New Tung Kee Noodle House 947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luvnoodlemv INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant 462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

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(Century 16, Century 20) According to an old showbiz saw, the key to comedy is timing. Well, the new big-budget sci-fi comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Watchâ&#x20AC;? has a problem there. The laugher about a self-appointed â&#x20AC;&#x153;neighborhood watchâ&#x20AC;? doing what the cops canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t comes just five months after a neighborhood-watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla., defied police and pursued, shot and killed an unarmed teenager. If and when the Trayvon Martin shooting ever becomes a distant memory, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Watchâ&#x20AC;? will be able to stand on its own. But for now, the net of reality has entangled this bit of would-be escapism. For a while, even in spite of egregious corporate-brand placement, the film appears to be an almost accidentally daring satire. Scripted by Jared Stern and Seth Rogen & Evan Goldberg, the picture opens with fussbudget hero Evan (Ben Stiller) introducing us to â&#x20AC;&#x153;the greatest town in the greatest country on the greatest planet in the universeâ&#x20AC;?: Glenview, Ohio. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any black friends, he tells us, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the market for one. Evan likes to be involved: as a city councilman, doing highway cleanup, you name it. So when the big-box-store manager discovers that his Hispanic security guard (Joe Nunez) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; freshly anointed an American citizen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has been brutally killed (unbeknownst to anyone, by a space alien), Evan organizes a neighborhood watch with the intention of finding the murderer. Enter hyperactive alpha-bro Bob (Vince Vaughn), police-reject Franklin (Jonah Hill) and the apparently biracial Jamarcus (Richard Ayoade of Britcom â&#x20AC;&#x153;The IT Crowdâ&#x20AC;?), and the motley watch begins its nightly patrols. This wouldbe â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ghostbustersâ&#x20AC;? puts stock in green goo and plentiful explosions to complement the comedy-team fireworks, but â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Watchâ&#x20AC;? also

NOW PLAYING The following is a sampling of movies recently reviewed in the Weekly: The Dark Knight Rises ---(Century 16, Century 20) All the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gotham City in Christopher Nolanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambitious Batman trilogy, which here comes to an emphatic conclusion. The screenplay by Nolan and his brother Jonathan takes inspiration from â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Tale of Two Citiesâ&#x20AC;? and Fritz Langâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metropolisâ&#x20AC;? in depicting the levels of society: the 99 percent versus the 1 percent, the skyscrapers down to the sewers. The leitmotif of Nolanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-orchestrated Batman saga is how a society, and an individual, responds to a fall. Batman has receded into billionaire Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale), a limping recluse. He faces two characters plucked from the pages of Batman comics: fearsome terrorist Bane (Tom Hardy) and cat burglar Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway), who wants a â&#x20AC;&#x153;clean slateâ&#x20AC;? in an internet age when information is immortal. The film delivers a whole lotta movie, with cast-of-thousands spectacle and giant-sized action. The Nolans consider the issues of the day (thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big Occupy Gotham theme); explore the role of legendary heroes in galvanizing the public; and labor mightily to ensure that how their Batman ends dovetails with 2005â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Batman

chooses to make its in-over-theirheads heroes dumb instead of smart, then celebrates them anyway. Part of the joke is that this inept bunch gets together and blithely commits crimes in the process of trying to foil them, and they become drunk on power whenever they perceive the tiniest of victories. Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character particularly (and, again, accidentally) evokes trigger-happy wannabe George Zimmerman. Ever-angry and constantly flicking his butterfly knife, Franklin lives with his mother and explains his failed bid to join the police force: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apparently I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pass the written exam or the physical exam or the mentalhealth exam.â&#x20AC;? As director Akiva Schaffer sticks â&#x20AC;&#x153;Straight Outta Comptonâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boyz in the Hoodâ&#x20AC;? on the soundtrack, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Watchâ&#x20AC;? parodies the middle-class middle-American maleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need to test and prove his manhood, to himself and others (also, Stillerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character frets over not being able to give his wife a child). But the movie also buys into traditional masculinity. When Evan cries over the death of the security guard (accompanied by a Spanish cover of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sound of Silenceâ&#x20AC;?), weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re prompted to laugh. Despite the amusing verbal riffs (most of them from still-got-it motor-mouth Vaughn) and expert delivery from all four leads, having its main characters both ways â&#x20AC;&#x201D; horrifying yet heroic â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ultimately sinks this scattershot exercise. A bodysnatchers subplot brings to mind Rod Serlingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suburban-paranoia parable â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street,â&#x20AC;? but â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Watchâ&#x20AC;? falls back on the convention of the inept heroes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; spoiler alert â&#x20AC;&#x201D; saving the day. Any other year, we probably wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bat an eye at that, but whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the key to comedy? Rated R for strong sexual content including references, pervasive language and violent images. One hour, 38 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese Begins.â&#x20AC;? Rated PG-13 for violence, sensuality and language. Two hours, 45 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C. (Reviewed July 20, 2012)

Beasts of the Southern Wild ---(Guild) Independent filmmaking doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come any better than this. Newcomer Quvenzhane Wallis delivers a riveting performance as the child trying to make sense of her world on the wrong side of a southern Louisiana levee. She and her ailing father (Dwight Henry) struggle to stay afloat in The Bathtub, a floodplain populated with odd characters and littered with ramshackle housing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a hurricane away from disaster. The community refuses to be displaced. Director Zeitlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift is the ability to pack social commentary within a unique voice and look. He and co-writer Lucy Alibar address the difficulties of preserving a people and their culture in post-Katrina Louisiana. The imagery has a haunting quality, especially once the characters become unmoored. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beasts of the Southern Wildâ&#x20AC;? is a must-see movie of rare vision. And the defiant brown eyes of Quvenzhane Wallis burn with a warrior spirit you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t soon forget. Rated PG-13 for language, child imperilment, brief sensuality, disturbing images and thematic material. 1 hour, 33 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S.T. (Reviewed July 13, 2012)

Movies MOVIE TIMES Showtimes for the Century 16 theater are for Friday through Tuesday only unless otherwise noted. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 5:10 & 9:35 p.m. The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 2:50 & 10:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Century 20: 1:10 & 7:15 p.m.; In 3D at 10:30 a.m.; 4 & 9:30 p.m. Beasts of the Southern Wild (PG-13) (((( Century 20: Noon, 2:35, 5, 7:25 & 9:55 p.m. Guild Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7:15 & 9:45 p.m. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: Sat.-Tue. at 12:10, 3:30, 6:50 & 9:55 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Fri. at 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 & 10 p.m. Brave (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:55, 4:45, 7:25 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 1:45, 4:25, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) (((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 12:50, 2:30, 3, 4, 4:40, 5:30, 6:20, 7, 8, 8:40, 9:30 & 10:40 p.m.; Fri. also at 11:30 a.m. & 10 p.m.; Sat.Tue. also at 1:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:30, 11:05 & 11:40 a.m.; 12:15, 12:50, 2:10, 2:45, 3:20, 3:55, 4:30, 5:50, 7, 7:35, 8:10, 9:30 & 10:35 p.m.; Fri., Sat. & Mon.-Thu. also at 1:30 p.m.; Fri.-Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 5:05 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 6:25, 8:45 & 10:05 p.m.; Wed. also at 10:10 p.m. East of Eden (1955) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m. Farewell, My Queen (R) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 2, 4:30, 7:05 & 9:35 p.m. The Grateful Dead Birthday Celebration Event (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 7 p.m. Century 20: Wed. at 7 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2:20, 5:10, 8 & 10:30 p.m.; In 3D at 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4:30, 7:10 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m.; 12:50, 3:10, 5:35, 8 & 10:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11:45 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:05 & 9:25 p.m. The Intouchables (R) (( Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:15, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Katy Perry: Part of Me (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 10:45 a.m.; In 3D at 1:35 & 7:05 p.m. Magic Mike (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; Fri. also at 2:15, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m.; Sat.-Tue. also at 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:25, 5, 7:45 & 10:30 p.m. Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Tue. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 3:40 p.m. Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 1:50, 4:20, 7:10 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 12:25, 2:50, 5:10, 7:50 & 10:10 p.m. The Queen of Versailles (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:10 p.m.

The Intouchables -(Aquarius) In â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Intouchables,â&#x20AC;? a rich, stuffy, white man exposes a poor black man to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;finer thingsâ&#x20AC;? in life; in turn, the black man teaches the white man how to loosen up and love. No need to check your watch. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still 2012. With its brash humor and emotional generosity, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Intouchablesâ&#x20AC;? has crowd-pleaser written all over it, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no mistaking the queasy racial implications. Francois Cluzet (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tell No Oneâ&#x20AC;?) plays Phillippe, a quadriplegic millionaire who unexpectedly plucks Senegalese immigrant Driss (Omar Sy) out of the Parisian ghetto to be a live-in home-care provider. Phillippe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also a closet adventurer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; appreciates Drissâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; irreverent insistence on prodding his boss out of his discomfort zone and into his need for speed and romance. Wildly popular in its native France, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Intouchablesâ&#x20AC;? applies strict formula to a reassuring story about improving oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life by embracing new people and experiences. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cinematic warm fuzzy if ever there was one, and the performances by Cluzet and Sy prove highly appealing. But in America, where we invented this formula, audiences are likely to find it discomfitingly retrograde. Rated R for language and some drug use. One hour, 52 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C. (Reviewed July 13, 2012)

Savages ---1/2 (Century 20) Oliver Stone still believes in red-meat cinema. The proof is in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Savages,â&#x20AC;? a hard-R crime drama that never treats the audience as juvenile. A war veteran named Chon (Taylor Kitsch) and his business partner and best friend Ben (Aaron Johnson) have a partnership that brings to mind the entrepreneurship of Ben and Jerry. The boutique product they export isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gourmet ice cream but gourmet pot. Ben and Chon face a takeover by a Mexican cartel, but when the duo makes other plans, the cartel takes their surfer girl â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oâ&#x20AC;? (Blake Lively) hostage, setting off a war of wills. Salma Hayekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elena, the cruel cartel mistress, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t suffer fools,

but sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a devoted, frustrated mother. Benicio Del Toro plays her top goon, Lado, both psychotic and sensitive. John Travolta is the slick, corrupt DEA agent. All three could be Oscar front-runners. The menage a trois at the heart of the film symbolizes American life: Naive consumer O is in bed with both damaged-goods muscle Chon and Buddhist businessman Ben, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never want her as much as they want, need and envy each other. Rated R for violence, sexuality, nudity, drug use and language. Two hours, 10 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C. (Reviewed July 6, 2012) The Amazing Spider-Man --(Century 16, Century 20) Viewers will compare â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Amazing Spider-Man,â&#x20AC;? to Sam Raimiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2002 effort, and it could be argued that the two are on equal footing. In this comic book movie reboot, Andrew Garfield (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Social Networkâ&#x20AC;?) is high-school outcast Peter Parker, and Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love interest is Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone). Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents left him with his uncle Ben (Martin Sheen) and aunt May (Sally Field) when he was a boy, and he still puzzles over their sudden departure. Peter discovers his father had been working with one-armed scientist Dr. Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans), and visits Connors at R&D company OsCorp. A genetically altered spider bites Peter, who starts showing enhanced strength and reflexes. He dubs himself Spider-Man, and takes to swinging over the city. The visual effects in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amazingâ&#x20AC;? are superior (including breathtaking scenes from Spider-Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s P.O.V.) and its villain, the Lizard, is one of the genreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most frightening. The battle scenes between Spider-Man and the Lizard are exceptional. Garfield is a terrific actor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; better than Maguire â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Stone is a welcome upgrade over the dour Kirsten Dunst. Both familiar and fresh, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a spectacle with enough thrills and humor to satisfy most fans. Rated PG-13 for action and violence. Two hours, 16 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; T.H. (Reviewed July 6, 2012)

D I S C OV E R T H E M O S T

Royal Ballet: The Sleeping Beauty (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Sun. at noon; Tue. at 7 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Sun. at noon; Tue. at 7 p.m. Savages (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 4:15 & 10:15 p.m. The Secret Garden (1949) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Tue. at 5:45 & 9:35 p.m. Step Up: Revolution (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 1:45 & 7:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11:20 a.m.; 4:20 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 3, 5:35, 8:10 & 10:40 p.m.; In 3D at 11:05 a.m.; 1:50, 4:20, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Ted (R) ( Century 16: 11:15 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:40 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. To Rome With Love (R) (( Palo Alto Square: 4:30 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 1:30, 7:25 & 10:05 p.m.; Sun. also at 7:25 p.m.; Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 1:30 & 7:25 p.m.; Tue. also at 1:30 p.m.

MAGICAL FILM

THE

Y EAR

+ +++

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

A REMARKABLE CREATION.â&#x20AC;? ROGER EBERT

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A BLAST OF

Total Recall (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Thu. at 12:01 a.m. Century 20: Thu. at 12:01 & 12:02 a.m.

OF

SHEER IMPROBABLE JOY.â&#x20AC;?

The Watch (R) (( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 12:10, 1:40, 2:40, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:45 a.m.; noon, 1:20, 2:35, 3:55, 5:10, 6:30, 7:50, 9:05 & 10:25 p.m.

A.O. SCOTT

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260)

Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260)

Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264)

Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700)

Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264)

Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to Palo AltoOnline.com/movies

CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) ON THE WEB: The most up-to-date movie listings at PaloAltoOnline.com

WOODY ALEC ROBERTO PENĂ&#x2030;LOPE JUDY JESSE GRETA ELLEN ALLEN BALDWIN BENIGNI CRUZ DAVIS EISENBERG GERWIG PAGE

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri 7/27

To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 10:05 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00 Sat 7/28 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 10:05 Sun 7/29 To Rome with Love - 4:30, 7:25 Mon 7/30 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 Tues 7/31 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30 Wed & Thurs To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 8/1-8/2

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

TO ROME WITH LOVE

WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY WOODY ALLEN WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM  

    

NOW PLAYING

CINĂ&#x2030;ARTS@PALO ALTO SQUARE 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (800) FANDANGO

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.TOROMEWITHLOVE.COM

MENLO PARK %$'"/( *!# )' '*%,'      

 

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS CAMPBELL $' 

NOW PLAYING

SAN JOSE !%-')( %)%&+ 

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 23

by Dean McArdle

M

ost newly turned 16-year olds canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to get their driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license and start cruising around town. Palo Alto High junior Lily Zhang, however, has bigger things on her mind, like the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. Zhang qualified in January to represent the United States in table tennis. She defeated Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anqui Luo in the Olympic Trials final to clinch a team win for the USA and fulfill her dream of reaching the London Games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even describe it,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said in a recent interview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The feeling is just so exciting, because it has been my dream ever since I was a little girl.â&#x20AC;? Joining Zhang on the U.S. Olympic table tennis team is a pair of fellow California teens, Ariel Hsing of San Jose and Erica Wu of Arcadia. The three-teen team will be a heavy underdog in London, but Zhang embraces the role. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that takes a lot of pressure of us,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We go out there thinking we are the underdogs, and we can just play our game.â&#x20AC;? Although only a few months into her 16th year, Zhang has been serving and volleying for over a decade. She began playing table tennis at seven-years-old, and quickly developed into one of the young phenoms of the game. When Zhang made the U.S. Under-15 cadet team at the precocious age of 10, she realized that table tennis could contain a serious future for her. She began training at the India Community Center in Milpitas under the tutelage of a myriad of coaches, including former Italian National Team coach Massimo Constantini. Honing her skills over the years, Zhang has blossomed into one of the United Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; best players in any age category. The International Table Tennis Association currently ranks her No. 148 in the world. Since qualifying for the Olympics, Zhang has pumped up her practice and competition schedule. She recently defeated teammate and training partner Hsing at the U.S. Table Tennis Open to claim the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Under-21 national title. In London, however, the competition wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be limited to under-21, and Zhang

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a

jolly good time

Palo Alto High table tennis player Lily Zhang makes her Olympic debut, joining the many local athletes living for the moment in London at the 30th Summer Games in merry olde England

Despite being only 16 and ranked No. 148 in the world, Palo Alto High junior Lily Zhang will be tested like no other time in her career at the Summer Games in London, England.

(continued on next page)

Veronica Weber

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will be up against the best the world of table tennis has to offer, and that means Team China. The daughter of a Chinese immigrant, Zhang knows that in table tennis China has no equal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;China has definitely been dominating table tennis for a while now,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In China it (table tennis) is like the football of the U.S., it is huge and they have so many schools and training systems.â&#x20AC;? In her own school, Zhang has experienced a wealth of support from classmates and friends. After qualifying, the story ran in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Campanile newspaper, prompting an outpouring of congratulations. Zhang has not allowed the praise to slow her work ethic though, and trains every daty after school for two to three hours. While she is quick to express her love for the sport that has taken her around the world, managing high school and world-class athletics can be a tricky balancing act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting harder and harder with school,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;School is getting harder as I go along with homework and more tests, and having to study for SATs now.â&#x20AC;? Since the end of the school year, Zhang has expanded her practice schedule and now trains more than five hours a day. As the Summer Games approached, she began to work not only on her physical skills, but also on the mental side of table tennis, as well.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are working a lot on our mental game. A lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, but there is so much mental game involved in table tennis,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to know your strategy and you have to think a few balls ahead of your opponent so you know where to go and where the ball is coming and how to place it.â&#x20AC;? While Opening Ceremonies take place Friday, Zhang reported to Manchester, England on July 19 to continue her training with the national team coaches. There her training is focused on strategy and game planning for her upcoming opponents. Her rapid rise to the upper echelon of her sport has forced Zhang into competition against opponents much older than her, some of whom are more than twice her age and have been competing longer than she has been alive. Her older competitors may have an advantage dealing with the nerves that come with the world stage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure when we get there and are about to play all of us will feel some butterflies in our stomach,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said, explaining that her strategy is just to stay calm and limit her emotions. Despite the hard training and the nerves, Lily Zhang still relishing the experience, and maintains a good deal of perspective. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It still feels cool to wake up every day and know that you are going to be in the Olympics,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really care if I win or lose, I just want to play my best.â&#x20AC;?N Editorial intern Dean McArdle can be emailed at dmcardle@ paweekly.com.

Palo Alto High junior Lily Zhang (top right) practices with her Olympic teammate Ariel Hsing during a training session at the India Community Center in Milpitas, prior to departing for the Summer Olympic in London, England. Zhang (above) will begin competition on Saturday after walking in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opening Ceremonies. At age 16, Zhang will be among the youngest competitors in the table tennis competition and will be a big underdog despite being ranked No. 148 in the world.

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 25

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will be up against the best the world of table tennis has to offer, and that means Team China. The daughter of a Chinese immigrant, Zhang knows that in table tennis China has no equal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;China has definitely been dominating table tennis for a while now,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In China it (table tennis) is like the football of the U.S., it is huge and they have so many schools and training systems.â&#x20AC;? In her own school, Zhang has experienced a wealth of support from classmates and friends. After qualifying, the story ran in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Campanile newspaper, prompting an outpouring of congratulations. Zhang has not allowed the praise to slow her work ethic though, and trains every daty after school for two to three hours. While she is quick to express her love for the sport that has taken her around the world, managing high school and world-class athletics can be a trickly balancing act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting harder and harder with school,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;School is getting harder as I go along with homework and more tests, and having to study for SATs now.â&#x20AC;? Since the end of the school year, Zhang has expanded her practice schedule and now trains more than five hours a day. As the Summer Games approached, she began to work not only on her physical skills, but also on the mental side of table tennis, as well.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are working a lot on our mental game. A lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, but there is so much mental game involved in table tennis,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to know your strategy and you have to think a few balls ahead of your opponent so you know where to go and where the ball is coming and how to place it.â&#x20AC;? While Opening Ceremonies take place Friday, Zhang reported to Manchester, England on July 19 to continue her training with the national team coaches. There her training is focused on strategy and game planning for her upcoming opponents. Her rapid rise to the upper echelon of her sport has forced Zhang into competition against opponents much older than her, some of whom are more than twice her age and have been competing longer than she has been alive. Her older competitors may have an advantage dealing with the nerves that come with the world stage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure when we get there and are about to play all of us will feel some butterflies in our stomach,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said, explaining that her strategy is just to stay calm and limit her emotions. Despite the hard training and the nerves, Lily Zhang still relishing the experience, and maintains a good deal of perspective. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It still feels cool to wake up every day and know that you are going to be in the Olympics,â&#x20AC;? Zhang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really care if I win or lose, I just want to play my best.â&#x20AC;?N Editorial intern Dean McArdle can be emailed at dmcardle@ paweekly.com.

Palo Alto High junior Lily Zhang (top right) practices with her Olympic teammate Ariel Hsing during a training session at the India Community Center in Milpitas, prior to departing for the Summer Olympic in London, England. Zhang (above) will begin competition on Saturday after walking in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opening Ceremonies. At age 16, Zhang will be among the youngest competitors in the table tennis competition and will be a big underdog despite being ranked No. 148 in the world.

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 25

Stanford divers could be on board for medals Ipsen, Krug hope to make the most of their first Olympic Games by Rick Eymer

S Kirby Lee/Image of Sport

Former Stanford All-American and current Castilleja water polo coach Brenda Villa heads into her fourth Olympics in London still searching for an elusive gold medal. Villa is expected to retire following the Summer Games.

Four-time Olympians Villa, Azevedo still searching for that gold medal Former Stanford water polo standouts hope to achieve their elusive goal in London by Rick Eymer

S

tanford grads Brenda Villa and Tony Azevedo have become the faces of the United States Olympic water polo teams. Villa was in from the beginning, helping shape the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team into an international powerhouse. Azevedo, often called the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest water polo player and certainly the best in the U.S., created a renewed interest in the sport among Americans. Villa plans to retire from the U.S. national team following the 2012 London Olympic Games, although she still has a job coaching at Castilleja. A commitment to the national team requires an all-encompassing, time-consuming way of life and Villa has spent most of the past 10 years doing exactly that. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helped guide the sport from afterthought to international recognition.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to take a step back and breathe a little bit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have Stanford teammates with whom I have stayed in touch,â&#x20AC;? Villa said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I miss things. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve missed birthdays and weddings. Margie Dingeldein just got married and I missed her wedding. Jackie Frank is in medical school. I see those teammates doing amazing things.â&#x20AC;? Azevedo is a different story. He was born into a water polo family and has devoted his career to raising the United States out of obscurity. The journey began when he was the youngest member of the team at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, not yet enrolled at Stanford. Azevedo spends his spare time playing overseas in some of the toughest leagues in the world. It made him even more committed to helping the U.S. compete for gold.

Kirby Lee/Image of Sport

Four-time Stanford Olympian Tony Azevedo also is still looking for his first gold medal in the Olympic Games. Page 26Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

For both Azevedo and Villa, the gold medal symbolizes the final elusive step needed to make the journey succeed. Both have shared the podium on each side of the top rung. This year, they wish to stand on top. Azevedoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final words following his final game at Stanford, a loss to USC in the NCAA championship game in 2004, were â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to play professionally in Italy and then help the United States win a gold medal.â&#x20AC;? At the time, the Americans had not even medaled since the 1988 Seoul Games. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holding himself to that promise. Azevedo is already formulating plans for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. He was born in Brazil and still has family there. He if continues into 2020, he would tie the record for most Olympics in water polo. Stanford won the NCAA title twice during the Azevedo era, when he dominated the college arena like never before. He was named the national Player of the Year all four years and left Stanford with a school record of 332 goals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In my mind, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna win the gold one way or another,â&#x20AC;? Azevedo told USA Today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely something that kept me motivated.â&#x20AC;? Azevedo led the team in scoring, with 17 goals, to help the U.S. win its first medal in 20 years at the 2008 Beijing Games. He scored a team-high 15 goals in the 2004 Athens Games and had 13 as a high school player in 2000. A three-time United States Olympic Committee Player of the Year, Azevedoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value to the sport to (continued on page 28)

tanford grad Cassidy Krug â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had improved so much in one grew up with parents who year,â&#x20AC;? Krug said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never really plawere both diving coaches but teaued, I just steadily improved.â&#x20AC;? she preferred gymnastics. Diving In 2008, she underwent surgery was something fun to do, until she that set her back. She gave herself arrived at Stanford. the year after graduating to see Cardinal sophomore Kristian Ip- where she could go in diving. After sen was already a world-class diver the trials she retired, sort of. when he arrived at Stanford. He also â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the back of my mind, it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enjoys gymnasa real retiretics, though as a ment,â&#x20AC;? she said. spectator. Less than a Krug was a year later she l a t e - blo o m e r ; was back in the Ipsen developed pool. What startfast, and both ed as an Olymhave several pic gymnastics things in comdream became mon. In addition Olympic diving to each winning reality. an NCAA title, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing,â&#x20AC;? Krug and Ipsen Krug said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will be competstill a little suring in the 2012 real. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been London Olympic dreaming of this Games for the since I was three United States and now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m livafter winning ing it. I get the events at the opportunity to Olympic Trigo to London als earlier this and compete at month. the biggest meet â&#x20AC;&#x153;My parents in the world.â&#x20AC;? instilled my love Stanford diving Olympians Most observers of the sport but Kristian Ipsen (left) and Cassidy felt Ipsen would I never felt any Krug flank their Olympic coach reach the Olympressure,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Rick Schavone. pics at some point. Krug, who comHe made it in the petes in the 3-meter event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They 3-meter synchro event with veteran were supportive of my involvement Olympian Troy Dumais. He nearly in gymnastics. My dad did not even made it in an individual event, as try to recruit me (for diving at the well. University of Pittsburgh). Diving â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I missed one dive and it cost me was a gradual process.â&#x20AC;? a spot in the Olympic team,â&#x20AC;? IpIt wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until she arrived at Stan- sen said of the individual 3-meter ford and began working with coach competition, one of the closest in Dr. Rick Schavone that she U.S. history as less than started dreaming large. two points separated the â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Schavone) made my top three divers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the Olympic dreams a possibest preliminary Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had in bility,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He gave along time. Overall it was me the goal.â&#x20AC;? a good list and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy I Krug competed in both came back with a good dive gymnastics and diving to end it.â&#x20AC;? until she was 15. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when she Ipsen has been diving since he made the decision to concentrate on was six years old. He grew up in diving. Walnut Creek and attended De La â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was improving more as a div- Salle High. He teamed with Dumais er,â&#x20AC;? she said. three years ago to win the 3-meter Krug seemingly came out of synchro event at the FINA World nowhere to win her NCAA title. Championships in Rome and they Schavone said the talent was always have been successful ever since. there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned a lot from him,â&#x20AC;? Ipâ&#x20AC;&#x153;You would always see glimpses sen said of his diving partner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He of her greatness. The question was was a lot older and had been to the could she put it all together?â&#x20AC;? he Olympics and that was my first insaid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She came to the sport rela- ternational competition. He helped tively late and hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put a whole me deal with nerves.â&#x20AC;? list together.â&#x20AC;? Like Krug, he competed in a test Krug dived at both the 2004 and event in London. The facilities wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t 2008 Olympic Trials, qualifying â&#x20AC;&#x153;at be so overwhelming this trip. the last possible momentâ&#x20AC;? in 2004 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great diver, period,â&#x20AC;? and somehow reaching the finals af- Schavone said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the top ter entering the semifinals in ninth five divers of all time and a genius of place. She had just completed her freshman year at Stanford. (continued on page 28)

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Ben Lee of the Palo Alto Police Department is using his experience as a 1992 Olympian in badminton to guide the fortunes of the U.S. Olympic badminton team in the 2012 Summer Games in London.

A 1992 Olympian heads up USA badminton team as coach Palo Alto police officer, Ben Lee, helped grow sport in U.S. by Eric Van Susteren s a young athlete, Ben Lee was active in many sports. The future Olympian, however, found only one that could satisfy his high activity level. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t boxing, soccer, or even tennis. It was badminton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It got me hooked as soon as I started playing,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the combination of so many different things: endurance, speed, power, agility finesse â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never just one.â&#x20AC;? Twenty years ago, Lee represented the United States at the Barcelona Olympics in badminton. It was the first year it was included as an Olympic sport. This month heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s returning to the Summer Games in London, England, but not as player. Lee, now a Palo Alto police officer, was selected as the U.S. Olympic Badminton Teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head coach. For the past few months he has been flying to Los Angeles most weeks to coach the team for 10 to 20 hours, pushing them hard in practice and nudging them gently when he tries to motivate them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try not to tell them too much,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It clouds the mind, and I want them to compete with a clear head.â&#x20AC;? Lee, who was the captain of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;92 Olympic badminton team, said he understands the pressure. His doubles team made it as far as the final 16 in Barcelona, and the rest U.S. badminton team didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take any medals home that summer. But he said one of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major accomplishments that year was inspiring the next generation of athletes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Olympians. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was definitely one of the pinnacles of my career,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really

A

motivated a lot of coming-up players that we competed with the resources we had at the level we did.â&#x20AC;? He said badminton as a serious sport has grown tremendously in the in the U.S. since his time. Professional badminton facilities didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist in the Bay Area 10 years ago, Lee said. Today there are 16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the late â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s and in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s there were no clubs like there are now,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were under the mercy of the days and times the high schools and gyms were open, and there werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t many coaches around either. Nowadays players can play in really nice clubs with an abundance of coaches.â&#x20AC;? The growth doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come from only professional badminton facilities. High school teams and college clubs are popping up, both of which do a lot to dispel the image of badminton as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;backyardâ&#x20AC;? sport or â&#x20AC;&#x153;lawn game,â&#x20AC;? he said. Palo Alto and Gunn high schools have had badminton teams for years and college scholarships are even offered in the sport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you tell people you compete professionally, they still have that backyard image in their mind,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What a lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize is that shuttle is coming off the racquet at 200 miles per hour. The flanged design slows it down a lot, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still going over the net at 100 miles per hour.â&#x20AC;? These days, 47-year-old Lee said he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hit the shuttle that fast and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compete with the athleticism of the players he coaches, saying it would be like John McEnroe going up against Roger Federer. Still, coaching is his opportunity to stay engaged with the sport and its com-

munity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some players retire and they take it easy, move on and start a family,â&#x20AC;? said Lee, who has two children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the most part Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done the same, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a great passion for the sport and really wanted to stay involved.â&#x20AC;? Lee said the discipline and determination he learned from badminton helped him achieve another of his childhood dreams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; becoming a police officer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that I had wanted to do for a long time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; since I was a kid,â&#x20AC;? said Lee, who joined the police department when he was 37. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As I got older I knew if I waited too long it would be too late. I felt like it was either now or never.â&#x20AC;? Lee, who teaches defensive tactics and is trained in hostage negotiation with the Palo Alto Police Department, is coaching his players much as he would for other international competitions because on the surface theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very similar. Just as in the Pan Am Games or World Championships, players compete with elite competitors in front of thousands, but to Lee there is something different about playing at the Olympics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the environment that makes it so special,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is pretty much the event, and the players know it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the pinnacle of every dream.â&#x20AC;?N Editorial assistant Eric Van Susteren can be emailed at evansusteren@paweekly.com.

WATCH IT ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com A First Person video interview with Olympic badminton coach Ben Lee will be posted on Sunday on Palo Alto Online.

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Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 27

Water polo

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which he has dedicated a lifetime reaches far beyond the pool. He has graced the covers of hundreds of magazines and inspired a whole generation of players that will keep America vibrant in the sport. Earlier this year, the U.S. beat powerhouses Hungary and Serbia during an exhibition series on American soil. The U.S. understands how close it is to the top of the Jessica Steffens podium. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If everyone is on the same page, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving more like a machine,â&#x20AC;? Azevedo said in the USA Today article. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get to learn more about your teammates, how someone reacts, how to talk to them, how to inspire them. I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really important part. Ideally, especially in a team sport, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s which team is better not which 13 individuals are better.â&#x20AC;? Team USA has three other Stanford grads on its roster: Peter Varellas, Peter Hudnut and Layne Beaubein. They have all played on national collegiate championship teams and were members of the 2008 silver medal ride.

Divers

(continued from page 26)

a twister. He does that was well now as he did when he was eight years old. He hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been over-trained.â&#x20AC;? Ipsen and Dumais took a big lead into the finals of the Olympic Trials and still dived well enough to increase that lead. Ipsen said it felt

Villa has another Stanford grad around her in Jessica Steffens. Several others will be returning to Stanford in the fall and a run at a third straight NCAA title. Melissa Seidemann and Annika Dries played on Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 national title team. Maggie Steffens has yet to play for the Cardinal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I genuinely enjoy playing water polo and have fun doing it as this level,â&#x20AC;? Villa said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The travel, the team, competing, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still fun. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun to train with a group of winners every day.â&#x20AC;? Villa, at age 32, is not the oldest on the team. That honor belongs to Cal grad Heather Petri, 34. Villa is, however, the most decorated womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo player the United States has ever known. FINA Magazine, which covers the world, named her the Female Water Polo Player of the Decade for 2000-10. Like Azevedo, she left Stanford as the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-time leading scorer and with a national title. And also like Azevedo, only a gold medal would add to her legacy. Still, a new future awaits her following these Olympics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you get older itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harder,â&#x20AC;? Villa said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Realistically you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if you can do it financially any more. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to join the real world and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to see whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next.â&#x20AC;? N Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer can be emailed at reymer@ paweekly.com. like the best they had ever done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ifâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; were gone after that final dive,â&#x20AC;? Ipsen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a great feeling.â&#x20AC;? And having a teammate? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I enjoy the team aspect,â&#x20AC;? Ipsen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can definitely help each other.â&#x20AC;? Sharing gold in London also would be nice. N

Logan Tom

Ryan Hall

STANFORD OLYMPIANS IN LONDON Name

Sport

Stanford Affiliation

Foluke Akinradewo Tony Azevedo David Banks Cynthia Barboza Nicole Barnhart Layne Beaubien Bob Bryan Mike Bryan Rachel Buehler Jillian Camarena-Williams Jake Cornelius Annika Dries Gabe Gardner Ryan Hall Kevin Hansen Peter Hudnut Kristian Ipsen Maria Koroleva Cassidy Krug Elle Logan Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara Alex Osborne Christen Press Kristin Richards Logan Tom Melissa Seidemann Silas Stafford Jessica Steffens Maggie Steffens Brenda Villa Peter Varellas Kerri Walsh

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indoor volleyball Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eight (8+) rowing Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indoor volleyball (alternate) Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis doubles Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis doubles Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shot put Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eight (8+) rowing Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volleyball (alternate) Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marathon Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volleyball (alternate) Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-meter synchro diving Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s synchronized swimming Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-meter springboard diving Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eight (8+) Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quadruple Sculls (4x) Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer (alternate) Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indoor volleyball (alternate) Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indoor volleyball Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pair (2-) rowing Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beach volleyball

Graduated in 2009 Graduated in 2005 Graduated in 2005 Graduated in 2008 Graduated in 2004 Graduated in 1999 Turned pro in 1998 Turned pro in 1998 Graduated in 2007 Graduated in 2004 Graduated in 2005 Class of 2014 Graduated in 1999 Graduated in 2005 Graduated in 2004 Graduated in 2003 Class of 2015 Class of 2015 Graduated in 2007 Graduated in 2011 Graduated in 2010 Graduated in 2009 Graduated in 2011 Graduated in 2006 Graduated in 2003 Class of 2013 Graduated in 2008 Graduated in 2010 Class of 2016 Graduated in 2003 Graduated in 2006 Graduated in 2000

STANFORD OLYMPIANS REPRESENTING OTHER COUNTRIES Name

Country/Sport

Stanford Affiliation

David Dunford Jason Dunford Matt Gentry Aranxta King Amaechi Morton Tobias Oriowol Ali Riley Markus Rogan Katerina Stefanidi Kristina Vaculik

Kenya/menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swimming Kenya/menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swimming Canada/menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrestling Bermuda/womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s track and field Nigeria/menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s track & field Canada/menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swimming New Zealand/womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer Austria/menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swimming Greece/womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s track & field Canada/womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics

Graduated in 2010 Graduated in 2009 Graduated in 2005 Graduated in 2012 Graduated in 1012 Graduated in 2006 Graduated in 2010 Graduated in 2004 Graduated in 2012 Class of 2015

OTHER LOCAL OLYMPIANS

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Name

Country/Sport

Affiliation

Edrick Floreal Ben Lee Dr. Rick Schavone Lily Zhang

Track and field Badminton Diving Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s table tennis

Jumps, decathlon coach Head coach Assistant coach Palo Alto High

Sports Shorts

SEMIPRO BASEBALL

Winning might not be enough

STANFORD NOTES . . . Tight end Coby Fleener and quarterback Andrew Luck are officially teammates again, this time with the Indianapolis Colts. The former Stanford pass-catch duo hooked up again Wednesday when Fleener signed on. Fleener used his Twitter account to announce resolution of his contract. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am happy to announce the @NFLColts and I have agreed to a contract! #gocolts,â&#x20AC;? he tweeted. Specific financial details were not immediately available, but the NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rookie wage scale had set the parameters for Fleener, the Coltsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; second-round draft pick who went No. 34 overall. Fleener was slotted to receive a four-year, $5.3 million contract with a signing bonus of approximately $2.3 million.On coming to the Colts and working once again with Luck, Fleener said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think anytime you can go into a camp with someone you are familiar with, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting.â&#x20AC;? At Stanford last season, Fleener had 34 catches for 667 yards (a 19.6 average) plus 10 touchdowns. In 51 career games, he had 96 catches for 1,543 yards and 18 touchdowns.

Palo Alto Oaks face plenty of hurdles on way to World Series by Keith Peters

S

ROWING MEDALS . . . Sacred Heart Prep senior Danni Struck of Portola Valley will have some interesting stories to tell when she returns to school in the next month. She just won a gold medal in the quadruple sculling (four-person boat) and a bronze in the single at the Canammex International Regatta held at Lake Xochimilco, site of 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Struck was representing US Rowing in the annual event that brings together athletes from Canada, Mexico and the United States.

ON THE AIR Friday Olympic Games: Opening ceremonies, 7:30 p.m.; NBC

Saturday

Keith Peters

PA KNIGHTS . . . The Palo Alto Knights still have some roster spot open heading into the 2012 youth football season. Teams with openings include: Tiny Mites (ages 6-7), Cadets (ages 8-9), Jr. Pee Wee (ages 10-11), Pee Wee (ages 11-12), Jr. Midget (atges 12-13) and Midget (ages 14-15). Signups and equipment handouts will be Sunday at the Palo Alto High tennis courts from 9 a.m. To 2 p.m. For more information, go to www.paknights.

Palo Alto Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; veteran Matt Campbell will be in action this weekend as he and his teammates defend their title at the AABC Stan Musial Division Western Regional at Baylands Athletic Center. The Oaks open on Friday at 5 p.m.

OLYMPIC GAMES

Stanford teams will be tested in the JOs

USA women off to good soccer start

by Keith Peters

Sunday

larke Weatherspoon and his Stanford Water Polo Club Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 16U Red team have enjoyed some success this season with three top-five finishes in major tournaments. Those performances, however, are mere quizzes compared to the test the Stanford team will face beginning Saturday at the annual SwimOutlet.com Junior Olympics. The Stanford Water Polo Club not only is hosting the largest youth water polo tournament in the world, but the 16U Red squad is seeded No. 1 in its 48-team division. No pressure there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;JOs have not always been the kindest tournament for me,â&#x20AC;? said

Monday Olympic Games: Events from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and from 8 p.m.-midnight, NBA

Tuesday Olympic Games: Events from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and from 8 p.m.-midnight, NBC

Wednesday Thursday Olympic Games: Events from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and from 8 p.m.-midnight, NBC

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www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

C

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by Keith Peters tanford grad Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara made her Olympic debut with the U.S. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Team one to remember as the Americans rallied from two goals down to post a 4-2 soccer victory over France in an opening-round match on Wednesday at the famed Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara and fellow Stanford grad Rachel Buehler both started and played the entire match, witnessing the stirring comeback that earned Team USA three points in its quest for a third straight Olympic gold medal. Cardinal grad and backup goalie Nicole Barnhart did not see action behind starter Hope Solo.

S Mike Stahlschmidt/isiphotos.com

Olympic Games: Events from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and from 8 p.m.-midnight, NBC

(continued on next page)

WATER POLO

Olympic Games: Events from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 8 p.m.-midnight; NBC Olympic Games: Events from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 7 p.m.-midnight, NBA

ince the first day of the season, the Palo Alto Oaks had a goal of returning to the American Amateur Baseball Congress Stan Musial World Series. The Oaks finished third two years ago and fourth last season. The 2012 campaign was to provide the opportunity to move up even higher. While Palo Alto may have two opportunities to reach the World Series at this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Western Regional on its home field at Baylands Athletic Center, the Oaks may have to decline the trip even if they earn it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the problem,â&#x20AC;? said Steve Espinoza, the Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; general manager who coached the team to the past two World Series appearances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The AABC cut out paying for the hotel, except for $1,000. They also cut out giving players a daily allowance for food. If that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sound bad enough, they moved it (the World Series) from Houston to (Port Lucie) Florida and are trying to expand the tournament to 12-16 teams. So, they are requiring teams to be there earlier in the week to start playing games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taking away those funds and expanding the tournament is a major hardship on the Oaks. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any more sponsors as in years past and the cost to take the team is $20,000. To add to this hardship is some of my guys work and taking up to six days off to play in the World Series is a hardship on them.

Stanford grads Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara (left) and Rachel Buehler (right) both started in Team USAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-2 soccer victory over France in an Olympic opener.

(continued on next page)

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Sports

P.A. Oaks

Soccer

(continued from previous page)

Keith Peters

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m unsure that we will go to the World Series, even if we win the West Region.â&#x20AC;? Espinoza hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t closed the door on a possible trip to Florida. He said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll wait to see how things play out this weekend and what kind of commitments his players can make. The Oaks are the two-time defending regional champion and will their quest to make it three when they take on Bandidos Baseball, the No. 1 seed from Southern California, on Friday at 5 p.m. In the first game, the NorCal champion Sacramento Legends will face the NorCal runner-up Solano Mudcats at 1 p.m. The winners will meet Saturday at Baylands at 2 p.m., with the firstround losers tangling at 11 a.m. The championship game is set for Sunday at 11 a.m., with a challenge game (if necessary) scheduled for 3 p.m. If the Oaks donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win the regional title, they still could advance to the World Series as an at-large team based on the expanded field. Or, Palo Alto may not go at all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things have changed a lot,â&#x20AC;? Espinoza said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and not for the better.â&#x20AC;? Palo Alto comes into the regional with a 15-3 record and perhaps better suited than in the previous two seasons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re confident,â&#x20AC;? said player-manager Greg Matson, who took over the on-field duties this season with coach Joey Ordonez to allow Espinoza to concentrate on the business side of the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lost a few games.â&#x20AC;? The Oaks were 20-1 last season heading into the World Series and 20-1-2 the year before. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like what we have now,â&#x20AC;? said Matson, who has nine guys who can throw. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always gotten to these (postseason) places with pitching. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m feeling good about it. Our pitching and defense has been the best Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen.â&#x20AC;? Matson, a 2002 Gunn High grad,

Veteran Allen Stiles brings some hitting punch and speed to the Palo Alto Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lineup for the Western Regional this weekend. is in his ninth season with the Oaks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; arriving with Espinoza, another former Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; player (1974-84). The 28-year-old Matson still lives in Palo Alto and remains loyal to his team and former coach. Matson is one of nine players who are 25 or older. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of the guys have been here for five years or more,â&#x20AC;? Matson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guys donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to give up their positions. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve turned down the most players weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever turned away.â&#x20AC;? While playing for the Oaks used to be a way to fill the summer, things have changed for the players in recent years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing for a reason every week,â&#x20AC;? Matson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The standards weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve set â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we expect to win.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the goal once again this weekend as the Oaks host the Western Regional for the first time in their 62 years of existence. Lefty A.J. Gallardo is expected to start for the Oaks in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opener. Matson also has lefties Matt Campbell and newcomer C.J. Hillyer. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also Dominic Hernandez, Brant Norlander, Brian Maihack, Gunn grad Ricky Navarro, Paly grad Jason Kleinhoffer and even Matson, fittingly a closer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the deepest pitching we have had since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here,â&#x20AC;? Espinoza said. Added Matson: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can get some hits, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be OK.â&#x20AC;? The Oaks tuned up for this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regional playoffs by winning two of three games last weekend at Baylands Athletic Center. Palo Alto topped Bercovich Gold, 7-1, in a nonleague game Saturday before splitting a nonleague doubleheader with the visiting Fontanettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Collegiate on Sunday, losing the opener (3-2) before winning the nightcap, 2-0. On Saturday, the Oaks cruised past Bercovich Gold of Oakland behind the powerful left-handed tandem of Gallardo and Campbell.

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Gallardo, a first-year Oak coming off a fine senior season at Cal State East Bay, dominated the Gold by allowing no runs and only one hit over the first five frames. Campbell, serving in rare relief duty, allowed one run on one hit in the sixth before shutting down the Gold in order for the remainder of the game. Leadoff hitter Evan Warner from Palo Alto High hit the ball well, reaching base in four of five chances. Cleanup hitter Bryan Beres had two doubles, driving in two, while Danny Ordonez added three hits of his own, driving in one and scoring twice. The Oaks had 13 hits in all. On Sunday, Hernandez started the first game and allowed Fontanettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three runs and five hits through the first six innings. Fontanettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s used four pitchers who combined to allow only two runs on five Palo Alto hits. Navarro held Fonatanettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scoreless for the remainder of the game, but three runs proved to be enough for the visitors from San Jose. The Oaks rallied in the bottom of the ninth, loading the bases with no outs but failed to score. In Game 2, the Oaks scored all the runs they needed in the first inning. Warner led off the game by reaching first on a fielding error and then stole second. He advanced to third on a single by Allen Stiles, then scored on a sacrifice fly by Beres. Stiles advanced to second on Beresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sacrifice, moved to third on a groundout and then scored on a single by designated hitter Anthony Bona. Jeff Ramirez had three hits in three at bats combined with two stolen bases in the game. Hillyer got the win by pitching a shutout for the first four innings of the seven-inning contest. Norlander pitched two more scoreless innings before turning the ball over to Matson, who earned the save with a scoreless final inning. N

Mike Stahlschmidt/isiphotos.com

Keith Peters

Player-manager Greg Matson adds pitching depth.

Lloyd gave the USA the lead in the 56th minute with a rocket shot from 25 yards out that screamed into the left side of the net almost Carli Lloyd came off the bench before Bouhaddi could make a move just 17 minutes into the game and toward it. Lloyd had received a ball scored the game-winning goal, Cal in midfield and took a few dribbles grad Alex Morgan contributed two to free herself for the winning shot, goals and veteran Abby Wambach which she then celebrated by runhad the USAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first tally as the U.S. ning to the U.S. bench and executing rebounded from an early deficit in a perfect knee slide into a gaggle of the first 13 minutes with four unan- teammates. swered to open the Olympics atop Lloydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal was her second its group. straight Olympic game-winner as â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look at only the first she had the lone goal in the 2008 minutes or the last minutes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Olympic gold-medal game to defeat whole game,â&#x20AC;? said U.S. head coach Brazil, 1-0, in overtime. Pia Sundhage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you Morgan sealed the look at the whole game, match in the 66th minute Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really proud of the with her team-leading 19 team. Scoring four goals, goal of the season. and goals that were fanThe two second half tastic, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one way to goals took the fight out of prove that you are ready France, and although the (for the Olympics). It was talented French tried to a little shaky beginning, pull a goal back, the U.S. but I think it was amazdefense led by Christie ing the way we came back Rampone and Buehler, and responded to those Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara closed off the back and two goals.â&#x20AC;? shut down almost every The USA had started the game French attack in the final 45 minoff well but, after allowing the two utes. Solo ruled her penalty area goals, it seemed things were going after the two early goals, making from bad to worse for the Ameri- several brave catches in traffic and cans who were forced to make an controlling the tempo of the match early substitution after midfielder with her distribution and kicking Shannon Boxx suffered a ham- game. She also made a nice grab string injury in the 17th minute and off a header from â&#x20AC;Ślodie Thomis was replaced by Lloyd. It actually in the first half. turned out to be a turning point in Along with Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara, four other the match. U.S. players made their Olympic Shortly after the change, the USA debuts on Wednesday: right back got one foot back into the match as Amy LePeilbet, midfielder Megan Wambach, who missed the 2008 Rapinoe and forwards Morgan and Olympics with a broken leg, tal- Sydney Leroux. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara was one of lied her first Olympic goal since six players making their first start in the 2004 Athens gold-medal game, the Summer Games. heading home a Megan Rapinoe The USA now has a 13-0-1 record corner kick in the 19th minute. in the series with France that dates The Americans now had the mo- to the first meeting on July 29, 1988 mentum and the prodigious right â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a 1-0 USA victory in Rimini, Itleg of keepr Hope Solo set up the aly. France entered these Olympics equalizer in the 32nd minute. Solo on a 17-game winning streak. sent a kick deep into the French The Americans will continue defensive third where it flew over Group G play against Colombia at the leaping Wambach and her mark, Hampden Park on Saturday at noon and skipped through to the streak- (PDT) and wrap up group play on ing Morgan. Morgan then held off Tuesday against Korea DPR at 9:15 defender Ophelie Meilleroux and a.m. lifted her left-footed shot over onBoth games are televised live on rushing France goalkeeper Sarah the NBC Sports Network (Comcast Bouhaddi and into the net. The cable 723). N strike was Morganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first Olympic goal after scoring twice in the (US Soccer contributed to this story) Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Cup last summer.

(continued from previous page)

Stanford grads Rachel Buehler (16) and Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara (5) were in the starting lineup for the U.S. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Team in its Olympic opener.

Sports

Water polo

(continued from page 29)

Keith Peters

Weatherspoon, who coached the 14U Red team to a ninth-place finish last year in Southern California. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real exciting weekend. For some of the guys, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be some of the biggest games theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play in high school, partially because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at home and will be playing in front of family and friends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re home and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the No. 1 seed and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing in the pool where you train . . . thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a responsibility.â&#x20AC;? We at her sp o onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team earned the No. 1 seed thanks to Lamorinda, which won the 16U title at the Junior Olympics last summer. When Stanford beat Lamorinda at the Zone Qualifying tournament last month, Stanford immediately had a target on its back. To that, Weatherspoon isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that concerned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As long as they do their job, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to worry about the Southern California teams,â&#x20AC;? Weatherspoon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t played a team this summer that, player for player, was better than us.â&#x20AC;? The Stanford 16U Red team has finished no lower than fifth, which was the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last outing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at the U.S. Club Championships in Orange County a few weeks ago. Seeded behind Stanford is No. 2 Rose Bowl, No. 3 Regency and No. 4 Lamorinda. Regency features the younger members of the Mater Dei program, which hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lost a high school match in over two years. The Stanford 16U squad last won a gold medal at JOs in 2008. The quest to duplicate that begins Saturday at Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Avery Aquatic Center when the local team opens against Chicago Park District at 8:40 a.m. A victory will move Stanford into a second-round game at 1:40 p.m. If Stanford continues to win, action shifts to San Jose State on Sunday with matches at 10:20 a.m. And 1:40 p.m. A 4-0 record will move Stanford

back to Baker Pool on the Cardinal campus on Monday morning. Semifinals are Tuesday morning at Sacred Heart Prep with the championship match back at Avery Aquatic Center later in the day. The Stanford 16U Red team has a number of local high school players, including Harrison Enright, Nelson Perla-Ward and Michael Swart of Sacred Heart Prep, Evan McClelland and Morgan Olson-Fabbro of Menlo-Atherton, Coby Wayne from Gunn and goalie John Wilson from Menlo School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a good job this year,â&#x20AC;? Weatherspoon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a few good years of training and playing together. The younger guys on the team, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve coached them for three years (as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come up through the ranks).â&#x20AC;? Weatherspoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 14U team finished ninth last year after losing one match in a shootout and another by just a goal. Defense will be crucial once again over the fourday tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tell the boys if they want to win, they have to make their goalie look good.â&#x20AC;? The Stanford Water Polo Club will have nine teams entered, equaling the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most ever in the Junior Olympics. There are two teams each in 18s, 16s, 14s and 12s plus one co-ed 10U squad. The 18U Red team, which won the JO title last year under Brian

Harrison Enright of the Stanford 16U Red team

Kreutzkamp, is being coach by Terry Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell this summer. He coached the 16U Red team to fourth place at the 2011 JOs and inherits three players off the 18U championship squad â&#x20AC;&#x201D; goalie Alex Gow from Menlo-Atherton and field players Patrick Goodenough (St. Francis) and Adam Warmoth (Los Altos). Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell also has his 16s goalie, Will Runkel of Sacred Heart Prep, which gives the 18s a solid one-two punch in the cage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have two great goalies,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very supportive of each other.â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team is on the young side with six current members heading off to college and nine coming back to their respective high school teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a nice group of kids, definitely different than last year,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell said. The Stanford 18U Red squad finished third in the Cal Cup and seventh at the U.S. Club Championships, both good tuneups for the Junior Olympics. A lot of the same teams from those tournaments will be in the area this weekend. The Stanford 18U Red team is seeded sixth and will open Saturday at Palo Alto High at 10 a.m. A victory means another game at Paly at 3 p.m. If Stanford continues to win, it will play Sunday at Paly at 7 a.m. And 1 p.m. The championship match will be Tuesday at Avery Aquatic Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are about eight good teams with a chance,â&#x20AC;? said Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell. Regency, which was favored to win last year before being upset by Stanford, is not entered. Most of its top players are traveling with various USA Water Polo all-star teams this summer. The Stanford 18U White team, coached by new Paly head coach Brandon Johnson, will open Saturday at West Valley College at 9 a.m. The 16U White squad, coached by Matt Johnson, will open Saurday in the Challenge Division at San Jose State at 9:30 a.m. The Stanford 14U Red and White teams will be at Wilcox High on Saturday at 7:50 a.m. and 11:10 a.m., respectively, while the 12U Red will open at Cabrillo College in Aptos at 11 a.m., with the 12U White at San Lorenzo Valley High at 8:45 a.m. N

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming! September 29th 7pm - 1am the Palo Alto



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Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC ÂŁÂ&#x2122;nxĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`]Ă&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;­Ă&#x2C6;xäŽĂ&#x160;nxĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°vVVÂŤ>°Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;£ä\ääĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°

10:00 a.m. This Sunday Animal Blessing Sunday Rev. Dr. Eileen Altman leading An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

STANFORD WATER POLO CLUB JO ROSTERS 18&U RED Zachary Churukian, Brayden Curry, David Freudenstein, Matthew Godar, Patrick Goodenough, Alex Gow, Mitchell Hamilton, Bret Hinrichs, Harrison Holland-McCowan, Michael Holloway, Reid Lazzarini, Cory McGee, Ben Pickard, Will Runkel, Adam Warmoth Coach: Terry Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell

16&U WHITE Weston Avery, Nicholas Bisconti, Brandon Busse, Will Conner, Justin Cooper, Grant Harvey, Chris Hinrichs, Nikola Kapamadzin, Andreas Katsis, Max Somple, Darius Tenorio, Jack Turner, Ari Wayne, Jake Weinstein, Johnny Wilson Coach: Matt Johnson

12&U RED Niko Bhatia, Andrew Churukian, Dakota Freudenstein, Miller Geschke, Jayden Kunwar, Jonathan Mallery, Alexander Nemeth, Andrew Penner, Nathan Puentes, Christopher Rowland, Michael Sonsini, Sam Untrecht, Alan Viollier, Eric Warmoth, Larson Weigle. Coach: Tim Kates

18&U WHITE Eric Bakar, Zach Cogan, Zach Deal, Ryan Dougherty, Brendan Duffy, Ian Fuller, John Halet, Scott Jollymour, Zoltan Lazar, Jamie Olson, Alex Swart, Connor Dillon, Victor Stolle, Michael Znidarsic, Christian Lantzsch Coach: Brandon Johnson

14&U RED Finn Banks, Nikhil Bhatia, Andrew Cho, Andrew Goodenough, Kevin Hansen, Patrick Kirk, Derek Petroni, Winston Rosati, Reed Schaaf, Michael Schuur, Ian Shepherd, Alex Stratton, Benoit Viollier, Christopher Xi, Christin Znidarsic Coach: Colin Mello

12&U WHITE Aaron Babian, Kyle Ballack, Jackson Clevenger, Finnegan Depuy, Rory Hocker, Dominick Kirk, JT Kujawa, Gary Marston, Andy Maxwell, Will Riley, Noah Smith, AJ Smyth, Ryan Toulouse, Alec Vort, Christian Schroeder Coach: Sasha Potulnytskyy

16&U RED Michael Blach, Stephen Cho, Harrison Enright, Rishabh Hegde, John Knox, Evan McClelland, Morgan Olson-Fabbro, Nelson Perla-Ward, Jack Pickard, Trevor Raisch, Michael Swart, Coby Wayne, Shawn Welch, John Wilson, Spencer Witte Coach: Clarke Weatherspoon

14&U WHITE John Barman, Jack Beasley, Cade Curry, Jackson Enright, Mostyn Fero, Alexander Hakanson, Quinn Hamilton, Calder Hilde-Jones, Christian Huhn, Andrew Jozefov, Kyle Leung, Jorge Pont, Kyle Rumptz, Nicholas Russell, Gabriel Sleeper Coach: James Frank

10&U RED Benjamin Siminoff, Natalie Knox, Cooper McKenna, Colin, Babian, James Kujawa, Aidan Russell, Donald Weigle, Skylar Fong, Atticus Stephens, Jack Vort, Luke Johnston Coaches: Kielan Crow, Alex Bailey, Nick Schaefer, Lauryn Isford

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

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Menlo Park Median Price â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Midyear 2012

Flood Park

$1,098,000 Fair Oaks d

Bay Road

Roa

East of 101

$348,000 10 1

dA ven u

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Ma rsh

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Rin

gw o o

Enc

6t h Ave nu

e

$615,000

Ba ys ho re Fw y

Felton Gables

$1,400,000 am i

no R

ea l

Middlefield

Roa

El C

Willows

$1,205,000

Wil lo w

$2,293,000

d

Menlo Oaks

$1,540,000

Va lp

Av en ue Cr uz

$1,261,000

Sa nt a

ara

is o

Av en

ue

Downtown / Allied Arts

Central Menlo

$1,855,000 Alameda

$1,751,000 Ala me d

a

Sharon Heights

$1,882,000

schoelerman

Alpine Road

ad Sand Hill Ro

Alpine Road

$1,283,000 Information Based on MLS Single Family Homes / Map Courtesy of Google Maps

Call Jackie & Richard to Sell or Buy Your Home Jackie (650) 855-9700 | Richard (650) 566-8033 jackie@apr.com | richard@apr.com www.schoelerman.com DRE # 01092400 | DRE # 01413607

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Palo Alto Weekly 07.27.2012 - Section 1