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INSIDE

Community School of Music and Arts class guide

page

Donate to the HOLIDAY FUND page 22

Spectrum 12

16

Movies 26

Eating Out 29

Puzzles 45

NNews City looks ahead to 2012 challenges

Page 3

NSports Era ends for Stanford football

Page 31

NHome Downtown North: near Palo Alto’s action

Page 37

Palo Alto Medical Foundation Community Health Education Programs

January

-OUNTAIN6IEW   s0ALO!LTO   

&ORACOMPLETELISTOFCLASSESANDCLASSFEES LECTURES ANDHEALTHEDUCATIONRESOURCES VISITpamf.org/healtheducation.

Lectures and Workshops Current Topics in Vitamins and Herbs! For Your Health Lecture Series 0RESENTEDBY+ATHY/RRICO 0!-&#LINICAL0HARMACY#OORDINATOR 4UESDAY *AN nPM %L#AMINO2EAL 0ALO!LTO    This talk will continue our evidence based review and discussion about spices and nutritional supplements that have recently been in the news. We will present tips for selecting reliable products and keeping your healthcare providers in the loop!

Effective and Positive Parenting Dr. Marvin Small Memorial Parent Workshop Series 0RESENTEDBY3USAN3TONE"ELTON 0ARENT%DUCATION3PECIALIST 4UESDAY *AN nPM %%L#AMINO2EAL -OUNTAIN6IEW 650-934-7373 Topics include understanding your child, communicating with your child and effective discipline.

Cancer Care – Exercise for Energy – men and women’s group – Expressions – Healing Imagery – Healing Touch

– Healthy Eating After Cancer Treatment – Look Good, Feel Better – Qigong – When Eating is a Problem, During Cancer Treatment

Childbirth and Parent Education Classes – – – – – – – –

Baby Safety Basics Breastfeeding Childbirth Preparation Feeding Your Young Child Infant and Child CPR Infant Care Infant Emergencies and CPR Introduction to Solids

– Mother-Baby Circle – New Parent ABC’s – All About Baby Care – OB Orientation – Prenatal Yoga – Sibling Preparation – What to Expect with Your Newborn

Living Well Classes – Back School – Mind/Body Stress Management – Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

Nutrition and Diabetes Classes Mountain View, 650-934-7177 s Palo Alto, 650-853-2961

Prediabetes: A Wakeup Call San Carlos Library Lecture Series 0RESENTEDBY*UDY&ARNSWORTH 2$ #$% 0!-&.UTRITION3ERVICES -ONDAY *AN nPM 3AN#ARLOS,IBRARY %LM3T 3AN#ARLOS    Please join us to learn about prediabetes, how it is diagnosed and important lifestyle strategies for self-management.

Advances in Cataract Surgery Senior Lecture Series 0RESENTEDBY+AREN3HIH -$ 0!-&/PHTHALMOLOGY 4HURSDAY *AN nPM -OUNTAIN6IEW3ENIOR#ENTER %SCUELA!VENUE -OUNTAIN6IEW    What is a cataract? How has treatment changed? When should I consider surgery?

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– Diabetes Management – Healthy Eating with Type 2 Diabetes – Heart Smart (cholesterol management)

– Living Well with Prediabetes – Sweet Success Program (gestational diabetes)

Weight Management Programs – Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery Program – Healthy eating. Active lifestyles. (for parents of children ages 2-12)

s 1-888-398-5597

– HMR Weight Management Program – LifestepsŽ (adult weight management) – New Weigh of Life (adult weight management)

Support Groups – – – – –

AWAKE Bariatric Surgery Breastfeeding Cancer CARE

– – – – –

Chronic Fatigue Diabetes Drug and Alcohol Kidney Multiple Sclerosis

Upfront

As of Dec. 30 410 donors $254,172 GOAL $250,000

Local news, information and analysis

See who’s already contributed to the Holiday Fund on page 22 Donate online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

with matching funds

Yeh, Scharff to lead Palo Alto council in 2012 Yeh becomes second-youngest mayor in city history; Scharff edges out Schmid to become vice mayor by Gennady Sheyner iaway Yeh, a mild-mannered auditor with an appetite for crunching budget numbers and delving into utilities issues, was unanimously elected Tuesday night to serve as Palo Alto mayor this year, becoming the second-youngest councilman to ever hold the position.

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In assuming the top position on the City Council, Yeh, 33, became Palo Alto’s youngest mayor in 80 years (only Byrl Salsman, who joined the council in 1929, was younger) and the first mayor to have graduated from Gunn High School. He also became the city’s first Chinese-American

mayor at a time when the city’s Chinese population is booming. In electing Yeh as mayor, the council lauded him for his patient, deliberative style and his mastery of some of the city’s driest but most critical issues, namely finances and utilities. (see sidebar on page 5). Councilman Larry Klein, who nominated Yeh, pointed to Yeh’s experience as a city auditor as a major reason for his ability to bring a different perspective to the council’s

deliberation. Council member Karen Holman also praised Yeh’s unswervingly polite manner, calling him a “gentleman and a gentle man.� “He frequently sees things that other members of the council, perhaps all of us, have not seen,� Klein said. “I think we’ve all seen that Yiaway is a careful, deliberate thinker.� Yeh had been serving as vice mayor in 2011 so his election to mayor was a foregone conclusion. The race for vice mayor proved far closer, with

the council narrowly picking Greg Scharff over Greg Schmid. After five of the nine members indicated that they would support Scharff, Schmid asked his colleagues to make the vote unanimous, which they did. Councilman Pat Burt nominated Scharff, citing his deep familiarity with local issues and his ability to communicate clearly and to seek consensus. He also noted that Scharff, (continued on page 5)

COMMUNITY

Record $100,000 donated to Holiday Fund Family’s contribution is largest individual gift ever received

A

Michelle Le

Camille Townsend, seen here in Palo Alto High School’s Tower Building, has begun her second term as president of the Palo Alto Board of Education.

EDUCATION

New school board president a veteran of education wars Former probation officer, lawyer, got hooked on schools as a Jordan parent

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aking the gavel for the second time, new Palo Alto Board of Education President Camille Townsend says she spends a lot of time “poring over research� to grasp the issues. “The school district is so complicated — from K-12 curriculum to construction to architecture to bond management to bond sales to athletics, including equipment, fields, coaching staff — and you have to get a feel for the issues so you can give direction.

by Chris “It’s not OK to say, ‘I don’t know construction, so I want to let someone else deal with that.’ You can’t do that,� she recently told the Weekly. First elected in 2003, Townsend is a veteran of school controversies that have included creation of the district’s five-year-old Mandarin Immersion program — she was a consistent supporter — and the ‘math wars’ that periodically surface over curriculum. She was in the minority on a

Kenrick controversial 3-2 vote in 2009 to adopt the K-5 mathematics textbook “Everyday Mathematics.� And most recently, she was in the minority on the contentious 3-2 vote last May to revamp the 201213 and 2013-14 academic calendars to begin the school year earlier in August so as to end the first semester before the December holidays. “Every year there are always one or two issues that capture the community’s attention,� she said. “It’s just a matter of framing them so you

can move forward and everybody learns. I don’t want there to be misplaced anger. We do our best work when we’re done being angry, and we get into the details of things, and that’s what we’re doing.� About a recent angry flare-up over math and science laning at Palo Alto and Gunn high schools, Townsend said, the facts need to be clarified before the board can act. In December, a coalition of stu(continued on page 8)

n anonymous $100,000 donation from a Palo Alto family foundation has propelled this year’s Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund total to more than $330,000, the largest amount ever raised. The gift is also the largest individual donation ever received by the Holiday Fund, according to Palo Alto Weekly Publisher Bill Johnson, who oversees the annual grant-making process that provides funds to local nonprofit organizations serving children and families. “This extraordinary gift comes at a time when nonprofits are serving more clients than ever before, and it will enable us to go much further in meeting their funding needs this year,� Johnson said. In a statement accompanying the donation, the donors stressed their desire to support local causes. “We grew up in Palo Alto and have always appreciated the extraordinary services provided by the city, the schools and the many community-based organizations. We wanted to support these efforts so they can continue, especially in these times of tight budgets and increasing needs. “The Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund is a great way for us to have that support distributed among the worthy projects and organizations in Palo Alto and our surrounding communities.� Over the last 18 years, the Holiday Fund has raised and distributed more than $4 million to local nonprofits that serve children, families, seniors and others. Since the Palo Alto Weekly and Silicon Valley Community Foundation donate the (continued on page 6)

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Upfront

PUBLISHER William S. Johnson EDITORIAL Jocelyn Dong, Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Tom Gibboney, Spectrum Editor Sue Dremann, Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Eric Van Susteren, Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Kelsey Kienitz, Photo Intern Dale F. Bentson, Colin Becht, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Contributors Angela Johnston, Editorial Interns DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Raul Perez, Assistant Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Lili Cao, Designer PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Samantha Mejia, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Judie Block, Adam Carter, Janice Hoogner, Brent Triantos, Display Advertising Sales Neal Fine, Carolyn Oliver, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Cathy Norfleet, Display Advertising Sales Asst. Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Asst. Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. Wendy Suzuki, Advertising Sales Intern EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Hatch, Multimedia Product Manager BUSINESS Susie Ochoa, Payroll & Benefits Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Claire McGibeny, Cathy Stringari, Business Associates

Bring a friend for appetizers and wine! Join Xceed and guest speaker Arden Clise who will share insights on proper etiquette in professional and social situations. Spinach in Your Boss’ Teeth and Other Etiquette Dilemmas, an absolutely free seminar, shares skills you can use immediately to feel more confident and at ease in many business and social settings. Xceed Financial Credit Union’s new LifeWorks seminar series is specially geared toward interests and concerns of busy women. Attend and be entered to win an iPodŽ touch!

Tuesday, January 24, 2012 Networking open forum: 6:15 p.m. Seminar: 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Xceed Financial Credit Union 601 Showers Drive, Mountain View, CA 94040 Seating is limited. RSVP by January 20 at www.xfcu.org/lifeworks or contact Matt Butler at 650.691.6501 or mbutler@xfcu.org.

ADMINISTRATION Janice Covolo, Doris Taylor, Receptionists Ruben Espinoza, Courier EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistant Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright Š2011 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or email circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

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450 CAMBRIDGE AVE, PALO ALTO, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

The neighborhood needs to maintain its integrity. — Richard Brand, Palo Alto Stanford Heritage (PAST) member, on why the home at 935 Ramona St. should remain on the Historic Building Inventory. See story on page 7.

Around Town ON A HIGH NOTE ... Mayoral elections in Palo Alto are typically feel-good affairs bursting with compliments, platitudes and back-patting aplenty. But there was nothing typical about the reception outgoing Mayor Sid Espinosa received Tuesday night just after he handed over the top City Council position to his colleague Yiaway Yeh. Dozens of speakers, including state dignitaries, environmental leaders and past mayors, praised Espinosa’s year as mayor in what former Mayor Gary Fazzino, a local-history buff, called one of the most remarkable outpourings of tribute to an outgoing mayor. The immense number of speakers turned normally brief thank-yous into an hourand-a-half affair. Councilman Larry Klein said the tribute set a new record. “I think I sat through 15 or 16 of these events for an outgoing mayor, and I can’t remember anything that comes remotely close,� Klein said. “It’s not because someone went out and beat the bushes for all these people to show up. It’s because of genuine feeling of respect and admiration and, really, love of the job that you’ve done this year.� Espinosa also came away from the ceremony with enough props to make Carrot Top jealous. These include a poster of him dressed as Harry Potter, courtesy of Library Director Monique le Conge; a red-and-gold “Downtown Crown� from Russ Cohen, executive director of the Downtown Business and Professional Association; and a baseball cap affixed with a tiny El Palo Alto tree on the bill and the title “Mayor Sid� from Urban Cummings, board member of the nonprofit tree-planting group Canopy. After the council unanimously passed a resolution of appreciation, Espinosa said he was touched and humbled by the comments from the community and his council colleagues. “It really takes all of us to get this stuff done,� Espinosa said.

ballots, and the remainder wrote Scharff’s. After Schaff’s victory was assured, the senior Greg asked his colleagues to make the vote for the junior Greg unanimous, which they did. Both Scharff and Schmid were commended by their colleagues and by members of the public, including former Mayor Gary Fazzino. “Thanks for keeping all of us entertained and interested,� Fazzino said. “It says much about the two individuals considered tonight.� Before this week, the closest race for vice mayor occurred in 1982, when Betsy Bechtel edged out a youthful Fazzino by a 5-4 vote.

BATTLE OF THE GREGS ... Immediately after the council elected Yiaway Yeh to serve as Palo Alto’s mayor for 2012, members embarked on the more suspenseful task of electing a vice mayor. Though the council ultimately elected Greg Scharff by a 9-0 vote, the vote tally belied the fact that this was the most competitive race for vice mayor in almost four decades. Scharff, who joined the council in 2009, was facing off against Greg Schmid, who was elected in 2007 and who has not held a leadership post on the council. Four council members initially wrote Schmid’s name on their

BACK TO THE COUNTY ... State Sen. Joe Simitian’s quest to return to his old position on the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors became a tad easier Thursday when one of his opponents for the county seat, Mountain View Councilmember Margaret Abe-Koga, ended her candidacy and decided to back the former Palo Alto mayor. “After a great deal of thought and consultation with my supporters and family, I have decided to withdraw from the race for County Supervisor and throw my support behind Joe.� Simitian will be termed out of the state Senate later this year. N

EASING THE STRUGGLE ... If students at Palo Alto High School are feeling overburdened, they might be cheered, at least momentarily, to hear a 2012 priority list shared by Principal Phil Winston. No. 1 is “supporting struggling students — we are redistributing our resources to better support struggling students,� Winston said. Next on the principal’s list is creating “a culture that values reflection� and collaboration, including opportunities for teachers to observe one another in action. The third has to do with homework: The school is implementing a software program called Rjenda to track and assess student workload, he said. ALL SHOOK UP ... To honor the Jan. 8 birthday of the King of Rock and Roll, Chef Charlie Ayers at Calafia in Town & Country Village is adding two Elvis-inspired foods to his Sunday menu: buttermilk-brined Elvis fried chicken, biscuits and gravy and mashed potatoes as well as griddled peanut-butter banana bacon sandwiches. Ayers, a huge music fan, used to cook for the Grateful Dead and continues to cook for large music festivals, his spokeswoman said.

Upfront CITY COUNCIL

Palo Alto’s young mayor packs policy experience Yiaway Yeh brings understanding of government, history of community building to position by Gennady Sheyner

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maintained that binding arbitration is an unfair procedure that gives too much power to unelected arbitrators and strips the council of its budget-setting responsibilities, Yeh had no such qualms. Instead, Yeh voted for the ballot measure because he wanted to gauge the sentiments of the voters on the issue. “I kind of reached a point where I want clarity,� Yeh said at the July 18 meeting. “I want to know where the voters ultimately are.� His vote made a dramatic difference. In November, voters approved Measure D by a roughly two-to-one margin. But while Yeh’s vote led to a policy change that he has consistently opposed, it also illustrated his legislative style and his philosophy toward local government. As a councilman, Yeh has been among the least dogmatic and most technocratic elected members, as comfortable discussing pension plans for public employees as debating renewable-energy goals and the latest labor legislation coming out of Sacramento. An auditor who currently works for the City of Oakland, he is well-versed in Palo Alto’s budget process and has helped craft the city budget as a member of the council’s Finance Committee. Santa Clara County Supervisor Liz Kniss, herself a former Palo Alto mayor, predicted at Tuesday’s election ceremony that Yeh’s extensive experience with numbers will serve him well as a mayor.

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Jan. 3)

Mayor: The council elected Yiaway Yeh to serve as the city’s mayor in 2012. Yes: Unanimous Vice mayor: The council elected Greg Scharff to serve as the city’s vice mayor in 2012. Yes: Unanimous

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week

BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will hold a study session on new demographic projections of school enrollment. The meeting will begin at noon on Tuesday, Jan. 10, in Conference Room A of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission is scheduled to discuss 355 Alma St., a request by Lund Smith for a planned community (PC) zone to enable a mixed-use, five-story building at the site of a former Shell station; and 830 Los Trancos Road, a request for construction of a two-story home. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 11, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission is scheduled to discuss the Human Services Needs Assessment and the new report from the Infrastructure Blue Ribbon Commission. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 12, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Yiaway Yeh, left, talks with an acquaintance in Palo Alto City Council Chambers shortly before being elected mayor. Yeh opposed the repeal of binding arbitration, praised Yeh this week for his understanding of the public sector. “His commitment to social justice is clear, broad and deep,� Price said. “And as you all know, he served in the Peace Corps, and he brings those values with him every day.� Councilman Pat Burt praised Yeh for being “somebody who truly believes that government is here to serve the community and that government can be conduced in a way that is open and fair and deliberate and efficient and through those means that government will do what’s best for the community.� He also lauded Yeh for carrying himself in a way that engenders respect and admiration from his colleagues. “I think each leader has his own style and Yiaway’s is one where he will continue to have that quiet and yet strong leadership that we’ve seen from him throughout his four years on the council to date,� Burt said.

In accepting his election to mayor, the 33-year-old Yeh spoke extensively about his interest in building community and said much of the year will be devoted to repairing the city’s aged infrastructure, promoting youth wellbeing and finding ways to make provision of city services more efficient. “I will work hard to keep us focused, efficient and effective as best as possible so that we can best serve Palo Alto,� Yeh told the council. He also proposed on Tuesday a series of “Mayor’s Challenges� — athletic competitions throughout the city with the aim of bringing neighbors and members of different generations together. “I know as mayor for 2012, this is the fun part,� Yeh said. “I’m really looking forward to working with colleagues to bring new and old neighbors together.� N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@paweekly. com.

Mayor

(continued from page 3)

like Yeh, has been deeply engaged in the realms of finance and utilities. Scharff, a local attorney, has served as chair of the council’s Finance Committee and as liaison to the Utilities Advisory Commission. These issues, Burt said, “are the backbone of everything we do.� Scharff was also one of the leaders of the city’s successful effort to repeal a City Charter provision that required a bindingarbitration panel to settle labor disputes between the city and its public-safety unions. “He has demonstrated a strong outlook that leaders truly must put the community’s interest first,� Burt said. Councilman Sid Espinosa agreed and, after praising Schmid, said Scharff would “move us forward.� “He listens carefully when we have debates. He finds middle ground and, meeting after meeting, he helps us come to a decision,� Espinosa said of Scharff. Council members Klein and Nancy Shepherd also voted for Scharff, with Scharff himself providing the fifth vote

New Vice Mayor Greg Scharff, center, chats with outgoing Mayor Sid Espinosa, left, and Ray Bacchetti at this week’s Palo Alto City Council meeting. to secure his own election. His rise to vice mayor makes Scharff the first of the four council members who were elected in 2009 to take on a leadership position on the council. Mayor Yeh and council members Holman, Gail Price and Schmid all wrote Schmid’s name on their ballots, though they all ultimately voted for Scharff upon Schmid’s request.

Schmid’s supporters lauded the economist for his dedication to strategic planning and transparency. Price called him a “very wise and thoughtful individual� while Espinosa praised him for understanding issues and data “at a level that is unmatched at this dais.� N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@paweekly. com.

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Gennady Sheyner

CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to hold a joint session with the Library Advisory Commission and to hold a public hearing on a request to remove 935 Ramona St. from the city’s Historical Inventory. The joint session will begin at 6 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 9, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). Regular meeting will follow in the Council Chambers.

“When you have the auditor as the mayor you know you won’t be getting into any trouble,� Kniss said. Much like his friend and mayoral predecessor, Sid Espinosa, Yeh is an articulate speaker who became interested in public policy at an early age and who boned up on the subject at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Like Espinosa, Yeh is well traveled, having served in the Peace Corps in Burkina Faso. But whereas Espinosa stood out for his omnipresence at local events and his tireless promotion of Palo Alto, Yeh’s style on the council has been focused, if quieter. He rarely, if ever, speaks in sound bites, choosing instead to dive right into legislative details and the subtle implications of the policy at hand. He has also been representing the city for the past four years on the Northern California Power Agency (NCPA), a task that entailed long meetings and wonky discussions of electric rates and renewable-energy goals. State Sen. Joe Simitian, who worked with Yeh on Northern California Power Agency issues, half-joked Tuesday that Yeh deserves a “lifetime achievement award� for his service. “Anyone who spends four years representing this council on NCPA has already paid their dues and then some,� Simitian said. But as his vote on Measure D demonstrated, Yeh’s idea of public service far transcends data crunching and policy analysis. As early Election Day results showed the measure winning by a heavy margin, Yeh told the Weekly that while he was disappointed by the repeal of binding arbitration, he hopes the process of negotiations between the city and its public-safety unions will benefit from mandatory mediation. Councilwoman Gail Price, who like

Jocelyn Dong

hen Yiaway Yeh cast the deciding vote last July to send a labor-reform measure on the November ballot, just about everyone in the Council Chambers raised an eyebrow or two in disbelief. Yeh, 33, who this week became Palo Alto mayor, had been a staunch ally of the city’s public-sector unions since he first joined the council in 2007. For the past two years, he has been a consistent opponent of repealing binding arbitration, a longstanding law that enables a panel of arbitrators to settle disputes between the city and its police and fire unions. In 2010, he was one of five council members who voted against placing the repeal of the law on the ballot. He continued to oppose the repeal last year, arguing that the binding-arbitration provision gives much needed leverage to public-safety workers who, unlike most other city employees, are barred by state law from striking. But on July 18, Yeh surprised both his colleagues and his union supporters by reversing course and joining Council members Greg Scharff, Karen Holman, Pat Burt and Greg Schmid in voting to place the repeal on the ballot (the other four council members advocated modifying rather than repealing the measure). Yeh’s reason for supporting the placement of repeal on the ballot was drastically different from that of his colleagues. While the other four all

Upfront

News Digest Bloomingdale’s building a smaller Palo Alto store

Report: Halt state funding for high-speed rail California’s quest to build a high-speed rail system between San Francisco and Los Angeles suffered a heavy blow Tuesday (Jan. 3) when a peer-review committee recommended that state legislators not fund the project until major changes are made to the business plan for the increasingly controversial line. In a scathing report, the California High-Speed Rail Peer Review Group found that the business plan the California High-Speed Rail Authority unveiled in early November offers inadequate information about funding, fails to answer the critical question of which operating segment will be built first and features a phased-construction plan that would violate state law. The group, which is chaired by Will Kempton, recommends that the state Legislature not authorize expenditure of bond money for the project until its concerns are met. The report is the latest setback to the project, for which state voters approved a $9.95 billion bond in 2008. Since then, the project’s price tag has more than doubled, and several agencies, including the Legislative Analyst’s Office and Office of the State Auditor, released critical reports about the project. In its letter to the Legislature, the peer-review group cited some of the same issues that local officials and watchdogs have long complained about, most notably an unrealistic funding plan. The project currently has about $6 billion in committed funding, and the rail authority plans to make up much of the balance from federal grants and private investments. The report is available on PaloAltoOnline.com. N — Gennady Sheyner

Facebook expansion unlikely to displace residents A consultant’s study of whether Facebook’s hiring expansion will push East Palo Alto residents from their homes came to the common-sense conclusion that it simply depends on how many employees decide to live in East Palo Alto. The city of East Palo Alto sent a letter to Menlo Park in May expressing concern that Facebook’s hires, attracted by the relatively lower housing prices, would want to live in East Palo Alto, leaving low-income residents — an estimated 79 percent of the city’s population — struggling to afford new homes elsewhere. The environmental impact report for Facebook’s campus development did not examine this scenario since it’s a matter of socioeconomics, not physical environmental change. So an additional analysis, conducted by Keyser Marston Associates, came out Dec. 21. The report stated: “Impacts will be minimal if a very limited number of workers seek housing in East Palo Alto; conversely, if East Palo Alto is viewed as an attractive option by a large share of Facebook’s workforce, impacts would be greater.� Right now, despite East Palo Alto’s relative affordability and proximity, the largest number of Facebook employees — 26 percent — live in San Francisco, compared with 0.2 percent in East Palo Alto, according to the report. Free bus and shuttle service helps ease the pain of the commute. Nevertheless, Keyser Marston Associates assumed that 3 to 5 percent of future Facebook workers may choose to live in East Palo Alto. The expected net gain of 5,800 new hires by 2018 then leaves 100 to 160 homes needed in East Palo Alto, or 16 to 26 additional units a year — a maximum of about 2 percent of the city’s total housing. N — Sandy Brundage, Almanac staff writer

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Baby Basics helps working poor meet their children’s basic needs All-volunteer nonprofit organization provides free diapers to families by Angela Johnston hen Anna Quintana gave birth to her twins, Bailey and Mateo, she didn’t expect buying diapers would be an issue. “Diapers are something everyone takes for granted,� Quintana said. “But the first six months after the twins were born were absolutely crazy. Never in my life could I have predicted the expense of diapers.� With the help of Baby Basics of the Peninsula, an all-volunteer nonprofit organization that provides free diapers to working poor families in East Menlo Park and East Palo Alto, Quintana’s diaper expense was taken care of. “When you have twins, everything is double the cost. I can’t even begin to speak. ... The expense was incredible,� said Quintana, whose twins are now 2 years old. “We are very blessed to receive diapers through Baby Basics.� Kim Crockett and Karin Willis founded Baby Basics of the Peninsula in 2006, and by the end of this year, they will have distributed more than 175,000 free diapers to families in need. “We recognized that East Palo Alto and East Menlo Park are really overlooked and underserved segments of our population in terms of working poor families with babies, so I decided to create a chapter out here with Karin,� Crockett said. Quintana, who lives in Menlo Park, and 19 other working-poor families attend Baby Basic’s diaper distributions twice a month at the Arbor Free Clinic in Menlo Park. The clinic is centrally located, and the distributions are scheduled after working hours to make Baby Basics as accessible as possible. Baby Basics saves families an average of $800 per year, per child. “In order for a baby to have a healthy upbringing, they need diapers. It’s a basic necessity and a health-care essential that isn’t subsidized. The cost can break the back of a struggling family,� Crockett said. When Crockett and Willis started Baby Basics, they contacted community agencies to make sure they weren’t duplicating an existing service. “We’re actually the only local diaper-distribution program in the area. There is nothing else like Baby Basics, and that’s really been a huge motivator for us,� Crockett said. Baby Basics differentiates itself from other family-service organizations in the area by strictly focusing on diapers. There are no overhead costs, and all of the board members are volunteers. Donated money goes toward providing families with diapers, which Baby Basics is able to

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Holiday Fund (continued from page 3)

necessary administrative services, 100 percent of the funds raised are distributed in the community. It’s not too late to make contri-

Courtesy of Baby Basics

Longstanding Stanford Shopping Center tenant Bloomingdale’s will build a smaller store at the mall, its parent company, Macy’s, Inc. announced Wednesday (Jan. 4). The new store is part of an overhaul of Bloomingdale’s stores, focusing on smaller footprints that the company has found successful in recent years in SoHo (New York), Chevy Chase, Md., and Santa Monica, Calif., according to the announcement. The new 120,000-square-foot store will reduce by nearly half the store’s existing 229,000 square feet. The current Bloomingdale’s will remain in operation until the new store is constructed and opened in spring 2014, subject to completion of a public-approval process, the company said. The current store will be razed and replaced by a new specialty retail development by Simon Property Group, developer and manager of the shopping center, which is owned by Stanford University. Bloomingdale’s currently has about 180 employees at the mall, and the company plans to maintain a similar workforce in the new store when it opens, according to Macy’s. Macy’s made the announcement as part of a store-closing and opening press release that includes closing five Macy’s and four Bloomingdale’s stores throughout the country and opening stores in other locations. Five new Bloomingdale’s Outlet stores will open in 2012, each with about 25,000 square feet and 35 employees. N — Sue Dremann

HOLIDAY FUND

With the help of Baby Basics of the Peninsula, Aurora Gallardo was able to receive free diapers for her daughter Isabella. purchase for a reduced, bulk price. Crocket says the beauty of the program is in this simplicity. “The ability to, twice a month, literally hand over what a family needs is extremely gratifying,� Crockett described. Baby Basics has limited resources and currently is only able to serve 20 families in the Menlo Park, Palo Alto and Redwood City area. Thanks to a $2,000 Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund grant, Baby Basics was able to increase its client base by five families in 2011. Ten to 15 families are on Baby Basics’ waiting list, according to Lisa Moody, Baby Basics’ referral agent. However, Crockett said there are at least 1,000 other families in the area that the program could potentially help. Crockett said she hopes to continue expanding the program and replicate South Boston’s Baby Basics, which serves more than 70 families at two distribution sites. Moody refers many families in the Star Vista Learning Together, a youth and family enrichment services program in San Mateo County, to Baby Basics. She said her referrals are solely based on need. “Not everyone qualifies, and there is usually a long waiting list, but we do have specific requirements,� Moody said.

Baby Basics accepts only working poor families. Moody said these families have incomes below the poverty level but aren’t receiving welfare payments. Typically one parent is working, and the family income does not exceed 185 percent of the federal poverty level. Baby Basics focuses on the working poor because, as Crockett described, they are one of the “most overlooked� income level groups. “We target families who don’t qualify for other types of welfare or aid because they’re just making enough to make ends meet,� Crockett said. Eligible families also need to have a child under 3 and have to live in East Palo Alto, Menlo Park or Redwood City. Only a few weeks ago, Quintana discovered that Baby Basics would support her twins until they were 3 years old. “Originally, I thought the service stopped when they turned 2,� Quintana said. “When I heard that, I walked out and started crying in my car.� Quintana said she isn’t sure what her life would be like if it weren’t for Baby Basics. “If they didn’t cover our diapers, I wonder what we would have had to go without. We probably would have had to cut back on our groceries to pay for diapers,� she said. “I can’t wait to give back once the twins have graduated,� Quintana said. “Baby Basics will be with me forever, even after the twins come out of diapers. I want to volunteer, donate and help spread the word about Baby Basics.� N

butions to this year’s campaign. Information is available online at PaloAltoOnline.com/holidayfund. The final publication of donors’ names will be in the Friday, Jan. 20, edition of the Weekly. The Holiday Fund is a fund at the

Silicon Valley Community Foundation, which serves as its fiscal agent, and receives support from the Packard, Hewlett, Arrillaga and Peery foundations in the form of matching grants. N — Palo Alto Weekly staff

Upfront CITY HALL

Green goals, infrastructure on Palo Alto’s 2012 agenda City officials to take on host of complex topics, from aged facilities to regional housing goals, in the new year by Gennady Sheyner urbing employee costs, fixing up the city’s aged infrastructure, reopening the city’s largest library and using technology to spur community involvement are among the issues looming large on Palo Alto’s horizon in 2012. Coming off a busy 2011, the City Council is heading into the new year with an agenda packed with complex topics such as overhauling the city’s waste-collection services, challenging regional housing mandates and finding new ways to provide services more efficiently, whether through community partnerships or through privatization of certain services, City Manager James Keene told the Weekly in an interview. At the same time, Keene said, the city will be striving to meet ambitious sustainability goals, unveiling new apps and technologies and welcoming a slew of new department heads into the city’s operation, including a new city auditor, an information-technology director and an Office of Emergency Services director. But even with all the new faces and looming issues, the council will continue to devote much of its time to the longstanding priority of managing the city’s finances during a period of austerity. Though the city has succeeded in wringing concessions from its public-sector unions over the past three years, that effort is far from over

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as pension and health-care costs continue to rise, Keene said. While the Silicon Valley economy is looking better than it did a year ago, the improvement doesn’t necessarily translate to more revenues for the city, he said. “I think we partly have gotten used to the challenging times we’re in so it doesn’t seem as bad, but we’re still faced with a future in which we have costs that continue to outpace our revenue growth,� Keene said. “I think we’ll still be facing how we can have more employee-sharing in the costs, particularly on the benefits side.� “You’ll continue to see us addressing that and trying to ensure that Palo Alto is in the lead among cities in trying to fix that kind of structural problem.� Among the highest priorities for 2012 are devising a plan to repair the city’s infrastructure and paying for a new public-safety building. The efforts received a major boost at the end of 2011 when a 17-member Infrastructure Blue Ribbon Task Force released a report analyzing the city’s infrastructure needs and proposing various funding options. The group found that Palo Alto has about $41.5 million in “deferred maintenance� (fixes that should have been made earlier but weren’t) and that it has to spend about $32.2 million a year to keep up with infrastructure maintenance (about $2 million more than it currently spends).

The council is scheduled to discuss the commission’s findings and recommendations on Jan. 17. These recommendations include an increase to the city’s sales tax and a bond package to pay for a new public-safety building and for two fire stations. Mayor Yiaway Yeh, who will be tasked with leading the council through these complex discussions, highlighted infrastructure as a top priority for 2012 Tuesday. Yeh said he sees 2012 “as a year of infrastructure investment and renewal for our community.� The city’s new Mitchell Park Library and Community Center, the largest project in the 2008 librarybond package, is slated to reopen to the public this year, as is the renovated Palo Alto Art Center. Minutes after being elected mayor by his colleagues, Yeh called 2012 “the year for us to prioritize and determine how as a community we will fund our infrastructure needs, not just for our current generation but for our next several generations.� Even while they look for new revenue sources to pay for the needed repairs, the city will continue to look for ways to cut costs. Yeh said the city would seek greater efficiencies and regional opportunities, particularly in the realms of public safety, emergency-preparedness services, animal services and municipal services. The goal, he said, is providing “the most

cost-effective services, but in a way that the quality of those services are positively impacted.� “We are in an era of austerity within government and that necessitates that we use our best thinking to look at how we deliver services,� Yeh said. Environmental sustainability will also remain a priority, with several of the city’s strategic plans, including its Climate Action Plan and its Zero Waste Plan, containing performance targets for 2012. These targets, Yeh said, “give us an opportunity, as council, to be able to delve into detail to make sure that we’re on track, that we’re hitting what we want to hit in terms of our sustainability goals.� But even as Palo Alto continues to focus on and refine its own sustainability goals, city officials are preparing for a larger battle over regional housing allocations, which are part of the state’s “Sustainable Community Strategy.� A plan proposed by Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission mandates that Palo Alto plan for nearly 12,000 new homes by 2035, with the goal of reducing congestion and encouraging construction of housing near job centers. The council has vehemently rejected ABAG’s housing projections and has argued over the past two years that Palo Alto has neither the land nor the resources to accommodate the

regional estimates. Keene predicted that the city will emerge as a leader in challenging the regional-allocation process, much like it did on the issue of high-speed rail. “I think we’re going to play an active role in that regional conversation,� Keene said. Other city goals aim at promoting civic pride and participation. Yeh this week said he plans to sponsor “Mayor’s Challenges,� a series of athletic events aimed at bringing neighbors together. Keene said the city plans to unveil new apps and to place a greater emphasis on publicizing data and allowing residents to use technology to more efficiently request services and provide feedback. Social media is expected to play a major role in this effort. The city, for example, is working with the company rBlock to launch a pilot program early this year for providing a social-networking platform on a block-by-block basis to selected neighborhoods. The city is also trying to roll out in 2012 an “open data� approach to information to spark innovation. Keene said at the Dec. 19 meeting of the council that this effort is a way “to share the data and information we have as a city with the wider community that can generate all sorts of free and new applications and mobile apps.� N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

Resident seeks to get home off of historic inventory City Council to deliberate status of Palo Alto home Monday by Sue Dremann

I

told the board. The home is also not located in the downtown zone or in a historic district, a September staff report noted. The homeowner’s consultant, Garavaglia Architecture, evaluated the property and concluded the alterations caused it to lose its “physical historic integrity� since its historic-inventory listing in 1980. Backlund told the Historic Resources Board that staff used standards practiced by the National Park Service and California Office of Historic Preservation and came to the same conclusion. But board members said the building, although altered, fully meets the requirements for Category 3 or 4 designations and should remain on the list. Palo Alto Stanford Heritage (PAST) member Richard Brand, who has lived in a historically designated home on Addison Avenue for 20 years, argued before the Historic Resources Board that he has seen much of the city’s historic inventory disappear. Removing historical designation from 935 Ramona could allow the homeowner to demolish the house. “The neighborhood needs to maintain its integrity,� he said. Homes, structures, sites and districts receive their historical designation after an individual or group proposes the

designation to the city, according to the historic-building ordinance. The Historic Resources Board reviews the proposal and makes a recommendation to the council, which approves or rejects the application. Homeowners and commercial-building owners can receive incentives and property advantages when they choose to have a historical designation. Incentives include reduction of or exemption from on-site parking requirements; bonus square-footage allowances; exemptions from full upgrading to current standards; modified seismic upgrades; and exemptions from disability-access mandates, state energy standards and state flood-hazard area regulations. But only Category 1 and 2 buildings receive the incentives. There are no incentives for Category 3 and 4 structures, said Steven Turner, city advance planning manager. Palo Alto has four categories for historic preservation: Category 1 (exceptional building) is a structure with no exterior modifications or minor changes that maintain the overall appearance and original character; Category 2 (major building) might have some exterior modifications but the original character remains; Categories 3 or 4 (contributing building) is a building that maintains an appropriate design for its neighborhood

Tyler Hanley

f a Palo Alto homeowner succeeds having his 1895 home taken off of the city’s Historic Building Inventory, it would only be the second such instance in a dozen years, according to the city. Christopher Pickett will ask the City Council Monday to approve the removal of his Queen Anne-style home at 935 Ramona St. from the list. His home is among 500 structures the city has designated as historic since 1980. City staff supported his request in September, citing many alterations to the house since its construction. But the city’s Historic Resources Board rejected that recommendation 6 to 0 on Sept. 21. The difference in perspectives on the historical merits of the home demonstrates how carefully the city guards its historic inventory. The 116-year-old building looks like a Queen Anne-style home and has the curb appeal to fit in with the character of the neighborhood. But the house underwent $500,000 in alterations between 1976 and 2005, according to a consultant’s report. The Ramona Street home is a Category 4, the least restrictive designation on the inventory list, and changes were allowed without first undergoing a Historic Resources Board review, historicpreservation planner Dennis Backlund

Owners of 935 Ramona St. in the University South neighborhood want to remove their home from the city’s Historic Building Inventory, which would free them to make extensive changes or even demolish it. and maintains its historical integrity, such as not having been moved from another location. “When you go by this building, it has a very strong feeling of significance and history,â€? board chair David Bower said of the Ramona property. Any structure of similar age would require new siding and other changes as part of its upkeep. But the Queen Anne façade still remains to the degree that “it is still a physical record of its time,â€? he said. In the 12 years Backlund has worked for the city, only one home, a Category 3 Mission Revival style house located at 445 Colorado Ave., has been removed from the list, he said. That occurred in 2005. Palo Alto Realtor Ken DeLeon said removing a historic designation is dif-

ficult. “It’s a huge procedural battle and even then there are no guarantees,� he said. One Professorville client ran afoul of his neighborhood’s historic status when he wanted to demolish a building on his property. The building itself was not deemed a historic structure. He spent $500,000 on legal fees and finally won the council’s approval in 2010 to demolish it. Many people buy historically designated homes without understanding the full implications. Often they fail to consider their future home needs, DeLeon said. When they realize they want or need to do more with their home, they (continued on page 10)

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Upfront 2011/12

Board president (continued from page 3)

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dents and parents challenged the board to ensure the district’s two high schools offer a basic, non-honors track in math and science that satisfies entrance requirements for the University of California and California State University. “I think the staff will go back and look at what we’re actually offering,� she said. “To the board this is all rumor. We haven’t heard directly from anybody. Are we really exceeding the standards or not? “It’s our duty to see whether that’s the case because it’s our obligation to give kids access to public universities as a matter of public policy. “But you can’t let anger rule the day,� she said. “When you have a better understanding about what’s actually going on, then there are solutions.� Townsend, who grew up in Wisconsin, has worked as a law-firm receptionist, youth counselor, probation officer, lawyer and professor of

business law at Purdue University. Though not actively practicing law, she maintains her membership in the State Bar of California. She got involved in Palo Alto schools as a newcomer from Indiana, when the older of her two daughters was in sixth grade at Jordan Middle School. “We couldn’t figure out what the math homework was,� she said. “Being a diligent parent I saw that there was a math meeting at Jordan so I went to the meeting and found out there was no textbook. There were just these handouts that kids would lose. “I raised my hand and said, ‘What math book are you using?’ and I felt all this heat turn toward me. I hadn’t realized this was part of a bigger (math wars) issue. That’s why I’m still leery of trendy math curriculums.� She served as PTA president at Nixon Elementary School and ran a Palo Alto PTA campaign to blanket state legislators with letters urging preservation of funding for “basic aid� school districts such as Palo Alto.

“It’s just my general inclination to think that public education is so important,� said Townsend, whose own parents never got beyond the eighth grade. Remembering her childhood in Wisconsin, she said, “My mother was always so happy when the school bus came.� Townsend’s second term on the board — along with the first terms of members Melissa Baten Caswell and Barbara Klausner — had been due to expire in 2011. However, following the resounding 2010 passage of a Palo Alto measure to consolidate City Council elections with even-year county, state and federal balloting as a cost-saving effort, the Board of Education voted to follow suit. As a consequence, school board elections were moved from November 2011 to November 2012. The terms of Townsend, Caswell and Klausner expire this year. Those of board Vice-President Dana Tom and member Barb Mitchell expire in 2014. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@paweekly.

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Upfront EDUCATION

Cubberley, growing enrollment, budget top 2012 school concerns City looks to end Cubberley lease, but will school district be ready? by Chris Kenrick lanning for the future of Cubberley Community Center will likely take center stage in 2012, along with growing schooldistrict enrollment and a shrinking budget, according to school-district officials. A citizen commission in December recommended the City of Palo Alto terminate its lease of districtowned Cubberley, located at 4000 Middlefield Road, a move that would have a significant impact on Palo Alto school finances, said Camille Townsend, president of the Board of Education. “It would be huge,� Townsend said of the proposals put forth by the city’s Infrastructure Blue Ribbon Commission. She spoke in a wideranging Dec. 31 interview on topics likely to come before the school board in 2012. Termination of the city’s $6.1 million in annual payments to the school district is one of the major recommendations in the city Blue Ribbon Commission’s 170-page report on how to deal with the city’s mounting infrastructure problems. The city has scheduled a Jan. 17 public hearing on the recommendations. The current Cubberley lease agree-

ing steadily back upward. For the current school year it stands at 12,286, with two high schools, three middle schools and 12 elementary schools. The school board is scheduled to hear the latest demographic projections for enrollment Tuesday (Jan. 10). But, Townsend said, the district needs to stay flexible “given operating budget fluctuations and uncertainty about how much money we actually have to educate kids. “There’s always the argument that if you open a whole new school you have all the administrative costs. And if our operating budget is going down, well, sometimes numbers talk. So if we were to open another school, we have to look at what it costs and where the money’s going to come from. “On the other hand, I understand people’s concern that Cubberley is not looking as good as it should and everyone wants to tackle that.� The school district has been in cautious, budget-cutting mode since 2009, while maintaining what it calls an “unrestricted, undesignated fund balance� to cover so-called “ongoing structural deficits.� The district made $3.8 million in cuts to the roughly $160 million operating budget in 2010-11 and another

$2.7 million reflected in the current year’s budget. By February, school administrators said they’ll recommend between $1.2 million and $2.8 million in cuts to the current year’s budget. Much of the earlier reductions were achieved through incremental increases in elementary class sizes, which have bumped up from 20 to 22 in grades K-3, and from 23 to 24 in grades 4-5. “In the last two rounds we could shield out instructional programs from deep cuts, but this may not be possible for the upcoming cuts,� the school district’s Co-Chief Business Official Cathy Mak has told the board. Townsend is worried now about class sizes in the high schools which, in some Advanced Placement classes, are as high as 39, she said. As a so-called “basic aid� district funded primarily through property tax, Palo Alto does not collect revenue based on headcount, so enrollment growth means less money per student. “As a result of state funding cuts, enrollment growth and relatively flat property-tax growth, the district now receives $939 less per student compared to three years ago,� Mak said. Cooperation between the city and

school district on Cubberley dates back to the 1980s when — following the 1979 closure of the high school due to declining enrollment — community leaders crafted a plan to preserve the Cubberley acreage while providing a revenue stream to the schools. The city pays the school district $4.48 million a year to lease Cubberley, which it in turn leases out as a community center. Additionally, the city pays the schools $1.73 million a year under a “covenant� in which the district promises not to sell any district-owned land for housing development, as well as $600,000 to ensure the schools offer after-school day care on elementary campuses. But the infrastructure commission said the city no longer can afford the Cubberley deal. “With our city struggling to meet the financial requirements of the General Fund, let alone catching up and keeping up with the maintenance of the city’s infrastructure demands, now is the appropriate time for the school district to re-establish its management and financial responsibilities of and for the Cubberley site,� commissioners said. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed ckenrick@paweekly.com.

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ment between the school district and the city expires in 2014. The school board and City Council have pledged to hold talks on the future of the 35-acre campus, but Townsend said, “I think the city is under a tighter timeline than the school district, but obviously we all need to sit down and work through those timelines together. “I think the City Council will ask what impact this will have on the schools. The Council as much as the school board wants to maintain the integrity of the schools.� Last summer, the Board of Education successfully dissuaded the council from selling the 8 city-owned acres of Cubberley, insisting that — with growing enrollment — the district eventually would need to reclaim the full property for schools. But contending with budget cuts and uncertain enrollment projections, school leaders have kept mum on exactly how — and when — the land will be needed. At its peak in 1968, Palo Alto had an enrollment of 15,000 students, with three high schools, three middle schools and more than 20 elementary campuses. Student headcount fell to a low of 7,500 in 1989 and then began creep-

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A motorcyclist was taken to Stanford Hospital with a serious leg injury after being hit by a car on Middlefield Road Wednesday morning (Jan. 4), Palo Alto police said Thursday (Jan. 5). (Posted Jan. 5 at 10:45 a.m.)

2011

is top “Dean’s notch. Staff is

2010

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These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

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Motorcyclist hit by car on Middlefield Road

California Avenue plan challenged again Palo Alto’s plan to reduce lanes on California Avenue from four to two and to add a host of streetscape improvements to the commercial strip is facing a fresh legal challenge from an area merchant. (Posted Jan. 5 at 9:41 a.m.)

Dry winter increasing fire risk, officials warn

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Cal Fire is increasing its staff and canceling burn days and planned debris burning in response to increased fire danger because of an unusually dry winter, Cal Fire officials said. (Posted Jan. 5 at 8:25 a.m.)

Woman killed by train Monday was from Palo Alto The San Mateo County Coroner’s Office has identified the woman killed by a train at Encinal Avenue in Menlo Park Monday night (Jan. 2) as Jasmine Ahluwalia, 31, of Palo Alto. (Posted Jan. 4 at 11:02 a.m.)

DUI arrests down in Santa Clara County There were 100 fewer people arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs in Santa Clara County during this year’s holiday crackdown compared to 2010. (Posted Jan. 3 at 8:36 a.m.)

Bullet shatters Palo Alto window; no injuries Apparent New Year’s revelry turned into a headache for one Crescent Park neighborhood homeowner when a .22-caliber bullet shattered his kitchen window Sunday (Jan. 1) at about 1 a.m. No one in the home was injured. (Posted Jan. 1 at 2:50 p.m.)

Vehicle hits historic building in downtown Palo Alto

  

A sports utility vehicle crashed into a historic house in downtown Palo Alto Friday afternoon (Dec. 30) in an apparent hit-and-run collision. No one was hurt. (Posted Dec. 30 at 12:54 p.m.)

 

     

Court maintains charge against knife-carrying man A Palo Alto man who allegedly posted a video of himself parading around Sequoia Hospital with a 4-inch knife strapped to his ankle lost his motion to dismiss a felony charge on Thursday (Dec. 29). (Posted Dec. 30 at 10:22 a.m.)

Residents appeal AT&T antenna plan

            

AT&T’s plan to install 19 antennas on utility poles throughout Palo Alto will have to undergo an additional review after several residents filed letters appealing the city’s approval of the company’s application. (Posted Dec. 30 at 9:53 a.m.)

     

Historic home (continued from page 7)

             

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bump up against restrictions. “There are only so many changes you can make. The cost is usually a little higher (to remodel), and you don’t get what you want,� he said. Homes with a historical designation are a niche market, often attracting people from the East Coast and Boston area who want older houses, he said. But the cultural preference for the oldtown charm of a small home on a big lot is changing, he added. Palo Alto is a magnet for many wealthy immigrants who are changing the cultural norm. Many desire to build larger homes, and that could affect home values of historic properties in the future, he said. DeLeon conservatively estimated that homes with historical designations are valued 15 to 20 percent lower than other properties. The disparity is likely to rise as more people seek out larger lots for bigger homes, he said. Pickett said he regretted not having attended the Historic Resources Board meeting, when he and his wife were on separate trips as chaperones for more than 70 schoolchildren each. “I think it was a matter of first

impressions,� he said, noting that it might have seemed insulting to board members that the couple didn’t attend. He plans to attend the council meeting, he added. “Pretty much everything stopped because of the (Historic Resources Board) decision,� he said, noting he and his wife have looked at a variety of things they could do to the house. The Historic Resources Board members based their decision in essence on a walk-by, he said, not having any requirement to view the inside of the house. The previous owners gutted the inside and remodeled it in an ultra-modern style. When the couple purchased the home 4 1/2 years ago, they had no idea of what they were facing, he said. They had only remodeled a bathroom. Since the Historic Resources Board decision Pickett hired a second consultant from the planning department’s list to do a peer review of the Garavaglia report. The consultants, Page and Turnbull, came to the same conclusion that the home did not meet the test on seven city criteria for historic integrity, he said. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

Violence related Arson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Child abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Theft related Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .8 Lost/stolen license plates . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .7 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Miscellaneous Elder abuse/financial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .2 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Noise ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .3 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Shooting at occupied dwelling . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Receiving stolen property. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Tow request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .8 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Animal call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic disturbance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Felon in possession of weapon . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Gang information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Gang validations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Information report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Located missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Parole arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Resisting arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Menlo Park

Atherton

Dec. 27 - Jan. 3

Dec. 28 - Jan. 3

Violence related Assault w/a deadly weapon . . . . . . . . . .1

Theft related Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Dec. 28 - Jan. 3

Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Parking problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Vehicle/traffic hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .2 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Miscellaneous Animal call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Attempt to contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Be on the lookout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Citizen assist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Foot patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hang-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Meet citizen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Pedestrian check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Tree down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC

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VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Unlisted block Moreno Avenue, 12/28, 2:42 p.m.; child abuse/neglect. Unlisted block Hawthorne Avenue, 12/30, 10:46 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Cypress Lane, 12/31, 12:55 a.m.; arson/misc. Lytton Avenue and High Street, 12/31, 12:59 a.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Waverley Street, 12/31, 1:17 a.m.; family violence/misc. Unlisted block Allen Court, 12/31, 4:15 a.m.; domestic violence/assault. Unlisted block Alma Street, 1/1, 6:14 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block San Antonio Road, 1/3, 6 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block Alma Street, 1/3 2 p.m.; domestic violence/battery.

Menlo Park 1200 block Crane Street, 12/30, 8:55 p.m.; battery. 1200 block Crane Street, 12/31, 4:05 p.m.; battery. 600 block Pierce Road, 1/1, 3:28 a.m.; assault with a deadly weapon. 100 block Chester Street, 1/1, 2:41 p.m.; shooting at occupied dwelling.

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, January 19, 2012 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review ďŹ led documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. Formal Review 3431 Hillview [11PLN-00399]: Request by VM Ware on behalf of Leland Stanford Jr. University for Major ARB review for one new 3 story parking garage. Environmental Assessment: An addendum to the previously prepared MayďŹ eld EIR will be prepared as part of the formal Master Plan ARB application [11PLN-00458] which is anticipated to be reviewed on March 1, 2012. Consent Calendar 3251 Hanover [11PLN-00336]: Request by DGA Architects, on behalf of Stanford and Lockheed Martin, for Architectural Review of the construction of a two-story 82,120 sf building) within an existing ofďŹ ce park. Zone: RP. Environmental Assessment: An initial study and mitigated negative declaration were prepared in 2009 Study Session 3431 Hillview - Request by VM Ware on behalf of Leland Stanford Jr. University for study session related to proposed major site renovations including renovation of several existing buildings and construction of four new ofďŹ ce buildings, two amenity buildings and three new parking structures. Zone District: RP-5. Environmental Assessment: No assessment is required for a study session item. Amy French Manager of Current Planning *>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 11

Editorial Antenna angst unwarranted AT&T’s low-power distributed antenna system should be approved he debate over whether to allow AT&T to improve cell service in Palo Alto using small antennas positioned on the top of existing utility poles will finally come to a head later this month. Several residents have appealed the approvals already granted by the Architectural Review Board and Planning Director Curtis Williams to the City Council, which will decide the matter at its meeting on Jan. 23. Supporters complain about the notoriously bad and under-built AT&T network in Palo Alto and the need for this epicenter of technology to provide reliable cell service. The large number of iPhone and iPad owners in our community put unusual demands on the current system, and AT&T is desperately trying to put in place the needed and long-overdue infrastructure. Ironically, Palo Alto’s dense canopy of trees is one of the factors that impairs the reliability of cell service, according to AT&T officials. The appellants, largely people who live next to one of the 19 utility poles initially proposed for the antennas, object on a variety of grounds, including concern over radiation, noise and visual impact. Federal law constrains local authorities when considering cell phone antenna systems, and specifically prohibits any consideration of health impacts and radiation. Most experts agree that the distributed antenna system (DAS) technology actually reduces radio-wave emissions because cell phones use less power when connecting to a close-by DAS than a cell tower. AT&T consultants claim that a DAS antenna gives off very little radiation, up to 200 times lower than the Federal Communications Commission threshold, or about 3 watts when operating at maximum power. According to the October 2010 study by Hammett and Edison, broadcast and wireless engineers, the antenna would produce about 0.5 percent of the FCC limit. Output in other directions, including a Wi-Fi antenna mounted 63 feet above a street, would be far less when measured at ground level, the experts said. Because of the federal pre-emption on the health issue, the city’s only real regulatory authority relates to the aesthetics of the antenna and related equipment. When the Architectural Review Board voted to approve the plan, it attached a long list of conditions to minimize the impact of the equipment, including use of trees whenever possible to screen the equipment from view and using colors to make the antennas less conspicuous. The company had already agreed to reduce the number of antennas on each pole from two to one. We fail to see the aesthetic problems with placing an antenna on top of a relatively small number of 60-foot or higher utility poles. In most parts of town with overhead utilities, street trees already obscure the upper reaches of the poles. A more legitimate concern is the power units that will be mounted lower on the poles and their visual and noise impact. The company’s plan to install battery backups on the utility poles generated a wide-ranging discussion at the ARB meeting, with most concerns expressed about the sound the battery cabinets would make. An attorney for AT&T said the company would be willing to remove the battery boxes from the proposal, but he stressed the importance of backup power during an emergency or power outage. Ultimately, the board approved the boxes, but added a condition requiring that AT&T test the equipment’s noise level to make sure it complies with local regulations. We are satisfied with this resolution and the ARB’s conclusions and other conditions. With the appeal, by dozens of residents, the plan will get a full airing before the City Council, probably Jan. 23. While we believe the plan should be approved, we hope that future applications for more DAS antennas can go through a better and less antagonistic process. Next month the Council is scheduled to begin a discussion with planners about how to develop such a framework, action we called for in a March 18 editorial last year. Model ordinances to govern cellular infrastructure are already in place in several Bay Area cities, including Berkeley and Richmond. Palo Alto could be the next to find a way to reduce the bickering over a technology that is now embedded in our culture and is considered much safer than driving your automobile on the freeway.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Re-use downtown post office Editor, With the historic downtown post office on the auction block, a prime use would be a new public-safety building. The past two decades city leaders have struggled with various sites throughout Palo Alto searching for a location for a new police headquarters, and always coming up short. This time an existing public facility, located in the downtown, a stone’s throw from City Hall, and immediately adjacent to other Cityowned sites is finally available. The downtown post office is not

only identified with Palo Alto’s historic architecture, but has ample interior headroom to allow another level to be built over the mail-sorting floor, with basement space and adjacent parking for building expansion. The adjacent parking lot could become a new parking structure servicing police vehicles, and nearby lots used by the public and visitors. Palo Alto has a rich history of reclaiming our historic public buildings. Avenidas once housed Palo Alto’s police headquarters, and the Roth Building is soon to become the Palo Alto History Museum. Further, if the post office were to be auctioned, developer Chop

Keenan estimates it would sell for approximately $6M — a relative bargain for parcels in the downtown. But city leaders hold all the cards. The underlying zoning for the post office remains a public facility, and can’t be rezoned without City Council initiation. The City Council should authorize the city manager to conduct a feasibility study to determine if a badly needed public-safety building could work at the downtown post office location. Lee I. Lippert, AIA, architect Hawthorne Avenue Palo Alto

This week on Town Square Town Square is an online discussion forum at www.PaloAltoOnline.com Posted Jan. 3 at 7:22 a.m. by Coach E, a resident of the Southgate neighborhood: “I’m sure (Stanford football coach) David Shaw knows more football than anyone commenting on (Town Square), myself included, but here’s how I see it on that final drive in regulation (in the Fiesta Bowl Monday).... “I figured that the 35-yard kick was probably about an 80 percent chance to be successful. Not a bad gamble. But, what do you think the chances were that Stanford might have gotten a touchdown with 52 seconds left and two timeouts, had they decided to not just run out the clock? Maybe another 25 percent chance at least, right? And, even if they had not made a touchdown, would they likely have driven to make a shorter field goal? Probably increasing the chances of making a shorter field goal. “Look, they had a guy, Luck, who their coach says is the best player he’s ever seen at this level. Why not give him the chance to win the game, rather than a freshman kicker? I know they could have turned the ball over, but that was unlikely the way things were going. And in the end, it wouldn’t have been any worse than what happened.� Posted Jan. 4 at 10:46 a.m. by Caryn, a resident of the Professorville neighborhood: “I’m sad to learn that Second Harvest Food Bank has not been able to get the donations it so desperately needs. Feeding the hungry in our community is critical in a just society and Second Harvest does the job well. They stretch every dollar! “A very helpful way of giving to Second Harvest is to sign up for a monthly donation from one’s credit card or bank account. That way, Second Harvest can count on your donation during the winter months, but, just as importantly, they have money to feed hungry children during the summer when school is out and there are no subsidized lunches or break-

fasts to count on for a decent meal. “We are all in this together. Please don’t let our fellow citizens go hungry!� Posted Jan. 5 at 9:36 a.m. by Sandra Newell, a resident of another community: “I remember Yiahway Yeh when he was a student at Gunn High School. He was a polite, unassuming young man who was always willing to help his peers with academic dif-

ficulties. “I’m glad to know he still shares generously of his talents and am proud to have known him. I wish him every success; Palo Alto is not the easiest city to lead, given the level of education and articulation of its citizens. It has been some years since I lived in Palo Alto, but I have warm memories of my 30-plus years there and believe the city to be very fortunate in its mayor.�

YOUR TURN The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

What do you think? What do you think the City’s greatest accomplishments were in 2011? Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. You can also participate in our popular interactive online forum, Town Square, at our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Read blogs, discuss issues, ask questions or express opinions with you neighbors any time, day or night. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Online Editor Tyler Hanley at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

On Deadline:

Palo Alto’s frenetic year, with more to come in 2012 by Jay Thorwaldson or a city oft criticized for its “Palo Alto Process� delays, the past year has been wildly busy in terms of things getting done, started or approved. And there promises to be more to come in 2012: big things that will leave a mark on the community for years, even decades in some cases. Look for summaries of the specifics of 2011 in the Dec. 30 edition, and they are outlined online at www.cityofpaloalto.org (search for mayor’s message). The sheer number of items is worth noting, especially as some spill over into 2012 and beyond. One of the biggest accomplishments was approval of rebuilding the Stanford University Medical Center, the largest single landuse decision in the city’s history, after eight years of negotiations. Construction will take years, and the complex will serve medicine, Stanford and Peninsula communities for much of the next century. Other so-called bricks-and-mortar accomplishments include opening of the refurbished Downtown Library and completing a major storm-drain project along Channing Avenue. There were important launches, notably the highly visible Mitchell Park Library and Community Center and the low-visibility 2.5 million gallon emergency-water-supply reservoir beneath El Camino Park. “Softer� accomplishments include completing negotiations with the city’s unions and

F

tackling the retirement-benefits challenge; overhauling the city’s Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan to make it easier for people to leave their cars at home; and strengthening the emergency-preparedness collaboration between the city and neighborhood groups, including a “Quakeville� campout exercise and educational videos; improving renewalenergy and street-light efficiency programs; and implementing a Project Safety Net program aimed to promote well-being of young persons. Perhaps the most important achievements were re-energizing the city’s “economic development� efforts and pushing for more efficient approvals of construction and remodeling projects — long the source of “Palo Alto Process� complaints. Outgoing Mayor Sid Espinosa, who has energized the usually low-profile one-term mayorship, says the year is a source of pride to him personally, while crediting city staff and mayors and City Council members who served before him for the scope of accomplishments. But there have been frustrations as well, primarily not enough time to get everything done, inefficient City Council meetings and an “appalling� failure to capitalize on technology in conducting city business. These don’t show up on the city accomplishments list. But Espinosa elaborated on his own approach and the frustrations, which echo complaints of prior mayors, who are elected by fellow council members, not by voters. First is to work hard, he said: “Put our head down, work very hard, and let the work/accomplishment speak for itself. “I also try to create a fun environment where

people’s hard work is praised.� City staff members have told him “they have worked harder this year, but that they’ve also enjoyed working with the mayor’s office more than they can remember.� The city’s “outreach� efforts also have expanded greatly under Espinosa’s encouragement. One good-natured comment was that there was never a ribbon-cutting ceremony that Espinosa didn’t love. There have been numerous positive responses from citizens and nonprofit organizations, as well as from businesses and large companies that were quietly visited by Espinosa, City Manager James Keene and the city’s new economic-development Director Tommy Fehrenbach “to engage them in a conversation about their future in the city.� There has also been a greater emphasis on working with nonprofit groups, from bike groups, the “urban forest� advocacy group Canopy, the Arts Center Foundation, theater groups, environmental organizations and senior groups. Frustrations include a “top three:� 1) “There are not enough hours in the day, week, month, year. I wish that I had gotten more done this year. It is frustrating. It takes a year to learn the job. I could definitely be much more productive in a second year. That said, let me be very clear that I am not gunning for another year. Period.� 2) “The city’s use of technology is embarrassing. Appalling even. We are so far from operating like a technology center. There are developing countries that do a better job of e-government than we do.� 3) We are not running efficient meetings, and this is not fair to the public, staff or council. Unfortunately, as I mentioned, I don’t see

council members being willing to take the steps necessary to fix this. If everyone speaks for 20 to 30 minutes per meeting, we’re there all night. And council members don’t act with any sense of urgency or wanting to get out of the room. Many of them are happy to stay there all night — and then of course, in the end, we often just approve staff’s recommendation!! ARGH.� So much for 2011. Looking forward to 2012 there will be little respite as a new Mayor Yiaway Yeh, along with Vice Mayor Greg Scharff, take over. Upcoming projects include the Edgewood Plaza major remodeling and building 10 new homes; construction of 37 new homes at Alma Plaza; and construction of 45 new homes at 200 San Antonio Road. A report on long-term “infrastructure� needs and priorities is due for completion, encompassing hundreds of millions of dollars of mostly unfunded projects. The refurbished Art Center will be reopened with what is expected to be some artistic flair in an arts-conscious community. The Mitchell Park Library and Community Center should be completed, or nearly so. And rebuilding of the California Avenue commercial strip between El Camino Real and the Caltrain tracks may be implemented — unless it is derailed by challenges to the idea of reducing its four lanes to two to improve the “streetscape.� There will be effort to expand “emergency preparedness� to a regional or subregional level — watch for another Quakeville campout exercise. There will be a focus on improving the management of parking in commercial areas, (continued on next page)

Streetwise

What was your favorite film of 2011? Asked on California Avenue, Palo Alto. Interviews and photographs by Eric Van Susteren.

Jerry Marxman

Retired Resident of Portola Valley “‘Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.’ It told a complex story very well and it had great acting.�

Fermin Urrutia

Facilities Project Manager Resident of 2nd Street, Los Altos “‘The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn.’ I listened to all the books while I was commuting to work and I thought it turned out pretty good compared to the books.�

Pamela Deckard

Production Coordinator Resident of East Palo Alto “‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.’ But I had to close my eyes during a few parts. I didn’t sign up for that stuff.�

Tony Espinoza

Entrepreneur Resident of Webster Street, Palo Alto “‘Tree of Life.’ A lot of people didn’t even like it. I thought it was a really brave and artistic film to even be made.�

Linda Sanford

Architectural Lighting Designer Resident of Old Palo Alto “‘Margin Call.’ It did a really good job of telling the story of the economic collapse in a suspenseful way.�

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Spectrum

Palo Alto’s year (continued from previous page)

an echo of periodic efforts over the past 60 years or so. Technology and innovation, a “technology test bed� project and environmental sustainability projects (perhaps including planning for a composting and electricity-production plant adjacent to the city’s wastewater-treatment plant) will round out the agenda. Not listed is the issue of whether Palo Alto should have a directlyelected mayor or stay with the council-elected mayor, who mostly chairs meetings and attends civic ceremonies in addition to whatever “bully pulpit� abilities he or she has. That question has been around for two decades, and was reopened by former City Councilman and Mayor Gary Fazzino in a guest opinion in the Dec. 16 Weekly. That’s something about which almost everyone will have an opinion. N Former Weekly Editor Jay Thorwaldson can be emailed at jthorwaldson@paweekly.com with cc: to jaythor@well.com.

Guest Oninion On spur of the moment, gift bouquets blossom for vets at VA By Carrie Manley s a new year begins, I’m grateful for an unexpected gift given this past holiday season, something more precious and beautiful than any present you might find wrapped under the tree. This gift began to take shape six days before Christmas, thanks to Karen Froniewski, owner of Nature’s Alley in mid-town Palo Alto. Surrounded by fragrant flowers in her cozy shop, we pondered the possibility of making holiday bouquets for veterans at the Palo Alto VA Hospital hospice. Karen said $3 per bouquet would cover her costs. (Karen is a

A

former nurse, and it shows in the care she gives to arranging flowers, and in the generosity of her most modest estimates.) Next, VA Hospice head nurse Scott Sutorius provided thoughtful encouragement. “We expect 22 patients on Christmas Eve,� he said. “So long as you can bring enough for everyone, it would be great,� he said. Thanks to www.paloaltoonline. com, word quickly spread. “One man just walked in and gave me $100. He said he was a veteran, and wanted to help. And one family brought $22 in change,� Karen reported. “Another woman said she wants to deliver to the Spinal Cord Injury unit, too!� Mountain View Greenhouse and Summer Winds Nursery also contributed supplies, and another Midtown neighbor, My Gym, offered tables for volunteers to make the holiday bouquets. Christmas Eve morning, a nurse

told us that 22 veterans would be at the Spinal Cord unit that night, along with the 22 vets at the hospice. Next, at La Biscotteria in Redwood City, master baker Augustine Buonocore and his beautiful wife, Angela, put what had to be their busiest day of the year on hold, to hand over two huge grocery bags of biscotti for the hospitalized veterans, to the cheers of their many loyal customers. Now came the big question: Would anyone actually show up on Christmas Eve to make bouquets? At noon our answer came, as retired teachers, parents, children, teenagers, Girl Scouts and neighbors formed a bouquet-making assembly line in front of Nature’s Alley. In two hours, strangers became friends, and together, created 78 bouquets of red roses, white mums, evergreens, and silvery trimmings. They also assembled dozens of individual biscotti bags, and drew holiday cards,

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to go with some wonderful cards made by children at the Palo Alto Community Child Care program at Walter Hays Elementary School. As the delivery time approached, one woman quietly mentioned that she was worried that she might cry when she met the veterans. Another woman said, “Don’t worry, come with me and my family. Let’s stick together.� So off they went, this volunteer caravan of love and generosity. The caravan even included the bestlooking Christmas couple ever, Mr. and Mrs. Claus, known the rest of the year as Eddie and Melina Foote of Palo Alto. Eddie is our neighbor, 28 years old, who bravely served in Iraq for 14 months. The night before deliveries, I explained to him that my husband couldn’t be Santa, since he was in Cleveland, Ohio, helping his gravely ill mother and his father, a veteran of WWII. I asked Eddie if he would be willing to put on the big red suit. “I can’t be Santa,� said Eddie. “I’m the wrong color.� Eddie grew up on a Northern Cheyenne reservation in Montana. Another neighbor, Lonnie, and I immediately said, “Who says what color Santa is? Eddie, you can be Santa!� Despite his initial doubts, Eddie gamely tried on the suit, and then stood in the middle of our street under the stars, practicing his “Ho Ho Ho’s.� The next afternoon, after making all the bouquets, Santa and the rest of the volunteers visited every veteran at the Hospice and Spinal Cord Injury unit, and then dropped off the remaining 34 bouquets at my house. With my daughter offering to stay home and make our Christmas Eve dinner, my son and I loaded up the car, and drove to the VA’s long-term care facility on Willow Road in Menlo Park. There, a helpful nurse guided us from room to room. Two elderly female veterans said they loved the flowers and hugged my son. In another room, a wife tenderly fussed over a bouquet for her husband, silent in his wheelchair. “He doesn’t speak now. We have been married 53 years. I come every day,� she told us. In another room, a veteran cried as he recalled how much his grandfather had sacrificed for him. “My grandfather believed education was the most important thing. I went to high school, and college, thanks to everything he did for me. I even got a Ph.D!� Then, he shared his pain. “My wife died of breast cancer three years ago. Now I have Lou Gehrig’s disease. Thank you so much for bringing me these flowers.� As we walked back to the car, my son thanked me for taking him. It wasn’t even Christmas Day, and what more could I ask for? Thanks to family, friends and our veterans, here’s what I learned this past Christmas Eve: The most meaningful, treasured gifts we give and receive are the lessons, experiences and love we share with each other. ■ Carrie Manley is a Midtown Palo Alto resident and a kindergarten aide at Walter Hays Elementary School. She can be reached at carrie_manley@yahoo.com.

Transitions Deaths Betty Britton Betty Britton, 75, an active participant in the Palo Alto community for many years, died Dec. 28. She spent a happy Christmas with her family and finally her struggle with Parkinson’s and kidney diseases ended. Many at the Palo Alto Adult School will remember her as a capable, patient and fun upholstery teacher. She guided many students through the complexities of upholstering vintage chairs and enjoyed the company of her students. She served as a board member of Palo Alto Stanford Heritage, where she helped research historic properties. Earlier in her life, she volunteered at the nursery school, elementary school library and the international children’s playgroups at Stanford’s Bechtel International Center. For several years during the fall, her family hosted foreign families arriving for study at Stanford, which

resulted in many long-term friendships. She was always up for something new and different. She got her private pilot’s license in 1987 and joined the Ninety-Nines International Organization of Women Pilots. She and her husband made trips all around the United States, including to Alaska. An accomplished cook, she wrote a cookbook entitled “Lots of Pots — Cooking for 10 to 300,� the inspiration for which grew out of the many meals she catered for friends and organizations. She was born April 24, 1936, in Chicago, Ill., but moved to Southern California at age 2. After graduating from Hamilton High School in Los Angeles, she attended Tobe-Coburn School for Fashion Careers in New York City. She moved to Palo Alto in 1958, where she took a job with the Emporium at Stanford. She married and started her family in June 1960. As her children became more independent, she returned to do retail for some time, managing a small chain specializing in women’s sizes. She later took up upholstery. At first upholstery was a hobby but finally, with a new teaching credential, she taught it until Parkinson’s disease took its toll. She is survived by her husband

of 51 years, Ralph Britton; sisters, Jane Childs of Torrance, Calif., and Kathleen Cairns of Santa Cruz, Calif.; daughter, Carla of Boise, Idaho; son, Stuart of San Diego, Calif.; and two grandchildren. A celebration of her life will be held in the garden of the family home in the spring. The family requests that memorials be sent to The Parkinson’s Institute at www. thepi.org.

Myrna Klee Robinson Myrna Klee Robinson, a longtime resident of Menlo Park, died Dec. 21. She died at the age of 64 in her home, surrounded by family and friends. Shortly before her death from advanced melanoma, she said: “I never knew I was so beloved.� Born Nov. 20, 1947, in Pittsburg, Pa., the only child of Edward and Sylvia Klee, she lived in that area for her childhood and adolescence, and then went on to graduate from Vassar College in 1969. At that time she relocated to the Bay Area, where she didn’t know anyone. Once working in San Francisco, she attended U.C. Berkeley to receive her master’s degree in social work in 1974. She married in 1981 and divorced in 1998. She was a highly skilled and

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Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo.

Visit: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

August 9, 1915 – January 1, 2012

Resident of Palo Alto missed by her children Juanita C. Loo (William), Leilani Eng (Peter), Ronald Leung; Grandchildren: Robert Loo, Irene Wesley (Alan), Michael Yu (Mary), Theresa Loo (Phillip Indihar), Leticia Barr (James), Darrell Eng (Kate), and Angela Leung; Great-Grandchildren: Brittny Yu-Loo, James Wesley (Caroline), D. Tyler Wesley, Kyle Indihar, Brooke Indihar-Loo, Emily Barr, Thomas Barr; and many nephews, nieces and friends. Vera’s ashes will be scattered at sea where she will join her late husband James. The Family will hold a Celebration of Life on Sunday, January 15, 2012 at Mings in Palo Alto at 11:30 am. In lieu of owers, contributions can be made to your favorite charities in her memory. www. rollerhapgoodtinney.com PA I D

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friends, whom all looked to her as a caring teacher and master of the game. Far more important than any of this was her deep relationship with her son, Eric Robinson, who survives her. When Eric showed an early childhood interest in music, she went to unusual lengths to foster his passion. He has since gone on to become a successful musician and record producer in Los Angeles. A memorial service, which is open to the public, will be held at Sharon Heights Country Club in Menlo Park on Sunday, Jan. 15, at 2 p.m. The family requests that in lieu of flowers contributions be made in Robinson’s name to the Cleo Eulau Center, 2483 Old Middlefield Way, Ste. 208, Mountain View, CA 94303.

Adrian L Ward

Vera Oy Leung Vera Oy Leung was born on March 3, 1919 passed away peacefully in her home surrounded by her children on December 1, 2011. Vera, the daughter of Merchants Lee Quan and Ho Shee, was born and raised in San Francisco’s Chinatown. She attended George Washington High School and Munson Business College. In 1939, she married James C.Y. Leung of Palo Alto where they raised a family, did property management, and owned and operated The Golden Dragon Restaurant. Vera was an active respected community member. She served as the President of the Stanford Area Chinese Club, received the Life Long Service Award of the Palo Alto Chinese Community Center, received boating Yachtsman certiďŹ cation, was a Lifetime member of Square and Circle Club of San Francisco and was a longtime member of the Reserve OfďŹ cer Association Ladies. Vera loved playing mahjong, exercising, dancing, walking, traveling, and doing handicrafts. She will be deeply

compassionate psychotherapist with a thriving private practice in Palo Alto for 41 years. During that time, she pursued many professional interests, including individual, couple and collaborative divorce counseling. She received an honorary Ph.D. from the esteemed Sanville Institute in the summer of 2011. Known for her extremely generous nature, she maintained several lifelong and meaningful friendships with people from all sorts of backgrounds. She was a tireless and passionate campaigner for the Cleo Eulau Center, an organization that she helped create in honor of her mentor. The culmination of her work with the center was becoming chairperson of the board and using her commitment and vision to lead the agency to create a more expansive reach. Under her ambassadorship, the center tripled in size, reaching a statewide and national audience in the past year. She developed her longtime love of interior design and spent any of her limited free time in the homes of those who needed imaginative help in finding a new face and a new love for their residences. On Tuesday afternoons she could be found playing bridge with a tight-knit group of

OBITUARY

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Adrian was born in Portland Or. and moved with his family to Menlo Park in 1925. He graduated from St. Joseph Grammar School in 1929, from Bellermine Prep in 1933 and from Univ. of Santa Clara in 1937 with a business degree. Adrian worked at President Hotel, Palo Alto, during school years and sales at Schwabacher/Fry, San Francisco until 1941 when he joined the Quartermaster Corps of the Air Force at Moffett Field. In 1945 he was released from the Army as Sergeant in an Altitude Training unit at Hickam Field, Hawaii. In 1945 he joined the sales force of PaciďŹ c Telephone Co. until 1954 when he went into the sporting goods business. He was active in all ďŹ elds, rental, wholesale, factory and importing in various parts of Northern California, Oregon and Nevada in the sales and purchasing departments. During this time he was able to spend considerable time in the ďŹ eld in order to verify the quality of the equipment and the productivity of the many hunting and ďŹ shing locations. In 1977 with the words “freedom and independenceâ€? appearing in the tea leaves, he took early retirement in order to perfect the art of hunting and ďŹ shing and to support the humane drive to reduce the overpopulation of ďŹ sh and game where necessary. Favorite sports to play or watch-ďŹ shing, hunting, boxing, tennis, golf, baseball, football. “He left no footprints on the sands of time but sure tracked up a lot of trout streamsâ€?. Unknown Adrian is preceded in death by his parents Adrian F. and Adele Ward and his sister, Jean Bone. Mass will be celebrated January 11, 2012 at 11:00 am at the Church of the Nativity 210 Oak Grove Av. Menlo Park. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Arts & Entertainment Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

The

story’s the thing FILM CRITICS’ PICKS FOCUS ON THE ELEMENTAL ART OF STORYTELLING

O

nly two movies made it onto all the Weekly film critics’ “best� lists for 2011, and they’ve got one thing in common: a focus on good old-fashioned storytelling. “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy� told its trenchcoated tale without whiz-bang action or Bond braggadocio. Rather, said critic Tyler Hanley, it was an “intelligent and deliberate whodunit fueled by espionage, intrigue and thespian excellence.� And “The Artist� was no CGI blockbuster. In fact, it barely even had sound. Director Michel Hazanavicius paid tribute to 1920s silent films

by making his own. That’s a risky choice in 2011, but “The Artist� was a hit with Hanley and his Weekly cohorts Peter Canavese and Susan Tavernetti, who praised it as nostalgic, lively and charming — with, of course, a captivating narrative. Here are the trio’s choices for the top 10 and worst five films of 2011. Hanley also chimes in with his annual picks for the best cinematic heroes and villains of the year.

From left, Michelle Williams in “My Week with Marilyn�; Penelope Ann Miller in “The Artist�; Marion Cotillard and Owen Wilson in “Midnight in Paris.� All films made it onto at least one Weekly “best� list this year.

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lationships, art and what constitutes real life (as opposed to our comfortable illusions). 1. The Tree of Life No studio release this year was more ambitious, emotional or elegant than Terrence Malick’s searching epic about our place in a family, a town, a galaxy, the universe. Emmanuel Lubezki’s innovative cinematography beautifully painted with light and shadow and color, while boy lead Hunter McCracken and screen parents Brad Pitt and Jessica Chastain exquisitely navigated existential terrain. It has everything and the kitchen sink (and dinosaurs).

Peter Canavese’s pans Sucker Punch Visually and aurally loud, plodding, repetitive and sexist, this Zack Snyder joint about abused female mental patients fantasizing then enacting revenge was the year’s top endurance test and, hence, the year’s worst movie. In “The Descendants,� George Clooney “wears his vulnerability on his Hawaiian-shirt sleeve, playing the lawyer-husband-father whose life gets upended in rough surf,� Weekly critic Susan Tavernetti wrote. She and Tyler Hanley both put the movie on their “best� lists.

Peter Canavese’s top films 10. The Artist Just for kicks, there’s Michel Hazanavicius’ “The Artist,â€? a transportive celebration of silent cinema and artistic endurance. Though capable of tongue-in-cheekiness, the film lives more comfortably in sentimental melodrama, and excels technically in its recreation (through photography and production design) of filmic composition circa 1927. It’s also a lively performance piece for French actors Jean Dujardin and BĂŠrĂŠnice Bejo, whose work can’t get lost in translation. 9. The Skin I Live In Pedro AlmodĂłvar’s loose adaptation of Thierry Jonquet’s novel “Tarantulaâ€? is certified crazy, a treasure of sick cinema. Antonio Banderas plays the disconcertingly dashing mad doctor, a plastic surgeon whose unhinged creativity knows no bounds (ethics? what ethics?). AlmodĂłvar genderbends with the best of them, exploring with abandon sexual orientation, identity and taboos. 8. Margin Call The 2009 market crisis revisited, from within a representative tower of power. A fictional Wall Street investment bank becomes the proverbial canary in the coal mine and, as such, weathers a long, dark night of the soul in deciding how to parcel out its precious loyalty, to employees, clients and the American economy. Under the direction of breakthrough screenwriter J.C. Chandor, Kevin Spacey and Stanley Tucci excel as morally elastic yet sympathetic executives.

5. Nostalgia for the Light Patricio GuzmĂĄn takes us with him on a creative leap in this moving documentary, which creatively conflates two searches for answers in Chile’s Atacama Desert. The place’s unique environmental conditions make it suitable for astronomical study; as scientists look up, widows and orphans dig down, in search of the remains of husbands and fathers “disappearedâ€? by the Pinochet regime.

Gary Oldman in “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.� 6. The Mill and the Cross One of the year’s most inspired creative excursions, “The Mill and the Cross� found Polish filmmaker Lech Majewski adapting Michael Francis Gibson’s book about the genesis of Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s 1564 painting “The Way to Calvary.� Rutger Hauer plays Bruegel, Michael York his patron and Charlotte Rampling a local muse, but it’s all about the imagery in this fascinating — nay, mesmerizing — look at the artistic process, rural life and fervent faith.

4. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Tomas Alfredson’s commendable adaptation of John le CarrÊ’s celebrated espionage novel was among the year’s smartest entertainments. Though it entirely eschews the action of a Bond or Bourne escapade, “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spyâ€? has a fascinating central character in carefully measured career spy George Smiley, now embodied by the brilliant Gary Oldman. 3. Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives As “The Tree of Lifeâ€? did this year, “Uncle Boonmeeâ€? won the Palme D’Or at the Cannes Film Festival last year. And as select American audiences discovered in 2011, Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s new film provided its own distinctive take on the big

questions of life, the afterlife, history and memory, in a ghost story a far cry from “Paranormal Activity 3� (and, sadly, its box-office grosses). 2. Certified Copy There’s nothing quite like a two-hander carried off by a pair of actors up for the challenge. Writer-director Abbas Kiarostami had a ringer in the always great Juliette Binoche, but gambled and won by casting opera singer (and first-time screen actor) William Shimell to go toe-to-toe with her. The film itself vigorously works itself into an intellectual tangle over the nature of long-term re-

I Am Number Four This teen sci-fi action flick was dull. Also tedious. Also tiresome and mundane. I Am Bored Times Four. Conan the Barbarian “I live, I love, I slay. I am content.� Yeah, Jason Momoa’s Conan also squints, mumbles and cocks his eyebrow a lot. He makes Schwarzenegger look like Olivier. Just Go With It Dear audience: I hate you stupid rubes. Here, have a turd. That’ll be 11 bucks. The only laughing you will hear will be me on the way to the bank. Love, Adam Sandler. (continued on next page)

Left: William Shimell and Juliette Binoche in “Certified Copy.� Below: Brad Pitt and Jessica Chastain with their on-screen sons in “The Tree of Life.�

7. The Interrupters Documentary filmmaker Steve James (“Hoop Dreamsâ€?) turns his camera on “violence interruptersâ€? working in Chicago’s CeaseFire organization. James focuses on the efforts of three interrupters, former violent offenders now doing the noble work of swimming upstream in one of the nation’s most violence-plagued communities. Though the change James observes is almost imperceptibly incremental, there’s palpable hope in commitment to community. *>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 17

Arts & Entertainment

COMMUNITY MEETING Join the community discussion on the proposed landscape renovations to Cogswell Plaza Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 6:30 PM At the Avenidas Senior Center in the La Comida Dining Hall 450 Bryant St. Palo Alto, CA 94301 The City of Palo Alto seeks the communities input on this proposed landscape renovation project Meeting hosted by City of Palo Alto Public Works (650) 496-5916 Email pwecips@cityofpaloalto.org for more information

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Asa Butterfield and Chloe Grace Moretz in “Hugo,� which was a favorite with critics Tyler Hanley and Susan Tavernetti. “Simply beautiful,� Hanley wrote of the film.

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thespian excellence. 8. The Artist This clever homage to the silent-film era is one of the year’s most fascinating pictures. Parisian auteur Michel Hazanavicius paints his “Artistâ€? with a whimsical brush that is at once daring and nostalgic. Jean Dujardin and BĂŠrĂŠnice Bejo are perfectly cast in the lead roles, but the movie’s unrivaled ingenuity is what truly sets it apart. Hazanavicius deserves a great deal of credit for directing a crowdpleasing, black-and-white silent film while most studios are deciding which mindless 3D actioner to dump on indiscriminate viewers.

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7. War Horse Steven Spielberg hops in the saddle again to helm this harrowing World War I epic. The production values are exemplary, from breathtaking cinematography to stitch-perfect costume design. Spielberg’s ambitious and poignant family drama includes powerful messages about empathy and resilience that trump the picture’s sometimes saccharine qualities. The movie’s massive scope and diverse characters serve to remind us that “War Horse� is much more about the journey than the destination.

Jeremy Irons in “Margin Call.�

2011 Movies

(continued from previous page)

2011

2796 MiddleďŹ eld Road, Palo Alto 650-329-8171

Jack and Jill P.S. For my next Adam Sandler trick, I will enlist Al Pacino to play a horny version of himself chasing a woman I play in drag. Oh, America, is there nothing I can do to make you stay home?

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10. Bridesmaids This hilarious R-rated offering from producer Judd Apatow and director Paul Feig gives the female of the species the same sort of unapologetic, buddy-based chuckler guys have gotten a dozen times over with films like “The Hangover.� But it isn’t fair to pigeonhole the flick based on gender, so I’ll state it simply: “Bridesmaids� is the best comedy of 2011. “Saturday Night Live� standout Kristen Wiig shines in both writing and acting, while Melissa McCarthy is a revelation in delivering one of the year’s most entertaining performances. 9. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy James Bond meets “The Usual

Brad Pitt in “Moneyball.â€? Suspectsâ€? in Swedish filmmaker Tomas Alfredson’s sharp adaptation of the 1974 John le CarrĂŠ novel. Gary Oldman headlines a virtuoso cast that includes Colin Firth, John Hurt, Tom Hardy, Toby Jones, Mark Strong and Benedict Cumberbatch (if you don’t recognize some of those names, don’t worry — you will soon enough). “Tinkerâ€? is an intelligent and deliberate whodunit fueled by espionage, intrigue and

6. Midnight in Paris Present and past intertwine poetically in Woody Allen’s romantic charmer. Allen’s textured writing brings the audience into 1920s Paris with vivacious flair, and Owen Wilson wriggles free of comedic preconceptions in the leading role. “Midnight� lights up with gorgeous set design and costuming while Kathy Bates, Tom Hiddleston, Corey Stoll and Marion Cotillard sparkle in supporting roles. An imaginative fantasy for the artist in all of us. 5. Moneyball The unlikely pairing of Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill helps drive the most insightful and compelling baseball-themed film since Robert Redford smashed the stadium lights with a homerun in “The Natural.� Based on Michael Lewis’ 2003 novel about Oakland A’s gen-

Arts & Entertainment

Avenidas presents its 1st Annual the 1930s. Marrying 3D technology with Dante Ferretti’s incredible production design provides eye candy galore. Although the story is too thin to support the movie’s lengthy running time, lovers of film history will adore the tribute to early film pioneer Georges MÊliès (Ben Kingsley) and the power of imagination.

Money Matters: A Financial Conference Saturday, January 28 8:30 am - 2 pm

9. Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol Brad Bird directs the fourth installment of the “Mission: Impossible� franchise as though it were “The Incredibles.� Cartoon-like superheroes (led by Tom Cruise’s Ethan Hunt) perform death-defying feats at a breakneck pace and turn rogue agents to save the world from nuclear annihilation. An adrenaline rush laced with humor, the popcorn movie provides a big escapist bang for the buck. In “Conan,� Jason Momoa “makes Schwarzenegger look like Olivier,� critic Peter Canavese wrote. eral manager Billy Beane and his controversial approach to fielding a winning team on the cheap, “Moneyball� offers a vivid and witty glimpse into the business side of America’s pastime. And Pitt’s firecracker portrayal may earn the accomplished actor his first Academy Award. 4. The Descendants Writer/director Alexander Payne (“About Schmidt,� “Sideways�) strikes again with this smart and soulful dramedy. George Clooney is at his very best and impressive newcomer Shailene Woodley shines in a challenging role. “The Descendants� is deep and affecting, with humor and heartache flowing through the picture in waves. The lush Hawaiian landscape acts as a backdrop for Payne to touch on powerful themes such as love, death and family ties. 3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Pottermania hits a crescendo with this taut and thoughtful final chapter in the extraordinary “Harry Potter� film franchise. “Deathly Hallows: Part 2� caps the series with visual panache and emotional punch, and author J.K. Rowling’s boy wizard gets the big-screen denouement he so richly deserves. The experience is both cathartic and melancholy for Potter fans — a fitting finale to an unparalleled cinematic achievement.

Paris with exceptional costuming, set design and cinematography. Family films are rarely crafted with such care and creative vision. Simply beautiful.

Tyler Hanley’s pans Arthur Peculiar funnyman Russell Brand picks the wrong economic climate to play an irresponsible, booze-guzzling spendthrift. The always excellent Helen Mirren gives the cast more thespian spark, but “Arthur� is a dud. Conan the Barbarian Arnold Schwarzenegger made 1982’s “Conan� something of a cult classic. But this futile attempt to remake the franchise stumbles thanks to a silly plot, goofy costumes and glut of CGI-fueled nonsense. Prom Borrowing liberally from the films of “Breakfast Club� scribe John Hughes makes this cheesy teen pleaser more imitation than inspiration. At least the title fits — the plot and characters are about as onedimensional as cardboard-cutout prom decorations. Red Riding Hood The classic fairy tale gets a “Twilight�-inspired facelift with unflattering results. A hackneyed script and inexperienced acting make “Hood� feel like a mega-budget high school play even grandma would lambaste.

2. 50/50 The finest screenwriting of 2011 comes courtesy of this funny and heartfelt story about a young man confronting cancer. Joseph Gordon-Levitt deserves the Academy Award for his raw and riveting portrayal of Adam, the fledgling adult diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and given a 50/50 chance of survival. Like “The Descendants,� “50/50� coaxes both laughs and tears from viewers, and Seth Rogen and Anna Kendrick are superb in their supporting roles.

Susan Tavernetti’s top films

1. Hugo Mastermind director Martin Scorsese’s longstanding affection for all things cinema is colorfully showcased in the enchanting “Hugo.� Scorsese paints a rich tapestry in adapting the Brian Selznick novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret,� presenting a vibrant 1930s

10. Hugo Martin Scorsese could direct the phone book and make it interesting. Fortunately, Brian Selznick’s book “The Invention of Hugo Cabret� gave the filmmaking maestro plenty of magical material about an orphan (Asa Butterfield) living in a Paris train station during

Sucker Punch Director Zack Snyder (“Dawn of the Dead,� “300�) serves up a visual feast riddled with empty calories. Once the eye candy gets stale, viewers are left with the kind of vacant, achy sensation that can be brought on only by a real “Sucker Punch.�

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Register at Avenidas.org or call (650) 289-5435.

8. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Director Tomas Alfredson focuses on the trench-coated veteran (Gary Oldman) of the British secret service known as “the Circus,â€? who must find the Soviet mole within the organization. Subtlety and restraint characterize this adaptation of John le CarrÊ’s Cold War thriller. Shot with a grainy realism, the film depicts seemingly ordinary spies (including Toby Jones, Ciaran Hinds and Colin Firth) without a hint of James Bond swagger, as they engage in sing-alongs at holiday parties, talk about gathering information, and snatch a file or two. 7. War Horse “Saving War Horse Joeyâ€? might be an appropriate title for Steven Spielberg’s World War I saga that tugs at the heartstrings and affirms traditional values. No one can direct a mainstream movie better. Janusz Kaminski’s lensing and John Williams’ score contribute to the epic grandeur, while the screenplay by Lee Hall and Richard Curtis provides thematic heft and narrative drive. Drafted to serve in the Great War, the magnificent horse moves from master to master, allowing us to see the British, French and German perspectives — and how a splendid creature can stop some humans from behaving like animals. 6. My Week With Marilyn Michelle Williams doesn’t impersonate Marilyn Monroe as much as capture the essence of the 30-year-old screen goddess in an Oscar-worthy turn. From breathy whispers to selfaware winking and posing while “being herâ€? for an adoring public, Williams shows her impressive range. Based on the memoirs of the late Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), then a smitten third assistant director on the set of Sir Laurence Olivier’s “The Prince and the Showgirl,â€? the breezy biopic chronicles his sevenday itch with the blonde legend. Brit Simon Curtis directs a fragile Marilyn as she tries to find the Method in the madness of working with British royalty (Kenneth Branagh and Judi Dench). 5. Bill Cunningham New York On the documentary shortlist for the 2012 Oscars, Richard Press’ profile of octogenarian Bill Cunningham bubbles with the subject’s ebullient spirit. Ironically, the pioneer of the (continued on next page)

Resources and programs for positive aging

  



    

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Arts & Entertainment

Conflict of interests The heroes and villains of 2011 by Tyler Hanley In 2011, Hollywood served up another tantalizing mix of valiant and vile characters to cheer or jeer. Two of Marvel Comics’ most famous dogooders, Thor and Captain America, finally hit the big screen (though only one made this list). Meanwhile, Sherlock Holmes’ classic nemesis Professor James Moriarty also found his way to the cineplex.

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Public Meeting Notice 2011 Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation Plan Public Open House and Call for Ideas DATE: TIME: PLACE:

Johnny Depp as Rango

Rooney Mara

Chris Evans

Thursday, January 12, 2012 6:30-8:30 PM Cubberley Community Center: Room H-1 4000 MiddleďŹ eld Road Road, Palo Alto, CA

The City of Palo Alto is currently in the process of updating the existing Bicycle Transportation Plan, which will include a new Pedestrian Element. A community meeting will be held on Thursday, January 12th, 2012 at 6:30 PM at the Cubberley Community Center, Room H-1. This meeting will focus on connections between South Palo Alto to Mountain View and Los Altos. All interested parties are invited to participate in this community forum, where staff will present a summary of existing and proposed network connections. Staff would like to receive input on the connections that are most important to the community for walking and biking to and from neighboring jurisdictions.

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a public hearing at the special meeting on Monday, January 23, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to consider the Appeal of Director’s Architectural Review Approval of the CoLocation by AT&T of (Distributed Antenna System, a.k.a. DAS) Wireless Communications Equipment on 20 existing utility poles located at 179 and 595 Lincoln Av.; 1851 Bryant St.; 1401 Emerson Av.; 1880 Park Blvd.; 134 Park Av.; 109 Coleridge Av.; 1345, 1720 and 2326 Webster St.; 1248 and 2101 Waverley St.; 968 Dennis Dr.; 370 Lowell Av. (Waverley side); 105 Rinconada Av.; 2704 Louis Rd.; 464 Churchill Av.; 255 N. California Av.; 1085 Arrowhead Wy.; and Oregon Expy near Ross Rd. DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk Page 20ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?Ăž

Kevin Spacey

Jared Harris

Heroes Captain America (Chris Evans), “Captain America: The First Avenger� Courage and sacrifice were standard procedure for Steve Rogers, who transformed from scrawny to brawny in becoming Marvel’s shield-wielding patriot. Cap’s heroics included rescuing a band of American POWs and foiling a megalomaniac’s plot for world domination. Joe Lamb (Joel Courtney), “Super 8� This admirable youngster demonstrated boundless bravery in helping send a stranded alien back to its home planet. Joe also proved to be a steadfast friend, often placing the wellbeing of others above his own. Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara), “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo� The inked-up anti-hero of “Dragon Tattoo� helped take down a sadistic serial killer. Lisbeth also made her mark on a despicable, potbellied rapist thanks to some good old-fashioned vigilante justice. Neville Longbottom (Matthew Lewis), “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2� Unassuming Neville Longbottom — an afterthought character low on the wizarding totem poll — shines when the odds seem insurmountable. Neville was stout despite threats of death, and beheaded Voldemort’s slithering sidekick with one masterful stroke. Rango (voice of Johnny Depp), “Rango� This quirky chameleon sauntered into the arid western town of Dirt and helped energize the downtrodden populace by playing sheriff during difficult times. Rango’s faux confidence eventually gave way to true leadership as he helped end a mysterious water crisis.

Bryce Dallas Howard

Villains Bernie Rose (Albert Brooks), “Drive� Albert Brooks steered clear of his comedic roots to portray this callous mobster whose close-quarters weapons of choice included a fork and a razor. Brooks’ cold-blooded performance will also likely earn him an Oscar nod. Dave Harken (Kevin Spacey), “Horrible Bosses� The bane of the “Horrible Bosses� bunch treated one of his most valuable employees like a dirty doormat. Murder, deceit and greed were also part of Harken’s repertoire. Hilly Holbrook (Bryce Dallas Howard), “The Help� A manicured facade couldn’t mask this spoiled brat’s racist core. Dishonesty, prejudice and verbal abuse were part of Hilly’s daily routine as she lorded over the hard-working women around her. Louis Roulet (Ryan Phillippe), “The Lincoln Lawyer� Vile may be the perfect descriptor for this wealthy wretch who was a playboy on the outside but a killer at heart. Roulet’s deviant behavior veered from simple deception to sexual assault. Professor James Moriarty (Jared Harris), “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows� Moriarty exuded a creepy confidence while plotting numerous killings for the sake of financial windfall. Being a celebrated professor in the position of power and influence made him that much more unsettling. N

2011 Movies

(continued from previous page)

art of street-style photography has no personal sartorial flair — unless a duct-taped poncho and a camera slung around his neck qualify. But the New York Times photographer and cultural anthropologist of fashion is fascinating, whether pedaling his Schwinn around Manhattan, shooting fashion-forward ordinary people, or musing about his principles and passion for his work. 4. Melancholia The sights and sounds of Lars von Trier’s meditation on the parallels between the cosmos and a pair of moody sisters (Kirsten Dunst and Charlotte Gainsbourg) explode in an apocalypse wow. The visual imagery of the Danish writer-director demands attention, while the mounting depression and erratic behavior of the siblings earn it. As the planet Melancholia rushes on a collision course to Earth, you’ll have ample time to contemplate what it all means. 3. The Descendants Alexander Payne delivers another smart movie about ordinary people grappling with crises large and small. George Clooney wears his vulnerability on his Hawaiian-shirt sleeve, playing the lawyer-husband-father whose life gets upended in rough surf. A small film with plenty to say about personal and civic responsibility, the character-driven piece balances deadpan comedy with heartfelt emotion — and Hawaii emerges as an integral member of the ensemble cast. 2. Poetry Quiet and deeply humanistic, the multi-layered drama from South Korean filmmaker Lee Chang-dong focuses on a 66year-old grandmother who learns how to see the world and find transcendence through her struggle to write a single poem. Yun Jung-hee’s delicate performance draws you into her awakening, as she gradually discards traditional trappings to follow her own moral compass and use her own voice. The film rhythmically develops emotional power that resonates long after the credits roll. 1. The Artist Infectiously joyful and charming, this black-and-white love letter to the movies reminds us that cinema is a universal language — no dialogue needed. French director Michel Hazanavicius proves that the best films cast a spell using the basics: lovable characters portrayed by fine actors, a captivating story and timeless themes. Debonair Jean Dujardin sparkles as the silentfilm star who gives a girl (BÊrÊnice Bujo) with a dream her big break. The sight gags of the pre-talkie era are delightful. And just as refreshing is the film’s generosity of spirit, as individuals lend helping hands rather than backstab for personal gain. When the sound era arrives in 1927, you’ll wanna sing, wanna dance alongside the couple in the spotlight. N Note: Susan Tavernetti opted out of writing a pans list this year, as she was not assigned to review any films bad enough to qualify, she said.

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with a gift to the Holiday Fund. Last Year’s Grant Recipients Abilities United ...........................................$5,000 Adolescent Counseling Services ............$7,500 American Red Cross - Palo Alto Area ....$3,000 Art in Action ................................................$5,000 Baby Basics of the Peninsula, Inc. .........$2,000 Bread of Life................................................$5,000 Breast Cancer Connections .....................$7,500 California Family Foundation ....................$3,500 Cleo Eulau Center.......................................$3,500 Collective Roots..........................................$5,000 Downtown Streets Team ........................$15,000 East Palo Alto Children’s Day Committee ..................................................$5,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation ................$5,000 East Palo Alto Tennis and Tutoring .........$5,000 East Palo Alto Youth Court ........................$3,000 Environmental Volunteers ........................$3,000 Foothill-De Anza Foundation ....................$2,500 Foundation for a College Education ........$5,000 Friends of the Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo ...........................................$5,000 InnVision ......................................................$5,000 JLS Middle School PTA.............................$3,500 Jordan Middle School PTA.......................$3,500 Kara ..............................................................$5,000 Lytton Gardens Senior Communities ......$5,000 Music in the Schools Foundation ............$5,000 New Creation Home Ministries ...............$5,000 Northern California Urban Development ....$5,000 Nuestra Casa ..............................................$5,000 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation ..............$5,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care ..............$5,000 Palo Alto YMCA ..........................................$5,000 Palo Alto Housing Corporation ................$5,000 Palo Alto Library Foundation .................$17,500 Peninsula HealthCare Connection ..........$7,500 Quest Learning Center of the EPA Library ..................................................$5,000 Reading Partners .......................................$5,000 St. Elizabeth Seton School .......................$5,000 St. Francis of Assisi Youth Club ...............$3,000 St. Vincent de Paul Society ......................$6,000 The Friendship Circle.................................$5,000 TheatreWorks .............................................$2,500 Youth Community Service .........................$7,500 CHILD CARE CAPITAL GRANTS Children’s Center at Stanford ...................$4,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care ..............$5,000 The Children’s Pre-School Center ...........$5,000

Non-profits: Grant application and guidelines at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/ holidayfund

E

ach year the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund raises money to support programs serving families and children in the Palo Alto area. Since the Weekly and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation cover all the administrative costs, every dollar raised goes directly to support community programs through grants to non-profit organizations ranging from $1,000 to $25,000. And with the generous support of matching grants from local foundations, including the Packard, Hewlett, Peery and Arrillaga foundations, your tax-deductible gift will be doubled in size. A donation of $100 turns into $200 with the foundation matching gifts. With your generosity, we can give a major boost to the programs in our community helping kids and families.

Give to the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund and your donation is doubled. You give to non-profit groups that work right here in our community. It’s a great way to ensure that your charitable donations are working at home.

410 donors through Dec. 30 totalling $254,172; with match $331,172 has been raised for the Holiday Fund Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/paw-holiday-fund 49 Anonymous .................. 120,185

Newly Received Donations Craig & Susie Thom ................ 100 Dee and Don Price ..................... ** Nancy Montague ........................ ** Barbara Noparstak & Duane Bay.....50 Elizabeth Miller ......................... ** Mimi Webb ................................ ** Kingsley Jack ........................... 100 Don and Jacquie Rush.............. 200 Rick and Eileen Brooks ........... 250 Peter Sturrock........................... 100 Peter Skinner and Marie Earl ... 100 John and Marjan Wilkes........... 300 Gina Signorello and Chuck Katz............................... 450 Feldman, David ........................ 350 Robert A. Weeks ........................ 25 Stewart Family Trust ................ 100 Irene V. Schwartz ....................... 50 Madeline Wong ........................ 100 Richard Mazze ......................... 200 Stephen Westfold ..................... 400 United Methodist Women of the First United Methodist Church ................................... 1,000

In Honor Of Paul and Barbara Madsen .......... 25 Steve Jobs ................................... 50

In Memory Of Jim Burch ................................... 50 Jack F. Cline ............................... ** Robert Spinrad ........................... **

Page 22ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?Ăž

Joseph Perlmutter ..................... 200 Frank and Gene Crist ............... 100 Our son Nick ............................ 500 James Burch ............................... 50 Marty Wood ............................. 100

Businesses & Organizations Your Energy Systems, LLC .. 1,000

Previously Published Donors Mrs. Stanley R. Evans ................ ** John & Lee Pierce .................... 200 Carol & Leighton Read .............. ** Freddy & Jan Gabus................... ** Peggy & Chuck Daiss ................ ** Adele & Donald Langendorf ... 200 Lynnie and Joe Melena .............. 75 Karen and Steve Ross ................ ** Chuck & Jean Thompson ........... ** Jason and Lauren Garcia ............ ** M. D. Savoie .............................. ** Werner Graf................................ ** Kenneth E. Bencala .................. 100 Philip C. Hanawalt ................... 300 Richard A. Greene ................... 300 Chet FrankenďŹ eld ....................... ** Dorothy Saxe.............................. ** Kathrine Schroeder .................... ** Joyce Nelsen ............................ 200 Memorial Fund, Inc. ................ 300 Mark R. Shepherd .................... 250 Bill Johnson & Terri Lobdell ..... ** Hal and Iris Korol ...................... ** Gwen Luce ................................. ** Theresa Carey .......................... 250

Ted & Ginny Chu ....................... ** Harry Press ............................... 100 Penny & Greg Gallo ................. 500 Isabel & Tom Mulcahy ............ 100 Nancy Lobdell ............................ ** John & Olive Borgsteadt ............ ** Ted & Jane Wassam ................. 250 Barbara Riper ............................. ** Daniel & Lynne Russell ........... 250 Ellen & Tom Ehrlich .................. ** Donna & Jerry Silverberg ........ 100 Nan Prince................................ 100 Andy & Liz Coe ....................... 100 George & Betsy Young .............. ** Walt & Kay Hays ..................... 100 Jeanne & Leonard Ware ............. ** Lorrin & Stephanie Koran.......... ** David & Nancy Kalkbrenner ..... ** Jim & Ro Dinkey ....................... 60 Attorney Susan Dondershine ... 200 David & Karen Backer ............. 100 Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green .......................... 100 Diane Doolittle ........................... ** Richard Kilner.......................... 100 Tony & Carolyn Tucher ............. ** Shirley & James Eaton ............... ** Barbara Klein & Stan Schrier .... ** Roy & Carol Blitzer ................... ** John & Mary Schaefer ............. 100 Margot D. Goodman .................. ** Brigid Barton ........................... 250 Sue Kemp ................................. 250 Elisabeth Seaman ....................... ** Dena Goldberg ......................... 100 Linda & Steven Boxer................ **

Micki & Bob Cardelli ................ ** Debbie Mytels ............................ ** The Ely Family ........................ 250 Ian & Karen Latchford ............. 100 Richard A. Baumgartner & Elizabeth M. Salzer .............. 350 Carolyn & Richard Brennan ...... ** Lynn & Joe Drake ...................... ** Eugene & Mabel Dong ............ 200 Nancy & Richard Alexander .... 500 Diane E. Moore ........................ 350 Sally & Craig Nordlund ........... 500 Arthur D. Stauffer .................... 500 Michael Hall Kieschnick....... 1,000 Mark Kreutzer ............................ 75 Nehama Treves......................... 200 Les Morris ................................ 250 Christina S. Kenrick .............. 1,000 Susan H. Richardson ................ 250 Leif and Sharon Erickson......... 250 The Havern Family ............... 3,500 The Wihtol Family Fund .......... 500 John N. Thomas ....................... 100 Anthony F. Brown ...................... 50 Diane Simoni ........................... 200 John J. McLaughlin.................. 100 Braff Family Fund .................... 250 Richard Rosenbaum ................... ** Zelda Jury................................... ** Eric & Elaine Hahn ............... 1,000 Nancy Huber .............................. ** Susan Woodman......................... ** Arthur R. Kraemer ..................... ** William E. Reller ....................... ** John and Florine Galen .............. ** David and Virginia Pollard ...... 150

Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/paw-holiday-fund Tony and Judy Kramer ............... ** Eve and John Melton ............... 500 Andrea Boehmer ........................ 50 Patti Yanklowitz and Mark Krasnow............................ ** Harriet and Gerry Berner ........... ** Roy Levin and Jan Thomson ..... ** Sylvia J. Smitham .................... 100 Kenyon Scott ............................ 200 Gil and Gail Woolley ............... 200 Henry and Nancy Heubach ...... 100 Marc and Margaret Cohen ....... 100 Jeremy Platt and Sondra Murphy .....** Don and Ann Rothblat ............... ** Jon and Julie Jerome .................. ** Richard Cabrera ......................... ** Richard and Bonnie Sibley ........ ** Barbara Zimmer and Kevin Mayer............................... ** John and Ruth DeVries .............. ** Rita Vrhel ................................. 150 Robyn H. Crumly ....................... ** Lori and Hal Luft ..................... 100 Neva and Tom Cotter ............ 2,000 Ralph R. Wheeler ..................... 350 Johnsson, Richard ................. 1,000 Shirk, Martha ........................... 500 Pam Mayerfeld ......................... 100 Ralph Cahn................................. 50 Kate Dreher ................................ 18 Gloria Schulz ........................... 200 Solon Finkelstein ..................... 250 J. Stephen Brugler .................... 300 Marlene Prendergast .................. ** Rosalie Shepherd ..................... 100 Bob & Edie Kirkwood ............... ** M. M. Dieckmann .................... 300 Tom and Peg Hanks ................... ** Marcia & Michael Katz ........... 200 Ms. Carolyn Frake ..................... 25 Betty Gerard ............................... ** Peter S. Stern............................ 250 Nancy & Stephen Levy .............. ** Daniel Cox ............................... 200 Christine M. Wotipka ............... 100 Marc Igler and Jennifer Cray ..... 50 Richard A. Morris ................. 2,000 Greg and Anne Avis ................... ** Cathy Kroymann ...................... 250 Martha Mantel............................ 25 Lolly T. Osborne ...................... 150 Shulman, Lee ............................. ** David and Lynn Mitchell ......... 300 Andrews, Ron........................... 500 Patricia Levin ........................... 100 Robert and Joan Jack ................. ** Mary Jackman .......................... 100 Marianne and Tom Moutoux...... ** Robert and Betsy Gamburd ........ ** Hugh O. McDevitt.................... 200 Michael L. Foster ..................... 500 Ann, Mike and Fiona O’Neill .... 25 Jean Dawes................................. 50 Mrs. Eleanor Settle................... 500 Nancy and Joe Huber ............... 100 Mimi Marden ............................. ** Robert K. Aulgur ....................... ** Bobbie and Jerry Wagger ........... ** Morgan Family Fund ............ 5,000 Jane Holland............................... ** Ray and Carol Bacchetti ............ ** Helene Pier ................................. ** Lawrence Naiman .................... 100

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Silicon Valley Community Foundation and send to: PAW Holiday Fund c/o SVCF 2440 W. El Camino Real, Suite 300 Mountain View, CA 94040

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_________________________________________________________ (Name of person) Q I wish to contribute anonymously.

Q Please withhold the amount of my contribution.

The Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund is a fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. All donors will be published in the Palo Alto Weekly unless the coupon is marked “Anonymous.�

Jonathan J. Macquitty ........... 1,000 Marc and Ragni Pasturel .......... 100 Chris and Beth Martin................ ** Gloria R. Brown ....................... 200 Stuart and Carol Hansen ............ 50 Ellie and Dick MansďŹ eld ........... ** Alice Smith .............................. 100 Ron Wolf .................................. 100 Russell C. Evarts ...................... 300 Sally Hewlett ............................ 250 John Tang ................................. 150 Ed and Linda De Meo .............. 100 John and Barbara Pavkovich .... 200 Anna Wu Weakland ................. 100 Susan & Harry Hartzell............ 100 Sallie I. Brown ........................... ** Amy Renalds.............................. ** Maureen and John Martin .......... ** Lani Freeman and Stephen Monismith .................... ** Larry Breed .............................. 100 Claude Madden .......................... ** Ellen and Mike Turbow............ 200 Elkind Family Foundation ....... 250 Roger and Joan Warnke ............. ** Bjorn and Michele Liencres .....1,000 Lijun Wang & Jia-Ning Xiang ....200 Mary B. Fuller.......................... 100 Constance Crawford................... ** Sallie and Jay Whaley ................ ** Lindsay Joye ............................ 100 Victoria Wendel........................ 150 Helen C. Feinberg ................. 3,000 Ken Schroeder & Fran Codispoti.......................... 500 Al Russell and Joanne Russell . 250 Pat and Tom Sanders .................. ** Bonnie B. Packer...................... 100 Lee Sanders ................................ 36 Robert F. Bell ........................... 150 Bryan Wilson ........................... 100 Meri Gruber and James Taylor...... ** Stephanie Klein and

Larry Baer ............................. 1,000 Jim and Alma Phillips .............. 250 Ruth K. Chippendale.................. ** Mahlon and Carol Hubenthal ........ ** Sandy Sloan ............................. 100 Ira Kanter ................................. 100 Thomas Rindeisch ................. 250 Bob Donald ................................ ** Jim and Nancy Baer ................... ** Virginia E. Fehrenbacher ......... 100 Mandy Lowell ............................ ** Robert and Constance Loarie ..... ** Luca and Mary CaďŹ ero .............. ** Bruce Campbell .................... 1,000 Scott Wong ............................... 200 Jan Krawitz ................................ ** Bonnie Street............................ 100 Elizabeth Yasek and Michael Fleice ................... 100 Michael Roberts ....................... 100 Elgin Lee .................................. 250 Keith Lee .................................. 550 Boyce and Peggy Nute ............... ** Matt Glickman and Susie Hwang Fund ................... 250 Allan and Marilyn Brown .......... ** Jim Voll and Scout Voll .............. ** Diane and Harry Greenberg ..... 500 Nancy and Norm Rossen............ ** Suzan Stewart ............................. ** Marilyn Slater Family Trust ..... 100 Elliot Margolies.......................... 25 Mitchell Rosen ........................... 50 A. Carlisle Scott ....................... 100 Barbara and Charles Stevens...... ** Joy L. Sleizer ............................. 50 Tony and Jan Di Julio................. ** Mary Ann and Keith Kvenvolden..................... 100 Hoda Epstein .............................. ** Susan Elgee and Steve Eglash ... ** Joan Norton ................................ ** Jean Colby.................................. **

Lawrence Yang and Jennifer Kuan .................. 1000 Adrienne Dong ......................... 100 Annette Glanckopf and Thomas Ashton ................. 100 Jean-Yves Bouguet .................. 500 Alice Fischgrund ........................ 50 Vic and Norma Hesterman ......... ** Janice Bohman and Eric Keller.......250 Nancy Moss ............................... ** Richard Barr ............................. 200 Deirdre C. Dolan .................... 1000 Daniel Chapiro ......................... 500 David Labaree .......................... 200 Deborah L. Plumley ................... 50 Morton Maser........................... 120

In Honor Of Emma Claire Cripps and Elizabeth Marie Kurland ... 300 Patricia Demetrios ................. 1,000 Sandy Sloan ............................. 100 Marilyn Sutorius ...................... 150 Elizabeth McCroskey ................. ** Lucy Berman’s Clients .......... 1,500 Ruth & Marty Mazner.............. 100 Andrew Luchard and Caitlin Luchard ........................ 100 Ro and Jim Dinkey..................... 50 Paul Resnick............................. 100 Alan Stewart ............................... 25 Ellen Turbow ............................ 100 Public School Teachers .............. 36 Darla Tupper, 860 Harvard Avenue ................ 100 The Barnea-Smith Family .......... **

In Memory Of John O. Black ........................... 500 Yen-Chen Yen .......................... 250 Charles Bennett Leib................ 100 Mdm. Pao Lin Lee ..................... ** Al and Kay Nelson ..................... **

Pam Grady ............................... 200 Leo Breidenbach ........................ ** Thomas W. and Louise Phinney........................... ** Marie and Donald Anon........... 100 Jacques Naar & Wanda Root ..... ** Bob Makjavich ........................... ** Dr. John Plummer Steward ...... 100 Bertha Kalson............................. ** Al Bernal .................................... ** Helene F. Klein .......................... ** Ernest J. Moore .......................... ** Jack Sutorius ............................ 150 Ruth & Chet Johnson ................. ** Robert Lobdell ........................... ** Jim Burch ................................... ** Fred Everly................................. ** Aaron O’Neill ............................ ** Michael Coghlin....................... 100 Alan Herrick............................. 100 Nancy Ritchey ............................ ** Helene F. Klein .......................... ** Our Dad Albert Pellizzari .......... ** Jim Burch ................................... 50 Jim Burch ................................. 100 Leonard Ely, Jim Burch and Aggie Robinson................. 500 Nancy Tincher ............................ 50 Mary Floyd and Betty Meltzer ... ** Jim Burch ................................. 100 Al Jacobs .................................. 100 Jim Burch ................................. 100 August King ............................... ** Nate Rosenberg ........................ 100 Becky Schaefer .......................... ** Emmett Lorey ............................ ** Irvin B. Rubin .......................... 150 Helen Rubin ............................. 150 Anna and Max Blanker ............ 150 James Burch ............................... 25 James Burch ............................... ** Jim Burch ................................. 100 Steve Fasani ............................... ** Maria Serpa ................................ 20 Bill Land .................................... ** Bob Donald ................................ ** Glen A. Lillington, M.D. ......... 100 Jim Byrnes ................................. 50 Hattie and Stephen Tokar ........... 50 Florence Kan Ho ........................ ** Lucy Nystrom .......................... 100 Jim Burch ................................. 100 Carole Hoffman.......................... ** Jim Burch ................................. 100 Aggie Robinson ....................... 100

Businesses & Organizations Thoits Bros Inc......................... 500 Harrell Remodeling.................... ** The Palo Alto Business Park...... ** The Palo Alto Business Park...... ** “No Limit� Drag Racing Team .. 25 Alta Mesa Improvement Company .................................. 750 deLemos Properties.................. 250 The Palo Alto Business Park...... ** Communications and Power Industries (CPI) ............... ** Lasecke Weil Wealth Advisory Group, LLC .............................. 100 Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run .................... 27,000 ** Designates amount withheld at donor request

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Public Meeting Notice Channing Avenue and Waverley Street TrafďŹ c Signal Removal Project WHEN: PLACE:

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 6:30-7:30 PM Downtown Library - Community Room 270 Forest Avenue

City staff is hosting a community meeting to discuss the proposed removal of the trafďŹ c signal at the intersection of Channing Avenue and Waverley Street. The purpose of the meeting is to present ďŹ ndings of the trafďŹ c study conducted for the intersection to support the trafďŹ c signal removal. The City is recommending the installation of an All Way Stop control in place of the trafďŹ c signal. Public input and comments are sought for this project. For more information on this project, please contact: transportation@cityofpaloalto.org or (650) 329-2442.

Goings On The best of what’s happening on Art Galleries

‘Self-Help Book Club’ This exhibition features new works created by five first-year MFA students from Stanford University’s Department of Art & Art History. Ben Bigelow, Chris Duncan, Terry Powers, Greg Stimac and Dawn Weleski present a body of work in diverse media. Jan. 17-Feb. 26, Tue.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery, 419 Lasuen Mall, Stanford. Call 650-723-3404. art. stanford.edu Sukey Bryan: ‘Waterforms’ Stanford artist Sukey Bryan is exhibiting prints and large paintings in the Anita Seipp Gallery. The art focuses on water as it cycles through the natural environment in many forms, including rain, ocean, glaciers, icebergs and waterfalls. Jan. 3-Feb. 3, weekdays 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Castilleja School, 1311 Emerson St., Palo Alto. Call 650-328-3160, ext. 7878. www.castilleja. org

Benefits

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE:

http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA – SPECIAL MEETING – COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM JANUARY 09, 2012 - 6:00 PM 1. 2.

Joint Meeting with the Library Advisory Commission Review and Acceptance of Annual Status Report on Developers’ Fees for Fiscal Year 2011 3. Policy & Services Committee and Utilities Advisory Commission Joint Recommendation to Adopt a Budget Amendment Ordinance in the Amount of $200,000 to be Transferred from the Electric, Gas and Water Enterprise Funds in Order to Establish the Utilities Emerging Technology Demonstration Program 4. Utilities Advisory Commission Recommendation to Adopt a Resolution Approving the City of Palo Alto Utilities’ Legislative Policy Guidelines for 2012 5. SECOND READING: Adoption of Ordinance Amending Municipal Code to Eliminate Local Recycling Center Requirement 6. Approval of a Public-Private Partnership Agreement between the City of Palo Alto and the Palo Alto Players for the Cooperative Use of the Lucie Stern Community Theatre 7. Adoption of an Ordinance Amending The Budget For Fiscal Year 2012 to Amend the Table Of Organization and Adoption of Resolution Amending The Compensation Plan For Management and Professional Personnel and Council Appointees For 2011 and Rescinding Resolution Nos.,X 8. Approval of Appointment of Mike Sartor as the Director of Public Works Department ACTION ITEMS 9. Public Hearing: Objections to Weed Abatement and Adoption of Resolution Ordering Weed Nuisance Abated 11. Public Hearing: 935 Ramona – Request for removal of a Category 3 Historic Structure From the Historic Inventory 12. CLOSED SESSION: Existing Litigation High Speed Rail

Page 24ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?Ăž

Music Boosters’ flea market A flea market will support Palo Alto High School’s instrumental-music program, with books, antiques, crafts, plants and other items for sale. Jan. 14, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission. Palo Alto High School parking lot, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-324-3532.

Classes/Workshops

‘Communicating Across Generations’ This event will include discussion of such end-of-life issues as health-care choices, funeral options and disposition of assets and possessions. Lunch, door prizes, handouts included. Leaders are Steve Coralis of CODA, Jeanne Smith of Exit Stage Right and Deborah Meckler of Funeral Consumers Alliance. Jan. 14, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $10. Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-321-2109. www.fcapeninsula.org ‘Edible Garden Series: From Design To Harvest’ Learn garden design and planning, composting, soil testing and preparation, seed propagation and trans-

the Midpeninsula CALENDAR LISTINGS

For complete Calendar listings or to submit a Calendar listing, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com and click on “Master Community Calendar� For News submissions for possible use elsewhere in the paper, e-mail editor@paweekly.com or call (650) 326-8210 www.PaloAltoOnline.com

planting, watering and nurturing healthy edible crops. Saturdays, Jan. 14-April 14, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $325. Common Ground Garden Supply and Education Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650493-6072. ediblegardenseriesdesigntoharvest.eventbrite.com/ ‘History of Napa and Monterey’ This Palo Alto Adult School class covers the old wine and sardine industries, and the people who made them notable in Napa and Monterey. Seven sessions on Tuesdays, Jan. 10-Feb. 21, 6:30-7:45 p.m. $60. 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-329-3752. PAAdultSchool.org ‘How Food Has Shaped the World’ This class will cover such questions as “Who added sugar to the chocolate of the Aztecs?� Thursdays from Jan. 12 through Feb. 23, 6:30-7:45 p.m. $60. Palo Alto Adult School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-329-3752. PAAdultschool.org ‘New Year’s Playshop’ Guided meditations, creative expression and other activities are planned to pave the way for the new year. Jan. 7, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $44/ person or $75/couple in advance (by Jan. 6), $50/person at the door. Pathways for Self Healing, 4153A El Camino Way, Palo Alto. shiningyourbrightestlight.eventbrite. com

OF NOTE

Solo on stage Michael Fosberg’s one-man theatrical show “Incognito� tells a story of race, with an unusual plot twist. Growing up near Chicago in a white middle-class family, Fosberg always thought of himself as white. At age 32, he learned that his father was black, and that he himself had an ethnicity and a history that he never knew. Fosberg performs his show in Palo Alto on Saturday, Jan. 14, in an 8 p.m. performance at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center at 3921 Fabian Way. Tickets are $20 general and $15 for JCC members. Call 650-223-8609 or go to paloaltojcc.org.

‘Winter Pruning’ with Chris Ingram When, why and how to prune Japanese maples, camellias and wisteria will be addressed in this two-hour lecture and demonstration. Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-noon, $35 general, $25 for members. Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 650-329-1356, ext. 201. www.gamblegarden.org ‘Zoom In’ Video-Production Workshop This 16-hour hands-on workshop in field production is taught over two consecutive weekends. Students will create a short video, edit it with Final Cut Pro and burn a DVD and upload it to YouTube. The Media Center provides all the equipment and facilities. Sat.-Sun., Jan. 14-22, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $145. Midpeninsula Community Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-494-868 ext 11. www.midpenmedia.org Genealogy Class Genealogist Richard Rands will teach a three-month series on family history. Students may find out where their ancestors lived, how they managed challenges, and what family heirlooms and family stories mean. For beginners to intermediate. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Jan. 3-March 8, 10-11:30 a.m. $99 general, $90 for Little House members. Little House, Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Call 650-326-2025 ext 229. www. peninsulavolunteers.org Media Center Video-Production Workshop The Media Center Studio Class is a comprehensive crash course over five nights that covers the basics of TV studio production including camera operating, floor directing, audio, graphics, lighting and teleprompter. The class produces a half-hour TV show as its class project. Mon., Tue. and Fri. from 6 to 10 p.m., Jan. 23-Feb. 3, 6-10 p.m. $145. Midpeninsula Community Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-494-8686, ext. 10. www.midpenmedia.org Rose Pruning and Care Encourage profuse flowering with winter pruning and proper care. Learn about soil and amendments for healthy, happy roses. Mulches are also discussed. The class will go to a nearby garden for a demonstration and some hands-on pruning. Bring: a snack; pruning shears are optional. Jan. 7, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $38. Common Ground Garden Supply and Education Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-4936072. rosepruningandcare.eventbrite. com/ Yoga 101 Workshop Series This workshop is designed for beginning students or those wanting a step-by-step review. It focuses on the fundamentals of yoga, breathing and elemental versions of all poses. Thursdays, Jan. 19-Feb. 2, 7:158:30 p.m. $45 if paid before Dec. 31, $50 afterward. Blue Iris Studio, 3485 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. Call 650-858-1440. www.blueirisstudiopaloalto.com

Community Events

Used-Book Sale The Friends of the Palo Alto Library organization is holding monthly sales of used books, CDs and DVDs on Sat. and Sun., Jan. 14-15 and Feb. 11-12. Sale hours: Sat.:, main sale room open 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; children’s and

Goings On

find the balance X

W bargain rooms open 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., all rooms open 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission free. Cubberley Community Center, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-2138755. www.fopal.com Vegetarian Dinners The Peninsula Macrobiotic Community serves a vegetarian dinner every Monday (except holidays). Full vegan meal includes soup, grain, beans or bean products, vegetables, dessert and beverage. Communal seating. Lecture monthly. Diners are asked to make phone reservations by Mondays at 9:30 a.m. Dec. 12-Jan. 30, 6:30-8 p.m. $15. First Baptist Church, 305 N. California Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650 599-3320. peninsulamacro.org

Concerts

‘The Art of the Baroque Violin’ Voices of Music features baroque violinist Elizabeth Blumenstock in its Great Artist Series. She joins William Skeen on viola da gamba; Hanneke van Proosdij on harpsichord, organ and recorder; and David Tayler on archlute. Jan. 19, 8 p.m. $35 regular, $25 for seniors and students. All Saints’ Episcopal Church, 555 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 415-260-4687. www. voicesofmusic.org Fortnightly Music Club This concert presented by the Fortnightly Music Club features music by Beethoven Norine Chang, violin), Bach and Schubert (David Saslav, tenor), and Liszt (Emiliya Serebrennikova, piano). Jan. 8, 7 p.m. Free. Lucie Stern Community Center Ballroom, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www.fortnightlymusicclub.org Grace Note Chamber Players Claudia Bloom, violin; Russ Bartoli, cello and Casey Mullin, piano; will perform a concert on Jan. 15, 3-5 p.m. $15 general, $5 student/senior. Grace Lutheran Church, 3149 Waverley St., Palo Alto, CA 94303. Call 650-327-2019. bit.ly/uX7oEm New Esterhazy Quartet Period-instrument musicians will play quartets by Haydn, Beethoven and other composers. Jan. 8, 4-6 p.m. $25. All Saints’ Episcopal Church, 555 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 415-520-0611. newesterhazy.org Pianist Frank Levy Frank Levy will perform a recital with violinist Minjung Cho. The program includes music by Mozart, Liszt and Schumann. Jan. 21, 7-9:30 p.m. $15. Campbell Recital Hall, Stanford University, Stanford. www.stanfordtickets. org

Dance

Social Ballroom Dancing Friday Night Dance at the Cubberley Community Center Pavilion. The Jan. 6 lesson at 8 p.m. is tango for beginning and intermediate levels, followed by dancing from 9 p.m. to midnight. No experience or partner necessary, refreshments included. $9. Cubberley Community Center Pavilion, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-395-8847. readybyte.com/fridaynightdance

Exhibits

‘Art as a Sacred Practice’ These paintings come from a course taught by Shiloh Sophia McCloud on the “intentional Creativity Method.� This is “an invitation for us to approach our work in a sacred manner,� she said. Jan. 9-March 24, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, 1069 E. Meadow Circle, Palo Alto. Call 650-493-4430, extension 254. www.itp.edu ‘Clear Story’ The Palo Alto Art Center presents “Clear Story,� a temporary site-specific installation by artist Mildred Howard, on view through August 2012, 3-5 p.m. Free. Palo Alto City Hall’s King Plaza, 250 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-329-2366. www.cityofpaloalto.org/ artcenter ‘Object-Oriented Programming’ A solo exhibition by Stanford native Katie Herzog, a mixed-media artist in residence at the Whittier Public Library. The show combines art and “disjunctive librarianship� through knowledge, narrative and information culture to comment on the object, language and symbols of human communication. An opening reception and artist’s talk are set for Jan. 13 from 3:30 to 6 p.m. Exhibit is open weekdays through March 30, 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Free. Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto. katieherzog.net ‘The Legend of Rex Slinkard’ An exhibition focuses on the works of the early20th-century California artist Rex Slinkard. During his life he emerged from his roots as a rancher to become a painter who helped influence the modernist bent of

the nascent California art scene. Through Feb. 26, open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursdays until 8 p.m. Free. Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, 328 Lomita Drive and Museum Way, Stanford. museum. stanford.edu Antique Toys, 1870-1930 In addition to early American toys, the exhibit also features turn-of-the-century toy trains and accessories from fine European toymakers such as Marklin and Bing. Through April, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-321-1004. www.moah.org

Family and Kids

‘Lunar New Year Spectacular’ This party marks the Chinese New Year with lion dancing, Kung Fu demonstrations, storytime, crafts and food trucks (Kalbi BBQ, Chairman Bao, House of Siam on Wheels, Curry Up NOW, TreatBot Karaoke Truck). Meant for all ages. Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Children’s Library, 1276 Harriet St., Palo Alto. Call 650-329-2436. www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/lib/news/ details.asp?NewsID=1912&TargetID=160 LEGO Holiday Display The Museum of American Heritage (MOAH), The Bay Area LEGO User Group (BayLUG) are cohosting the 2011 LEGO Holiday display at MOAH. Weekends through Jan. 15, 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $2. Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-321-1004. www.moah.org Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo Ongoing exhibits at the museum and zoo include “Bobcat Ridge,� “Africa’s Bats,� exhibits on physics and math, and a “Buzzz� display on insects and spiders. Museum hours: Tue.-Sat. from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sun. 1-4 p.m. Free. Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo, 1451 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www.friendsjmz.org Randel McGee as Hans Christian Andersen Storyteller Randel McGee brings Hans Christian Andersen and his famous fairy tales to life, creating papercuts as he tells. For ages 6 and up. Jan. 9, 4-4:45 p.m. Free. Atherton Library, 2 Dinkelspiel Station Lane, Atherton. Call 650-3282422. www.smcl.org

Film

‘To Catch A Dollar’ “To Catch A Dollar� is a microfinance documentary that explores the ins and outs of microfinance in America today. Narrated and explained by Nobel Peace Prize winner, Muhammad Yunus, the film delves into what makes microfinance so powerful, as well as its shortcomings. Jan. 18, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Cubberley Auditorium, 485 Lasuen Mall, Stanford. Call 650-814-5921.

On Stage

‘Marvin’s Room’ Dragon Productions Theatre Company presents this Scott McPherson play about life, death, mental illness and family. It follows two estranged sisters who are reunited when one of them needs the family to be tested for a bone marrow donation. 1992 Drama Desk Award for Best Play. Jan. 19-Feb. 12: Thu.-Sat. at 8 p.m., and Sun. at 2 p.m. $16-$30. Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto. Call 650-493-2006. www.dragonproductions.net/ ‘The Royal Falcon Musical’ This musical is the story of Arjan, a young boy who is taken on a journey through time by a falcon who teaches Arjan the importance of compassion, forgiveness and sharing. It is based on the children’s book by Jessi Kaur. Jan. 28, 6-7 p.m. Adults $12, children $8. Cubberley Theater, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Call 408-5156620. musical.theroyalfalcon.org Michael Fosberg’s ‘Incognito’ After being raised white, Michael Fosberg discovers his father is black. He explores this in his autobiographical play. Jan. 14, 8-9:30 p.m. $15-$20. Albert and Janet Schultz Cultural Arts Hall, Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. www.paloaltojcc.org

Religion/Spirituality

‘Yogananda’s Birthday Retreat’ This day is dedicated to Paramhansa Yogananda’s presence, with stories of his life and teaching, and periods of meditation and music. Jan. 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Ananda, 2171 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. Call 650-3233363. www.anandapaloalto.org Kirtan (Chanting) An evening of sacred chanting is planned, with many chants simple to learn. Indian chants and many in English. Words will be provided. Fridays, Jan. 6-27, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Ananda, 2171 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. Call

650-323-3363. www.anandapaloalto. org

Singles

‘The Future of Cougar Relationships’ Younger men and older women are invited to meet and socialize at a party with appetizers served at 7 p.m. All ages welcome. Jan. 12, 7-9 p.m. $10. Bay Cafe at Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course, 1875 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Call 415507-9962. www.thepartyhotline.com

ADULTS & KIDS

10% off Use coupon code

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Special Events

Student Concert Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra will perform a free educational concert intended for grades six through 12, with conductor/soloist Richard Egarr. Jan. 26, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Free. First United Methodist Church, 625 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto. Call 415-252-1288. www.philharmonia.org

Winter classes start January 9 PACIFIC ART LEAGUE 668 Ramona Street Palo Alto, CA 94301 www.pacificartleague.org

Talks/Authors

‘American Quilts: Fact & Fiction’ Quilt historian Beryl Self will give a lecture for the museum’s afternoon tea. Jan. 28, 2-4 p.m. $20 (museum members pay $15). Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-321-1004. www.moah.org ‘Ancient Philosophies as Ways of Life’ This two-day talk is part of the Tanner Lectures on Human Values series at Stanford University. Speaker John Cooper is a professor of philosophy and the author of “Reason and Human Good in Aristotle� and two collections of essays. Jan. 25 and 26, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Levinthall Hall, Stanford Humanities Center, 424 Santa Rita Ave., Stanford. Call 650-723-0997. www.ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu ‘Charles Fox: Killing Me Softly, My Life in Music’ Two-time Emmy Award winner and Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee Charles Fox (“Killing Me Softly With His Song�) will play songs and share highlights from his composing career. Jan. 12, 7-8:30 p.m. $10-$18. Albert and Janet Schultz Cultural Arts Hall, Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. www.paloaltojcc.org Dave Barry and Alan Zweibel The two humorists discuss and sign their new book, “Lunatics.� Jan. 18, 7 p.m. Audience members must buy the event book or a $10 gift card to admit two. Admission is free for book Kepler’s, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park. Call 650-324-4321. www.keplers.com/event/dave-barr yalan-zweibel Ethics & War Series: Lawrence Wright Lawrence Wright is an author, screenwriter, playwright, and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Jan. 12, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Cemex Auditorium, Zambrano Hall, Knight Management Center, Stanford. Call 650-723-0997. ethicsinsociety. stanford.edu Humanist Community in Silicon Valley Retired Judge LaDoris Cordell will describe her work as the independent police auditor for the City of San Jose. Jan. 8, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Palo Alto High School student center, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-964-7576. www.humanists.org Jacqueline Widmar Stewart Jacqueline Widmar Stewart shares “The Parks and Gardens in Greater Paris,� benefiting East Palo Alto Kids Foundation. Jan. 7, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 74 Town & Country Village, Palo Alto. www.booksinc.net Linda Gray Sexton Linda Gray Sexton (daughter of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Anne Sexton) discusses her memoir, “Half In Love,� which details her struggle to escape her mother’s legacy of suicide. Jan. 11, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 855 El Camino Real , Palo Alto. Call 323-304-2433. www.booksinc. net/PaloAlto Steve LaBadessa Steve LaBadessa, who was a contributing photographer at People magazine, will present a lecture and slideshow. His subjects have included Jay Leno, Ozzy Osborne and Bill Gates. LaBadessa will talk about his portrait work at People and projects that have appeared in Time and other publications. Tickets must be ordered by phone. Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-noon. $24.95. Keeble & Shuchat Gallery, 290 S. California Ave., Palo Alto. www.kspphoto.com/photo_ classes.html Tea Obreht Tea Obreht, author of “The Tiger’s Wife,� speaks Jan. 17, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 74 Town & Country Village, Palo Alto. www.booksinc.net

ART CLASSES

650 321 3891

We’ll be opening in your neighborhood

WEDNESDAY

   AT   Rengstorff & MiddleďŹ eld

        Join us for our Grand Opening celebration where we’ll be making a $1,000 donation to a local organization.

fresh&easy Ground Beef 80/20

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2

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Sold in a 2 lb pack, $4.50 each Limit 2

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Ecole internationale de la PĂŠninsule

Ě˝ ࣑ ੢ á„‘ á‹• ओ PRE-SCHOOL Outstanding fullday program.

LANGUAGE Longest running bilingual immersion school in the area. Experienced native-speaking faculty.

ACADEMICS Established English curriculum. Rigorous program in a nurturing environment. Low student-to-teacher ratio.

WHEN IT’S YOUR CHILD, EXPERIENCE MATTERS. TEACHING MANDARIN CHINESE IMMERSION FOR 15 YEARS. A LEADER IN FRENCH IMMERSION IN PALO ALTO. ACCEPTING PRE-SCHOOL APPLICATIONS.

RSVP FOR A TOUR! PRESCHOOL OPEN HOUSE JANUARY 7, 2012

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF THE PENINSULA 7%"777)340/2's0(/.%  

*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 25

GOLDEN GLOBE AWARD NOMINEE ÂŽ ÂŽ

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR  VIGGO MORTENSEN  

  





  

  

 

  

  ŠHFPA

                           

    

Movies MOVIE TIMES

A.O. Scott

              

 

A Dangerous Method (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: 3:45, 6:15 & 8:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:15 p.m.

 

  

The Adventures of Tintin (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Noon, 3, 6:10 & 8:50 p.m.; In 3D at 11 a.m.; 1:35, 4:10, 7:10 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 12:55 & 3:45 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 6:20 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Thu. at 11:20 a.m.; 2, 4:40, 7:25 & 10 p.m.

                           !   !    

  SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE ON

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:25, 3:50, 6:20 & 8:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 & 11:35 a.m.; 1:30, 3:55, 5:15, 6:10, 8:30 & 10:45 p.m.

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

NOW PLAYING

On Visit iTunes.com/SPC for a look at A Dangerous Method and other SPC films

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.ADANGEROUSMETHODFILM.COM

The Artist (PG-13) (((1/2 Palo Alto Square: 2 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 4:40 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:50 p.m. The Darkest Hour (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 3:10 p.m.; In 3D at 9:10 p.m. The Descendants (R) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 4, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:15 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4:20, 7:10 & 9:55 p.m. The Devil Inside (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 12:20, 1:25, 2:30, 3:35, 4:40, 5:45, 6:50, 7:55, 9:10 & 10:15 p.m.

GOLDEN GLOBE

ÂŽ

N O M I N E E DRAMA

BEST ACTOR MICHAEL FASSBENDER CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARD NOMINEE BEST ACTOR

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) (R) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 12:10, 2:40, 4, 6:30, 7:40 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 1:15, 3:30, 4:45, 7, 8:10 & 10:25 p.m. Hugo (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 2:35 & 9:15 p.m.; In 3D at 11:40 a.m. & 6:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 5:05 & 10:40 p.m.; In 3D at 2:10 & 7:55 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Faust (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 12:30, 2, 3:40, 5, 7, 8:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 10:55 a.m.; 12:45, 1:55, 4, 5, 7:15, 8:15 & 10:30 p.m. The Muppets (PG) ((( Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 1:55 & 4:30 p.m. New Year’s Eve (PG-13) (1/2 Century 16: 12:40, 3:35, 7:20 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 2:50, 5:35 & 8:50 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Shame (NC-17) ((( Aquarius Theatre: 4:45, 7:30 & 9:55 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 2:15 p.m. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 12:20, 2:30, 3:30, 6:05, 7:05, 9:10 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 1:20, 4:25, 7:35, 8:55 & 10:40 p.m. The Sitter (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 7:05 & 9:15 p.m. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 3, 6:10 & 9:05 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1:15, 4:15 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10:10 p.m.

MICHAEL FASSBENDER

War Horse (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; 12:30, 2:20, 3:45, 6:10, 7, 9:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 1:50, 3:20, 6:55 & 10:15 p.m.; Sat.-Thu. also at 8:20 p.m.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

We Bought a Zoo (PG) (1/2 Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 3:10, 6:40 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 12:15, 1:50, 4:45, 6:15, 7:40 & 10:35 p.m.

CAREY MULLIGAN

Young Adult (R) ((( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 1:30, 4:05, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 & 9:40 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260)

Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260)

Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264)

Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700)

Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264)

Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go toPaloAltoOnline.com.

CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456)

NOW PLAYING The Artist ---

The following is a sampling of movies recently reviewed in the Weekly:

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NOW PLAYING

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(Palo Alto Square) Any filmgoer undaunted by something different will surely walk out of this new silent film with a grin. Though this pastiche has been crafted by film nerds and largely for them, Michel Hazanavicius’ feature has an emotional generosity that speaks louder than words. Opening in 1927, “The Artist� begins with a premiere of a silent film starring dashing George Valentin (Jean Dujardin). When Valentin stumbles into a photo op with a girl named Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), the ground for a relationship is paved. Peppy sees her star begins to rise in proportion to George’s fall, precipitated by the arrival of talkies and the market crash of 1929. Writer-director Hazanavicius mostly steers clear of comparisons to the era’s epics and great screen comics, instead inhabiting the more manageable territory of melodrama. The acting is inventive, and the film joyously celebrates the movies. Rated PG-13 for a disturbing image and a crude gesture. One hour, 41 minutes. — Peter Canavese (Reviewed Dec. 2, 2011) The Descendants --1/2

Page 26ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>Ă€ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?Ăž

(Aquarius, Century 20) George Clooney plays Matt King, a lawyer and hapless father troubleshooting domestic and business concerns in a Hawaii he drily notes is not paradise. King’s petulance derives mostly from his wife being in a coma due to a boating accident, and his inability to do anything about it. As a father, he’s clumsy at best; by pampering 10-year-old Scottie (Amara Miller), Matt hopes to distract her from her mother’s decline. No such trickery works on delinquent 17-year-old Alexandra (Shailene Woodley). Matt’s business issue involves his role as trustee of his family’s ancestral land: 25,000 pristine acres in Kauai that will bring the Kings a pretty penny if they can agree on a buyer. As this subplot lingers, Matt becomes obsessed with a third concern: investigating a secret about his wife. It provides the excuse for the Kings to island-hop and family-bond in search of closure. Rated PG for some mild rude humor. One hour, 38 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed Nov. 25, 2011) The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo --(Century 16, Century 20) Not exactly lean, but plenty mean, David Fincher’s adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s mystery novel judiciously pares down 480 pages to 158 minutes. It’s hard not to feel Fincher’s film is old news, after Larsson’s widely read “Millennium� trilogy (2005-2007) and the

Swedish films starring Noomi Rapace as the punk hacker hero Lisbeth Salander. On the other hand, this is the film the novel has been waiting for: a crisp handling of the complex narrative that’s visually striking and impeccably acted. Lisbeth (Rooney Mara) is a vivid and compelling character. A superheroic sociopath in black leather and piercings, Lisbeth suffers no fools, unless as a means to the fool’s end. Though the mystery cannot engross as deeply as it does on the page, Fincher’s version is intelligent, properly moody and faithful enough. Rated R for brutal violent content including rape and torture, strong sexuality, graphic nudity and language. Two hours, 38 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed Dec. 23, 2011) Hugo ---1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) Director Martin Scorsese’s affection for all things cinema has never been more evident than in the enchanting “Hugo.�Young Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) lives alone in the hollowed walls of a Paris train station, orphaned following the death of his father (Jude Law). Hugo is desperate to finish repairing an old robotic figure that he and his dad had been working on, occasionally stealing parts from a toy shop. The shop’s enigmatic owner (Ben Kingsley as Georges Melies) catches Hugo in the act and confiscates Hugo’s journal: a booklet with his father’s

sketches of the automaton’s inner workings. Georges’ goddaughter Isabelle (Chloe Grace Moretz) agrees to help Hugo get his journal back, setting off a series of mysterious events that click and whirl with the rhythm of a finely tuned clock. Rated PG for mild thematic material, some action/ peril and smoking. Two hours, 6 minutes. — T.H. (Reviewed Nov. 25, 2011)

(Carey Mulligan). Sissy storms the castle and Brandon cannot refuse her request to stay for a spell. In a scene that competes to be Brandon’s ultimate nightmare, his manic boss (James Badge Dale) makes — right in front of Brandon — an aggressive bid to bed Sissy, following a performance of “New York, New York� that moves her brother to tears. Mulligan does her most impressive work yet, but the picture belongs to her costar. Fassbender makes a case for himself as the next Jeremy Irons, quietly revealing tormented men from inside-out embodiment. Rated NC-17 for explicit sexual content. One hour, 41 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed Dec. 23, 2011)

Shame --(Aquarius) Steve McQueen’s “Shame� is a mood piece, as abstract and engrossing as the Bach piano on the soundtrack. It’s another showcase for the subtle work of Michael Fassbender, who bares all to play a sex addict. Brandon lives and works in skyscraping, hermetically sealed chambers, flashing a Mona Lisa smile to create just enough of an appearance of normality to deflect inconvenient questions. There’s one person from whom Brandon can’t hide, much as he tries: his sister Sissy

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows ---1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) Director Guy Ritchie’s 2009 “Sherlock Holmes� film split viewers. Some applauded the strong cast, solid production values and blend of mys-

tery and action. Others argued Holmes was too reliant on his fighting abilities. “Shadows� probably won’t make any converts out of the second group, although the inclusion of Holmes’ nemesis, Professor James Moriarty, will be welcome to traditionalists. The first group, however, will be thrilled with this follow-up that is funnier and more compelling than its predecessor. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law reprise their roles as Holmes and sidekick Dr. John Watson, with Jared Harris of TV’s “Mad Men� as Moriarty, a genius professor with nefarious plans. The duo finds assistance in the form of gypsy Madam Simza Heron (Swedish actress Noomi Rapace of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo�). Downey Jr. and Law make an exceptional tandem, and the musical score by Hans Zimmer is tremendous. Rated PG-13 for some drug material, intense sequences of violence and action. Two hours, nine minutes. — T.H. (Reviewed Dec. 16, 2011)



     

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JAPANESE & SUSHI Fuki Sushi 494-9383

of the week

4119 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Online Ordering-Catereing-Chef Rental Sushi Workshops-Private Tatami Rooms Online Gift Card Purchase fukisushi.com & facebook.com/fukisushi

MEXICAN

AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 941-2922

New Tung Kee Noodle House

408 California Ave, Palo Alto

1031 N. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos

947-8888

Ă&#x2022;}iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Â?iĂ&#x160;,iVÂ&#x2C6;ÂŤiĂ&#x192;

Range: $5.00-13.00

520 Showers Dr., MV

Palo Alto Sol 328-8840

in San Antonio Ctr. Hobeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 856-6124 4224 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Also at Town & Country Village, Palo Alto 327-4111

Burmese

Voted MV Voice Best â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 & â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 Prices start at $4.75

115 Hamilton Ave, Palo Alto Voted Best Pizza in Palo Alto

Dining Phone: 323â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6852

www.spotpizza.com

To Go: 322â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4631 Winner, Menlo Almanac â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Ofâ&#x20AC;?

Green Elephant Gourmet Burmese & Chinese Cuisine

Spot A Pizza 324-3131

Su Hong â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Menlo Park

8 years in a row! 494-7391

PIZZA

POLYNESIAN Trader Vicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 849-9800

INDIAN

4269 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Dinner Mon-Thurs 5-10pm;

3950 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto

Darbar Indian Cuisine

Fri-Sat 5-11pm;

(Charleston Shopping Center)

321-6688

Sun 4:30 - 9:30pm

Dine-In, Take-Out, Local Delivery-Catering

129 Lytton, Downtown Palo Alto

Available for private luncheons

www.greenelephantgourmet.com

Lunch Buffet M-F; Open 7 days

Lounge open nightly

CHINESE

Janta Indian Restaurant

Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-6 pm (650) 462-5903 Fax (650) 462-1433 369 Lytton Ave., Downtown Palo Alto

1067 N. San Antonio Road

Lunch Buffet M-F;

Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood 325-0604

on the corner of El Camino, Los Altos

www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

751 El Camino Real, Menlo Park

443 Emerson St., Palo Alto Authentic Szechwan, Hunan Food To Go, Delivery

ITALIAN

$6.95 to $10.95

La Cucina di Pizzeria Venti

STEAKHOUSE

254-1120 1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View

Sundance the Steakhouse

www.pizzeriaventi.com

321-6798

Fresh, Chef Inspired Italian Food

1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto

www.jingjinggourmet.com

Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30 am-2:00pm Spalti Ristorante 327-9390

Dinner: Mon-Thu 5:00-10:00pm

Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 856-7700

417 California Ave, Palo Alto

Fri-Sat 5:00-10:30pm,

1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto

Ă?ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;"Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;`Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;

Sun 5:00-9:00pm

www.mings.com

www.spalti.com

www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

Page 28Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;

650.941.2922

Seafood Dinners from

2010 Best Chinese

Jing Jing 328-6885

1031 N. San Antonio Rd, Los Altos

SEAFOOD

Chef Chuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 948-2696

MV Voice & PA Weekly

Catered Texas BBQ (800) 585-RIBS(7427)

Search a complete listing of local restaurant reviews by location or type of food on PaloAltoOnline.com

Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW

Ambassador of the bean Palo Alto woman holds â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;chocolate partiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to boost cacao farmers by Chris Kenrick

Weekly file photo

S

Chocolate tastings feature fair-trade and artisanal chocolate from many lands. Probably no one eats the giant pod.

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Pizzeria Venti ys

lida o H y p Hap

tanding in her tiny Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x153;chocolate garage,â&#x20AC;? Sunita de Tourreil shakes a rich, brown cacao pod full of beans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all seen chocolate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we eat it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably never seen this,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the other hand, the farmers who grow it have only seen this pod, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen the chocolate, or eaten it in the form we enjoy.â&#x20AC;? De Tourreil aims to bridge that gap â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and boost the connection between cacao farmer and chocolate consumer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; through the Chocolate Garage, in which she offers tasting parties in her downtown location, peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homes or corporate venues.

Tasters â&#x20AC;&#x153;will leave knowing much more about chocolate and cacao and feeling very good: full of chocolate,â&#x20AC;? she said. De Tourreil, a former UCSF biology researcher concentrating on the human form of mad-cow disease, turned into a researcher of chocolate after a chance meeting seven years ago with an Ecuador-based chocolate maker. He was growing the beans and making the chocolate on site, and had sponsored a village health clinic and school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was doing great work with a rigorous, for-profit model, but he had no access to capital to scale, market and distribute his product,â&#x20AC;? (continued on next page)

Spaghetti alla Langostino e Pangrattato h3CAMPIvISA6ENETIANTERM DATINGIN%NGLISHPRINTTO)N!MERICAWEREFER to Langostino or shrimp cooked in garlic, butter, lemon juice, and white wine and commonly listed on menus as â&#x20AC;&#x153;shrimp scampi.â&#x20AC;? The true scampo (scampi is the PLURAL OF)TALYISASMALLLOBSTERORPRAWN OFTHEFAMILY.EPHROPIDAE WHICHIN !MERICAISCALLEDAhLOBSTERETTEv7HEW7ETRULYBELIEVETHISEXPLANATIONISA bit over the top. By far the best historical deďŹ nition comes from Mrs. Hedy GiustiLanham, a rather zaftig woman who styled herself â&#x20AC;&#x153;practically a scampo, although NOTQUITEASPINKAS)SHOULDBEh3HEWASUNABASHEDCONlDENTASSHESTATEDh9OU SEE THEBESTONESCOMEFROM6ENICE WHERE)AMFROMANDWEAREALL0LUMPLITTLE BEASTSh.OWTHATSAWOMEN From our kitchen to yours. Giulia Grisi as Norma in 1831 Buon appetito! Chef Marco Salvi, Executive Chef

Spaghetti with Langostino in a Garlic Butter Sauce with toasted breadcrumbs and spinach sLB)MPORTEDDRY3PAGHETTI s4BSPOF"UTTER s4BSPOF/LIVE/IL s#LOVESOF'ARLIC SLICED s3HALLOT 4HINLY3LICED s4BREADCRUMBS sCUPFRESHSPINACH PACKEDORÂ&#x17E;CUP frozen spinach, thawed and thoroughly drained

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.mvpizzeriaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

sOZOF,ANGOSTINOMEAT 4HAWED Rinsed, and Drained sÂ&#x2014;#UPOF$RY7HITE7INE sÂ&#x2014;CUP&RESH0ARSLEYMINCED s4,EMONZEST s'RATED0ECORINO

To cook: Broil water to boil. Salt and add pasta and cook according to directions or al dente. To a large sauce pan add the butter and olive oil and set heat to medium heat. Once butter has melted add 1/3 of the garlic and the shallots; sautĂŠ until both are translucent. Add the breadcrumbs and toss to coat. SautĂŠ breadcrumbs until lightly toasted. Add the spinach and wine and wilt down. Add the Langostino meat. Gently stir to combine and cook until Langostino are heated through (about 3 minutes) Note: Do not overcook the Langostino. Taste and adjust the salt and pepper. As soon as pasta is done immediately add to pan, add lemon zest and parsley and toss to combine all ingredients. Sprinkle with grated Pecorino cheese to serve. Feeds 4. *>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;U Page 29

Eating Out (continued from previous page)

a blossoming of American artisan makers thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on, an explosion thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s occurred just in the past five to seven years.â&#x20AC;? She rattles off the names of chocolate-makers in Missouri, Tennessee, Utah, Colorado, California, Washington, Virginia, Massachusetts and New York City. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If all of these craft makers and farmers could afford to hire an organization to promote their chocolate and explain the value-add of the farmer and the importance of preserving these varietals and fine cacaos, they would hire me.â&#x20AC;? De Tourreil hopes to link up some Silicon Valley business brains with a few small chocolate makers next month when they come to town for the 37th Annual Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of these small makers arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taking salaries yet and investing everything in their business. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taste the amazing chocolate and then talk about, how do we get them to actually stay in business?â&#x20AC;? Info: For more about the Chocolate Garage, go to thechocolategarage. com.

Weekly file photo

De Tourreil said. As a result, de Tourreil and her â&#x20AC;&#x153;business and life partnerâ&#x20AC;? Greg Wolff launched Chocolate Dividends, a company featuring fairtrade products that reinvests profits into social enterprises such as the Ecuador-based Yachana. But the couple quickly realized people strongly prefer eating chocolate to talking about socially responsible investing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you make it personal and about chocolate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about what they like and their tastes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; people can learn a whole lot about cacao in the process,â&#x20AC;? she said. De Tourreilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;friends and familyâ&#x20AC;? chocolate tastings grew into more formal, for-hire affairs, with proceeds going to the Chocolate Dividends fund, which is invested in social enterprises through the Calvert Foundation. The Chocolate Garage opened its doors on Gilman Street in June 2010. Party-goers can feast their eyes on elegantly wrapped chocolate bars made everywhere from Ecuador to Missouri to Madagascar, and

hear a torrent of chocolate stories from de Tourreil. The actual chocolate-eating comes at the end. De Tourreil also offers blind tastings and corporate team-building activities with a chocolate theme. She favors the expression â&#x20AC;&#x153;happy chocolateâ&#x20AC;? to describe an end product that tastes good, contains healthful antioxidants and has a â&#x20AC;&#x153;happyâ&#x20AC;? history: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cacao farmer gets a good price and the supply chain is short, with fewer middlemen.â&#x20AC;? With the passion of a researcher whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s found her prize topic, she tells stories about the economics of cacao farming and cacao-based cottage industries for women while passing out chocolate-covered cacao beans from Nicaraguan maker Momotombo. She makes a point of promoting Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Moniqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chocolate shop on Bryant Street, where owners Mark and Cathy West craft â&#x20AC;&#x153;single-originâ&#x20AC;? confections that reflect the region where the bean was grown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love what Moniqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is doing, showcasing the cacao,â&#x20AC;? de Tourreil said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see them as competition at all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so exciting is that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Sunita de Tourreil founded the Chocolate Garage in Palo Alto.

ShopTalk by Rebecca Wallace

NEW DIGS FOR GALLERY ... After 17 years at Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Town & Country Village, the Nature Gallery is moving its sparkly amethyst clusters, gleaming tourmaline pendants and other jewelry, minerals and fossils to a larger storefront in Los Altos. The new 1,100-squarefoot space, about twice the size of the current one, has â&#x20AC;&#x153;very tall, open, almost full-length windowsâ&#x20AC;? and lots of natural light, said Carolyn Digovich, who is doing PR for the business. The gallery is scheduled to close on Jan. 26 and then reopen on the corner of 2nd and State streets in Los Altos on Feb. 10. Renovations on the new space, which has held a boutique and a tile store in recent years, will be minimal, consisting mostly of painting and putting in new carpet, Digovich said. Gallery owner Carol Garsten said that she plans to start carrying larger home-decor items such as larger fossil specimens and sinks made of petrified wood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Town & Country Village informed me they might be developing the corner of the shopping center my gallery occupies, I saw an opportunity to grow,â&#x20AC;? she said in a press release. Garsten opened

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the gallery with her mother, the late Norma Trager, in San Luis Obispo in 1987 and then moved it to Palo Alto in 1994. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neither my mother nor I had degrees in geology ... but we did love rocks and crystals,â&#x20AC;? Garsten says on the galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, nature-gallery.com. CHEESE ON THE CAMINO ... Philly cheesesteaks, twister fries and Italian hoagies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with Tastykakes for dessert â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are among the offerings at the new outpost of the Cheese Steak Shop that opened recently at 2305 B El Camino Real in Palo Alto, near California Avenue. Based in Hercules, Calif., the chain nonetheless bills itself as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Real Philly,â&#x20AC;? with Tastykakes and Amoroso rolls â&#x20AC;&#x153;shipped directly from Philadelphia.â&#x20AC;? The company started in 1982 with its first store in San Francisco. More info is at cheesesteakshop.com.

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business moving out, or in, down the block or across town? Shop Talk will check it out. Email shoptalk@ paweekly.com.

Sports Shorts

Sports Shorts

STANFORD FOOTBALL

While one era ends, another gets under way

PREP NOTES . . . Sacred Heart Prep senior Kyle Koenig has committed to play water polo for the U.S. Naval Academy next fall. Koenig was an All-Central Coast Section Division II selection this past fall and was an honorable mention choice in 2010. He also was a first-team selection for the West Catholic Athletic League as a junior and senior. Koenig was the team captain for the Gators while helping his team win the WCAL and CCS Division II title. It was the Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fourth section championship in the past five years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am both honored and excited to represent the Naval Academy and my country next fall,â&#x20AC;? Koenig said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know that Coach Schofield will help me become the best athlete I can be and that the Naval Academy will provide me with one of the best academic environments in the country. It has always been my dream to play water polo in college in represent my country at the same time.â&#x20AC;? . . . The Palo Alto girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volleyball team, which has won back-to-back Division I state championships, will be honored once again when the team receives the Army National Guard national ranking trophy as part of the second annual MaxPreps Tour of Champions for Girls Volleyball. The award presentation will be Wednesday at 7 p.m., between the Palo Alto-Gunn girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball games in the Vikingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gym. Palo Alto was ranked No. 1 in the nation in the Freeman computerized rankings on MaxPreps. Palo Alto is one of just six high schools nationwide being honored on the second annual girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volleyball MaxPreps Tour of Champions. MaxPreps ranks more than 17,000 varsity high school girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volleyball teams.

ON THE AIR Saturday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Oregon St. at Stanford, 2 p.m., KZSU (90.1 FM) Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Stanford at Oregon St., 7 p.m., KNBR (1050 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)

Thursday Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Utah at Stanford, 7 p.m., Comcast Sports Net Bay Area; KNBR (1050 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)

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www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

by Rick Eymer

O

David Gonzales

CARDINAL RECRUIT . . . Before the Stanford football team took the field for Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s showdown with Oklahoma State in the Fiesta Bowl, the Cardinal took another step toward solidifying its future by getting a verbal commit from one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top offensive guards. Brandon Fanaika, a 6-foot-3, 295-pounder from Pleasant Grove High in Utah, was the top uncommitted recruit in his state before putting Stanford down as his top choice. Fanaika was ranked No. 19 nationally at his position according to theBootleg.com. He is the second offensive guard to commit as Stanford looks to replacing veteran David DeCastro, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be leaving The Farm a year early for the NFL. Stanford has 16 recruits who have committed, six on offense.

Cardinal moves on from Fiesta Bowl loss and looks to a future without Luck K, the Fiesta Bowl trophy resides in Stillwater, Oklahoma instead of, say, the lobby of the Arrillaga Family Sports Center, or the Hall of Fame room off to the left. That much is fact. How it got there is open to speculation, of which there is plenty. The simple answer, of course, is that a bunch of Cowboys got together in the open desert (Glendale, Ariz. used to be nothing but open desert) and outplayed a bunch of Cardinal (formerly known as the Indians) in a classic Tug of War. Neither side budged in what became a 41-38 overtime victory for No. 3 Oklahoma State over No. 4 Stanford (11-2) on Monday night in a fiercely-contested Fiesta Bowl in front of 69,927 fans. In the hours and days that followed, it became popular to blame just about anyone on the Cardinal side for the loss, including sniper hits on coach David Shaw, future NFL quarterback Andrew Luck and kicker Jordan Williamson, who was overcome with grief at missing a couple of field goals. Is it possible that the five Oklahoma State AP AllAmericans had something to do with it? Wide receiver Justin Blackmon was, deservedly so, named the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MVP. Safety Markelle Martin and corner Broderick Brown made some huge plays down the stretch. Center Grant Garner was pivotal at protecting quarterback Brandon Weeden and everybody knows what Quinn Sharp did. David DeCastro, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only first team AP AllAmerican, and fellow offensive lineman Jonathan Martin certainly did plenty to help Stanford win. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve both declared their intention to become available for the NFL draft, joining Luck in giving up their final year of eligibility. Senior tight end Coby Fleener, a third team AP AllAmerican pick, was not on the field late in the contest for the Cardinal after leaving with an injury. Perhaps the question should be how the heck did Stanford come so close to beating, arguably, the best team in the nation? Coincidentally, Oklahoma State was left out of the national championship game because of an overtime loss. The Cardinal suffered two losses this year, both to BCS bowl champions. Stanford deserves to be in the conversation as one of the top teams in the country

Quarterback Andrew Luck didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite end his remarkable career the way he wanted after the Cardinal dropped a 41-38 overtime decision to Oklahoma State in the Fiesta Bowl on Monday.

(continued on page 34)

Stanford fans thrown for a loss by schedule Cardinal football will visit Cal in midseason game on Oct. 20 by Rick Eymer he Big Game hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always been the final game scheduled, but it was usually one of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final two games and played in November. Well, scrap another tradition to television and the new economics of a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Super Conference.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The 115th Big Game will be played on Saturday, October 20 in Berkeley, continuing a stretch that will see the Cardinal play five of its last seven games on the road as the Pac-12 announced next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s football schedule on Wednesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The October 20 date for Big Game is 2012 is certainly not our first choice but the conference is governed by the will of the majority and we have a duty to respect the outcome of the vote,â&#x20AC;? Stanford Director of Athletics Bob Bowlsby said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will work with California and the Pac-12 Office to advocate for the Big Game and all rivalry games to be scheduled toward the end of

T

the season in future years.â&#x20AC;? Stanford, which lost the Fiesta Bowl, 41-38, in overtime, will open the season with a home game against San Jose State on Sept. 1. Duke (Sept. 8) and USC (Sept. 15) will follow the Spartans into Stanford Stadium in the ensuing weeks, giving the Cardinal three home games to open the season. The Trojans will be playing at Stanford before

the students arrive, another glitch in the schedule. Following a bye week on Sept. 22, Stanford travels to Washington. After Arizona visits Stanford Stadium on Oct. 6, the Cardinal resumes its long nonconference rivalry with Notre Dame in South Bend on Oct. 13. Washington State will be at Stanford Stadium on Oct. 27, followed by a trip to Boulder on Nov. 3 for a game with Colorado. After Stanford entertains Oregon State on Nov. 10, the Cardinal will face the Oregon Ducks in Eugene on Nov. 17. Stanford will wrap up the regular season on Nov. 24 at UCLA. The second annual Pac-12 Championship game will be played on Nov. 30 at the home field of the team with the best overall conference record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Very, very disappointing about Big Game,â&#x20AC;? said Menlo School Athletic Director Craig (continued on page 34)

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tanford junior Mallory Burdette finds herself in an unusual position, but one coveted by any college tennis player in the nation. Burdette is the No. 1 singles player and part of the No. 1 doubles team following the first Campbell/ ITA College Tennis Rankings of 2012. After capturing the USTA/ITA National Summer Championships title, Burdette broke out this fall with a series of strong singles victories. The right-hander from Jackson, Ga., earned five fall wins over Top 15 players, defeating No. 4 Joanna Mather of Florida, No. 10 Denise Dy of Washington (twice), No. 12 Kristi Boxx of Ole Miss and No. 14 Diana Nakic of Baylor. Burdette and sophomore teammate Nicole Gibbs, meanwhile, were ranked as the No. 1 doubles tandem. Two weeks before they faced off in the Regional final, Gibbs and Burdette teamed to capture the Riviera/ ITA All-American Championships doubles title. Along the way, they defeated the second-ranked team of Chelsey Gullickson and Nadja Gilchrist (Georgia), the eighth-ranked team of Keri Wong and Josipa Bek (Clemson) and the 10th-ranked team of Allie Will and Sofie Oyen (Florida). Those victories, combined with a semifinal appearance at the USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships, helped Gibbs and Burdette earn the No. 1 Campbell/ITA womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doubles ranking. As in singles, Gullickson comes in at No. 2 in doubles, playing alongside Gilchrist. The Bulldogs finished the fall with a 10-1 record, dropping only the All-American semifinal to Gibbs and Burdette. At No. 3 are USC sophomore Kaitlyn Christian and freshman Sabrina Santamaria. There were no changes among the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teams that finished in the top five of the 2010-11 Campbell/ ITA year-end rankings, with 2011 NCAA champion Florida, 2011 NCAA runner-up Stanford, Duke, North Carolina and UCLA appearing in that order. In the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team rankings, Stanford is No. 6 behind reigning NCAA champ USC and national runner-up Virginia. Ohio State is No. 3, followed by No. 4 Georgia and No. 5 Baylor. In singles, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ryan Thacher is ranked No. 37, due to his inactivity in the fall. Teammate Bradley Klahn, who took the fall season off, is unranked. Stanford has no doubles teams ranked among the top 50, but that will change once the Cardinal begins playing in the spring. Basketball The Stanford men and women

will wrap up the second week of the Pac-12 season on Saturday with games against Oregon State. The No. 4-ranked Stanford women (2-0, 11-1 before Thursday) will host the Beavers on Saturday at 2 p.m., while the unranked Cardinal men face host OSU at 7 p.m. Both Stanford teams, who played their Oregon counterparts on Thursday night, swept their USC and UCLA opponents last weekend. The Cardinal women romped to a 77-50 victory over host UCLA after getting by USC, 61-53. Nnemkadi Ogwumike led the way in both victories and was leading the Padc-12 in scoring (23 ppg) and rebounds (11.3 rpg) heading into Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s showdown with Oregon. Ogwumike needs 18 rebounds in the two games this week to reach 1,000 for her career, making her just the fifth player in Stanford history to reach that number. The Stanford men began this week 2-0 in the Pac-12 and 12-2 overall after edging UCLA, 60-59, and getting by USC, 51-43 last weekend. Diving Stanford diving coach Dr. Rick Schavone has been nominated to be the head coach for the U.S. Diving team for its February World Cup meet in London featuring Stanford graduate Cassidy Krug and freshman Kristian Ipsen. The meet will serve as an Olympic qualifier. Schavone, now in his 34th year at Stanford, is a three-time NCAA diving coach of the year and seven-time Pac-10 Diving Coach of the Year. An impressive resume since he took over the program in the late 1970â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, he has coached 89 All-Americans and 38 Pac-10 champions. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volleyball Stanford will open its season ranked No. 4 in the both the AVCA coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; poll and Volleyball Magazine rankings. The Cardinal (19-9 in 2011) will unveil its team by playing host to Thompson Rivers of Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada, on Friday at Maples Pavilion and Saturday at Burnham Pavilion in exhibition matches beginning at 7 p.m. The consensus top two choices among both national polls and the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; poll, is BYU at No. 1 and UC Irvine at No. 2. The national polls both have UCLA No. 3 and Stanford No. 4, though the MPSF coaches predicted a third-place Stanford finish, with the Bruins just behind. Stanford returns six of its seven starters, including three-time AVCA first-team All-America libero Erik Shoji and two-time first-team outside hitter Brad Lawson, the coMVP of the 2011 NCAA tournament. N

Sports PREP ROUNDUP

SHP boys have special soccer goals this year by Keith Peters

S

acred Heart Prep has one of the most successful programs in the history of Central Coast Section boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soccer. That, however, comes with an asterisk. All those titles came when the Division III playoffs were held in the fall. The Gators won seven section championships and finished second six times. No other teams were as successful. Sacred Heart Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competition in those days usually included Fremont Christian, Valley ChristianDublin and Monte Vista Christian â&#x20AC;&#x201D; teams the Gators rarely, if ever, face these days. Sacred Heart won its last Division III title in 2006, finished second in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 and moved to the West Bay Athletic League for the 2008-09 season. Since then, the Gators have yet to enjoy the kind of success it once had in section play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our ultimate goal/dream is to win CCS,â&#x20AC;? said SHP coach Armando del Rio, who once starred for the Gators in their fall days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, our program has not won a game in the postseason since moving to the winter. It is early in the season and, right now, we are focused on doing our best to reach the postseason â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and this involves trying to win our league.â&#x20AC;? The Gators took a small step in that direction on Wednesday with a 3-0 victory over host Menlo School in the WBAL opener for both teams. Sophomore standout Isaac Polkinhorne scored two goals for SHP and Robert Hellman added the other, plus an assist, all in the first half as the Gators improved to 4-0-2 overall. Menlo (0-1, 3-1-2) bounced back in the second half, settling down to keep the Gators from adding to their total.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Due to our academic calendar, we gave our team the entire (holiday) break off,â&#x20AC;? del Rio said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, we are coming off just two days practice after a long break, as is Menlo. I was happy with our team performance, away in a rivalry game, in our first league match under difficult circumstances. I felt we had very good sequences of total team possession, created very good opportunities, and scored very good goals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was not a perfect game; there are certainly areas for improvement for us to be sharper and better. Being so early on, I am happy about where we are.â&#x20AC;? Sacred Heart went 17-2-1 last season, losing in the first round of the CCS Division III playoffs despite outscoring the competition, 90-11, during a 17-1-1 regular season. The Gators graduated seven seniors with three others not returning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including offensive standout Joseph Bolous, who is now at a soccer academy. Ten players have returned and del Rio is excited at what he has seen from a group that features only three seniors â&#x20AC;&#x201D; goalie Max Polkinhorne and field players Andrew Liotta and Daniel Clancy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have tremendous confidence in this group, because this group has more fight, combativeness and grittiness,â&#x20AC;? del Rio said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This squad is embodying our new philosophy and culture shift â&#x20AC;&#x201D; playing with a street-like courage/physicality, with a blue-collar mentality/work ethic. And, playing a good style of team soccer. Playing with these values is our main goal, and we feel it will create the path for more success.â&#x20AC;? With one Polkinhorne brother scoring goals and the other stopping them, the Gators have those bookends to build around. Hellman and fellow juniors Willy Lamb, Nicklaus Salzman, Brendan Spillane,

Keith Peters

Despite winning seven CCS titles in the old fall days, Gators still looking for their first section win of new era

Sacred Heart Prep sophomore Isaac Polkinhorne (left) celebrates the first of his two goals while teammate Daniel Zdeblick (17) comes to congratulate him during the Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3-0 victory to open the WBAL season on Wednesday. Daniel Thaure, Grant Chou and Joe Callinan all saw plenty of first-half action against Menlo along with freshman Derek Chou. Along with the unbeaten record, del Rio is particularly pleased with the senior leadership of Liotta and Max Polkinhorne, both of whom start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two excellent players with tremendous experience, but who work hard, treat others with respect and exemplify what it means to be a mature high schooler. They really are instrumental to our team outlook and assisting in our program culture shift.â&#x20AC;? Something else working for the Gators is del Rioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facial hair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since I had facial hair during preseason for menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s awareness month (in November), the guys decided I have to keep the hair for our first game and, if we win, I have to keep it until we lose,â&#x20AC;? del Rio said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, it is a gift and a curse. It looks horrible, feels horrible, but it means things are going well.â&#x20AC;?

Keith Peters

Charlotte Alipate (holding microphone) and her Palo Alto basketball teammates were honored by Cal-Hi Sports on Wednesday as the TV programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team of the week during a ceremony at a Verizon store in Palo Alto.

In other boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soccer action Wednesday: Palo Alto continued its struggles while dropping a 4-1 decision to visiting Homestead in a SCVAL De Anza Division opener. The Mustangs (1-0, 4-4-1) took the lead quickly with a three goals in the first 20 minutes, with their final goal coming midway in the second half. Paly (0-1, 0-7-2) averted a shutout when junior Paul Stefanski took a pass down the left sideline and had a 1 on 1 with the Homestead keeper before finishing off the unassisted goal. In the WBAL, Pinewood dropped a 5-1 decision to visiting Harker. Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soccer Palo Alto opened its SCVAL De Anza Division season by rallying for a 1-1 deadlock with longtime nemesis Monta Vista in a match played at Homestead High. The Matadors (0-0-1, 4-2-2) grabbed a 1-0 lead on a corner kick in the 10th minute and could have extended it 10 minutes later, but Paly keeper Erin Chang made a great save to keep the deficit at one goal. After getting only four shots on goal in the first half, the Vikings (0-0-1, 2-2-3) came out in the second more aggressively. While a shot by Marina Foley was saved, the Vikings kept up the pressure and finally broke through a minute later when Katie Foug made a nice pass to Lily Seedman, who finished for the tying goal. Both teams had their chances after that with Foley missing from the top of the 18-yard box. Palyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emy Kelty foiled Monta Vistaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final scoring opportunity by stealing the ball before time ran out. Chang finished with six saves. On Tuesday, Sacred Heart Prep successfully opened defense of its WBAL (Foothill Division) title with a 3-0 victory over visiting Notre Dame-San Jose. The Gators (1-0,

3-2-3) got the winning goal in the first half on a penalty kick by Kendall Jager. She made it 2-0 in the second half before Alex Bourdillion (assist by Taylor Ruegg) wrapped up the scoring while dropping the Regents to 0-1 (2-4). Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball Palo Alto opened defense of its SCVAL De Anza Division title with a dominating defensive effort to shut down visiting Homestead, 46-20, on Wednesday night. It was the fewest points allowed by the Vikings (1-0, 10-1) this season. Senior Israel Hakim led Paly with 14 points while junior Aubrey Dawkins added 11 for the Vikings, who blanked the Mustangs in the third quarter. In Sunnyvale, Menlo School used a 22-6 third quarter to roll to a 56-31 victory over the Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy in a WBAL opener. The Knights held a 24-18 halftime lead, but the second half was a different story. Menlo sophomore guard Bobby Roth had 13 points, converting a trio of three-pointers, and nailing a 75foot buzzer-beater at the half. Double-teamed all night, senior Richard Harris still finished with 12 points and 10 rebounds. Senior guard Will Miller added 10 points and senior forward Freddy Avis chipped in with eight as the Knights improved to 7-3 overall. Menlo visits Harker on Friday. In boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball action Tuesday night, Sacred Heart Prep opened defense of its WBAL title with a 70-40 romp over host Crystal Springs in Hillsborough. Matt McNamara poured in 19 points for the Gators (1-0, 7-2), who overcame a one-point first-quarter deficit with a 43-point second-half explosion. Senior guard Franklin Bird, who was averaging under one point a game, drained four 3-pointers and finished with a season-high 12 points for SHP while making the most of his first start of the season. (continued on page 35)

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Sports

Stanford football

You can bet Shaw has moved on, despite hearing from disgruntled fans. The man is a professional. He made split-second decisions all the past two years. Luck, DeCas- year that brought the Cardinal to tro, Martin, Fleener and Shaw are the brink of a Fiesta Bowl victory. at the top of list for recognition that The blame game can only go so far belongs to hundreds of Stanford before it losses momentum. athletes, coaches, support staff and â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you dwell on the loss, you nevadministrators for the raised level er get better,â&#x20AC;? said defensive lineman of play, and with it, the Terrence Stephens, who higher expectations, of will be remembered for the football program. causing the fumble that This year was differsecured the overtime ent than last year and win at USC. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you keep next year will take on its dwelling on what went own personality with the wrong, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never be likes of Brett Nottingable to focus on what to ham at quarterback and a do right.â&#x20AC;? revamped offensive line Luck, who received three returning starters the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sportsmanin Cameron Fleming, ship Award, produced Sam Schwartzstein and yet another remarkable David Yankey) taking Stepfan Taylor performance, as did juover for the Cardinal. No nior running back Stepmore Fleener, Chris Owusu, Tyler fan Taylor and freshman receiver Ty Mabry, Griff Whalen, David Green, Montgomery. Andrew Fowler or Jeremy Stewart â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot has been written about the either. seniors and the senior class and Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense, which excelled regardless of which guys stay and at stopping the run this year, will which guys leave, there are really also have a different look without good football players here,â&#x20AC;? Luck Michael Thomas, Delano Howell, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously, you want to imJohnson Bademosi, Max Bergen, prove every year. But I think a very Corey Gatewood and Matt Mas- solid foundation has been laid with ifilo. coach Shaw at the helm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be I see a very bright future back,â&#x20AC;? Stanford defenfor the program.â&#x20AC;? sive end Ben Gardner Luck and his Stansaid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be ford teammates didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just fine. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to much care for the way be back next year with the season ended, nor a vengeance and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re for the folks moving on going to be a strong with their lives whether program for years to it includes the NFL or come.â&#x20AC;? otherwise. Then again, Of coursed thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remember the seven reason to be optimistic. straight losing years beJim Harbaugh and Shaw, Jeremy Stewart tween Tyrone Willingboth hired by Stanford ham and Harbaugh, the Athletic Director Bob Bowlsby, longest such streak in Stanford hishave set a high standard, not jut in tory. play but in recruiting as well. And Things could be worse. Or they thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plenty of leftover talent avail- could have been just a little bit betable as well. ter. After the disappointment of (continued from page 31)

David Gonzales

Redshirt freshman Jordan Williamson made this extra point, but missed three crucial field goals in Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 41-38 overtime loss. Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loss completes its journey from denial to acceptance, the football program will look a whole lot better. The most anticipated postseason game outside of the BCS championship, the Fiesta Bowl was an impressive offensive show, two of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best teams trading big plays and scores. Oklahoma State (12-1) came up with the last one on Sharpâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 22-yard field goal in overtime to win its first BCS bowl game. After getting the ball back with 2:35 left in the fourth quarter and the score tied, Luck drove the Cardinal within field-goal range with 52 seconds to play. Stanford, however, ran two running plays and put the game on the shoulder of Williamson, who hooked a 35-yard field goal wide left as time expired. He also missed from 43 yards in overtime.

Williamson was in tears in front of his locker after the game and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak with reporters. Luck hit 27 of 31 passes for 347 yards and two touchdowns in his final game before heading to the NFL. Taylor ran for a career-high 177 yards and a pair of scores, and the Cardinal recorded 590 yards but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pull out their second straight BCS bowl victory. Luck finished his career with a school-record 82 touchdown passes, 22 interceptions, 9,430 passing yards and a 31-7 career record as the starter. Manhandling Oklahoma Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense up front, the Cardinal had 225 yards by early in the second quarter and led 14-0 after Luck hit Montgomery on a 53-yard touchdown pass and Jeremy Stewart ran for a 24-yard score. Montgomery caught seven passes

Big Game

conference schedule are still being adjusted to accommodate television commitments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The one thing we heard loud and clear from fans across the Conference is they want to see their teams play every week,â&#x20AC;? Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starting in 2012 fans can see all games throughout the country.â&#x20AC;? This decision, of course, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sit well with a lot of Stanford alums. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of what I call â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the Development Complex,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; where everything at the university has a price tag associated with it; the prime consideration is to increase the endowment, tradition be damned,â&#x20AC;? said one alum, who wished to remain anonymous. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an arms race, and if Stanford wants to keep hoisting the Directorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cup each June, then it will keep making decisions based on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best for the bottom line, because we are not competing with Harvard ($20 billion endowment) but with Nike (Oregon), Dreamworks (USC) and Mesa Petroleum (Oklahoma State). â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is yet another step in the ultimate takeover of college athletics by Big Money. When was the last time an Athletic Director said â&#x20AC;&#x153;noâ&#x20AC;?

(continued from page 31)

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Schoof, a Stanford alum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Says so much about what college sports has become; tradition goes out the window for the all-mighty dollar. I will be interested to see how it â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;feelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in October. Got to admit it has felt weird the last few years with a game after it as well, but in midseason just seems so wrong. Definitely going to take some of the specialness out of the event.â&#x20AC;? With the new ESPN and FOX media rights agreement as well as the launch of the Pac-12 Networks in August, every Pac-12 football game will be available to fans on a national clearance, eliminating regional distribution which was prevalent in the prior broadcast arrangements. There will be 44 games on the combination of ESPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family of networks, Fox Broadcast and FX, while 34 games are scheduled to air on the Pac-12 Networks. Exact broadcast schedules will be determined at a later date. The schedule includes eight Thursday and Friday specialty dates for ESPN and FOX. Dates during the first two weeks of the non-

for 137 yards, his first career 100yard plus receiving game. The Cardinal held Oklahoma State to 15 yards rushing on 13 carries and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give up the lead until the final play. It still wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough, the Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hopes sailing wide left off the right foot of Williamson, a redshirt freshman who missed three field goals after missing three all season. The Stanford coaches (Shaw, offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton), however, failed to put the ball on the left hash mark for Williamson on all his misses, failing to give the rightfooted, soccer-style kicker the best opportunity for success. Taylor put Stanford up 38-31 with 4 1/2 minutes left, ducking behind Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s massive offensive line for a 1-yard touchdown. Oklahoma State answered quickly, moving 67 yards in less than two minutes to tie it on Joseph Randleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-yard touchdown run. The Cowboys left too much time for Luck, but Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s luck ran out when Williamson couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come through in regulation and again in overtime. When it comes to losing, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always more questions than answers. There were a few Stanford offensive plays, for example, that went bust. Tyler Gaffney lined up as the quarterback twice and got nothing. The defense didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make every play either, nor did special teams make all the plays. In a game so close, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a handful of turning points. Perhaps itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to understand what it took to get to the verge of a BCS bowl championship, especially with a first-year coach and expectations that seemed preposterously high. It took a lot more than just Luck, who leaves the program even more decorated than past quarterback greats like John Elway, Jim Plunkett, John Brodie and Frankie Albert. It may be over for Luck but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just beginning for Shaw. N

2012 SCHEDULE DATE OPPONENT Sept. 1 vs. San Jose St. Sept. 8 vs. Duke Sept. 15 vs. USC Sept. 27 at Washington Oct. 6 vs. Arizona Oct. 13 at Notre Dame Oct. 20 at California Oct. 27 at Washington St. Nov. 3 at Colorado Nov. 10 vs. Oregon St. Nov. 17 at Oregon Nov. 24 at UCLA Nov. 30 Pac-12 title game Times to be determine

to TV exposure (and the payday that comes with it)? Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a football playoff because it will cut into class time? Then what about March Madness? Playing college football games at night, on Thursdays or Mondays, completely disregards the feelings of the players, the alumni, and the potential fans . . . The original Pac 8 turns into the Pac-10 and then becomes the Pac-12, signs a lucrative new media deal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even creates its own network! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and yet there will always be sports on the bubble for being cut because there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough money.â&#x20AC;? N

Sports

Prep roundup (continued from page 33)

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

In San Jose, a perfect season came to an end for Eastside Prep in a 5242 setback to host Harker in another WBAL. The Panthers brought a 10-0 record into the game and held a 9-8 first-quarter lead before Harker outscored them, 29-11, over the next two periods. Senior Bryan Walker led Eastside Prep (0-1, 10-1) with 16 points. Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball Palo Alto opened defense of its SCVAL De Anza Division title and cleared an early hurdle by handing previously unbeaten Lynbrook a 4742 loss on Tuesday night in Palyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gym. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got out to a good lead in the first half and Lynbrook, to its credit, came back and made it a close game in the fourth quarter,â&#x20AC;? said Paly coach Scott Peters. Palo Alto (1-0, 8-2) held a 27-15 halftime lead but was outscored in the second half. Paly, however, was able to limit Lynbrookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top scorer, Jackie Hudepohl, to seven points as Lindsay Black and Josie Butler combined on the defensive effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lindsay Black was the player of the game,â&#x20AC;? Peters said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lindsayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy and effort sparked us both defensively and offensively. She held their best player and leading scorer, Jackie Hudepohl, scoreless in the first half.â&#x20AC;? Black also led the Vikings with 14 points while the 6-2 Butler scored eight points and grabbed 10 rebounds with five blocks. Danielle Palmer added 11 points and Stephanie Allen contributed 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Josie is starting to really put her offensive game together,â&#x20AC;? said Peters, â&#x20AC;&#x153;whether it is driving to the basket, passing to the post or shooting the three. She is getting better every game.â&#x20AC;? In other games Tuesday: Tennyson Jellins tossed in 19 points, grabbed 15 rebounds and had three blocks to pace MenloAtherton to a solid 49-41 victory over host Sacred Heart Prep in nonleague action. The Bears (5-8) grabbed an early lead and held on as the Gators rallied behind an 18-point outburst by Helen Gannon, who got her team to within 43-39 with under two minutes to play. SHP, however, was just 5-for-27 from three-point range while starting virtually an all-guard lineup. In Los Altos Hills, Pinewood battled back from a 10-point deficit entering the fourth quarter and rallied for a 43-40 nonleague victory over visiting Mercy-Burlingame. The Panthers (10-4) hit five 3-pointers in the final period while tallying 23 points and averting the upset. Kelly Doran, one of only two Pinewood seniors, scored all of her 10 points in the second half with sophomore teammate Leeana Bade adding eight points as the Panthers bounced back from losing the Leo LaRocca Sand Dune Classic title last week. On Wednesday, Sacred Heart Prep gave up 49 points for the second straight game and, for the second straight time, it cost the Gators a victory as they dropped a 49-47 nonleague decision to San Mateo. N

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The junior point guard scored 25 points in a pair of basketball victories and was named the Most Valuable Player as the Vikings won both to capture the Susie Nagpal Saratoga Shootout tourney.

The senior averaged 14 points and 14 rebounds over four basketball games and was named to the alltournament team as the Knights won three times and finished fifth at the Chaminade Holiday Classic.

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Honorable mention Leeana Bade

Kalen Gans

Pinewood basketball

Donya Dehnad Menlo basketball

Meghan Holland Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Lauren Rantz

Palo Alto wrestling

Israel Hakim Palo Alto basketball

Nick Ortiz Palo Alto wrestling

Bobby Roth

Castilleja basketball

Annie Susco

Menlo basketball

Dominic Tully

Palo Alto basketball

Amanda Suzuki Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Menlo-Atherton basketball

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Miles Weiss Menlo-Atherton basketball * previous winner

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Palo Alto Weekly 01.06.2012 - section 1