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INSIDE: N Classified Marketplace, page 34 N Puzzles, page 35 Home Front MAKING GOOD DIRT ... Master Gardener and composter Terry Lyngso of Lyngso Garden Materials will teach a workshop on “Building Healthy Soil” on Saturday, April 3, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at the Peninsula Conservation Center, 3921 E. Bayshore Road, Palo Alto. Part of Acterra’s Earth-friendly Landscape series, the class will focus on why healthy soil is important. Fee is $15, or $10 for students and Acterra members. Information: clairee@ Register: www. MEDICINAL PLANTS ... Tellur Fenner, owner/director of the Blue Wind Botanical Medicine Clinic in Oakland, will offer a class called “Bountiful Spring — Medicinal Plants of California” on Saturday, April 3, from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Common Ground Educational Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto. A clinical herbalist/educator who has traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Fenner will highlight taxonomical and chemical characteristics of medicinal plants in the morning, then take participants on a walk while addressing how to identify, harvest, prepare and use medicinal plants. Cost is $65. Information: 650-4936072 or or CLASSIC CHOCOLATE ... Cindy Roberts will teach a class on “Chocolate Cakes and Creative Decorating” on Wednesday, April 7, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at Palo Alto High School, Room 103, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. The class will include decorating techniques: stencils; marbling, chocolate rolls, walls, triangles and leaves. Cost is $50. Information: 650-329-3752 or www. THEY’RE THE TOPS ... Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage noted that nine of its Menlo Park Realtors ranked in the top 1 percent of the company’s agents in Northern California for 2009 sales. Top sellers included Keri Nicholas, Tom LeMieux and Hossein Djalali (continued on page 27) Al so on lin E M 29 HO GE EN PA OP IDE, GU HOME & REAL ESTATE PA L O A LT O W E E K LY e at w w w .P al o Al to On lin e. co m Old Palo Alto Historic, walkable, bike-able and beautiful story by Karla Kane photographs by Veronica Weber NEIGHBORHOOD SNAPSHOT G amble Garden, a 2.3-acre public oasis featuring diverse demonstration and formal gardens, educational programs and grand historic buildings, lies at the heart of the Old Palo Alto neighborhood. A crown jewel of the city, the garden, residents say, is representative of the things they love about their neighborhood as a whole: beautiful architecture, lush, well- tended greenery and a friendly atmosphere. Old Palo Alto, which stretches from Alma Street to Middlefield Road and between Embarcadero Road and the Oregon Expressway, is one of the city’s wealthiest and most desirable, popular with such local celebrity Steves as footballer Steve Young and Apple honcho Steve Jobs. And despite the “old” name, another Steve, city historian Steve Staiger, said it isn’t the oldest neighborhood in town, with its first homes not built until after the turn of the 20th century. “I think Realtors gave it that name because it sounds cool,” he said. Though the appropriateness of its name may be up for debate, its reputation as a pleasant place to live is not. “It’s got a great urban canopy and a great neighborhood feel,” Nadia Naik, founder of the recently created Old Palo Alto Neighborhood Association, said. “It’s historic, walkable and bike-able.” Naik moved to the area from Boston A variety of architecture, from Mediterranean to Colonial or Tudor, can be seen throughout the Old Palo Alto neighborhood. four years ago and liked the quiet, treeand-flower-filled atmosphere and “eclectic, hodgepodge” of houses, including Craftsman, Colonial, modern and Mediterranean-style homes. Fellow resident Mary Haverstock has renovated her own house several times and currently resides in a Craftsmanstyle home. “We tried to maintain some of the integrity of the original design,” she said. “The housing styles of the neighborhood are a real mix, and I love that,” she said. Haverstock and her family made the decision to return to Palo Alto from San Francisco in 1994 and specifically chose Old Palo Alto because of the “beauty and charm of the area” and its familyfriendly environment, including the excellent school system, she said. Haverstock, who, like Naik, has kids in the local schools, which include Walter Hays and Addison elementary, said it has been ideal for bringing up her family. And, she said, “Four new families with small kids” have recently moved near her home on Byron Street, “which is a change.” Turnover that brings in new families and children to mix with the older, longtime population? “That’s really fun,” she said. (continued on page 27) *>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ«ÀˆÊÓ]ÊÓä£äÊU Page 25

Palo Alto Weekly 04.02.2010 - Edition 2

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