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OWATO N N A P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T 2 0 1 3 A NN U A L RE P O RT Keith E. Hiller / Chief of Police 204 East Pearl Street, Owatonna, MN 55060 ci.owatonna.mn.us/police

2 0 1 3 A N N UA L R E P O RT

C i t y o f O w a t o nn a & Ch i e f ’s Me s s a g e

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Vi s i o n a n d Mi s s i o n

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Organizational Chart

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P e r s o n n e l Ch a n g e s

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D e p a r t me n t B u d g e t

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A d mi n i s t r a t i v e D i v i s i o n

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P ro f e s s i o n a l S t a n d a r d s

P a t ro l Di v i s i o n

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P a t ro l Di s t r i c t s

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2013 Highlights

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Ca n i n e O f f i c e r

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P o l i c e Ch a p l a i n s a n d Re s e r v e Un i t

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Tr a i n i n g

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D e t e c t i v e B u re a u / Cr i mi n a l I n ve s t i g a t i o n s

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Statistics

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2013 Highlights

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S c h o o l Re s o u rc e O f f i c e r s

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

S o . Ce n t r a l Dr u g I n v e s t i g a t i o n U n i t 

S C DI U Ta c t i c a l Te a m

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Co mp l i a n c e I n i t i a t i v e s 

P re d a t o r y O f f e n d e r Re g i s t r y

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A l c o h o l a n d To b a c c o Co mp l i a n c e

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Gang Officer

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D e t e c t i v e B u re a u S u p p o r t 

Ve h i c l e Fo r f e i t u re s

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C r i me S c e n e Te c h n i c i a n s

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P ro p e r t y a n d E v i d e n c e

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Support Services 

Co mmu n i t y S e r v i c e O f f i c e r s

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P a r ki n g Co n t ro l

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A n i ma l Co n t ro l

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Co mmu n i t y Pro g r a ms

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Da t a Tre n d

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A c kn o w l e d g e me n t s

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CITY OF OWATONNA

O R G A N I ZE D A S A M U N I C I PA L I T Y IN 1854

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P O P U L AT I O N :

2 5 ,4 6 9

M AY O R :

Th o ma s A. Ku n tz

A D M I N I S T R ATOR :

Kr is M. Bu ss e

G O V E R N M E N T:

Ma y o r — Co u n c il

L O C AT I O N :

Cro s sro ad s o f I 3 5 & U. S . H w ys 1 4 & 2 1 8

LAND AREA:

1 4 .4 5 Sq u a re Mi le s

C I T Y B U D G E T:

$ 2 3 ,6 8 6 ,6 1 4

R O A D WAY S :

1 5 5 L an e Mi le s

A I R P O RT:

Ru n w a y 1 — 5 ,5 0 0 ’ x 1 0 0 ’ Ru n w a y 2 — 3 ,0 0 0 ’ x 7 5 ’

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

Citizens of Owatonna Mayor and City Council Members City Administration and Staff On behalf of the staff at the Owatonna Police Department, I am excited to present the 2013 Annual Report in its newest format. This new viewer allows you to flip through the pages by clicking the arrow buttons to either the left or right of the publication. In the toolbar, you may also navigate through the thumbnail feature or click the search button to inquire by key words of your choice as well as zoom in and out. I hope you find this new layout friendly and informative. The Owatonna Police Department was busy establishing new outreach initiatives this past year. In March, the Police Reserve Unit became active and never looked back! Our new organizational chart can be found by clicking: http://www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police/2013 -reserve-unit-organizational-chart. The new unit patrols our local community, assists with traffic control and crime scene management, and attends community events. In less than 10 months, our Reserve Officers volunteered 2,357 hours. We are equally proud of our first ever Police Citizens Academy. This program is an educational experience designed to give residents and business owners a unique opportunity to become better acquainted with members of the Owatonna Police Department and its day-to-day operations. The attendees met once a week for 2-3 hours over eight consecutive weeks. A couple comments by our citizens were: “Every citizen should see this at least once.” and “ I tell everyone I talk to every week about the things I’ve learned.” I encourage our citizens to look for the upcoming Police Citizens Academy in 2014! For more information, please click: http://www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police/citizens-academy The Owatonna Police Department and the Owatonna Public School District enhanced our partnership during this school year in an effort to increase school security. We hired three additional Community Service Officers (CSOs) who are primarily assigned to work within the schools. Two of the CSOs are assigned to work in the Owatonna High School and one is assigned to work in the Owatonna Junior High School. This new venture was initiated and implemented to enhance security within our local school district.

C H I E F

S M E

S S A G E

As you peruse through the 2013 Annual Report, I trust you will be appreciative of the fine men and women of the Owatonna Police Department and all they do for our community. The staff and I at the Owatonna Police Department are honored to be part of this community and express our sincerest gratitude for allowing us to partner. I hope this past year provided many blessings and laughs! For those of you who have experienced tragedy or loss, we offer our sympathy and reflect on you often. Warmest Regards,

Keith E. Hiller Chief of Police City of Owatonna, Minnesota

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VISION AND MISSION

OWATO N N A P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Chief (1) Administrative Assistant (1)

Patrol Operations

Records Management

Professional Standards

Records Clerks (4) Support Services

Captain (1)

Sergeants (6)

Patrol Officers (20) Includes: K9 Unit (1) Traffic Unit (1) Crime Scene Techs (3) SWAT (4) Field Training (6) Gang (2) DRE (1) Firearms/Use of Force (4) EVOC (1)

Administrative Assistant (1)

Chaplains (7) Reserve Officers (20) Explorer Post (4)

Administrative Assistant (1)

Captain (1)

Investigations

Drug Investigations

Sergeant (.5)

SCDIU Commander (.5)

Investigators (2)

OPD SCDIU Agent (1)

School Resource Officers (2)

SCDIU Agents (3)

Divisions: Command Staff Sworn Staff

Community Service Officers (3) Includes Parking Control & Animal Control

Community Service Officers (3) OHS & OJHS School Security

Civilian Staff Shared Staff Volunteers

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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PERSONNEL CHANGES

YEAR

CHIEF

CAPTAIN

SERGEANT

CORPORAL

OFFICER

TOTAL

2004

1/1

2/2

5/5

4/4

**19 / **18

31 / 30

2005

1/1

2/1

5/7

4/4

**19 / **16

31 / 29

2006

1/1

1/1

7/7

4/5

***20 / ***19

35 / 33

2007

1/1

2/2

7/7

5/5

**20 / **19

35 / 34

2008

1/1

2/2

7/7

4/3

21 / 22

35 / 35

2009

1/1

2/2

7/6

4/3

21 / 21

35 / 33

2010

1/1

1/1

8/8

4/3

***21 / ***21

36 / 34

2011

1/1

2/2

7/7

2/2

23 / 23

35 / 35

2012

1/1

2/2

7/7

2/2

23 / 23

35 / 35

2013

1/1

2/2

7/7

2/2

23 / 23

35 / 35

L i t e ra l 1 / 1 = Au t h o r i z ed n u mb e r o f p e rs on n el / p os i ti on s f i l l ed * Tot al i ncl udes 1 par t -t i m e offi ce r

** Tot al i ncl udes 2 par t -t i me offi ce rs *** T ot al i ncl udes 3 part - t i m e offi cers

New Hires O f f i c e r s Jesse Ackerson, Christopher Kowalzek, Melissa Michael and John Petterson C o m mu n i ty S e r vi ce O f f i c e rs Chr istopher Her msted, Andr ew Hobbs, Tr avis J ohnson, Christopher Lee, Chad Schlueter and Joshua Steinberg A d mi n i s t r a ti v e A s si s t an t Wendy Bentley

R e t i r e m e n ts A d mi n i s t r a ti v e A s si s t an t Cher yl Pfeifer

R e s ig n a ti o ns O f f i c e r s Char les Eichten, Chr istopher Kowalzek, Br ady Pr ince and J oseph Swenson C o m mu n i ty S e r vi ce O f f i c e rs J oshua Feder ly, Chr istopher Her msted and Anthony Malepsy

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

DEPARTMENT BUDGET

The Owatonna City Council approved the annual base budget and capital improvement budget after a series of presentations by the Chief of Police, Finance Director and City Administrator.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT Ad o p t e d Fi s c a l B u d g e t = $ 4 ,1 9 9 ,1 9 6 

The police department had a $141,575 expenditure for a new police garage. This completed phase IV of a multi-year strategic plan.

The police department had eight (8) retirements / resignations impacting the actual budget.

Fiduciary responsibility is always at the forefront of our decision making process.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

2013 Budget Actual

$829,188

$4,240,893

$3,411,705

2013 Budget

$803,947

$4,199,196

$3,395,249

2012 Budget Actual

$811,361

$4,104,614

$3,293,253

2012 Budget

$640,945

$3,919,257

$3,278,312

2011 Budget Actual

$857,070

$4,129,716

$3,272,646

2011 Budget

$595,839

$3,965,147

$3,369,308

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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ADMINISTRATION

The Administrative Division of the Owatonna Police Department is comprised of the chief of police, captain of the patrol division, captain of support services, and an administrative assistant. Each captain is responsible for their respective division. The administrative assistant is responsible for daily administrative operations, payroll, receivables / payables, managing training and personnel assistance. The administrative team is responsible for the day-to-day operations that provide public safety services to the citizens of our great city. The team is also responsible for a budget of approximately $4.2 million and a department of 77 total full and part -time staff to includes volunteers. This total encompasses 44 full -time and 3 part-time staff, 4 shared positions, 6 volunteer chaplains and 20 volunteer reserve officers.

“Never compare yourself to the best that others can do, but to the best you can do.�

The administrative team prides itself in shaping and guiding staff with solid principles and best practices that ultimately affect our methods of operation. We strive to be transformational with focus placed on being one of the best law enforcement agencies in the State of Minnesota and United States. The engaged citizens in our community continue to assist the administrative team with direction and purpose. We will engender the principles of equity and diversity as well as develop and shape our department in an effort to balance the needs of individuals. The administrative team provides leadership and supervision that stimulates open -mindedness and ingenuity within the department and community. The team further clings to the principles of trust, compassion, respect, honesty, pride and empathy in all we do, with justice for all being the motivation of our every action.

Our corn erst one v al ue and pa rt of our e nt i re deci si on m aki n g pro cess!

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

Integrity of the Owatonna Police Department The primary responsibility of Professional Standards is to ensure the integrity of the department and to monitor the relationship between the community and the department, striving to create mutual trust. As an organization, we try very hard to provide quality customer service to all of our citizens. Policing is a very difficult and complex job in today's society; we realize that mistakes can be made and that the actions of our personnel may fall short of expectations. Professional Standards serves as a method of internal accountability by receiving, processing and investigating complaints concerning police conduct. These complaints may allege violations of criminal law, department policy or officer performance and may originate from outside sources or from within the agency. The Owatonna Police Department makes every effort to act with professionalism and integrity in everything we do. However, in the event a complaint against an officer is received, an internal affairs investigation is initiated in an attempt to determine whether the act of misconduct occurred and disciplinary or corrective action is necessary or if the officer acted in a justified, lawful or proper manner. If criminal wrongdoing is alleged, the Owatonna Police Department often requests an outside law enforcement agency complete the criminal investigation. In 2013, there were seventeen internal investigations conducted involving thirty-three employees. These investigations resulted in nine disciplinary actions—including six oral reprimands and three written reprimands. Disciplinary actions can include oral and written reprimands, suspensions, demotions or terminations. Seven of the investigations exonerated the officer(s), meaning that after a fair preponderance of the evidence, the act or acts complained of did not occur; the agency member named in the complaint was not involved in the alleged misconduct; or the acts that provided for the complaint occurred; however, the investigation revealed the act(s) were justified, lawful or proper. One investigation was halted when the employee voluntarily resigned from the department.

P R O F E

S S I O N A L S T A N D A R D

S

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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PATROL DIVISION

The Patrol Division is the largest division of the Owatonna Police Department—served by twenty uniformed officers and six sergeants. Each patrol sergeant is assigned three police officers that make up a team. Within these teams are a variety of specialized units, such as a canine officer, field training officer, members assigned to the multi-jurisdictional SCDIU Tactical Team, firearms and use of force instructors, crime scene technicians and an emergency vehicle driving instructor. In addition, the Patrol Division has supplemental support services that are not licensed police officers but serve as volunteers and play an important role for the city and police department. Those services are police chaplains, reserve officers and explorers. The Patrol Division has one administrative assistant to assist with a wide variety of tasks. Patrol Sergeants There are six patrol sergeants assigned to police officers under their direct supervision. The sergeants supervise the day-to-day operations of the patrol officers and coordinate efforts with the officers assigned to their watch. Each sergeant is appointed additional duties and oversees certain programs such as the City of Owatonna Landlord Association, SCDIU Tactical Team, firearms and defensive tactics training, squad car maintenance and

inventory and field training coordinators. The primary responsibility of a police sergeant is to supervise police personnel, coach, mentor, direct and hold the officers accountable for their day-to-day functions. Additionally, the sergeants are responsible for performance evaluations and creating opportunities for the professional development of the officers. Upon the start of each patrol shift, the sergeant will lead roll-call briefings, which is a summary of the previous shift activities, and provide additional information for the safety and service to the community.

Patrol Officers Patrol officers provide 24-hour police services to the citizens of Owatonna. Each officer is assigned to one of three patrol dis-

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

PATROL DISTRICT AREAS

tricts established within the city. The patrol Community Policing Districts officer’s primary duty is to provide public Officers of the Owatonna Police Department, safety through visual presence, enforcement, under the direction of their team leaders, are education, crime prevention and problem assigned to a specific district for not only solving throughout the city and in their repatrol duties and calls for service, but to also spective districts. Each district patrol officer establish partnerships with members of the is tasked with becoming familiar with crime community. All officers assigned to their issues and trends and individual districts working in partnerare responsible for ships with the resi“Action Requests” dents to improve the from citizens who quality of life in each call in specific connei ghbo rhood or cerns, crime issues, business district. The or traffic problems daily activities of a in their neighborpatrol officer also hoods. This include respondi n g affords the commut o emergency and nity the oppornon-emergency calls t uni t y t o acfor service, conductquaint themselves ing preliminary with the officers as i nves t i gat i ons of well as a vehicle criminal activity, for information investigating traffic sharing between crashes, preparing the community and incident, investigalaw enforcement. tive, and arrest reSpecific to t ra ffi c COMMUNITY POLICING DISTRICTS ports, making applicainitiatives based

NORTH -- SOUTH -- WEST CENTRAL tions for search warrants and conducting warrantless searches when permitted, implementing community policing strategies and directed patrols, identifying and enforcing criminal statutes, traffic laws, city ordinances and preparing and providing courtroom testimony.

on citizen concerns from each district is the use of the speed trailer that monitors and records the speed of passing motorists. This data is then passed on to citizens as a followup to their concerns. It is important for the officers to maintain district integrity as they respond to emergency calls from citizens. 2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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PATROL DIVISION

Of f i cer s Zack Schu maker , Ada m Hennen, Br i anne Lesnau, Benj ami n J ohn son and Christopher Kowalzek were formally sworn in as police officers on January 8, 2013 by District Court Judge Joseph Bueltel in the City of Owatonna Council Chambers.

January

The police department adopted a new program called e-Charging that was administered by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA). The program is designed to increase workplace efficiencies during the processing of criminal complaints and DWI’s. Because the process is through computer networks, it is sent and received immediately and acts as virtually paperless. The e-Charging application ties many governmental entities together to streamline the complaint procedures and processing of DWI offenders.

February

March K 9 Handl er and Of f i cer Brandon Fandel retired Bullet, a 7 year old dual purpose police canine who worked directly with Fandel since 2006.

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

In the same month, Bullet was replaced by Kash, a 13 month old German shepherd from the country of Slovakia. Kash is partnered with the latest handler—Officer Brady Fox.

March

The marked fleet saw considerable changes in its appearance with the arrival of the new Ford Utility and a new set of police gr aphi cs. T hese updat ed changes came from a recommendation by the Squad Car Committee to seek an alternative solution to the appearance, mai nt enance and expense of the whi t e door wraps. Check out the new looks here!

April

On April 5th, Officer Christian Berg and Officer Andrew Seifert made history with a narcotics bust stemming from a traffic stop by Officer Berg on Interstate 35. The automobile search uncovered 147 pounds of marijuana. The occupants were from Clovis, California en route to St. Paul. Their next stop—the Steele County Jail.

2013 HIGHLIGHTS

May

June

Sergeant G. Andr ew DeVinny nominated Of f i cer Joseph Swenson for the MADD Outstanding Service Award. Officer Swenson was one of 44 law enforcement officers to be considered statewide for the award which recognizes peace officers that go above and beyond in the areas of education, prevention, policy or enforcement and whose efforts are making an impact in reducing alcohol-related death and injury on Minnesota roads. Although Officer Swenson was not selected, he was credited for 41 DWI arrests accounting for over 22% of the total number of DWI arrests made by the entire department in the previous year of 2012. Officer Brady Fox and Kash graduated from an intensive 12 week PD1 certification course at the St. Paul Police Department Canine Training Academy. See page 17 for more details.

Summertime brings out many pol i ce / communi t y e vent s around town. On June 13th and 14th, officers from the Owatonna Police Department and other local emergency service groups participated in the Steele County Safety Camp; a program offered to students that have completed the 3 rd grade. Sergeant Tracy DuChene, Detective Joel Hunt, Officers Jason Matejcek, Brandon Fandel, Brady Vaith, Zack Schumaker, and Community Service Officers Andrew Van Osdale and Chris Lee served as police advisors to 228 student-participants.

July

Three new police officer candidates began their careers in July. They are Officers Melissa Michael—a community service officer from the Bloomington PD, Andrew Van Osdale—formerly a community service officer from our Owatonna PD and John Petterson—formerly a 20 year veteran officer that came back to our Owatonna PD after a two year tour in the private sector of investigations.

I r eco g n iz e th e b a d g e o f my o ff ic e a s a sy mb o l o f p u b l ic fa ith a n d a cc ep t it a s a p u b l ic t ru st to b e h eld a s lo n g a s I a m t ru e to th e eth ic s o f p o li ce se rv ic e. I wi ll co n sta n tl y s t ri ve to a ch ie ve th e se o b jec ti ve s a n d id ea l s, d ed ica tin g m ys el f b e fo re Go d to th e ch o sen p r o fe s sio n … la w en fo r ce men t .

L aw E nf o rc e m e n t C od e of E th i c s

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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PATROL HIGHLIGHTS

August

The annual Night to Unite celebration occurred on the second Tuesday of August. This is a statewide program that brings community members and law enforcement officers together. To find out more and to register for a block party, turn to page 38. A combined effort from the patrol division and the detective bureau ended a spree of residential burglaries that occurred over a period of 7 months resulting in over 20 known burglaries. The offender was sentenced to 54 months in prison. Owat onna Pol i ce Sergeant Jason Petterson hosted a 5 day National Rifle Association (NRA) handgun – shotgun instructor’s course. A total of 24 students attended the course from various parts of the state which represented law enforcement and private armed security services.

September

October The Patrol Division began testing and evaluation on two mobile in-car video systems. The Panasonic 360 Arbitrator and the WatchGuard 4RE were the systems under consideration. The recommendation from the pilot program represented by members on the department technology committee was the WatchGuard system. The system replaced the previously used Digital Ally system beginning March of 2014.

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

November

In the chilly month of November, the licensed officers of the police department completed their annual low light and cold weather firearms shoot. The temperature was almost perfect as it was cold enough to get a good reminder of the season without being unbearable to train in. Officers also had access to an unoccupied residence for building clearance and movement drills. The shoot took place in the evening where officers were handling weapons while they wore clothing they weren’t necessarily used t o wear i ng. T hese ci r cumst ances can potentially make for dangerous conditions however, officers managed the drills well with their safety officer and practiced good muzzle discipline.

December On Thursday, December 12th, co-workers, friends and family gathered at the Owatonna Art Center to celebrate the retirement of Cheryl Pfeifer, who served 33 years for the Owatonna Police Department. Cheryl started work in the Records Division and served in the position of Administrative Assistant to the Chief of Police for the last several years of her career.

2013 was a transitional year for the The team trained long hours together MonOwatonna Police Department’s K-9 Unit. day through Friday to become a safe and It marked the end of the career of previous effective duo for police patrol; they certified K-9 team-Officer Brandon Fandel and K-9 for patrol use at the end of May. Bullet, and the beginning of the career of In November, Officer Fox and Kash K-9 team-Officer Fox and K-9 Kash. returned to Saint Paul, where the team Officer Fandel and Bullet had a long and underwent 4 additional weeks of narcotics distinguished career as a team, and we are detection training. Kash was trained in grateful for their service and dedication to detecting Heroin, Marijuana, Cocaine / the City of Owatonna. It is with great Crack, Ecstasy, Methamphetamine, and sadness that we report Mushrooms. Kash was the death of K-9 Bullet taught a passive alert from complications (si tt i ng as a fi nal with cancer shortly response) when he detectafter his retirement. ed odor of drugs, and K-9 Kash has since Officer Fox was taught to been responsible for a read Kash when he was in suspect apprehension odor of the substance. after a pursuit in Steele The team certified at the County, a number of end of November at a narnon - physi cal f el ocotics detector trial hosted ny fugitive apprehenby the Mall of America, sions, sever al bui l dand successfully certii ng searches for fied through the USPsuspect s i nsi de of OF F IC E R F OX A N D K A S H CA. Although the K-9 burglarized businesses team’s formal training in and residences, multiSt. Paul has officially 2 013 C a ni n e Un it ple suspect tracks, completed, their training evidence recovery and really never ends. The sever al nar cot i cs team often trains with seizures. Not only has the South Metro TrainK ash assist ed t he ing K-9 Unit and weekOwat onna Pol i ce ly during their shifts. Department, but he has An additional and often also been called to assist the Steele County overlooked job function conducted by the K Sheriff’s Department, the Minnesota State -9 team is public demonstrations. Kash parPatrol, as well as the Faribault Police ticipated in several throughout the year to Department. increase public education of police dogs and promote public relations between the In March, Officer F ox and K-9 Kash entered a 12 week basic patrol course hostOwatonna Police Department and the ed by the Saint Paul Police Department to gener al publ i c. K ash was i nvi t ed certify in police patrol work. Kash t o conduct demonstrations at the following received training in obedience to include event s: Have a Saf e Summer , hand and voice commands, tracking, area Saf et y Camp, the Humane Society Walksearches, building searches, suspect A-Thon, and various other public groups. apprehension, agility, and evidence recovYou may have also seen Kash on the ery. Officer Fox received training in Owatonna Today Show and media outlets reading Kash during deployments, tactical including the Blooming Prairie Times and operations, and search techniques. Owatonna People’s Press. 2013 ANNUAL REPORT

C A N I N E U N I T

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CHAPLAINS

2013 Chaplains The Owatonna Pol i ce Departme nt Chapl ai ns Program was established in May of 2012 to enhance services in the community by providing non-denomination spiritual care and compassion to individuals in need; including first responders involved in critical incidents and / or during a time of crisis in one’s life. In May, Reverend Ron Wilson resigned after 42 years of ministry, although he continues to serve as a police chaplain. In June, Chaplain Gena Koeberl resigned from the chaplaincy to answer a call at Zion Lutheran Church in Brownsville, MN and Father Michael Cronin (not pictured) joined the program shortly thereafter. Chaplain Brent Carlson responded to a teenage suicide and later received a letter of appreciation from the family he cared for during the hours following the loss of their son. In October, Chaplains Olson, Carlson, Wilson and Captain Mundale attended the International Conference of Police Chaplains in Mankato, MN. A total of 227 hours were volunteered by the chaplains to the police department and community this year. They achieve volunteer service hours by participating in ride-alongs, roll-call briefings, emergency call-outs, critical incident stress debriefings, care of first responders and swearing in and recognition ceremonies. Pictured are Reverend Loren Olson, Parish Nurse Nancy Deetz, Reverend Ron Wilson (ret.), Reverend Brent Carlson and Reverend Mark Rosenau. Not pictured is Father Michael Cronin.

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

RESERVE UNIT

Since March 19, 2013, when the Owatonna Police Reserve Unit began, the membership of 19 reserve members donated a total of 2,230 hours. WOW—what an excellent service and contribution to our community and police department! Of those hours, 268 have been dedicated to training and preparing the reserve officers for field duties. The remaining 1,962 hours have been committed to field activities such as traffic control at parades and community run /walk events, overnight security at the OHS, security at Four Seasons Center events, security at street dances and other special use permits, Steele County Kids Safety Camp, park patrols, emergency callbacks securing fire and crime scenes, assistance at the Senior Expo and Senior Games, prisoner and transport details along with assisting the community with the Night To Unite program.

2 0 1 3 R e s e r ve s

The Owatonna Pol i ce Departme nt Reserv e Uni t holds monthly meetings to train and conduct business at the Law Enforcement Center. Applications are always being accepted for this unit and are available upon request. You do not need to be pursuing a career in law enforcement to apply and no prior law enforcement experience is required. Members of the unit are comprised of volunteers who are focused on serving their community as well as law enforcement students hoping to gain experience and a foothold towards a career. Coordinators of this program are Patrol Sergeants Andy DeVinny and Robbe Kniefel.

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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PATROL DIVISION

The Owatonna Police Department Fi r ear ms and shotgun, while Sergeant Petterson & Officer Bata T r ai ni ng Uni t consists of four members: instruct on the patrol rifle & handgun. The field trainSergeant Jason Petterson (Firearms Training ing and evaluation process of any police department is Coordinator), Sergeant Joshua Sorensen, Officer a critical component to the overall success of the Brandon Fandel and department. The field Officer John L. Bata. t r ai ni ng pr ocess In past years, a training concept Each are certified ensur es t hat t he known as scenario based training —or firearms instructors employer had suffiforce on force, was integrated into and have specialized cient opportunity to the training program. This type of duties within the unit, directly observe and training utilizes simulation rounds as well as are certified certify newly hired and actors in planned scenarios. weapons armorers. police officers so they H o w e v e r , t h e a g e n c y c o n d u c t e d e a c h Together, the instrucpossess the essential t r a i n i n g e v e n t w i t h t h e u s e o f l i v e tors of the Firearms job-related knowledge a m m u n i t i o n f i r e i n 2 0 1 3 . A l l o f t h e Training Unit work to and skills to be an Firearms training events were held train, test and evaluate effective solo police the licensed peace officer for the departat the 20 Rifle and Pistol Club, with officers of this agency ment as well as the a paid membership . under the mandated community. Sergeant training requirements set forth by the Minnesota DuChene supervises the Field Training Unit Peace Officer Standards & Training Board. In made up of three Field Training Officers (FTOs). 2013, the firearms instructors conducted four New officers are put through an extensive five-phase separate training events. These training events field training program in which they are evaluated on focused on basic and fundamental firearm skills, a daily basis in ten areas of core competency. The annual qualifications, first four phases of advanced firearms training involve a 16 skills and low light / week mi ni mu m cold weather shoots. intensified training Each event is outlined period where new by specific guidelines, officers are assigned training goals, and up to three different objectives. Sergeant FTO’S on the day, Sorensen & Officer afternoon, and night Fandel are primary shifts. The first three instructors for handgun phases involve

2 0 1 3 F i re a r m s Tr a i n i n g

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

TRAINING

Oeltjenbruns for two years. These instructors have received specialized training in defensive tactics and follow the Pr essur e Point Cont r ol T echni ques training curriculum. New to the program this past year was an introduction to the Gr ound Avoi d ance Gr ound Escape program by Officer Seifert. Sergeant Sorensen also attended an ASP Tactical Baton instructor’s course and educated the department’s licensed officers on the new material. Because the T ASER is recognized as a valuable tool in obtaining subject complidirection and coaching ance, the agency has outfrom a uniformed FTO E a ch l i c en s ed of f i ce r w i th th e fitted each sworn officer and in the fourth phase, O w a t on n a Pol i c e De p a r t me n t r e c e i v e d with an X26 TASER. the FTO is in plain Officers Seifert and a p p r o xi ma t e l y 1 4 h o u r s of f i r e a r ms clothes and acts as an Oeltjenbruns are both t r a i n i n g — u p f r om 8 . 5 h o u rs i n observer to the probaTASER Instructors and 2 0 1 2. I n s t ru c t o r s d e d i c a t ed 2 f u l l tionary officer to verify manage the maintenance d a ys of t r ai n i n g to d ef e n s i v e t a c ti c s , that they are ready for and downloading of data p r o vi d i n g a mi n i mu m o f 8 h ou r s solo patrol where they when these units are dec o n ti n u i n g E d t o a l l sw o r n of f i c e r s . start phase five until they ployed in the field. We have completed a full are extremely proud of * * H ou rs do n ot i n c l u de pe rson al t i m e year of employment. In the training efforts put t rai n i n g of f -du t y . 2013, Officers Ackerson forth by all in the police #7111, Michael #7138, department! Petterson #7115, and V an Osdal e #7133 completed the field training program and were certified for solo patrol. The Owatonna Police Department’s current Field Training Officers are Jason Matejcek, John L. Bata and Anthony Heaser. Sergeant Sorensen, Officer Seifert and Officer Oeltjenbruns are the Def ensi ve T act i cs Instructors for the department. Sergeant Sorensen has been instructing Use of Force for eight years, Of f i cer Seif er t f or f our year s and Of f i cer

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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DETECTIVE BUREAU

Criminal Investigations The Detective Bureau serves in a support capacity of the Owatonna Police Department by concentrating on the investigation of criminal matters that have previously been reported by the Patrol Division. The responsibilities of the Detective Bureau are to provide support to members of the Patrol Division through follow-up investigations and to initiate proactive investigations into general criminal, narcotics and gangrelated activity. Additionally, the Detective Bureau is generally the liaison with other local, state and federal law enforcement agencies. In 2013, the Detective Bureau was comprised of a captain, a detective sergeant, two corporal detectives, three detectives,

Services Department. Two detectives are assigned to the Owatonna Public Schools during the school year, serving in the role of school resource officer. Detectives receive specialized training in the areas of interview and interrogation, crime and death scene investigations and writing search warrants. In addition, detectives conduct liquor and tobacco licensing investigations and compliance enforcement activities, coordinate predatory offender compliance verifications conducted semiannually, conduct preemployment background investigations, oversee the Retailer’s Protection Agency program and gather gang and criminal intelligence. The Owatonna

Types of cases referred to the Detective Bureau broken into two separate classifications:

CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS # C ri m i n al S e x ual A s s ault # C hi ld / A d ult Prot e c t i on # A s s ault s

# Ars on

# R ob b e ry

# Hom i c i d e

and an administrative assistant. The captain oversees the overall operation of the bureau while the detective sergeant’s focus is on overseeing the bureau’s daily operations and workflow. The detective sergeant assigned to the bureau also currently serves as the commander of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU). In addition to these responsibilities, the detective sergeant oversees the investigation and management of the Registered Sex Offender database and acts as a liaison to the Steele County Attorney’s Office and Steele County Human

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

PROPERTY CRIMES # T he ft # F raud /F or ge ry

# Burgl ary # Fi n an c i al

# C om p ut e r C ri m e s

Detective Bureau Administrative Assistant serves in a support role to department investigations and to the SCDIU. Additionally, the administrative assistant serves as the department’s property and evidence officer, compiles monthly statistical analysis, prepares completed prosecutorial case files and is also certified as a physical evidence officer. For the South Central Drug Investigation Unit, the administrative assistant serves as the fiscal agent in addition to the property and evidence officer and prepares statistical analysis for the unit.

STATISTICS

Owatonna Police Department Detective Bureau Staff: Captain Eric Rethemeier Detective Sergeant Tim Hassing Detective Corporal Mark Edel Detective Corporal Tom Munns Detective Andrew Drenth Detective Terrence Flynn Detective Joel Hunt Admin. Assistant Kimberly Dub * *During the school year, Detective Hunt is assigned to the Owatonna Junior High School and Detective Flynn is assigned to the Owatonna High School.

*CAC refers to a formal complaint sent to the county attorney’s office. 2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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DETECTIVE BUREAU

Owatonna Detectives conducted semi-annual tobacco compliance checks using underage volunteers and surveillance equipment. Two individuals were charged with selling tobacco to a minor and were charged through the Steele County Attorney’s Office. (OW13-000096, OW13- 000097)

January

February

An Owatonna Detective investigated reports of check fraud / forgery. After interviewing

suspects and obtaining surveillance footage from local banks, the detective requested forgery charges on several individuals. (OW13-000093) The South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU), with the assistance of Owatonna Detectives, executed multiple search warrants for the sale of synthetic marijuana. SCDIU conducted an investigation into Jericho Tobacco after receiving numerous reports alleging the sale of illegal synthetic marijuana. After numerous undercover buys and lab verification of substance bought, the warrants were executed and three arrests were made. (OW13-000593)

March

Agents from the SCDIU and detectives from the Owatonna Police Department concluded an undercover investigation with the arrest of three individuals. SCDIU Agents received information from a confidential informant indicating that he was able to buy heroin from a male from Austin. A deal was set up to purchase an ounce of heroin and of methamphetamines in the parking lot of Fleet Farm in Owatonna. As the timing of the deal drew closer, the dealer changed the location of the exchange to the Burger King lot. SCDIU Agents and Owatonna Detectives set

April

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

up surveillance of the Burger King lot and shortly thereafter spotted the dealer’s vehicle. Surveillance officers observed a suspect exit the dealer’s vehicle and enter an undercover vehicle where the deal was consummated. Agents and detectives converged on the undercover vehicle and took the dealer into custody. They also converged on the dealer’s vehicle which was parked in the Arby’s parking lot and occupied by two other subjects. As a result of the operation, three individuals were taken into custody and transported to the Steele County Jail. As the dealer was being taken into custody in the undercover vehicle, an agent observed the dealer concealing an item in a seat-back pouch; a subsequent search of the vehicle recovered a .22 caliber pistol, $4000 in marked buy money, 15.5 grams of heroin and 7.4 grams of methamphetamines. (OW13-000919) Officers from the Owatonna Police Department were called to the area of the 1400 block of 14th Street N.E. for the reports of someone possibly stealing mail. Officers responding to the area learned from witnesses that two individual were seen taking packages from a residence on 14th Street and running toward another residence on Bigelow Avenue. Officers secured a perimeter around the suspected residence, but were unable to locate the suspects. Shortly thereafter, the officers were directed to the residence next door on Bigelow where they came into contact with two individuals matching the description of the subjects suspected of stealing the packages; a witness later positively identified the two individuals as the suspects. Owatonna Detectives interviewed one of the suspects who admitted to seeing the packages left out in front of the residence and taking them. Two subjects were charged in this case. (OW13-001238)

May

2013 HIGHLIGHTS

At least twice annually, the Owatonna Police Department conducts predatory offender compliance checks of the registered offenders living in the City of Owatonna. The Patrol Division and the Detective Bureau work together to ensure each offender is accounted for and compliant with registration requirements. The first round of checks were completed in June on the 78 offenders living within the city. The majority of the offenders are without classification, meaning they are deemed the least likely offenders on the registry to re-offend. Others are classified as level I, II or III with level III offenders being the mostly likely to re-offend. At the conclusion of checks, OPD found that 6 offenders had moved out of Owatonna and were monitored by other law enforcement jurisdictions. Two offenders were incarcerated on unrelated charges and two were non-compliant and incarcerated because of their non-compliance. Lastly, two offenders were no longer required to register as offenders and the remaining were found to be compliant.

June

July

Detectives working unsolved burglary cases that dated back to June were able to make an arrest. After gathering information and evidence that tied each burglary in the N.E. section of Owatonna to one suspect, patrol officers came into contact with a suspicious male subject parked in a residential area during the early hours of July 30th. Based upon that contact and property observed inside the vehicle, detectives were able to secure a search warrant for the male’s residence and vehicles where property was recovered related to the string of burglaries. An 18-year old male was arrested and brought to the law enforcement center for questioning. During the course of the questioning, the suspect admitted to committing a number of burglaries in the northeast section of the city. The suspect was charged in District Court with eight separate counts relating to the burglaries.

On Sunday, August 25th around 11:00 P.M., officers were called to the 500 block of Allen Avenue for a reported assault. Arriving officers located a 19-year old female victim who had blood around her mouth and face. The victim reported she met with a 19-year old male individual to talk about their relationship. Together, they went for a walk along the Kaplan’s Woods Parkway. The victim and the male had stopped along the walkway to sit when they were approached by a female suspect and a 16year old juvenile female. The suspect confronted the victim, took her cell phone and punched the victim in the face. The male, the female suspect and the juvenile female then all fled the scene to an awaiting vehicle. Later, the investigation revealed the suspect was upset with the victim texting her boyfriend and a plan was devised for the 19-year old male to lure the victim to the parkway where she was going to be confronted about texting the suspect’s boyfriend. Officers arrested a 19-year old female suspect who was later formally charged with Simple Robbery—a felony, 5th Degree Assault and Theft—both misdemeanors. In addition, two accomplices in the scheme were also arrested. (OW13-002218)

August

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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DETECTIVE BUREAU HIGHLIGHTS

The South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) and Tactical Team, assisted by the Owatonna Police Department and a Rice County Task Force Agent, executed a search warrant on Park Street. During the course of the raid, a female was located inside. The female granted an SCDIU Agent consent to search her purse which was located inside of the residence. A search of the purse revealed a pipe commonly used for smoking methamphetamines, 1 gram of presumptive methamphetamines and a switch blade knife. Additional items associated with illegal drugs were also located inside and outside of the residence. A 34-year old female was arrested and later formally charged with 5th Degree Possession of a Controlled Substance, Possession of a Dangerous Weapon—a switch blade and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.

September

The Owatonna Police Department initiated an investigation involving inappropriate, sexually explicit text messages between a 49-year old male and an 11-year old juvenile male who suffers from disabilities. The suspect in this case was reported to live in Geneva, Minnesota and was a family friend to the victim’s family. A search of the victim’s cellular telephone confirmed the alleged allegations. At the conclusion of the investigation, Owatonna Detectives, assisted by a Freeborn County Investigator, met with the suspect at his residence and placed him under arrest. The suspect was later formally charged with Engaging in Electronic Communications Relating or Describing Sexual Conduct with a Child. (OW13-002224)

October

Pol i ce of f icer s often see tragic stories occurring in our community, but many are exemplified when they involve a child. One such case happened in the month of November when our officers received the report of a child that was reported as a victim of sexual assault. Officers already

November

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

had the suspect in protective custody awaiting a transport to detox when the sexual assault report came in. Officers responded to the scene and developed probable cause to place the suspect under arrest. A later forensic interview conducted at the Midwest Children’s Resource Center in St. Paul supported the initial investigation. A 43-year old male suspect was arrested and later charged with 1st Degree Criminal Sexual Assault. (OW13-003007)

December

Officers were called to Sunset Drive for the report of mail theft. The responding officer learned that a 30-year old male victim observed a female walking away from his front door carrying a package and getting into a gold colored SUV. The victim and his wife were expecting a package and confirmed with FedEx that the package had been delivered to their front door. The victim was able to get a license plate number from the SUV and officers were able to track it to the 2600 block of 3rd Avenue N.E. where they found it parked in a driveway. The officers made contact with a female resident who was uncooperative. A detective was called in to assist with obtaining a search warrant when a second female in the residence had a change of heart and allowed detectives into the residence and consented to a search. Inside the apartment, detectives recovered numerous items alleged to be stolen from throughout the city. The two female suspects—sisters, indicated that they drove around Owatonna and took packages they found that had been left on unsuspecting victims’ doorsteps. (OW13-003365)

Two Owatonna Police Department School Liaison Officers are assigned to work within the local schools of Owatonna. They serve as a resource to improve school safety and prevent crime and violence. School liaison officers collaborate with school administration and staff to investigate crime on school property and improve reporting of criminal activity as well as serve as an educational resource by bringing their expertise as guest instructors into certain facets of the education curriculum. Currently, Detective and Liaison Officer Terrence Flynn and two community service officers are assigned to the Owatonna High School and Detective and Liaison Officer Joel Hunt and one community service officer are assigned to the Owatonna Junior High School; however, together they also serve the elementary schools and the Alternative Learning Center. The community service officers provide additional security and safety for our community’s schools and from the moment the they started, students, staff and visitors were complimentary of the improvements to access control of the school. Combined, the Owatonna Public Schools have an approximate enrollment of 5,000 students.

C H O O L R E

S

S c h ool Li ai so n Off i c ers Maintain safe, secure and uninterrupted learning environments for students, staff, administration and parents of the Owatonna Public School District.

2012-2013 School Year Calls by Location O w a t on n a H i gh S ch o ol

=

657

O w a t on n a J r . H i g h S ch o ol

=

343

W i l l ow C r e e k In t er me d i a t e

=

23

W a s h i n g to n E l e me n t a r y

=

65

W i l s on E l e me n t a ry

=

30

M c K i n l e y E l e me n ta r y

=

59

L i n c ol n E l e me n t a ry

=

32

R o o s e v el t

=

4

=

1,213

TOTAL

S

O U R C E O F F I C E R

S

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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SOUTH CENTRAL DRUG INVESTIGATION UNIT

The Owatonna Police Department continued its leadership role as fiscal agent of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) in 2013. This leadership role included the assignment of a police sergeant as commander as well as an administrative assistant. The Owatonna Police Department also continued to co-fund a field agent position in conjunction with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office. The SCDIU is a federally funded narcotics task force formed in cooperation with member agencies of four counties, which encompassed a jurisdictional area of approximately 2,500 square miles. Staffed by four specially trained field agents, a commander and an administrative coordinator, the task force concentrated their efforts on narcotics distribution and

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

narcotics related investigations. Agents also assisted member agencies with criminal investigations that have a correlation with illegal drugs. The SCDIU has developed strong partnerships with adjoining task forces—the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Drug Enforcement Agency, and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Together, they all take part in investigating cases that stretch beyond boundaries and have a direct impact on the flow of illegal drugs into our area. The agents also focus on public education, specifically toward young people of our communities, by conducting presentations at schools, churches, civic organizations and in the work place.

SCDIU TACTICAL TEAM

SAFETY AND PRESERVATION OF ALL HUMAN LIFE In 2013, the S out h C ent ral D ru g Inv es t i gat i on Uni t ’s Tactical Team, which is a multi-jurisdictional team, consisted of 21 operators from seven different law enforcement agencies within Steele, Freeborn, Waseca and Faribault Counties. Officer and Team Leader Jason Matejcek, stepped down

placed by Detective Joel Hunt. Each team member received extensive training related to, but not limited to entry tactics, breaching, less lethal and gas munitions and marksmanship. A ten hour training day is dedicated to the entire team monthly. Each operator from the Owatonna Police Department is allowed to

O w a t o n n a P o l i c e D e p a r t me n t S C D I U Ta c t i c a l Te a m: * Se r g e a nt J a so n P e t t e r so n ( S upe r v i s o r / T e a m L e a de r ) * O f f i c er B r a ndo n F a n de l * O f f i c er J o hn L . B a t a

* O f f i c er M a t t he w O e l t j e nbr uns * De t e c t i v e J o e l H unt

SWAT Call Outs 25

20

15

10

5

0 Call Outs 2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

from the team in May of 2013. He was an experienced and essential team member, who will certainly be missed. Matejcek served successfully for several years and was re-

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

attend an additional six hours of training per month to meet the National Tactical Officers Association’s recommended monthly training time of 16 hours.

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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DETECTIVE BUREAU

Predatory Offender Registration 2013 Statistics R e g i s t e r ed Of f e n d er s

=

88

M o v e d O u t of O w at o n n a

=

11

I n c a r c e r at e d

=

6

N o L o n g e r R eq u i r ed t o R e gi s t e r

=

2

C o mp l i a n c e C h e ck — C h an g e s

=

30

N e w O f f en d e rs i n O w a t on n a

=

13

The Owatonna Police Department recognizes that predatory offenders pose a significant risk to the citizens who reside in our community. Keeping the public safe is our priority and it is our belief that a collaborative approach, including taking precautionary measures and encouraging community reporting practices, will ensure that the predatory offender registration will continue to be largely successful. It has been well documented that roughly 80% of predatory offenders are known by their victims; therefore, it is imperative that law enforcement agencies along with court systems, correction agencies and human services departments work together to keep our community informed and

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

educated. Registering as a predatory offender is a collateral consequence of criminal behavior and it acts as one of the many deterrent factors as to whether someone will reoffend. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension maintains a registry of predatory offenders residing within the state. Those offenders registered have been convicted of a violent felony or sexually related crime and are classified in the registry based on their likelihood to reoffend. A risk assessment is conducted on each person registered prior to their release from confinement. An offender’s risk assessment will dictate the level of community notification that is required of local law enforcement.

COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS

The Owatonna Police Department Detective Bureau, with the assistance of underage operatives, conducts tobacco and alcohol compliance checks with licensed retailers around the city of Owatonna. These compliance checks enable a proactive effort in keeping

alcohol and tobacco out of the hands of our community’s youth. The checks are conducted at least two times per year and operatives are trained, photographed and equipped with electronic listening devices so officers can monitor conversations between the parties.

2 0 1 3 T o b a c c o a n d A l c o h o l C o m pl ia n c e I n i t ia t iv e s

Most recent Tobacco compliance results: 100% COMPLIANCE

Most recent Alcohol compliance results: 100% COMPLIANCE

Owatonna Police Department - Gang Task Force Mission: To reduce recruitment and expansion of gangs within Steele County and lessen the amount of gang and drug crime.

In addition to their normal patrol duties, Gang Task Force Officers Berg and Cooper are responsible for intelligence gathering on potential gang activity. Once the intelligence is gathered, it is analyzed and disseminated to appropriate agencies to include local, state and federal for assistance with pending investigations. The task force developed gang field interview cards that contain qualifiers as well as physical descriptions of possible gang members for the patrol officers to carry while out on duty. Gang officers use department

and national databases to track and store the gang related data. Other duties of the gang offi c ers include presentations to area organizations on local gang issues and with the help of community volunteers, they provide quick response time to and clean up of vandalism and graffiti throughout Steele County.

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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D E T E C T I V E B U R E A U

Vehicle Forfeitures Minnesota statutes contain a provision where an offender’s vehicle may be forfeited when they have used the vehicle in a driving while intoxicated incident if certain conditions related to offender’s prior drinking and driving record exist. Along with DWI vehicle forfeitures, the Owatonna Police Department has seized vehicles associated with criminal offenses and arrests. The intention of a forfeiture is that public safety is served by forfeiting vehicles used in a commission of a crime and to reduce recidivism. In 2013, a total of twenty-four (24) vehicles were subject to forfeiture. Of these vehicles, eleven (11) were returned to the owner or lien holder, while thirteen (13) are still pending in the forfeiture process.

S U P P O R T -32-

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

PROPERTY & EVIDENCE

Property & Evidence Technician This position is tasked with maintaining the chain of custody for all evidentiary items submitted to the property room. Documenting the intake, storage, security, release and disposal of all items is the primary focus of the property room personnel. The Owatonna Police Department continues to utilize a program called Ev idence Tracker to electronically track all items that are submitted to the area.

6,897 items as of 12/31/13

1,605 items released / destroyed as of 12/31/13

Crime Scene Unit This unit is called to assist the Patrol & Investigative Divisions for purposes of evidence identification, collection and preservation. The unit is comprised of Officers Bata and Heaser, Detectives Hunt and Flynn, Corporal Munns and Evidence Specialist Dub. They are trained in areas of crime scene photography, latent print development and recovery, biological and trace evidence recovery and tool mark and footwear impression recovery.

2,192 items entered in 2013

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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SUPPORT SERVICES

The current climate within police agencies is that they are becoming increasingly constrained due to budgetary concerns while having the need to serve larger or growing communities. In this environment, the position of the Community Service Officer (CSO) is considered a blessing for both the department and community they serve in. CSOs are typically paid significantly less than sworn police officers, allowing departments to field more people for the same

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS

amount of money. This has the effect of providing quicker response times to citizen requests for police services that are not considered emergencies or a matter of immedi-

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

ate public safety. Further, CSOs usually handle lower priority calls that do not require a licensed police officer with arrest powers thus freeing sworn officers up to concentrate on those incidents requiring their specific skill sets. CSOs can even have a substantial impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of police services provided. Our traditional CSOs support the efforts of the department by providing services to the community as well as other divisions within the police T h e Ow a t on n a P o l i c e D e p a rt m e n t c u r r e nt l y e m p l o ys si x c o m m u ni t y s e r vi c e s of fi c er s ( C S O s ) — t h r e e p ar t - ti m e a nd t h r e e f u l l - ti m e . T h e t h r e e p a rt - t i m e C S O s s e r v e i n a tr ad i ti o na l ro l e b y su p p or ti n g th e P a tr o l D i vi si o n , D e t e c ti v e B u r e a u , a nd A d m i ni s tr a ti v e Di vi si o n. T h e t h r e e fu l l - ti m e C S O s a r e p ri m a ri l y a ssi g n e d t o t h e Ow a t o n na P u b li c S c h o o l Di s t ri c t t o e n h a n c e s ec u r i t y i n th e O w a t o n n a Hi g h Sc h o o l a n d O w a t o n n a J u n i o r Hi g h S c h o o l. department. The CSOs are contributive and flexible in their assignments as they are asked to perform duties from every direction within the Owatonna Police Department.

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS

Owatonna Police Department Traditional CSOs are tasked with an assortment of responsibilities Animal Control / Facility  Calls for service  Investigate / follow-up with complaints, maintain state statute compliance  Care for impounded animals  Facility maintenance

Pu b l i c E v en t s

Veh i cl e C o l l i s i o n s / Mi n o r A cci d e n t s

Tr a ffi c S i g n a l O u t a g es

Pa r k i n g E n fo r cem en t

C om m u n i t y R el a t i o n s

To u r / Pr es en t a t i o n R eq u es t s

F u n er a l E s co r t s

C r i m e Pr even t i o n

S a fet y C a m p A s s i s t a n ce

S ecu r i t y — C om m u n i t y E ven t s

Th e ft s / Va n d a l i s m

Pa r a d es

Pa t r o l C i t y Pa r k s / S ch o o l s

Work with Owatonna Parks & Recreation Department 

Report / document damage in parks

Assist with locking park buildings

P a t r o l t h e C i ty a n d E n f o r c e me n t Work with Police Department Fleet Vehicles  Monitor mileage  Schedule routine maintenance / vehicle repairs with public works mechanics

Beginning in the fall of 2013, we embarked on a new partnership with the Owatonna Public School District to place CSOs in the high school and junior high school to enhance security. We currently have two CSOs assigned to the high school—one CSO monitors the single point of entry (control visitor and student access and monitor surveillance cameras) while the other is free to patrol inside and outside of the building. The junior high school CSO’s primary duty is to mon-

 Ord i n a nce v io la tio n s  J u n k ve h ic le co mp la i nt s  P erfo r m ho u se ch ec k s

itor a single point of entry located just inside the main front doors. The school CSOs provide additional security at special school district functions such as sporting events or dances. When school is not in session, these three CSOs are assigned back to the department to conduct traditional CSO duties—who all display a positive image for the Owatonna Police Department in addition to the contribution of maintaining a more efficient and professional organization. 2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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PARKING CONTROL

Parking Control Division Mission: To create a fair use of available parking within the City of Owatonna by enforcing parking laws.

Objective of the Graduated Parking Fine System: To provide a warning for first time offenders, but penalize the chronic offenders for multiple parking violations. It is a continued goal of the Parking Control Division to maintain a vibrant downtown with parking that is user friendly and convenient for customers, business owners, employees, and residents.

Parking Control Division Strategy: To maximize the use of all existing parking spaces for downtown customers, businesses, and residents. To accomplish this strategy, parking restrictions are enforced to encourage employees, business owners, and residents to use long-term parking spaces located on the fringe of the downtown area, while making available short-term parking spaces located in the center of downtown for shoppers and customers.

Administrative offenses are intended to provide the public and the city with an informal, cost effective and expeditious alternative to traditional criminal charges for violations of certain ordinance provisions. The administrative citation procedure is intended to be voluntary by those individuals who have been cited. Any time prior to payment of the administrative penalty, an individual may withdraw from participating in the procedure, in which event, the City may bring criminal charges in accordance with the law. Likewise, prior to the payment of the administrative citation, the City, at its discretion, may choose to dismiss the administrative offense.

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YEAR

2013

2012

2011

Fines Collected

$41,395

$46,605

$50,843

Administrative Fines Collected

$1,995

$2,425

$3,475

Green Tickets Issued

1,190

959

1,393

Odd / Even Parking Tickets

825

630

894

Red Tickets Issued

1,919

2,149

2,257

Administrative Tickets Issued

53

68

69

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

ANIMAL CONTROL

A n im a l Co n tr o l C a l l s

Animal Control 2011 2012 2008 2009 2010 2013 helps to mainI mp o u n d e d 251 tain the health Released 111 and safety of pets and protects Adopted 98 city residents Euthanized 42 from problem 1,207 1,324 domesticated 1,429 1,455 animals. The 1,911 1,921 Owatonna Police Department Community Service Officers (CSOs) and police officers respond to domestic animal complaints within the city including barking dogs and animals at large, amongst others. They also enforce city ordinances regarding animals, educate the public on important issues concerning animals, and look after the safety and welfare of pets and their owners. The CSOs manning the Animal Control Shelter regularly work in cooperation with animal advocating partners to provide safe homes for abandoned or lost pets that cannot be re-united with their owners— we strive to find homes for every adoptable animal taken in. The shelter went through a bit of a face lift in 2013. A new epoxy coating was The following animal services applied throughout to help seal the concrete floor are performed: and enhance the cleanliness. Also, S.A.F.E. Sanctuary, one of our partnering advocates, donated a num Provide live traps for catching cats ber of Kuranda elevated dog beds to help our furry  Pick up of animals captured by citizens friends reside a little more comfortably during their  Impoundment of loose dogs and cats stay with us. In March, former CSO and current Officer Andrew Van Osdale developed our Owaton Vaccination tag enforcement na Animal Shelter Facebook page. The page was  Investigate cruelty and barking complaints designed to serve as an avenue to help reunite  Enforce the potentially dangerous impounded animals with their owners. Our CSOs and dangerous dog ordinances are tasked with maintaining the page by posting

2013

pictures, descriptors and pick-up location of animals currently housed.

In 2013, a total of $3,553.00 in funds were collected from animals claimed at the Owatonna Animal Control Shelter.

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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NIGHT TO UNITE

Each year t housands of ci t i zens acr oss Min nesot a gat her t oget her on t he fi r st T uesday i n Au gust and par t i ci pat e wi t h l ocal l aw enf or cement of f i ci als t o bui l d st r onger nei ghbor hoods t hr ough pol i ce and co mmuni t y par t ner shi ps. T he Owatonna Police Depart-

place in Owatonna on Tuesday, August 6, 2013. The Owatonna Police Department, along with City Administrator Kris Busse and Council Members Les Abraham, Nathan Dotson, Greg Schultz and Kevin Raney, the Owatonna Fire Department and staff from our local Target store

Minnesota Night to Unite is designed to: (1) (2) (3) (4)

Heighten crime/drug prevention awareness Generate support for, and participation in local anticrime efforts Strengthen neighborhood spirit/police -community partnerships Send a message to criminals: “Neighborhoods are organized and fighting back!�

ment encourages residents to participate in this great celebration of community, crime pr event i on, and st r ong pol i ce/ communi t y col l abor at i ons. A strong community makes for a safe community. Everything we do to strengthen the ties among neighbors of all ages, backgrounds and lifestyles makes our present and future that much brighter. Celebrating Minnesota Night to Unite with the Owatonna Police Department and your neighbors is a positive way to build and nurture our community by starting, quite literally—in your own front yard! Night to Unite took

visited 31 different neighborhood groups and an estimated 1,200 community members. Night to Unite is one of the most impor tant community outreach programs that we participate in during the year. It offers the opportunity for our officers to reach out to many citizens in an informal setting so that we can work together in collaborative efforts to strengthen our neighborhoods and community as a whole. It also gives the police department an opportunity to see how we are doing in the eyes of the community and what we can do better in an effort to deliver outstanding police services to the citizens of Owatonna.

**Night to Unite is sponsored by the Minnesota Crime Prevention Association, AAA of Minnesota / Iowa and local law enforcement communities.

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

EXPLORERS / SAFETY CAMP

The Explorer Post #204, founded in 1998, is a cooperative effort between the Owatonna Police Department and the Boys Scouts of America that allows young men and women to experience a law enforcement career education program while helping them mature into responsible, caring adults. Members of the Owatonna Pol i ce Department Explorer Post #204 par ticipated in training meetings, which exposed them to a wide variety of situations that law enforcement officers experience; and in community events where their assistance was valuable to the police department, all while giving them insight into the many facets of the department. There were 6 participants in 2013 and the program had

two active advisors—Officers Matt Oeltjenbruns and Zack Schumaker. Several previous Explorer members are now sworn officers, and several more are currently majoring in college law enforcement programs.

Explorer Program Areas of Emphasis:     

Career Opportunities Life Skills Service Learning Character Education Leadership Experience

This program is based on the Learning for Life Mission Statement: “T o serv e ot hers by hel pi ng i nst i l l core v al ues i n young peopl e and i n ot her ways prepare t hem t o make et hi cal choi ces t hroughout t hei r lives so t hey can achi eve t hei r f ul l potent i al .”

FOR VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES CONTACT OR VISIT US AT: 507-774-7200 Email: police@ci.owatonna.mn.us Web: www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police

S t ee le Coun ty Saf et y Cam p Children from Steele County who have completed the third grade are invited to spend a few days learning about safety. The camp is held at Lake Kohlmier and the Fairgrounds for two full days. Along with lots of fun and games, the kids learn about fishing, boat and canoe, camping and hiking, bicycle, firearms, first aid, electrical, fire, outdoor equipment safety and much more. In the end, each child receives a camp T-shirt, a certificate of completion and a team picture. The Owatonna Police Department

226 participating kids in 2013! Safety camp is a joint effort with various organizations who contribute time, money, and talents to ensure our youth learn the skills they need to stay safe.

volunteered the following staff: Officers Fandel, Matejcek, Heaser, Vaith, Schumaker & Sergeant DuChene as well as reserve officers who all acted as camp counselors. They were tasked with keeping the kids on schedule and having fun as they went from class to class. Our community service officers also assisted as counselors the first day and ran the bike safety course the second day. Detective Joel Hunt is the department’s representative on the Safety Camp Planning Board. 2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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0

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

The City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) was formed as a network of landlords, big and small who work with the Owatonna Police Department. COLA is in its seventh year and 2013 brought a change in leadership, implementation of a new website and even work with social media on Facebook. Sergeant Deanne von Wald and Detective Terrence Flynn were the Owatonna Police Department COLA Liaisons where they attended board meetings and various trainings to answer questions for the landlords. In 2013, the COLA has grown in landlords participating. Meetings and trainings held by COLA varied in time of day so they could communicate and reach as many landlords as possible while limiting time away from their respective properties. Disorderly

use and nuisance violations in addition to the enf or cement of city ordinances continued to be the main focus of the association. In 2013, t her e were 173 disorderly use and 37 nuisance violations reported and resolved. Communication between the Owatonna Police Department and landlords regarding various issues remained a top priority and prompt attention to those issues helped to protect the safety of the individuals residing in housing units all throughout the community.

Visit the C.O.L.A website @ http://owatonnacola.wix.com/owatonnamn

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

C.O.L.A. / T.Z.D

In 1998, the Owatonna Police Department joined in a partnership with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office and the Blooming Prairie Police Department and applied for a Safe and Sober overtime grant for

and specific types of traffic enforcement. For instance, in May and October the campaign focus is seatbelt safety and child restraints. The “Buckle Up, Click it or Ticket” campaign is to battle

Toward Zero Death A pa rt n er s hip to l o we r t h e n um ber o f d e at hs o n Mi n n es ot a r oad w ay s . E ngi n eers

- Through working to create safer roads—both new and existing

Ed ucat i o n

- Through media, through driver’s education and defensive driving courses

EM S

- Through communication with law enforcement to obtain vital information on crash victims

E nf orcem ent

- Through enforcement of traffic laws by law enforcement

funding that allows officers to work specific hours during each of the designated traffic enforcement campaigns. The partnership is still going strong and the grant has since changed its name from Safe and Sober to Towards Zero Deaths (TZD). Owatonna has been the fiscal agent for this grant for the past three years. The TZD grant period

unsecur ed drivers and t hei r passengers. St at i sti cal information shows that

 Alcohol and/or drug impairment  Underage consumption  Speeding  Distracted driving  Motorcycle violations

JUS T R E ME MB E R ... “Y ou Dri nk, Y ou D ri ve, Y ou Lose .” runs from October 1 to September 30 and during that period, the particular violation focus of traffic enforcement is designated by the Office of Traffic Safety. The wave’s focus is also determined through statistical analysis done by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Even though there is a specific focus of enforcement, officers continue their routine enforcement of all traffic infractions. During the holiday seasons of Christmas, New Year’s and Labor Day, all eyes are on alcohol and/or drug impairment as well as underage consumption. Many initiatives are dedicated to special campaigns that target age groups

C a m p a ig n Vi o l at io n T a r g et s :

 Move Over Law for emergency  DOT / tow trucks

75% of all  Seat belt / child restraint violations fatality crashes occur on two lane state aid highways in greater Minnesota. Unfortunately, surveys show that drivers in greater Minnesota are less likely to wear seat belts. In fact, data from the Minnesota Office of Traffic Safety advised that individuals in the Southeast part of the State of Minnesota are only 87% compliant in wearing their seat belts. With the vast majority of fatality crashes occurring in outstate Minnesota, you need to protect yourself and others in your vehicle by buckling everyone up! http://www.minnesotatzd.org/

2013 TZD GOAL: Fewer deaths than in 2012 of 293. Preliminary number of traffic deaths in 2013 are 278. 2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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DATA TREND

OWATONNA

P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T

CRIME

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

5

7

9

4

10

Robbery

6

1

12

4

3

Aggravated Assault

25

22

18

28

22

Burglary

114

82

119

76

83

Larceny

538

509

352

386

402

Motor Vehicle Theft

28

21

20

20

18

Arson

0

4

0

1

1

Total Part I

716

646

530

519

539

Total Part II

903

916

801

864

904

Total Part I & II

1,619

1,562

1,331

1,383

1,443

*Statistics furnished from the 2013 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

DATA TREND

2013 Part I Crimes Murder Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Total Part I 2013 Part II Crimes Other Assaults Forgery/Counterfeiting Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property Vandalism Weapons Prostitution Other Sex Offenses Narcotics Gambling Family/Children DUI Liquor Laws Disorderly Conduct Other Offenses Total Part II GRAND TOTAL

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,000

0 5 6 25 114 538 28 0 716

0 3 1 16 24 220 13 0 277

0 50 17 64 21 41 46 0 39

0 19 23 97 442 2090 108 0 2782

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,000

143 40 72 0 6 183 7 0 46 104 0 14 100 30 43 115 903

106 18 15 0 5 47 6 0 21 86 0 4 72 25 38 78 521

74 45 21 0 83 26 86 0 46 83 0 29 72 83 88 68 58

555 155 279 0 23 711 27 0 178 404 0 54 388 116 167 446 3,508

1,619

798

49

6,291

*Statistics furnished from the 2013 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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DATA TREND

OWATONNA

P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T 2013 Part I & Part II Arrests

2013 Local Narcotics Arrests

79.6%

84.4% 20.4%

Owatonna Police Department

2013 Arrests by Agency

15.6%

Steele County Sheriff’s Office

Part I & II

Narcotics

950

39

3,543

154

Faribault Co. Sheriff’s Office

192

6

Freeborn Co. Sheriff’s Office

334

71

1,120

94

Waseca Co. Sheriff’s Office

449

7

Rice Co. Sheriff’s Office

233

51

Northfield Police Dept.

762

35

1,898

53

415

19

1,619

103

Mower Co. Sheriff’s Office Austin Police Dept.

Albert Lea Police Dept.

Faribault Police Dept. Steele Co. Sheriff’s Office Owatonna Police Dept.

*Statistics furnished from the 2013 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

DATA TREND

South Central Drug Investigative Unit Steele, Waseca, Faribault, and Freeborn Counties Population = 102,138 Total Narcotic Arrests = 395 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0039

Narcotics Arrests by Agency - Drug Task Force Regions 2013 per Capita

MN River Valley Drug Task Force Martin, Watonwan, Nicollet, and Blue Earth Counties Population = 129,916 Total Narcotic Arrests = 588 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .004 SE MN Narcotics and Gang Task Force Olmsted, Winona, Goodhue, Dodge, Mower, Fillmore, Houston, and Wabasha Counties Population = 366,685 Total Narcotic Arrests = 1,251 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0034

Rice County Drug Task Force .0021

South Central Drug Investigative Unit .0039

SE MN Narcotics & Gang Task Force .0034 MN River Valley Drug Task Force .004

Rice County Drug Task Force Rice County Population = 65,986 Total Narcotic Arrests = 139 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0021

2013 Crime Rate Regional Comparison Statewide Average = 6,706

Urban (Police) Average = 7,630

Rural (Sheriffs) Average = 4,167 6,291

Owatonna Police Department

8,042

Faribault Police Department

14,176

Austin Police Department Albert Lea Police Department

6,194

Waseca Police Department

5,494

Steele County Sheriff Office

4,442

Rice County Sheriff Office

2,611

Mower County Sheriff’s Office

6,503

Freeborn County Sheriff’s Office

2,513

Waseca County Sheriff’s Office

7,068

Faribault County Sheriff’s Office

2,833

*Statistics furnished from the 2013 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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A C K N O W L E D G E M This document and all its contents are the property of: Owatonna Police Department Reproductions or distributions of this document in whole or in part are permitted subject to appropriate source citation and the express prior written consent of the Chief of Police of the Owatonna Police Department.

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Please visit us and learn more about our organization @ www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police

OWATO N N A P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T 2 0 1 3 AN N U A L R E P O R T


Owatonna Police Department 2013 Annual Report